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Sample records for air film thrust

  1. Optimum Design of Thrust Air Bearing for Hard Disk Drive Spindle Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Mohd Danial; Namba, Tadashi; Ochiai, Masayuki; Hashimoto, Hiromu

    This paper describes the application of geometry optimization method proposed by Hashimoto to the design of air lubricated thrust bearings used for HDD spindle motors. The optimization is carried out to maximize the dynamic stiffness of air films because the low stiffness is a serious problem of thrust air bearings in the actual application to HDD spindle motor. The optimized dynamic stiffnesses are obtained by changing the allowable film thickness, which is corresponding to the tolerance of bearings. The results obtained show that the optimized thrust air bearings have the comparable stiffness to the oil lubricated thrust bearings and it is verified theoretically that this type of thrust air bearing can be used for HDD spindle motors.

  2. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  3. Start-stop testing of two self-acting air-lubricated spiral groove thrust bearing coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunfee, J. D.; Shapiro, W.

    1974-01-01

    Start-stop tests were conducted on air-lubricated spiral-groove thrust bearings. Application of a matrix-bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) coating over a porous chrome oxide coating resulted in significantly lower friction, compared to bearings coated with chrome oxide only. The MoS2 coated bearing sustained 15,000 start-stop cycles at a maximum of 3600 rpm. Each cycle was 15 seconds on, 30 seconds off. The chrome oxide coated bearing failed by local welding after 2030 cycles. Both types of coatings exhibited early failures under higher thrust loads when operating films were insufficient to sustain the load without overheating.

  4. Effects of bleed air extraction on thrust levels on the F404-GE-400 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuhas, Andrew J.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A ground test was performed to determine the effects of compressor bleed flow extraction on the performance of F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engines. The two engines were installed in the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. A specialized bleed ducting system was installed onto the aircraft to control and measure engine bleed airflow while the aircraft was tied down to a thrust measuring stand. The test was conducted on each engine and at various power settings. The bleed air extraction levels analyzed included flow rates above the manufacturer's maximum specification limit. The measured relationship between thrust and bleed flow extraction was shown to be essentially linear at all power settings with an increase in bleed flow causing a corresponding decrease in thrust. A comparison with the F404-GE-400 steady-state engine simulation showed the estimation to be within +/- 1 percent of measured thrust losses for large increases in bleed flow rate.

  5. A piloted simulation investigation of the normal load factor and longitudinal thrust required for air-to-air acquisition and tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalley, Matthew S.

    1993-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was performed by the U.S. Army Aeroflighydynamics Directorate to develop insight into the maneuverability requirements for aggressive helicopter maneuvering tasks such as air-to-air combat. Both a conventional helicopter and a helicopter with auxiliary thrust were examined. The aircraft parameters of interest were the normal and longitudinal load factor envelopes. Of particular interest were the mission performance and handling qualities tradeoffs with the parameters of interest. Two air-to-air acquisition and tracking tasks and a return-to-cover task were performed to assess mission performance. Results indicate that without auxiliary thrust, the ownship normal load factor capability needs to match that of the adversary in order to provide satisfactory handling qualities. Auxiliary thrust provides significant handling qualities advantages and can be substituted to some extent for normal load factor capability. Auxiliary thrust levels as low as 0.2 thrust/weight can provide significant handling qualities advantages.

  6. Prediction of engine performance and wall erosion due to film cooling for the 'fast track' ablative thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.

    1994-01-01

    Efforts have been made at the Propulsion Laboratory (MSFC) to design and develop new liquid rocket engines for small-class launch vehicles. Emphasis of the efforts is to reduce the engine development time with the use of conventional designs while meeting engine reliability criteria. Consequently, the engine cost should be reduced. A demonstrative ablative thrust chamber, called 'fast-track', has been built. To support the design of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber, predictions of the wall temperature and ablation erosion rate of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber have been performed using the computational fluid dynamics program REFLEQS (Reactive Flow Equation Solver). The analysis is intended to assess the amount of fuel to be used for film cooling so that the erosion rate of the chamber ablation does not exceed its allowable limit. In addition, the thrust chamber performance loss due to an increase of the film cooling is examined.

  7. Performance and human factors results from thrust vectoring investigations in simulated air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennington, J. E.; Meintel, A. J., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In support of research related to advanced fighter technology, the Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS) has been used to investigate the effects of advanced aerodynamic concepts, parametric changes in performance parameters, and advanced flight control systems on the combat capability of fighter airplanes. At least five studies were related to thrust vectoring and/or inflight thrust reversing. The aircraft simulated ranged from F-4 class to F-15 class, and included the AV-8 Harrier. This paper presents an overview of these studies including the assumptions involved, trends of results, and human factors considerations that were found.

  8. Determination of thermal load in film cooled bipropellant thrust chambers by an inverse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckel, J. N.; Savonov, R. I.; Patire, H.

    2013-03-01

    A method to obtain the heat load on the internal wall of a rocket thrust chamber using an inverse problem approach is described. According to the "classical" approach, the heat load on the internal wall of the chamber is assumed as the product of a heat transfer coefficient and the temperature difference of adiabatic wall temperature and local wall surface temperature. The time-dependent temperature distribution of the external wall of the thruster chamber is used to obtain empirical curve fittings to the temperature profile of the near wall flow field (adiabatic wall temperature) and the heat transfer coefficient profile. The applicability of the method is verified by applying it to three different problems; a model problem, an analytical solution, and a set of experimental data.

  9. Evaluation of chromium oxide and molybdenum disulfide coatings in self-acting stops of an air-lubricated Rayleigh step thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1974-01-01

    Two coatings for a Rayleigh step thrust bearing were tested when coasting down and stopping under self-acting operation in air. The thrust bearing had an outside diameter of 8.9 cm (3.5 in.), an inside diameter of 5.4 cm (2.1 in.), and nine sectors. The load was 73 N (16.4 lbf). The load pressure was 19.1 kN/per square meter (2.77 lbf/per square inch) on the total thrust bearing area. The chromium oxide coating was good to 150 stops without bearing deterioration, and the molybdenum disulfide coating was good for only four stops before bearing deterioration. The molybdenum disulfide coated bearing failed after nine stops.

  10. Drainage of the air film during drop impact on flowing liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Zhizhao; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Immediately upon the impact of a droplet on a liquid or a solid, a thin air cushion is formed by trapping air beneath the droplet. The drainage of the air film is critical in determining the eventual outcome of the impact. Here we propose a model to study the drainage of the gas film between a droplet and a flowing liquid film. The effects of a wide range of parameters influencing the drainage process are studied, such as the fluid viscosities, the surface tension, the velocity of the droplet, the velocity of the liquid film. The results show that the tangential movement of the liquid film can delay the drainage of the air film and promote the bouncing of droplets. This confirms our previous experimental results, which show that during the impact of droplets on flow liquid films, the probability of bouncing increases with the Reynolds number of the liquid film. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  11. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  12. Air film cooling in a nonadiabatic wall conical nozzle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldman, D. R.; Papell, S. S.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental data for an air-film cooled conical nozzle operating with a heated-air main stream and a water-cooled wall confirm the validity of Lieu's (1964) method for correlating film cooling data in the accelerated flow of a nonadiabatic-wall nozzle. The film cooling effectiveness modified for nonadiabatic walls by Lieu can be used to correlate film cooling under the condition that the main-stream to coolant velocity ratio at the slot is about 1. Such a ratio provides the optimum cooling effectiveness.

  13. Development of a 12-Thrust Chamber Kerosene /Oxygen Primary Rocket Sub-System for an Early (1964) Air-Augmented Rocket Ground-Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, D.; Hyde, E. H.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Airbreathing/Rocket combined-cycle, and specifically rocket-based combined- cycle (RBCC), propulsion systems, typically employ an internal engine flow-path installed primary rocket subsystem. To achieve acceptably short mixing lengths in effecting the "air augmentation" process, a large rocket-exhaust/air interfacial mixing surface is needed. This leads, in some engine design concepts, to a "cluster" of small rocket units, suitably arrayed in the flowpath. To support an early (1964) subscale ground-test of a specific RBCC concept, such a 12-rocket cluster was developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The small primary rockets used in the cluster assembly were modified versions of an existing small kerosene/oxygen water-cooled rocket engine unit routinely tested at MSFC. Following individual thrust-chamber tests and overall subsystem qualification testing, the cluster assembly was installed at the U. S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for RBCC systems testing. (The results of the special air-augmented rocket testing are not covered here.) While this project was eventually successfully completed, a number of hardware integration problems were met, leading to catastrophic thrust chamber failures. The principal "lessons learned" in conducting this early primary rocket subsystem experimental effort are documented here as a basic knowledge-base contribution for the benefit of today's RBCC research and development community.

  14. NEXAFS Study of Air Oxidation for Mg Nanoparticle Thin Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, S.; Murakami, S.; Shirai, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Ohta, T.; Yagi, S.

    2013-03-01

    The air oxidation reaction of Mg nanoparticle thin film has been investigated by Mg K-edge NEXAFS technique. It is revealed that MgO is formed on the Mg nanoparticle surfaces at the early stage of the air oxidation for Mg nanoparticle thin film. The simulation of NEXAFS spectrum using standard spectra indicates the existence of complex magnesium carbonates (x(MgCO3).yMg(OH2).z(H2O)) in addition to MgO at the early stage of the air oxidation.

  15. Abdominal thrusts

    MedlinePlus

    ... call 911 . If the person loses consciousness, start CPR . If you are not comfortable performing abdominal thrusts, ... American Red Cross. First Aid/CPR/AED Participant's Manual. 2nd ... Red Cross; 2014. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS, et al. Part 5: ...

  16. Porous Mg thin films for Mg-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Xin, Gongbiao; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Chongyun; Zheng, Jie; Li, Xingguo

    2013-12-28

    An alkaline primary Mg-air battery made from a porous Mg thin film displayed superior discharge performances, including a flat discharge plateau, a high open-circuit voltage of 1.41 V and a large discharge capacity of 821 mAh g(-1), suggesting that the electrochemical performances of Mg-air batteries can be improved by controlling the Mg anode morphology. PMID:24158667

  17. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  18. Design and evaluation of thrust vectored nozzles using a multicomponent thrust stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Thomas W.; Blattner, Ernest W.; Stagner, Robert E.; Contreras, Juanita; Lencioni, Dennis; Mcintosh, Greg

    1990-01-01

    Future aircraft with the capability of short takeoff and landing, and improved maneuverability especially in the post-stall flight regime will incorporate exhaust nozzles which can be thrust vectored. In order to conduct thrust vector research in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Cal Poly, a program was planned with two objectives; design and construct a multicomponent thrust stand for the specific purpose of measuring nozzle thrust vectors; and to provide quality low moisture air to the thrust stand for cold flow nozzle tests. The design and fabrication of the six-component thrust stand was completed. Detailed evaluation tests of the thrust stand will continue upon the receipt of one signal conditioning option (-702) for the Fluke Data Acquisition System. Preliminary design of thrust nozzles with air supply plenums were completed. The air supply was analyzed with regard to head loss. Initial flow visualization tests were conducted using dual water jets.

  19. Degradation of co-evaporated perovskite thin film in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Congcong; Li, Youzhen; Xu, Xuemei; Wang, Chenggong; Xie, Fangyan; Gao, Yongli

    2016-04-01

    Methylammonium lead halide perovskites as highly promising photovoltaic materials have been found unstable in air. We investigated the degradation of CH3NH3PbI3 by air exposure using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The stoichiometric sample was grown with co-evaporation of PbI2 and CH3NH3I on an Au coated Si wafer. It was found that the perovskite thin film gradually turned to PbI2 in air, accompanied with complete removal of N and substantial reduction of I. It was also observed that PbI2 crystallization roughened the film and resulted in a partial exposure of the Au substrate.

  20. Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these tests. The maximum overall sound pressure level is generated in the duct downstream of the valve and reached a value of 180 dB at a valve pressure ratio of 2.8. At the higher valve pressure ratios the spectra downstream of the valve is broad banded with its maximum at 1000 Hz.

  1. The breakup of thin air films caught under impacting drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoroddsen, Sigurdur; Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Takehara, Kohsei; Etoh, T. Goji

    2012-11-01

    When a drop impacts a pool at very low velocities V, an air layer cushions the impact and prevents immediate contact. This air layer is stretched into a hemispheric shape and thins to a submicron thickness. We use silicone oils, where these films are more stable than for water [Saylor & Bounds (2012), AIChE J., online: doi 10.1002/aic.13764 ]. We observe three main breakup mechanisms which are imprinted onto the micro-bubble morphology. First, for lowest V the film ruptures at isolated holes which grow rapidly, leaving bubble necklaces where their edges meet. Based on micro-bubble volumes, we show the film breaks by van der Waals, when its thickness ~ 100 nm. Secondly, for slightly larger V a ring of holes appearing a fixed depth, where the film is thinnest, producing bubble chandeliers. Finally, for larger V an air jet within the drop, ruptures it at the bottom tip, in an axisymmetric breakup. We measure the rupture speed and find that for very viscous liquids, the breakup moves faster than the capillary-viscous velocity, through the repeated ruptures. [Thoroddsen, Thoraval, Takehara & Etoh (2012), J. Fluid Mech. online: doi:10.1017/jfm.2012.319].

  2. Hydrogen film cooling of a small hydrogen-oxygen thrust chamber and its effect on erosion rates of various ablative materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N.; Roberts, W. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine what arrangement of film-coolant-injection orifices should be used to decrease the erosion rates of small, high temperature, high pressure ablative thrust chambers without incurring a large penalty in combustion performance. All of the film cooling was supplied through holes in a ring between the outer row of injector elements and the chamber wall. The best arrangement, which had twice the number of holes as there were outer row injection elements, was also the simplest. The performance penalties, presented as a reduction in characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency, were 0.8 and 2.8 percentage points for the 10 and 20 percent cooling flows, respectively, The best film-coolant injector was then used to obtain erosion rates for 19 ablative materials. The throat erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 2.5 with a 10 percent coolant flow. Only the more expensive silica phenolic materials had low enough erosion rates to be considered for use in the nozzle throat. However, some of the cheaper materials might qualify for use in other areas of small nozzles with large throat diameters where the higher erosion rates are more acceptable.

  3. Thin-film silicon for flexible metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Garamoun, Ahmed; Schubert, Markus B; Werner, Jürgen H

    2014-12-01

    Due to its high energy density, theoretical studies propose silicon as a promising candidate material for metal-air batteries. Herein, for the first time, experimental results detail the use of n-type doped amorphous silicon and silicon carbide as fuel in Si-air batteries. Thin-film silicon is particularly interesting for flexible and rolled batteries with high specific energies. Our Si-air batteries exhibit a specific capacity of 269 Ah kg(-1) and an average cell voltage of 0.85 V at a discharge current density of 7.9 μA cm(-2) , corresponding to a specific energy of 229 Wh kg(-1) . Favorably in terms of safety, low concentrated alkaline solution serves as electrolyte. Discharging of the Si-air cells continues as long as there is silicon available for oxidation. PMID:25251223

  4. Pneumatic hammer in aerostatic thrust bearings with single orifice compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Zhongke; Tao, Jizhong

    2013-01-01

    In dealing with the phenomenon of the pneumatic hammer in aerostatic thrust bearings, the vibrant model of the one-single freedom system has been established to study the pneumatic hammer from the point of sympathetic vibration. It is found that the bearings show a tendency to result in the pneumatic hammer with the increase of air supply pressure, and the occurrence probability of the pneumatic hammer will be reduced when the gas film thickness is maintained within a certain range. Meanwhile, the existence of the pneumatic hammer, which is caused by sympathetic vibration, is experimentally verified, and it is found that gas bearings undergo certain disturbance, which causes the system to produce micro breadth vibration. Accordingly, the micro breadth vibration causes the gas film and thrust face to form flow/structure coupled to excite the pneumatic hammer. Therefore, it provides another path to study the pneumatic hammer and is of academic value.

  5. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  6. Summary of Scale-Model Thrust-Reverser Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H; Steffen, Fred W; Mcardle, Jack G

    1957-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the characteristics of several basic types of thrust-reverser. Models of three types, target, tailpipe cascade, and ring cascade, were tested with unheated air. The effects of design variables on reverse-thrust performance, reversed-flow boundaries, and thrust modulation characteristics were determined.

  7. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, J. B.; Lan, C. Edward

    1989-01-01

    Thrust vectoring as a means to enhance maneuverability and aerodynamic performane of a tactical aircraft is discussed. This concept usually involves the installation of a multifunction nozzle. With the nozzle, the engine thrust can be changed in direction without changing the attitude of the aircraft. Change in the direction of thrust induces a significant change in the aerodynamic forces on the aircraft. Therefore, this device can be used for lift-augmenting as well as stability and control purposes. When the thrust is deflected in the longitudinal direction, the lift force and the pitching stability can be manipulated, while the yawing stability can be controlled by directing the thrust in the lateral direction.

  8. Substrate topography-mediated air film collapse below an impacting drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2012-11-01

    Liquid drops hitting solid surfaces are slowed down by the ambient air layer that needs to be squeezed out before the liquid actually touches the solid. How does substrate topography mediate the collapse of the air film? For moderate velocity impacts (Weber number around unity) we show that a drop gently spreads on an undulated air layer that thins to a minimum of several hundreds of nanometers. Whether or not the air layer collapses (in a single spot nucleation) leading to wetting of the substrate, can be tuned with substrate topography. Introducing micro- and nanoscale defects of various topography, we observe the two different cases, i.e. drop bouncing on the air layer and directed nucleation of liquid-solid contact. Using quantitative dual wavelength reflection interference microscopy we reveal the evolution of the air film, and the influence of substrate defects on localized pressure build-up and film collapse.

  9. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  10. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  11. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study evaluating thrust chamber cooling engine cycles and preliminary engine design for low thrust chemical rocket engines for orbit transfer vehicles is described. Oxygen/hydrogen, oxygen/methane, and oxygen/RP-1 engines with thrust levels from 444.8 N to 13345 N, and chamber pressures from 13.8 N/sq cm to 689.5 N/sq cm were evaluated. The physical and thermodynamic properties of the propellant theoretical performance data, and transport properties are documented. The thrust chamber cooling limits for regenerative/radiation and film/radiation cooling are defined and parametric heat transfer data presented. A conceptual evaluation of a number of engine cycles was performed and a 2224.1 N oxygen/hydrogen engine cycle configuration and a 2224.1 N oxygen/methane configuration chosen for preliminary engine design. Updated parametric engine data, engine design drawings, and an assessment of technology required are presented.

  12. Solid mesostructured polymer-surfactant films at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Jonathan C; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Pioneering work by Edler et al. has spawned a new sub-set of mesostructured materials. These are solid, self-supporting films comprising surfactant micelles encased within polymer hydrogel; composite polymer-surfactant films can be grown spontaneously at the air-liquid interface and have defined and controllable mesostructures. Addition of siliconalkoxide to polymer-surfactant mixtures allows for the growth of mesostructured hybrid polymer-surfactant silica films that retain film geometry after calcinations and exhibit superior mechanical properties to typically brittle inorganic films. Growing films at the air-liquid interface provides a rapid and simple means to prepare ordered solid inorganic films, and to date the only method for generating mesostructured films thick enough (up to several hundred microns) to be removed from the interface. Applications of these films could range from catalysis to encapsulation of hydrophobic species and drug delivery. Film properties and mesostructures are sensitive to surfactant structure, polymer properties and polymer-surfactant phase behaviour: herein it will be shown how film mesostructure can be tailored by directing these parameters, and some interesting analogies will be drawn with more familiar mesostructured silica materials. PMID:25127447

  13. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.; Yost, M. C.; Tobin, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted on the regenerative cooled thrust chamber of the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine. The conditions for the tests and the durations obtained are presented. The tests demonstrated thrust chamber operation over the nominal ranges of chamber pressure mixture ratio. Variations in auxiliary film coolant flowrate were also demonstrated. High pressure tests were conducted to demonstrate the thrust chamber operation at conditions approaching the design chamber pressure for the derivative space tug application.

  14. Variable thrust cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  15. PPT Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A torsional-type thrust stand has been designed and built to test Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) in both single shot and repetitive operating modes. Using this stand, momentum per pulse was determined strictly as a function of thrust stand deflection, spring constant, and natural frequency. No empirical corrections were required. The accuracy of the method was verified using a swinging impact pendulum. Momentum transfer data between the thrust stand and the pendulum were consistent to within 1%. Following initial calibrations, the stand was used to test a Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES-8/9) thruster. The LES-8/9 system had a mass of approximately 7.5 kg, with a nominal thrust to weight ratio of 1.3 x 10(exp -5). A total of 34 single shot thruster pulses were individually measured. The average impulse bit per pulse was 266 microN-s, which was slightly less than the value of 300 microN-s published in previous reports on this device. Repetitive pulse measurements were performed similar to ordinary steady-state thrust measurements. The thruster was operated for 30 minutes at a repetition rate of 132 pulses per minute and yielded an average thrust of 573 microN. Using average thrust, the average impulse bit per pulse was estimated to be 260 microN-s, which was in agreement with the single shot data. Zero drift during the repetitive pulse test was found to be approximately 1% of the measured thrust.

  16. Rupture of thin liquid films induced by impinging air-jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Kruis, Geerit C F L; Riepen, Michel; Darhuber, Anton A

    2012-07-01

    Thin liquid films on partially wetting substrates are subjected to laminar axisymmetric air-jets impinging at normal incidence. We measured the time at which film rupture occurs and dewetting commences as a function of diameter and Reynolds number of the air-jet. We developed numerical models for the air flow as well as the height evolution of the thin liquid film. The experimental results were compared with numerical simulations based on the lubrication approximation and a phenomenological expression for the disjoining pressure. We achieved quantitative agreement for the rupture times. We found that the film thickness profiles were highly sensitive to the presence of minute quantities of surface-active contaminants. PMID:22671425

  17. Tests on Thrust Augmenters for Jet Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Shoemaker, James M

    1932-01-01

    This series of tests was undertaken to determine how much the reaction thrust of a jet could be increased by the use of thrust augmenters and thus to give some indication as to the feasibility of jet propulsion for airplanes. The tests were made during the first part of 1927 at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. A compressed air jet was used in connection with a series of annular guides surrounding the jet to act as thrust augmenters. The results show that, although it is possible to increase the thrust of a jet, the increase is not large enough to affect greatly the status of the problem of the application of jet propulsion to airplanes.

  18. Formation of mesostructured thin films at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Edler, Karen J; Yang, Bin

    2013-05-01

    The growth of free-standing surfactant-templated films of inorganic oxides at the air-solution interface is an attractive route to manufacture unsupported mesostructured membranes for a range of potential applications. So far this synthesis method has been relatively neglected due to the fragility of the initial films. More recent work to understand the mechanism of formation has led to development of thicker, more robust films, as well as providing new information on the general formation mechanisms of mesoporous materials whether in film or particulate form. This review describes the properties of silica and other inorganic oxide films templated by surfactants and grown at the air-solution interface, their formation mechanisms and implications for further development of these materials. PMID:23090013

  19. Ion thrusting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An ion thrusting system is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which a gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas molecules passing therethrough to form ions and electrons, and an accelerator element which accelerates the ions to form thrust. In some variations, a potential is applied to the ionization membrane may be reversed to thrust ions in an opposite direction. The ionization membrane may also include an opening with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of the gas being ionized. Methods of manufacture and use are also provided.

  20. Evaluation of rotating, incompressibly lubricated, pressurized thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1971-01-01

    Program evaluates a series hybrid, fluid film ball bearing consisting of an orifice compensated pressurized thrust bearing in conjunction with a self-acting journal bearing. Oil viscosities corresponding to experimentally measured ball bearing outer-race temperatures were used.

  1. Influence of atmospheric pressure supplied on permittivity of air-film of aerostatic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Yubing; Li, Dong-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Influence of atmospheric pressure supplied on permittivity of the air-film is researched based on the capacitive testing method of the air film thickness of aerostatic bearing. An experiment platform is designed. The experimental results illustrate that permittivity has significant negative correlation with atmospheric pressure which varies from 0.1MPa to 0.48MPa when other environmental conditions remain unchanged. The curves conform to the fourth-order polynomial approximately. All of the values of R2 are beyond 0.944 which means that trend lines fit the data curves well. Relative permittivity of the air film is between 0.996 and 1.324. This interval shows that weak current exists between restrictor and flat of the experiment which are not absolutely insulating and atmosphere of the air film is not pure. This result provides a basis both for establishing accurate mathematical model of air film thickness and capacitance value of the aerostatic bearing and for other exploratory experiments later.

  2. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  3. Roll-to-Roll Transfer of Electrospun Nanofiber Film for High-Efficiency Transparent Air Filter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinwei; Liu, Chong; Hsu, Po-Chun; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Rufan; Liu, Yayuan; Cui, Yi

    2016-02-10

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution in air has become a serious environmental issue calling for new type of filter technologies. Recently, we have demonstrated a highly efficient air filter by direct electrospinning of polymer fibers onto supporting mesh although its throughput is limited. Here, we demonstrate a high throughput method based on fast transfer of electrospun nanofiber film from roughed metal foil to a receiving mesh substrate. Compared with the direct electrospinning method, the transfer method is 10 times faster and has better filtration performance at the same transmittance, owing to the uniformity of transferred nanofiber film (>99.97% removal of PM2.5 at ∼73% of transmittance). With these advantages, large area freestanding nanofiber film and roll-to-roll production of air filter are demonstrated. PMID:26789781

  4. Thrust Characteristics of Water Rocket and Their Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Rikio; Tomita, Nobuyuki; Takemae, Toshiaki

    The propulsive characteristics of water rockets are analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The unsteady thrust force acting on a PET bottle and the air pressure inside the bottle are measured simultaneously by the thrust test stand we have developed. The semi-empirical thrust history is obtained utilizing the air pressure history and it is compared with the measured thrust history. The results show qualitative agreement. The observation of the flow inside bottle by a high-speed video camera shows that the air precedes water when it is about to be discharged entirely. We have developed a flow regulator attached to the nozzle cap to reduce the precursor air discharge that is considered as a result of the swirling flow inside the bottle. The experimental results show that the air discharge and the body vibration are suppressed effectively.

  5. Thrust reverser for high bypass turbofan engine

    SciTech Connect

    Matta, R.K.; Bhutiani, P.K.

    1990-05-08

    This patent describes a thrust reverser for a gas turbine engine of the type which includes an outer wall spaced from the center body of a core engine to define a bypass duct therebetween. The thrust reverser comprising: circumferentially displaced blocker doors, each of the doors being movable between a normal position generally aligned with the outer wall and a thrust reversing position extending transversely of the bypass duct for blocking the exhaust of air through the bypass duct and directing the air through an opening in the outer wall for thrust reversal; each of the blocker doors being of lightweight construction and including a pit in the inner surface thereof in the normal position; means for covering the pit during normal flow of air through the bypass duct to reduce the pressure drop in the bypass duct and to reduce noise. The covering means including a pit cover hingedly mounted at one end thereof on the blocker door and means of biasing the pit cover away from the blocker door to a position providing smooth flow of air through the bypass duct during normal operation.

  6. Thrust stand for low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qin; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Min; Jia, Zhen-yuan; Sun, Bao-yuan

    2010-09-01

    A thrust stand is developed for measuring the pulsed thrust generated by low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines. It mainly consists of a thrust dynamometer, a base frame, a connecting frame, and a data acquisition and processing system. The thrust dynamometer assembled with shear mode piezoelectric quartz sensors is developed as the core component of the thrust stand. It adopts integral shell structure. The sensors are inserted into unique double-elastic-half-ring grooves with an interference fit. The thrust is transferred to the sensors by means of static friction forces of fitting surfaces. The sensors could produce an amount of charges which are proportional to the thrust to be measured. The thrust stand is calibrated both statically and dynamically. The in situ static calibration is performed using a standard force sensor. The dynamic calibration is carried out using pendulum-typed steel ball impact technique. Typical thrust pulse is simulated by a trapezoidal impulse force. The results show that the thrust stand has a sensitivity of 25.832 mV/N, a linearity error of 0.24% FSO, and a repeatability error of 0.23% FSO. The first natural frequency of the thrust stand is 1245 Hz. The thrust stand can accurately measure thrust waveform of each firing, which is used for fine control of on-orbit vehicles in the thrust range of 5-20 N with pulse frequency of 50 Hz. PMID:20887003

  7. Interfacial properties of mixed films of long-chain organics at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilman, Jessica B.; Tervahattu, Heikki; Vaida, Veronica

    Organic molecules residing at the air-water interface of atmospheric aerosols will have a critical and direct effect on the aerosols' chemical, physical, and optical properties. It is important to study the interfacial properties of such compounds in order to accurately assess these effects. In this study, the compositions of two organic binary films at the air-water interface were monitored as a function of exposure time to the ambient atmosphere. One film was composed of tetracosanoic acid (lignoceric acid, CH 3(CH 2) 22COOH) and nonacosane (C 29H 60), and the second film was composed of octadecanoic acid (stearic acid, CH 3(CH 2) 16COOH) and octadecane (C 18H 38). These films were used as simplified proxies for the organic coating on atmospheric aerosols. The effect of lengthening the hydrocarbon chain on the interfacial longevity of the compounds in the mixed organic film at the air-aqueous interface was determined. The results show that octadecane in a mixed film desorbs from the interface after 72 h while octadecanoic acid remains. For nonacosane, further lengthening of the carbon chain greatly increased its interfacial longevity so that it was comparable with the fatty acids, which remained stable at the interface for at least 144 h. These results are used to explain the preponderance of long-chain fatty acids on the surfaces of collected aerosols and give insight into the degree to which the presence of other long-chain organics may affect the aerosol's chemical and physical properties.

  8. Air shear driven flow of thin perfluoropolyether polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpulla, Michael A.; Mate, C. Mathew; Carter, Malika D.

    2003-02-01

    We have studied the wind driven movement of thin perfluoropolyether (PFPE) polymer films on silicon wafers and CNx overcoats using the blow-off technique. The ease with which a liquid polymer film moves across a surface when sheared is described by a shear mobility χS, which can be interpreted both in terms of continuum flow and in terms of wind driven diffusion. Generally, we find that the movement of PFPE films can be described as a flow process with an effective viscosity, even when the film thickness is smaller than the polymer's diameter of gyration. Only in the special case of sparse coverage of a polymer with neutral end groups is the motion better described by a wind driven diffusion process. The addition of alcohol end groups to the PFPE polymer chain results in strong interactions with the substrate, creating a restricted layer having an effective viscosity an order of magnitude larger than the mobile layer that sits on top of the restricted layer.

  9. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    SciTech Connect

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Shigehito; Kuwano, Hiroki; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-09-01

    We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH), using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100) substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10{sup −2} Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness R{sub RMS} of ∼0.4 nm.

  10. A stably enhanced transparent conductive graphene film obtained using an air-annealing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xuefen; Wei, Dapeng; Sun, Tai; Yu, Leyong; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Yongna; Fang, Liang; Wei, Dacheng; Shi, Haofei; Du, Chunlei

    2016-08-01

    A simple and effective air-annealing technique was developed to stably improve both the electrical conductivity and light transmission of pristine graphene. After the graphene film was annealed in air at 250 °C for 80 min, the mobility and carrier concentration were both significantly enhanced, and the sheet resistance was greatly reduced with a decrease rate of ∼33%. Meanwhile, the transparency was also improved by more than 3%. The mechanism is carefully discussed. The reason might be that air-annealing conditions provide a suitable atmosphere to etch and remove amorphous carbons. More importantly, the enhanced transparent conductive properties of the air-annealed graphene films were extraordinarily stable, and remained almost unchanged for 100 days.

  11. Wettability-independent bouncing on flat surfaces mediated by thin air films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Lagraauw, Rudy; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of drops onto solid surfaces plays a crucial role in a variety of processes, including inkjet printing, fog harvesting, anti-icing, dropwise condensation and spray coating. Recent efforts in understanding and controlling drop impact behaviour focused on superhydrophobic surfaces with specific surface structures enabling drop bouncing with reduced contact time. Here, we report a different universal bouncing mechanism that occurs on both wetting and non-wetting flat surfaces for both high and low surface tension liquids. Using high-speed multiple-wavelength interferometry, we show that this bouncing mechanism is based on the continuous presence of an air film for moderate drop impact velocities. This submicrometre `air cushion' slows down the incoming drop and reverses its momentum. Viscous forces in the air film play a key role in this process: they provide transient stability of the air cushion against squeeze-out, mediate momentum transfer, and contribute a substantial part of the energy dissipation during bouncing.

  12. Presence and absence of a water film between moving air bubbles and a plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remenyik, Carl J.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of water films between an inclined Lucite plate submerged in water and air bubbles moving beneath it was measured with a small impedance probe. The instrument was calibrated with a laser interferometer built for this purpose. The bubbles released beneath the plate varied in size from 10 cc to 100 cc. At a plate inclination angle of 0.98°, and in tap water, an uninterrupted water film covered most of the bubbles. Some bubbles, however, dewetted the plate, and the water film covered only a forward part of the bubble. When the film was uninterrupted, its thickness was very uniform from front to rear. When the bubble dewetted the plate, a large forward section of the film had the same uniform thickness, but this was followed by a hump on the film the rear slope of which ended at the plate surface. For some of the experiments, the surface tension of the water was reduced by admixing a detergent. In these experiments, dewetting was not observed. In a second set of experiments, a hand held transparent container filled with water and a 1.3 cm3 air bubble was used to observe visually the behavior of the moving bubble and its associated water film.

  13. 53. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND GASEOUS NITROGEN PURGE CONTROLS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND GASEOUS NITROGEN PURGE CONTROLS ON EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH DECK. LAUNCHER IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  15. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  16. Experimental investigation on liquid film asymmetry in air-water horizontal annular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Andriyanto; Deendarlianto, Indarto, Neo, Fredrick

    2016-06-01

    The asymmetry of circumferential liquid film thickness distribution in an air-water horizontal annular flow has been experimentally investigated using superficial gas and liquid velocity of 10 - 40 m/s and 0.025 to 0.4 m/s, respectively. In general, the film at the bottom of the pipe will be thicker than that of the side and the top. The asymmetry parameter could be expressed in the ratio of average film thickness to the bottom film thickness or the ratio of the top-to-bottom film thickness. Measurement using compact multiple probe instrument shows that the circumferential film thickness distribution is strongly affected by superficial gas velocity. The higher gas velocity results in the more uniform liquid film circumferential distribution. In comparison to the existing correlations, the asymmetry parameter resulted from the experiment shows a good agreement. It is also shown from the experiment that a less symmetry of film thickness distribution is resulted when the gravity force is dominant. A more symmetry distribution is resulted when the inertial force takes control.

  17. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric data and preliminary designs on liquid rocket engines for low thrust cargo orbit-transfer-vehicles are described and those items where technology is required to enhance the designs are identified. The results of film cooling studies to establish the upper chamber pressure limit are given. The study showed that regen cooling with RP-1 was not feasible over the entire thrust and chamber pressure ranges. The thermal data showed that the RP-1 bulk temperature exceeded the study coking temperature limit of 1010 R. Based upon the results presented, O2/H2 and O2/CH4 regen engine systems and O2/H2 film cooled engines were selected for further study in the system analysis. Six engine design concepts are examined.

  18. Thrust Augmentation with Mixer/Ejector Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, Walter M., Jr.; Reynolds, Gary; Hunter, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Older commercial aircraft often exceed FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) sideline noise regulations. The major problem is the jet noise associated with the high exhaust velocities of the low bypass ratio engines on such aircraft. Mixer/ejector exhaust systems can provide a simple means of reducing the jet noise on these aircraft by mixing cool ambient air with the high velocity engine gases before they are exhausted to ambient. This paper presents new information on thrust performance predictions, and thrust augmentation capabilities of mixer/ejectors. Results are presented from the recent development program of the patented Alternating Lobe Mixer Ejector Concept (ALMEC) suppressor system for the Gulfstream GII, GIIB and GIII aircraft. Mixer/ejector performance procedures are presented which include classical control volume analyses, compound compressible flow theory, lobed nozzle loss correlations and state of the art computational fluid dynamic predictions. The mixer/ejector thrust predictions are compared to subscale wind tunnel test model data and actual aircraft flight test measurements. The results demonstrate that a properly designed mixer/ejector noise suppressor can increase effective engine bypass ratio and generate large thrust gains at takeoff conditions with little or no thrust loss at cruise conditions. The cruise performance obtained for such noise suppressor systems is shown to be a strong function of installation effects on the aircraft.

  19. Three-dimensionally ordered array of air bubbles in a polymer film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasarao, M.; Collings, D.; Philips, A.; Patel, S.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    We report the formation of a three-dimensionally ordered array of air bubbles of monodisperse pore size in a polymer film through a templating mechanism based on thermocapillary convection. Dilute solutions of a simple, coil-like polymer in a volatile solvent are cast on a glass slide in the presence of moist air flowing across the surface. Evaporative cooling and the generation of an ordered array of breath figures leads to the formation of multilayers of hexagonally packed water droplets that are preserved in the final, solid polymer film as spherical air bubbles. The dimensions of these bubbles can be controlled simply by changing the velocity of the airflow across the surface. When these three-dimensionally ordered macroporous materials have pore dimensions comparable to the wavelength of visible light, they are of interest as photonic band gaps and optical stop-bands.

  20. Photodegradation of the electronic structure of PCBM and C60 films in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, Ana S.; Dzwilewski, Andrzej; Svensson, Krister; Moons, Ellen

    2016-05-01

    Fullerenes are common electron acceptors in organic solar cells. Here the photostability in air of the electronic structures of spin-coated PCBM ([6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) and evaporated C60 films are studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. After exposing these materials in air to simulated sunlight, the filled and empty molecular orbitals are strongly altered, indicating that the conjugated π-system of the C60-cage has degraded. Even a few minutes in normal lab light induces changes. These results stress the importance of protecting fullerene-based films from light and air during processing, operation, and storage.

  1. Environmental Thrust Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    This handbook was prepared as a tool to assist U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) employees coordinate their resources and efforts to help people improve their environment. Twenty-two projects are outlined as potential environmental thrusts at the community level. It is the role of USDA employees to encourage and assist, in every way possible,…

  2. Thin-film encapsulation of the air-sensitive organic-based ferrimagnet vanadium tetracyanoethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Froning, I. H.; Harberts, M.; Yu, H.; Johnston-Halperin, E.; Lu, Y.; Epstein, A. J.

    2015-03-23

    The organic-based ferrimagnet vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]{sub x∼2}) has demonstrated potential for use in both microwave electronics and spintronics due to the combination of high temperature magnetic ordering (T{sub C} > 600 K), extremely sharp ferromagnetic resonance (peak to peak linewidth of 1 G), and low-temperature conformal deposition via chemical vapor deposition (deposition temperature of 50 °C). However, air-sensitivity leads to the complete degradation of the films within 2 h under ambient conditions, with noticeable degradation occurring within 30 min. Here, we demonstrate encapsulation of V[TCNE]{sub x∼2} thin films using a UV-cured epoxy that increases film lifetime to over 710 h (30 days) as measured by the remanent magnetization. The saturation magnetization and Curie temperature decay more slowly than the remanence, and the coercivity is unchanged after 340 h (14 days) of air exposure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that the epoxy does not react with the film, and magnetometry measurements show that the presence of the epoxy does not degrade the magnetic properties. This encapsulation strategy directly enables a host of experimental protocols and investigations not previously feasible for air-sensitive samples and lays the foundation for the development of practical applications for this promising organic-based magnetic material.

  3. Formation, disruption and mechanical properties of a rigid hydrophobin film at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lynn; Kirby, Stephanie; Anna, Shelley; CMU Team

    Hydrophobins are small, globular proteins with distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions that make them extremely surface active. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential industrial applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams and emulsions, and as dispersants. Practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, both individually and in the presence of surfactants. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been shown to strongly stabilize air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. In this work, we characterize the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to strongly, irreversibly adsorb at air/water interfaces; the magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure, until the CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the addition of SDS, a strong surfactant, to the bulk. SDS is found to co-adsorb to interfaces pre-coated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU. These results lend insight into the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. Funding from GoMRI.

  4. Air-stable solution-processed n-channel organic thin film transistors with polymerenhanced morphology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Zhengran; Shaik, Shoieb; Bi, Sheng; Chen, Jihua; Li, Dawen

    2015-05-04

    N,N0-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN2) is an n-type semiconductor exhibiting high electron mobility and excellent air stability. However, the reported electron mobility based on spin-coated PDIF-CN2 film is much lower than the value of PDIF-CN2 single crystals made from vapor phase deposition, indicating significant room for mobility enhancement. In this study, various insulating polymers, including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PaMS), are pre-coated on silicon substrate aiming to enhance the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 thin film, thereby improving the charge transport and air stability. Atomic force microscopy images reveal that with the pre-deposition of PaMS or PMMA polymers, the morphologymore » of the PDIF-CN2 polycrystalline films is optimized in semiconducting crystal connectivity, domain size, and surface roughness, which leads to significant improvement of organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) performance. Particularly, an electron mobility of up to 0.55 cm2/V s has been achieved from OTFTs based on the PDIF-CN2 film with the pre-deposition of PaMS polymer.« less

  5. Air-stable solution-processed n-channel organic thin film transistors with polymerenhanced morphology

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Shaik, Shoieb; Bi, Sheng; Chen, Jihua; Li, Dawen

    2015-05-04

    N,N0-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN2) is an n-type semiconductor exhibiting high electron mobility and excellent air stability. However, the reported electron mobility based on spin-coated PDIF-CN2 film is much lower than the value of PDIF-CN2 single crystals made from vapor phase deposition, indicating significant room for mobility enhancement. In this study, various insulating polymers, including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PaMS), are pre-coated on silicon substrate aiming to enhance the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 thin film, thereby improving the charge transport and air stability. Atomic force microscopy images reveal that with the pre-deposition of PaMS or PMMA polymers, the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 polycrystalline films is optimized in semiconducting crystal connectivity, domain size, and surface roughness, which leads to significant improvement of organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) performance. Particularly, an electron mobility of up to 0.55 cm2/V s has been achieved from OTFTs based on the PDIF-CN2 film with the pre-deposition of PaMS polymer.

  6. Langmuir-Blodgett film of hydrophobin protein from Pleurotus ostreatus at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Houmadi, S; Ciuchi, F; De Santo, M P; De Stefano, L; Rea, I; Giardina, P; Armenante, A; Lacaze, E; Giocondo, M

    2008-11-18

    We present results concerning the formation of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of a class I hydrophobin from Pleurotus ostreatus at the air-water interface, and their structure as Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films when deposited on silicon substrates. LB films of the hydrophobin were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We observed that the compressed film at the air-water interface exhibits a molecular depletion even at low surface pressure. In order to estimate the surface molecular concentration, we fit the experimental isotherm with Volmer's equation describing the equation of state for molecular monolayers. We found that about (1)/ 10 of the molecules contribute to the surface film formation. When transferred on silicon substrates, compact and uniform monomolecular layers about 2.5 nm thick, comparable to a typical molecular size, were observed. The monolayers coexist with protein aggregates, under the typical rodlet form with a uniform thickness of about 5.0 nm. The observed rodlets appear to be a hydrophilic bilayer and can then be responsible for the surface molecular depletion. PMID:18925762

  7. Experimentally determined stiffness and damping of an inherently compensated air squeeze-film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Values of damping and stiffness were determined experimentally for an externally pressurized, inherently compensated, compressible squeeze-film damper up to excitation frequencies of 36,000 cycles per minute. Experimental damping values were higher than theory predicted at low squeeze numbers and less than predicted at high squeeze numbers. Experimental values of air film stiffness were less than theory predicted at low squeeze numbers and much greater at higher squeeze numbers. Results also indicate sufficient damping to attenuate amplitudes and forces at the critical speed when using three dampers in the flexible support system of a small, lightweight turborotor.

  8. The effect of air entrapment on the performance of squeeze film dampers: Experiments and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Briceno, Sergio Enrique

    Squeeze film dampers (SFDs) are an effective means to introduce the required damping in rotor-bearing systems. They are a standard application in jet engines and are commonly used in industrial compressors. Yet, lack of understanding of their operation has confined the design of SFDs to a costly trial and error process based on prior experience. The main factor deterring the success of analytical models for the prediction of SFDs' performance lays on the modeling of the dynamic film rupture. Usually, the cavitation models developed for journal bearings are applied to SFDs. Yet, the characteristic motion of the SFD results in the entrapment of air into the oil film, thus producing a bubbly mixture that can not be represented by these models. In this work, an extensive experimental study establishes qualitatively and---for the first time---quantitatively the differences between operation with vapor cavitation and with air entrainment. The experiments show that most operating conditions lead to air entrainment and demonstrate the paramount effect it has on the performance of SFDs, evidencing the limitation of currently available models. Further experiments address the operation of SFDs with controlled bubbly mixtures. These experiments bolster the possibility of modeling air entrapment by representing the lubricant as a homogeneous mixture of air and oil and provide a reliable data base for benchmarking such a model. An analytical model is developed based on a homogeneous mixture assumption and where the bubbles are described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Good agreement is obtained between this model and the measurements performed in the SFD operating with controlled mixtures. A complementary analytical model is devised to estimate the amount of air entrained from the balance of axial flows in the film. A combination of the analytical models for prediction of the air volume fraction and of the hydrodynamic pressures renders promising results for prediction of the

  9. Monte Mountain thrust, additional confirmation of the central Nevada thrust

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, A.K. ); Chamberlain, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Monte Mountain thrust, a newly identified thrust exposed in the Timpahute Range, east central Nevada places porous Devonian reservoir rocks over rich Mississippian source rocks at the peak oil generating window. The thrust provides insurmountable evidence of a thrust model that may lead to discovery of giant oil and gas fields along the 400-mi long central Nevada thrust belt. The Timpahute Range lies a little over 50 mi on strike to the south of the prolific Grant Canyon field. Scattered remnants of the north-trending thrust belt are obscured by parallel valleys of Tertiary valley fill and volcanics. The fact that the east-west-trending Timpahute Range could contain exposures of the north-south-trending central Nevada thrust belt attracted them to the range, Familiarity with the stratigraphic section led to the discovery of the thrust. As much as 750 ft of Devonian Guilmette sandstones, in the hanging wall just above the thrust contact have been erroneously mapped as Mississippian Scotty Wash sandstones. These Devonian sandstones could be excellent reservoir rocks. Sandstones in the Guilmette increase in thickness westward. East-vergent thrusting has juxtaposed plates of thicker Guilmette sandstones with plates of thinner sandstones, Reconstruction of Devonian paleogeography provides a clue to the amount of displacement along thrust boundaries.

  10. Dual-action gas thrust bearing for improving load capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    The principle of utilizing hydrodynamic effects in diverging films to improve the load carrying capacity in gas thrust bearings is discussed. A new concept of a dual action bearing based on that principle is described and analyzed. The potential of the new bearing is demonstrated both analytically for an infinitely long slider and by numerical solution for a flat sector shaped thrust bearing. It is shown that the dual action bearing can extend substantially the range of load carrying capacity in gas lubricated thrust bearings and can improve their efficiency.

  11. Advanced thrust chamber designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, F. J.; Leach, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    A regeneratively cooled thrust chamber has been designed and fabricated, consisting of an inner TD nickel liner which was spin formed, welded, and machined and an outer shell of electroformed nickel. Coolant channels were produced in the outer surface of the inner liner by the electric discharge machining process before electroforming the shell. Accessory manifolds and piping were attached by welding. Manufacturing processes employed are described.

  12. Static Thrust Analysis of the Lifting Airscrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Hefner, Ralph A

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental investigation conducted at the Georgia School of Technology on the static thrust of the lifting air screw of the type used in modern autogiros and helicopters. The theoretical part of this study is based on Glauert's analysis but certain modifications are made that further clarify and simplify the problem. Of these changes the elimination of the solidity as an independent parameter is the most important. The experimental data were obtained from tests on four rotor models of two, four, and five blades and, in general, agree quite well with the theoretical calculations. The theory indicates a method of evaluating scale effects on lifting air screws, and these corrections have been applied to the model results to derive general full-scale static thrust, torque, and figure-of-merit curves for constant-chord, constant-incidence rotors. Convenient charts are included that enable hovering flight performance to be calculated rapidly.

  13. Permeability of acetic acid through organic films at the air-aqueous interface.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Jessica B; Vaida, Veronica

    2006-06-22

    Recent field studies of collected aerosol particles, both marine and continental, show that the outermost layers contain long-chain (C >or= 18) organics. The presence of these long-chain organics could impede the transport of gases and other volatile species across the interface. This could effect the particle's composition, lifetime, and heterogeneous chemistry. In this study, the uptake rate of acetic acid vapor across a clean interface and through films of long-chain organics into an aqueous subphase solution containing an acid-base indicator (bromocresol green) was measured under ambient conditions using visible absorption spectroscopy. Acetic acid is a volatile organic compound (VOC) and is an atmospherically relevant organic acid. The uptake of acetic acid through single-component organic films of 1-octadecanol (C(18)H(38)O), 1-triacontanol (C(30)H(62)O), cis-9-octadecen-1-ol (C(18)H(36)O), and nonacosane (C(29)H(60)) in addition to two mixed films containing equimolar 1-triacontanol/nonacosane and equimolar 1-triacontanol/cis-9-octadecen-1-ol was determined. These species represent long-chain organic compounds that reside at the air-aqueous interface of atmospheric aerosols. The cis-9-octadecen-1-ol film had little effect on the net uptake rate of acetic acid vapor into solution; however, the uptake rate was reduced by almost one-half by an interfacial film of 1-triacontanol. The measured uptake rates were used to calculate the permeability of acetic acid through the various films which ranged from 1.5 x 10(-3) cm s(-1) for 1-triacontanol, the least permeable film, to 2.5 x 10(-2) cm s(-1) for cis-9-octadecen-1-ol, the most permeable film. Both mixed films had permeabilities that were between that of the single-component films comprising the mixture. This shows that the permeability of a mixed film may not be solely determined by the most permeable species in the mixture. The permeabilities of all the films studied here are discussed in relation to their

  14. Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in an ultrathin air film causes drop splashing on smooth surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Peng; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    When a fast-moving drop impacts onto a smooth substrate, splashing will be produced at the edge of the expanding liquid sheet. This ubiquitous phenomenon lacks a fundamental understanding. Combining experiment with model, we illustrate that the ultrathin air film trapped under the expanding liquid front triggers splashing. Because this film is thinner than the mean free path of air molecules, the interior airflow transfers momentum with an unusually high velocity comparable to the speed of sound and generates a stress 10 times stronger than the airflow in common situations. Such a large stress initiates Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities at small length scales and effectively produces splashing. Our model agrees quantitatively with experimental verifications and brings a fundamental understanding to the ubiquitous phenomenon of drop splashing on smooth surfaces. PMID:25713350

  15. Rapid Facial Fabrication of Silica Colloidal Crystal Film at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Wang, Yun; Chen, Qiming

    2015-12-01

    A rapid and facial strategy has been developed to self-assemble 2D or 3D silica colloidal crystals at the air/water interface. The surface hydrophilicity of monodisperse silica microspheres were prepared by the Stöber method and modified by physical adsorption of a cationic surfactant (CTAB). The surface-modified silica microspheres were dispersed into an organic solvent and readily self-assemble at the air/water interface to form 2D monolayer film. The surface potential (ζ ) of silica microspheres could be changed with different concentration of CTAB aqueous solution. When the surface potential of silica particles was of -36.67 mV, a 2D monolayer film with close-packed and high-ordered structure could be easily obtained and may further be transferred onto a solid substrate layer by layer to develop a 3D multilayer film. UV-visible spectrophotometer was used to analyze the orderliness of colloidal crystal film, the Bragg diffraction positions and silica diameters were in good agreement with those were theoretically calculated. In addition, Atomic Force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe the arrangement of colloidal crystals. PMID:26682401

  16. Air-Flow Navigated Crystal Growth for TIPS Pentacene-Based Organic Thin-Film Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Chen, Jihua; Sun, Zhenzhong; Szulczewski, Greg; Li, Dawen

    2012-01-01

    6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS pentacene) is a promising active channel material of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) due to its solubility, stability, and high mobility. However, the growth of TIPS pentacene crystals is intrinsically anisotropic and thus leads to significant variation in the performance of OTFTs. In this paper, air flow is utilized to effectively reduce the TIPS pentacene crystal anisotropy and enhance performance consistency in OTFTs, and the resulted films are examined with optical microscopy, grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, and thin-film transistor measurements. Under air-flow navigation (AFN), TIPS pentacene drop-cast from toluene solution has been observed to form thin films with improved crystal orientation and increased areal coverage on substrates, which subsequently lead to a four-fold increase of average hole mobility and one order of magnitude enhancement in performance consistency defined by the ratio of average mobility to the standard deviation of the field-effect mobilities.

  17. Thermodynamic and dynamic characteristics of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose adsorbed films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Oscar E; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M; Pilosof, Ana M R

    2006-01-01

    Surface pressure isotherms and structural and surface dilatational properties of three hydroxypropylmethycelluloses (HPMCs, called E4M, E50LV, and F4M) adsorbed films at the air-water interface were determined. In this work we present evidence that HPMC molecules are able to diffuse and saturate the air-water interface at very low concentrations in the bulk phase. As bulk concentration increased, structural changes at a molecular level occurred at the interface. These changes corresponded to transition from an expanded structure (structure I) to a condensed one (structure II). When the surface concentration of HPMC was high enough, the collapse of the monolayer was observed. The three HPMCs formed very elastic films at the air-water interface, even at low surface pressures. E4M showed features that make it unique. For instance it showed the highest surface activity, mainly at low bulk concentrations (<10(-4) wt %). The differences observed in surface activity may be attributed to differences in the hydroxypropyl molar substitution and molecular weight of HPMC. All three HPMCs formed films of similar viscoelasticity and elastic dilatational modulus, which can be accounted for by their similar degree of methyl substitution. PMID:16398540

  18. Analytical modeling of squeeze air film damping of biomimetic MEMS directional microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishfaque, Asif; Kim, Byungki

    2016-08-01

    Squeeze air film damping is introduced in microelectromechanical systems due to the motion of the fluid between two closely spaced oscillating micro-structures. The literature is abundant with different analytical models to address the squeeze air film damping effects, however, there is a lack of work in modeling the practical sensors like directional microphones. Here, we derive an analytical model of squeeze air film damping of first two fundamental vibration modes, namely, rocking and bending modes, of a directional microphone inspired from the fly Ormia ochracea's ear anatomy. A modified Reynolds equation that includes compressibility and rarefaction effects is used in the analysis. Pressure distribution under the vibrating diaphragm is derived by using Green's function. From mathematical modeling of the fly's inspired mechanical model, we infer that bringing the damping ratios of both modes in the critical damping range enhance the directional sensitivity cues. The microphone parameters are varied in derived damping formulas to bring the damping ratios in the vicinity of critical damping, and to show the usefulness of the analytical model in tuning the damping ratios of both modes. The accuracy of analytical damping results are also verified by finite element method (FEM) using ANSYS. The FEM results are in full compliance with the analytical results.

  19. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  20. A Target Indirect Thrust Measurement Method of Pulse Detonation Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiqiao; Xiong, Yuefei; Li, Chao; Zheng, Longxi; Li, Qing

    2015-05-01

    An indirect thrust measurement method based on impulse of a target plate was developed, and a new thrust measurement system (TMS) was successfully designed and constructed. A series of multi-cycle experiments on thrust measurement were conducted to investigate the feasibility of this method with the newly-built indirect TMS. The thrust measurement of PDE was made at different plate target axial positions and operating frequencies. All the experiments were conducted using gasoline as fuel and air as oxidant. The experimental results implied that the thrust of PDE by using the indirect impulse method was a function of the target plate axial position, and there existed an optimum measurement position for PDE with a diameter of 60 mm. The optimum target plate position located at 3.33. According to the experimental results, the thrusts obtained by using indirect TMS were less than the actual values, and so the observed value of thrust was modified in order to make the thrust more reliable. A relative accurate calibration formula depending on the operating frequency was found.

  1. Thrust and propulsive efficiency from an instructive viewpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-09-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static pressures that act on engine surfaces. Such an alternative, but equivalent, method can offer insights into some special examples of jet engine thrust that contradict commonly held beliefs. One such example is provided by the engine bellmouth that is used for testing jet engines on the ground. The static pressure distribution clearly shows that the engine bellmouth actually experiences forward thrust. Another example is provided by the conic exhaust nozzle that is used at the end of some jet engines. The static pressure distribution shows that the conic nozzle does not experience any forward thrust (although the nozzle increases the overall thrust of an engine through higher pressures upstream of the nozzle). Following these examples, a basis for conceptualizing propulsive efficiency is discussed. This illustrates that it is more efficient to have a smaller acceleration of a large amount of air than a larger acceleration of a smaller amount of air.

  2. Ultrafast formation of air-processable and high-quality polymer films on an aqueous substrate

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Polymer solar cells are attracting attention as next-generation energy sources. Scalable deposition techniques of high-quality organic films should be guaranteed to realize highly efficient polymer solar cells in large areas for commercial viability. Herein, we introduce an ultrafast, scalable, and versatile process for forming high-quality organic films on an aqueous substrate by utilizing the spontaneous spreading phenomenon. This approach provides easy control over the thickness of the films by tuning the spreading conditions, and the films can be transferred to a variety of secondary substrates. Moreover, the controlled Marangoni flow and ultrafast removal of solvent during the process cause the films to have a uniform, high-quality nanomorphology with finely separated phase domains. Polymer solar cells were fabricated from a mixture of polymer and fullerene derivatives on an aqueous substrate by using the proposed technique, and the device exhibited an excellent power conversion efficiency of 8.44 %. Furthermore, a roll-to-roll production system was proposed as an air-processable and scalable commercial process for fabricating organic devices. PMID:27507624

  3. Ultrafast formation of air-processable and high-quality polymer films on an aqueous substrate.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Polymer solar cells are attracting attention as next-generation energy sources. Scalable deposition techniques of high-quality organic films should be guaranteed to realize highly efficient polymer solar cells in large areas for commercial viability. Herein, we introduce an ultrafast, scalable, and versatile process for forming high-quality organic films on an aqueous substrate by utilizing the spontaneous spreading phenomenon. This approach provides easy control over the thickness of the films by tuning the spreading conditions, and the films can be transferred to a variety of secondary substrates. Moreover, the controlled Marangoni flow and ultrafast removal of solvent during the process cause the films to have a uniform, high-quality nanomorphology with finely separated phase domains. Polymer solar cells were fabricated from a mixture of polymer and fullerene derivatives on an aqueous substrate by using the proposed technique, and the device exhibited an excellent power conversion efficiency of 8.44 %. Furthermore, a roll-to-roll production system was proposed as an air-processable and scalable commercial process for fabricating organic devices. PMID:27507624

  4. Ultrafast formation of air-processable and high-quality polymer films on an aqueous substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-08-01

    Polymer solar cells are attracting attention as next-generation energy sources. Scalable deposition techniques of high-quality organic films should be guaranteed to realize highly efficient polymer solar cells in large areas for commercial viability. Herein, we introduce an ultrafast, scalable, and versatile process for forming high-quality organic films on an aqueous substrate by utilizing the spontaneous spreading phenomenon. This approach provides easy control over the thickness of the films by tuning the spreading conditions, and the films can be transferred to a variety of secondary substrates. Moreover, the controlled Marangoni flow and ultrafast removal of solvent during the process cause the films to have a uniform, high-quality nanomorphology with finely separated phase domains. Polymer solar cells were fabricated from a mixture of polymer and fullerene derivatives on an aqueous substrate by using the proposed technique, and the device exhibited an excellent power conversion efficiency of 8.44 %. Furthermore, a roll-to-roll production system was proposed as an air-processable and scalable commercial process for fabricating organic devices.

  5. Spread Films of Human Serum Albumin at the Air-Water Interface: Optimization, Morphology, and Durability.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Richard A; Ang, Joo Chuan; Sebastiani, Federica; Tummino, Andrea; White, John W

    2015-12-22

    It has been known for almost one hundred years that a lower surface tension can be achieved at the air-water interface by spreading protein from a concentrated solution than by adsorption from an equivalent total bulk concentration. Nevertheless, the factors that control this nonequilibrium process have not been fully understood. In the present work, we apply ellipsometry, neutron reflectometry, X-ray reflectometry, and Brewster angle microscopy to elaborate the surface loading of human serum albumin in terms of both the macroscopic film morphology and the spreading dynamics. We show that the dominant contribution to the surface loading mechanism is the Marangoni spreading of protein from the bulk of the droplets rather than the direct transfer of their surface films. The films can be spread on a dilute subphase if the concentration of the spreading solution is sufficient; if not, dissolution of the protein occurs, and only a textured adsorbed layer slowly forms. The morphology of the spread protein films comprises an extended network with regions of less textured material or gaps. Further, mechanical cycling of the surface area of the spread films anneals the network into a membrane that approach constant compressibility and has increased durability. Our work provides a new perspective on an old problem in colloid and interface science. The scope for optimization of the surface loading mechanism in a range of systems leading to its exploitation in deposition-based technologies in the future is discussed. PMID:26607026

  6. Scalable Fabrication of Nanoporous Carbon Fiber Films as Bifunctional Catalytic Electrodes for Flexible Zn-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Wang, Yaobing; Dai, Liming; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-04-01

    A flexible nanoporous carbon-fiber film for wearable electronics is prepared by a facile and scalable method through pyrolysis of electrospun polyimide. It exhibits excellent bifunctional electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution. Flexible rechargeable zinc-air batteries based on the carbon-fiber film show high round-trip efficiency and mechanical stability. PMID:26914270

  7. Theoretical and experimental steady-state rotordynamics of an adaptive Air Film Damper with Metal Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanhong, Ma; Zhichao, Liang; Hong, Wang; Dayi, Zhang; Jie, Hong

    2013-10-01

    An Air Film Damper (AFD) made with a highly damping material called Metal Rubber (MR) as the outer ring is a novel damping structure that aims to reduce the remarkable vibrations produced by a flexible rotor system. The mechanism of an AFD is firstly put forward and the mechanical model describing the fluid structure interaction is constructed. Taking into consideration the complex whirl of the rotor and the precession of the floating ring, the Reynolds equation of AFDs is derived and the air film pressure is obtained. Based on these calculations, the selection of MR stiffness is introduced and the adaptive properties of AFD are analyzed. Then the effects of AFD on the rotordynamics are studied based on the characterization of the parameters of a rotor system in the steady state. The mechanism and the effects of AFD on a rotor system are verified through rotating experimental tests. The theoretical and experimental results both show that AFD can adjust the air film clearance adaptively according to the vibration of the rotor; this can not only decrease the friction between the journal and the floating ring, but can also provide additional stiffness and damping to the rotor system, thus yielding additional vibration control. The mechanism of an AFD is obtained by theoretical and experimental investigations. Due to the elastic MR serving as the outer ring, an AFD can adjust the air film clearance adaptively according to the vibration of the rotor; this not only decreases the friction between the journal and the floating ring, but also provides additional stiffness and damping to the rotor system, as a function of vibration control. Taking into consideration the complex whirl of the rotor and the precession of the floating ring, the Reynolds equation of an AFD is derived and the mechanical model is established, based on the fluid structure interaction. Moreover, based on the maximum radial displacement during the entire operational process and the minimum thickness of

  8. Improved thrust calculations of active magnetic bearings considering fringing flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Ji-Hwan; Sung, So-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2012-04-01

    A methodology for deriving fringing permeance in axisymmetric devices such as active thrust magnetic bearings (ATMBs) is presented. The methodology is used to develop an improved equivalent magnetic circuit (EMC) for ATMBs, which considers the fringing effect. This EMC was used to characterize the force between the housing and mover and the dependence of thrust and inductance on the air gap and input current, respectively. These characteristics were validated by comparison with those obtained by the finite element method and in experiments.

  9. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Pancotti, Anthony; Haag, Thomas; King, Scott; Walker, Mitchell; Blakely, Joseph; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, direct measurement of thrust or impulse is one of the most critical elements of electric thruster characterization, and one of the most difficult measurements to make. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has started an initiative to develop standards for many important measurement processes in electric propulsion, including thrust measurements. This paper summarizes recommended practices for the design, calibration, and operation of pendulum thrust stands, which are widely recognized as the best approach for measuring micro N- to mN-level thrust and micro Ns-level impulse bits. The fundamentals of pendulum thrust stand operation are reviewed, along with its implementation in hanging pendulum, inverted pendulum, and torsional balance configurations. Methods of calibration and recommendations for calibration processes are presented. Sources of error are identified and methods for data processing and uncertainty analysis are discussed. This review is intended to be the first step toward a recommended practices document to help the community produce high quality thrust measurements.

  10. Low thrust vehicle concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Low thrust chemical (hydrogen-oxygen) propulsion systems configured specifically for low acceleration orbit transfer of large space systems were defined. Results indicate that it is cost effective and least risk to combine the OTV and stowed spacecraft in a single 65 K Shuttle. The study shows that the engine for an optimized low thrust stage (1) does not require very low thrust; (2) 1-3 K thrust range appears optimum; (3) thrust transient is not a concern; (4) throttling probably not worthwhile; and (5) multiple thrusters complicate OTV/LSS design and aggravate LSS loads. Regarding the optimum vehicle for low acceleration missions, the single shuttle launch (LSS and expendable OTV) is most cost effective and least risky. Multiple shuttles increase diameter 20%. The space based radar structure short OTV (which maximizes space available for packaged LSS) favors use of torus tank. Propellant tank pressures/vapor residuals are little affected by engine thrust level or number of burns.

  11. Finite thrust orbital transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzini, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The finite thrust optimal transfer in the presence of the Earth's shadow and oblate planet perturbations is a problem of strong interest in modern telecommunication satellite design with plasmic propulsion. The Maximum Principle cannot be used in its standard form to deal with the Earth's shadow. In this paper, using a regularization of the Hamiltonian which expands the Maximum Principle application domain, we provide for the first time, the necessary conditions in a very general context for the finite thrust optimal transfer with limited power around an oblate planet. The costate in such problems is generally discontinuous. To obtain fast numerical solutions, the averaging of the Hamiltonian is introduced. Two classes of boundary conditions are analyzed and numerically solved: the minimum time and the minimum fuel at a fixed time. These two problems are the basic tools for designing the orbit raising of a satellite after the launcher injection into its separation orbit. Numerical solutions have been calculated for the more important applications of LEO to GEO/MEO missions and the results have been reported and discussed.

  12. Jet Propulsion with Special Reference to Thrust Augmenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubauer, G B

    1933-01-01

    An investigation of the possibility of using thrust augmented jets as prime movers was carried out. The augmentation was to be effected by allowing the jet to mix with the surrounding air in the presence of bodies which deflect the air set in motion by the jet.

  13. 10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the test stand deck to east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Erosion of a-C:H films deposited on W, Mo, and stainless steel under interaction with air glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalavutdinov, R. Kh.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Bukhovets, V. L.; Zakharov, A. P.; Mazul, I. V.

    2011-08-01

    An air direct current glow discharge with a hollow cathode was used as source of chemically active oxygen for selective removal of amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) films deposited on W, Mo, and stainless steel. The films were removed both directly in the discharge and afterglow region. The film erosion rates depend on the sample position relatively to plasma and decrease in the order: hollow cathode, positive column, afterglow region. It was shown that primary (1-3 nm) continuous amorphous and secondary (1-30 nm) island-like oxide films were formed on the metal surfaces after removal of the a-C:H films. Polycrystalline island-like oxide films were generated due to recrystallization of the primary films. Material oxidation suppression was caused by reactions of oxygen ion neutralization and atomic oxygen recombination on metals.

  15. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G; Shea, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors. PMID:26628174

  16. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors.

  17. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert

    2015-11-15

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors.

  18. Biodegradable polyester films from renewable aleuritic acid: surface modifications induced by melt-polycondensation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesús Benítez, José; Alejandro Heredia-Guerrero, José; Inmaculada de Vargas-Parody, María; Cruz-Carrillo, Miguel Antonio; Morales-Flórez, Victor; de la Rosa-Fox, Nicolás; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Good water barrier properties and biocompatibility of long-chain biopolyesters like cutin and suberin have inspired the design of synthetic mimetic materials. Most of these biopolymers are made from esterified mid-chain functionalized ω-long chain hydroxyacids. Aleuritic (9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic) acid is such a polyhydroxylated fatty acid and is also the major constituent of natural lac resin, a relatively abundant and renewable resource. Insoluble and thermostable films have been prepared from aleuritic acid by melt-condensation polymerization in air without catalysts, an easy and attractive procedure for large scale production. Intended to be used as a protective coating, the barrier's performance is expected to be conditioned by physical and chemical modifications induced by oxygen on the air-exposed side. Hence, the chemical composition, texture, mechanical behavior, hydrophobicity, chemical resistance and biodegradation of the film surface have been studied by attenuated total reflection–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR–FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindentation and water contact angle (WCA). It has been demonstrated that the occurrence of side oxidation reactions conditions the surface physical and chemical properties of these polyhydroxyester films. Additionally, the addition of palmitic acid to reduce the presence of hydrophilic free hydroxyl groups was found to have a strong influence on these parameters.

  19. Controls on thrust belt curvature, Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, J.M. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Structural curvature in the northern part of the Wyoming-Idaho thrust belt (WITB) may be the result of either along-strike variations in pre-thrust stratigraphy or a buttress which physically concentrated shortening, or possibly both. Most thrust sheets of the WITB strike northward and were translated eastward, but in the Snake River Range (SRR) (the northernmost range in the WITB), structural strike curves from northward to nearly westward. Structural cross sections of the SRR are generally drawn in a radial pattern creating a volumetric imbalance in regional palinspastic restorations. Stratigraphic separation diagrams of major, through-going thrust faults in the SRR show extensive cut off in upper Paleozoic strata. New measured sections of upper Paleozoic stratigraphy at locations in several major thrust sheets of the WITB and in the foreland, new structural cross sections and mapping, and existing paleomagnetic data are used in a new interpretation of the origin of structural curvature in the WITB. Published paleomagnetic data require counterclockwise rotation of frontal thrust sheets along the northern boundary of the WITB, but no rotation of eastward-translated thrust sheets farther south along most of the WITB. Evidence for both a pre-existing west-trending depositional margin and rotation of frontal thrust sheets suggests that buttressing and modification of structural strike occurred along an oblique ramp where differences in stratigraphic thickness and possible pre-existing fault partitioning of the Paleozoic strata are localized.

  20. Bulk-Flow Analysis of Hybrid Thrust Bearings for Advanced Cryogenic Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1998-01-01

    on a Windows 95/NT personal computer. The program, help files and examples are licensed by Texas A&M University Technology License Office. The study of the static and dynamic performance of two hydrostatic/hydrodynamic bearings demonstrates the importance of centrifugal and advection fluid inertia effects for operation at high rotational speeds. The first example considers a conceptual hydrostatic thrust bearing for an advanced liquid hydrogen turbopump operating at 170,000 rpm. The large axial stiffness and damping coefficients of the bearing should provide accurate control and axial positioning of the turbopump and also allow for unshrouded impellers, therefore increasing the overall pump efficiency. The second bearing uses a refrigerant R134a, and its application in oil-free air conditioning compressors is of great technological importance and commercial value. The computed predictions reveal that the LH2 bearing load capacity and flow rate increase with the recess pressure (i.e. increasing orifice diameters). The bearing axial stiffness has a maximum for a recess pressure rati of approx. 0.55. while the axial damping coefficient decreases as the recess pressure ratio increases. The computer results from three flow models are compared. These models are a) inertialess, b) fluid inertia at recess edges only, and c) full fluid inertia at both recess edges and film lands. The full inertia model shows the lowest flow rates, axial load capacity and stiffness coefficient but on the other hand renders the largest damping coefficients and inertia coefficients. The most important findings are related to the reduction of the outflow through the inner radius and the appearance of subambient pressures. The performance of the refrigerant hybrid thrust bearing is evaluated at two operating speeds and pressure drops. The computed results are presented in dimensionless form to evidence consistent trends in the bearing performance characteristics. As the applied axial load

  1. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  2. Lamellar Bodies Form Solid Three-dimensional Films at the Respiratory Air-Liquid Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Ravasio, Andrea; Olmeda, Bárbara; Bertocchi, Cristina; Haller, Thomas; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for lung function. It is assembled, stored and secreted as particulate entities (lamellar body-like particles; LBPs). LBPs disintegrate when they contact an air-liquid interface, leading to an instantaneous spreading of material and a decline in surface tension. Here, we demonstrate that the film formed by the adsorbed material spontaneously segregate into distinct ordered and disordered lipid phase regions under unprecedented near-physiological conditions and, unlike natural surfactant purified from bronchoalveolar lavages, dynamically reorganized into highly viscous multilayer domains with complex three-dimensional topographies. Multilayer domains, in coexistence with liquid phases, showed a progressive stiffening and finally solidification, probably driven by a self-driven disassembly of LBPs from a sub-surface compartment. We conclude that surface film formation from LBPs is a highly dynamic and complex process, leading to a more elaborated scenario than that observed and predicted by models using reconstituted, lavaged, or fractionated preparations. PMID:20558742

  3. Analysis of the interactions between pentacene film and air molecules by means of Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, F.; Das, G.; Di Fabrizio, E.

    2008-09-01

    We report on the interactions between spin-coated pentacene films and molecules present in air (nitrogen, oxygen, and moisture) studied by means of micro-Raman spectroscopy. We found that while oxygen does not interact with pentacene, water molecules diffuse in the film proportionally to the relative humidity of the ambient, giving rise to an interaction that affects pentacene's optical properties. These findings are fully reversible when dry ambient is restored, and they could be ascribed to the formation of a reversible water-pentacene complex theoretically calculated. This interaction affects a specific pentacene vibration mode that could lead to reversible formation of electron traps involved in the degradation of the electrical performance of pentacene.

  4. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher

  5. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-11-01

    An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher

  6. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Engine data and information are presented to perform system studies on cargo orbit-transfer vehicles which would deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit. Low-thrust engine performance, weight, and envelope parametric data were established, preliminary design information was generated, and technologies for liquid rocket engines were identified. Two major engine design drivers were considered in the study: cooling and engine cycle options. Both film-cooled and regeneratively cooled engines were evaluated. The propellant combinations studied were hydrogen/oxygen, methane/oxygen, and kerosene/oxygen.

  7. Influence of film thickness and air exposure on the transport gap of manganese phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Haidu, F.; Fechner, A.; Salvan, G.; Gordan, O. D.; Fronk, M.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Lehmann, D.; Mahns, B.; Knupfer, M.

    2013-06-15

    The interface formation between manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) and cobalt was investigated combining ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy. The transport band gap of the MnPc increases with the film thickness up to a value of (1.2 {+-} 0.3) eV while the optical band gap as determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry amounts to 0.5 eV. The gap values are smaller compared to other phthalocyanines due to metallic Mn 3d states close to the Fermi level. The transport band gap was found to open upon air exposure as a result of the disappearance of the occupied 3d electronic states.

  8. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  9. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  10. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Solid rocket thrust vector control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Thrust vector control systems that superimpose a side force on the motor thrust, steering being achieved by the side force causing a moment about the vehicle center of gravity are described. A brief review of thrust vector control systems is presented, and two systems, flexible joint and liquid injection, are treated in detail. Treatment of the flexible-joint thrust vector control system is limited to the design of the flexible joint and its insulation against hot motor gases. Treatment of the liquid injection thrust vector control system is limited to discussion of the injectant, valves, piping, storage tanks, and pressurization system; no evaluation is presented of the nozzle except for (1) the effect of the injectant and erosion at the injection port and (2) the effect of injection on pressure distribution within the nozzle.

  12. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  13. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  14. Thin porous indium tin oxide nanoparticle films: effects of annealing in vacuum and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ederth, J.; Hultåker, A.; Niklasson, G. A.; Heszler, P.; van Doorn, A. R.; Jongerius, M. J.; Burgard, D.; Granqvist, C. G.

    2005-11-01

    Electrical and optical properties were investigated in porous thin films consisting of In2O3:Sn (indium tin oxide; ITO) nanoparticles. The temperature-dependent resistivity was successfully described by a fluctuation-induced tunneling model, indicating a sample morphology dominated by clusters of ITO nanoparticles separated by insulating barriers. An effective-medium model, including the effect of ionized impurity scattering, was successfully fitted to measured reflectance and transmittance. Post-deposition treatments were carried out at 773 K for 2 h in both air and vacuum. It is shown that vacuum annealing increases either the barrier width or the area between two conducting clusters in the samples and, furthermore, an extra optical absorption occurs close to the band gap. A subsequent air annealing then reduces the effect of the barriers on the electrical properties and diminishes the absorption close to the band gap.

  15. Screening of Novel Li-Air Battery Catalyst Materials by a Thin Film Combinatorial Materials Approach.

    PubMed

    Hauck, John G; McGinn, Paul J

    2015-06-01

    A combinatorial synthesis and high-throughput screening process was developed for the investigation of potential oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts for use as Li-air battery cathode materials. Libraries of discrete ternary metal alloy compositions were deposited via thin-film sputtering. The samples were electrochemically tested in parallel using cyclic voltammetry in O2-saturated KOH electrolyte. Compositions were ranked by ORR and OER onset potentials with respect to an internal Pt reference. Results from the Pt-Mn-Co, Cr-Mn-Co, Pd-Mn-Co, and Pd-Mn-Ru systems are reported. Many alloy compositions showed marked improvement in catalytic activity compared to pure Pt. Among the systems considered, Pt12Mn44Co44, Pd43Co57 and Pd36Mn28Ru36 in particular exhibited lower overpotentials for oxygen reactions, which occur at the cathode in Li-air batteries. PMID:25965839

  16. Application of in-flight thrust determination uncertainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, G. R.; Thompson, J. W., Jr.; Abernethy, R. B.; Biesiadny, T.; Havey, C. T.; Steurer, J. W.; Ascough, J. C.; Williams, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical example is given of a previously proposed methodology for the evaluation of in-flight thrust measurement uncertainty, using data extracted from a performance report comparing two different missile prototypes under a variety of flight conditions. Attention is given to the data for the AGM-68B Air Launched Cruise Missile, which is powered by the F107 dual-spool, mixed flow turbofan engine. Assessments are made of the definition of the measurement process, instrumentation error estimation, the propagation of errors to thrust calculation, mathematical model errors, the in-flight thrust error component, and correction to standard conditions. It is concluded that in-flight thrust measurement uncertainty limits can be evaluated from measurement system error analysis results and test data for the missile evaluation process presently described.

  17. Design and Analysis of an Electromagnetic Thrust Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Bibhuti; Rao, Dantam K.

    1996-01-01

    A double-acting electromagnetic thrust bearing is normally used to counter the axial loads in many rotating machines that employ magnetic bearings. It essentially consists of an actuator and drive electronics. Existing thrust bearing design programs are based on several assumptions. These assumptions, however, are often violated in practice. For example, no distinction is made between maximum external loads and maximum bearing forces, which are assumed to be identical. Furthermore, it is assumed that the maximum flux density in the air gap occurs at the nominal gap position of the thrust runner. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear theoretical basis for the design of the electromagnetic thrust bearing which obviates such assumptions.

  18. Direct thrust force measurement of pulse detonation engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahid, Mazlan Abdul; Faiz, M. Z. Ahmad; Saqr, Khalid M.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we present the result of High-Speed Reacting Flow Laboratory (HiREF) pulse detonation engine (PDE) experimental study on direct thrust measurement. The thrust force generated by the repetitive detonation from a 50 mm inner diameter and 600 mm length tube was directly measured using load cell. Shchelkin spiral was used as an accelerator for the Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) phenomenon. Propane-oxygen at stoichiometric condition was used as the combustible fuel-air mixture for the PDE. The PDE was operated at the operation frequency of 3Hz during the test. The amount of thrust force that was measured during the test reaching up to 70N. These values of thrust force were found to be fluctuating and its combustion phenomenon has been analyzed and discussed.

  19. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man; Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-01

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H2O), glycerol (C3H8O3) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  20. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  1. Cinema audiences reproducibly vary the chemical composition of air during films, by broadcasting scene specific emissions on breath

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan; Stönner, Christof; Wicker, Jörg; Krauter, Nicolas; Derstroff, Bettina; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Klüpfel, Thomas; Kramer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Human beings continuously emit chemicals into the air by breath and through the skin. In order to determine whether these emissions vary predictably in response to audiovisual stimuli, we have continuously monitored carbon dioxide and over one hundred volatile organic compounds in a cinema. It was found that many airborne chemicals in cinema air varied distinctively and reproducibly with time for a particular film, even in different screenings to different audiences. Application of scene labels and advanced data mining methods revealed that specific film events, namely “suspense” or “comedy” caused audiences to change their emission of specific chemicals. These event-type synchronous, broadcasted human chemosignals open the possibility for objective and non-invasive assessment of a human group response to stimuli by continuous measurement of chemicals in air. Such methods can be applied to research fields such as psychology and biology, and be valuable to industries such as film making and advertising. PMID:27160439

  2. Cinema audiences reproducibly vary the chemical composition of air during films, by broadcasting scene specific emissions on breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan; Stönner, Christof; Wicker, Jörg; Krauter, Nicolas; Derstroff, Bettina; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Klüpfel, Thomas; Kramer, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Human beings continuously emit chemicals into the air by breath and through the skin. In order to determine whether these emissions vary predictably in response to audiovisual stimuli, we have continuously monitored carbon dioxide and over one hundred volatile organic compounds in a cinema. It was found that many airborne chemicals in cinema air varied distinctively and reproducibly with time for a particular film, even in different screenings to different audiences. Application of scene labels and advanced data mining methods revealed that specific film events, namely “suspense” or “comedy” caused audiences to change their emission of specific chemicals. These event-type synchronous, broadcasted human chemosignals open the possibility for objective and non-invasive assessment of a human group response to stimuli by continuous measurement of chemicals in air. Such methods can be applied to research fields such as psychology and biology, and be valuable to industries such as film making and advertising.

  3. Cinema audiences reproducibly vary the chemical composition of air during films, by broadcasting scene specific emissions on breath.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan; Stönner, Christof; Wicker, Jörg; Krauter, Nicolas; Derstroff, Bettina; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Klüpfel, Thomas; Kramer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Human beings continuously emit chemicals into the air by breath and through the skin. In order to determine whether these emissions vary predictably in response to audiovisual stimuli, we have continuously monitored carbon dioxide and over one hundred volatile organic compounds in a cinema. It was found that many airborne chemicals in cinema air varied distinctively and reproducibly with time for a particular film, even in different screenings to different audiences. Application of scene labels and advanced data mining methods revealed that specific film events, namely "suspense" or "comedy" caused audiences to change their emission of specific chemicals. These event-type synchronous, broadcasted human chemosignals open the possibility for objective and non-invasive assessment of a human group response to stimuli by continuous measurement of chemicals in air. Such methods can be applied to research fields such as psychology and biology, and be valuable to industries such as film making and advertising. PMID:27160439

  4. Metal-free porphyrin-sensitized mesoporous titania films for visible-light indoor air oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Adel A; Bahnemann, Detlef W

    2010-09-24

    Transparent cubic mesoporous TiO2 films coated on soda-lime glass have been developed. A metal free meso-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TPPS) has been adsorbed on these TiO2 films from aqueous solutions. The results indicated that the obtained mesoporous TiO2 and 3D TPPS/TiO2 films are optically transparent and crack free (thickness ca. 200±20 nm). The introduction of the TPPS molecules has only a very small influence on the pore system and some limited pore blocking seems to occur. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images revealed that the adsorption of TPPS does not disrupt the meso order of TPPS/TiO2. The particle size of these TiO2 nanocrystals has been measured to be approximately 5-8 nm. TPPS/TiO2 photocatalysts, exhibiting regularly ordered mesopores, large surface area (ca. 102.5 cm(2) cm(-2)), and specific pore volume of about 0.1 mm(3) cm(-2), show improved light-harvesting efficiency as compared with other transparent TiO2 films. Employing the 3D TPPS/TiO2 photocatalyst, a quantum efficiency of 0.059 % has been obtained for the photodegradation of CH3CHO in the gas phase under visible-light illumination. Recycling tests demonstrated that the newly synthesized photocatalyst was quite stable during this gas-solid heterogeneous photocatalytic process because no significant decrease in photocatalytic activity was observed even after being used repetitively up to five times. Therefore, the newly synthesized transparent 3D TPPS/TiO2 photocatalysts can potentially be applied for low-cost air purification and self-cleaning applications. PMID:20806316

  5. Air cushioning in droplet impact. I. Dynamics of thin films studied by dual wavelength reflection interference microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Mugele, Frieder; van den Ende, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    When a liquid droplet impacts on a solid surface, it not only deforms substantially but also an air film develops between the droplet and the surface. This thin air film—as well as other transparent films—can be characterized by reflection interference microscopy. Even for weakly reflecting interfaces, relative thickness variations of the order of tens of nanometers are easily detected, yet the absolute thickness is generally known only up to an additive constant which is a multiple of half of the wavelength. Here, we present an optical setup for measuring the absolute film thickness and its spatial and temporal behavior using a combination of a standard Hg lamp, an optical microscope, and three synchronized high-speed cameras to detect conventional side-view images as well as interferometric bottom view images at two different wavelengths. The combination of a dual wavelength approach with the finite coherence length set by the broad bandwidth of the optical filters allows for measuring the absolute thickness of transient air films with a spatial resolution better than 30 nm at 50 μs time resolution with a maximum detectable film thickness of approximately 8 μm. This technique will be exploited in Part II to characterize the air film evolution during low velocity droplet impacts.

  6. Operating characteristics of a cantilever-mounted resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1979-01-01

    A resilient-pad gas thrust bearing consisting of pads mounted on cantilever beams was tested to determine its operating characteristic. The bearing was run at a thrust load of 74 newtons to a speed of 17000 rpm. The pad film thickness and bearing friction torque were measured and compared with theory. The measured film thickness was less than that predicted by theory. The bearing friction torque was greater than that predicted by theory.

  7. Low thrust optimal orbital transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, Shannon S.

    1994-01-01

    For many optimal transfer problems it is reasonable to expect that the minimum time solution is also the minimum fuel solution. However, if one allows the propulsion system to be turned off and back on, it is clear that these two solutions may differ. In general, high thrust transfers resemble the well known impulsive transfers where the burn arcs are of very short duration. The low and medium thrust transfers differ in that their thrust acceleration levels yield longer burn arcs and thus will require more revolutions. In this research, we considered two approaches for solving this problem: a powered flight guidance algorithm previously developed for higher thrust transfers was modified and an 'averaging technique' was investigated.

  8. Thrust Generating Mechanism of Nozzle Powered by Single Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qian; Hong, Yanji; She, Jinhu; Cao, Zhengrui; Wang, Junhua

    2006-05-01

    Using Sedov's strong explosion theory, the process of gas dynamics after air is broken down under the irradiation of single laser pulse is analyzed, and the analytic formulas of the fluid field parameters of the gas disturbed by shock wave inside the nozzle are educed. The theoretical values are validated by numerical simulation, and the thrust generating mechanism is disclosed. The result indicates that the thrust generated by the interaction of laser induced shock wave and nozzle is equal to the one generated by the reactive jet on nozzle exit during a period, but the trends of the thrust-time evolvement are different, which provides some available information for further study of the mechanism of air-breathing laser propulsion.

  9. Effect of air annealing on structure and magnetic properties of Sn1-xFexO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuppan, M.; Begam, M. Regana; Babu, S. Harinath; Kaleemulla, S.; Rao, N. Madhusudhana; Krishnamoorthi, C.

    2016-05-01

    Sn1-xFexO2 (x = 0.07) thin films were prepared on to glass substrates using flash evaporation technique and annealed in air at different temperatures. The X-ray diffraction study showsed that all the thin films annealed at different temperatures were in tetragonal rutile structure of SnO2. The Elemental analysis confirms the presence of Fe and Sn and O in the films. The magnetic measurements were carried out using vibrating sample magnetometer and found that the strength of magnetization decreased with increase of annealing temperature.

  10. In-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The major aspects of processes that may be used for the determination of in-flight thrust are reviewed. Basic definitions are presented as well as analytical and ground-test methods for gathering data and calculating the thrust of the propulsion system during the flight development program of the aircraft. Test analysis examples include a single-exhaust turbofan, an intermediate-cowl turbofan, and a mixed-flow afterburning turbofan.

  11. Thrust Bearing with Rough Surfaces Lubricated by an Ellis Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walicka, A.; Walicki, E.; Jurczak, P.; Falicki, J.

    2014-11-01

    In the paper the influence of bearing surfaces roughness on the pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of a thrust bearing is discussed. The equations of motion of an Ellis pseudo-plastic fluid are used to derive the Reynolds equation. After general considerations on the flow in a bearing clearance and using the Christensen theory of hydrodynamic rough lubrication the modified Reynolds equation is obtained. The analytical solutions of this equation for the cases of a squeeze film bearing and an externally pressurized bearing are presented. As a result one obtains the formulae expressing pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity. A thrust radial bearing is considered as a numerical example.

  12. Micro thrust and heat generator

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    The present invention relates generally to micromachines such as microengines or micromotors. More specifically, the invention is directed to a micro rocket which functions as a source of heat and thrust, and utilizes chemical energy to drive or power micromechanical apparatuses. The invention is adaptable to applications involving defense, bio-medical, manufacturing, consumer product, aviation, automotive, computer, inspection, and safety systems. A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachine techniques (LIGA).

  13. Analysis of pneumatic hammer in rectangular aerostatic thrust bearing with groove

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei; Tan, Jiubin; Cui, Jiwen; Liu, Yongmeng

    2015-02-01

    The pneumatic hammer in rectangular aerostatic thrust bearings with groove is analyzed using perturbation theory. Routh stability criterion was used to evaluate the critical condition of pneumatic hammer in rectangular aerostatic thrust bearings with groove, and the influence of supply pressure, throttle area, groove area, and thickness of film on aerostatic thrust bearings. It was found through analysis that the change rate of stiffness and the volume ratio of aerostatic bearing could be used to analyze the pneumatic hammer in rectangular aerostatic thrust bearings with groove. At a certain film thickness, the stability of aerostatic bearings could be improved by reducing supply pressure, increasing throttle area and decreasing groove area to facilitate the design of a general aerostatic thrust bearing.

  14. Comparison of effectiveness of convection-, transpiration-, and film-cooling methods with air as coolant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Livingood, N B

    1954-01-01

    Various parts of aircraft propulsion engines that are in contact with hot gases often require cooling. Transpiration and film cooling, new methods that supposedly utilize cooling air more effectively than conventional convection cooling, have already been proposed. This report presents material necessary for a comparison of the cooling requirements of these three methods. Correlations that are regarded by the authors as the most reliable today are employed in evaluating each of the cooling processes. Calculations for the special case in which the gas velocity is constant along the cooled wall (flat plate) are presented. The calculations reveal that a comparison of the three cooling processes can be made on quite a general basis. The superiority of transpiration cooling is clearly shown for both laminar and turbulent flow. This superiority is reduced when the effects of radiation are included; for gas-turbine blades, however, there is evidence indicating that radiation may be neglected.

  15. 49. VIEW OF EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH PAD. THRUST SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. VIEW OF EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH PAD. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND DUCTS ON RIGHT; UMBILICAL MAST POWER CONNECTORS ON LEFT; RAIL SYSTEM AND FIRE SUPPRESSION NOZZLES IN FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  16. Army (MANTECH) Thrust Area Concept: Optics Thrust Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-01-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  17. Army (MANTECH) thrust area concept: Optics thrust area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-04-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  18. Evaluation of fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle via thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Hirota, M.; Ouchi, K.; Saito, T.

    2016-03-01

    Shock vector control (SVC) in a converging-diverging nozzle with a rectangular cross-section is discussed as a fluidic thrust vectoring (FTV) method. The interaction between the primary nozzle flow and the secondary jet is examined using experiments and numerical simulations. The relationships between FTV parameters [nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and secondary jet pressure ratio (SPR)] and FTV performance (thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment) are investigated. The experiments are conducted with an NPR of up to 10 and an SPR of up to 2.7. Numerical simulations of the nozzle flow are performed using a Navier-Stokes solver with input parameters set to match the experimental conditions. The thrust pitching angle and moment computed from the force-moment balance are used to evaluate FTV performance. The experiment and numerical results indicate that the FTV parameters (NPR and SPR) directly affect FTV performance. Conventionally, FTV performance evaluated by the common method using thrust pitching angle is highly dependent on the location of evaluation. Hence, in this study, we show that the thrust pitching moment, a parameter which is independent of the location, is the appropriate figure of merit to evaluate the performance of FTV systems.

  19. Uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Steurer, John W.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating the measurement error or uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination in aircraft employing conventional turbofan/turbojet engines are reviewed. While the term 'in-flight thrust determination' is used synonymously with 'in-flight thrust measurement', in-flight thrust is not directly measured but is determined or calculated using mathematical modeling relationships between in-flight thrust and various direct measurements of physical quantities. The in-flight thrust determination process incorporates both ground testing and flight testing. The present text is divided into the following categories: measurement uncertainty methodoogy and in-flight thrust measurent processes.

  20. Effect of air annealing on structural, optical, morphological and electrical properties of thermally evaporated CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, A.; Chander, S.; Nehra, S. P.; Dhaka, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a study on effect of air annealing on structural, optical, morphological and electrical properties of CdSe thin films is undertaken. The thin films of thickness 810 nm were deposited on glass and ITO coated glass substrates employing thermal evaporation technique. The glass substrates were used to find structural, optical and morphological properties while ITO coated glass substrates for electrical properties. The as-deposited films were subjected to thermal annealing in air atmosphere at different temperatures 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows that the films have cubic phase with preferred orientation (111). The structural parameters like inter-planner spacing, lattice constant, grain size, dislocation density, strain and number of crystallites per unit area are calculated. The grain size is found in the range 27.11-34.03 nm and observed to be varied with air annealing. The dislocation density and strain vary with annealing in the range (0.86-1.36)×1011 cm-2 and 0.276-0.347 respectively. The extinction coefficient is found to be increased at lower annealing temperature and decreased at higher. The refractive index is also calculated and found in the range 2.75-2.80. The AFM studies show that roughness of thin films are increased with annealing. The electrical resistivity is found to be decreased with annealing temperature. The results are in good agreement with the standard data and available literature.

  1. Formation of amorphous silicon passivation films with high stability against postannealing, air exposure, and light soaking using liquid silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cheng; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Masuda, Takashi; Shen, Zhongrong; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2016-04-01

    We applied liquid-source vapor deposition (LVD), thermal CVD from the vapor of cyclopentasilane (CPS), to form amorphous silicon (a-Si) passivation films on crystalline Si (c-Si) wafers, and investigated the thermal stability of the films against postannealing. LVD a-Si passivation films showed a high initial effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff) of >300 µs and a higher thermal stability than a reference plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor-deposited (PECVD) sample. The high thermal stability of LVD a-Si passivation films may be attributed to the considerably high deposition temperature of the films at 360 °C or more. LVD a-Si passivation films were sufficiently stable also against air exposure and 1-sun light soaking. We also confirmed that the epitaxial growth of Si films does not occur on c-Si even at such high deposition temperatures, and LVD could realize the simultaneous deposition of a-Si films on both sides of a c-Si wafer.

  2. Investigation of a Full-scale, Cascade-type Thrust Reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Robert C; Algranti, Joseph S

    1957-01-01

    A double set of turning vanes was carried inside the jet tailpipe. To produce reverse thrust, the tailpipe opens into two side sections and the turning vanes move outward to form a V-shaped cascade, which deflects the exhaust-gas flow. Forward and reverse net thrust were measured over a range of engine speeds with the airplane stationary. Taxi tests were made to determine the comparative stopping distances using wheel braking and reverse thrust separately, and a combination of both. The effect of turning-vane spacing on thrust-reverser performance was determined by scale-model tests using unheated air.

  3. Ag-Cu nanoalloyed film as a high-performance cathode electrocatalytic material for zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yimin; Chen, Fuyi; Jin, Yachao; Liu, Zongwen

    2015-04-01

    A novel Ag50Cu50 film electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The electrocatalyst actually is Ag-Cu alloyed nanoparticles embedded in amorphous Cu film, based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization. The rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements provide evidence that the ORR proceed via a four-electron pathway on the electrocatalysts in alkaline solution. And it is much more efficient than pure Ag catalyst. The catalytic layer has maximum power density of 67 mW cm-2 and an acceptable cell voltage at 0.863 V when current densities increased up to 100 mA cm-2 in the Ag50Cu50-based primary zinc-air battery. The resulting rechargeable zinc-air battery exhibits low charge-discharge voltage polarization of 1.1 V at 20 mAcm-2 and high durability over 100 cycles in natural air.

  4. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Reusable thrust chamber and injector concepts were evaluated for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine (OME). Parametric engine calculations were carried out by computer program for N2O4/amine, LOX/amine and LOX/hydrocarbon propellant combinations for engines incorporating regenerative cooled and insulated columbium thrust chambers. The calculation methods are described including the fuel vortex film cooling method of combustion gas temperature control, and performance prediction. A method of acceptance of a regeneratively cooled heat rejection reduction using a silicone oil additive was also demonstrated by heated tube heat transfer testing. Regeneratively cooled thrust chamber operation was also demonstrated where the injector was characterized for the OME application with a channel wall regenerative thrust chamber. Bomb stability testing of the demonstration chambers/injectors demonstrated recovery for the nominal design of acoustic cavities. Cavity geometry changes were also evaluated to assess their damping margin. Performance and combustion stability was demonstrated of the originally developed 10 inch diameter combustion pattern operating in an 8 inch diameter thrust chamber.

  5. Analytic Modeling of the Hydrodynamic, Thermal, and Structural Behavior of Foil Thrust Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Prahl, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    A simulation and modeling effort is conducted on gas foil thrust bearings. A foil bearing is a self acting hydrodynamic device capable of separating stationary and rotating components of rotating machinery by a film of air or other gaseous lubricant. Although simple in appearance these bearings have proven to be complicated devices in analysis. They are sensitive to fluid structure interaction, use a compressible gas as a lubricant, may not be in the fully continuum range of fluid mechanics, and operate in the range where viscous heat generation is significant. These factors provide a challenge to the simulation and modeling task. The Reynolds equation with the addition of Knudsen number effects due to thin film thicknesses is used to simulate the hydrodynamics. The energy equation is manipulated to simulate the temperature field of the lubricant film and combined with the ideal gas relationship, provides density field input to the Reynolds equation. Heat transfer between the lubricant and the surroundings is also modeled. The structural deformations of the bearing are modeled with a single partial differential equation. The equation models the top foil as a thin, bending dominated membrane whose deflections are governed by the biharmonic equation. A linear superposition of hydrodynamic load and compliant foundation reaction is included. The stiffness of the compliant foundation is modeled as a distributed stiffness that supports the top foil. The system of governing equations is solved numerically by a computer program written in the Mathematica computing environment. Representative calculations and comparisons with experimental results are included for a generation I gas foil thrust bearing.

  6. Low thrust propulsion literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Darrel

    1989-01-01

    A literature search was performed to investigate the area of low thrust propulsion. In an effort to evaluate this technology, a number of articles, obtained through the use of the NASA-RECON database, were collected and categorized. The study indicates that although much was done, particularly in the 1960's and 1970's, more can be done in the area of practical navigation and guidance. It is suggested that the older studies be reinvestigated to see what potential there exists for future low thrust applications.

  7. Formation of a Rigid Hydrophobin Film and Disruption by an Anionic Surfactant at an Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Stephanie M; Zhang, Xujun; Russo, Paul S; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M

    2016-06-01

    Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins produced by fungi. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been associated with Dutch elm disease. Like other hydrophobins, CU stabilizes air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams, and emulsions and as dispersants. The practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, alone and in the presence of added surfactants. In this study, the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces is characterized by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to adsorb irreversibly at air/water interfaces. The magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure until CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the sequential addition of strong surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the bulk liquid adjacent to the interface. SDS is found to coadsorb to interfaces precoated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU by SDS. Sequential adsorption results in mixed layers with properties not observed in interfaces generated from complexes formed in the bulk. These results lend insight to the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. PMID:27164189

  8. Air-stable solution-processed n-channel organic thin film transistors with polymer-enhanced morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhengran; Shaik, Shoieb; Bi, Sheng; Chen, Jihua; Li, Dawen

    2015-05-01

    N,N'-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN2) is an n-type semiconductor exhibiting high electron mobility and excellent air stability. However, the reported electron mobility based on spin-coated PDIF-CN2 film is much lower than the value of PDIF-CN2 single crystals made from vapor phase deposition, indicating significant room for mobility enhancement. In this study, various insulating polymers, including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PαMS), are pre-coated on silicon substrate aiming to enhance the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 thin film, thereby improving the charge transport and air stability. Atomic force microscopy images reveal that with the pre-deposition of PαMS or PMMA polymers, the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 polycrystalline films is optimized in semiconducting crystal connectivity, domain size, and surface roughness, which leads to significant improvement of organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) performance. Particularly, an electron mobility of up to 0.55 cm2/V s has been achieved from OTFTs based on the PDIF-CN2 film with the pre-deposition of PαMS polymer.

  9. Surface Partitioning and Stability of Mixed Films of Fluorinated Alcohols and Acids at the Air- Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontu, N. A.; Vaida, V.

    2007-05-01

    The production of fluorinated compounds over the past 50 years has had numerous industrial applications. For example, perfluorinated carboxylic acids are used in the synthesis of polymers and fire retardants, perfluoroalkyl sulfonates act as surface protectors, and fluorotelomer alcohols are incorporated into products such as paints, coatings, polymers, and adhesives. Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) are linear polyfluorinated alcohols with the formula CF3(CF2)nCH2CH2OH (n=1,3,5,...). They have been suggested as possible precursors for perfluorinated carboxylic acids and detected in the troposphere over several North American sites. Perfluorocarboxylic acids have even been detected in the arctic food chain, human blood, tissues of animals and environmental waters. We report the surface activity of fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluorinated carboxylic acids at the air-water interface by using a Langmuir trough. Isotherms of the pure compounds along with mixed films with other organic carboxylic acids were collected. The main objective of these experiments was to understand their heterogeneous chemistry by characterizing the pure and mixed films, which serves as a representative model for organic films on atmospheric surfaces such as those found on oceans and aqueous aerosols. Film properties and behavior, notably stabilization, evaporation from the subphase, and miscibility in the single-component mixtures as well as in the mixed films will be discussed. An important consequence of FTOHs and perfluorocarboxylic acids being found to partition to the air-water interface is the possibility of their transport and widespread distribution and deposition using atmospheric aerosols.

  10. Air-stable solution-processed n-channel organic thin film transistors with polymer-enhanced morphology

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Shaik, Shoieb; Bi, Sheng; Li, Dawen; Chen, Jihua

    2015-05-04

    N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) is an n-type semiconductor exhibiting high electron mobility and excellent air stability. However, the reported electron mobility based on spin-coated PDIF-CN{sub 2} film is much lower than the value of PDIF-CN{sub 2} single crystals made from vapor phase deposition, indicating significant room for mobility enhancement. In this study, various insulating polymers, including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PαMS), are pre-coated on silicon substrate aiming to enhance the morphology of the PDIF-CN{sub 2} thin film, thereby improving the charge transport and air stability. Atomic force microscopy images reveal that with the pre-deposition of PαMS or PMMA polymers, the morphology of the PDIF-CN{sub 2} polycrystalline films is optimized in semiconducting crystal connectivity, domain size, and surface roughness, which leads to significant improvement of organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) performance. Particularly, an electron mobility of up to 0.55 cm{sup 2}/V s has been achieved from OTFTs based on the PDIF-CN{sub 2} film with the pre-deposition of PαMS polymer.

  11. Internal performance characteristics of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Milton

    1995-01-01

    A series of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles were designed and experimentally tested for internal performance and pumping characteristics at the Langley research center. This study indicated that discontinuities in the performance occurred at low primary nozzle pressure ratios and that these discontinuities were mitigated by decreasing expansion area ratio. The addition of secondary flow increased the performance of the nozzles. The mid-to-high range of secondary flow provided the most overall improvements, and the greatest improvements were seen for the largest ejector area ratio. Thrust vectoring the ejector nozzles caused a reduction in performance and discharge coefficient. With or without secondary flow, the vectored ejector nozzles produced thrust vector angles that were equivalent to or greater than the geometric turning angle. With or without secondary flow, spacing ratio (ejector passage symmetry) had little effect on performance (gross thrust ratio), discharge coefficient, or thrust vector angle. For the unvectored ejectors, a small amount of secondary flow was sufficient to reduce the pressure levels on the shroud to provide cooling, but for the vectored ejector nozzles, a larger amount of secondary air was required to reduce the pressure levels to provide cooling.

  12. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  13. Pulsed Electric Propulsion Thrust Stand Calibration Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of the performance of any propulsion device requires the accurate measurement of thrust. While chemical rocket thrust is typically measured using a load cell, the low thrust levels associated with electric propulsion (EP) systems necessitate the use of much more sensitive measurement techniques. The design and development of electric propulsion thrust stands that employ a conventional hanging pendulum arm connected to a balance mechanism consisting of a secondary arm and variable linkage have been reported in recent publications by Polzin et al. These works focused on performing steady-state thrust measurements and employed a static analysis of the thrust stand response. In the present work, we present a calibration method and data that will permit pulsed thrust measurements using the Variable Amplitude Hanging Pendulum with Extended Range (VAHPER) thrust stand. Pulsed thrust measurements are challenging in general because the pulsed thrust (impulse bit) occurs over a short timescale (typically 1 micros to 1 millisecond) and cannot be resolved directly. Consequently, the imparted impulse bit must be inferred through observation of the change in thrust stand motion effected by the pulse. Pulsed thrust measurements have typically only consisted of single-shot operation. In the present work, we discuss repetition-rate pulsed thruster operation and describe a method to perform these measurements. The thrust stand response can be modeled as a spring-mass-damper system with a repetitive delta forcing function to represent the impulsive action of the thruster.

  14. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-31

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H{sub 2}O), glycerol (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O{sub 3}) and diiodomethane (CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  15. Tribological behavior of micron-scale polycrystalline silicon structural films in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsem, D. H.; van der Hulst, R.; Stach, E. A.; Dugger, M. T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.; Ritchie, R. O.

    2009-02-01

    As tribological properties are critical factors in the reliability of microelectromechanical systems, it is important to understand the physical processes and parameters governing wear and friction in silicon structural films. Dynamic friction, wear volumes and wear morphology have been studied for polysilicon devices from the Sandia SUMMiT VTM process actuated in ambient air at μN loads. A total of seven devices were tested. Roughly half of the devices showed a peak in the friction coefficient at three times the initial value with failure after 105 cycles. The other half of the devices behaved similarly initially; however, following the friction coefficient peak they displayed a lower steady-state friction regime with no failure for millions of cycles. Additionally, the nanoscale wear coefficient and roughness increased in the first ~105 cycles and then slowly decayed over several million cycles. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed amorphous oxygen-rich debris. These measurements show that after a short adhesive wear regime, abrasive wear is the governing mechanism with failures attributed to differences in the local nanoscale surface morphology. Changing the relative humidity, sliding speed and load was found to influence the friction coefficient, but re-oxidation of worn polysilicon surfaces was only found to have an effect after periods of inactivity.

  16. Recognizing thrust faults on remote sensing images

    SciTech Connect

    Prost, G.L. )

    1990-09-01

    This article examines the geomorphic evidence for thrusting and compares it to the expression of other faults and unconformities on remote sensing images. No single feature identifies thrusting, but rather the coincidence of several factors builds a case for a thrust interpretation. An example from Pakistan illustrates the geomorphic criteria in an area with excellent exposures and classic thrust features. The structure interpretation is supported by construction of cross sections; together these are used to suggest areas of exploration interest.

  17. Studies on Thrust Characteristic of High-Thrust Spiral Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominami, Tsutomu; Fujimoto, Yasutaka

    Linear actuators are used in various industrial applications. Connentional linear actuators are a combination of a rotational motor and a ball screw, a hydraulic actuator, or a linear motor. However, these actuators have some demerits. This paper proposes a spiral motor (SPRM) that comprises a spiral stator and a spiral mover. Owing to its spiral structure, the SPRM can be expected to show better performance as compared to the conventional linear actuator. However, it is not easy to manufacture spiral stators and spiral movers. In this paper, thrust and torque equations derived from a magnetic circuit are introduced. A prototype is developed and its specifications are provided. Sixty fan-shaped stator blocks are mounted on the frame and forty-eight fan-shaped mover blocks with flat surfaces are mounted on the axis. These blocks form an approximately spiral structure. The blocks are not difficult to manufacture. The feasibility of the developed SPRM is confirmed by performing basic experiments. First, the SPRM is driven by using synchronous control. Subsequently, the thrust is measured by a load cell and the thrust constant is determined.

  18. Two-phase air/oil flow in aero engine bearing chambers: Characterization of oil film flows

    SciTech Connect

    Glahn, A.; Wittig, S.

    1996-07-01

    For the design of secondary air and lubrication oil systems, a sufficient knowledge of two-phase flow and heat transfer phenomena under bearing chamber flow conditions is required. The characterization of oil film flows at the bearing chamber walls is one of the major tasks for a better understanding of these processes and, therefore, a necessity for improvements of the efficiency of aero engines. The present paper gives a contribution to this subject. Utilizing a fiber-optic LDV setup, measurements of oil film velocity profiles have been performed in the high-speed bearing chamber rig simulating real engine conditions. All data have been compared with different theoretical approaches, which have been derived from a force balance at a liquid film element, including geometric conditions and temperature dependent fluid properties, and by approaches for the eddy viscosity available in the literature.

  19. Exfoliation at the liquid/air interface to assemble reduced graphene oxide ultrathin films for a flexible noncontact sensing device.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Xiong, Zuoping; Liu, Zheng; Zhang, Ting

    2015-02-25

    Reduced graphene oxide ultrathin films are fabricated by a reproducible exfoliation method at the liquid/air interface, and they show high transparency, tunable sheet resistance, uniform electric conductivity, and structural homogeneity over a large area. A flexible relative humidity sensing matrix is demonstrated and it is shown to be excellent for close proximity sensing without touching it. This method opens up a novel avenue for future human-machine interaction applications. PMID:25522328

  20. Properties of the seawater-air interface. 2. Rates of surface film formation under steady state conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dragcevic, D.; Pravdic, V.

    1981-05-01

    The laboratory techniques of dynamic surface tension and of surface electrical potential measurements were used to determine rates of formation and of reorientation of organic surface films at the seawater-air interface. Relaxation times of surface films were determined for three characteristic samples obtained by screen and bottle sampling in the coastal waters of the northern Adriatic area. These data were compared with those for model samples produced by spreading oleic acid and crude oil on or dissolving polyethyleneglycol and sodium dodecyl sulfate in artificial seawater. Relaxation times were in the range of 0.1-1 s for most of the samples. A good representative value for field samples is 0.2 s. The temperature-dependence (the energies of activation) for the surface film relaxation indicates that several processes control material transport toward the seawater-air interface. The findings are interpreted as showing that an almost ever-present organic surface film influences the mechanism and the rate of material transport across the sea-atmosphere boundary.

  1. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness. PMID:25514470

  2. Bonding of SU-8 films onto KMPR structures for microfluidic, air-suspended photonic and optofluidic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokop, Christoph; Schoenhardt, Steffen; Mahmud, Tanveer; Mitchell, Arnan; Karnutsch, Christian

    2016-05-01

    We present a method to bond unstructured and structured SU-8 films down to sub-micron thicknesses onto microchannels fabricated in KMPR using a flexible polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp. By exploiting differently casted PDMS stamps, 3D microfluidic channel networks, air-suspended photonic devices and optofluidic structures have been fabricated. First, microchannels of KMPR are patterned by photolithography and an SU-8 film is spin coated onto a prepared PDMS stamp. The stamp is then placed on top of the KMPR microchannels and the SU-8 layer is cross-linked by applying sufficient heat and pressure. After peeling off the PDMS stamp, the SU-8 layer remains bonded on the KMPR. In our experiments, we demonstrate the bonding of approximately 0.5 μm thick structured SU-8 films onto KMPR microchannels of about 500 μm width and 25 μm height. Bond strength tests demonstrated that such thin layers can withstand pressures up to 1100 hPa. The laminated SU-8 layers can enable various functionalities, e.g. sealing of microfluidic channels, realization of air-suspended photonic structures or optofluidic devices. Most importantly, the combination of fluid handling in the microchannels and air-suspended photonic structures realized in the laminated SU-8 layer enables research towards a large range of applications, such as optofluidics, biosensors, chemical and biomedical analysis, environmental investigations, and renewable energy.

  3. The dual action gas thrust bearing - A new high load bearing concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    The principle of utilizing hydrodynamic effects in diverging films for improving load capacity in gas thrust bearings is discussed. A new concept of dual action bearing based on that principle is described and analyzed. The potential of the new bearing is demonstrated both analytically for an infinitely long slider and by numerical solution for a flat sector shaped thrust bearing. It is shown that the dual action bearing can extend substantially the range of load carrying capacity in gas lubricated thrust bearings and improve their efficiency.

  4. An approach to evaluate capacitance, capacitive reactance and resistance of pivoted pads of a thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prashad, Har

    1992-07-01

    A theoretical approach is developed for determining the capacitance and active resistance between the interacting surfaces of pivoted pads and thrust collar, under different conditions of operation. It is shown that resistance and capacitive reactance of a thrust bearing decrease with the number of pads times the values of these parameters for an individual pad, and that capacitance increases with the number of pads times the capacitance of an individual pad. The analysis presented has a potential to diagnose the behavior of pivoted pad thrust bearings with the angle of tilt and the ratio of film thickness at the leading to trailing edge, by determining the variation of capacitance, resistance, and capacitive reactance.

  5. Synthesis of air-stable, volatile uranium(IV) and (VI) compounds and their gas-phase conversion to uranium oxide films.

    PubMed

    Appel, Linus; Leduc, Jennifer; Webster, Christopher L; Ziller, Joseph W; Evans, William J; Mathur, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    Four air-stable, volatile uranium heteroarylalkenolates have been synthesized and characterized by three synthetic approaches and their gas phase deposition to uranium oxide films has been examined. PMID:25537920

  6. Low thrust orbit determination program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, P. E.; Shults, G. L.; Huling, K. R.; Ratliff, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Logical flow and guidelines are provided for the construction of a low thrust orbit determination computer program. The program, tentatively called FRACAS (filter response analysis for continuously accelerating spacecraft), is capable of generating a reference low thrust trajectory, performing a linear covariance analysis of guidance and navigation processes, and analyzing trajectory nonlinearities in Monte Carlo fashion. The choice of trajectory, guidance and navigation models has been made after extensive literature surveys and investigation of previous software. A key part of program design relied upon experience gained in developing and using Martin Marietta Aerospace programs: TOPSEP (Targeting/Optimization for Solar Electric Propulsion), GODSEP (Guidance and Orbit Determination for SEP) and SIMSEP (Simulation of SEP).

  7. Growth of CdS thin films on indium coated glass substrates via chemical bath deposition and subsequent air annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Biswajit; Kumar, Kamlesh; Singh, Balwant Kr; Banerjee, Pushan; Das, Subrata

    2014-11-01

    In the present work attempts were made to synthesize indium doped CdS films by fabricating In/CdS bilayers using CBD-CdS on vacuum evaporated In thin films and subsequent air annealing. 135 nm CdS films were grown onto 20 nm and 35 nm indium coated glass substrate employing chemical bath deposition technique. The In/CdS bilayers thus formed were subjected to heat treatment at the temperatures between 200 and 400 °C for 4 min in the muffle furnace to facilitate indium to diffuse into the CdS films. XRD pattern ascertained no noticeable shift in lattice constant implying grain boundary metal segregation, while secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated the diffusion profile of indium into CdS matrices. Mass spectrometry results showed that substantial diffusion of indium had been taken place within CdS at 400 °C. Dark and photocurrent with different illumination time were measured to ascertain the photosensitivity of pure and composite CdS films.

  8. Controllable Growth of Perovskite Films by Room-Temperature Air Exposure for Efficient Planar Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Keum, Jong; Das, Sanjib; Puretzky, Alexander; Aytug, Tolga; Joshi, Pooran C.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2015-12-01

    A two-step-solution-processing approach has been established to grow void-free perovskite films for low-cost and high-performance planar heterojunction photovoltaic devices. We generally applied a high-temperature thermal annealing treatment in order to drive the diffusion of CH3NH3I precursor molecules into the compact PbI2 layer to form perovskite films. But, thermal annealing for extended periods would lead to degraded device performance due to the defects generated by decomposition of perovskite into PbI2. In this work, we explored a controllable layer-by-layer spin-coating method to grow bilayer CH3NH3I/PbI2 films, and then drive the interdiffusion between PbI2 and CH3NH3I layers by a simple room-temperature-air-exposure for making well-oriented, highly-crystalline perovskite films without thermal annealing. This high degree of crystallinity resulted in a carrier diffusion length of ~ 800 nm and high device efficiency of 15.6%, which is comparable to the reported values from thermally-annealed perovskite films based counterparts. Finally, the simplicity and high device performance of this processing approach is highly promising for direct integration into industrial-scale device manufacture.

  9. Controllable Growth of Perovskite Films by Room-Temperature Air Exposure for Efficient Planar Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Keum, Jong; Das, Sanjib; Puretzky, Alexander; Aytug, Tolga; Joshi, Pooran C.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Duscher, Gerd; et al

    2015-12-01

    A two-step-solution-processing approach has been established to grow void-free perovskite films for low-cost and high-performance planar heterojunction photovoltaic devices. We generally applied a high-temperature thermal annealing treatment in order to drive the diffusion of CH3NH3I precursor molecules into the compact PbI2 layer to form perovskite films. But, thermal annealing for extended periods would lead to degraded device performance due to the defects generated by decomposition of perovskite into PbI2. In this work, we explored a controllable layer-by-layer spin-coating method to grow bilayer CH3NH3I/PbI2 films, and then drive the interdiffusion between PbI2 and CH3NH3I layers by a simple room-temperature-air-exposure for makingmore » well-oriented, highly-crystalline perovskite films without thermal annealing. This high degree of crystallinity resulted in a carrier diffusion length of ~ 800 nm and high device efficiency of 15.6%, which is comparable to the reported values from thermally-annealed perovskite films based counterparts. Finally, the simplicity and high device performance of this processing approach is highly promising for direct integration into industrial-scale device manufacture.« less

  10. Parametric Investigation of Thrust Augmentation by Ejectors on a Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Sgondea, Alexandru; Paxson, Daniel E.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric investigation has been made of thrust augmentation of a 1 inch diameter pulsed detonation tube by ejectors. A set of ejectors was used which permitted variation of the ejector length, diameter, and nose radius, according to a statistical design of experiment scheme. The maximum augmentations for each ejector were fitted using a polynomial response surface, from which the optimum ejector diameters, and nose radius, were found. Thrust augmentations above a factor of 2 were measured. In these tests, the pulsed detonation device was run on approximately stoichiometric air-hydrogen mixtures, at a frequency of 20 Hz. Later measurements at a frequency of 40 Hz gave lower values of thrust augmentation. Measurements of thrust augmentation as a function of ejector entrance to detonation tube exit distance showed two maxima, one with the ejector entrance upstream, and one downstream, of the detonation tube exit. A thrust augmentation of 2.5 was observed using a tapered ejector.

  11. Air admixture to exhaust jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, Eugen

    1953-01-01

    The problem of thrust increase by air admixture to exhaust jets of rockets, turbojet, ram- and pulse-jet engines is investigated theoretically. The optimum ratio of mixing chamber pressure to ambient pressure and speed range for thrust increase due to air admixture is determined for each type of jet engine.

  12. The thrust minimization problem and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyukhin, A. V.; Petukhov, V. G.

    2015-07-01

    An indirect approach to the optimization of trajectories with finite thrust based on Pontryagin's maximum principle is discussed. The optimization is aimed at calculating the minimum thrust for a point-to-point flight completed within a given interval of time with a constant exhaust velocity and a constant power. This may help calculate the region of existence of the optimum trajectory with thrust switching: it is evident that the latter problem may be solved if minimum thrust is lower than or equal to the available thrust in the problem with switching. A technique for calculating the optimum trajectories with a finite thrust by solving the problem of minimization of the thrust acceleration with a subsequent numerical continuation with respect to the mass flow towards the thrust minimization problem is proposed. This technique offers an opportunity to detect degeneracies associated with the lack of thrust or specific impulse. In effect, it allows one to calculate the boundaries of the region of existence of trajectories with thrust switching and thus makes it possible to automate the process of solving the problem of optimization of trajectories with thrust switching.

  13. Low Temperature Fabrication of REBa2Cu3Oy Epitaxial Films on SrTiO3 (100) Substrate Prepared by Molten Hydroxide Method in 1-atm Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, S.; Yamada, Y.; Miyachi, Y.; Okunishi, R.

    In order to establish the fabrication method of high-Tc REBa2Cu3Oy (RE123) films by feasible simple system, we fabricated the RE123 films on SrTiO3 substrate by molten hydroxide method in low temperature and 1-atm air. Obtain films of RE-123 (RE = Gd, Eu, Sm) fabricated at low temperature of 525 °C show a c-axis orientation of RE123 and REBa2Cu4O8 phases. Moreover, the Nd-123 films show a bi-axial orientation of Nd123 single phase completely above 425 °C. The Tconset of Nd123 film fabricated at 525 °C denotes 67.1 K which was drastically lower compared with previous study of Nd123 single crystalline film, and Tconset of Nd123 films degrade with decreasing fabrication temperature. We can consider that the Nd/Ba substitution was caused by lowering the fabrication temperature.

  14. Band gap shift in the indium-tin-oxide films on polyethylene napthalate after thermal annealing in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, H.; Mayer, J. W.; Alford, T. L.

    2006-10-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films on polyethylene napthalate (PEN) with high carrier concentration (˜1021/cm3) have been grown by electron-beam deposition without the introduction of oxygen into the chamber. The electrical properties of the ITO films (such as, carrier concentration, electrical mobility, and resistivity) abruptly changed after annealing in the air atmospheres. In addition, optical transmittance and optical band gap values significantly changed after heat treatment. The optical band gap narrowing behavior is observed in the as-deposited sample because of impurity band and heavy carrier concentration. The influence of annealing in air on the electrical and optical properties of ITO/PEN samples can be explained by the change in the free electron concentration, which is evaluated in terms of the oxygen content. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses are used to determine the oxygen content in the film. Hall effect measurements are used to determine the dependence of electrical properties on oxygen content.

  15. Modular multi-engine thrust control assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a modular thrust control lever assembly for controling forward/reverse thrust generated by an aircraft engine. It includes an electric/electronic engine thrust control system, an inhibit mechanism for preventing inadverent or premature establishment of at least one of forward and reverse engine thrust. It consists of a (a) housing; (b) a control lever assembly pivotally mounted within the housing for fore and aft pivotal movement in a single vertical plane; (c) movable inhibit mechanism normally mounted in the path of movement of the laterally projecting roller on the control lever assembly between at least one of the maximum thrust limit positions of the assembly and the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (d) a electric/electronic engine thrust control system including an mechanism for reconfiguring the thrust controls of the engine upon movement of the thrust control lever assembly to the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (e) a mechanism responsive to the output signal for shifting the inhibit mechanism out of the path of movement of the control lever assembly.

  16. Ag-Cu nanoalloyed film as a high-performance cathode electrocatalytic material for zinc-air battery.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yimin; Chen, Fuyi; Jin, Yachao; Liu, Zongwen

    2015-01-01

    A novel Ag50Cu50 film electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The electrocatalyst actually is Ag-Cu alloyed nanoparticles embedded in amorphous Cu film, based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization. The rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements provide evidence that the ORR proceed via a four-electron pathway on the electrocatalysts in alkaline solution. And it is much more efficient than pure Ag catalyst. The catalytic layer has maximum power density of 67 mW cm(-2) and an acceptable cell voltage at 0.863 V when current densities increased up to 100 mA cm(-2) in the Ag50Cu50-based primary zinc-air battery. The resulting rechargeable zinc-air battery exhibits low charge-discharge voltage polarization of 1.1 V at 20 mAcm(-2) and high durability over 100 cycles in natural air. PMID:25977668

  17. Effect of air post contamination on mechanical properties of amorphous carbon nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lejeune, M.; Benlahsen, M.; Lemoine, P.

    2005-08-01

    We report in this study the mechanical, structural and compositional characteristics of amorphous carbon nitride films (a-CN x) deposited on Si(100) using RF magnetron sputtering of graphite targets in pure nitrogen and under different RF powers. The properties of the films were determined in their as deposited state using nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), elastic recoil detection (ERDA), infrared (IR) absorption and Raman spectroscopy. The mechanical properties were obtained combining nanoindentation and residual stress measurements. The presence of various types of C-N bonds, as well as the post-deposition contamination of the deposited films by oxygen and water (voids) is revealed. The measured hardness and Young modulus were 0.9-2.03 and 23-27 GPa, respectively. These results have been analysed in term of the matrix flexibility which results from the nitrogen content and the porous character of the films, which can affect deeply the estimation of the physical-mechanical properties of the films.

  18. Studies on 2D hybrid films of half surfactant-covered Au nanoparticles at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Pang, Shufeng; Tetsuya, Oikawa; Tomoyuki, Watanabe; Kondo, Takeshi; Kawai, Takeshi

    2005-05-15

    A hybrid monolayer film of Au nanoparticles, half-covered with dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC), was prepared at the air/water interface and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), a quartz-crystal microbalance, and infrared spectra measurements. TEM images of the hybrid film showed that the distribution of Au nanoparticles depends on the surface density of DODAC and reaction time. IR spectral data provided evidence for a surface-enhanced effect of the Au nanoparticles. The wavenumber of CH(2)-stretch vibrations of DODAC in the infrared external reflection spectra revealed that the DODAC molecules were adsorbed onto the Au nanoparticles in a close-packed crystalline state for any surface density of DODAC, which is different from the usual behavior of Langmuir monolayers. PMID:15837481

  19. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  20. On Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Marty

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the role of window films in enhancing indoor air quality in schools. Historically, window film has been used to reduce temperatures in buildings prone to overheating. Too much solar energy entering through windows makes occupants uncomfortable and air conditioning more costly. Film has been a simple solution…

  1. Synthesis of perm-selective membranes by grafting acrylic acid into air-irradiated Teflon-FEP films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzi, Annick; Chapiro, Adolphe

    Grafting acrylic acid into air-irradiated Teflon-FEP films was investigated. Pre-irradiation doses ranged from 0.5 to 10 kGy. Grafting occurred at 45 or 60°C. Homopolymerization inhibitors, ferrous ions or methylene blue, were added to the system. It was found that after completion of the reaction, within 40-100 min, membranes were obtained with very low electric resistivities. The influence of added inhibitors, pre-irradiation dose and grafting temperature was studied. From the results it is concluded that the initiating centers in air-irradiated Teflon-FEP are, on the one hand, peroxides of structure POOP', in which P is a polymeric radical and Pprime; a small fragment, and on the other trapped PO .2 radicals. The latter only react after losing their oxygen. In the presence of polymerization inhibitors, initiation involves a redox process which reduces the overall activation energy.

  2. Air-stable n-type organic thin-film transistor array and high gain complementary inverter on flexible substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisaki, Yoshihide; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Kumaki, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Tokito, Shizuo; Kono, Takahiro; Nishida, Jun-ichi; Yamashita, Yoshiro

    2010-09-01

    Air-stable n-type organic thin-film transistor (TFT) arrays and a complementary inverter circuit were fabricated on a flexible substrate. A benzobis(thiadiazole) (BBT) derivative-based TFT showed excellent air- stability and performances such as an electron mobility of over 0.1 cm2/V s, a large ON/OFF ratio over 108 when combined with a cross-linkable olefin-type polymer gate dielectric. In addition, an organic complementary inverter that combined the BBT derivative and a pentacene TFT demonstrated a sharp switching behavior and a high gain of over 150. We attribute these excellent characteristics to a combination of the low-lying lowest unoccupied molecular orbital level of n-type semiconductor material and the low interface trap of the gate dielectric.

  3. Internal-liquid-film-cooling Experiments with Air-stream Temperatures to 2000 Degrees F. in 2- and 4-inch-diameter Horizontal Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, George R; Abramson, Andrew E; Sloop, John L

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the effectiveness of liquid-cooling films on the inner surfaces of tubes containing flowing hot air. Experiments were made in 2- and 4-inch-diameter straight metal tubes with air flows at temperatures from 600 degrees to 2000 degrees F. and diameter Reynolds numbers from 2.2 to 14 x 10(5). The film coolant, water, was injected around the circumference at a single axial position on the tubes at flow rates from 0.02 to .24 pound per second per foot of tube circumference (0.8 to 12 percent of the air flow). Liquid-coolant films were established and maintained around and along the tube wall in concurrent flow with the hot air. The results indicated that, in order to film cool a given surface area with as little coolant flow as possible, it may be necessary to limit the flow of coolant introduced at a single axial position and to introduce it at several axial positions. The flow rate of inert coolant required to maintain liquid-film cooling over a given area of tube surface can be estimated when the gas-flow conditions are known by means of a generalized plot of the film-cooling data.

  4. Weakening inside incipient thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Oliot, E.

    2013-12-01

    In fold-and-thrust belts, shortening is mainly accommodated by thrust faults that nucleate along décollement levels. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that these faults might be weak because of a combination of processes such as pressure-solution, phyllosilicates reorientation and delamination, and fluid pressurization. In this study we aim to decipher the processes and the kinetics responsible for weakening of tectonic décollements. We studied the Millaris thrust (Southern Pyrenees): a fault representative of a décollement in its incipient stage. This fault accommodated a total shortening of about 30 meters and is constituted by a 10m thick, intensively foliated phyllonite developed inside a homogeneous marly unit. Detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses have been carried out to characterize the mineralogical change, the chemical transfers and volume change in the fault zone compared to non-deformed parent sediments. We also carried out microstructural analysis on natural and experimentally deformed rocks. Illite and chlorite are the main hydrous minerals. Inside fault zone, illite minerals are oriented along the schistosity whereas chlorite coats the shear surfaces. Mass balance calculations demonstrated a volume loss of up to 50% for calcite inside fault zone (and therefore a relative increase of phyllosilicates contents) because of calcite pressure solution mechanisms. We performed friction experiments in a biaxial deformation apparatus using intact rocks sheared in the in-situ geometry from the Millaris fault and its host sediments. We imposed a range of normal stresses (10 to 50 MPa), sliding velocity steps (3-100 μm/s) and slide-hold slide sequences (3 to 1000 s hold) under saturated conditions. Mechanical results demonstrate that both fault rocks and parent sediments are weaker than average geological materials (friction μ<<0.6) and have velocity-strengthening behavior because of the presence of phyllosilicate horizons. Fault rocks are

  5. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators Thrust-Measurement Methodology Incorporating New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a large diameter, grounded, metal sleeve.

  6. Characteristics of TiO2 Thin Film Surfaces Treated by Helium and Air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Retsuo; Niibe, Masahito; Takeichi, Atsushi; Mori, Yuta; Konishi, Masashi; Kotaka, Takuya; Matsunaga, Fumihiko; Takasaki, Toshihide; Kitano, Takanori; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Inaoka, Takeshi; Tominaga, Kikuo

    2012-08-01

    The characteristics of TiO2 thin film surfaces treated with He and air dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasmas at different gas pressures are investigated. There is a difference between the two DBD plasma characteristics: for He-DBD, which is an atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD), the breakdown voltage and discharge current hardly change with increasing gas pressure, whereas for air-DBD, which is basically a filamentary discharge, they increase with increasing gas pressure. There is also a difference between the characteristics of TiO2 surfaces treated with the two DBDs. The surface roughness for He-DBD is lower than the roughness of the as-grown surface, whereas that for air-DBD is higher. The surface hydrophilicity for He-DBD is more enhanced than the hydrophilicity of the as-grown surface regardless of UV irradiation. The hydrophilicity for air-DBD is dependent on UV irradiation. It is more enhanced with UV irradiation; it is not improved adequately without UV irradiation.

  7. Analysis of heat and mass transfer between air and falling film desiccant for different flow configurations in the presence of ultrafine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ahmad A.

    This work focuses on the enhancement of heat and mass transfer between air and falling desiccant film for different flow channel configurations. Cu-Ultrafine particles are added to the desiccant film to investigate the enhancement in heat and mass transfer between air and desiccant film for dehumidification and cooling processes of the air and regeneration of desiccant film. A detailed comparative study between parallel and counter flow channels is performed using a parametric study to investigate the enhancements in dehumidification, cooling, and regeneration processes in terms of the pertinent parameters. The results reveal that the parallel flow arrangement provides better dehumidification and cooling for the air than the counter flow channel for a wide range of parameters. Next, the inclined parallel and counter flow configurations are investigated using an Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) and successive over-relaxation methods to discretize the vorticity and stream-function equations, respectively. A parametric study is employed to investigate the inclination angle effects in enhancing the heat and mass transfer in terms of the controlling parameters. It is shown that inclination angle plays a significant role in enhancing the dehumidification, cooling, and regeneration processes. Finally, the enhancements in heat and mass transfer in cross flow channel between air and desiccant film is examined based on a parametric study to investigate the dehumidification and cooling processes of the air in terms of the pertinent controlling parameters. These parameters are air and desiccant Reynolds numbers, dimensions of the channel, volume fraction of Cu-ultrafine particles, and thermal dispersion effects. It is found that an increase in the Cu-volume fraction increases dehumidification and cooling capabilities and produce more stable Cu-desiccant film.

  8. The Beaufort Sea fold-and-thrust belt, northwestern Canada: Implications for thrust-belt evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Root, K.G. )

    1991-06-01

    The northeasternmost segment of the Cordilleran thrust belt of western North American underlies the Beaufort Sea continental margin. Folds and associated northesat-directed thrusts in this region formed synchronously with Tertiary sedimentation. As a result, the times of fold development can be determined from reflection seismic data by analyzing lateral thickness changes in stratigraphic sequences of known ages, and onlap and truncation relationships at unconformities. Thrust faulting occurred throughout the late Paleocene-Pliocene. The abundant temporal data indicate the deformational seuqence was significantly differet from the simple, steplike, foreland-propagating model formulated in other less well-dated thrust belts. Many thrusts were active simultaneously, especially during the late Eocnee, when the region of active thrusting had an across-strike width of greater than 200 km. This observation calls into question the popular concept that only one thrust moves at a time as a thrust belt develops. The thrust belt propagated along, as well as across, strike. During the late Paleocene-middle Eocene, the area of active thrusting was bounded on the southeast by poorly imaged zones of right-lateral strike-slip faults that apparently are the northern offshore continuation of the Rapid fault array. The change in the age of thrusting along strike results in no obvious geometrical anomalies and could not be deduced without timing information. This has an important implication: temporal data cannot necessarily be projected along strike in a thrust belt.

  9. Low thrust rocket test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    A low thrust chemical rocket test facility has recently become operational at the NASA-Lewis. The new facility is used to conduct both long duration and performance tests at altitude over a thruster's operating envelope using hydrogen and oxygen gas for propellants. The facility provides experimental support for a broad range of objectives, including fundamental modeling of fluids and combustion phenomena, the evaluation of thruster components, and life testing of full rocket designs. The major mechanical and electrical systems are described along with aspects of the various optical diagnostics available in the test cell. The electrical and mechanical systems are designed for low down time between tests and low staffing requirements for test operations. Initial results are also presented which illustrate the various capabilities of the cell.

  10. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  11. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    A technology program aimed at improving the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft onboard applications is reviewed. Navier-Stokes analyses of low Reynolds number rocket flows have been compared with local flow property measurements obtained using Rayleigh and Raman diagnostics in a 100 N gaseous hydrogen/gaseous oxygen rocket. It is indicated that computational domain should include the near injector flow and that the shear layer combustion model needs improvement. The system analyses and technical efforts intended to develop a technology base for higher performance propellants are presented. A LOX/hydrazine engine is demonstrated to have a 95 percent theoretical c-star which translates into a projected vacuum specific impulse of 345 seconds at an area ratio of 204:1.

  12. Fabrication of air-stable n-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible substrates using bilayer dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanhong; Li, Qunqing; Jin, Yuanhao; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Kaili; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-11-14

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed charges in the ALD layer. The key advantage of the method is the relatively low temperature (120 or 90 °C) required here for the ALD process because we need not employ this step to totally remove the absorbates on the SWNTs. This advantage facilitates the integration of both p-type and n-type transistors through a simple lift off process and compact CMOS inverters were demonstrated. We also demonstrated that the doping of SWNTs in the channel plays a more important role than the Schottky barriers at the metal contacts in carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, unlike the situation in individual SWNT-based transistors. PMID:26451806

  13. Effects of air annealing on CdS quantum dots thin film grown at room temperature by CBD technique intended for photosensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Shaheed U.; Desale, Dipalee J.; Siddiqui, Farha Y.; Ghosh, Arindam; Birajadar, Ravikiran B.; Ghule, Anil V.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of different intensities (40, 60 100 and 200 W) of light on CdS quantum dots thin film annealed at 350 °C indicating enhancement in (a) photo-current and (b) photosensitivity. Highlights: ► The preparation of CdS nanodot thin film at room temperature by M-CBD technique. ► Study of air annealing on prepared CdS nanodots thin film. ► The optimized annealing temperature for CdS nanodot thin film is 350 °C. ► Modified CdS thin films can be used in photosensor application. -- Abstract: CdS quantum dots thin-films have been deposited onto the glass substrate at room temperature using modified chemical bath deposition technique. The prepared thin films were further annealed in air atmosphere at 150, 250 and 350 °C for 1 h and subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, electrical resistivity and I–V system. The modifications observed in morphology and opto-electrical properties of the thin films are presented.

  14. Thrust bolting: roof bolt support apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tadolini, Stephen C.; Dolinar, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    A method of installing a tensioned roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads by applying thrust to the bolt (19) as the bonding material (7') is curing to compress the strata (3) surrounding the borehole (1), and then relieving the thrust when the bonding material (7') has cured.

  15. Pulsed thrust measurements using laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubbin, E. A.; Ziemer, J. K.; Choueiri, E. Y.; Jahn, R. G.

    1997-06-01

    An optical interferometric proximeter system (IPS) for measuring thrust and impulse bit of pulsed electric thrusters was developed. Unlike existing thrust stands, the IPS-based thrust stand offers the advantage of a single system that can yield electromagnetic interference-free, high accuracy (<2% error) thrust measurements within a very wide range of impulses (100 μN s to above 10 N s) covering the impulse range of all known pulsed plasma thrusters. In addition to pulsed thrusters, the IPS is theoretically shown to be capable of measuring steady-state thrust values as low as 20 μN for microthrusters such as the field emission electric propulsion thruster. The IPS-based thrust stand relies on measuring the dynamic response of a swinging arm using a two-sensor laser interferometer with 10 nm position accuracy. The wide application of the thrust stand is demonstrated with thrust measurements of an ablative pulsed plasma thruster and a quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thruster.

  16. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Thrust reversers. 33.97 Section 33.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If...

  17. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Thrust reversers. 33.97 Section 33.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If...

  18. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Thrust reversers. 33.97 Section 33.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If...

  19. Solar-electric propulsion breadboard thrust subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, T. D.

    1972-01-01

    A solar-electric propulsion breadboard thrust subsystem has been designed, built, and tested. A 1500-h test was performed to demonstrate the functional capabilities of the subsystem. Described are the subsystem functions and testing process. The results show that the ground work has been established for development of an engineering model of the thrust subsystem.

  20. Thrust-Vector Deflectors For Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soong, William C.

    1990-01-01

    Rotating shield steers thrust in desired direction. Report discusses use of thrust-vector deflectors (TVD's) to enhance controllability and reduce number of small rocket engines (thrustors) needed to control attitudes of artificial satellites. Developed in aircraft industry for use in jet engines. Principal advantages gained, lower cost and greater simplicity.

  1. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  2. Mu rhythm desynchronization by tongue thrust observation

    PubMed Central

    Sakihara, Kotoe; Inagaki, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the mu rhythm in the sensorimotor area during tongue thrust observation and to obtain an answer to the question as to how subtle non-verbal orofacial movement observation activates the sensorimotor area. Ten healthy volunteers performed finger tap execution, tongue thrust execution, and tongue thrust observation. The electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 128 electrodes placed on the scalp, and regions of interest were set at sensorimotor areas. The event-related desynchronization (ERD) and event-related synchronization (ERS) for the mu rhythm (8–13 Hz) and beta (13−25 Hz) bands were measured. Tongue thrust observation induced mu rhythm ERD, and the ERD was detected at the left hemisphere regardless whether the observed tongue thrust was toward the left or right. Mu rhythm ERD was also recorded during tongue thrust execution. However, temporal analysis revealed that the ERD associated with tongue thrust observation preceded that associated with execution by approximately 2 s. Tongue thrust observation induces mu rhythm ERD in sensorimotor cortex with left hemispheric dominance. PMID:26441599

  3. Reverse-thrust technology for variable-pitch fan propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Schaefer, J. W.; Dietrich, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Tests conducted to develop the technology necessary to meet the unique reverse-thrust performance requirements of a variable pitch fan propulsion system are discussed. The losses and distortion associated with the air entering the fan and core compressor from the rear of the engine, the direction of fan blade pitch rotation for best reverse-thrust aeroacoustic performance, and engine response and operating characteristics during forward- to reverse-thrust transients are among the factors studied. The test results of several scale fan models as well as a full-size variable pitch fan engine are summarized. Results show the following: a flared exhaust nozzle makes a good reverse-thrust inlet; acceptable core inlet duct recovery and distortion levels in reverse flow were demonstrated; adequate thrust levels were achieved; forward- to reverse-thrust response time achieved was better than the goal; thrust and noise levels strongly favor reverse through feather pitch; and finally, flight-type inlets make the establishment of reverse flow more difficult.

  4. Computational Investigation of Fluidic Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Deere, Karen A.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study of fluidic counterflow thrust vectoring has been conducted. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were run using the computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D with two-equation turbulence closure and linear Reynolds stress modeling. For validation, computational results were compared to experimental data obtained at the NASA Langley Jet Exit Test Facility. In general, computational results were in good agreement with experimental performance data, indicating that efficient thrust vectoring can be obtained with low secondary flow requirements (less than 1% of the primary flow). An examination of the computational flowfield has revealed new details about the generation of a countercurrent shear layer, its relation to secondary suction, and its role in thrust vectoring. In addition to providing new information about the physics of counterflow thrust vectoring, this work appears to be the first documented attempt to simulate the counterflow thrust vectoring problem using computational fluid dynamics.

  5. Oxygen/Alcohol Dual Thrust RCS Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angstadt, Tara; Hurlbert, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A non-toxic dual thrust RCS engine offers significant operational, safety, and performance advantages to the space shuttle and the next generation RLVs. In this concept, a single engine produces two thrust levels of 25 and 870 lbf. The low thrust level is provided by the spark torch igniter, which, with the addition of 2 extra valves, can also be made to function as a vernier. A dual thrust RCS engine allows 38 verniers to be packaged more efficiently on a vehicle. These 38 vemiers improve translation and reduce cross coupling, thereby providing more pure roll, pitch, and yaw maneuvers of the vehicle. Compared to the 6 vemiers currently on the shuttle, the 38 dual thrust engines would be 25 to 40% more efficient for the same maneuvers and attitude control. The vernier thrust level also reduces plume impingement and contamination concerns. Redundancy is also improved, thereby improving mission success reliability. Oxygen and ethanol are benign propellants which do not create explosive reaction products or contamination, as compared to hypergolic propellants. These characteristics make dual-thrust engines simpler to implement on a non-toxic reaction control system. Tests at WSTF in August 1999 demonstrated a dual-thrust concept that is successful with oxygen and ethanol. Over a variety of inlet pressures and mixture ratios at 22:1 area ratio, the engine produced between 230 and 297 sec Isp, and thrust levels from 8 lbf. to 50 lbf. This paper describes the benefits of dual-thrust engines and the recent results from tests at WSTF.

  6. Note: Radial-thrust combo metal mesh foil bearing for microturbomachinery.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Choi, Sang Kyu; Hong, Doo Euy; Yoon, Tae Gwang; Lee, Sung Hwi

    2013-10-01

    This Note proposes a novel radial-thrust combo metal mesh foil bearing (MMFB). Although MMFBs have advantages such as higher stiffness and damping over conventional air foil bearings, studies related to MMFBs have been limited to radial MMFBs. The novel combo MMFB is composed of a radial top foil, thrust top foils, and a ring-shaped metal mesh damper--fabricated by compressing a copper wire mesh--with metal mesh thrust pads for the thrust bearing at both side faces. In this study, the combo MMFB was fabricated in half-split type to support the rotor for a micro gas turbine generator. The manufacture and assembly process for the half-split-type combo MMFB is presented. In addition, to verify the proposed combo MMFB, motoring test results up to 250,000 rpm and axial displacements as a function of rotational speed are presented. PMID:24182175

  7. Note: Radial-thrust combo metal mesh foil bearing for microturbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Choi, Sang Kyu; Hong, Doo Euy; Yoon, Tae Gwang; Lee, Sung Hwi

    2013-10-01

    This Note proposes a novel radial-thrust combo metal mesh foil bearing (MMFB). Although MMFBs have advantages such as higher stiffness and damping over conventional air foil bearings, studies related to MMFBs have been limited to radial MMFBs. The novel combo MMFB is composed of a radial top foil, thrust top foils, and a ring-shaped metal mesh damper—fabricated by compressing a copper wire mesh—with metal mesh thrust pads for the thrust bearing at both side faces. In this study, the combo MMFB was fabricated in half-split type to support the rotor for a micro gas turbine generator. The manufacture and assembly process for the half-split-type combo MMFB is presented. In addition, to verify the proposed combo MMFB, motoring test results up to 250 000 rpm and axial displacements as a function of rotational speed are presented.

  8. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti3+, Ti4+, O2−, oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift. PMID:27572095

  9. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti(3+) state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti(3+), Ti(4+), O(2-), oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift. PMID:27572095

  10. Influence of air/N2 treatment on the structural, morphological and optoelectronic traits of nanostructured ZnO:Mn thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoupour, E.; Abdolahzadeh Ziabari, A.; Andarva, H.; Ghodsi, F. E.

    2014-01-01

    Nanocrystalline ZnO:Mn thin films have been prepared by sol-gel dip-coating method. The content of Mn in sol was varied from 0 to 12 wt%. The influence of Mn concentration and annealing ambient (i.e. air and nitrogen) on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of ZnO thin films were studied by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-visible spectroscopy and Hall Effect measurements. XRD results show that the films have hexagonal wurtzite structure and the crystallite size varies between 38 and 10 nm. The samples annealed in nitrogen indicate better crystallinity than those annealed in air. SEM results revealed that the surface smoothness of the films improved at higher content of Mn. AFM measurements exhibit that the RMS roughness of the samples reduces with Mn concentration. In comparison with air ambient, the electrical mobility improved with annealing in nitrogen. Meanwhile, it was found that introducing Mn decreased the electrical conductivity. The optical transparency and band gap of the doped films decreased with Mn doping. The band gap variation of the films due to Mn doping was discussed in details.

  11. Photoinduced Directional Motions of Microparticles at Air-Liquid-Crystal Interfaces of Azobenzene-Doped Liquid-Crystal Films with Homeotropic or Homogeneous Alignment Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the effects of liquid-crystal (LC) alignments on photoinduced motions of microparticles at air-LC interfaces of azobenzene-doped LC films. In homeotropically aligned LC films, the lattice spacings of pseudo-hexagonal structures of microparticles site-selectively exhibited reversible expansion or contraction on alternating irradiation with ultraviolet and visible light. The particle motions were probably driven by photochemical deformation of LC surfaces. In homogeneously aligned films, alternating irradiation induced macroscopic convective flows followed by rapid gathering or dispersion of linear chains of microparticles. Particle motions were significantly influenced by LC alignments as well as the light wavelength.

  12. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  13. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel having the configuration of an assembly having a combustion chamber portion connected to a nozzle portion through a throat portion is wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The width of the tape is positioned at an angle of 30 to 50 deg. to the axis of the mandrel such that one edge of the tape contacts the mandrel while the other edge is spaced from the mandrel. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined to provide a frusto-conical surface extending at an angle of 15 to 30 deg. with respect to the axis of the mandrel for starting a second wrap on the mandrel to cover the throat portion. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape having its width positioned at a angle of 5 to 20 deg. from the axis of the mandrel. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined to provide a smooth outer surface. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  14. Collar nut and thrust ring

    DOEpatents

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  15. Insulated Engine, 100-Pound Thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, N. R.

    1966-01-01

    The design and test results of an insulated, 100-pound thrust engine capable of delivering high performance, providing long, steady state and pulse mode endurance, and maintaining a low outside surface temperature of 4000 F, are presented. Included are descriptions of the injector designs and insulation materials investigated, plus a discussion of the thermal analysis and test results. Continuous operation in excess of 29 minutes, and start capability in excess of 4900 pulses, have been demonstrated. To allow the use of available chamber materials and coating systems under insulated conditions, the major challenge to the designer was to define an injector design that would provide gas temperatures and performance of a predetermined value. The solution was the development of an unbalanced, 8-element triplet injector having an unequal fuel distribution within each element, capable of providing a specific impulse in excess of 290 pounds at reduced wall temperatures. The design consists of a columbium chamber and nozzle utilizing a silicide coating, a columbium injector, a composite insulation system of aluminum oxide

  16. Thrust Characteristics of Multiple Lifting Jets in Ground Proximity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davenport, Edwin E.; Spreeman, Kenneth P.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation has been made to determine the thrust characteristics within ground proximity of a series of models which might represent vertical take-off-and-landing (VTOL) aircraft with multiple exit jet engines exhausting vertically downward beneath a lifting surface. Variations in simulated engine configurations were provided by a series of nozzle insert plugs in which the number of jet exits, located symmetrically on a fixed circle, was varied, or the diameter of the circle was varied for a given number of jet exits. represent lifting surfaces, and high-pressure air was used to simulate jet-engine exhaust. Plywood plates were used to The results of the investigation showed that increasing the number of exits, such that an annular jet configuration was approached, provided more favorable thrust characteristics within ground proximity than any other variation in the geometry of these multiple jets. Tests of a configuration with two nozzles approximating a fan-in-wing VTOL aircraft with fans located at different spanwise locations indicated that the augmentation in thrust within ground proximity was greater for the arrangement with the more inboard location of the nozzles.

  17. Phases, line tension and pattern formation in molecularly thin films at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pritam

    A Langmuir film, which is a molecularly thin insoluble film on a liquid substrate, is one practical realization of a quasi-two dimensional matter. The major advantages of this system for the study of phase separation and phase co-existence are (a) it allows accurate control of the components and molecular area of the film and (b) it can be studied by various methods that require very flat films. Phase separation in molecularly thin films plays an important role in a range of systems from biomembranes to biosensors. For example, phase-separated lipid nano-domains in biomembranes are thought to play crucial roles in membrane function. I use Brewster Angel Microscopy (BAM) coupled with Fluorescence Microscopy (FM) and static Light Scattering Microscopy (LSM) to image phases and patterns within Langmuir films. The three microscopic techniques --- BAM, FM and LSM --- are complimentary to each other, providing distinct sets of information. They allow direct comparison with literature results in lipid systems. I have quantitatively validated the use of detailed hydrodynamic simulations to determine line tension in monolayers. Line tension decreases as temperature rises. This decrease gives us information on the entropy associated with the line, and thus about line structure. I carefully consider the thermodynamics of line energy and entropy to make this connection. In the longer run, LSM will be exploited to give us further information about line structure. I have also extended the technique by testing it on domains within the curved surface of a bilayer vesicle. I also note that in the same way that the presence of surface-active agents, known as surfactants, affects surface energy, the addiction of line active agents alters the inter-phase line energy. Thus my results set to stage to systematically study the influence of line active agents ---'linactants' --- on the inter-phase line energy. Hierarchal self-assembled chiral patterns were observed as a function of

  18. Humidity-dependent compression-induced glass transition of the air-water interfacial Langmuir films of poly(D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid) (PLGA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Jung, Hyunjung; Choi, Yun Hwa; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Bang, Joona; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-07-28

    Constant rate compression isotherms of the air-water interfacial Langmuir films of poly(D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid) (PLGA) show a distinct feature of an exponential increase in surface pressure in the high surface polymer concentration regime. We have previously demonstrated that this abrupt increase in surface pressure is linked to the glass transition of the polymer film, but the detailed mechanism of this process is not fully understood. In order to obtain a molecular-level understanding of this behavior, we performed extensive characterizations of the surface mechanical, structural and rheological properties of Langmuir PLGA films at the air-water interface, using combined experimental techniques including the Langmuir film balance, X-ray reflectivity and double-wall-ring interfacial rheometry methods. We observed that the mechanical and structural responses of the Langmuir PLGA films are significantly dependent on the rate of film compression; the glass transition was induced in the PLGA film only at fast compression rates. Surprisingly, we found that this deformation rate dependence is also dependent on the humidity of the environment. With water acting as a plasticizer for the PLGA material, the diffusion of water molecules through the PLGA film seems to be the key factor in the determination of the glass transformation properties and thus the mechanical response of the PLGA film against lateral compression. Based on our combined results, we hypothesize the following mechanism for the compression-induced glass transformation of the Langmuir PLGA film; (1) initially, a humidified/non-glassy PLGA film is formed in the full surface-coverage region (where the surface pressure shows a plateau) during compression; (2) further compression leads to the collapse of the PLGA chains and the formation of new surfaces on the air side of the film, and this newly formed top layer of the PLGA film is transiently glassy in character because the water evaporation rate

  19. Pulsed Ejector Thrust Amplification Tested and Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack

    2004-01-01

    There is currently much interest in pulsed detonation engines for aeronautical propulsion. This, in turn, has sparked renewed interest in pulsed ejectors to increase the thrust of such engines, since previous, though limited, research had indicated that pulsed ejectors could double the thrust in a short device. An experiment has been run at the NASA Glenn Research Center, using a shrouded Hartmann-Sprenger tube as a source of pulsed flow, to measure the thrust augmentation of a statistically designed set of ejectors. A Hartmann- Sprenger tube directs the flow from a supersonic nozzle (Mach 2 in the present experiment) into a closed tube. Under appropriate conditions, an oscillation is set up in which the jet flow alternately fills the tube and then spills around flow emerging from the tube. The tube length determines the frequency of oscillation. By shrouding the tube, the flow was directed out of the shroud as an axial stream. The set of ejectors comprised three different ejector lengths, three ejector diameters, and three nose radii. The thrust of the jet alone, and then of the jet plus ejector, was measured using a thrust plate. The arrangement is shown in this photograph. Thrust augmentation is defined as the thrust of the jet with an ejector divided by the thrust of the jet alone. The experiments exhibited an optimum ejector diameter and length for maximizing the thrust augmentation, but little dependence on nose radius. Different frequencies were produced by changing the length of the Hartmann-Sprenger tube, and the experiment was run at a total of four frequencies. Additional measurements showed that the major feature of the pulsed jet was a starting vortex ring. The size of the vortex ring depended on the frequency, as did the optimum ejector diameter.

  20. Interaction of hot swirling air and liquid film flow in airblast atomizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Wolfgang W.; Bendisch, Holger; Eickhoff, Heinrich; Thiele, Frank

    The flowfield in an airblast atomizer of the prefilming type is studied numerically. Special attention is drawn to the flow near the liquid film surface, which is calculated using a boundary-layer method. Thereby near-wall effects (e.g., evaporation) are exactly accounted for. The main nozzle flow is calculated using the Navier-Stokes equations. Both systems are linked by the boundary conditions. The results for an airblast atomizer with adjacent combustion chamber show significant differences between coupled and uncoupled calculations. It is shown that the detailed modeling of the film and the coupled calculation, which accounts exactly for boundary-layer effects including evaporation, is essential for accurate simulations.

  1. Rocket thrust variation with foamed liquid propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrell, G

    1957-01-01

    An analysis is presented on a method for varying rocket thrust by varying the bulk density of the propellants. This density variation was accomplished by uniformly dispersing an inert, insoluble gas in the liquid propellants. Only qualitative agreement with theory was obtained from preliminary experiments with a 1000-pound-thrust ammonia - nitric acid rocket engine; the required experimental gas-flow rates were two to six times greater than those predicted by theory. It was demonstrated, however, that this method of rocket-thrust variation is feasible.

  2. Low-thrust chemical orbit transfer propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelouch, J. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The need for large structures in high orbit is reported in terms of the many mission opportunities which require such structures. Mission and transportation options for large structures are presented, and it is shown that low-thrust propulsion is an enabling requirement for some missions and greatly enhancing to many others. Electric and low-thrust chemical propulsion are compared, and the need for an requirements of low-thrust chemical propulsion are discussed in terms of the interactions that are perceived to exist between the propulsion system and the large structure.

  3. Simulated afterburner performance with hydrogen peroxide injection for thrust augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, Allen J; Grobman, Jack S

    1956-01-01

    Combustion performance of three afterburner configurations was evaluated at simulated altitude flight conditions with liquid augmentation to the primary combustor. Afterburner combustion efficiency and stability were better with injection of high-strength hydrogen peroxide than with no injection or with water injection. Improvements were observed in afterburner configurations with and without flameholders and in a short-length afterburner. At a peroxide-air ratio of 0.3, combustion was stable and 85 to 90 percent efficient in all configurations tested. Calculated augmented net-thrust ratios for peroxide injection with afterburning were approximately 60 percent greater than those for water injection.

  4. Gold-on-Polymer-Based Sensing Films for Detection of Organic and Inorganic Analytes in the Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, Kenneth; Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Kisor, Adam; Shevade, Abhijit; Jewell, April; Zhou, Hanying

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses gold-on-polymer as one of the novel sensor types developed for part of the sensor development task. Standard polymer-carbon composite sensors used in the JPL Electronic Nose (ENose) have been modified by evaporating 15 nm of metallic gold on the surface. These sensors have been shown to respond to alcohols, aromatics, ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and elemental mercury in the parts-per-million and parts-per-billion concentration ranges in humidified air. The results have shown good sensitivity of these films operating under mild conditions (operating temperatures 23-28 C and regeneration temperature up to 40 C). This unique sensor combines the diversity of polymer sensors for chemical sensing with their response to a wide variety of analytes with the specificity of a gold sensor that shows strong reaction/binding with selected analyte types, such as mercury or sulfur.

  5. Fabrication of air-stable n-type carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible substrates using bilayer dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guanhong; Li, Qunqing; Jin, Yuanhao; Zhao, Yudan; Xiao, Xiaoyang; Jiang, Kaili; Wang, Jiaping; Fan, Shoushan

    2015-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed charges in the ALD layer. The key advantage of the method is the relatively low temperature (120 or 90 °C) required here for the ALD process because we need not employ this step to totally remove the absorbates on the SWNTs. This advantage facilitates the integration of both p-type and n-type transistors through a simple lift off process and compact CMOS inverters were demonstrated. We also demonstrated that the doping of SWNTs in the channel plays a more important role than the Schottky barriers at the metal contacts in carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, unlike the situation in individual SWNT-based transistors.Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) thin-film transistors hold great potential for flexible electronics. However, fabrication of air-stable n-type devices by methods compatible with standard photolithography on flexible substrates is challenging. Here, we demonstrated that by using a bilayer dielectric structure of MgO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 or HfO2, air-stable n-type devices can be obtained. The mechanism for conduction type conversion was elucidated and attributed to the hole depletion in SWNT, the decrease of the trap state density by MgO assimilating adsorbed water molecules in the vicinity of SWNT, and the energy band bending because of the positive fixed

  6. Air stable n-doping of WSe{sub 2} by silicon nitride thin films with tunable fixed charge density

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kevin; Kiriya, Daisuke; Hettick, Mark; Tosun, Mahmut; Ha, Tae-Jun; Madhvapathy, Surabhi Rao; Desai, Sujay; Sachid, Angada; Javey, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Stable n-doping of WSe{sub 2} using thin films of SiN{sub x} deposited on the surface via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is presented. Positive fixed charge centers inside SiN{sub x} act to dope WSe{sub 2} thin flakes n-type via field-induced effect. The electron concentration in WSe{sub 2} can be well controlled up to the degenerate limit by simply adjusting the stoichiometry of the SiN{sub x} through deposition process parameters. For the high doping limit, the Schottky barrier width at the metal/WSe{sub 2} junction is significantly thinned, allowing for efficient electron injection via tunneling. Using this doping scheme, we demonstrate air-stable WSe{sub 2} n-MOSFETs with a mobility of ∼70 cm{sup 2}/V s.

  7. Influence of pulsed nanosecond volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air on the electrical characteristics of MCT epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, Denis V.; Voitsekhovskii, Alexandr V.; Lozovoy, Kirill A.; Nesmelov, Sergey N.; Dzyadukh, Stanislav M.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shulepov, Michail A.; Dvoretskii, Sergei A.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was investigating the effect of volume nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure on the electro-physical properties of the HgCdTe (MCT) epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Hall measurements of electro-physical parameters of MCT samples after irradiation have shown that there is a layer of epitaxial films exhibiting n-type conductivity that is formed in the near-surface area. After more than 600 pulses of influence parameters and thickness of the resulting n-layer is such that the measured field dependence of Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of n-type conductivity. Also it is shown that the impact of the discharge leads to significant changes in electro-physical characteristics of MIS structures. This fact is demonstrated by increase in density of positive fixed charge, change in the hysteresis type of the capacitance-voltage characteristic, an increase in density of surface states. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies of the controlled change in the properties of MCT.

  8. Balancing soft elasticity and low surface polarity in films of charged BSA capsules at air/fluid interface.

    PubMed

    D, Madhumitha; Jaganathan, Maheshkumar; Dhathathreyan, Aruna; Miller, Reinhard

    2016-10-01

    Interaction between charged BSA colloids and the buffer at air/fluid interface has been studied using spread films of the capsules of the protein prepared at pH 4.5 and 7.5 (below and above the pI of BSA). Surface pressure-surface concentration plots, interfacial dilational rheology and Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation have been used to characterize the films. The study shows that below the pI of the protein, the positively charged colloids entrain more water on the surface which leads to partial neutralization of the charges. Results suggest that the charged capsules are elastic due to the strongly adsorbed protein layers that restrict deformation and any small shape fluctuations is likely due to the distortion of the viscoelastic surface layer at pH=4.5. Capsules of BSA behave as 'soft elastic membrane' with interfacial properties lying between that of an elastic membrane and a slightly soluble diffuse capsule with low interfacial tension. Such elastic capsules would find applications in drug delivery and food colloids. PMID:27318961

  9. Tailoring indium oxide nanocrystal synthesis conditions for air-stable high-performance solution-processed thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Swisher, Sarah L; Volkman, Steven K; Subramanian, Vivek

    2015-05-20

    Semiconducting metal oxides (ZnO, SnO2, In2O3, and combinations thereof) are a uniquely interesting family of materials because of their high carrier mobilities in the amorphous and generally disordered states, and solution-processed routes to these materials are of particular interest to the printed electronics community. Colloidal nanocrystal routes to these materials are particularly interesting, because nanocrystals may be formulated with tunable surface properties into stable inks, and printed to form devices in an additive manner. We report our investigation of an In2O3 nanocrystal synthesis for high-performance solution-deposited semiconductor layers for thin-film transistors (TFTs). We studied the effects of various synthesis parameters on the nanocrystals themselves, and how those changes ultimately impacted the performance of TFTs. Using a sintered film of solution-deposited In2O3 nanocrystals as the TFT channel material, we fabricated devices that exhibit field effect mobility of 10 cm(2)/(V s) and an on/off current ratio greater than 1 × 10(6). These results outperform previous air-stable nanocrystal TFTs, and demonstrate the suitability of colloidal nanocrystal inks for high-performance printed electronics. PMID:25915094

  10. Comparative investigation of multiplane thrust vectoring nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F.; Smereczniak, P.; Spetnagel, D.; Thayer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The inflight aerodynamic performance of multiplane vectoring nozzles is critical to development of advanced aircraft and flight control systems utilizing thrust vectoring. To investigate vectoring nozzle performance, subscale models of two second-generation thrust vectoring nozzle concepts currently under development for advanced fighters were integrated into an axisymmetric test pod. Installed drag and vectoring performance characteristics of both concepts were experimentally determined in wind tunnel testing. CFD analyses were conducted to understand the impact of internal flow turning on thrust vectoring characteristics. Both nozzles exhibited drag comparable with current nonvectoring axisymmetric nozzles. During vectored-thrust operations, forces produced by external flow effects amounted to about 25 percent of the total force measured.

  11. Combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing is disclosed that allows for both radial and thrust axes control of an associated shaft. The combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing comprises a rotor and a stator. The rotor comprises a shaft, and first and second rotor pairs each having respective rotor elements. The stator comprises first and second stator elements and a magnet-sensor disk. In one embodiment, each stator element has a plurality of split-poles and a corresponding plurality of radial force coils and, in another embodiment, each stator element does not require thrust force coils, and radial force coils are replaced by double the plurality of coils serving as an outer member of each split-pole half.

  12. Three dimensional thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Brogren, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to analytically determine the cyclic thermomechanical behavior and fatigue life of three configurations of a Plug Nozzle Thrust Chamber. This thrust chamber is a test model which represents the current trend in nozzle design calling for high performance coupled with weight and volume limitations as well as extended life for reusability. The study involved the use of different materials and material combinations to evaluate their application to the problem of low-cycle fatigue in the thrust chamber. The thermal and structural analyses were carried out on a three-dimensional basis. Results are presented which show plots of continuous temperature histories and temperature distributions at selected times during the operating cycle of the thrust chamber. Computed structural data show critical regions for low-cycle fatigue and the histories of strain within the regions for each operation cycle.

  13. GSFC Technology Thrusts and Partnership Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Moigne, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology thrusts and the opportunities to partner in developing software in support of the technological advances at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). There are thrusts in development of end-to-end software systems for mission data systems in areas of flight software, ground data systems, flight dynamic systems and science data systems. The required technical expertise is reviewed, and the supported missions are shown for the various areas given.

  14. JPL micro-thrust propulsion activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, J.; Marrese, C.; Ziemer, J.; Green, A.; Yang, E.; Mojarradi, M.; Johnson, T.; White, V.; Bame, D.

    2002-01-01

    Formation flying and microspacecraft constellation missions pose new propulsion requirements. Formationflying spacecraft, due to the tight positioning and pointing control requirements, may need thrust control within 1- 20 uN to an accuracy of 0.1 uN for LISA and ST-7, for example. Future missions may have extended thrust ranges into the sub - mN range. However, all do require high specific impulses (>500 sec) due to long required thruster firings.

  15. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1986-01-01

    In previous tests of liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastropic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed here.

  16. Analysis of the gas-lubricated flat-sector-pad thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A flat sector-shaped pad geometry for a gas-lubricated thrust bearing is analyzed considering both the pitch and roll of the pad. It is shown that maximum load capacity is achieved when the pad is tilted so as to create uniform minimum film thickness along the pad trailing edge. Performance characteristics for various geometries and operating conditions of gas thrust bearings are presented in the form of design curves, and a comparison is made with the rectangular slider approximation. It is found that this approximation is unsafe for practical design, since it always overestimates load capacity.

  17. Oxygen transport resistance at gas diffusion layer - Air channel interface with film flow of water in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koz, Mustafa; Kandlikar, Satish G.

    2016-01-01

    Water present as films on the gas diffusion layer-air channel interface in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) alters the oxygen transport resistance, which is expressed through Sherwood number (Sh). The effect of multiple films along the flow length on Sh is investigated through 3D and stationary simulations. The effects of air Péclet number, non-dimensional film width, length, and spacing are studied. Using the simulation results, non-dimensional correlations are developed for local Sh within a mean absolute percentage error of 9%. These correlations can be used for simulating PEMFC performance over temperature and relative humidity ranges of 20-80 °C and 0-100%, respectively. Sh on the film side can be up to 31% lower than that for a dry channel, while a film may reduce the interfacial width by up to 39%. The corresponding increase in transport resistance results in lowering the voltage by 5 and 8 mV respectively at a current density of 1.5 A cm-2. However, their combined effect leads to a voltage loss of 20 mV due to this additional mass transport resistance. It is therefore important to incorporate the additional resistance introduced by the films while modeling fuel cell performance.

  18. A method to form semiconductor quantum dot (QD) thin films by igniting a flame at air-liquid interface: CdS and WO3.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Aarti H; Patil, Sagar H; Sathaye, Shivaram D; Patil, Kashinath R

    2015-02-01

    We reveal an easy, inexpensive, efficient one stepflame synthesis of semiconductor/metal oxide thin films at air-liquid interface, subsequently, transferred on suitable substrate. The method has been illustrated by the formation of CdS and WO3 QDs thin films. The features of the present method are (1) Growth of thin films consisting of0.5-2.0nm sized Quantum Dots (QDs)/(ultra-small nanoparticles) in a short time, at the air-liquid interface which can be suitably transferred by a well-known Blodgett technique to an appropriate substrate, (2) The method is suitable to apply layer by layer (LbL) technique to increase the film thickness as well as forming various compositions as revealed by AFM measurements. The films are characterized for their structure (SAED), morphology (TEM), optical properties (UV-Vis.) and photoluminescence (PL). Possible mechanism of formation of QDs thin film and effect of capping in case of CdS QDs is discussed. PMID:25463183

  19. Thrust faulting and hydrocarbon generation: discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, M.A.; Royse, F.

    1987-07-01

    Following the discovery of large volumes of hydrocarbons in the Cordilleran thrust belt of southwestern Wyoming and northern Utah, Angevine and Turcotte (1983), Edman and Surdam (1984), and Furlong and Edman (1984) discussed the role of thrust faulting in hydrocarbon generation. The authors concluded that overthrusting plays an important or even dominant role in the process of hydrocarbon generation in overthrust terrains. These conclusions may be in error because they are based on a mathematical analysis of thermal and geologic models that have little resemblance to actual thrust-belt geology. In this discussion, the authors discuss shortcomings of the thermal model used in the papers referred to above; emphasize the differences between their model and the geologic facts as they exist in thrust belts in general and in western Wyoming in particular; and caution readers about applying the conclusions based on such a model in the search for hydrocarbons. They contend that the temperature effects of thrust faulting were rather insignificant in the process of hydrocarbon generation in the Wyoming thrust belt.

  20. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  1. Repeated bouncing of drops on wetting and non-wetting surfaces mediated by a persisting thin air film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Lagraauw, Rudy; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2014-11-01

    Liquid drops impinging onto solid surfaces undergo a variety of impact scenarios such as splashing, sticking, and bouncing, depending on impact conditions and substrate properties. Bouncing requires efficient conversion of initial kinetic energy into surface energy and back into kinetic energy. This process is believed to be limited to non-wetting, in particular superhydrophobic surfaces, for which viscous dissipation during drop-substrate contact is minimal. Here, we report a novel bouncing mechanism that applies equally to non-wetting and wetting systems for flat surfaces with contact angles down to 10 degrees. For initial impact speeds up to about 0.5 m/s we demonstrate using dual wavelength interferometry that aqueous and non-aqueous drops remain separated from the substrate by air films of (sub)micrometer thickness at all times throughout a series of up to 16 consecutive bouncing events. We show that the purely dissipative force arising from the viscous squeeze-out of air is responsible for both the momentum transfer and for a substantial part of the residual energy dissipation.

  2. The Importance of Nanometric Passivating Films on Cathodes forLi - Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Brian D.; Black, Robert; Radtke, Claudio; Williams, Zach; Mehdi, Beata L.; Browning, Nigel D.; Nazar, Linda F.

    2014-12-23

    Recently, there has been a transition from fully carbonaceous positive electrodes for the aprotic lithium oxygen battery to alternative materials and the use of redox mediator additives, in an attempt to lower the large electrochemical overpotentials associated with the charge reaction. However, the stabilizing or catalytic effect of these materials can become complicated due to the presence of major side-reactions observed during dis(charge). Here, we isolate the charge reaction from the discharge by utilizing electrodes prefilled with commercial lithium peroxide with a crystallite size of about 200-800 nm. Using a combination of S/TEM, online mass spectrometry, XPS, and electrochemical methods to probe the nature of surface films on carbon and conductive Ti-based nanoparticles, we show that oxygen evolution from lithium peroxide is strongly dependent on their surface properties. Insulating TiO2 surface layers on TiC and TiN - even as thin as 3 nm*can completely inhibit the charge reaction under these conditions. On the other hand, TiC, which lacks this oxide film, readily facilitates oxidation of the bulk Li2O2 crystallites, at a much lower overpotential relative to carbon. Since oxidation of lithium oxygen battery cathodes is inevitable in these systems, precise control of the surface chemistry at the nanoscale becomes of upmost importance.

  3. The importance of nanometric passivating films on cathodes for Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brian D; Black, Robert; Radtke, Claudio; Williams, Zack; Mehdi, B Layla; Browning, Nigel D; Nazar, Linda F

    2014-12-23

    Recently, there has been a transition from fully carbonaceous positive electrodes for the aprotic lithium oxygen battery to alternative materials and the use of redox mediator additives, in an attempt to lower the large electrochemical overpotentials associated with the charge reaction. However, the stabilizing or catalytic effect of these materials can become complicated due to the presence of major side-reactions observed during dis(charge). Here, we isolate the charge reaction from the discharge by utilizing electrodes prefilled with commercial lithium peroxide with a crystallite size of about 200-800 nm. Using a combination of S/TEM, online mass spectrometry, XPS, and electrochemical methods to probe the nature of surface films on carbon and conductive Ti-based nanoparticles, we show that oxygen evolution from lithium peroxide is strongly dependent on their surface properties. Insulating TiO2 surface layers on TiC and TiN - even as thin as 3 nm-can completely inhibit the charge reaction under these conditions. On the other hand, TiC, which lacks this oxide film, readily facilitates oxidation of the bulk Li2O2 crystallites, at a much lower overpotential relative to carbon. Since oxidation of lithium oxygen battery cathodes is inevitable in these systems, precise control of the surface chemistry at the nanoscale becomes of upmost importance. PMID:25364863

  4. Toward air-stable multilayer phosphorene thin-films and transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Seok; Liu, Yingnan; Zhu, Weinan; Kim, Seohee; Wu, Di; Tao, Li; Dodabalapur, Ananth; Lai, Keji; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-01-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP), also known as phosphorene, is poised to be the most attractive graphene analogue owing to its high mobility approaching that of graphene, and its thickness-tunable band gap that can be as large as that of molybdenum disulfide. In essence, phosphorene represents the much sought after high-mobility, large direct band gap two-dimensional layered crystal that is ideal for optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability in air is of paramount concern for practical applications. Here, we demonstrate air-stable BP devices with dielectric and hydrophobic encapsulation. Microscopy, spectroscopy, and transport techniques were employed to elucidate the aging mechanism, which can initiate from the BP surface for bare samples, or edges for samples with thin dielectric coating, highlighting the ineffectiveness of conventional scaled dielectrics. Our months-long studies indicate that a double layer capping of Al2O3 and hydrophobic fluoropolymer affords BP devices and transistors with indefinite air-stability for the first time, overcoming a critical material challenge for applied research and development. PMID:25758437

  5. Toward air-stable multilayer phosphorene thin-films and transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Seok; Liu, Yingnan; Zhu, Weinan; Kim, Seohee; Wu, Di; Tao, Li; Dodabalapur, Ananth; Lai, Keji; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-01-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP), also known as phosphorene, is poised to be the most attractive graphene analogue owing to its high mobility approaching that of graphene, and its thickness-tunable band gap that can be as large as that of molybdenum disulfide. In essence, phosphorene represents the much sought after high-mobility, large direct band gap two-dimensional layered crystal that is ideal for optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability in air is of paramount concern for practical applications. Here, we demonstrate air-stable BP devices with dielectric and hydrophobic encapsulation. Microscopy, spectroscopy, and transport techniques were employed to elucidate the aging mechanism, which can initiate from the BP surface for bare samples, or edges for samples with thin dielectric coating, highlighting the ineffectiveness of conventional scaled dielectrics. Our months-long studies indicate that a double layer capping of Al2O3 and hydrophobic fluoropolymer affords BP devices and transistors with indefinite air-stability for the first time, overcoming a critical material challenge for applied research and development. PMID:25758437

  6. Toward air-stable multilayer phosphorene thin-films and transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon-Seok; Liu, Yingnan; Zhu, Weinan; Kim, Seohee; Wu, Di; Tao, Li; Dodabalapur, Ananth; Lai, Keji; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-01

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP), also known as phosphorene, is poised to be the most attractive graphene analogue owing to its high mobility approaching that of graphene, and its thickness-tunable band gap that can be as large as that of molybdenum disulfide. In essence, phosphorene represents the much sought after high-mobility, large direct band gap two-dimensional layered crystal that is ideal for optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability in air is of paramount concern for practical applications. Here, we demonstrate air-stable BP devices with dielectric and hydrophobic encapsulation. Microscopy, spectroscopy, and transport techniques were employed to elucidate the aging mechanism, which can initiate from the BP surface for bare samples, or edges for samples with thin dielectric coating, highlighting the ineffectiveness of conventional scaled dielectrics. Our months-long studies indicate that a double layer capping of Al2O3 and hydrophobic fluoropolymer affords BP devices and transistors with indefinite air-stability for the first time, overcoming a critical material challenge for applied research and development.

  7. Thrusting and sedimentation along an emergent thrust front: an example from the External Sierras of the Southern Pyrenees, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasio, D.J.; De Paor, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Depending on the relative rates of thrusting and erosion, emergent thrusts, like glaciers, may advance or retreat while continually moving forward. The relative rates of thrusting and erosion as a thrust ruptures the land surface also control the mountain front geometry. For listric thrusts, the high angle of intersection with the land surface results in primarily upward rather than horizontal movement. If thrust movement is much faster than the prevailing erosion a large emergent toe will develop as the thrust sheet advances over its synorogenic deposits. Alternatively, if the erosion rates are generally faster than thrusting, synorogenic deposits will progressively onlap onto a receding mountain front. Comparable rates of thrusting and erosion result in steady state uplift and denudation. In the External Sierras the thrust front reached the synorogenic surface during the Paleogene and resulted in the accumulation of thick synorogenic deposits. Relatively slow rates of thrusting (<1mm/a) and uplift (<0.5mm/a) of the External Sierras, coupled with moderate erosion rates resulted in a near stationary mountain front. Despite this, temporal and spatial fluctuations in the thrusting resulted in three different mountain front geometries. In places, the thrust front has been buried by molasse, elsewhere, the emergent thrust sheet has deformed its proximal molasse by bulldozing, producing deposits analogous to push moraines, and in other places the frontal thrust has overridden its molasse. Striated cobbles within the molasse immediately below the frontal thrust may have functioned like ball bearings, reducing the friction with the overriding thrust sheet.

  8. Simultaneous heat and mass transfer inside a vertical tube in evaporating a heated falling alcohols liquid film into a stream of dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senhaji, S.; Feddaoui, M.; Mediouni, T.; Mir, A.

    2009-03-01

    A numerical study of the evaporation in mixed convection of a pure alcohol liquid film: ethanol and methanol was investigated. It is a turbulent liquid film falling on the internal face of a vertical tube. A laminar flow of dry air enters the vertical tube at constant temperature in the downward direction. The wall of the tube is subjected to a constant and uniform heat flux. The model solves the coupled parabolic governing equations in both phases including turbulent liquid film together with the boundary and interfacial conditions. The systems of equations obtained by using an implicit finite difference method are solved by TDMA method. A Van Driest model is adopted to simulate the turbulent liquid film flow. The influence of the inlet liquid flow, Reynolds number in the gas flow and the wall heat flux on the intensity of heat and mass transfers are examined. A comparison between the results obtained for studied alcohols and water in the same conditions is made.

  9. 4. COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, DETAIL OF THRUST MOUNTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, DETAIL OF THRUST MOUNTING STRUCTURE AT ENGINE END OF PLANE. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Dryden/Edwards 1994 Thrust-Vectoring Aircraft Fleet - F-18 HARV, X-31, F-16 MATV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The three thrust-vectoring aircraft at Edwards, California, each capable of flying at extreme angles of attack, cruise over the California desert in formation during flight in March 1994. They are, from left, NASA's F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV), flown by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center; the X-31, flown by the X-31 International Test Organization (ITO) at Dryden; and the Air Force F-16 Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) aircraft. All three aircraft were flown in different programs and were developed independently. The NASA F-18 HARV was a testbed to produce aerodynamic data at high angles of attack to validate computer codes and wind tunnel research. The X-31 was used to study thrust vectoring to enhance close-in air combat maneuvering, while the F-16 MATV was a demonstration of how thrust vectoring could be applied to operational aircraft.

  11. Static investigation of two fluidic thrust-vectoring concepts on a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    A static investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel of two thrust-vectoring concepts which utilize fluidic mechanisms for deflecting the jet of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. One concept involved using the Coanda effect to turn a sheet of injected secondary air along a curved sidewall flap and, through entrainment, draw the primary jet in the same direction to produce yaw thrust vectoring. The other concept involved deflecting the primary jet to produce pitch thrust vectoring by injecting secondary air through a transverse slot in the divergent flap, creating an oblique shock in the divergent channel. Utilizing the Coanda effect to produce yaw thrust vectoring was largely unsuccessful. Small vector angles were produced at low primary nozzle pressure ratios, probably because the momentum of the primary jet was low. Significant pitch thrust vector angles were produced by injecting secondary flow through a slot in the divergent flap. Thrust vector angle decreased with increasing nozzle pressure ratio but moderate levels were maintained at the highest nozzle pressure ratio tested. Thrust performance generally increased at low nozzle pressure ratios and decreased near the design pressure ratio with the addition of secondary flow.

  12. Characterization of air-formed surface oxide film on a Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (MP35N) and its change in Hanks' solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Akiko; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Yuta; Katayama, Keiichi; Hanawa, Takao; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2012-05-01

    The air-formed surface oxide films used for stents were characterized to determine their composition and chemical state on a Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy. The change of the films in Hanks' solution was used to estimate the reconstruction of the film in the human body. Angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the composition of the film and substrate, as well as the film's thickness. The surface oxide film on the Co-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy (when mechanically polished) consists of oxide species of cobalt, nickel, chromium, and molybdenum, contains a large amount of OH-, and has a thickness of approximately 2.5 nm. Cations exist in the oxide as Co2+, Ni2+, Cr3+, Mo4+, Mo5+, and Mo6+. Chromium is enriched and cobalt and nickel are depleted in the oxide; however, nickel is enriched and cobalt is depleted in the substrate alloy just under the surface oxide film. Concentration of chromium was low and that of nickel was high at small take-off angles. This indicates that distribution of chromium is greater in the inner layer, but nickel is distributed more in the outer layer of the surface oxide film. During immersion in Hanks' solution, cobalt and nickel dissolved, and the film composition changed to mostly chromium oxide (Cr3+), along with small amounts of cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum oxides, and calcium phosphate containing magnesium, potassium, and carbonate. After immersion in Hanks' solution, the thickness of the surface layer containing calcium phosphate increased to more than 4 nm, while the amount of OH- increased. The amount of cobalt and nickel in the surface oxide film and in the substrate alloy just below the oxide decreased during immersion.

  13. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket Booster Disassembly & Refurbishment Complex, Thrust Vector Control Deservicing Facility, Hangar Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. Middle Proterozoic thrusting in central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Grambling, J.A.; Thompson, A.G. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences); Dallmeyer, R.D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Ductile thrust faults truncate contact-metamorphic aureoles surrounding two 1.4 Ga plutons in central New Mexico. The Priest quartz monzonite (1440 Ma) and Sandia granite (1420 Ma) are 50 km apart in the continuous Sandia/Manzano mountain chain. Thermobarometry and phase relations demonstrate that country-rock temperatures rose from 700 C toward the pluton, at pressure near 4 kb. The northern edge of this aureole is cut by the southeast-dipping ductile Monte Largo thrust fault. Prograde, greenschist-facies metamorphism of footwall rocks accompanied local retrogression of hangingwall rocks during thrusting. This second metamorphism took place at P-T conditions of 2-3 kb and 450-475 C. Another contact aureole surrounds the Sandia granite. Mafic rocks near the granite reflect amphibolite-facies conditions, whereas pelites display low-pressure contact assemblages. Quantitative temperatures increase from 500--750 C toward the granite, at pressures of 2.5--3.5 kb. The shallowly southeast-dipping Vincent Moore fault truncates the Sandia granite and the southern portion of its contact aureole. This ductile shear zone emplaced greenschist-facies rocks northwestward above the Sandia contact aureole. Footwall rocks were retrograded to the greenschist facies within 100 m of this fault; the retrograde phases are aligned parallel to the trace of the thrust. Metamorphic temperatures in hangingwall rocks (during thrusting ) were 400-475 C at pressures above 2.75 kb. Additional northwest-vergent ductile thrusts are found elsewhere in the mountain chain. This may represent the age of thrusting and of the related greenschist and the related greenschist-facies metamorphic overprint.

  15. On the Thrust of a Single Electrode Electrohydrodynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilit', Tomáš; Váry, Michal; Valko, Pavol

    2015-03-01

    Linear thrust generation by a single pin emitter electrode under AC excitation has been studied. Presented are thrust measurements of a single electrode thruster, in comparison with classical, two electrode electrohydrodynamic thruster. The experiments show comparable thrust for both configurations at low voltage levels, suggesting higher thrust-to-weight ratio of single electrode thrusters at low applied voltages. Further, a hypothesis of single electrode thrust creation is proposed.

  16. Studies of leading-edge thrust phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Mack, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A study of practical limitations on achievement of theoretical leading-edge thrust has been made and an empirical method for estimation of attainable thrust has been developed. The method is based on a theoretical analysis of a set of two-dimensional airfoils to define thrust dependence on airfoil geometric characteristics and arbitrarily defined limiting pressures, an examination of two-dimensional airfoil experimental data to provide an estimate of limiting pressure dependence on local Mach number and Reynolds number, and employment of simple sweep theory to adapt the method to three-dimensional wings. Because the method takes into account the spanwise variation of airfoil section characteristics, an opportunity is afforded for design by iteration to maximize the attainable thrust and the attendant performance benefits. The applicability of the method was demonstrated by comparisons of theoretical and experimental aerodynamic characteristics for a series of wing-body configurations. Generally, good predictions of the attainable thrust and its influence on lift and drag characteristics were obtained over a range of Mach numbers from 0.24 to 2.0.

  17. Tubular copper thrust chamber design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The use of copper tubular thrust chambers is particularly important in high performance expander cycle space engines. Tubular chambers have more surface area than flat wall chambers, and this extra surface area provides enhanced heat transfer for additional energy to power the cycle. This paper was divided into two sections: (1) a thermal analysis and sensitivity study; and (2) a preliminary design of a selected thrust chamber configuration. The thermal analysis consisted of a statistical optimization to determine the optimum tube geometry, tube booking, thrust chamber geometry, and cooling routing to achieve the maximum upper limit chamber pressure for a 25,000 pound thrust engine. The preliminary design effort produced a layout drawing of a tubular thrust chamber that is three inches shorter than the Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) milled channel chamber but is predicted to provide a five percent increase in heat transfer. Testing this chamber in the AETB would confirm the inherent advantages of tubular chamber construction and heat transfer.

  18. Thrust Measurement of Pure Magnetic Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazuma; Kimura, Toshiyuki; Ayabe, Tomohiro; Funaki, Ikkoh; Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Horisawa, Hideyuki

    A Pure Magnetic Sail is a deep space propulsion system consisting of a coil mounted on a spacecraft. In order to predict the thrust characteristics of a Pure Magnetic Sail in space, thrust measurement and magnetic field measurement were conducted using a scale model in a laboratory. To simulate the solar wind, a magnetoplasmadynamic arcjet provides a high density (2×1019 m-3) and high velocity (47 km/s) plasma flow that impinges on a 20-turn 25-mm-radius coil simulating a Pure Magnetic Sail. When the magnetic cavity size of the scale model (L) is increased from 0.12 to 0.17 m, the thrust increases from 0.47 to 0.92 N. Scaling up, this experiment corresponds to a 300-km diameter Pure Magnetic Sail in space. The thrust also depends on the coil tilt angle, which is the angle between the direction of the solar wind flow and the coil axis. The maximum thrust of 1.5 N is obtained for a tilt angle of 90 degrees.

  19. Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.; Jones, J. E.; Cox, M. D.

    2004-01-01

    An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting thrusters with total mass of up to 125 kg and 1 mN to 1 N thrust levels has been developed and tested. The mechanical design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that transforms horizontal motion into amplified vertical motion, with accommodation for variable displacement sensitivity. Unlike conventional hanging pendulum thrust stands, the deflection is independent of the length of the pendulum arm, and no reference structure is required at the end of the pendulum. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer. Mechanical oscillations are attenuated using a passive, eddy current damper. An on-board microprocessor-based level control system, which includes a two axis accelerometer and two linear-displacement stepper motors, continuously maintains the level of the balance mechanism - counteracting mechanical %era drift during thruster testing. A thermal control system, which includes heat exchange panels, thermocouples, and a programmable recirculating water chiller, continuously adjusts to varying thermal loads to maintain the balance mechanism temperature, to counteract thermal drifts. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady state calibration both prior to and during thruster testing. Thrust measurements were carried out on a well-characterized 1 kW Hall thruster; the thrust stand was shown to produce repeatable results consistent with previously published performance data.

  20. Investigating Langmuir films at the air-water interface using a planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Shin

    In this work, a new planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph (PA-IRRAS) was developed to investigate a broad range of Langmuir films at the air-water interface. This instrument is capable of recording sample and reference spectra simultaneously with an optical setup that is the same as that of a single-beam instrument but splits the incident infrared beam into two sections on a plane mirror (H) or a water trough. With this design, the instrument could accommodate large infrared accessories, such as a water trough. In addition, water bands were subtracted to obtain a high quality spectrum for a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) Langmuir film on the water subphase with a resolution of about 8 cm-1 in 10.8 sec. With this instrument, two types of monolayer systems were studied; polymeric and lipid Langmuir films at the air-water interface. For the polymeric monolayer system, PA-IRRAS was used as a probe to follow the real-time conformational changes associated with intermolecular interactions of the polymer chains during the compression of the monolayers. It was found that the mixture of poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) (D/L) formed a stereocomplex when the mixed solution developed the two-dimensional monolayer at the air-water interface. The stereocomplexation occurred before film compression, indicating that there is no direct correlation between film compression and stereocomplexation. For the lipid monolayer system, PA-IRRAS was also used as a probe to investigate the origin of the disruption of a lipid monolayer upon protein adsorption at the air-water interface. Analysis of the time-resolved PA-IRRAS spectra revealed that Cu(II) ion-chelated DSIDA lipid monolayer (Cu 2+-DSIDA) was readily disrupted by myoglobin adsorption as demonstrated by a blue shift of 1.7 cm-1 and a lower intensity in the vas(CH2) stretch mode of the lipid monolayer over a period of five hours. To find the origin of the disruption of the lipid monolayer, a

  1. Investigation into the optoelectrical properties of tungsten oxide thin films annealed in an oxygen air

    SciTech Connect

    Arfaoui, A.; Ouni, B. Touihri, S.; Mannoubi, T.

    2014-12-15

    Tungsten oxide (WO{sub x}) thin film have been deposited onto glass substrates using the thermal vacuum evaporation technique, monitored by an annealing process in a variable oxygen atmosphere. Analysis by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed the structural changes from orthorhombic to monoclinic which depend on the annealing temperature and the oxygen content. AFM study shows that the increase of oxygen content leads to a decrease of the root-mean-square from 94.64 nm to 2 nm. Ellipsometric measurements have been used to evaluate the optical constants. Further, it is found that when the oxygen content increases, the band gap of the annealed layer varies from 3.01 eV to 3.52 eV by against, the Urbach energy decreases. The AC conductivity plot showed a universal power law according to the Jonscher model. Moreover, at high frequency semiconductor-to-metallic behavior has been observed. Finally, the effect of annealing in oxygen atmosphere on their structural modifications, morphological, optical properties and electrical conductivity are reported.

  2. Impact of air-exposure on the chemical and electronic structure ofZnO:Zn3N2 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, M.; Ahn, K.-S.; Shet, S.; Yan, Y.; Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Pookpanratana, S.; George, K.; Yang, W.; Denlinger, J.D.; Al-Jassim, M.; Heske, C.

    2008-09-08

    The chemical and electronic surface structure of ZnO:Zn3N2 ("ZnO:N") thin films with different N contents was investigated by soft x-ray emission spectroscopy. Upon exposure to ambient air (in contrast to storage in vacuum), the chemical and electronic surface structure of the ZnO:N films changes substantially. In particular, we find that the Zn3N2/(Zn3N2+ZnO) ratio decreases with exposure time and that this change depends on the initial N content. We suggest a degradation mechanism based on the reaction of the Zn3N2 content with atmospheric humidity.

  3. Status of Low Thrust Work at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald L.

    2004-01-01

    High performance low thrust (solar electric, nuclear electric, variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket) propulsion offers a significant benefit to NASA missions beyond low Earth orbit. As NASA (e.g., Prometheus Project) endeavors to develop these propulsion systems and associated power supplies, it becomes necessary to develop a refined trajectory design capability that will allow engineers to develop future robotic and human mission designs that take advantage of this new technology. This ongoing work addresses development of a trajectory design and optimization tool for assessing low thrust (and other types) trajectories. This work targets to advance the state of the art, enable future NASA missions, enable science drivers, and enhance education. This presentation provides a summary of the low thrust-related JSC activities under the ISP program and specifically, provides a look at a new release of a multi-gravity, multispacecraft trajectory optimization tool (Copernicus) along with analysis performed using this tool over the past year.

  4. Pulsed thrust measurements using electromagnetic calibration techniques.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haibin; Shi, Chenbo; Zhang, Xin'ai; Zhang, Zun; Cheng, Jiao

    2011-03-01

    A thrust stand for accurately measuring impulse bits, which ranged from 10-1000 μN s using a noncontact electromagnetic calibration technique is described. In particular, a permanent magnet structure was designed to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a multiturn coil was made to produce a calibration force less than 10 mN. The electromagnetic calibration force for pulsed thrust measurements was linear to the coil current and changed less than 2.5% when the distance between the coil and magnet changed 6 mm. A pulsed plasma thruster was first tested on the thrust stand, and afterward five single impulse bits were measured to give a 310 μN s average impulse bit. Uncertainty of the measured impulse bit was analyzed to evaluate the quality of the measurement and was found to be 10 μN s with 95% credibility. PMID:21456799

  5. Thrust Vector Control using movable probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavalleri, Robert; Tiarn, Weihnurng; Readey, Harvey

    1990-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if movable probes or struts positioned in the nozzle can be used to provide Thrust Vector Control of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. The study employed CFD to determine estimates of the shock standoff distance from the probe. An empirical correlation was used to construct the shock shape and the pressure distribution generated by the probe. The TVC performance for a single and multiple number of probes was then used to determine requirements for a maximum thrust angle offset of 7.5 degrees. Consideration was given to what materials would be suitable for the probe and if active cooling is required. Based on the performance analysis and thermal requirements, a Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) system was sized. Indications are that a PTVC system weight is in the 1500 1bm weight range, compared to the existing weight of 7500 1bm for the SRB nozzle gimble system.

  6. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion

  7. Oil-Free Turbomachinery Research Enhanced by Thrust Bearing Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team is developing aircraft turbine engines that will not require an oil lubrication system. Oil systems are required today to lubricate rolling-element bearings used by the turbine and fan shafts. For the Oil-Free Turbomachinery concept, researchers combined the most advanced foil (air) bearings from industry with NASA-developed high-temperature solid lubricant technology. In 1999, the world s first Oil-Free turbocharger was demonstrated using these technologies. Now we are working with industry to demonstrate Oil-Free turbomachinery technology in a small business jet engine, the EJ-22 produced by Williams International and developed during Glenn s recently concluded General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) program. Eliminating the oil system in this engine will make it simpler, lighter (approximately 15 percent), more reliable, and less costly to purchase and maintain. Propulsion gas turbines will place high demands on foil air bearings, especially the thrust bearings. Up until now, the Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team only had the capability to test radial, journal bearings. This research has resulted in major improvements in the bearings performance, but journal bearings are cylindrical, and can only support radial shaft loads. To counteract axial thrust loads, thrust foil bearings, which are disk shaped, are required. Since relatively little research has been conducted on thrust foil air bearings, their performance lags behind that of journal bearings.

  8. An Oil-Free Thrust Foil Bearing Facility Design, Calibration, and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steve

    2005-01-01

    New testing capabilities are needed in order to foster thrust foil air bearing technology development and aid its transition into future Oil-Free gas turbines. This paper describes a new test apparatus capable of testing thrust foil air bearings up to 100 mm in diameter at speeds to 80,000 rpm and temperatures to 650 C (1200 F). Measured parameters include bearing torque, load capacity, and bearing temperatures. This data will be used for design performance evaluations and for validation of foil bearing models. Preliminary test results demonstrate that the rig is capable of testing thrust foil air bearings under a wide range of conditions which are anticipated in future Oil-Free gas turbines. Torque as a function of speed and temperature corroborates results expected from rudimentary performance models. A number of bearings were intentionally failed with no resultant damage whatsoever to the test rig. Several test conditions (specific speeds and loads) revealed undesirable axial shaft vibrations which have been attributed to the magnetic bearing control system and are under study. Based upon these preliminary results, this test rig will be a valuable tool for thrust foil bearing research, parametric studies and technology development.

  9. X-ray Lithography on Perovskite Nanocrystals Films: From Patterning with Anion-Exchange Reactions to Enhanced Stability in Air and Water

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Films of colloidal CsPbX3 (X = I, Br or Cl) nanocrystals, prepared by solution drop-casting or spin-coating on a silicon substrate, were exposed to a low flux of X-rays from an X-ray photoelectron spectrometer source, causing intermolecular C=C bonding of the organic ligands that coat the surface of the nanocrystals. This transformation of the ligand shell resulted in a greater stability of the film, which translated into the following features: (i) Insolubility of the exposed regions in organic solvents which caused instead complete dissolution of the unexposed regions. This enabled the fabrication of stable and strongly fluorescent patterns over millimeter scale areas. (ii) Inhibition of the irradiated regions toward halide anion exchange reactions, when the films were exposed either to halide anions in solution or to hydrohalic vapors. This feature was exploited to create patterned regions of different CsPbIxBryClz compositions, starting from a film with homogeneous CsPbX3 composition. (iii) Resistance of the films to degradation caused by exposure to air and moisture, which represents one of the major drawbacks for the integration of these materials in devices. (iv) Stability of the film in water and biological buffer, which can open interesting perspectives for applications of halide perovskite nanocrystals in aqueous environments. PMID:26617344

  10. Aqueous chemical growth of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films: Air annealing and photoelectrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shinde, N.M.; Deshmukh, P.R.; Patil, S.V.; Lokhande, C.D.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Facile and efficient route for synthesis of CZTS film. ► Effect of annealing on structural, morphological and electrical properties of CZTS films. ► Solar cell study. - Abstract: In present investigation, Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films have been deposited on to glass substrates by novel chemical successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The effect of air annealing in the temperature range between 573 and 773 K on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties has been studied. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of polycrystalline CZTS films. The surface morphological study showed smooth, compact and uniform film formation after annealing formation. The band gap was in between range from 1.5 to 1.8 eV depending on annealing temperature. The thermo emf measurement revealed that the CZTS exhibits p-type electrical conductivity. Further, photoactivity of CZTS thin films was tested by forming the photoelectrochemical cell.

  11. Effect of substrate roughness and working pressure on photocatalyst of N-doped TiOx films prepared by reactive sputtering with air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seon-Hong; Yamasue, Eiji; Okumura, Hideyuki; Ishihara, Keiichi N.

    2015-01-01

    N-doped TiOx films on the glass substrate were prepared by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron reactive sputtering of Ti target in a mixed gas of argon and dry air. The effect of substrate roughness and working pressure on the physical properties and the photocatalytic properties of the N-doped TiOx films was investigated. The surface roughness of glass substrate has little influence on the film properties such as produced phases, lattice parameters, introduced nitrogen contents, and atomic bonding configurations, but significant influence on the surface roughness of film resulting in the variation of the photocatalytic ability. The working pressure has little influence on the produced phases and the atomic bonding configurations, but significant influence on the atomic concentration of the N-doped TiOx film, resulting in the large variation of optical, structural, and photocatalytic properties. It is suggested that the high photocatalysis of N-doped TiOx film requires a certain range of the N doping concentration which shows the interstitial complex N doping states in TiO2.

  12. SEP thrust subsystem performance sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.; Sauer, C. G., Jr.; Kerrisk, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    This is a two-part report on solar electric propulsion (SEP) performance sensitivity analysis. The first part describes the preliminary analysis of the SEP thrust system performance for an Encke rendezvous mission. A detailed description of thrust subsystem hardware tolerances on mission performance is included together with nominal spacecraft parameters based on these tolerances. The second part describes the method of analysis and graphical techniques used in generating the data for Part 1. Included is a description of both the trajectory program used and the additional software developed for this analysis. Part 2 also includes a comprehensive description of the use of the graphical techniques employed in this performance analysis.

  13. Sub-micro-Newton resolution thrust balance.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, G

    2015-10-01

    Herein is described a sensitive vacuum balance for measuring the thrust produced by small (∼0.5 kg) thrusters typically employed in microsat station-keeping. The balance is based on a torsion design but incorporates jewel-pivot bearings instead of the more typical torsion spring bearings. Novel tilt control allows maintenance of true verticality of the bearing axis even while under vacuum. The low moment of inertia design allows it to measure small thrusts from high-voltage devices without direct wire conductor connections. Calibration by several means is described including use of a previously calibrated dielectric barrier discharge thruster. PMID:26520993

  14. Sub-micro-Newton resolution thrust balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, G.

    2015-10-01

    Herein is described a sensitive vacuum balance for measuring the thrust produced by small (˜0.5 kg) thrusters typically employed in microsat station-keeping. The balance is based on a torsion design but incorporates jewel-pivot bearings instead of the more typical torsion spring bearings. Novel tilt control allows maintenance of true verticality of the bearing axis even while under vacuum. The low moment of inertia design allows it to measure small thrusts from high-voltage devices without direct wire conductor connections. Calibration by several means is described including use of a previously calibrated dielectric barrier discharge thruster.

  15. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  16. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  17. Influence of variable thrust parameters on swirl injector fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Robert J.

    Current swirl injector design methodologies do not consider elevated chamber pressure and less than design mass flow rate operation found in variable thrust liquid rocket engines. The objective of this work is to study the effects of elevated chamber pressure and off-design mass flow rate operation on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a high pressure chamber, water flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of elevated chamber pressure and reduced mass flow rate. The optically-accessible swirl injector allowed for determination of the film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section. High speed video and digital stills showed significant increases in the film thickness profile at high chamber pressure and low mass flow rate operation. At prescribed combinations of chamber pressure and mass flow rate, a jump was noted in the film thickness profile. This jump was assumed related to a vortex breakdown phenomenon. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber pressure at low mass flow rate operation as opposed to near-design mass flow rate operation. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber pressure worked to decrease the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. A new set of fundamental relations linking swirl injector design parameters to injector geometry and flow conditions were derived. Impacts of the research findings to the swirl injector design process were assessed.

  18. Superhydrophobic metallic surfaces functionalized via femtosecond laser surface processing for long term air film retention when submerged in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhlke, Craig A.; Anderson, Troy P.; Li, Pengbo; Lucis, Michael J.; Roth, Nick; Shield, Jeffrey E.; Terry, Benjamin; Alexander, Dennis R.

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond laser surface processing (FLSP) is a powerful technique used to create self-organized microstructures with nanoscale features on metallic surfaces. By combining FLSP surface texturing with surface chemistry changes, either induced by the femtosecond laser during processing or introduced through post processing techniques, the wetting properties of metals can be altered. In this work, FLSP is demonstrated as a technique to create superhydrophobic surfaces on grade 2 titanium and 304 stainless steel that can retain an air film (plastron) between the surface and a surrounding liquid when completely submerged. It is shown that the plastron lifetime when submerged in distilled water or synthetic stomach acid is critically dependent on the specific degree of surface micro- and nano-roughness, which can be tuned by controlling various FLSP parameters. The longest plastron lifetime was on a 304 stainless steel sample that was submerged in distilled water and maintained a plastron for 41 days, the length of time of the study, with no signs of degradation. Also demonstrated for the first time is the precise control of pulse fluence and pulse count to produce three unique classes of surface micron/nano-structuring on titanium.

  19. Functionalization of Hydrogen-free Diamond-like Carbon Films using Open-air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Atmospheric Plasma Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Instituto de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Quimica-Fisica"Rocasolano"C.S.I.C., 28006 Madrid, Spain; Mahasarakham University, Mahasarakham 44150, Thailand; CASTI, CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory, L'Aquila 67100, Italy; SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA; Endrino, Jose; Endrino, J. L.; Marco, J. F.; Poolcharuansin, P.; Phani, A.R.; Allen, M.; Albella, J. M.; Anders, A.

    2007-12-28

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique has been employed to produce uniform atmospheric plasmas of He and N2 gas mixtures in open air in order to functionalize the surface of filtered-arc deposited hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. XPS measurements were carried out on both untreated and He/N2 DBD plasma treated DLC surfaces. Chemical states of the C 1s and N 1s peaks were collected and used to characterize the surface bonds. Contact angle measurements were also used to record the short- and long-term variations in wettability of treated and untreated DLC. In addition, cell viability tests were performed to determine the influence of various He/N2 atmospheric plasma treatments on the attachment of osteoblast MC3T3 cells. Current evidence shows the feasibility of atmospheric plasmas in producing long-lasting variations in the surface bonding and surface energy of hydrogen-free DLC and consequently the potential for this technique in the functionalization of DLC coated devices.

  20. Surface-chemistry-sensitive spectral features of In-Ga-Zn-O thin film: Cleaned, air-passivated, and sputter-phase-separated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Se Jun; Baik, Jae Yoon; Thakur, Anup; Kim, Hyeong-Do; Shin, Hyun-Joon; Chung, JaeGwan; Lee, Jaecheol; Lee, JaeHak

    2011-07-01

    The photoelectron spectral features and corresponding energy band diagrams of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide ( a-IGZO) thin films were investigated for different surface chemistries. Cleaned-IGZO surface had a deep subgap state (DSS), the binding energy (BE) of which expanded to ˜1.5 eV. When stored in air, IGZO surface became contaminant passivated and DSS became negligible. Sputtering resulted in phase separation of surface into metallic In and lesser In and Zn containing IGZO. Compared with IGZO, the air-passivated surface and phase-separated surface, respectively, had a more weakly conducting environment and a higher BE spectral shift.

  1. A microNewton thrust stand for average thrust measurement of pulsed microthruster.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Jing; Hong, Yan-Ji; Chang, Hao

    2013-12-01

    A torsional thrust stand has been developed for the study of the average thrust for microNewton pulsed thrusters. The main body of the thrust stand mainly consists of a torsional balance, a pair of flexural pivots, a capacitive displacement sensor, a calibration assembly, and an eddy current damper. The behavior of the stand was thoroughly studied. The principle of thrust measurement was analyzed. The average thrust is determined as a function of the average equilibrium angle displacement of the balance and the spring stiffness. The thrust stand has a load capacity up to 10 kg, and it can theoretically measure the force up to 609.6 μN with a resolution of 24.4 nN. The static calibrations were performed based on the calibration assembly composed of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet. The calibration results demonstrated good repeatability (less than 0.68% FSO) and good linearity (less than 0.88% FSO). The assembly of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet was also used as an exciter to simulate the microthruster to further research the performance of the thrust stand. Three sets of force pulses at 17, 33.5, and 55 Hz with the same amplitude and pulse width were tested. The repeatability error at each frequency was 7.04%, 1.78%, and 5.08%, respectively. PMID:24387476

  2. Large-scale recrystallization of the S-layer of Bacillus coagulans E38-66 at the air/water interface and on lipid films.

    PubMed Central

    Pum, D; Weinhandl, M; Hödl, C; Sleytr, U B

    1993-01-01

    S-layer protein isolated from Bacillus coagulans E38-66 could be recrystallized into large-scale coherent monolayers at an air/water interface and on phospholipid films spread on a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. Because of the asymmetry in the physiochemical surface properties of the S-layer protein, the subunits were associated with their more hydrophobic outer face with the air/water interface and oriented with their negatively charged inner face to the zwitterionic head groups of the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) monolayer films. The dynamic crystal growth at both types of interfaces was first initiated at several distant nucleation points. The individual monocrystalline areas grew isotropically in all directions until the front edge of neighboring crystals was met. The recrystallized S-layer protein and the S-layer-DPPE layer could be chemically cross-linked from the subphase with glutaraldehyde. Images PMID:8478338

  3. AIR Model Preflight Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) ER-2 preflight analysis, one of the first attempts to obtain a relatively complete measurement set of the high-altitude radiation level environment, is described in this paper. The primary thrust is to characterize the atmospheric radiation and to define dose levels at high-altitude flight. A secondary thrust is to develop and validate dosimetric techniques and monitoring devices for protecting aircrews. With a few chosen routes, we can measure the experimental results and validate the AIR model predictions. Eventually, as more measurements are made, we gain more understanding about the hazardous radiation environment and acquire more confidence in the prediction models.

  4. Friction losses in a lubricated thrust-loaded cageless angular-contract bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Allen, C. W.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The NASA spinning torque apparatus was modified to measure the spinning torque on a cageless ball thrust bearing. Friction torque was measured for thrust loads varying from 44.5 to 403 newtons (10 to 90 lb) at speeds of 1000, 2000, and 3000 rpm. Tests were conducted with di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate and a synthetic paraffinic oil. These tests were run with either oil jet lubrication or with a thin surface film of lubricant only. An analytical model which included rolling resistance was developed and extended from previous models for spinning torque and lubricant rheology. The model was extended by the inclusion of rolling resistance. The computed values were in fair agreement with the experimental results and confirmed previous hypotheses that a thin lubricant film gives minimum bearing torque and an oil jet flow of a viscous lubricant will result in considerable rolling torque in addition to the torque due to ball spin.

  5. Thrust Characteristics of High-Thrust Spiral Motor Using FEM Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyuk-Jin; Fujimoto, Yasutaka

    We propose a spiral-type motor that has high thrust characteristics as a linear actuator. This motor generates torque around the axis and thrust in the axial direction only by electromagnetic force. It has little friction because no additional hardware is required for straight-line movement. This paper presents the concept of the spiral motor. The finite-element method (FEM) analysis certifies that this motor has high motor constant as same as High Density Linear Motor (HDL). We also study a method to compensate the thrust fluctuation of 5-pitch-stator 6-pitch-mover model

  6. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  7. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Bloomer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady-state reverse and forward-to-reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original QCSEE 4-segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30-deg half-angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30-deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress and approximately a 20% improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35% of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff-to-reverse thrust transients.

  8. Deep-seated thrust faults bound the Mare Crisium lunar mascon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Paul K.; Klimczak, Christian; McGovern, Patrick J.; Mazarico, Erwan; James, Peter B.; Neumann, Gregory A.; Zuber, Maria T.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2015-10-01

    Mare Crisium is composed of a set of volcanic deposits situated in an impact basin on the Moon's near side. The topography of the mare is dominated by an annulus of elevated topography, the inner edge of which is delineated by basin-concentric wrinkle ridges. From a combination of remotely sensed image and topographic data and numerical modeling, we show that the thrust faults that underlie these ridges penetrate up to 20 km in depth, considerably below the base of the mare deposits themselves. Thrust faults of this scale have not heretofore been recognized on the Moon. Mare Crisium sits above a region of uplifted mantle, which contributes to a mass excess beneath the basin, and we demonstrate by comparison with free-air gravity anomaly and derived crustal thickness data for Crisium that the thrust faults structurally bound this elevated mantle material. By means of finite-element models of stresses induced by lithospheric loading within the basin, we argue that the deep-seated thrusts may have been localized by the boundary between the superisostatic mantle material and a sub-isostatic collar of thickened crust that resulted from basin formation and modification shortly after impact. Importantly, numerous other mare-filled mascon basins on the Moon share the same topographic and tectonic characteristics as Crisium, suggesting that they, too, are underlain by deep-seated thrust faults that formed in a similar manner.

  9. Development of a Lightweight Thrust Chamber Assembly Utilizing In-Situ Reinforced Silicon Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvander, J.; Wherley, B.; Claflin, S.

    1999-06-01

    The paper describes the status of the Light Weight Thrust Chamber Assembly (LWTCA) program currently underway at Boeing Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, under contract with the US Air Force Research Laboratory. The goal of the program is to demonstrate technology which will lead to a 40% reduction in weight (including the nozzle), a 50% reduction in cost, a 75% reduction in part count and a 3% increase in specific impulse on a full scale, 400 klbf thrust LOX/hydrogen booster engine. The demonstration will be performed through the use of manufacturing technology demonstrator hardware and 60 klbf thrust hot-fire tests. The primary means to achieving these goals is by using in-situ reinforced silicon nitride for structural components. Silicon nitride is an advanced ceramic material that has high specific strength and fracture toughness, and can be cast to near- net part shape. Tests to validate the material properties of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride are discussed, along with the resulting changes to traditional thrust chamber design as a result of the improved properties. The progress towards manufacturing and hot-fire testing a thrust chamber assembly from the material is also described.

  10. Parametric Investigation of Thrust Augmentation by Ejectors on a Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Sgondea, Alexandru; Paxson, Daniel E.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2006-01-01

    A parametric investigation has been made of thrust augmentation of a 1 in. diameter pulsed detonation tube by ejectors. A set of ejectors was used which permitted variation of the ejector length, diameter, and nose radius, according to a statistical design of experiment scheme. The maximum augmentation ratios for each ejector were fitted using a polynomial response surface, from which the optimum ratios of ejector diameter to detonation tube diameter, and ejector length and nose radius to ejector diameter, were found. Thrust augmentation ratios above a factor of 2 were measured. In these tests, the pulsed detonation device was run on approximately stoichiometric air-hydrogen mixtures, at a frequency of 20 Hz. Later measurements at a frequency of 40 Hz gave lower values of thrust augmentation. Measurements of thrust augmentation as a function of ejector entrance to detonation tube exit distance showed two maxima, one with the ejector entrance upstream, and one downstream, of the detonation tube exit. A thrust augmentation of 2.5 was observed using a tapered ejector.

  11. Ascent thrust vector control system test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Testing of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control System in support of the Ares 1-X program at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available

  12. Ramp initiation in a thrust wedge.

    PubMed

    Panian, John; Wiltschko, David

    2004-02-12

    Collisional mountain belts are characterized by fold and thrust belts that grow through sequential stacking of thrust sheets from the interior (hinterland) to the exterior (foreland) of the mountain belt. Each of these sheets rides on a fault that cuts up through the stratigraphic section on inclined ramps that join a flat basal fault at depth. Although this stair-step or ramp-flat geometry is well known, there is no consensus on why a particular ramp forms where it does. Perturbations in fault shape, stratigraphy, fluid pressure, folding, and surface slope have all been suggested as possible mechanisms. Here we show that such pre-existing inhomogeneities, though feasible causes, are not required. Our computer simulations show that a broad foreland-dipping plastic strain band forms at the surface near the topographic inflection produced by the previous ramp. This strain band then migrates towards the rigid base, where the plastic strain is preferentially concentrated in a thrust ramp. Subsequent ramps develop toward the foreland in a similar fashion. Syntectonic erosion and deposition may strongly control the location of thrust ramps by enhancing or removing the surface point of initiation. PMID:14961118

  13. Thrust faulting and hydrocarbon generation: reply

    SciTech Connect

    Edman, J.D.; Furlong, K.P.

    1987-07-01

    This paper is a rebuttal of an earlier paper trying to refute the claims of these authors. They believe this reply illustrates that the simplifications used by Warner and Royse (1987) in their model are generally inappropriate to describe the thermal history of units in the Western Overthrust belt, as well as other overthrust regions. Although their shortcuts produce results that are generally consistent with measured maturity values for some specific modeling sites, the differences in maturation history and the mismatch for the general thrust case make their model a less effective predictive tool. At this stage in the understanding of overthrust thermal processes, you cannot predict a priori when the thermal effects of thrusting will be significant and when they will be minimal. Defining the exact relationship between thrusting and hydrocarbon accumulations in overthrust areas requires additional work and data collection. In particular, workers must consider case histories where the hanging wall contains thick sequences of resistant strata. By incorporating additional constraints, instead of returning to the simplified assumption of constant thermal gradients in tectonic regions, the understanding of the evolution and maturation history of thrust belts is improved.

  14. Take-off and propeller thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenk, Martin

    1933-01-01

    As a result of previous reports, it was endeavored to obtain, along with the truest possible comprehension of the course of thrust, a complete, simple and clear formula for the whole take-off distance up to a certain altitude, which shall give the correct relative weight to all the factors.

  15. Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Subscale rocket thrust chamber tests were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and durability of thin yttria stabilized zirconium oxide coatings applied to the thrust chamber hot-gas side wall. The fabrication consisted of arc plasma spraying the ceramic coating and bond coat onto a mandrell and then electrodepositing the copper thrust chamber wall around the coating. Chambers were fabricated with coatings .008, and .005 and .003 inches thick. The chambers were thermally cycled at a chamber pressure of 600 psia using oxygen-hydrogen as propellants and liquid hydrogen as the coolant. The thicker coatings tended to delaminate, early in the cyclic testing, down to a uniform sublayer which remained well adhered during the remaining cycles. Two chambers with .003 inch coatings were subjected to 1500 thermal cycles with no coating loss in the throat region, which represents a tenfold increase in life over identical chambers having no coatings. An analysis is presented which shows that the heat lost to the coolant due to the coating, in a rocket thrust chamber design having a coating only in the throat region, can be recovered by adding only one inch to the combustion chamber length.

  16. Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Stanojev, Boris J.; Dehoyos, Amado; Spaun, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting testing of thrusters having a total mass of up to 125 kg and producing thrust levels between 100 microN to 1 N has been developed and tested. The design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that converts horizontal deflections produced by the operating thruster into amplified vertical motion of a secondary arm. The level of amplification is changed through adjustment of the location of one of the pivot points linking the system. Response of the system depends on the relative magnitudes of the restoring moments applied by the displaced thruster mass and the twisting torsional pivots connecting the members of the balance mechanism. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer and balance oscillatory motion is attenuated using a passive, eddy-current damper. The thrust stand employs an automated leveling and thermal control system. Pools of liquid gallium are used to deliver power to the thruster without using solid wire connections, which can exert undesirable time-varying forces on the balance. These systems serve to eliminate sources of zero-drift that can occur as the stand thermally or mechanically shifts during the course of an experiment. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady-state calibration before, during and after thruster operation. Thrust measurements were carried out on a cylindrical Hall thruster that produces mN-level thrust. The measurements were very repeatable, producing results that compare favorably with previously published performance data, but with considerably smaller uncertainty.

  17. Combustion effects on film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of: (1) a reactive environment on film cooling effectiveness, and (2) film cooling on rocket engine performance were determined experimentally in a rocket thrust chamber assembly operating with hydrogen and oxygen propellants at 300 psi chamber pressure. Tests were conducted using hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen film coolants in an instrumented, thin walled, steel thrust chamber. The film cooling, performance loss, and heat transfer coefficient data were correlated with the ALRC entrainment film cooling model which relates film coolant effectiveness and mixture ratio at the wall to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. In addition, a comprehensive thermal analysis computer program, HOCOOL, was prepared from previously existing ALRC computer programs and analytical techniques.

  18. Influence of complex impact of the picosecond electron beam and volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air on the electronic properties of MCT epitaxial films surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, Denis V.; Novikov, Vadim A.; Bezrodnyy, Dmitriy A.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shulepov, Michail A.; Dvoretskii, Sergei A.

    2015-12-01

    In the present report we studied the distribution of surface potential of the HgCdTe epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy after the impact of picosecond electron beam and volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air. The surface potential distribution was studied by the Kelvin Force Probe Microscopy. The experimental data obtained for the variation of the contact potential difference (ΔCPD) between the V-defect and the main matrix of the epitaxial film. The investigation of the origin epitaxial films show that variation of the spatial distribution of surface potential in the V-defect region can be related to the variation of the material composition. The experimental data obtained for the irradiated samples show that the mean value of ΔCPD for the original surface differs from the one for the irradiated surface for 55 eV. At the same time the mean value of ΔCPD changes its sign indicating that the original surface of the epitaxial HgCdTe film predominantly contains the grains with increased cadmium content while after the irradiation the grains possess an increased content of mercury. Therefore, during the irradiation process a decrease of the mercury content in the near-surface region of the semiconductor takes place resulting in the alteration of the electrophysical properties in the films near-surface region.

  19. Facile and Scalable Fabrication of Highly Efficient Lead Iodide Perovskite Thin-Film Solar Cells in Air Using Gas Pump Method.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bin; Gao, Lili; Liang, Lusheng; Chu, Qianqian; Song, Xiaoxuan; Li, Yan; Yang, Guanjun; Fan, Bin; Wang, Mingkui; Li, Chengxin; Li, Changjiu

    2016-08-10

    Control of the perovskite film formation process to produce high-quality organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite thin films with uniform morphology, high surface coverage, and minimum pinholes is of great importance to highly efficient solar cells. Herein, we report on large-area light-absorbing perovskite films fabrication with a new facile and scalable gas pump method. By decreasing the total pressure in the evaporation environment, the gas pump method can significantly enhance the solvent evaporation rate by 8 times faster and thereby produce an extremely dense, uniform, and full-coverage perovskite thin film. The resulting planar perovskite solar cells can achieve an impressive power conversion efficiency up to 19.00% with an average efficiency of 17.38 ± 0.70% for 32 devices with an area of 5 × 2 mm, 13.91% for devices with a large area up to 1.13 cm(2). The perovskite films can be easily fabricated in air conditions with a relative humidity of 45-55%, which definitely has a promising prospect in industrial application of large-area perovskite solar panels. PMID:27428311

  20. Direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B.; Rawlin, V.; Weigand, A. J.; Walker, J.

    1975-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm diameter ion thruster was accomplished by means of a laser interferometer thrust stand. The thruster was supported in a pendulum manner by three 3.65-m long wires. Electrical power was provided by means of 18 mercury filled pots. A movable 23-button planar probe rake was used to determine thrust loss due to ion beam divergence. Values of thrust, thrust loss due to ion beam divergence, and thrust loss due to multiple ionization were measured for ion beam currents ranging from 0.5 A to 2.5 A. Measured thrust values indicate an accuracy of approximately 1% and are in good agreement with thrust values calculated by indirect measurements.

  1. Static thrust improvement of a linear proportional solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.; Kihara, S.; Yamaguchi, M.; Nakagawa, H.; Hagiwara, K.

    1994-11-01

    A linear proportional solenoid (LPS) is an actuator for a proportional control valve used in hydraulic pressure-control devices. The LPS thrust must be constant over a specified displacement range, and must be proportional to the current. This paper describes simulations of the thrust-displacement characteristics of LPSes as determined by FEM, conducted with the aim of improving the LPM thrust. In model P, where high flux-density permendur was used in the LPS stator and mover, the maximum thrust increased from 27 to 40 N. The range of constant thrust, however, decreased from 1.0 to 0.5 mm. In model S, where permendur was used in the stator and mover, and the salient pole of the stator in the LPS was modified, the range of constant thrust was the same as in the present model. Moreover, the static thrust in the range of constant thrust increased from 27 to 38 N.

  2. Performance of 4600-pound-thrust centrifugal-flow-type turbojet engine with water-alcohol injection at inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, Philip W

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of injecting a water-alcohol mixture of 2:1 at the compressor inlet of a centrifugal-flow type turbojet engine was conducted in an altitude test chamber at static sea-level conditions and at an altitude of 20,000 feet with a flight Mach number of 0.78 with an engine operating at rated speed. The net thrust was augmented by 0.16 for both flight conditions with a ratio of injected liquid to air flow of 0.05. Further increases in the liquid-air ratio did not give comparable increases in thrust.

  3. Semiconductor Conjugated Polymer-Quantum Dot Nanocomposites at the Air/Water Interface and Their Performance in Thin Film Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiqun; Goodman, Matthew; Xu, Jun; Wang, Jun

    2009-03-01

    Organic-inorganic nanocomposites consisting of electroactive conjugated polymer, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) intimately tethered on the surface of semiconductor CdSe quantum dot (i.e., P3HT-CdSe nanocomposites) at the air/water interface formed via Langmuir isotherms were explored for the first time. The P3HT-CdSe nanocomposites displayed a high pressure plateau in the Langmuir isotherm, illustrating their complex packing at the air/water interface. Furthermore, photovoltaic devices fabricated from the LB depositions of the P3HT-CdSe nanocomposites exhibited a relatively high short circuit current, ISC, while maintaining a thin film profile. These studies provide insights into the fundamental behaviors of semiconductor organic-inorganic nanocomposites confined at the air/water interface as well as in the active layer of an organic-based photovoltaic device.

  4. Magnetron sputtered Si-B-C-N films with high oxidation resistance and thermal stability in air at temperatures above 1500 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Vlcek, Jaroslav; Hreben, Stanislav; Kalas, Jiri; Capek, Jiri; Zeman, Petr; Cerstvy, Radomir; Perina, Vratislav; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2008-09-15

    Novel quaternary Si-B-C-N materials are becoming increasingly attractive because of their possible high-temperature and harsh-environment applications. In the present work, amorphous Si-B-C-N films were deposited on Si and SiC substrates by reactive dc magnetron cosputtering using a single C-Si-B or B{sub 4}C-Si target in nitrogen-argon gas mixtures. A fixed 75% Si fraction in the target erosion areas, a rf induced negative substrate bias voltage of -100 V, a substrate temperature of 350 deg. C, and a total pressure of 0.5 Pa were used in the depositions. The corresponding discharge and deposition characteristics (such as the ion-to-film-forming particle flux ratio, ion energy per deposited atom, and deposition rate) are presented to understand complex relationships between process parameters and film characteristics. Films deposited under optimized conditions (B{sub 4}C-Si target, 50% N{sub 2}+50% Ar gas mixture), possessing a composition (in at. %) Si{sub 32-34}B{sub 9-10}C{sub 2-4}N{sub 49-51} with a low (less than 5 at. %) total content of hydrogen and oxygen, exhibited extremely high oxidation resistance in air at elevated temperatures (even above 1500 deg. C). Formation of protective surface layers (mainly composed of Si and O) was proved by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and x-ray diffraction measurements after oxidization. Amorphous structure of the Si-B-C-N films was maintained under the oxidized surface layers after annealing in air up to 1700 deg. C (a limit imposed by thermogravimetric analysis in oxidative atmospheres)

  5. Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency from an Instructive Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static…

  6. Nature of thrusting along western flank of Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Noggle, K.S.

    1986-08-01

    The northern portion of the Bighorn Mountains is characterized by opposed mountain-front thrusts, of which the southwest direction is dominant. Blind basement thrusts along the northeastern flank do not pierce the folded Paleozoic cover; whereas on the western flank, southwest-directed thrust segments expose Precambrian rocks along a 24-km (14-mi) extent. Field studies on the western flank show evidence of four major southwest-directed thrust segments delineated by tear-fault boundaries, which include from northwest to southeast: (1) the Five Springs thrust, a low-angle, out-of-the-syncline fault mainly involving the sedimentary sequence; (2) the Bear Creek thrust, a continuation of the Five Springs out-of-the-syncline fault; (3) the South Beaver Creek thrust, which juxtaposes Precambrian rocks against a tectonically thinned, overturned anticlinal limb of Mississippian through Jurassic rocks and which is inward from an out-of-the-syncline thrust involving little displacement of Jurassic formations; and (4) a mountain-front reentrant that coincides with the zone where the South Beaver Creek thrust continues beneath Paleozoic cover, causing the upper flexure of a double monocline. The central portion of the Bighorn Mountains is thrust eastward, whereas the northern portion is thrust southwestward with much less displacement. The segmented association of southwest-directed basement thrusts along the western flank of the northern Bighorns is indicative of the major transport direction for that portion of the Bighorn uplift.

  7. Thrust vectoring for lateral-directional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peron, Lee R.; Carpenter, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using thrust vectoring for lateral-directional control and the effects of reducing the tail size of a single-engine aircraft were investigated. The aerodynamic characteristics of the F-16 aircraft were generated by using the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System II panel code. The resulting lateral-directional linear perturbation analysis of a modified F-16 aircraft with various tail sizes and yaw vectoring was performed at several speeds and altitudes to determine the stability and control trends for the aircraft compared to these trends for a baseline aircraft. A study of the paddle-type turning vane thrust vectoring control system as used on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle is also presented.

  8. Low-thrust mission risk analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, C. L.; Smith, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized multi-stage failure process simulation procedure is used to evaluate the risk in a solar electric space mission. The procedure uses currently available thrust-subsystem reliability data and performs approximate simulations of the thrust subsystem burn operation, the system failure processes, and the retargetting operations. The application of the method is used to assess the risks in carrying out a 1980 rendezvous mission to Comet Encke. Analysis of the results and evaluation of the effects of various risk factors on the mission show that system component failure rates is the limiting factor in attaining a high mission reliability. But it is also shown that a well-designed trajectory and system operation mode can be used effectively to partially compensate for unreliable thruster performance.

  9. Thrust production by a mechanical swimming lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, M. C.; Smits, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey to investigate the formation of the wake structure, the shedding vorticity from the body, and the relationship between thrust production and pressure on the surface of the robot. The robot mimics the motion of living lamprey in steady swimming by using a programmable microcomputer to actuate 13 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments. This indicates that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined, showing a clear connection between the location of vortex structures and the fluctuations of the pressure signal.

  10. NATURAL BARRIERS TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2005-07-27

    This booklet contains project descriptions of work performed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Science and Technology and International's (OST&I) Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust during Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust is part of OST&I's Science and Technology Program which supports the OCRWM mission to manage and dispose of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. In general, the projects described will continue beyond FY 2004 assuming that the technical work remains relevant to the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and sufficient funding is made available to the Science and Technology Program.

  11. Thrust vector control using electric actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Robert T.; Hall, David K.

    1995-01-01

    Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles.

  12. Advanced tube-bundle rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced rocket thrust chamber for future space application is described along with an improved method of fabrication. Potential benefits of the concept are improved cyclic life, reusability, and performance. Performance improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced heat transfer into the coolant which will enable higher chamber pressure in expander cycle engines. Cyclic life, reusability and reliability improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced structural compliance inherent in the construction. The method of construction involves the forming of the combustion chamber with a tube-bundle of high conductivity copper or copper alloy tubes, and the bonding of these tubes by an electroforming operation. Further, the method of fabrication reduces chamber complexity by incorporating manifolds, jackets, and structural stiffeners while having the potential for thrust chamber cost and weight reduction.

  13. MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2005-09-13

    The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability.

  14. Low-thrust Isp sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison of the cooling requirements and attainable specific impulse performance of engines in the 445 to 4448N thrust class utilizing LOX/RP-1, LOX/Hydrogen and LOX/Methane propellants is presented. The unique design requirements for the regenerative cooling of low-thrust engines operating at high pressures (up to 6894 kPa) were explored analytically by comparing single cooling with the fuel and the oxidizer, and dual cooling with both the fuel and the oxidizer. The effects of coolant channel geometry, chamber length, and contraction ratio on the ability to provide proper cooling were evaluated, as was the resulting specific impulse. The results show that larger contraction ratios and smaller channels are highly desirable for certain propellant combinations.

  15. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  16. Solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    The Solar Electric Propulsion System developed under this program was designed to demonstrate all the thrust subsystem functions needed on an unmanned planetary vehicle. The demonstration included operation of the basic elements, power matching input and output voltage regulation, three-axis thrust vector control, subsystem automatic control including failure detection and correction capability (using a PDP-11 computer), operation of critical elements in thermal-vacuum-, zero-gravity-type propellant storage, and data outputs from all subsystem elements. The subsystem elements, functions, unique features, and test setup are described. General features and capabilities of the test-support data system are also presented. The test program culminated in a 1500-h computer-controlled, system-functional demonstration. This included simultaneous operation of two thruster/power conditioner sets. The results of this testing phase satisfied all the program goals.

  17. CFD Code Survey for Thrust Chamber Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Klaus W.

    1990-01-01

    In the quest fo find analytical reference codes, responses from a questionnaire are presented which portray the current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program status and capability at various organizations, characterizing liquid rocket thrust chamber flow fields. Sample cases are identified to examine the ability, operational condition, and accuracy of the codes. To select the best suited programs for accelerated improvements, evaluation criteria are being proposed.

  18. High Rate Data Delivery Thrust Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a brief description of the high rate data delivery (HRDD) thrust area, its focus and current technical activities being carried out by NASA centers including JPL, academia and industry under this program is provided. The processes and methods being used to achieve active participation in this program are presented. The developments in space communication technologies, which will shape NASA enterprise missions in the 21 st. century, are highlighted.

  19. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, S.; Effinger, M.; Holmes, R.; Lee, J.; Jaskowiak, M.

    2000-01-01

    Traditional metals like steel and copper alloys have been used for many years to fabricate injector and chamber components of thruster assemblies. While the materials perform well, reducing engine weights would help existing and future vehicles gain performance and payload capability. It may now be possible to reduce current thruster weights up to 50% by applying composite materials. In this task, these materials are being applied to an existing thrust cell design to demonstrate new fabrication processes and potential weight savings. Two ceramic matrix composite (CMC) designs, three polymer matrix composite (PMC) designs, and two metal matrix composite (MMC) designs are being fabricated as small chamber demonstration units. In addition, a new alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is being investigated for thrust chamber liners since it offers higher strength and increased cycle life over traditional alloys. This new alloy is being used for the liner in each MMC and PMC demonstration unit. During June-August of 2000, hot-fire testing of each unit is planned to validate designs in an oxygen/hydrogen environment at chamber pressures around 850 psi. Although the weight savings using CMC materials is expected to be high, they have proven to be much harder to incorporate into chamber designs based on current fabrication efforts. However, the PMC & MMC concepts using the Cu-8Cr-4Nb liner are nearly complete and ready for testing. Additional efforts intend to use the PMC & MMC materials to fabricate a full size thrust chamber (60K lb(sub f) thrust class). The fabrication of this full size unit is expected to be complete by October 2000, followed by hot-fire testing in November-December 2000.

  20. Low Carbon Propulsion Strategic Thrust Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Jay

    2014-01-01

    NASA is taking a leadership role with regard to developing new options for low-carbon propulsion. Work related to the characterization of alternative fuels is coordinated with our partners in government and industry, and NASA is close to concluding a TC in this area. Research on alternate propulsion concepts continues to grow and is an important aspect of the ARMD portfolio. Strong partnerships have been a key enabling factor for research on this strategic thrust.

  1. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Schmid, T. E.; Torrey, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques and materials were developed and evaluated for the fabrication and coating of advanced, long life, regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. Materials were analyzed as fillers for sputter application of OFHC copper as a closeout layer to channeled inner structures; of the materials evaluated, aluminum was found to provide the highest bond strength and to be the most desirable for chamber fabrication. The structures and properties were investigated of thick sputtered OFHC copper, 0.15 Zr-Cu, Al2O3,-Cu, and SiC-Cu. Layered structures of OFHC copper and 0.15 Zr-Cu were investigated as means of improving chamber inner wall fatigue life. The evaluation of sputtered Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, NASA IIb-11, aluminum and Al2O3-Al alloys as high strength chamber outer jackets was performed. Techniques for refurbishing degraded thrust chambers with OFHC copper and coating thrust chambers with protective ZrO2 and graded ZrO2-copper thermal barrier coatings were developed.

  2. Nozzle Thrust Optimization While Reducing Jet Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.; Gilinsky, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    A Bluebell nozzle design concept is proposed for jet noise reduction with minimal thrust loss or even thrust augmentation. A Bluebell nozzle has a sinusoidal lip line edge (chevrons) and a sinusoidal cross section shape with linear amplitude increasing downstream in the divergent nozzle part (corrugations). The experimental tests of several Bluebell nozzle designs have shown nose reduction relative to a convergent-divergent round nozzle with design exhaust number M(e) = 1.5. The best design provides an acoustic benefit near 4dB with about 1 percent thrust augmentation. For subsonic flow ((M(e)= 0.6)), the tests indicated that the present method for design of Bluebell nozzles gives less acoustic benefit and in most cases jet noise increased. The proposed designs incorporate analytical theory and 2D and 3D numerical simulations. Full Navier-Stokes and Euler solvers were utilized. Boundary layer effects were used. Several different designs were accounted for in the Euler applications.

  3. Calculating track thrust with track functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsi-Ming; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2013-08-01

    In e+e- event shapes studies at LEP, two different measurements were sometimes performed: a “calorimetric” measurement using both charged and neutral particles and a “track-based” measurement using just charged particles. Whereas calorimetric measurements are infrared and collinear safe, and therefore calculable in perturbative QCD, track-based measurements necessarily depend on nonperturbative hadronization effects. On the other hand, track-based measurements typically have smaller experimental uncertainties. In this paper, we present the first calculation of the event shape “track thrust” and compare to measurements performed at ALEPH and DELPHI. This calculation is made possible through the recently developed formalism of track functions, which are nonperturbative objects describing how energetic partons fragment into charged hadrons. By incorporating track functions into soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate the distribution for track thrust with next-to-leading logarithmic resummation. Due to a partial cancellation between nonperturbative parameters, the distributions for calorimeter thrust and track thrust are remarkably similar, a feature also seen in LEP data.

  4. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  5. Thrust and power measurements of Olympic swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Wu, Vicki; Hutchison, Sean; Mark, Russell

    2012-11-01

    Elite level swimming is an extremely precise and even choreographed activity. Swimmers not only know the exact number of strokes necessary to take them across the pool, they also plan to be a precise distance from the wall at the end of their last stroke. Too far away and they lose time by drifting into the wall. Too close and their competitor may slide in before their hand comes forward to touch the wall. In this context, it is important to know, in detail, where and how a swimmer propels her/himself through the water. Over the past decade, state-of-the-art flow and thrust measurement diagnostics have been brought to competitive swimming. But the ability to correlate stroke mechanics to thrust production without somehow constraining the swimmer has here-to-fore not been possible. Using high speed video, a simple approach to mapping the swimmer's speed, thrust and net power output in a time resolved manner has been developed. This methodology has been applied to Megan Jendrick, gold medalist in the 100 individual breast stroke and 4 × 100 medley relay events in 2000 and Ariana Kukors, 2009 world champion and continuing world record holder in the 200 individual medley. Implications for training future elite swimmers will be discussed.

  6. Statistical error model for a solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bantell, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem statistical error model was developed as a tool for investigating the effects of thrust subsystem parameter uncertainties on navigation accuracy. The model is currently being used to evaluate the impact of electric engine parameter uncertainties on navigation system performance for a baseline mission to Encke's Comet in the 1980s. The data given represent the next generation in statistical error modeling for low-thrust applications. Principal improvements include the representation of thrust uncertainties and random process modeling in terms of random parametric variations in the thrust vector process for a multi-engine configuration.

  7. Ouachita Mountain thrust front: An integrated approach to prospect analysis in thrust belts

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, R.L. ); Keeling, M.A. ); Cassiani, D. )

    1990-05-01

    The thrust front of the Ouachita Mountains in western Arkansas is defined by the prominent asymmetric Washburn anticline. Previously interpreted as a complexly thrust-faulted anticline, the feature has been reinterpreted as a delta or triangle structure based on integration of surface mapping from thematic mapper (TM) data with subsurface interpretation of seismic and well-log cross sections. The northern limb of the Washburn anticline consists of a relatively unfaulted steeply north-dipping sheet above a major north-dipping backthrust. The southern limb consists of several steeply south-dipping thrust sheets that form a duplex zone in the center of the delta structure. Seismic and well-log interpretations suggested the presence of the imbrication in the core of the structure, but poor seismic resolution within the structure made interpretation of the backthrust and duplex geometry difficult. Surface mapping from TM imagery indicates the presence of the backthrust and the extent and geometry of the delta structure. Thrust sheets and horses also crop out, and their geometry is a guide to interpretation of subsurface data sets. The new model of the Ouachita thrust front as a delta structure has aided in subsurface data analysis and has resulted in a better understanding of trap geometry and distribution. This study also demonstrates the application of detailed surface mapping from satellite remote-sensing data to prospect-scale analysis.

  8. The Zagros hinterland fold-and-thrust belt in-sequence thrusting, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkarinejad, Khalil; Ghanbarian, Mohammad Ali

    2014-05-01

    The collision of the Iranian microcontinent with the Afro-Arabian continent resulted in the deformation of the Zagros orogenic belt. The foreland of this belt in the Persian Gulf and Arabian platform has been investigated for its petroleum and gas resource potentials, but the Zagros hinterland is poorly investigated and our knowledge about its deformation is much less than other parts of this orogen. Therefore, this work presents a new geological map, stratigraphic column and two detailed geological cross sections. This study indicates the presence of a hinterland fold-and-thrust belt on northeastern side of the Zagros orogenic core that consists of in-sequence thrusting and basement involvement in this important part of the Zagros hinterland. The in-sequence thrusting resulted in first- and second-order duplex systems, Mode I fault-bend folding, fault-propagation folding and asymmetric detachment folding which indicate close relationships between folding and thrusting. Study of fault-bend folds shows that layer-parallel simple shear has the same role in the southeastern and northwestern parts of the study area (αe = 23.4 ± 9.1°). A major lateral ramp in the basement beneath the Talaee plain with about one kilometer of vertical offset formed parallel to the SW movement direction and perpendicular to the major folding and thrusting.

  9. Initiation process of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Dotare, Tatsuya; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-04-01

    We conducted 2D (cross-sectional) analog experiments with dry sand using a high resolution digital image correlation (DIC) technique to reveal initiation process of a thrust fault in detail, and identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the thrust initiation. The observations suggest that the process can be divided into three stages. Stage 1: characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will be generated later. Before initiation of the fault, the area to be the hanging wall starts to uplift. Stage 2: defined by the generation of the new thrust and its active displacement. The location of the new thrust seems to be constrained by its associated back-thrust, produced at the foot of the surface slope (by the previous thrust). The activity of the previous thrust turns to zero once the new thrust is generated, but the timing of these two events is not the same. Stage 3: characterized by a constant displacement along the (new) thrust. Similar minor shear bands can be seen in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan and we can correlate the along-strike variations in seismic profiles to the model results that show the characteristic features in each thrust development stage.

  10. Gas dynamic calibration of a nano-Newton thrust stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, Andrew J.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Muntz, E. P.

    2002-10-01

    The ability to measure extremely low thrust levels with unusual precision is becoming more critical as attempts are made to characterize the performance of emerging micropropulsion systems. Many new attitude control concepts for nanospacecraft involve the production of thrust below 1 μN. A simple, but uniquely successful thrust stand has been developed and used to measure thrust levels as low as 86.2 nano-Newtons (nN) with an estimated accuracy of ±11%. Thrust levels in the range of 712 (nN) to 1 μN have been measured with an estimated accuracy of ±2%. Thrust is measured from an underexpanded orifice operating in the free molecule flow regime with helium, argon, and nitrogen propellants. The thrust stand is calibrated using results from direct simulation Monte Carlo numerical models and analytical solutions for free molecule orifice flow. The accuracy of the gas dynamic calibration technique, using free molecule orifice flow, has also been investigated. It is shown that thrust stand calibration using high Knudsen number helium flow can be accurate to within a few percent in the 80 to 1 μN thrust range for thin walled orifices when the stagnation pressure is accurately measured. The thrust stand and calibration technique exhibit significant improvement for accurate, low thrust measurements compared to currently published results.

  11. Conjunction challenges of low-thrust geosynchronous debris removal maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul V.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-06-01

    The conjunction challenges of low-thrust engines for continuous thrust re-orbiting of geosynchronous (GEO) objects to super-synchronous disposal orbits are investigated, with applications to end-of-life mitigation and active debris removal (ADR) technologies. In particular, the low maneuverability of low-thrust systems renders collision avoidance a challenging task. This study investigates the number of conjunction events a low-thrust system could encounter with the current GEO debris population during a typical re-orbit to 300 km above the GEO ring. Sensitivities to thrust level and initial longitude and inclination are evaluated, and the impact of delaying the start time for a re-orbiting maneuver is assessed. Results demonstrate that the mean number of conjunctions increases hyperbolically as thrust level decreases, but timing the start of the maneuver appropriately can reduce the average conjunction rate when lower thrust levels are applied.

  12. A Layman's Guide to Thrust Engine Development for Super/Hyper Sonic Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiesse, James L.

    The intention of this paper is to discuss the advances in thrust engines from the initial development of the J58/SR-71 (JT11D-20) of the U.S. Air Force's SR-71 Blackbird to the development of the RAM and SCRAM engines necessary to propel the new generations of high-flying super-speed aircraft. Engineering complexities suggest that the engines and…

  13. Paleostress analysis of the Osning Thrust, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saintot, Aline; Kozakovski, Anna; Pascal, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    The Osning Thrust is a 100 km-scale NW-SE fault separating the Lower Saxony Basin to the NE from the Münsterland Basin to the SE. The fault has accommodated a polyphase deformation that started at least when it acted as one of the normal border faults of the Jurassic Lower Saxony Basin. Tectonic inversion of the basin in Late Cretaceous-Early Paleocene times led to the development of the SE-vergent Osning Thrust and to folding of rocks. A paleostress analysis was carried out in order to decipher the polyphase kinematics of the Osning Thrust. The fault slip data were collected in the folded Albian to Turonian stratigraphic units of the Münsterland basin, in the SE vicinity of a 20 km-long steep segment of the Osning Thrust. Fault slip data in sufficient amount to perform paleostress inversion were collected in 10 sites among 23 visited outcrops. Abundant minor faults trend sub-parallel to the NW-SE steep segment of the Osning Thrust but, surprisingly, they are dextral (and not reverse) in type. Another major set of E-W striking minor faults is remarkable. It corresponds to conjugate systems of either reverse or normal faults and to oblique- to strike-slip faults in a less extent. The paleostress tensors reveal a ca. N-S compression recorded in 5 locations under which the NW-SE steep faults were dextral and the E-W striking S- and N- dipping faults were reverse. Six stress tensors fit with a ca. N-S extension. They are calculated from E-W striking S- and N- dipping normal to oblique normal faults. The same N-S trend of minimum stress axis is also recorded with NNE-SSW dextral and E-W sinistral faults. We propose that along the studied segment of the Osning Thrust a N-S compressional stress field led to the inversion of the Lower Saxony Basin and that slip along the Osning Thrust was oblique reverse. At two locations, the N-S compressive stress states affected the rock prior to tilting of the beds (herein, due to folding) and at one site, the normal faults of the N

  14. Static investigation of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, John G.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance of two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles designed to have simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring capability. This concept utilized divergent flap rotation of thrust vectoring in the pitch plane and deflection of flat yaw flaps hinged at the end of the sidewalls for yaw thrust vectoring. The hinge location of the yaw flaps was varied at four positions from the nozzle exit plane to the throat plane. The yaw flaps were designed to contain the flow laterally independent of power setting. In order to eliminate any physical interference between the yaw flap deflected into the exhaust stream and the divergent flaps, the downstream corners of both upper and lower divergent flaps were cut off to allow for up to 30 deg of yaw flap deflection. The impact of varying the nozzle pitch vector angle, throat area, yaw flap hinge location, yaw flap length, and yaw flap deflection angle on nozzle internal performance characteristics, was studied. High-pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust at nozzle pressure ratios up to 7.0. Static results indicate that configurations with the yaw flap hinge located upstream of the exit plane provide relatively high levels of thrust vectoring efficiency without causing large losses in resultant thrust ratio. Therefore, these configurations represent a viable concept for providing simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring.

  15. The use of laterally vectored thrust to counter thrust asymmetry in a tactical jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A nonlinear, six degree-of-freedom flight simulator for a twin engine tactical jet was built on a hybrid computer to investigate lateral vectoring of the remaining thrust component for the case of a single engine failure at low dynamic pressures. Aircraft control was provided by an automatic controller rather than a pilot, and thrust vector control was provided by an open-loop controller that deflected a vane (located on the periphery of each exhaust jet and normally streamlined for noninterference with the flow). Lateral thrust vectoring decreased peak values of lateral control deflections, eliminated the requirement for steady-state lateral aerodynamic control deflections, and decreased the amount of altitude lost for a single engine failure.

  16. Extended performance solar electric propulsion thrust system study. Volume 2: Baseline thrust system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; Hawthorne, E. I.

    1977-01-01

    Several thrust system design concepts were evaluated and compared using the specifications of the most advanced 30- cm engineering model thruster as the technology base. Emphasis was placed on relatively high-power missions (60 to 100 kW) such as a Halley's comet rendezvous. The extensions in thruster performance required for the Halley's comet mission were defined and alternative thrust system concepts were designed in sufficient detail for comparing mass, efficiency, reliability, structure, and thermal characteristics. Confirmation testing and analysis of thruster and power-processing components were performed, and the feasibility of satisfying extended performance requirements was verified. A baseline design was selected from the alternatives considered, and the design analysis and documentation were refined. The baseline thrust system design features modular construction, conventional power processing, and a concentractor solar array concept and is designed to interface with the space shuttle.

  17. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  18. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

  19. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Namtran C.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation actuator. The device utilized a fuel mixture of H2 and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at approx.600 Hz, for the lambda/4 mode. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to specific impulse of 2611 s. This value is comparable to other H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) experiments. The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was approx.600 Hz, and was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the model and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 lb/cu in, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume values of approximately 0.01 lb/cu in.

  20. High-power, null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kunning G; Walker, Mitchell L R

    2009-05-01

    This article presents the theory and operation of a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand. The thrust stand design supports thrusters having a total mass up to 250 kg and measures thrust over a range of 1 mN to 5 N. The design uses a conventional inverted pendulum to increase sensitivity, coupled with a null-type feature to eliminate thrust alignment error due to deflection of thrust. The thrust stand position serves as the input to the null-circuit feedback control system and the output is the current to an electromagnetic actuator. Mechanical oscillations are actively damped with an electromagnetic damper. A closed-loop inclination system levels the stand while an active cooling system minimizes thermal effects. The thrust stand incorporates an in situ calibration rig. The thrust of a 3.4 kW Hall thruster is measured for thrust levels up to 230 mN. The uncertainty of the thrust measurements in this experiment is +/-0.6%, determined by examination of the hysteresis, drift of the zero offset and calibration slope variation. PMID:19485530

  1. Jaw thrust can deteriorate upper airway patency.

    PubMed

    von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Erb, T O; Frei, F J

    2005-04-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a frequent problem in spontaneously breathing children undergoing anesthesia or sedation procedures. Failure to maintain a patent airway can rapidly result in severe hypoxemia, bradycardia, or asystole, as the oxygen demand of children is high and oxygen reserve is low. We present two children with cervical masses in whom upper airway obstruction exaggerated while the jaw thrust maneuver was applied during induction of anesthesia. This deterioration in airway patency was probably caused by medial displacement of the lateral tumorous tissues which narrowed the pharyngeal airway. PMID:15777312

  2. STOL landing thrust: Reverser jet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis tools and modeling concepts for jet flow fields encountered upon use of thrust reversers for high performance military aircraft are described. A semi-empirical model of the reverser ground wall jet interaction with the uniform cross flow due to aircraft forward velocity is described. This ground interaction model is used to demonstrate exhaust gas ingestion conditions. The effects of control of exhaust jet vector angle, lateral splay, and moving versus fixed ground simulation are discussed. The Adler/Baron jet-in-cross flow model is used in conjunction with three dimensional panel methods to investigate the upper surface jet induced flow field.

  3. Entrainment and mixing in thrust augmenting ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, L.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of two-dimensional thrust augmenting ejector flows has been conducted. Measurements of the shroud surface pressure distribution, mean velocity, turbulent intensities and Reynolds stresses were made in two shroud geometries at various primary nozzle pressure ratios. The effects of shroud geometry and primary nozzle pressure ratio on the shroud surface pressure distribution, mean flow field and turbulent field were determined. From these measurements the evolution of mixing within the shroud of the primary flow and entrained fluid was obtained. The relationship between the mean flow field, the turbulent field and the shroud surface pressure distribution is discussed.

  4. A review of induction and attachment times of wetting thin films between air bubbles and particles and its relevance in the separation of particles by flotation.

    PubMed

    Albijanic, Boris; Ozdemir, Orhan; Nguyen, Anh V; Bradshaw, Dee

    2010-08-11

    Bubble-particle attachment in water is critical to the separation of particles by flotation which is widely used in the recovery of valuable minerals, the deinking of wastepaper, the water treatment and the oil recovery from tar sands. It involves the thinning and rupture of wetting thin films, and the expansion and relaxation of the gas-liquid-solid contact lines. The time scale of the first two processes is referred to as the induction time, whereas the time scale of the attachment involving all the processes is called the attachment time. This paper reviews the experimental studies into the induction and attachment times between minerals and air bubbles, and between oil droplets and air bubbles. It also focuses on the experimental investigations and mathematical modelling of elementary processes of the wetting film thinning and rupture, and the three-phase contact line expansion relevant to flotation. It was confirmed that the time parameters, obtained by various authors, are sensitive enough to show changes in both flotation surface chemistry and physical properties of solid surfaces of pure minerals. These findings should be extended to other systems. It is proposed that measurements of the bubble-particle attachment can be used to interpret changes in flotation behaviour or, in conjunction with other factors, such as particle size and gas dispersion, to predict flotation performance. PMID:20478547

  5. How does spacer length of imidazolium gemini surfactants control the fabrication of 2D-Langmuir films of silver-nanoparticles at the air-water interface?

    PubMed

    Datta, Sougata; Biswas, Joydeep; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-09-15

    A series of gemini surfactants based on cationic imidazolium ring as polar headgroup, abbreviated as [Im-n-Im], 2Br(-) (n=2, 5, 6 and 12), was synthesized. Their ability to stabilize silver nanoparticles in aqueous media was investigated. The resulting suspensions were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). They exhibit specific morphologies by adopting different supramolecular assemblies in aqueous media depending on the internal packing arrangements and on the number of spacer methylene units [-(CH2)n-]. Individual colloids were extracted from the aqueous to chloroform layer and spread at the air/water interface to allow the formation of well-defined Langmuir films. By analysis of the surface pressure-area isotherms, the details about the packing behavior and orientation of the imidazolium gemini surfactant capped silver nanoparticles were obtained. Morphological features of the dynamic process of monolayer compression at the air-water interface were elucidated using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). These monolayers were further transferred on mica sheets by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique at their associated collapse pressure and the morphology of these monolayers was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The number of spacer methylene units [-(CH2)n-] of the gemini surfactants exerted critical influence in modulating the characteristics of the resulting Langmuir films. PMID:24998058

  6. Reconciling Himalayan midcrustal discontinuities: The Main Central thrust system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kyle P.; Ambrose, Tyler K.; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Cottle, John M.; Shrestha, Sudip

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of thrust-sense tectonometamorphic discontinuities within the exhumed Himalayan metamorphic core can be explained as part of the Main Central thrust system. This imbricate thrust structure, which significantly thickened the orogenic midcrustal core, comprises a series of thrust-sense faults that all merge into a single detachment. The existence of these various structures, and their potential for complex overprinting along the main detachment, may help explain the contention surrounding the definition, mapping, and interpretation of the Main Central thrust. The unique evolution of specific segments of the Main Central thrust system along the orogen is interpreted to be a reflection of the inherent basement structure and ramp position, and structural level of exposure of the mid-crust. This helps explain the variation in the timing and structural position of tectonometamorphic discontinuities along the length of the mountain belt.

  7. Experimental investigations of thrust vectoring systems for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rolls, L. S.; Aoyagi, K.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of two technology programs sponsored by NASA to investigate the characteristics of two thrust vectoring schemes for V/STOL aircraft. The operational capability of the VTOL aircraft is dependent on maximum utilization of the installed thrust in both the cruise and powered lift modes of flight. An effective thrust vectoring system on the cruise propulsion unit is therefore essential to provide maximum payload in hover and STOL plus minimum specific fuel consumption in loiter and cruise. Introducing a high by-pass ratio fan system, augmenting the gas generator thrust, as the propulsion system for VTOL aircraft places increased significance on the performance of the relatively short coupled thrust vectoring systems. The two programs discussed herein include both large-scale and small-scale tests of a vectoring hood system with a vented, internal-lip and swivel nozzle systems. These tests indicated that a satisfactory thrust vectoring system can be developed.

  8. Optimal high- and low-thrust geocentric transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackett, L. L.; Edelbaum, T. N.

    1974-01-01

    A computer code which rapidly calculates time optimal combined high- and low-thrust transfers between two geocentric orbits in the presence of a strong gravitational field has been developed as a mission analysis tool. The low-thrust portion of the transfer can be between any two arbitrary ellipses. There is an option for including the effect of two initial high-thrust impulses which would raise the spacecraft from a low, initially circular orbit to the initial orbit for the low-thrust portion of the transfer. In addition, the effect of a single final impulse after the low-thrust portion of the transfer may be included. The total Delta V for the initial two impulses must be specified as well as the Delta V for the final impulse. Either solar electric or nuclear electric propulsion can be assumed for the low-thrust phase of the transfer.

  9. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, Louis; Litchford, Ron; Jeng, San-Mou

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the variable thrust engine (VTE) in the orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N2O4 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  10. OMV/VTE variable thrust engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosillere, L.; Litchford, R.; Jeng, S. M.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop a predictive CFD based analytical tool for the Variable Thrust Engine (VTE) in the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). This objective is being accomplished within the framework of the Los Alamos KIVA computer code for chemically reactive flows with sprays. For the OMV application, the main structure of KIVA is to be retained while reformulating many of the phenomenological submodels, enhancing some of the numerics, and adding more features. The analytical model consists of the general conservation equations for two-phase reactive flows and of submodels for turbulence, chemical reactions, and bipropellant sprays. Tailoring this model to the OMV engine brings about the added complexities of combustion and flow processes that occur in a liquid hypergolic propellant rocket chamber. This report exposes the foundation upon which the analytical tool is being constructed and developed. Results from a cursory computational exercise involving the simulation of the flow and combustion processes in a hypothetical N2H4/N204 rocket engine thrust chamber is presented and discussed.

  11. Thrust vector control using electric actuation

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtel, R.T.; Hall, D.K.

    1995-01-25

    Presently, gimbaling of launch vehicle engines for thrust vector control is generally accomplished using a hydraulic system. In the case of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters and main engines, these systems are powered by hydrazine auxiliary power units. Use of electromechanical actuators would provide significant advantages in cost and maintenance. However, present energy source technologies such as batteries are heavy to the point of causing significant weight penalties. Utilizing capacitor technology developed by the Auburn University Space Power Institute in collaboration with the Auburn CCDS, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Auburn are developing EMA system components with emphasis on high discharge rate energy sources compatible with space shuttle type thrust vector control requirements. Testing has been done at MSFC as part of EMA system tests with loads up to 66000 newtons for pulse times of several seconds. Results show such an approach to be feasible providing a potential for reduced weight and operations costs for new launch vehicles. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  12. Emergency Control Aircraft System Using Thrust Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J. (Inventor); Burcham, Frank W., Jr. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A digital longitudinal Aircraft Propulsion Control (APC system of a multiengine aircraft is provided by engine thrust modulation in response to comparing an input flightpath angle signal (gamma)c from a pilot thumbwheel. or an ILS system with a sensed flightpath angle y to produce an error signal (gamma)e that is then integrated (with reasonable limits) to generate a drift correction signal to be added to the error signal (gamma)e after first subtracting a lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) for phugoid damping. The output error signal is multiplied by a constant to produce an aircraft thrust control signal ATC of suitable amplitude to drive a throttle servo for all engines. each of which includes its own full-authority digital engine control (FADEC) computer. An alternative APC system omits sensed flightpath angle feedback and instead controls the flightpath angle by feedback of the lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) which also inherently provides phugoid damping. The feature of drift compensation is retained.

  13. Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batakis, A. P.; Vogan, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to generate data and develop analytical techniques to predict the performance and reliability of ceramic thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments. A finite element model was used to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of coating systems in rocket thrust chambers. Candidate coating systems (using a copper substrate, NiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2.8Y2O3 ceramic overcoat) were selected for detailed study based on photomicrographic evaluations of experimental test specimens. The effects of plasma spray application parameters on the material properties of these coatings were measured and the effects on coating performance evaluated using the finite element model. Coating design curves which define acceptable operating envelopes for seleted coating systems were constructed based on temperature and strain limitations. Spray gun power levels was found to have the most significant effect on coating structure. Three coating systems were selected for study using different power levels. Thermal conductivity, strain tolerance, density, and residual stress were measured for these coatings. Analyses indicated that extremely thin coatings ( 0.02 mm) are required to accommodate the high heat flux of a rocket thrust chamber and ensure structural integrity.

  14. Experimental Results of Schlicher's Thrusting Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the claims by Rex L. Schlicher, et al., (Patent 5,142,86 1) that a certain antenna geometry produces thrust greatly exceeding radiation reaction, when driven by repetitive, fast rise, and relatively slower decay current pulses. In order to test this hypothesis, the antenna was suspended by strings as a 3 in pendulum. Current pulses were fed to the antenna along the suspension path by a very flexible coaxial line constructed from loudspeaker cable and copper braid sheath. When driving the antenna via this cabling, our pulser was capable of sustaining 1200 A pulses at a rate of 30 per second up to a minute. In this way, bursts of pulses could be delivered in synch with the pendulum period in order to build up any motion. However, when using a laser beam passing through a lens attached to the antenna to amplify linear displacement by a factor of at least 25, no correlated motion of the beam spot could be detected on a distant wall. We conclude, in agreement with the momentum theorem of classical electromagnetic theory, that any thrust produced is far below practically useful levels. Hence, within classical electrodynamics, there is little hope of detecting any low level motion that cannot be explained by interactions with surrounding structural steel and the Earth's magnetic field.

  15. Fluid storage and transport in thrust belts: the Gavarnie Thrust system revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaig, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    There has been renewed interest in the pressure and movement of fluids in thrust systems in recent years with the discovery and increasing importance of slow slip earthquakes. Unfortunately the overpressured regime thought to be the source region for both normal and slow-slip earthquakes is inaccessible to direct observation, so information about the actual water content, flow regimes and permeability structure at the time of thrusting can only be obtained in exhumed rocks. The Gavarnie Thrust System in the Pyrenees (including the immediate footwall of the thrust and overlying thrust sheets) is exceptionally well studied in terms of structural and microstructural work, fluid inclusions, and isotopic tracing of fluid flow. Southward thrusting by 12-15 km occurred during the Eocene, and the current geometry of the thrust is a broad dome, allowing sampling at many locations. There is abundant evidence for near-lithostatic fluid pressures at depths of 8-15 km in the crust and temperatures of 300-400 °C, and fluids at these levels are dominated by hypersaline brines with Cl/Br ratios indicating evaporation of seawater. They are inferred to be derived from widespread Triassic evaporates, and stored in underlying redbeds and fractured basement rocks. There is also evidence from fluid inclusions for periodic pressure cycling down to near-hydrostatic values. This is thought to be related to co-seismic fault valve behaviour with release of fluid both into the shallow thrust and into steeply dipping shear zones in the hangingwall. Isotopic studies of carbonate mylonites along the Gavarnie thrust indicate unidirectional southward (structurally upward) flow of fluid , again probably mainly during transient veining events. These relatively slow moving fluids appear to have fed into a hydrostatic regime with topographically driven flow at higher levels. If time averaged permeability was high, most of the fluid would have rapidly escaped, since there is little opportunity to

  16. Explicit Low-Thrust Guidance for Reference Orbit Targeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Try; Udwadia, Firdaus E.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of a low-thrust spacecraft controlled to a reference orbit is addressed in this paper. A simple and explicit low-thrust guidance scheme with constrained thrust magnitude is developed by combining the fundamental equations of motion for constrained systems from analytical dynamics with a Lyapunov-based method. Examples are given for a spacecraft controlled to a reference trajectory in the circular restricted three body problem.

  17. Design and test of a magnetic thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Mikula, A.; Banerjee, B.; Lewis, D. W.; Imlach, J.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic thrust bearing can be employed to take thrust loads in rotating machinery. The design and construction of a prototype magnetic thrust bearing for a high load per weight application is described. The theory for the bearing is developed. Fixtures were designed and the bearing was tested for load capacity using a universal testing machine. Various shims were employed to have known gap thicknesses. A comparison of the theory and measured results is presented.

  18. Comparison of surface modification of polypropylene film by filamentary DBD at atmospheric pressure and homogeneous DBD at medium pressure in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Z.; Xie, X.; Li, J.; Yang, H.; Qiu, Y.; Kuffel, E.

    2009-04-01

    Non-equilibrium plasmas generated by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) are of great interest in material surface processing because of their convenience, effectiveness and low cost. In this paper, polypropylene (PP) films are modified using a non-equilibrium plasma generated by a DBD in air in homogeneous mode and in filamentary mode. The filamentary DBD is generated in ambient air, and the homogeneous DBD is generated at medium pressure with an operating pressure value of 3 kPa. The characteristics of homogeneous DBD are studied and compared with those of filamentary DBD by measuring their electrical discharge parameters and observing their light emission phenomena, and the surface properties of the PP films before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle and surface energy measurement, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that the homogeneous DBD is even and stable in the whole gas gap, which differs from the commonly filamentary DBD. The plasma treatments modify the PP surface in both morphology and composition. The PP films modified in both treatments show a remarkable decrease in the water contact angle and a remarkable increase in surface energy due to the introduction of oxygen-containing groups on the surface and the etching of the surface. The homogeneous DBD is more effective in PP surface modification than the filamentary DBD as it can make the contact angle decrease to a lower level by introducing more oxygen-containing groups. This effect could be explained by the evenly distributed plasma at a homogeneous DBD than at a filamentary DBD, and by the more efficient introduction of atomic oxygen to the PP surface in the case of homogeneous DBD.

  19. Measuring HOMO/LUMO gap of explosive film at air interface using ESFG: model for explosive at void surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, Darcie; Kohl, Ian; Kearney, Sean; Rupper, Stephen; Martin, Laura; Alam, Kathy; Knepper, Robert; Kay, Jeffery

    Vibrational broadband sum frequency generation has enabled measurements of heat transfer/disorder under shock compression on monolayer length scales (Carter, JPCA, 2008). At Sandia, we are extending this approach to examine shock-induced changes in the electronic structure of secondary explosives at surfaces using electronic sum frequency generation (ESFG)(Yamaguchi, JCP, 2008). Theoretical studies suggest explosives at voids and grain boundaries may have different reactivity than bulk material based on shifts in the bandgap at defects (Kuklja, Appl. Phys. A 2003). We seek to measure these electronic shifts for the first time using a thin film explosive samples as a model for the void surface. We will report electronic sum frequency data from vapour deposited thin film explosive compared to UV/Vis data of the bulk film at ambient pressures and discuss application of ESFG technique to samples under shock compression.

  20. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of potential reusable thrust chamber concepts is studied. Propellant condidates were examined and analytically combined with potential cooling schemes. A data base of engine data which would assist in a configuration selection was produced. The data base verification was performed by the demonstration of a thrust chamber of a selected coolant scheme design. A full scale insulated columbium thrust chamber was used for propellant coolant configurations. Combustion stability of the injectors and a reduced size thrust chamber were experimentally verified as proof of concept demonstrations of the design and study results.

  1. A review of thrust-vectoring schemes for fighter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a review of thrust vectoring schemes for advanced fighter applications. Results are presented from wind tunnel and system integration studies on thrust vectoring nozzle concepts. Vectoring data are presented from wind tunnel tests of axisymmetric C-D (convergent-divergent) and nonaxisymmetric wedge, C-D, single ramp and USB (upper-surface blowing) nozzle concepts. Results from recent airframe/nozzle integration studies on the impact of thrust vectoring on weight, cooling and performance characteristics are discussed. This review indicates that the aircraft designer has, at his disposal, a wide range of thrust vectoring schemes which offer potential for added or improved aircraft capability.

  2. Kinematic modeling of folding above listric propagating thrusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardozo, Nestor; Brandenburg, J. P.

    2014-03-01

    We describe a kinematic approach to simulate folds above listric propagating thrusts. The model is based on a pre-defined circular thrust geometry with a maximum central angle beyond which the thrust is planar, inclined shear above the circular thrust, and trishear in front of the thrust. Provided the trajectory of thrust propagation is established, the model can be run forward and backwards. We use this last feature to implement a global simulated annealing, inverse modeling strategy. This inverse modeling strategy is applied to synthetic folds as well as two real examples in offshore Venezuela and the Niger Delta toe-thrust system. These three examples illustrate the benefits of the algorithm, particularly in predicting the possible range of models that can fit the structures. Thrust geometry, depth to detachment level, and backlimb geometry have high impact in model parameters such as backlimb shear angle and fault slip; while forelimb geometry is critical to constrain parameters such as fault propagation to fault slip ratio and trishear angle. Steep to overturned beds in forelimb areas are often not imaged by seismic, so in the absence of additional well data, considering all possible thrust-fold geometries is critical for the modeling and whatever prediction (e.g. hydrocarbon trap integrity) is made from it.

  3. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the

  4. Vista/F-16 Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) control law design and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwerneman, W. D.; Eller, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    For the Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) program, a new control law was developed using multi-axis thrust vectoring to augment the aircraft's aerodynamic control power to provide maneuverability above the normal F-16 angle of attack limit. The control law architecture was developed using Lockheed Fort Worth's offline and piloted simulation capabilities. The final flight control laws were used in flight test to demonstrate tactical benefits gained by using thrust vectoring in air-to-air combat. Differences between the simulator aerodynamics data base and the actual aircraft aerodynamics led to significantly different lateral-directional flying qualities during the flight test program than those identified during piloted simulation. A 'dial-a-gain' flight test control law update was performed in the middle of the flight test program. This approach allowed for inflight optimization of the aircraft's flying qualities. While this approach is not preferred over updating the simulator aerodynamic data base and then updating the control laws, the final selected gain set did provide adequate lateral-directional flying qualities over the MATV flight envelope. The resulting handling qualities and the departure resistance of the aircraft allowed the 422nd_squadron pilots to focus entirely on evaluating the aircraft's tactical utility.

  5. 3D Two-way coupled TEHD analysis on the lubricating characteristics of thrust bearings in pump-turbine units by combining CFD and FEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Liming; Luo, Yongyao; Wang, Zhengwei; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal elastic hydro dynamic (TEHD) lubrication analysis for the thrust bearing is usually conducted by combining Reynolds equation with finite element analysis (FEA). But it is still a problem to conduct the computation by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and FEA which can simulate the TEHD more accurately. In this paper, by using both direct and separate coupled solutions together, steady TEHD lubrication considering the viscosity-temperature effect for a bidirectional thrust bearing in a pump-turbine unit is simulated combining a 3D CFD model for the oil film with a 3D FEA model for the pad and mirror plate. Cyclic symmetry condition is used in the oil film flow as more reasonable boundary conditions which avoids the oil temperature assumption at the leading and trailing edge. Deformations of the pad and mirror plate are predicted and discussed as well as the distributions of oil film thickness, pressure, temperature. The predicted temperature shows good agreement with measurements, while the pressure shows a reasonable distribution comparing with previous studies. Further analysis of the three-coupled-field reveals the reason of the high pressure and high temperature generated in the film. Finally, the influence of rotational speed of the mirror plate on the lubrication characteristics is illustrated which shows the thrust load should be balanced against the oil film temperature and pressure in optimized designs. This research proposes a thrust bearing computation method by combining CFD and FEA which can do the TEHD analysis more accurately.

  6. Large-Scale Wind-Tunnel Tests of Exhaust Ingestion Due to Thrust Reversal on a Four-Engine Jet Transport during Ground Roll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolhurst, William H., Jr.; Hickey, David H.; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi

    1961-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests have been conducted on a large-scale model of a swept-wing jet transport type airplane to study the factors affecting exhaust gas ingestion into the engine inlets when thrust reversal is used during ground roll. The model was equipped with four small jet engines mounted in nacelles beneath the wing. The tests included studies of both cascade and target type reversers. The data obtained included the free-stream velocity at the occurrence of exhaust gas ingestion in the outboard engine and the increment of drag due to thrust reversal for various modifications of thrust reverser configuration. Motion picture films of smoke flow studies were also obtained to supplement the data. The results show that the free-stream velocity at which ingestion occurred in the outboard engines could be reduced considerably, by simple modifications to the reversers, without reducing the effective drag due to reversed thrust.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Thrust Fault Rupture Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabuchian, Vahe

    Thrust fault earthquakes are investigated in the laboratory by generating dynamic shear ruptures along pre-existing frictional faults in rectangular plates. A considerable body of evidence suggests that dip-slip earthquakes exhibit enhanced ground motions in the acute hanging wall wedge as an outcome of broken symmetry between hanging and foot wall plates with respect to the earth surface. To understand the physical behavior of thrust fault earthquakes, particularly ground motions near the earth surface, ruptures are nucleated in analog laboratory experiments and guided up-dip towards the simulated earth surface. The transient slip event and emitted radiation mimic a natural thrust earthquake. High-speed photography and laser velocimeters capture the rupture evolution, outputting a full-field view of photo-elastic fringe contours proportional to maximum shearing stresses as well as continuous ground motion velocity records at discrete points on the specimen. Earth surface-normal measurements validate selective enhancement of hanging wall ground motions for both sub-Rayleigh and super-shear rupture speeds. The earth surface breaks upon rupture tip arrival to the fault trace, generating prominent Rayleigh surface waves. A rupture wave is sensed in the hanging wall but is, however, absent from the foot wall plate: a direct consequence of proximity from fault to seismometer. Signatures in earth surface-normal records attenuate with distance from the fault trace. Super-shear earthquakes feature greater amplitudes of ground shaking profiles, as expected from the increased tectonic pressures required to induce super-shear transition. Paired stations measure fault parallel and fault normal ground motions at various depths, which yield slip and opening rates through direct subtraction of like components. Peak fault slip and opening rates associated with the rupture tip increase with proximity to the fault trace, a result of selective ground motion amplification in the

  8. Investigation of Thrust and Drag Characteristics of a Plug-type Exhaust Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearth, Donald P; Gorton, Gerald C

    1954-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the 8- by 6-foot supersonic wind tunnel on the external and internal characteristics of a plug-type exhaust nozzle. Two positions of the center plug, one simulating a convergent nozzle and the other a convergent-divergent nozzle, were investigated. Data were obtained at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.1, 0.6, 1.6, and 2.0 over a pressure-ratio range of 1 to 20 and angles of attack of zero and 8 degrees. Results of this investigation indicated that the plug nozzle had thrust-minus-drag performance over the entire pressure-ratio range comparable with equivalent conventional nozzles. The effect of the exhaust jet on the external aerodynamics was similar to results observed for conventional nozzles. In addition, the thrust characteristics were generally insensitive to external flow and good agreement was noted with data obtained on comparable plug nozzles in quiescent air.

  9. High-mobility, air stable bottom-contact n-channel thin film transistors based on N,N′-ditridecyl perylene diimide

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lanchao; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Guo, Yunlong; Wen, Yugeng; Liu, Yunqi E-mail: liuyq@iccas.ac.cn; Zhan, Xiaowei E-mail: liuyq@iccas.ac.cn; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871

    2013-11-11

    Bottom-gate bottom-contact (BGBC) organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) based on N,N′-ditridecyl perylene diimide exhibit electron mobility as high as 3.54 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in nitrogen, higher than that (1 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}) of bottom-gate top-contact devices. The better performance of BGBC configuration in N{sub 2} is attributed to lower contact resistance, which is further reduced by thermal annealing. After thermally annealing the BGBC OTFTs at 180 °C, electron mobility as high as 3.5 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, current on/off ratio of 10{sup 6} and threshold voltage of 9 V are achieved in air, and the mobility retains above 1 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} after storage for two months in air. Thermal treatment enhanced crystalline grains, reduced grain boundaries, and suppressed the adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}, leading to excellent performance in air.

  10. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, André H.; Mateu, Vicent; Pietrulewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e+e- → hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N3LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(ΛQCD) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  11. Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

  12. Thrust Production in a Mechanical Swimming Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey as a means of investigating the surface pressure and wake structure during swimming. A programmable microcomputer actuates 11 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The waveform is based on the motion of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), as described by Tytell and Lauder (2004) and kinematic studies of living lamprey. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments indicating that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined. The project is supported by NIH CNRS Grant 1R01NS054271.

  13. An investigation of corner separation within a thrust augmenter having Coanda jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiler, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    The development of separation in corners of thrust augmentor wings having Coanda jets was investigated using hot film surface sensors and pressure transducers. Separation on the test augmentor began at a corner very close to the augmentor exit and then rapidly proceeded upstream. Measurements of the pressure fields in the corner region indicated that a modified form of the Stratford criterion could be used to predict the onset of separation. Testing was conducted over a range of nozzle pressure ratios, aspect ratios, diffuser angles, and designs of the boundary layer and Coanda nozzles.

  14. The Chevron Foil Thrust Bearing: Improved Performance Through Passive Thermal Management and Effective Lubricant Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An improved foil thrust bearing is described that eliminates or reduces the need for forced cooling of the bearing foils while at the same time improves the load capacity of the bearing, enhances damping, provides overload tolerance, and eliminates the high speed load capacity drop-off that plagues the current state of the art. The performance improvement demonstrated by the chevron foil thrust bearing stems from a novel trailing edge shape that splays the hot lubricant in the thin film radially, thus preventing hot lubricant carry-over into the ensuing bearing sector. Additionally, the chevron shaped trailing edge induces vortical mixing of the hot lubricant with the gas that is naturally resident within the inter-pad region of a foil thrust bearing. The elimination of hot gas carry-over in combination with the enhanced mixing has enabled a completely passive thermally managed foil bearing design. Laboratory testing at NASA has confirmed the original analysis and reduced this concept to practice.

  15. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program has been planned at the NASA Lewis Research Center to build confidence in the feasibility of liquid oxygen cooling for hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines. Although liquid oxygen cooling has previously been incorporated in test hardware, more runtime is necessary to gain confidence in this concept. In the previous tests, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot-gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastrophic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed in this report. Four thrust chambers, three with cracks and one without, should be tested. The axial location of the cracks should be varied parametrically. Each chamber should be instrumented to determine the effects of the cracks, as well as the overall performance and durability of the chambers.

  16. Thrust faults and back thrust in Madison range of southwestern Montana foreland

    SciTech Connect

    Tysdal, R.G.

    1986-04-01

    In the Rocky Mountain foreland of southwestern Montana, a zone of Late Cretaceous thrust faults, named the Hilgard fault system, extends along the west side of the Madison Range from Hebgen Lake northward for about 50 mi (80 km). The thrust faults are steep at their leading edges but flatten westward beneath the associated plates, where they commonly dip 25/sup 0/-30/sup 0/. Structural lows and highs are apparent beneath the Beaver Creek plate, the major thrust sheet of the system, and correlate with salients and reentrants of the plate. The Beaver Creek plate consists primarily of Archean metamorphic rocks, but Phanerozoic strata are preserved along the northern part of the plate's leading edge. Only the forward part of the plate is preserved in the Madison Range because Cenozoic normal faults of the Madison Range fault system dropped much of the plate beneath the Madison Valley on the west. The Kirkwood plate lies east of and beneath the Beaver Creek plate, and contains structures of the eastern part of the Hilgard system. The central segment of the leading edge of the Kirkwood plate is not completely detached from underlying strata. The leading edge of the northern part of the plate, defined by the Cache Creek fault, is flanked on the west by an associated anticline. The southern end of the Cache Creek fault is an eastward-dipping back thrust, which abruptly steepens on the west adjacent to the anticline. Both the fault and the anticline are believed to have formed above a concealed detachment fault. The southern part of the Kirkwood plate displays structures interpreted to represent displacement transfer from the Beaver Creek plate. 9 figures.

  17. The 30-centimeter ion thrust subsystem design manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The principal characteristics of the 30-centimeter ion propulsion thrust subsystem technology that was developed to satisfy the propulsion needs of future planetary and early orbital missions are described. Functional requirements and descriptions, interface and performance requirements, and physical characteristics of the hardware are described at the thrust subsystem, BIMOD engine system, and component level.

  18. Impact of plasma noise on a direct thrust measurement system.

    PubMed

    Pottinger, S J; Lamprou, D; Knoll, A K; Lappas, V J

    2012-03-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a pendulum-type thrust measurement system, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and a laser optical displacement sensor have been used simultaneously to determine the displacement resulting from an applied thrust. The LVDT sensor uses an analog interface, whereas the laser sensor uses a digital interface to communicate the displacement readings to the data acquisition equipment. The data collected by both sensors show good agreement for static mass calibrations and validation with a cold gas thruster. However, the data obtained using the LVDT deviate significantly from that of the laser sensor when operating two varieties of plasma thrusters: a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma thruster, and a DC powered plasma thruster. Results establish that even with appropriate shielding and signal filtering the LVDT sensor is subject to plasma noise and radio frequency interactions which result in anomalous thrust readings. Experimental data show that the thrust determined using the LVDT system in a direct current plasma environment and a RF discharge is approximately a factor of three higher than the thrust values obtained using a laser sensor system for the operating conditions investigated. These findings are of significance to the electric propulsion community as LVDT sensors are often utilized in thrust measurement systems and accurate thrust measurement and the reproducibility of thrust data is key to analyzing thruster performance. Methods are proposed to evaluate system susceptibility to plasma noise and an effective filtering scheme presented for DC discharges. PMID:22462919

  19. Heat pipe technology for advanced rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    The application of heat pipe technology to the design of rocket engine thrust chambers is discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) evaporator wick development, (2) specific heat pipe designs and test results, (3) injector design, fabrication, and cold flow testing, and (4) preliminary thrust chamber design.

  20. Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C.; Phelps, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided.

  1. Thrust augmentation nozzle (TAN) concept for rocket engine booster applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Scott; Bulman, Mel; Neill, Todd

    2006-07-01

    Aerojet used the patented thrust augmented nozzle (TAN) concept to validate a unique means of increasing sea-level thrust in a liquid rocket booster engine. We have used knowledge gained from hypersonic Scramjet research to inject propellants into the supersonic region of the rocket engine nozzle to significantly increase sea-level thrust without significantly impacting specific impulse. The TAN concept overcomes conventional engine limitations by injecting propellants and combusting in an annular region in the divergent section of the nozzle. This injection of propellants at moderate pressures allows for obtaining high thrust at takeoff without overexpansion thrust losses. The main chamber is operated at a constant pressure while maintaining a constant head rise and flow rate of the main propellant pumps. Recent hot-fire tests have validated the design approach and thrust augmentation ratios. Calculations of nozzle performance and wall pressures were made using computational fluid dynamics analyses with and without thrust augmentation flow, resulting in good agreement between calculated and measured quantities including augmentation thrust. This paper describes the TAN concept, the test setup, test results, and calculation results.

  2. Simulations of directed energy thrust on rotating asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griswold, Janelle; Madajian, Jonathan; Johansson, Isabella; Pfau, Krysten; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; Gilkes, Aidan; Meinhold, Peter; Motta, Caio; Brashears, Travis; Zhang, Qicheng

    2015-09-01

    Asteroids that threaten Earth could be deflected from their orbits using directed energy to vaporize the surface, because the ejected plume creates a reaction thrust that alters the asteroid's trajectory. One concern regarding directed energy deflection is the rotation of the asteroid, as this will reduce the average thrust magnitude and modify the thrust direction. Flux levels required to evaporate surface material depend on surface material composition and albedo, thermal, and bulk mechanical properties of the asteroid, and rotation rate. The observed distribution of asteroid rotation rates is used, along with an estimated range of material and mechanical properties, as input to a 3D thermal-physical model to calculate the resultant thrust vector. The model uses a directed energy beam, striking the surface of a rotating sphere with specified material properties, beam profile, and rotation rate. The model calculates thermal changes in the sphere, including vaporization and mass ejection of the target material. The amount of vaporization is used to determine a thrust magnitude that is normal to the surface at each point on the sphere. As the object rotates beneath the beam, vaporization decreases, as the temperature drops and causes both a phase shift and magnitude decrease in the average thrust vector. A surface integral is calculated to determine the thrust vector, at each point in time, producing a 4D analytical model of the expected thrust profile for rotating objects.

  3. 14 CFR 25.945 - Thrust or power augmentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Thrust or power augmentation system. 25.945... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.945 Thrust or power... must be able to withstand without failure the vibration, inertia, fluid, and structural loads that...

  4. 14 CFR 25.945 - Thrust or power augmentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Thrust or power augmentation system. 25.945 Section 25.945 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.945 Thrust or power augmentation system. (a) General....

  5. 14 CFR 25.945 - Thrust or power augmentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Thrust or power augmentation system. 25.945 Section 25.945 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.945 Thrust or...

  6. 14 CFR 25.945 - Thrust or power augmentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Thrust or power augmentation system. 25.945 Section 25.945 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.945 Thrust or...

  7. 14 CFR 25.945 - Thrust or power augmentation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Thrust or power augmentation system. 25.945 Section 25.945 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.945 Thrust or...

  8. A magnetic coupling thrust stand for microthrust measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. P.; Ferrer, P.

    2016-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement system that is based on a horizontal lever and utilizes a novel magnetic coupling mechanism to measure thrust has been developed. The system is capable of measuring thrusts as low as 10’s of μN. While zero drift is observed in the balance, tests have shown that they do not have an appreciable effect on thrust measurements. The thrust stand’s sensitivity can be adjusted by shifting the position of the coupling magnet inside the stand’s thrust support member, which allows flexibility for testing both higher and lower powered thrusters. The thrust stand has been modeled theoretically and the predicted results from the model are compared with experimentally measured data. The system was tested using a simple cold gas thruster and provided credible results that can be compared with other systems studied in the literature. Advantages include that the thrust stand is very cheap and easy to construct and further, the calibration process takes no longer than half an hour, facilitating rapid turnaround times while still retaining accuracy. Repeatability tests have shown that the balance gives consistent results.

  9. Thrust wedges and fluid overpressures: Sandbox models involving pore fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2006-05-01

    The well-known model for the critical taper of an accretionary wedge includes overpressure as a first-order parameter. Fluid overpressures reduce frictional resistance at the base of a wedge but they also act as body forces on all material particles of the wedge, in addition to that of gravity. By means of sandbox modeling, many workers have tried to verify the predictions of the critical taper model, but few of them have so far incorporated true fluid pressures. We have used scaled experiments, in which compressed air flows through sand packs, so as to model the deformation of overpressured wedges. A new apparatus provides for a horizontally varying fluid pressure, for example, a linear variation, as in the critical taper model. We have done three series of experiments, involving horizontal shortening of homogeneous or multilayered sand models for various gradients of fluid pressure. As predicted by the critical taper model, the apical angle of the resulting wedge depends on the overpressure gradient. In homogeneous sand at a high overpressure gradient, deformation becomes diffuse and looks ductile. In multilayered models, detachments form beneath layers of low permeability, so that thrusts propagate rapidly toward the undeformed foreland. The efficiency of a detachment and its ability to propagate depend not only on the fluid pressure but also on the permeability ratios between the various layers.

  10. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David A.; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the test campaigns designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster (QVPT), but instead will describe the recent test campaign. In addition, it contains a brief description of the supporting radio frequency (RF) field analysis, lessons learned, and potential applications of the technology to space exploration missions. During the first (Cannae) portion of the campaign, approximately 40 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 935 megahertz and 28 watts. During the subsequent (tapered cavity) portion of the campaign, approximately 91 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 1933 megahertz and 17 watts. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level. Test campaign results indicate that the RF resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and therefore is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma.

  11. Six degree-of-freedom thrust sensor for hybrid rocket.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joshua

    2008-04-01

    Thrust is the reactive force experienced by a rocket due to the ejection of high velocity matter. The Hybrid Rocket Facility at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) uses strain gauges mounted to an s-beam to measure axial direction thrust of the rocket. A new six degree of freedom thrust sensor has been built for the UALR Hybrid Rocket Facility. The six degrees of freedom are the thrust force components in the three spacial directions (Fx, Fy, Fz) plus the three moments (roll, pitch, yaw). Even though the majority of the rocket's thrust is in the axial direction, the components in the other directions are non-zero, and must be measured to account for the total work done by the rocket motor. The sensor design and fabrication are now complete. Calibration of the load cells on each of the six uni-axial legs of the sensor and any preliminary data available will be presented.

  12. Thrust Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pak, Sibtosh; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S. R.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors aimed at probing different aspects of PDE ejector processes, are presented and discussed. The PDE was operated using ethylene as the fuel and an equimolar oxygen/nitrogen mixture as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. The thrust measurements for the PDE alone are in excellent agreement with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature and serve as a Baseline for the ejector studies. These thrust measurements were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups using constant diameter ejector tubes and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. The results show that for the geometries studied here, a maximum thrust augmentation of 24% is achieved. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  13. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres, the two largest members of the main asteroid belt. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional low-thrust design objectives (like minimum change in velocity or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that cannot be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and turned out to be essential to the successful navigation of Dawn at Vesta.

  14. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the two largest members of the main asteroid belt, the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional thrust design objectives (like minimum (Delta)V or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that can not be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and necessary to successfully navigate Dawn through all orbital transfers at Vesta.

  15. New Highly Dynamic Approach for Thrust Vector Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, M.; Ettl, J.; Grothe, D.; Hrbud, I.

    2015-09-01

    For a new launcher system a thrust vector control system is needed. This launch vehicle system consists of two rockets which are namely the VS-50 (two-stage suborbital vehicle) and the VLM-1 (three-stage microsatellite launch vehicle). VLM-1 and VS-50 are developed in a cooperation between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Brazilian Aeronautics and Space Institute (IAE). To keep these two rockets on its trajectory during flight a highly dynamic thrust vector control system is required. For the purpose of developing such a highly dynamic thrust vector control system a master thesis was written by the author. The development includes all mechanical constructions as well as control algorithms and electronics design. Moreover an optimization of control algorithms was made to increase the dynamic capabilities of the thrust vector control system. The composition of the right components plus the sophisticated control algorithm make the thrust vector control system highly dynamic.

  16. Interactive property of large thrust sheets with footwall rocks—the Sub thrust interactive duplex hypothesis: A mechanism of dome formation in thrust sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatcher, Robert D.

    1991-06-01

    Recently acquired Appalachian Ultradeep Core Hole (ADCOH) Project site investigation seismic reflection data and geologic data from the Appalachians and several other orogenic belts suggest an important mutually interdependent relationship exists between emplacement of large crystalline thrust sheets and the deforming foreland rocks beneath. This relationship suggests isolated domes beneath crystalline thrust sheets may be produced by passive folding of the sheet as a result of formation of an antiformal stack duplex in the platform sedimentary sequence beneath. Suggestions that domes in crystalline thrust sheets formed by interference of late open folds is doubtlessly still valid in places, but the platform duplex mechanism is probably also valid to explain the late doming of many crystalline and other large thrust sheets. The dome beneath the Shooting Creek and Brasstown Bald windows in the ADCOH site region is imaged as an antiformal stack duplex at depth. The Tallulah Falls dome, Grandfather Mountain and Mountain City windows, and Smokies Foothills duplex in the site region and elsewhere in the southern Blue Ridge are all late isolated domes and all are probably or demonstrably underlain by antiformal stack duplexes beneath the Blue Ridge-Piedmont composite crystalline thrust sheet. The Assynt window and footwall duplex benath the Arnabol and Moine thrusts in Scotland, and the Engadine window in the Alps may be similar structures.

  17. Tertiary structural evolution of the Gangdese thrust system southeastern Tibet

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, An; Harrison, M.; Ryerson, F.J.; Wenji, Chen; Kidd, W.S.F.; Copeland, P.

    1994-09-10

    Structural and thermochronological investigations of southern Tibet (Xizang) suggest that intracontinental thrusting has been the dominant cause for formation of thickened crust in the southernmost Tibetan plateau since late Oligocene. Two thrust systems are documented in this study: the north dipping Gangdese system (GTS) and the younger south dipping Renbu-Zedong system (RZT). West of Lhasa, the Gangdese thrust juxtaposes the Late Cretaceous forearc basin deposits of the Lhasa Block (the Xigaze Group) over the Tethyan sedimentary rocks of the Indian plate, whereas east of Lhasa, the fault juxtaposes the Late Cretaceous-Eocene, Andean-type arc (the Gangdese batholith) over Tethyan sedimentary rocks. Near Zedong, 150 km southeast of Lhasa, the Gangdese thrust is marked by a >200-m-thick mylonitic shear zone that consists of deformed granite and metasedimentary rocks. A major south dipping backthrust in the hanging wall of the Gangdese thrust puts the Xigaze Group over Tertiary conglomerates and the Gangdese plutonics north of Xigaze and west of Lhasa. A lower age bound for the Gangdese thrust of 18.3{+-}0.5 Ma is given by crosscutting relationships. The timing of slip on the Gangdese thrust is estimate to be 27-23 Ma from {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar thermochronology, and a displacement of at least 46{+-}9 km is indicated near Zedong. The age of the Gangdese thrust (GT) is consistent with an upper age limit of {approximately}24 Ma for the initiation of movement on the Main Central thrust. In places, the younger Renbu-Zedong fault is thrust over the trace of the GT, obscuring its exposure. The RZT appears to have been active at circa 18 Ma but had ceased movement by 8{+-}1 Ma. The suture between India and Asia has been complexely modified by development of the GTS, RZT, and, locally, strike-slip and normal fault systems. 64 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Formamide mediated, air-brush printable, indium-free soluble Zn-Sn-O semiconductors for thin-film transistor applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Jip; Jeon, Hye-Ji; Oh, Sang-Jin; Lee, Sun Sook; Choi, Youngmin; Park, Jin-Seong; Jeong, Sunho

    2014-11-12

    In this study, for high-performance indium-free metal oxide channel layer, we synthesize Zn-Sn-O (ZTO) precursor solutions in which formamide is incorporated as an additive for catalyzing the subsequent sol-gel reactions and the evolution of chemical structure. It is revealed that the formamide plays a critical chemical role in evolving a chemical structure with more oxygen-deficient oxide lattice and with less hydroxide, allowing for high field-effect mobility over 7 cm(2)/V·s. Furthermore, it is for the first time demonstrated that electrically active metal-oxide films can be patterned, using an air-brush printing technique, by directly depositing formamide-mediated ZTO-precursor solutions in patterned geometries. PMID:25333251

  19. Initial Thrust Measurements of Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Natalie R. S.; Scogin, Tyler; Liu, Thomas M.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Dankanich, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Electronegative ion thrusters are a variation of traditional gridded ion thruster technology differentiated by the production and acceleration of both positive and negative ions. Benefits of electronegative ion thrusters include the elimination of lifetime-limiting cathodes from the thruster architecture and the ability to generate appreciable thrust from both charge species. While much progress has been made in the development of electronegative ion thruster technology, direct thrust measurements are required to unambiguously demonstrate the efficacy of the concept and support continued development. In the present work, direct thrust measurements of the thrust produced by the MINT (Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster) are performed using an inverted-pendulum thrust stand in the High-Power Electric Propulsion Laboratory's Vacuum Test Facility-1 at the Georgia Institute of Technology with operating pressures ranging from 4.8 x 10(exp -5) and 5.7 x 10(exp -5) torr. Thrust is recorded while operating with a propellant volumetric mixture ratio of 5:1 argon to nitrogen with total volumetric flow rates of 6, 12, and 24 sccm (0.17, 0.34, and 0.68 mg/s). Plasma is generated using a helical antenna at 13.56 MHz and radio frequency (RF) power levels of 150 and 350 W. The acceleration grid assembly is operated using both sinusoidal and square waveform biases of +/-350 V at frequencies of 4, 10, 25, 125, and 225 kHz. Thrust is recorded for two separate thruster configurations: with and without the magnetic filter. No thrust is discernable during thruster operation without the magnetic filter for any volumetric flow rate, RF forward Power level, or acceleration grid biasing scheme. For the full thruster configuration, with the magnetic filter installed, a brief burst of thrust of approximately 3.75 mN +/- 3 mN of error is observed at the start of grid operation for a volumetric flow rate of 24 sccm at 350 W RF power using a sinusoidal waveform grid bias at 125 kHz and +/- 350 V

  20. Film ispalators

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Aleksandr V; Stoilov, Yurii Yu

    2002-05-31

    New physical objects, ispalators based on free soap films, exhibit persistent flows of the soap solution in open and closed volumes in air with additions of gases of the C{sub 8}F{sub 18} type (p = 20 Torr) at temperature drops on the films of the order of tenths and hundredths of kelvin. The flows move continuously at a velocity of 5 - 20 cm s{sup -1}. It is found that the parts of an inclined ispalator film show anomalous behaviour upon heating: their weight increases and they move downward over the film, whereas the unheated parts of the film move upward. Continuous radial vortex flows accompanied by the formation and washing of the regions of a thin black film are observed on circular films in closed volumes upon their uniform external cooling by evaporating water for 5 - 10 hours. The rapid flows make film ispalators the efficient heat carriers, which operate at small temperature drops (tenths and hundredths of kelvin) and surpass copper in the amount of thermal energy being transferred. The outlook for the further study and applications of film ispalators for detecting thermal fields and laser radiation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  1. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of aluminum-copper systems: Air-formed films to complex conversion coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    Understanding the mechanism of corrosion inhibition by carcinogenic chromates is critical to the development of environmentally safe coatings containing benign chromate substitutes. An integrated approach to correlate the surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of a wide range of systems has been undertaken. Electrochemical behavior was studied by open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Surface chemistry was studied using variable-angle X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VAXPS), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), infrared spectroscopy and synchrotron infrared micro spectroscopy (SIRMS) and Raman spectroscopy. Using SIRMS, the ASTM recommended acetone degreasing was shown to initiate pitting of AA2024-T3 via photochemical formation of acetic acid. Due to the known tendency for photoreduction of Cr6+(3d0) following soft X-ray dosage during XPS, a novel method has been developed to prevent this reduction. This method yields, for the first time, an accurate determination of the Cr6+ content of a CCC. The pretreatment of the alloy prior to conversion coating has been shown to have significant influence on the surface intermetallic distribution, composition and corrosion resistance of the initial oxide film and subsequent conversion coating. AlconoxRTM pretreatment was found to result in a highly protective surface film that inhibits the subsequent formation of CCC. The study also shows that coupling of the alloy to platinum during the bromate pretreatment increases the corrosion resistance of the subsequently formed CCC by over an order of magnitude due to reduction in surface copper content. Adsorption of chromate ion on the passive oxide film formed on the metal surface was observed to induce fixed negative charges that inhibit chloride ingress on planar surfaces. While deprotonation of the aluminum hydroxide film by chromate was

  2. Deployable Engine Air Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    On approach, next-generation aircraft are likely to have airframe noise levels that are comparable to or in excess of engine noise. ATA Engineering, Inc. (ATA) is developing a novel quiet engine air brake (EAB), a device that generates "equivalent drag" within the engine through stream thrust reduction by creating a swirling outflow in the turbofan exhaust nozzle. Two Phase II projects were conducted to mature this technology: (1) a concept development program (CDP) and (2) a system development program (SDP).

  3. NERVA 400E thrust train dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vronay, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    The natural frequencies and dynamic responses of the NERVA 400E engine thrust train were determined for nuclear space operations (NSO), and earth-orbital shuttle (EOS) during launch and boost conditions. For NSO, a mini-tank configuration was analyzed with the forward end of the upper truss assumed fixed at the stage/mini-tank interface. For EOS, both a mini-tank and an engine only configuration were analyzed for a specific engine assembly support (EAS) stiffness. For all cases the effect of the shield on dynamic response characteristics was determined by performing parallel analyses with and without the shield. Gimbaling loads were not generated as that effort was scheduled after the termination date. The analysis, while demonstrating the adequacy of the engine design, revealed serious deficiencies in the EAS. Responses at the unsupported ends of the engine are excessive. Responses at the nuclear subsystem interface appear acceptable. It is recommended that additional analysis and design effort be expended upon the EAS to ensure that all engine responses stay within reasonable bounds.

  4. Interseismic coupling on the main Himalayan thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, V. L.; Avouac, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    We determine the slip rate and pattern of interseismic coupling on the Main Himalayan Thrust along the entire Himalayan arc based on a compilation of geodetic, interferometric synthetic aperture radar, and microseismicity data. We show that convergence is perpendicular to the arc and increases eastwards from 13.3 ± 1.7 mm/yr to 21.2 ± 2.0 mm/yr. These rates are comparable to geological and geomorphic estimates, indicating an essentially elastic geodetic surface strain. The interseismic uplift rate predicted from the coupling model closely mimics the topography, suggesting that a small percentage of the interseismic strain is permanent. We find that the fault is fully locked along its complete length over about 100 km width. We don't find any resolvable aseismic barrier that could affect the seismic segmentation of the arc and limit the along-strike propagation of seismic ruptures. The moment deficit builds up at a rate of 15.1 ± 1 × 1019 N m/yr for the entire length of the Himalaya.

  5. Cretaceous biostratigraphy in the Wyoming thrust belt.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, D.J.; Jacobson, S.R.

    1982-01-01

    In the Cretaceous section of the thrust belt, fossils are especially useful for dating and correlating repetitive facies of different ages in structurally complex terrain. The biostratigraphic zonation for the region is based on megafossils (chiefly ammonites) , which permit accurate dating and correlation of outcrop sections, and which have been calibrated with the radiometric time scale for the Western Interior. Molluscan and vertebrate zone fossils are difficult to obtain from the subsurface, however, and ammonites are restricted to rocks of marine origin. Palynomorphs (plant microfossils) have proven to be the most valuable fossils in the subsurface because they can be recovered from drill cuttings. Palynomorphs also are found in both marine and nonmarine rocks and can be used for correlation between facies. Stratigraphic ranges of selected Cretaceous marine and nonmarine palynomorphs in previously designated reference sections in Fossil Basin, Wyoming are correlated with the occurrence of ammonites and other zone fossils in the same sections. These correlations can be related to known isotopic ages, and they contribute to the calibration of palynomorph ranges in the Cretaceous of the Western Interior. -from Authors

  6. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    The advanced launch system (ALS), is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost-effective, highly reliable, and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. An electromechanical actuation (EMA) system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link power management and distribution (PMAD) technology and pulse population modulation (PPM) techniques to implement field-oriented vector control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a built-in test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance, and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA thrust vector control (TVC) system. The EMA system and work proposed for the future are discussed.

  7. Electronegative Gas Thruster - Direct Thrust Measurement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John (Principal Investigator); Aanesland, Ane; Polzin, Kurt; Walker, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This effort is an international collaboration and academic partnership to mature an innovative electric propulsion (EP) thruster concept to TRL 3 through direct thrust measurement. The initial target application is for Small Satellites, but can be extended to higher power. The Plasma propulsion with Electronegative GASES (PEGASES) concept simplifies ion thruster operation, eliminates a neutralizer requirement and should yield longer life capabilities and lower cost implementation over conventional gridded ion engines. The basic proof-of concept has been demonstrated and matured to TRL 2 over the past several years by researchers at the Laboratoire de Physique des Plasma in France. Due to the low maturity of the innovation, there are currently no domestic investments in electronegative gas thrusters anywhere within NASA, industry or academia. The end product of this Center Innovation Fund (CIF) project will be a validation of the proof-of-concept, maturation to TRL 3 and technology assessment report to summarize the potential for the PEGASES concept to supplant the incumbent technology. Information exchange with the foreign national will be one-way with the exception of the test results. Those test results will first go through a standard public release ITAR/export control review, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum.

  8. Thrust Stand Characterization of the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamant, Kevin D.; Pollard, James E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Direct thrust measurements have been made on the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion engine using a standard pendulum style thrust stand constructed specifically for this application. Values have been obtained for the full 40-level throttle table, as well as for a few off-nominal operating conditions. Measurements differ from the nominal NASA throttle table 10 (TT10) values by 3.1 percent at most, while at 30 throttle levels (TLs) the difference is less than 2.0 percent. When measurements are compared to TT10 values that have been corrected using ion beam current density and charge state data obtained at The Aerospace Corporation, they differ by 1.2 percent at most, and by 1.0 percent or less at 37 TLs. Thrust correction factors calculated from direct thrust measurements and from The Aerospace Corporation s plume data agree to within measurement error for all but one TL. Thrust due to cold flow and "discharge only" operation has been measured, and analytical expressions are presented which accurately predict thrust based on thermal thrust generation mechanisms.

  9. Structural style of the Marathon thrust belt, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Robert G.; Varga, Robert J.; Altany, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    The Marathon portion of the Ouachita thrust belt consists of a highly deformed allochthonous wedge of Cambrian-Pennsylvanian slope strata (Marathon facies) that was transported to the northwest and emplaced over Pennsylvanian foredeep sediments. The foredeep strata in turn overlie early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments which are deformed by late Paleozoic basement-involved reverse faults. The Dugout Creek thrust is the basal thrust of the allochthon. Shortening in this sheet and overlying sheets is ˜80%. Steep imbricate faults link the Dugout Creek thrust to upper level detachments forming complex duplex zones. Progressive thrusting and shortening within the allochthon folded the upper level detachments and associated thrust sheets. The Caballos Novaculite is the most competent unit within the Marathon facies and controlled development of prominent detachment folds. Deeper imbricate sheets composed of the Late Pennsylvanian foredeep strata, and possibly early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments developed concurrently with emplacement of the Marathon allochthon and folded the overlying allochthon. Following termination of thrusting in the earliest Permian, subsidence and deposition shifted northward to the Delaware, Midland and Val Verde foreland basins.

  10. Lift and thrust generation by a butterfly-like 3D flapping wing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Inamuro, Takaji

    2013-11-01

    The flapping flight of tiny insects such as a butterfly is of fundamental interest not only in biology itself but also in its practical use for the development of micro air vehicles. It is known that a butterfly flaps downward for generating lift force and backward for generating thrust force. In this study, we consider a simple butterfly-like 3D flapping wing model whose body is a thin rod, wings are rigid and rectangular, and wing motion is simplified. We investigate the lift and thrust generation by the butterfly-like flapping wing model by using the immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. Firstly, we compute the lift and thrust forces when the body of the model is fixed for Reynolds numbers in the range of 50 - 1000. In addition, we evaluate the supportable mass for each Reynolds number by using the computed lift force. Secondly, we simulate the free flight where the body can move translationally but cannot rotate. As results, we find that the evaluated supportable mass can be supported even in the free flight, and the wing model with the mass and the Reynolds number of a fruit fly can go upward against the gravity. Finally, we simulate the effect of the rotation of the body. As results, we find that the body has a large pitching motion and consequently gets off-balance.

  11. Propeller thrust analysis using Prandtl's lifting line theory, a comparison between the experimental thrust and the thrust predicted by Prandtl's lifting line theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Steven R.

    The lifting line theory was first developed by Prandtl and was used primarily on analysis of airplane wings. Though the theory is about one hundred years old, it is still used in the initial calculations to find the lift of a wing. The question that guided this thesis was, "How close does Prandtl's lifting line theory predict the thrust of a propeller?" In order to answer this question, an experiment was designed that measured the thrust of a propeller for different speeds. The measured thrust was compared to what the theory predicted. In order to do this experiment and analysis, a propeller needed to be used. A walnut wood ultralight propeller was chosen that had a 1.30 meter (51 inches) length from tip to tip. In this thesis, Prandtl's lifting line theory was modified to account for the different incoming velocity depending on the radial position of the airfoil. A modified equation was used to reflect these differences. A working code was developed based on this modified equation. A testing rig was built that allowed the propeller to be rotated at high speeds while measuring the thrust. During testing, the rotational speed of the propeller ranged from 13-43 rotations per second. The thrust from the propeller was measured at different speeds and ranged from 16-33 Newton's. The test data were then compared to the theoretical results obtained from the lifting line code. A plot in Chapter 5 (the results section) shows the theoretical vs. actual thrust for different rotational speeds. The theory over predicted the actual thrust of the propeller. Depending on the rotational speed, the error was: at low speeds 36%, at low to moderate speeds 84%, and at high speeds the error increased to 195%. Different reasons for these errors are discussed.

  12. Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

  13. Electric sail control mode for amplified transverse thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toivanen, P.; Janhunen, P.; Envall, J.

    2015-01-01

    The electric solar wind sail produces thrust by centrifugally spanned high voltage tethers interacting with the solar wind protons. The sail attitude can be controlled and attitude maneuvers are possible by tether voltage modulation synchronous with the sail rotation. Especially, the sail can be inclined with respect to the solar wind direction to obtain transverse thrust to change the osculating orbit angular momentum. Such an inclination has to be maintained by a continual control voltage modulation. Consequently, the tether voltage available for the thrust is less than the maximum voltage provided by the power system. Using a spherical pendulum as a model for a single rotating tether, we derive analytical estimations for the control efficiency for two separate sail control modes. One is a continuous control modulation that corresponds to strictly planar tether tip motion. The other is an on-off modulation with the tether tip moving along a closed loop on a saddle surface. The novel on-off mode is introduced here to both amplify the transverse thrust and reduce the power consumption. During the rotation cycle, the maximum voltage is applied to the tether only over two thrusting arcs when most of the transverse thrust is produced. In addition to the transverse thrust, we obtain the thrusting angle and electric power consumption for the two control modes. It is concluded that while the thrusting angle is about half of the sail inclination for the continuous modulation it approximately equals to the inclination angle for the on-off modulation. The efficiency of the on-off mode is emphasized when power consumption is considered, and the on-off mode can be used to improve the propulsive acceleration through the reduced power system mass.

  14. Role of detachments and thrust kinematics in Structural evolution of Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belt in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Humaad; Zeilinger, Gerold; Sobel, Edward; Heidarzadeh, Ghasem

    2016-04-01

    The Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belts in Pakistan represent the outermost external zone of the Himalayan fold and thrust system. The Main Boundary thrust marks their northern extent, showing that they are genetically linked; however, both exhibit a distinct contrast between the structural style at the surface and subsurface. This contrast becomes more conspicuous at the leading edge of the thrust belt where the Potwar allochothon extends further south, linked to Kohat in the north via an active strike-slip fault. Previous workers explained the structural evolution of the two belts separately, disregarding the influence of similar fold and thrusts developed in both belts. This research focuses on the preparation of a 3D structural model at the boundary of the two thrust belts to understand similarities and differences in their structural style and evolution. The model is constrained by integrating field, seismic and well data for better subsurface interpretation. Cross sections show that Potwar evolved on thrust faults originating from a basal detachment in Precambrian (pC) salt and terminating in Miocene Molasse forming duplexes of pre Himalayan strata. To the south, the Potwar allochothon is glided over a salt detachment with rare internal deformation toward its leading edge, forming fault bend fold thrust structure known as Salt range. The structural evolution towards the west in Kohat results from deformation on multiple detachment horizons at the pC salt, Eocene evaporites and Miocene Molasse. Disharmonic folding over Eocene evaporites is evident from their presence in the cores of outcropping folds. In the subsurface, closely spaced thrusts cut up section from basal detachment terminates in Eocene evaporites forming duplex in northern part of area. In south change of lithological facies from evaporites to limestone shift detachment level upward in to molasse strata which resemble structural style in northern Potwar. Thrusts at the surface evolved from the

  15. Thrust stand for high-power electric propulsion devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a new high-power thrust stand developed for use with high-power (up to 250 kW) magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters, which is installed in a high-vacuum MPD facility at Lewis Research Center. The design of the stand is based on inverted pendulum configuration, with the result of large displacements and high resolution. Calibration results showed that thrust measurements were linear and repeatable to within a fraction of 1 percent. The thrust stand was used for testing water-cooled MPD thrusters at power levels up to 125 kW. The thruster, however, is quite well suited for testing other types of electric propulsion devices.

  16. Fluid thrust control system. [for liquid propellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, W. L.; Jansen, H. B.; Lehmann, E. N. (Inventor)

    1968-01-01

    A pure fluid thrust control system is described for a pump-fed, regeneratively cooled liquid propellant rocket engine. A proportional fluid amplifier and a bistable fluid amplifier control overshoot in the starting of the engine and take it to a predetermined thrust. An ejector type pump is provided in the line between the liquid hydrogen rocket nozzle heat exchanger and the turbine driving the fuel pump to aid in bringing the fluid at this point back into the regular system when it is not bypassed. The thrust control system is intended to function in environments too severe for mechanical controls.

  17. ALBANIA: Thrust and backthrust systems of external Albanides: Examples

    SciTech Connect

    Bega, Z.; Janopulli, V.

    1995-08-01

    External Albanides have proved as an oil/gas province in a certain limited area. Better understanding of thrusting and backthrusting systems and how both systems work, could improve objectives for exploration beyond actual discoveries. Backthrusting is not seen any more typical for Cenozoic sediments, where buried front of thrust faulted belts are very active. Mesozoic rocks, that are dominated by westward thrust propagation are also affected by backthrusting, thus leaving more space for other units accommodation. New concepts postulated are based on Deep Holes, Seismic Data, Outcrops and Spot Imagery. Among onshore examples, some of them cross existing fields.

  18. A Regeneratively-Cooled Thrust Chamber for the Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kendall; Sparks, Dave; Woodcock, Gordon; Jim Turner (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of presentation slides about the development of the regeneratively cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine. The Fastrac engine was originally developed to demonstrate low cost design and fabrication methods. It was intended to be used in an expendable booster. The regen thrust chamber enables a more cost efficient test program. Using the low cost design and fabrication methodology designed for the 12K regeneratively cooled chamber, the contractor designed, developed and fabricated a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine.

  19. Multiphysics Thrust Chamber Modeling for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Cheng, Gary; Chen, Yen-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for a solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based computational fluid dynamics formulation. A two-pronged approach is employed in this effort: A detailed thermo-fluid analysis on a multi-channel flow element for mid-section corrosion investigation; and a global modeling of the thrust chamber to understand the effect of heat transfer on thrust performance. Preliminary results on both aspects are presented.

  20. Managing Momentum on the Dawn Low Thrust Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brett A.; Vanelli, Charles A.; Swenka, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    Dawn is low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft enroute to the asteroids Vesta and Ceres in an effort to better understand the early creation of the solar system. After launch in September 2007, the spacecraft will flyby Mars in February 2009 before arriving at Vesta in summer of 2011 and Ceres in early 2015. Three solar electric ion-propulsion engines are used to provide the primary thrust for the Dawn spacecraft. Ion engines produce a very small but very efficient force, and therefore must be thrusting almost continuously to realize the necessary change in velocity to reach Vesta and Ceres.

  1. Flapping tail membrane in bats produces potentially important thrust during horizontal takeoffs and very slow flight.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rick A; Snode, Emily R; Shaw, Jason B

    2012-01-01

    Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium) in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (<1 m (s-1)) was largely underestimated. Indeed, bats flapped the tail-membrane by extensive dorso-ventral fanning motions covering as much as 135 degrees of arc consistent with thrust generation by air displacement. The degree of dorsal extension of the tail-membrane, and thus the potential amount of thrust generated during platform launches, was significantly correlated with body mass (P = 0.02). Adduction of the hind limbs during upstrokes collapsed the tail-membrane thereby reducing its surface area and minimizing negative lift forces. Abduction of the hind limbs during the downstroke fully expanded the tail-membrane as it was swept ventrally. The flapping kinematics of the tail-membrane is thus consistent with expectations for an airfoil. Timing offsets between the wings and tail-membrane during downstrokes was as much as 50%, suggesting that the tail-membrane was providing thrust and perhaps lift when the wings were retracting through the upstoke phase of the wing-beat cycle. The extent to which the tail-membrane was used during takeoffs differed significantly among four vespertilionid species (P = 0.01) and aligned with predictions derived from bat ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates. PMID:22393378

  2. Flapping Tail Membrane in Bats Produces Potentially Important Thrust during Horizontal Takeoffs and Very Slow Flight

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Rick A.; Snode, Emily R.; Shaw, Jason B.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, studies concerning bat flight have focused primarily on the wings. By analyzing high-speed video taken on 48 individuals of five species of vespertilionid bats, we show that the capacity to flap the tail-membrane (uropatagium) in order to generate thrust and lift during takeoffs and minimal-speed flight (<1 m s−1) was largely underestimated. Indeed, bats flapped the tail-membrane by extensive dorso-ventral fanning motions covering as much as 135 degrees of arc consistent with thrust generation by air displacement. The degree of dorsal extension of the tail-membrane, and thus the potential amount of thrust generated during platform launches, was significantly correlated with body mass (P = 0.02). Adduction of the hind limbs during upstrokes collapsed the tail-membrane thereby reducing its surface area and minimizing negative lift forces. Abduction of the hind limbs during the downstroke fully expanded the tail-membrane as it was swept ventrally. The flapping kinematics of the tail-membrane is thus consistent with expectations for an airfoil. Timing offsets between the wings and tail-membrane during downstrokes was as much as 50%, suggesting that the tail-membrane was providing thrust and perhaps lift when the wings were retracting through the upstoke phase of the wing-beat cycle. The extent to which the tail-membrane was used during takeoffs differed significantly among four vespertilionid species (P = 0.01) and aligned with predictions derived from bat ecomorphology. The extensive fanning motion of the tail membrane by vespertilionid bats has not been reported for other flying vertebrates. PMID:22393378

  3. Tests on air propellers in yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, W F; Lesley, E P

    1923-01-01

    This report contains the results of tests to determine the thrust (pull) and torque characteristics of air propellers in movement relative to the air in a line oblique to the line of the shaft, and specifically when such angle of obliquity is large, as in the case of helicopter flight with the propeller serving for both sustentation and traction.

  4. Interplay of thrust, back-thrust, strike-slip and salt tectonics in a fold and thrust belt system: an example from Zakynthos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelilidis, A.; Papatheodorou, G.; Maravelis, A. G.; Christodoulou, D.; Tserolas, P.; Fakiris, E.; Dimas, X.; Georgiou, N.; Ferentinos, G.

    2016-01-01

    The southwestern flank of the Hellenic fold and thrust belt, situated along the southern edge of the Dinarides-Albanides-Hellenides continental convergent zone, was examined for reconstructing the tectonic deformation. This investigation presents an integrated study of onshore sedimentological and structural analyses, as well as offshore seismic lines, across the Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary succession in Zakynthos Island. Back-thrust faults, using the Triassic evaporites as decollement surface, during the Pliocene, and coeval diapiric intrusions formed three sub-basins on the hangingwall of the Kalamaki back-thrust fault. This interaction is responsible for the growth of the Skopos Mountain and the soft sediment deformation that formed synclines and slumps, respectively. Back-thrust and strike-slip faults were active during the early Pleistocene, and diapiric intrusions modified the bathymetry on the sea floor, giving rise to slumps and recumbent folds. At least five events of synsedimentary diapiric intrusions have been recognized and are marked by five slump horizons. During the Holocene, the diapiric intrusions between the Kalamaki back-thrust and the Vrachionas anticline could be either related to normal faults or gravitationally driven.

  5. Thin films under chemical stress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The goal of work on this project has been develop a set of experimental tools to allow investigators interested in transport, binding, and segregation phenomena in composite thin film structures to study these phenomena in situ. Work to-date has focuses on combining novel spatially-directed optical excitation phenomena, e.g. waveguide eigenmodes in thin dielectric slabs, surface plasmon excitations at metal-dielectric interfaces, with standard spectroscopies to understand dynamic processes in thin films and at interfaces. There have been two main scientific thrusts in the work and an additional technical project. In one thrust we have sought to develop experimental tools which will allow us to understand the chemical and physical changes which take place when thin polymer films are placed under chemical stress. In principle this stress may occur because the film is being swelled by a penetrant entrained in solvent, because interfacial reactions are occurring at one or more boundaries within the film structure, or because some component of the film is responding to an external stimulus (e.g. pH, temperature, electric field, or radiation). However all work to-date has focused on obtaining a clearer understanding penetrant transport phenomena. The other thrust has addressed the kinetics of adsorption of model n-alkanoic acids from organic solvents. Both of these thrusts are important within the context of our long-term goal of understanding the behavior of composite structures, composed of thin organic polymer films interspersed with Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembled monolayers. In addition there has been a good deal of work to develop the local technical capability to fabricate grating couplers for optical waveguide excitation. This work, which is subsidiary to the main scientific goals of the project, has been successfully completed and will be detailed as well. 41 refs., 10 figs.

  6. ZnO-based thin film transistors employing aluminum titanate gate dielectrics deposited by spray pyrolysis at ambient air.

    PubMed

    Afouxenidis, Dimitrios; Mazzocco, Riccardo; Vourlias, Georgios; Livesley, Peter J; Krier, Anthony; Milne, William I; Kolosov, Oleg; Adamopoulos, George

    2015-04-01

    The replacement of SiO2 gate dielectrics with metal oxides of higher dielectric constant has led to the investigation of a wide range of materials with superior properties compared with SiO2. Despite their attractive properties, these high-k dielectrics are usually manufactured using costly vacuum-based techniques. To overcome this bottleneck, research has focused on the development of alternative deposition methods based on solution-processable metal oxides. Here we report the application of spray pyrolysis for the deposition and investigation of Al2x-1·TixOy dielectrics as a function of the [Ti(4+)]/[Ti(4+)+2·Al(3+)] ratio and their implementation in thin film transistors (TFTs) employing spray-coated ZnO as the active semiconducting channels. The films are studied by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, impedance spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and field-effect measurements. Analyses reveal amorphous Al2x-1·TixOy dielectrics that exhibit a wide band gap (∼4.5 eV), low roughness (∼0.9 nm), high dielectric constant (k ∼ 13), Schottky pinning factor S of ∼0.44 and very low leakage currents (<5 nA/cm(2)). TFTs employing stoichiometric Al2O3·TiO2 gate dielectrics and ZnO semiconducting channels exhibit excellent electron transport characteristics with low operating voltages (∼10 V), negligible hysteresis, high on/off current modulation ratio of ∼10(6), subthreshold swing (SS) of ∼550 mV/dec and electron mobility of ∼10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). PMID:25774574

  7. Computational Study of Surface Tension and Wall Adhesion Effects on an Oil Film Flow Underneath an Air Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celic, Alan; Zilliac, Gregory G.

    1998-01-01

    The fringe-imaging skin friction (FISF) technique, which was originally developed by D. J. Monson and G. G. Mateer at Ames Research Center and recently extended to 3-D flows, is the most accurate skin friction measurement technique currently available. The principle of this technique is that the skin friction at a point on an aerodynamic surface can be determined by measuring the time-rate-of-change of the thickness of an oil drop placed on the surface under the influence of the external air boundary layer. Lubrication theory is used to relate the oil-patch thickness variation to shear stress. The uncertainty of FISF measurements is estimated to be as low as 4 percent, yet little is known about the effects of surface tension and wall adhesion forces on the measured results. A modified version of the free-surface Navier-Stokes solver RIPPLE, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratories, was used to compute the time development of an oil drop on a surface under a simulated air boundary layer. RIPPLE uses the volume of fluid method to track the surface and the continuum surface force approach to model surface tension and wall adhesion effects. The development of an oil drop, over a time period of approximately 4 seconds, was studied. Under the influence of shear imposed by an air boundary layer, the computed profile of the drop rapidly changes from its initial circular-arc shape to a wedge-like shape. Comparison of the time-varying oil-thickness distributions computed using RIPPLE and also computed using a greatly simplified numerical model of an oil drop equation which does not include surface tension and wall adhesion effects) was used to evaluate the effects of surface tension on FISF measurement results. The effects of surface tension were found to be small but not necessarily negligible in some cases.

  8. Convective Heat Transfer with and without Film Cooling in High Temperature, Fuel Rich and Lean Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Nathan J.

    Modern turbine engines require high turbine inlet temperatures and pressures to maximize thermal efficiency. Increasing the turbine inlet temperature drives higher heat loads on the turbine surfaces. In addition, increasing pressure ratio increases the turbine coolant temperature such that the ability to remove heat decreases. As a result, highly effective external film cooling is required to reduce the heat transfer to turbine surfaces. Testing of film cooling on engine hardware at engine temperatures and pressures can be exceedingly difficult and expensive. Thus, modern studies of film cooling are often performed at near ambient conditions. However, these studies are missing an important aspect in their characterization of film cooling effectiveness. Namely, they do not model effect of thermal property variations that occur within the boundary and film cooling layers at engine conditions. Also, turbine surfaces can experience significant radiative heat transfer that is not trivial to estimate analytically. The present research first computationally examines the effect of large temperature variations on a turbulent boundary layer. Subsequently, a method to model the effect of large temperature variations within a turbulent boundary layer in an environment coupled with significant radiative heat transfer is proposed and experimentally validated. Next, a method to scale turbine cooling from ambient to engine conditions via non-dimensional matching is developed computationally and the experimentally validated at combustion temperatures. Increasing engine efficiency and thrust to weight ratio demands have driven increased combustor fuel-air ratios. Increased fuel-air ratios increase the possibility of unburned fuel species entering the turbine. Alternatively, advanced ultra-compact combustor designs have been proposed to decrease combustor length, increase thrust, or generate power for directed energy weapons. However, the ultra-compact combustor design requires a

  9. The Development of NASA's Low Thrust Trajectory Tool Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Jon; Artis, Gwen; Kos, Larry

    2006-01-01

    Highly efficient electric propulsion systems can enable interesting classes of missions; unfortunately, they provide only a limited amount of thrust. Low-thrust (LT) trajectories are much more difficult to design than impulsive-type (chemical propulsion) trajectories. Previous low-thrust (LT) trajectory optimization software was often difficult to use, often had difficulties converging, and was somewhat limited in the types of missions it could support. A new state-of-the-art suite (toolbox) of low-thrust (LT) tools along with improved algorithms and methods was developed by NASA's MSFC, JPL, JSC, and GRC to address the needs of our customers to help foster technology development in the areas of advanced LT propulsion systems, and to facilitate generation of similar results by different analysts.

  10. Style and timing of frontal structures, thrust belt, Central Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, T.F.

    1985-07-01

    The Cordilleran fold and thrust belt in central Utah may be divided into a western belt of Precambrian to lower Mesozoic strata shortened above ramp-style thrust faults and an eastern belt of folded middle to upper Mesozoic rocks. Shortening in the eastern foldbelt occurred above a bedding-plane thrust fault system that terminates within a thick section of Jurassic shale, siltstone, and anhydrite. Demonstrable synthrusting deposits within the region are late Early to Late Cretaceous in age. The age of synorogenic deposits and structural relations of postorogenic strata indicate that deformation was complete by the close of the Cretaceous or early Paleocene, and support a thrust mechanism for much of the folding in the region.

  11. Six degree-of-freedom thrust sensor for hybrid rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Ryan

    2009-05-01

    Thrust is the reactive force experienced by a rocket due to the ejection of high velocity matter. A new six degree of freedom thrust sensor has been built for the UALR Hybrid Rocket Facility. The six degrees of freedom are the thrust force components in the three spacial directions (Fx, Fy, Fz) plus the three moments (roll, pitch, yaw). Even though the majority of the rocket's thrust is in the axial direction, the components in the other directions are non-zero, and must be measured to account for the total work done by the rocket motor. The load cells on each of the six uni-axial legs of the sensor were calibrated, and preliminary firing data was collected during the summer of 2008. This research project has been funded by a NASA EPSCoR grant, and a Hendrix Odyssey project award.

  12. Low-thrust solar electric propulsion navigation simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagar, H. J.; Eller, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    An interplanetary low-thrust, solar electric propulsion mission simulation program suitable for navigation studies is presented. The mathematical models for trajectory simulation, error compensation, and tracking motion are described. The languages, input-output procedures, and subroutines are included.

  13. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring by Navier-Stokes solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Jing-Biau; Lan, C. Edward

    1991-01-01

    Induced aerodynamics from thrust vectoring are investigated by a computational fluid dynamic method. A thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code with multiblock capability is used. Jet properties are specified on the nozzle exit plane to simulate the jet momentum. Results for a rectangular jet in a cross flow are compared with data to verify the code. Further verification of the calculation is made by comparing the numerical results with transonic data for a wing-body combination. Additional calculations were performed to elucidate the following thrust vectoring effects: the thrust vectoring effect on shock and expansion waves, induced effects on nearby surfaces, and the thrust vectoring effect on the leading edge vortex.

  14. Development of pneumatic thrust-deflecting powered-lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, R. J.; Nichols, J. H., Jr.; Harris, M. J.; Eppel, J. C.; Shovlin, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Improvements introduced into the Circulation Control Wing/Upper Surface Blowing (CCW/USB) STOL concept (Harris et al., 1982) are described along with results of the full-scale static ground tests and model-scale wind tunnel investigations. Tests performed on the full-scale pneumatic thrust-deflecting system installed on the NASA QSRA aircraft have demonstrated that, relative to the original baseline configuration, a doubling of incremental thrust deflection due to blowing resulted from improvements that increased the blowing span and momentum, as well as from variations in blowing slot height and geometry of the trailing edge. A CCW/Over the Wing model has been built and tested, which was shown to be equivalent to the CCW/USB system in terms of pneumatic thrust deflection and lift generation, while resolving the problem of cruise thrust loss due to exhaust scrubbing on the wing upper surface.

  15. Thrust imbalance of the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, W. A., Jr.; Sforzini, R. H.; Shackelford, B. W., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The Monte Carlo statistical analysis of thrust imbalance is applied to both the Titan IIIC and the Space Shuttle solid rocket motors (SRMs) firing in parallel, and results are compared with those obtained from the Space Shuttle program. The test results are examined in three phases: (1) pairs of SRMs selected from static tests of the four developmental motors (DMs 1 through 4); (2) pairs of SRMs selected from static tests of the three quality assurance motors (QMs 1 through 3); (3) SRMs on the first flight test vehicle (STS-1A and STS-1B). The simplified internal ballistic model utilized for computing thrust from head-end pressure measurements on flight tests is shown to agree closely with measured thrust data. Inaccuracies in thrust imbalance evaluation are explained by possible flight test instrumentation errors.

  16. Early use of thrust manipulation versus non-thrust manipulation: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad; Learman, Kenneth; Showalter, Chris; Kabbaz, Vincent; O'Halloran, Bryan

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the comparative effectiveness of early use of thrust (TM) and non-thrust manipulation (NTM) in sample of patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). The randomized controlled trial included patients with mechanically reproducible LBP, ≥ age 18-years who were randomized into two treatment groups. The main outcome measures were the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and a Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), with secondary measures of Rate of Recovery, total visits and days in care, and the work subscale of the Fears Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire work subscale (FABQ-w). A two-way mixed model MANCOVA was used to compare ODI and pain, at baseline, after visit 2, and at discharge and total visits, days in care, and rate of recovery (while controlling for patient expectations and clinical equipoise). A total of 149 subjects completed the trial and received care over an average of 35 days. There were no significant differences between TM and NTM at the second visit follow-up or at discharge with any of the outcomes categories. Personal equipoise was significantly associated with ODI and pain. The findings suggest that there is no difference between early use of TM or NTM, and secondarily, that personal equipoise affects study outcome. Within-groups changes were significant for both groups. PMID:23040656

  17. A double pendulum plasma thrust balance and thrust measurement at a tandem mirror exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.F.; Liu, P.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Lander, H.; Childs, R.A.; Becker, H.D.; Fairfax, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    For the purpose of measuring the plasma momentum flux in a plasma system, a highly sensitive and precision balance has been developed. It can measure a force, an impulse, or thrust as low as 0.1 mN free of mechanical noise, electrical and magnetic pickups. The double pendulum system consists of two parallel conducting plates. One or both of the plates can be suspended by needles. The needle suspended plate (or plates) can swing freely with negligible friction because of the sharp points of the needles. When one of the plates is impacted by an impulse it will swing relatively to the fixed plate or other movable plate. The capacitance between the plates changes as a result of such a motion. The change of capacitance as a function of time is recorded as an oscillating voltage signal. The amplitude of such a voltage signal is proportional to the impacting force or impulse. The proportional factor can be calibrated. The forces can thus be read out from the recorded value of the voltage. The equation of motion for the pendulum system has been solved analytically. The circuit equation for the electronic measurement system has been formulated and solved numerically. Using this balance the thrust at the exhaust of a Tandem Mirror plasma thruster has been measured. The analytical solution of the overall characteristics agrees greatly with the measurement. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Lower extremity thrust and non-thrust joint mobilization for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Brad G; Simon, Corey B

    2014-01-01

    A 40-year old female presented to physical therapy with a one-year history of insidious right anteromedial and anterolateral knee pain. Additionally, the patient had a history of multiple lateral ankle sprains bilaterally, the last sprain occurring on the right ankle 1 year prior to the onset of knee pain. The patient was evaluated and given a physical therapy diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), with associated talocrural and tibiofemoral joint hypomobility limiting ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension, respectively. Treatment included a high-velocity low amplitude thrust manipulation to the talocrural joint, which helped restore normal ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. The patient also received tibiofemoral joint non-thrust manual therapy to regain normal knee extension mobility prior to implementing further functional progression exercises to her home program (HEP). This case report highlights the importance of a detailed evaluation of knee and ankle joint mobility in patients presenting with anterior knee pain. Further, manual physical therapy to the lower extremity was found to be successful in restoring normal movement patterns and pain-free function in a patient with chronic anterior knee pain. PMID:24976753

  19. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the eight-day August 2013 test campaign designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster, but instead will describe the test integration, test operations, and the results obtained from the test campaign. Approximately 30-50 micro-Newtons of thrust were recorded from an electric propulsion test article consisting primarily of a radio frequency (RF) resonant cavity excited at approximately 935 megahertz. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level, within a stainless steel vacuum chamber with the door closed but at ambient atmospheric pressure. Several different test configurations were used, including two different test articles as well as a reversal of the test article orientation. In addition, the test article was replaced by an RF load to verify that the force was not being generated by effects not associated with the test article. The two test articles were designed by Cannae LLC of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. The torsion pendulum was designed, built, and operated by Eagleworks Laboratories at the NASA Johnson Space Center of Houston, Texas. Approximately six days of test integration were required, followed by two days of test operations, during which, technical issues were discovered and resolved. Integration of the two test articles and their supporting equipment was performed in an iterative fashion between the test bench and the vacuum chamber. In other words, the test article was tested on the bench, then moved to the chamber, then moved back as needed to resolve issues. Manual frequency control was required throughout the test. Thrust was observed on both test articles, even though one of the test articles was designed with the expectation that it would not

  20. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  1. The Selection of Propellers for High Thrust at Low Airspeed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Robert N.; Biermann, David

    1941-01-01

    Problem of improving thrust at low speeds is primarily one of reducing angle of attack of operation of sections to improve L/D or reducing blade helix angle. An analysis, based on recent propeller data, is presented for determining improvements in thrust or efficiency which could be obtained by increased number of blades, increased blade width, increased diameter, dual rotation, and two-speed gearing. All methods were found very effective, particularly two-speed gearing.

  2. Thrust Structure of Saturn V S-IC Stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    This image illustrates technicians working on a full scale engineering mock-up of a Saturn V S-IC stage thrust structure nearing completion at the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center. The booster, 33 feet in diameter and 138 feet long, was powered by five F-1 engines that provided 7,500,000 pounds of thrust to start the monstrous vehicle on its journey into space.

  3. Recent advances in low-thrust propulsion technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, James R.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA low-thrust propulsion technology program is aimed at providing high performance options to a broad class of near-term and future missions. Major emphases of the program are on storable and hydrogen/oxygen low-thrust chemical, low-power (auxiliary) electrothermal, and high-power electric propulsion. This paper represents the major accomplishments of the program and discusses their impact.

  4. Thrust Measurement of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2013-11-01

    DBD plasma actuators generate a wall-jet that can be used for active flow control. We used an analytical balance to measure the thrust generated by the actuator, it is a common metric of its performance without external flow. We found that the measured force is afflicted by several problems; it drifts in time, not always repeatable, is unstable, and depends on the manner the voltage is applied. We report results of investigations of these issues. Tests were conducted on an actuator constructed of 1/4 inch thick high-density polyethylene (HDPE) dielectric with 100 mm long offset electrodes, with applied voltages up to 48 kV p-p and frequencies from 32 Hz to 2.5 kHz, and pure Sine and Trapezoidal waveforms. The relative humidity was in the range of 51-55%, corresponding to moisture range of 10,500 to13,000 ppm mass. Force readings were up to 500 mg, (approximately 50 mN/m). We found that the measured force is the net of the positive thrust generated by the wall-jet and an ``anti-thrust'' acting in the opposite direction. We propose a correction procedure that yields the plasma-generated thrust. The correction is based on voltage-dependent anti-thrust measured in the low frequency range of 20-40 Hz. We found that adjacent objects in a test setup affect the measured thrust, and verified it by comparing experiments with and without a metal enclosure, grounded and ungrounded. Uncorrected thrust varied by up to approximately +/-100%, and the corrected thrust variations were up to approximately 30%. Supported by NASA's FAP/Aerospace Sciences Project.

  5. Thrust Enhancement in Hypervelocity Nozzles by Chemical Catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Drummond, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    In the hypersonic flight regime, the air-breathing supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) has been shown to be a viable propulsion system. The current designs of scramjet engines provide performance benefits only up to a Mach number of 14. Performance losses increase rapidly as the Mach number increases. To extend the applicability of scram'jets beyond Mach 14, research is being conducted in the area of inlet and wave drag reduction, skin-friction and heat-transfer reduction, nozzle loss minimization, low-loss mixing, and combustion enhancement. For high Mach number applications, hydrogen is the obvious fuel choice because of its high energy content per unit mass in comparison with conventional fuels. These flight conditions require engines to operate at supersonic internal velocities, high combustor temperatures, and low static pressures. The high static temperature condition enhances the production of radicals such as H and OH, and the low-pressure condition slows the reaction rates, particularly the recombination reactions. High-temperature and low-pressure constraints, in combination with a small residence time, result in a radical-rich exhaust gas mixture exiting the combustor. At high Mach number conditions (due to low residence time), H and OH do not have enough time to recombine ; thus, a significant amount of energy is lost as these high-energy free radical are exhausted. The objective of the present study is to conduct a flowfield analysis for a typical nozzle geometry for NASP-type vehicle to assess for thrust enhancement in hypervelocity nozzles by substituting small amount of phosphine for hydrogen.

  6. Influence of gold species (AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-)) on self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in solutions and morphology of composite thin films fabricated at the air/liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xingjuan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Xiaokai; Lee, Yong-Ill; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2016-01-21

    Composite thin films doped with Au species were fabricated at an air/liquid interface via a series of steps, including the mass transfer of polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) across the liquid/liquid interface between a DMF/CHCl3 solution and an aqueous solution containing either AuCl4(-) or AuCl2(-), self-assembly of PS-b-P2VP in a mixed DMF-water solution, and adsorption and further self-organization of the formed aggregates at the air/liquid interface. This is a new approach for fabricating composite polymer films and can be completed within a very short time. AuCl4(-) and AuCl2(-) ions were found to significantly influence the self-assembly behavior of the block copolymer and the morphologies of the composite films, leading to the formation of nanowire arrays and a foam structure at the air/liquid interface, respectively, which originated from rod-like micelles and microcapsules that had formed in the respective solutions. The effect of the metal complex was analyzed based on the packing parameters of the amphiphilic polymer molecules in different microenvironments and the interactions between the pyridine groups and the metal chloride anions. In addition, these composite thin films exhibited stable and durable performance as heterogeneous catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroaromatics in aqueous solutions. PMID:26688280

  7. Application of Chaboche Model in Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asraff, Ahmedul Kabir; Suresh Babu, Sheela; Babu, Aneena; Eapen, Reeba

    2015-12-01

    Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines are commonly used in space technology. Thrust chamber is one of the most important subsystems of a rocket engine. The thrust chamber generates propulsive thrust force for flight of the rocket by ejection of combustion products at supersonic speeds. Often double walled construction is employed for these chambers. The thrust chamber investigated here has its hot inner wall fabricated out of a high thermal conductive material like copper alloy and outer wall made of stainless steel. Inner wall is subjected to high thermal and pressure loads during operation of engine due to which it will be in the plastic regime. Main reasons for the failure of such chambers are fatigue in the plastic range (called as low cycle fatigue since the number of cycles to failure will be low in plastic range), creep and thermal ratcheting. Elasto plastic material models are required to simulate the above effects through a cyclic stress analysis. This paper gives the details of cyclic stress analysis carried out for the thrust chamber using different plasticity model combinations available in ANSYS (Version 15) FE code. The best model among the above is applied in the cyclic stress analysis of two dimensional (plane strain and axisymmetric) and three dimensional finite element models of thrust chamber. Cyclic life of the chamber is calculated from stress-strain graph obtained from above analyses.

  8. Development of a Thrust Stand to Meet LISA Mission Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, William D., III; Zakrzwski, Charles M.; Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    A thrust stand has been built to measure the force-noise produced by electrostatic micro-Newton (muN) thrusters. The LISA mission's Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) requires thrusters that are capable of producing continuous thrust levels between 1-100 muN with a resolution of 0.1 muN. The stationary force-noise produced by these thrusters must not exceed 0.1 muN/dHz in the measurement bandwidth 10(exp -4) to 1 Hz. The LISA Thrust Stand (LTS) is a torsion-balance type thrust stand designed to meet the following requirements: stationary force-noise measurements from l0( -4) to 1 Hz with 0.1 muN/dHz sensitivity, absolute thrust measurements from 1-100 muN with better than 0.1 muN resolution, and dynamic thruster response from to 10 Hz. The LTS employs a unique vertical configuration, autocollimator for angular position measurements, and electrostatic actuators that are used for dynamic pendulum control and null-mode measurements. Force-noise levels are measured indirectly by characterizing the thrust stand as a spring-mass system. The LTS was initially designed to test the indium FEEP thruster developed by the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf (ARCS), but can be modified for testing other thrusters of this type.

  9. Superposed fold-thrust events at the Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cashman, Patricia H.; Cole, James C.; Trexler, James H., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), in southern Nye County, Nevada, straddles significant pre-Tertiary structural and stratigraphic boundaries. Detailed stratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Upper Paleozoic section delineates the regional trust sheets and constrains their burial histories. The Paleozoic rocks record three phases of contractional deformation, overprinted by strike-slip faulting. These occured in the folloing order: (1) foreland-vergant folding and imbricate thrusting in the footwall of the Belted Range thrust; (2) hinterland-vergent folding and thrusting; and (3) north-vergant folding that we interpret as footwall deformation below a third major thrust system. Sinistral slip, typically accompanied by minor east-west shortening, has occured along a series of north-northeast--north-northwest--striking faults around Yucca Flat. This strike-slip faulting postdates both foreland-vergent and hinterland-vergent deformation, and predates the Cretaceous Climax stock; its age relative to the north-vergent folding and thrusting is unknown. Our new understanding of the geometry of these structures provides new insights into the correlation and interpretation of regional structural features. Field trip stops will examine: (1) the stratigraphic differences that allow us to distinguish the regional thrust sheets and constrain their burial histories; and (2) the field relationships that document the kinematics and relative ages of the penetrative deformational events.

  10. Advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of the advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis program. The primary objectives of this program were to: (1) provide an in-depth analytical investigation to develop thrust chamber cooling and fatigue life limitations of an advanced, high pressure, high performance H2/O2 engine design of 20,000-pounds (88960.0 N) thrust; and (2) integrate the existing heat transfer analysis, thermal fatigue and stress aspects for advanced chambers into a comprehensive computer program. Thrust chamber designs and analyses were performed to evaluate various combustor materials, coolant passage configurations (tubes and channels), and cooling circuits to define the nominal 1900 psia (1.31 x 10 to the 7th power N/sq m) chamber pressure, 300-cycle life thrust chamber. The cycle life capability of the selected configuration was then determined for three duty cycles. Also the influence of cycle life and chamber pressure on thrust chamber design was investigated by varying in cycle life requirements at the nominal chamber pressure and by varying the chamber pressure at the nominal cycle life requirement.

  11. Thrust Stand for Vertically Oriented Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally-stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A non-contact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational restoring force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN-level thrusts, while those tests conducted on 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 micro at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  12. Momentum Flux Measurements Using an Impact Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Breizman, Boris; Bengtson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure the force caused by a beam of charged and neutral particles impacting a target plate. This device, an impact thrust stand, was developed to allow thrusters, during early stages of development, to be quickly and easily exhausted and compared to other thrusters. Since some thruster concepts are tested using laboratory equipment that is heavy and cumbersome, measuring the momentum flux of the particles in the plume can be much simpler than placing the entire thruster on a thrust stand. Conservation of momentum requires the momentum flux measured in the plume to be related to the thrust produced by the thruster. The impact thrust stand was designed to be placed in the plume of an electric thruster and has been tested and compared to the thrust measured from a Hall thruster placed on a pendulum thrust stand. Force measurements taken at several axial locations in the magnetic nozzle region of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket will be presented.

  13. Full Flight Envelope Direct Thrust Measurement on a Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, Timothy R.; Sims, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Direct thrust measurement using strain gages offers advantages over analytically-based thrust calculation methods. For flight test applications, the direct measurement method typically uses a simpler sensor arrangement and minimal data processing compared to analytical techniques, which normally require costly engine modeling and multisensor arrangements throughout the engine. Conversely, direct thrust measurement has historically produced less than desirable accuracy because of difficulty in mounting and calibrating the strain gages and the inability to account for secondary forces that influence the thrust reading at the engine mounts. Consequently, the strain-gage technique has normally been used for simple engine arrangements and primarily in the subsonic speed range. This paper presents the results of a strain gage-based direct thrust-measurement technique developed by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and successfully applied to the full flight envelope of an F-15 aircraft powered by two F100-PW-229 turbofan engines. Measurements have been obtained at quasi-steady-state operating conditions at maximum non-augmented and maximum augmented power throughout the altitude range of the vehicle and to a maximum speed of Mach 2.0 and are compared against results from two analytically-based thrust calculation methods. The strain-gage installation and calibration processes are also described.

  14. Momentum flux measurements using an impact thrust stand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Breizman, Boris; Bengtson, Roger

    2004-11-01

    A device has been developed to measure the force caused by a beam of charged and neutral particles impacting a target plate. This device, an impact thrust stand, was developed to allow thrusters, during early stages of development, to be quickly and easily evaluated and compared to other thrusters. Since some thruster concepts are tested using laboratory equipment that is heavy and cumbersome, measuring the momentum flux of the particles in the plume can be much simpler than placing the entire thruster on a thrust stand. Conservation of momentum requires the momentum flux measured in the plume to be related to the thrust produced by the thruster. The impact thrust stand was designed to be placed in the plume of an electric thruster and has been tested and compared to the thrust measured from a Hall thruster placed on a pendulum thrust stand. Force measurements taken at several axial locations in the magnetic nozzle region of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket will be presented.

  15. Polyphase thrust tectonic in the Barberton greenstone belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, I. A.

    1986-01-01

    In the circa 3.5 by-old Barberton greenstone belt, the supracrustal rocks form a thick and strongly deformed thrust complex. Structural studies in the southern part of the belt have shown that 2 separate phases of over-thrusting (D sub 1 and D sub 2) successively dismembered the original stratigraphy. Thrust nappes were subsequently refolded during later deformations (D sub 3 and D sub 4). This report deals with the second thrusting event which, in the study region appears to be dominant, and (unlike the earlier thrusting), affects the entire supracrustal pile. The supracrustal rocks form a predominantly NE/SW oriented, SE dipping tectonic fan (the D sub 2 fan) in which tectonic slices of ophiolitic-like rocks are interleaved with younger sedimentary sequences of the Diepgezet and malalotcha groups. Structural and sedimentological data indicate that the D sub 2 tectonic fan was formed during a prolonged, multi-stage regional horizontal shortening event during which several types of internal deformation mechanisms were successively and/or simultaneously active. Movement appears to have been predominantly to the NW and to the N. During D sub 2, periods of quiescence and sedimentation followed periods of thrust propagation. Although the exact kinematics which led to the formation of this fan is not yet known, paleoenvironmental interpretations together with structural data suggest that D sub 2 was probably related to (an) Archean collision(s).

  16. Fuel optimum low-thrust elliptic transfer using numerical averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarzi, Zahi; Speyer, Jason; Wirz, Richard

    2013-05-01

    Low-thrust electric propulsion is increasingly being used for spacecraft missions primarily due to its high propellant efficiency. As a result, a simple and fast method for low-thrust trajectory optimization is of great value for preliminary mission planning. However, few low-thrust trajectory tools are appropriate for preliminary mission design studies. The method presented in this paper provides quick and accurate solutions for a wide range of transfers by using numerical orbital averaging to improve solution convergence and include orbital perturbations. Thus, preliminary trajectories can be obtained for transfers which involve many revolutions about the primary body. This method considers minimum fuel transfers using first-order averaging to obtain the fuel optimum rates of change of the equinoctial orbital elements in terms of each other and the Lagrange multipliers. Constraints on thrust and power, as well as minimum periapsis, are implemented and the equations are averaged numerically using a Gausian quadrature. The use of numerical averaging allows for more complex orbital perturbations to be added in the future without great difficulty. The effects of zonal gravity harmonics, solar radiation pressure, and thrust limitations due to shadowing are included in this study. The solution to a transfer which minimizes the square of the thrust magnitude is used as a preliminary guess for the minimum fuel problem, thus allowing for faster convergence to a wider range of problems. Results from this model are shown to provide a reduction in propellant mass required over previous minimum fuel solutions.

  17. Thrusting and wedge growth, Southern Alps of Lombardia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, Dietrich

    1992-06-01

    A south-vergent fold-thrust belt of Miocene-Recent age accompanies the south slope of the Lombardian Alps and is partly buried beneath Plio-Pleistocene Po Valley basin fill. The belt is probably detached along a trans-crustal thrust, named Main South Alpine Thrust (MSAT), with an estimated dip slip of 70-100 km. Transport on this thrust piggybacks the Adamello pluton of Late Eocene age, pre-Adamello folds, and Oligocene-Miocene Insubric strike-slip structures, by ramping up through 12-15 km of Austro-Alpine (Adria) crust and through 8-10 km of Triassic to Eocene sediments. Folds in the Front Ranges are ascribed to MSAT ramping, not to pre-Adamello compression. The MSAT soles upward in a blind thrust beneath 3-4 km of Oligocene-Pliocene foredeep fill. Initial regional failure along the MSAT implies substantial and pre-existing topographic relief near the Insubric line. An average of 25% wedge thickening during MSAT transport is consistent with the requirement of Coulomb critical taper. Progression of the south-Alpine detachment from the MSAT to the base of the foreland sediments has added a thickness of 6-12 km in footwall imbrications to the base and the toe of the thrust wedge. This addition in wedge volume is consistent with wedge dynamics only if a mid-Miocene or younger spike of excess Alpine topography is admitted.

  18. Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-11-15

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  19. Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A

    2010-11-01

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater. PMID:21133502

  20. Development of A Thrust Stand to Meet LISA Mission Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, William D., III; Zakrzwski, C. M.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A thrust stand has been built and tested that is capable of measuring the force-noise produced by electrostatic micro-Newton (micro-Newton) thrusters. The LISA mission's Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) requires thrusters that are capable of producing continuous thrust levels between 1-100 micro-Newton with a resolution of 0.1 micro-Newton. The stationary force-noise produced by these thrusters must not exceed 0.1 pN/4Hz in a 10 Hz bandwidth. The LISA Thrust Stand (LTS) is a torsion-balance type thrust stand designed to meet the following requirements: stationary force-noise measurements from 10(exp-4) to 1 Hz with 0.1 micro-Newton resolution, absolute thrust measurements from 1-100 micro-Newton with better than 0.1 micro-Newton resolution, and dynamic thruster response from 10(exp -4) to 10 Hz. The ITS employs a unique vertical configuration, autocollimator for angular position measurements, and electrostatic actuators that are used for dynamic pendulum control and null-mode measurements. Force-noise levels are measured indirectly by characterizing the thrust stand as a spring-mass system. The LTS was initially designed to test the indium FEEP thruster developed by the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf (ARCS), but can be modified for testing other thrusters of this type.

  1. Structural styles of the High Atlas mountains, Morocco: Potential hydrocarbon traps in the footwall of thrusts developed from the reactivation of syn-rift normal faults

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, W.; Allmendinger, R.W.; Barazangi, M. )

    1996-01-01

    Large asymmetrical folds and box folds created by fault bend and fault propagation folding characterize the style of deformation in the High Atlas mountains. Several compressional phases of faulting and folding from the Lower Jurassic through Cenozoic indicate a long and varied tectonic origin for the High Atlas intracontinental mountain belt. Footwall shortcut faults are formed with the inversion of syn-rift listric: normal faults, and progress into low angle thrust faults with fault bend fold geometries. This style of deformation is illustrated on reprocessed seismic reflection data and confirmed by field mapping. Geological field mapping, air photographs, and Thematic Mapper imagery provide important constraints for the interpretation of seismic reflection profiles along the margins of the High Atlas mountains. Balanced cross sections across the High Atlas suggest large horizontal displacements along low angle thrust faults. These thrusts place massive Lower Jurassic carbonates above post-rift Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks. Refolding of thrusts and large scale regional folds indicate oblique slip deformation during and after the inversion of syn-rift normal faults. Low angle thrusts propagate along detachments in shales and marts of the Lower Jurassic. Lower Jurassic shales provide an excellent seal for potential sandstone reservoirs in the Middle Jurassic and Triassic sandstones in the footwall of thrusts.

  2. Structural styles of the High Atlas mountains, Morocco: Potential hydrocarbon traps in the footwall of thrusts developed from the reactivation of syn-rift normal faults

    SciTech Connect

    Beauchamp, W.; Allmendinger, R.W.; Barazangi, M.

    1996-12-31

    Large asymmetrical folds and box folds created by fault bend and fault propagation folding characterize the style of deformation in the High Atlas mountains. Several compressional phases of faulting and folding from the Lower Jurassic through Cenozoic indicate a long and varied tectonic origin for the High Atlas intracontinental mountain belt. Footwall shortcut faults are formed with the inversion of syn-rift listric: normal faults, and progress into low angle thrust faults with fault bend fold geometries. This style of deformation is illustrated on reprocessed seismic reflection data and confirmed by field mapping. Geological field mapping, air photographs, and Thematic Mapper imagery provide important constraints for the interpretation of seismic reflection profiles along the margins of the High Atlas mountains. Balanced cross sections across the High Atlas suggest large horizontal displacements along low angle thrust faults. These thrusts place massive Lower Jurassic carbonates above post-rift Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks. Refolding of thrusts and large scale regional folds indicate oblique slip deformation during and after the inversion of syn-rift normal faults. Low angle thrusts propagate along detachments in shales and marts of the Lower Jurassic. Lower Jurassic shales provide an excellent seal for potential sandstone reservoirs in the Middle Jurassic and Triassic sandstones in the footwall of thrusts.

  3. Control of a Thrust Alignment Table for Modeling the Coning Dynamics of a Spinning Spacecraft with a Follower Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halsmer, Dominic; Bennett, J. Damon; DeHaven, Max; Ligard, Vidar

    1999-01-01

    This document presents a system controlling the motion of a spherical air bearing used in the modeling of spacecraft dynamics and controls in a laboratory environment. The system is part of the Spinning Rocket Simulator (SRS), used to simulate the coning of spacecraft during a thrusting stage. The reaction force at the spherical air bearing supporting the spacecraft model must coincide with the thrust axis of the model for proper simulation. Therefore, the bearing is translated in a circular path to introduce a centrifugal force. This horizontal force along with the gravitational reaction force at the bearing combines to simulate the direction of the spacecraft's thrust force. The control system receives attitude information from the spacecraft model via a laser beam embedded in the model that impinges on a photosensitive array. The non-linear system is controlled using high-speed lookup tables and digital techniques. A vector-controlled motor and a stepper motor are given the necessary signals to accurately control the turntable and platform supporting the air bearing. Preliminary performance data is presented. Mechanical elements of the table and platform are described in detail. A wireless (RF) data path for all devices on the spacecraft model to an off-table command computer is also described.

  4. Fabrication and different photoelectric responses of nanocrystalline ZnO film irradiated with UV and white light in dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Zhijun; Qiu, Yang; Xie, Changsheng; Xu, Jingjing; Luo, Yongsong; Wang, Chunlei; Yan, Hailong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, nanocrystalline ZnO film with porous structure was successfully prepared on alumina substrate by the technology of screen printing and the subsequent heat treatment. The fundamental characteristics of the as-prepared sample were examined through XRD, FE-SEM, EDX and PL spectra measurements. Meanwhile, photoelectric responses of it were tested under UV and white light irradiation, respectively. Different photocurrent curves were obtained. Under UV light, the photocurrent with comparatively high amplitude of each cycle could mostly recover upon the light off. While for white light, the photocurrent with low amplitude just partially recovered when the light was turned off. This phenomenon indicated that, after the white light off, a large number of free electrons still remained within the materials. To calculate the amount of the remained free electrons, three photocurrent parameters, which are related to the density of free electrons in ZnO, were defined for the first time. Furthermore, the explanations for the different photoelectric responses of ZnO based on the double Schottky barrier model were also proposed.

  5. Evolution of the Puente Hills Thrust Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, K. J.; Shaw, J. H.; Dolan, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to assess the evolution of the blind Puente Hills thrust fault system (PHT) by determining its age of initiation, lateral propagation history, and changes in slip rate over time. The PHT presents one of the largest seismic hazards in the United States, given its location beneath downtown Los Angeles. The PHT is comprised of three fault segments: the Los Angeles (LA), Santa Fe Springs (SFS), and Coyote Hills (CH). The LA and SFS segments are characterized by growth stratigraphy where folds formed by uplift on the fault segments have been continually buried by sediment from the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers. The CH segment has developed topography and is characterized by onlapping growth stratigraphy. This depositional setting gives us the unique opportunity to measure uplift on the LA and SFS fault segments, and minimum uplift on the CH fault segment, as the difference in sediment thicknesses across the buried folds. We utilize depth converted oil industry seismic reflection data to image the fold geometries. Identifying time-correlative stratigraphic markers for slip rate determination in the basin has been a problem for researchers in the past, however, as the faunal assemblages observed in wells are time-transgressive by nature. To overcome this, we utilize the sequence stratigraphic model and well picks of Ponti et al. (2007) as a basis for mapping time-correlative sequence boundaries throughout our industry seismic reflection data from the present to the Pleistocene. From the Pleistocene to Miocene we identify additional sequence boundaries in our seismic reflection data from imaged sequence geometries and by correlating industry well formation tops. The sequence and formation top picks are then used to build 3-dimensional surfaces in the modeling program Gocad. From these surfaces we measure the change in thicknesses across the folds to obtain uplift rates between each sequence boundary. Our results show three distinct phases of

  6. Design and evaluation of a 3 million DN series-hybrid thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scibbe, H. W.; Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M.

    1976-01-01

    The design and experimental evaluation of a series-hybrid thrust bearing, consisting of a 150-mm ball bearing and a centrifugally actuated, conical, fluid-film bearing, is presented. Tests were conducted up to 16,000 rpm and at this speed an axial load of 15,600 N (3500 lb) was safely supported by the hybrid bearing system. Through the series-hybrid bearing principle, the effective ball bearing speed was reduced to approximately one-half of the shaft speed. A speed reduction of this magnitude would result in a tenfold increase in the ball bearing fatigue life. A successful evaluation of fluid-film bearing lubricant supply failure was performed repeatedly at an operating speed of 10,000 rpm. A complete and smooth changeover to full-scale ball bearing operation was effected when the oil supply to the fluid-film bearing was cut off. Reactivation of the fluid-film oil supply system produced a flawless return to the original mode of hybrid operation.

  7. Electromagnetic launch, then lessening chemical thrust over time as laser beam powered ion thrust grows{emdash}to any orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, T.M.

    1996-03-01

    The ElectroMagnetic (EM) Launch Tube (LT), using High-Temp SuperConduction (HTSC) EM launch coils if developed, will be built in a tall building, or, if not, at a steep angle up the west slope of an extinct volcano. The Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) exits the LT at such high velocity that the otherwise violent entry into the atmosphere is made possible by Special-Laser-Launch-Assist (SLLA), which ionizes and expands the atmosphere immediately ahead of the RLV. At first a brief period of chemical thrust is followed by a long period of ion thrust during ascent to orbit. As decades pass and greater ion thrust is developed, the period of chemical thrust shortens until it is no longer needed. The RLV{close_quote}s ion thrusters are powered by laser/maser, beamed first from the launch site, then from two large Solar-Power-Satellites (SPS) 180{degree} apart in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) orbit. In orbit, the RLV is limited in where it can go only by the amount of propellant it carries or is stored in various orbits. The RLV can land at a launch site on Earth by using both chemical and ion thrust at first, and later by ion thrust alone as developments cause a far lighter RLV to carry no chemical engines/fuel/tanks. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Underwater thrust and power generation using flexible piezoelectric composites: an experimental investigation toward self-powered swimmer-sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erturk, Alper; Delporte, Ghislain

    2011-12-01

    Fiber-based flexible piezoelectric composites offer several advantages to use in energy harvesting and biomimetic locomotion. These advantages include ease of application, high power density, effective bending actuation, silent operation over a range of frequencies, and light weight. Piezoelectric materials exhibit the well-known direct and converse piezoelectric effects. The direct piezoelectric effect has received growing attention for low-power generation to use in wireless electronic applications while the converse piezoelectric effect constitutes an alternative to replace the conventional actuators used in biomimetic locomotion. In this paper, underwater thrust and electricity generation are investigated experimentally by focusing on biomimetic structures with macro-fiber composite piezoelectrics. Fish-like bimorph configurations with and without a passive caudal fin (tail) are fabricated and compared. The favorable effect of having a passive caudal fin on the frequency bandwidth is reported. The presence of a passive caudal fin is observed to bring the second bending mode close to the first one, yielding a wideband behavior in thrust generation. The same smart fish configuration is tested for underwater piezoelectric power generation in response to harmonic excitation from its head. Resonant piezohydroelastic actuation is reported to generate milli-newton level hydrodynamic thrust using milli-watt level actuation power input. The average actuation power requirement for generating a mean thrust of 19 mN at 6 Hz using a 10 g piezoelastic fish with a caudal fin is measured as 120 mW. This work also discusses the feasibility of thrust generation using the harvested energy toward enabling self-powered swimmer-sensor platforms with comparisons based on the capacity levels of structural thin-film battery layers as well as harvested solar and vibrational energy.

  9. Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accomodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part I-Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2-Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25.800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3-Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine, two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and BPR

  10. Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accommodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part 1: Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2: Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3: Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine. two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and

  11. Structure, optical, and electrical properties of indium tin oxide thin films prepared by sputtering at room temperature and annealed in air or nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen, C.; Herrero, J.

    2007-04-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films have been grown onto soda-lime glass substrates by sputtering at room temperature with various oxygen to argon partial pressure ratios. After deposition, the samples have been annealed at temperatures ranging from 100 to 500 degree sign C in nitrogen or in air. The structure, optical, and electrical characteristics of the ITO coatings have been analyzed as a function of the deposition and the annealing parameters by x-ray diffraction, spectrophotometry, and Hall effect measurements. It has been found that the as-grown amorphous layers crystallize in the cubic structure by heating above 200 degree sign C. Simultaneously, the visible optical transmittance increases and the electrical resistance decreases, in proportions that depend mainly on the sputtering conditions. The lowest resistivity values have been obtained by annealing at 400 degree sign C in nitrogen, where the highest carrier concentrations are achieved, related to oxygen vacancy creation. Some relationships between the analyzed properties have been established, showing the dependence of the cubic lattice distortion and the infrared optical characteristics on the carrier concentration.

  12. Channel-wing System for Thrust Deflection and Force/Moment Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J. (Inventor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An aircraft comprising a Channel Wing having blown c h - ne1 circulation control wings (CCW) for various functions. The blown channel CCW includes a channel that has a rounded or near-round trailing edge. The channel further has a trailing-edge slot that is adjacent to the rounded trailing edge of the channel. The trailing-edge slot has an inlet connected to a source of pressurized air and is capable of tangentially discharging pressurized air over the rounded trailing edge. The aircraft further has a propeller that is located in the channel and ahead of the rounded trailing edge of the channel. The propeller provides a propeller thrust exhaust stream across the channel wing to propel the aircraft through the air and to provide high lift. The pressurized air being discharged over the rounded trailing edge provides a high lift that is obtained independent of an aircraft angle of attack, thus preventing the asymmetry. separated flow, and stall experienced by the CC wing at the high angle of attack it required for high lift generation. The aircraft can further include blown outboard circulation control wings (CCW) that are synergistically connected to the blown channel CCWs. The blown outboard CCWs provide additional high lift, control thrust/drag interchange, and can provide all three aerodynamic moments when differential blowing is applied front-to-rear or left-to-right. Both the blown channel CCW and the outboard CCW also have leading-edge blowing slots to prevent flow separation or to provide aerodynamic moments for control.

  13. Geologic mapping delineates new thrust sheets, duplex structures, and timing relationships between the Meade and Crawford thrusts in Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    New geologic maps of nine complete and six partial 7.5[prime] quadrangles delineate a large-scale duplex comprised of at least five thrust sheets that together form the Sheep Creek culmination in the footwall of the Meade thrust. From west to east, the Sheep Creek culmination includes the Home Canyon, Sheep Creek, Red Mountain, northern Crawford, and Afton thrust sheets. The thrusts are floored by the regional sole decollement in the Cambrian Gros Ventre Formation and merge upward with a roof thrust that lies along the Meade thrust in the west and decollements in the Jurassic Gypsum Spring and Preuss salt intervals in the east. The individual thrusts of Sheep Creek culmination are generally blind thrusts that are recognized by integrating the surface mapping with subsurface well and seismic data in balanced cross sections. The common map expression for individual thrust sheets is marked by translated fault-propagation anticlines in upper Paleozoic, Triassic, and lower Jurassic rocks that are bordered to the east by frontal decollement fold trains in middle and upper Jurassic rocks. The Meade thrust is folded above the Sheep Creek culmination in the northern part of the map area, and it is specifically folded above the Crawford fault-propagation fold, Sublette anticline, north of the map area at Elk Valley, Idaho. Thus, the Meade and Crawford thrusts are not coeval, linked thrusts as previously assumed. Instead, the individual thrusts of Sheep Creek culmination form a linked, eastward-younging thrust system along which 30 km of Crawford thrust displacement in Utah is partitioned between the Sheep Creek, Red Mountain, northern Crawford, and Afton thrusts in Idaho and Wyoming.

  14. Bilateral and multiple cavitation sounds during upper cervical thrust manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The popping produced during high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation is a common sound; however to our knowledge, no study has previously investigated the location of cavitation sounds during manipulation of the upper cervical spine. The primary purpose was to determine which side of the spine cavitates during C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation. Secondary aims were to calculate the average number of pops, the duration of upper cervical thrust manipulation, and the duration of a single cavitation. Methods Nineteen asymptomatic participants received two upper cervical thrust manipulations targeting the right and left C1-2 articulation, respectively. Skin mounted microphones were secured bilaterally over the transverse process of C1, and sound wave signals were recorded. Identification of the side, duration, and number of popping sounds were determined by simultaneous analysis of spectrograms with audio feedback using custom software developed in Matlab. Results Bilateral popping sounds were detected in 34 (91.9%) of 37 manipulations while unilateral popping sounds were detected in just 3 (8.1%) manipulations; that is, cavitation was significantly (P < 0.001) more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally. Of the 132 total cavitations, 72 occurred ipsilateral and 60 occurred contralateral to the targeted C1-2 articulation. In other words, cavitation was no more likely to occur on the ipsilateral than the contralateral side (P = 0.294). The mean number of pops per C1-2 rotatory HVLA thrust manipulation was 3.57 (95% CI: 3.19, 3.94) and the mean number of pops per subject following both right and left C1-2 thrust manipulations was 6.95 (95% CI: 6.11, 7.79). The mean duration of a single audible pop was 5.66 ms (95% CI: 5.36, 5.96) and the mean duration of a single manipulation was 96.95 ms (95% CI: 57.20, 136.71). Conclusions Cavitation was significantly more likely to occur bilaterally than unilaterally during upper cervical HVLA

  15. Grenville foreland thrust belt hidden beneath the eastern US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, E.C. )

    1993-01-01

    Grenville foreland thrust structures are observed beneath the eastern US midcontinent on COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) line OH-1 and a short seismic line in southwest Ohio. These structures represent the first evidence for a significant Grenville foreland thrust belt preserved in eastern North America. On the COCORP lines, the structures include a thrust ramp anticline and an associated asymmetric syncline. The Grenville front tectonic zone appears to truncate these foreland structures, indicating a later, second phase expressed as a deeply penetrating, out-of-sequence thrust zone associated with the main uplift of the Grenville province on the east. A short, shallow seismic line in southwestern Ohio reveals an east-dipping sequence of prominently layered rocks that may lie above a footwall ramp to a deeper Grenville thrust fault. A drill hole into the less reflective top of this dipping sequence encountered unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks like those increasingly reported from other drill holes in southwestern Ohio and adjacent states. Although possibly part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift, these clastic sedimentary rocks may instead preserve evidence of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin in eastern North America. Alternatively these Precambrian sedimentary rocks together with an underlying, but yet undrilled, strongly layered sequence may correlate with similarly layered rocks observed on COCORP and industrial seismic lines within the Middle Proterozoic granite-rhyolite province to the west in Indiana and Illinois and indicate that unmetamorphosed sedimentary material is an important constituent of the granite-rhyolite province. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Development of the Himalayan frontal thrust zone: Salt Range, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.M.; Lillie, R.J.; Yeats, R.S.; Johnson, G.D.; Yousuf, M.; Zamin, A.S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Salt Range is the active frontal thrust zone of the Himalaya in Pakistan. Seismic reflection data show that a 1 km offset of the basement acted as a buttress that caused the central Salt Range-Potwar Plateau thrust sheet to ramp to the surface, exposing Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata. The frontal part of the thrust sheet was folded passively as it overrode the subthrust surface on a ductile layer of Eocambrian salt. Lack of internal deformation of the rear part of the thrust sheet is due to decoupling of sediments from the basement along this salt layer. Early to middle Pliocene (approx. 4.5 Ma) conglomerate deposition in the southern Potwar Plateau, previously interpreted in terms of compressional deformation, may instead document uplift related to basement normal faulting. Stratigraphic evidence, paleomagnetic dating of unconformities, and sediment-accumulation rates suggest that the thrust sheet began to override the basement offset from 2.1 to 1.6 Ma. Cross-section balancing demonstrates at least 20 to 23 km of shortening across the ramp. The rate of Himalayan convergence that can be attributed to underthrusting of Indian basement beneath sediments in the Pakistan foreland is therefore at least 9-14 mm/yr, about 20-35% of the total plate convergence rate.

  17. Simple control laws for low-thrust orbit transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropoulos, Anastassios E.

    2003-01-01

    Two methods are presented by which to determine both a thrust direction and when to apply thrust to effect specified changes in any of the orbit elements except for true anomaly, which is assumed free. The central body is assumed to be a point mass, and the initial and final orbits are assumed closed. Thrust, when on, is of a constant value, and specific impulse is constant. The thrust profiles derived from the two methods are not propellant-optimal, but are based firstly on the optimal thrust directions and location on the osculating orbit for changing each of the orbit elements and secondly on the desired changes in the orbit elements. Two examples of transfers are presented, one in semimajor axis and inclination, and one in semimajor axis and eccentricity. The latter compares favourably with a propellant-optimized transfer between the same orbits. The control laws have few input parameters, but can still capture the complexity of a wide variety of orbit transfers.

  18. Thrust Augmentation Measurements Using a Pulse Detonation Engine Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santoro, Robert J.; Pal, Sibtosh

    2005-01-01

    Results of an experimental effort on pulse detonation driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE)/ejector setup that was specifically designed for the study and operated at frequencies up to 50 Hz. The results of various experiments designed to probe different aspects of the PDE/ejector setup are reported. The baseline PDE was operated using ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel and an oxygen/nitrogen O2 + N2) mixture at an equivalence ratio of one. The PDE only experiments included propellant mixture characterization using a laser absorption technique, high fidelity thrust measurements using an integrated spring-damper system, and shadowgraph imaging of the detonation/shock wave structure emanating from the tube. The baseline PDE thrust measurement results at each desired frequency agree with experimental and modeling results reported in the literature. These PDE setup results were then used as a basis for quantifying thrust augmentation for various PDE/ejector setups with constant diameter ejector tubes and various ejector lengths, the radius of curvature for the ejector inlets and various detonation tube/ejector tube overlap distances. For the studied experimental matrix, the results showed a maximum thrust augmentation of 106% at an operational frequency of 30 Hz. The thrust augmentation results are complemented by shadowgraph imaging of the flowfield in the ejector tube inlet area and high frequency pressure transducer measurements along the length of the ejector tube.

  19. Thrust Augmentation Measurements for a Pulse Detonation Engine Driven Ejector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pal, S.; Santoro, Robert J.; Shehadeh, R.; Saretto, S.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2005-01-01

    Thrust augmentation results of an ongoing study of pulse detonation engine driven ejectors are presented and discussed. The experiments were conducted using a pulse detonation engine (PDE) setup with various ejector configurations. The PDE used in these experiments utilizes ethylene (C2H4) as the fuel, and an equi-molar mixture of oxygen and nitrogen as the oxidizer at an equivalence ratio of one. High fidelity thrust measurements were made using an integrated spring damper system. The baseline thrust of the PDE engine was first measured and agrees with experimental and modeling results found in the literature. Thrust augmentation measurements were then made for constant diameter ejectors. The parameter space for the study included ejector length, PDE tube exit to ejector tube inlet overlap distance, and straight versus rounded ejector inlets. The relationship between the thrust augmentation results and various physical phenomena is described. To further understand the flow dynamics, shadow graph images of the exiting shock wave front from the PDE were also made. For the studied parameter space, the results showed a maximum augmentation of 40%. Further increase in augmentation is possible if the geometry of the ejector is tailored, a topic currently studied by numerous groups in the field.

  20. Ground test of the D shaped vented thrust vectoring nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esker, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    Static ground tests of a large scale lift/cruise thrust vectoring nozzle were conducted to establish: (1) vectoring performance 'in' and 'out' of ground effect; (2) thrust spoilage capability; (3) compatibility of the nozzle with a turbotip fan; and (4) the nozzle structural temperature distribution. Vectoring performance of a short coupled, vented nozzle design on a large scale, (60%) basis was compared with small scale (4.5%) test nozzle results. The test nozzle was a "boilerplate" model of the MCAIR "D" vented nozzle configured for operation with the LF336/J85 turbotip lift fan system. Calibration of the LF336/J85 test fan with a simple convergent nozzle was performed with four different nozzle exit areas to establish reference thrust, nozzle pressure ratio, and nozzle corrected flow characteristics for comparison with the thrust vectoring nozzle data. Thrust vectoring tests with the 'D' vented nozzle were conducted over the range of vector angles between 0 and 117 deg for several different nozzle exit areas.

  1. Demand thrust pumped propulsion with automatic warm gas valving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, J. C.

    1992-06-01

    Operation of a thrust-on-demand, monopropellant rocket propulsion system which uses lightweight low-pressure tankage, free-piston pumps, and a small high-pressure thrust chamber, is explained. The pump intake-exhaust valves use warm gas pneumatic signals to ensure that two reciprocating pumps are alternately pressurized, with overlap during switchover to permit uninterrupted propellant flow. Experiments demonstrate that the miniature pumps operate at any speed depending on downstream demand, and can deliver nearly their own mass in hydrazine per second, at 7 MPa (1000 psi). The valves, which use the alternating layers of metal and graphite to mitigate the effects of differential thermal expansion, have been warm-gas tested for thousands of cycles. For biopropellant operation, a pair of reciprocating oxidizer pumps would be slaved to the fuel pumps' pneumatic oscillator, to provide for pulsed or continuous demand-driven flow of both liquids. Mass ratios and thrust-to-weight ratios of demand-thrust pumped propulsion systems compare quite favorably to those of pressure-fed and turbo-pumped systems. Due to the relatively high densities of storable propellants, liquid mass fractions greater than 0.95 are attainable with these novel pumps, with thrust/weight ratios above 10. The high performance potential of small propulsion systems which use reciprocating pumps suggests that this technology can significantly increase the capability of many types of small spacecraft.

  2. Sandbox modeling of evolving thrust wedges with different preexisting topographic relief: Implications for the Longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuang; Jia, Dong; Yin, Hongwei; Chen, Zhuxin; Li, Zhigang; Shen, Li; Wei, Dongtao; Li, Yiquan; Yan, Bin; Wang, Maomao; Fang, Shaozhi; Cui, Jian

    2016-06-01

    To understand the effects of substantial topographic relief on deformation localization in the seismically active mountains, like the Longmen Shan thrust belt in the eastern Tibet, sandbox experiments were performed based on the framework of the critical taper theory. First, a reference experiment revealed that the critical taper angle was 12° for our experimental materials. Subsequently, different proto wedges (subcritical (6° in taper angle), critical (12°), and supercritical (20°)) were introduced to cover the range of natural topographic relief, and we used two setups: setup A considered only across-strike topographic relief, whereas setup B investigated along-strike segmentation of topography, consist of two adjacent proto wedges. In all experiments, thrust wedges grew by in-sequence accretion of thrust sheets. Setup A revealed an alternating mode of slip partitioning on the accreted thrusts, with large-displacement thrust and small-displacement thrust developing in turn. And contrasting wedge evolutions occurred according to whether the proto wedge was subcritical or critical-supercritical. In setup B, the differential deformation along the strike produced transverse structures such as tear fault and lateral ramp during frontal accretion. The observed tear fault and its associated thrust system resemble the seismogenic fault system of the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. Our experimental results could also explain first-order deformation features observed in the Longmen Shan. Consequently, we conclude that topographic features, including topographic relief across the range and along-strike segmentation of topography, contribute significantly to the kinematics and deformation localization in such active mountains.

  3. Experimental investigation of the flow in a simplified model of water lubricated axial thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2014-03-01

    In hydropower plants the axial thrust bearing takes up the hydraulic axial thrust of the runner and, in case of vertical shafts, the entire weight of all rotating masses. The use of water lubricated bearings can eliminate the oil leakage risk possibly contaminating the environment. A complex flow is generated by the smaller film thickness due to the lower viscosity of water compared with oil. Measurements on a simplified hydrostatic axial trust bearing model were accomplished for validating CFD analysis of water lubricated bearings. In this simplified model, fixed pads are implemented and the width of the gap was enlarged to create a higher resolution in space for the measurements. Most parts of the model were manufactured from acrylic glass to get optical access for measurement with PIV. The focus of these measurements is on the flow within the space between two pads. Additional to the PIV- measurement, the pressure on the wall of the rotating disk is captured by pressure transducers. The model bearing measurement results are presented for varied operating conditions.

  4. Non-Toxic Dual Thrust Reaction Control Engine Development for On-Orbit APS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.

    2003-01-01

    A non-toxic dual thrust proof-of-concept demonstration engine was successfully tested at the Aerojet Sacramento facility under a technology contract sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The goals of the NASA MSFC contract (NAS8-01109) were to develop and expand the technical maturity of a non-toxic, on-orbit auxiliary propulsion system (APS) thruster under the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program. The demonstration engine utilized the existing Kistler K-1 870 lbf LOX/Ethanol orbital maneuvering engine ( O m ) coupled with some special test equipment (STE) that enabled engine operation at 870 lbf in the primary mode and 25 lbf in the vernier mode. Ambient testing in primary mode varied mixture ratio (MR) from 1.28 to 1.71 and chamber pressure (P(c) from 110 to 181 psia, and evaluated electrical pulse widths (EPW) of 0.080, 0.100 and 0.250 seconds. Altitude testing in vernier mode explored igniter and thruster pulsing characteristics, long duration steady state operation (greater than 420 sec) and the impact of varying the percent fuel film cooling on vernier performance and chamber thermal response at low PC (4 psia). Data produced from the testing provided calibration of the performance and thermal models used in the design of the next version of the dual thrust Reaction Control Engine (RCE).

  5. Geometry of a large-scale low-angle mid-crustal thrust (Woodroffe Thrust, Central Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Sebastian; Mancktelow, Neil S.; Hawemann, Friedrich; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Camacho, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    Young orogens, such as the Alps, mainly expose the upper part of the continental crust and it is not possible to follow large-scale thrusts (e.g. the Glarus Thrust) to great depth in order to study their changing rheological behavior. This knowledge, however, is crucial for determining the overall kinematic and dynamic response during collision, as middle to lower crustal rocks represent the major part of the total crustal section. Information from deeper parts of the continental crust can only be obtained directly by investigating regions where these levels are now exhumed. The Musgrave Ranges in Central Australia is a very well exposed, semi-desert area, in which numerous large-scale shear zones developed during the Petermann Orogeny around 550 Ma. The most prominent structure is the ˜400 km long E-W trending Woodroffe Thrust, which placed ˜1.2 Ga granulites onto similarly-aged amphibolite and granulite facies gneisses along a generally south-dipping thrust plane with a top-to-north shear sense. Geothermobarometric calculations on the associated mylonites established that the structure developed under mid-crustal conditions (500-650°C, 0.8-1 GPa). Regional P/T variations in the direction of thrusting are small, but show trends consistent with the south-dipping orientation of the thrust plane, which predicts deeper levels and a higher metamorphic grade in the south than in the north. They imply a very low gradient of only around 3°C/km for a distance of some 30 km in the movement direction of the thrust. Combined with a geothermal gradient on the order of 20°C/km, calculated from four separate P/T estimates from the hanging wall and footwall, this regional gradient indicates that the Woodroffe Thrust was originally shallow-dipping at an average angle of only around 9°. This suggests that upper crustal brittle thrusts do not necessarily steepen into the middle to lower crust, but can define very shallow-dipping, large-scale planar features, with dimensions in

  6. Numerical grid generation and flow simulation in SSME thrust chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.W.; Daley, P.L.; Przekwas, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    The development of liquid and solid rocket engines for future space projects demands a detailed optimization process for highly efficient performance and cost reasons. Also, testing of full size engines may not be feasible when the large size requires test facilities which are cost prohibitive or if vacuum operation cannot be acquired. For such situations only scaling from small test scale measurements or accurate analytical predictions will provide the performance prior to actually flying the mission. A rigorous approach for simulating the combustion processes in liquid rocket engines by employing a direct solution of Navier-Stokes equations within the entire volume of the thrust chambers is presented. This method is illustrated in the solution of reactive flow in the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) thrust chamber. The objective is to review recent improvements in the mathematical model and to present the grid generation methodology suitable for rocket thrust chamber geometries.

  7. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5 sec. duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 sec. duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  8. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1992-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5-s duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 s duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location of failure in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  9. Methods for determining atypical gate valve thrust requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R. Jr.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G.

    1995-04-01

    Evaluating the performance of rising stem, wedge type, gate valves used in nuclear power plant is not a problem when the valves can be design-basis tested and their operability margins determined diagnostically. The problem occurs when they cannot be tested because of plant system limitations or when they can be tested only at some less-than-design-basis condition. To evaluate the performance of these valves requires various analytical and/or extrapolation methods by which the design-basis stem thrust requirement can be determined. This has been typically accomplished with valve stem thrust models used to calculate the requirements or by extrapolating the results from a less-than-design-basis test. The stem thrust models used by the nuclear industry to determine the opening or closing stem thrust requirements for these gate valves have generally assumed that the highest load the valve experiences during closure (but before seating) is at flow isolation and during unwedging or before flow initiation in the opening direction. However, during full-scale valve testing conducted for the USNRC, several of the valves produced stem thrust histories that showed peak closing stem forces occurring before flow isolation in the closing direction and after flow initiation in the opening direction. All of the valves that exhibited this behavior in the closing direction also showed signs of internal damage. Initially, we dismissed the early peak in the closing stem thrust requirement as damage-induced and labeled it nonpredictable behavior. Opening responses were not a priority in our early research, so that phenomenon was set aside for later evaluation.

  10. Cyclic fatigue analysis of rocket thrust chambers. Volume 2: Attitude control thruster high cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element stress analysis was performed for the film cooled throat section of an attitude control thruster. The anlaysis employed the RETSCP finite element computer program. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the thruster operating cycle. The configuration and operating conditions considered, correspond to a flightweight integrated thruster assembly which was thrust pulse tested. The computed strain range was used in conjuction with Haynes 188 Universal Slopes minimum life data to predict throat section fatigue life. The computed number of cycles to failure was greater than the number of pulses to which the thruster was experimentally subjected without failure.

  11. Problems of millipound thrust measurement. The "Hansen Suspension"

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, David G.

    2014-03-31

    Considered in detail are problems which led to the need and use of the 'Hansen Suspension'. Also discussed are problems which are likely to be encountered in any low level thrust measuring system. The methods of calibration and the accuracies involved are given careful attention. With all parameters optimized and calibration techniques perfected, the system was found capable of a resolution of 10 {mu} lbs. A comparison of thrust measurements made by the 'Hansen Suspension' with measurements of a less sophisticated device leads to some surprising results.

  12. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabiers, R. L.; Siebenhaar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate pump and driver systems for low thrust cargo orbit transfer vehicle engines which deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit and beyond are evaluated. The pumps operate to 68 atmospheres (1000 psi) discharge pressure and flowrates suited to cryogenic engines using either LOX/methane or LOX/hydrogen propellants in thrust ranges from 445 to 8900 N (100 to 2000 lb F). Analysis of the various pumps and drivers indicate that the low specific speed requirement will make high fluid efficiencies difficult to achieve. As such, multiple stages are required. In addition, all pumps require inducer stages. The most attractive main pumps are the multistage centrifugal pumps.

  13. Thrust augmentor application for STOL and V/STOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aiken, T. N.

    1977-01-01

    A general parametric description is suggested for thrust augmentor application to STOL and V/STOL aircraft. The parameters and their relationships are discussed using several aircraft augmentor integration problems. For a STOL transport design, the ram drag is a key consideration, limiting the maximum gross augmentation that can be utilized. Maximizing gross augmentation and balancing the aircraft are key considerations for a V/STOL fighter design. Results from wind tunnel investigations on several different thrust augmentor concepts and system studies on STOL transport designs are also included.

  14. Thrust involvement of metamorphic rocks, southwestern Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Till, A.B.; Schmidt, J.M.; Nelson, S.W. )

    1988-10-01

    Most models for the tectonic history of the western Brooks Range treat Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic metamorphic rocks exposed in the southern part of the range as passive structural basement vertically uplifted late in the Mesozoic orogenic episode. Mapping in the metamorphic rocks shows that they can de divided into two structurally and metamorphically distinct belts, both of which were folded and thrust during the orogeny. Recognition of these belts and the nature of the contact separating them is critical to construction of accurate tectonic models of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt.

  15. Experimental investigation of leading-edge thrust at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. M.; Miller, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Wings, designed for leading edge thrust at supersonic speeds, were investigated in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.80, 2.00, 2.16, and 2.36. Experimental data were obtained on a uncambered wing which had three interchangeable leading edges that varied from sharp to blunt. The leading edge thrust concept was evaluated. Results from the investigation showed that leading edge flow separation characteristics of all wings tested agree well with theoretical predictions. The experimental data showed that significant changes in wing leading edge bluntness did not affect the zero lift drag of the uncambered wings.

  16. Fabrication of liquid-rocket thrust chambers by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Electroforming has proven to be an excellent fabrication method for building liquid rocket regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. NASA sponsored technology programs have investigated both common and advanced methods. Using common procedures, several cooled spool pieces and thrust chambers have been made and successfully tested. The designs were made possible through the versatility of the electroforming procedure, which is not limited to simple geometric shapes. An advanced method of electroforming was used to produce a wire-wrapped, composite, pressure-loaded electroformed structure, which greatly increased the strength of the structure while still retaining the advantages of electroforming.

  17. Development of a 115 newton thrust hydrazine catalytic thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinckel, Jose N.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and testing of a hydrazine catalytic thruster with a vacuum thrust of 115 newton. The design guidelines and procedures are presented and discussed. The thruster was tested over the range of feed pressure commonly used in blowdown systems with a ratio of 4:1; from 22 bar to 5.5 bar. The tests were conducted in atmospheric and altitude conditions. The measured thrust, chamber pressure and specific impulse were in good agreement with the design value. The mechanism responsible for the low frequency chamber pressure oscillations, observed during some test runs, is discussed.

  18. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-activated liquid hydrogen reorientation with Geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Efficient technique are studied for accomplishing propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage through impulsive thrust. A comparison between the use of constant-thrust and impulsive-thrust accelerations for the activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive thrust is superior to constant thrust for liquid reorientation in a reduced-gravity environment. This study shows that when impulsive thrust with 0.1-1.0-, and 10-Hz frequencies for liquid-fill levels in the range between 30-80 percent is considered, the selection of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive thrust over the other frequency ranges of impulsive thrust is the optimum. Characteristics of the slosh waves excited during the course of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive-thrust liquid reorientation were also analyzed.

  19. Aircraft ground test and subscale model results of axial thrust loss caused by thrust vectoring using turning vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA-Dryden F/A-18 high alpha research vehicle was modified to incorporate three independently controlled turning vanes located aft of the primary nozzle of each engine to vector thrust for pitch and yaw control. Ground measured axial thrust losses were compared with the results from a 14.25 pct. cold jet model for single and dual vanes inserted up to 25 degs into the engine exhaust. Data are presented for nozzle pressure ratios of 2.0 and 3.0 and nozzle exit areas of 253 and 348 sq in. The results indicate that subscale nozzle test results properly predict trends but underpredict the full scale results by approx. 1 to 4.5 pct. in thrust loss.

  20. An experimental investigation of thrust vectoring two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles installed in a twin-engine fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Mason, Mary L.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine thrust vectoring capability of subscale 2-D convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles installed on a twin engine general research fighter model. Pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by downward rotation of nozzle upper and lower flaps. The effects of nozzle sidewall cutback were studied for both unvectored and pitch vectored nozzles. A single cutback sidewall was employed for yaw thrust vectoring. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers ranging from 0 to 1.20 and at angles of attack from -2 to 35 deg. High pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust and provide values of nozzle pressure ratio up to 9.