Science.gov

Sample records for air film thrust

  1. Performance of Simple Gas Foil Thrust Bearings in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Foil bearings are self-acting hydrodynamics devices used to support high speed rotating machinery. The advantages that they offer to process fluid lubricated machines include: high rotational speed capability, no auxiliary lubrication system, non-contacting high speed operation, and improved damping as compared to rigid hydrodynamic bearings. NASA has had a sporadic research program in this technology for almost 6 decades. Advances in the technology and understanding of foil journal bearings have enabled several new commercial products in recent years. These products include oil-free turbochargers for both heavy trucks and automobiles, high speed electric motors, microturbines for distributed power generation, and turbojet engines. However, the foil thrust bearing has not received a complimentary level of research and therefore has become the weak link of oil-free turbomachinery. In an effort to both provide machine designers with basic performance parameters and to elucidate the underlying physics of foil thrust bearings, NASA Glenn Research Center has completed an effort to experimentally measure the performance of simple gas foil thrust bearing in air. The database includes simple bump foil supported thrust bearings with full geometry and manufacturing techniques available to the user. Test conditions consist of air at ambient pressure and temperatures up to 500 C and rotational speeds to 55,000 rpm. A complete set of axial load, frictional torque, and rotational speed is presented for two different compliant sub-structures and inter-pad gaps. Data obtained from commercially available foil thrust bearings both with and without active cooling is presented for comparison. A significant observation made possible by this data set is the speed-load capacity characteristic of foil thrust bearings. Whereas for the foil journal bearing the load capacity increases linearly with rotational speed, the foil thrust bearing operates in the hydrodynamic high speed limit. In

  2. Numerical analysis on nanoparticles-laden gas film thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiru; Diao, Dongfeng; Yang, Lei

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles can be taken as additives and added into various fluids to improve their lubricating performances. At present, researches in this area are mainly concentrated on the improvement effects of nanoparticles on the lubricating performances of liquid such as oil and water. Nanoparticles will also affect gas lubrication, but few related studies have been reported. Nanoparticles-laden gas film (NLGF) is formed when adding nanoparticles into gas bearing. Then, the lubricating performances of gas bearing including pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity will change. The variations of pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity in nanoparticles-laden gas film thrust bearing are investigated by numerical method. Taking account of the compressibility of gas and the interactions between gas and nanoparticles, a computational fluid dynamics model based on Navier-Stokes equations is applied to simulate the NLGF flow. The effects of inlet nanoparticles volume fraction and orifice radius on film pressure distribution and load-carrying capacity of the NLGF are calculated. The numerical calculation results show that both of the film land pressure and the maximum film pressure both increase when the nanoparticles are added into gas bearing, and the film pressures increase with the rising of the inlet nanoparticles volume fraction. The nanoparticles have an enhancement effect on load-carrying capacity of the studied bearing, and the enhancement effect becomes greater as the film thickness decrease. Therefore, nanoparticles can effectively improve the lubricating performance of gas bearing. The proposed research provides a theoretical basis for the design of new-type nanoparticles-laden gas film bearings.

  3. Compact and High Thrust Air Turbo Ram Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hiroaki; Kitahara, Kazuki; Inukai, Yasuo

    The Air Turbo Ramjet (ATR) is a combined cycle engine which performs like a turbojet engine at subsonic speeds and a ramjet at supersonic speeds and therefore the ATR is an attractive propulsion system for the wide operation range (e.g. Mach 0 to Mach 4). The ATR can provide a higher specific impulse than a solid fuel rocket engine and a higher thrust per frontal area than a turbojet engine. The major ATR components are the inlet, fan (compressor), turbine, gas generator, combustor and exhaust nozzle. In the ATR, the turbine drive gas is generated by a decomposed liquid or solid fuel gas generator. In order to carry heavier payloads and to attain shorter flight time, the compact and high thrust engine is required. In this study, the ram combustor with the double-staged flameholders and the fan with tandem blade were introduced to shorten the engine length and to increase the fan pressure ratio, respectively. Furthermore, the engine testing was carried out on sea level static condition to confirm the engine component integration technologies for the ATR propulsion system.

  4. Start-stop testing of two self-acting air-lubricated spiral groove thrust bearing coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunfee, J. D.; Shapiro, W.

    1974-01-01

    Start-stop tests were conducted on air-lubricated spiral-groove thrust bearings. Application of a matrix-bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) coating over a porous chrome oxide coating resulted in significantly lower friction, compared to bearings coated with chrome oxide only. The MoS2 coated bearing sustained 15,000 start-stop cycles at a maximum of 3600 rpm. Each cycle was 15 seconds on, 30 seconds off. The chrome oxide coated bearing failed by local welding after 2030 cycles. Both types of coatings exhibited early failures under higher thrust loads when operating films were insufficient to sustain the load without overheating.

  5. A Differential Thrust Controller for Air Cushion Landing System Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    8217 control installed, for each of the five time-delay values. In all cases , the average mean square error was reduced approximately 70% by the addition...assistance with explanations of the ACLS. Credit should also be given to Lieutenant John Pinnel , a classmate at the Air Force Institute of Technology...the system with and without the control installed, for each of the five time-delay values. In all cases , the average mean square error was reduced

  6. Effects of bleed air extraction on thrust levels on the F404-GE-400 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuhas, Andrew J.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A ground test was performed to determine the effects of compressor bleed flow extraction on the performance of F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engines. The two engines were installed in the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. A specialized bleed ducting system was installed onto the aircraft to control and measure engine bleed airflow while the aircraft was tied down to a thrust measuring stand. The test was conducted on each engine and at various power settings. The bleed air extraction levels analyzed included flow rates above the manufacturer's maximum specification limit. The measured relationship between thrust and bleed flow extraction was shown to be essentially linear at all power settings with an increase in bleed flow causing a corresponding decrease in thrust. A comparison with the F404-GE-400 steady-state engine simulation showed the estimation to be within +/- 1 percent of measured thrust losses for large increases in bleed flow rate.

  7. Effects of bleed air extraction of thrust levels on the F404-GE-400 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuhas, Andrew J.; Ray, Ronald J.

    1992-01-01

    A ground test was performed to determine the effects of compressor bleed flow extraction on the performance of F404-GE-400 afterburning turbofan engines. The two engines were installed in the F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle at the NASA Dryden Flight Research Facility. A specialized bleed ducting system was installed onto the aircraft to control and measure engine bleed airflow while the aircraft was tied down to a thrust measuring stand. The test was conducted on each engine and at various power settings. The bleed air extraction levels analyzed included flow rates above the manufacturer's maximum specification limit. The measured relationship between thrust and bleed flow extraction was shown to be essentially linear at all power settings with an increase in bleed flow causing a corresponding decrease in thrust. A comparison with the F404-GE-400 steady-state engine simulation showed the estimation to be within +/- 1 percent of measured thrust losses for large increases is bleed flow rate.

  8. A piloted simulation investigation of the normal load factor and longitudinal thrust required for air-to-air acquisition and tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalley, Matthew S.

    1993-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was performed by the U.S. Army Aeroflighydynamics Directorate to develop insight into the maneuverability requirements for aggressive helicopter maneuvering tasks such as air-to-air combat. Both a conventional helicopter and a helicopter with auxiliary thrust were examined. The aircraft parameters of interest were the normal and longitudinal load factor envelopes. Of particular interest were the mission performance and handling qualities tradeoffs with the parameters of interest. Two air-to-air acquisition and tracking tasks and a return-to-cover task were performed to assess mission performance. Results indicate that without auxiliary thrust, the ownship normal load factor capability needs to match that of the adversary in order to provide satisfactory handling qualities. Auxiliary thrust provides significant handling qualities advantages and can be substituted to some extent for normal load factor capability. Auxiliary thrust levels as low as 0.2 thrust/weight can provide significant handling qualities advantages.

  9. Prediction of engine performance and wall erosion due to film cooling for the 'fast track' ablative thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.

    1994-01-01

    Efforts have been made at the Propulsion Laboratory (MSFC) to design and develop new liquid rocket engines for small-class launch vehicles. Emphasis of the efforts is to reduce the engine development time with the use of conventional designs while meeting engine reliability criteria. Consequently, the engine cost should be reduced. A demonstrative ablative thrust chamber, called 'fast-track', has been built. To support the design of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber, predictions of the wall temperature and ablation erosion rate of the 'fast-track' thrust chamber have been performed using the computational fluid dynamics program REFLEQS (Reactive Flow Equation Solver). The analysis is intended to assess the amount of fuel to be used for film cooling so that the erosion rate of the chamber ablation does not exceed its allowable limit. In addition, the thrust chamber performance loss due to an increase of the film cooling is examined.

  10. Force versus current and air gap calibration of a double acting magnetic thrust bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Baun, D.O.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Force versus current and air gap measurements were obtained for a double acting thrust bearing. Static force measurements were made for various air gap settings and bearing current combinations. The resulting data was reduced and an optimized expression representing the force versus current and air gap relationship of the bearing was found. In addition, a theoretical force model was developed using simple magnetic circuit theory and magnetic properties obtained from standard magnetic material tests. The theoretical and the experimentally derived force models were compared. Hysteresis tests were conducted with the thrust disk in the centered position for various current perturbation amplitudes about the design bias current. Hysteresis effects were shown to cause a difference between the measured force as the current was increasing as compared to when the current was decreasing. A second order polynomial expression was developed to express the coercive force as a function of the perturbation current amplitude. The bearing frequency response was examined by injecting sinusoidal currents of varying frequencies into the bearing. A maximum actuator bandwidth of approximately 700 Hz was determined. Above 700 Hz the bearing frequency response could not be distinguished from the test fixture frequency response.

  11. Thrust rollers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A thrust roller bearing system comprising an inner rotating member, an outer rotating member and multiple rollers coupling the inner rotating member with outer rotating member. The inner and outer rotating members include thrust lips to enable the rollers to act as thrust rollers. The rollers contact inner and outer rotating members at bearing contact points along a contact line. Consequently, the radial/tilt and thrust forces move synchronously and simultaneously to create a bearing action with no slipping.

  12. Lateral dampers for thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibner, D. H.; Szafir, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    The development of lateral damping schemes for thrust bearings was examined, ranking their applicability to various engine classes, selecting the best concept for each engine class and performing an in-depth evaluation. Five major engine classes were considered: large transport, military, small general aviation, turboshaft, and non-manrated. Damper concepts developed for evaluation were: curved beam, constrained and unconstrained elastomer, hybrid boost bearing, hydraulic thrust piston, conical squeeze film, and rolling element thrust face.

  13. Temperature effect on titanium nitride nanometer thin film in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cen, Z. H.; Xu, B. X.; Hu, J. F.; Ji, R.; Toh, Y. T.; Ye, K. D.; Hu, Y. F.

    2017-02-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) is a promising alternative plasmonic material to conventional novel metals. For practical plasmonic applications under the influence of air, the temperature-dependent optical properties of TiN thin films in air and its volume variation are essential. Ellipsometric characterizations on a TiN thin film at different increasing temperatures in ambient air were conducted, and optical constants along with film thickness were retrieved. Below 200 °C, the optical properties varied linearly with temperature, in good agreement with other temperature dependent studies of TiN films in vacuum. The thermal expansion coefficient of the TiN thin film was determined to be 10.27  ×  10‑6 °C‑1. At higher temperatures, the TiN thin film gradually loses its metallic characteristics and has weaker optical absorption, impairing its plasmonic performance. In addition, a sharp increase in film thickness was observed at the same time. Changes in the optical properties and film thickness with temperatures above 200 °C were revealed to result from TiN oxidation in air. For the stability of TiN-based plasmonic devices, operation temperatures of lower than 200 °C, or measures to prevent oxidation, are required. The present study is important to fundamental physics and technological applications of TiN thin films.

  14. Development of a 12-Thrust Chamber Kerosene /Oxygen Primary Rocket Sub-System for an Early (1964) Air-Augmented Rocket Ground-Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, D.; Hyde, E. H.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Airbreathing/Rocket combined-cycle, and specifically rocket-based combined- cycle (RBCC), propulsion systems, typically employ an internal engine flow-path installed primary rocket subsystem. To achieve acceptably short mixing lengths in effecting the "air augmentation" process, a large rocket-exhaust/air interfacial mixing surface is needed. This leads, in some engine design concepts, to a "cluster" of small rocket units, suitably arrayed in the flowpath. To support an early (1964) subscale ground-test of a specific RBCC concept, such a 12-rocket cluster was developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The small primary rockets used in the cluster assembly were modified versions of an existing small kerosene/oxygen water-cooled rocket engine unit routinely tested at MSFC. Following individual thrust-chamber tests and overall subsystem qualification testing, the cluster assembly was installed at the U. S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for RBCC systems testing. (The results of the special air-augmented rocket testing are not covered here.) While this project was eventually successfully completed, a number of hardware integration problems were met, leading to catastrophic thrust chamber failures. The principal "lessons learned" in conducting this early primary rocket subsystem experimental effort are documented here as a basic knowledge-base contribution for the benefit of today's RBCC research and development community.

  15. Work function recovery of air exposed molybdenum oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Irfan; James Turinske, Alexander; Bao, Zhenan; Gao, Yongli

    2012-08-01

    We report substantial work function (WF) recovery of air exposed molybdenum oxide thin films with vacuum annealing. We observed a sharp reduction in the MoOx WF (from 6.8 eV to 5.6 eV) as well as a very thin layer of oxygen rich adsorbate on the MoOx film after an hour of air exposure. The WF of the exposed MoOx film started to gradually recover with increasing annealing temperature in vacuum, and the saturation in the WF recovery was observed at 450 °C with WF ˜6.4 eV. We further studied the interface formation between the annealed MoOx and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc). The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level of CuPc was observed to be almost pinned to the Fermi level, strongly suggesting the possibility of efficient hole injection with the vacuum annealed MoOx film.

  16. Hot-gas-side heat transfer with and without film cooling on a simulated nuclear rocket thrust chamber using H2-O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, R. J.; Schacht, R. L.; Jones, W. L.

    1972-01-01

    Heat-transfer coefficients were obtained on a thrust chamber which simulated the geometry of the NERVA nuclear rocket. The tests were performed with and without peripheral film cooling over a chamber pressure range of 1.05 million to 5.84 million newtons per square meter (153 to 847 psia). With no film cooling, the overall axial variation in the value of the correlation coefficient C of the equation (Stanton)* (Prandtl)* to the 0.7ths power = C(Reynolds)* to the -0.2ths power, where * indicates the reference enthalpy condition, was reduced 66 percent when the local diameter in the Reynolds number was replaced by the axial distance from the injector face. The average peak values of C were reduced 25 percent with 2 and 3.75 percent cooling and 50 percent with 7.5 percent cooling.

  17. Dynamic behavior of an inherently compensated air squeeze film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental values of damping and stiffness were determined for an externally pressurized, inherently compensated, compressible squeeze-film damper up to excitation frequencies of 36,000 cycles/min. Experimental values of damping were higher than predicted by a small pressure perturbation theory at low squeeze numbers and less than predicted at high squeeze numbers. Experimental values of air film stiffness were less than the theory predicted at low squeeze numbers and much greater at higher squeeze numbers.

  18. Polydopamine Films from the Forgotten Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Ponzio, Florian; Payamyar, Payam; Schneider, Anne; Winterhalter, Mathias; Bour, Jérôme; Addiego, Frédéric; Krafft, Marie-Pierre; Hemmerle, Joseph; Ball, Vincent

    2014-10-02

    The formation of polydopamine under mild oxidation conditions from dopamine solutions with mechanical agitation leads to the formation of films that can functionalize all kinds of materials. In the absence of stirring of the solution, we report the formation of polydopamine films at the air/water interface (PDA A/W) and suggest that it arises from an homogeneous nucleation process. These films grow two times faster than in solution and can be deposited on hydrophilic or hydrophobic substrates by the Langmuir-Schaeffer technique. Thanks to this new method, porous and hydrophobic materials like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes can be completely covered with a 35 nm thick PDA A/W film after only 3h of reaction. Finally the oxidation of a monomer followed by a polymerization in water is not exclusive to polydopamine since we also transferred polyaniline functional films from the air/water interface to solid substrates. These findings suggest that self-assembly from a solution containing hydrophilic monomers undergoing a chemical transformation (here oxidation and oligomerization) could be a general method to produce films at the liquid/air interface.

  19. THRUST BEARING

    DOEpatents

    Heller, P.R.

    1958-09-16

    A thrust bearing suitable for use with a rotor or blower that is to rotate about a vertical axis is descrihed. A centrifagal jack is provided so thnt the device may opernte on one hearing at starting and lower speeds, and transfer the load to another bearing at higher speeds. A low viscosity fluid is used to lubricate the higher speed operation bearing, in connection with broad hearing -surfaces, the ability to withstand great loads, and a relatively high friction loss, as contraated to the lower speed operatio;n bearing which will withstand only light thrust loads but is sufficiently frictionfree to avoid bearing seizure during slow speed or startup operation. An axially aligned shaft pin provides the bearing surface for low rotational speeds, but at higher speed, weights operating against spring tension withdraw nthe shaft pin into the bearing proper and the rotor shaft comes in contact with the large bearing surfaces.

  20. Hydrogen film cooling of a small hydrogen-oxygen thrust chamber and its effect on erosion rates of various ablative materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N.; Roberts, W. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine what arrangement of film-coolant-injection orifices should be used to decrease the erosion rates of small, high temperature, high pressure ablative thrust chambers without incurring a large penalty in combustion performance. All of the film cooling was supplied through holes in a ring between the outer row of injector elements and the chamber wall. The best arrangement, which had twice the number of holes as there were outer row injection elements, was also the simplest. The performance penalties, presented as a reduction in characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency, were 0.8 and 2.8 percentage points for the 10 and 20 percent cooling flows, respectively, The best film-coolant injector was then used to obtain erosion rates for 19 ablative materials. The throat erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 2.5 with a 10 percent coolant flow. Only the more expensive silica phenolic materials had low enough erosion rates to be considered for use in the nozzle throat. However, some of the cheaper materials might qualify for use in other areas of small nozzles with large throat diameters where the higher erosion rates are more acceptable.

  1. Thin-film silicon for flexible metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Garamoun, Ahmed; Schubert, Markus B; Werner, Jürgen H

    2014-12-01

    Due to its high energy density, theoretical studies propose silicon as a promising candidate material for metal-air batteries. Herein, for the first time, experimental results detail the use of n-type doped amorphous silicon and silicon carbide as fuel in Si-air batteries. Thin-film silicon is particularly interesting for flexible and rolled batteries with high specific energies. Our Si-air batteries exhibit a specific capacity of 269 Ah kg(-1) and an average cell voltage of 0.85 V at a discharge current density of 7.9 μA cm(-2) , corresponding to a specific energy of 229 Wh kg(-1) . Favorably in terms of safety, low concentrated alkaline solution serves as electrolyte. Discharging of the Si-air cells continues as long as there is silicon available for oxidation.

  2. Tribological study of an aerodynamic thrust bearing in the supersonic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuy, F.; Bou-Saïd, B.; Garcia, M.

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, aerodynamic air thrust bearing are mainly used over a large panel of turbo-machineries. These systems become increasingly faster and up to operate in supersonic regime. They have not reached a sufficient level of research in terms of high speed. The possibility of an aerodynamic thrust bearing operating in a supersonic regime is studied. First, the air film dynamic study for high Reynolds number is based on the “modified Reynolds” equations, which take into account the inertia terms, the viscosity’s variation in the film thickness, and the turbulence. It’s an extension of the traditional model used in lubrication called the generalized Reynolds equation. The results show that a depression occur at the location of the change of slope of the tapper flat geometry. The hypothesis of presence of shock or rarefaction waves shows that the pressure gradient in the film thickness may be no longer negligible. The modified Reynolds equation may be not enough to describe the problem. A new system is built to study these phenomena: the Navier-Stokes equation are adapted to the film’s geometry. The dynamic air film’s behavior study in supersonic regime requires a shock capturing scheme called WENO scheme (“Weighted Essentially Non Oscillatory”), mainly used in shock and turbulence studies. The numerical results give the film behavior modelling of a fixed air thrust bearing pad. The evolution of the quantities shows that shock wave can occur in a thin film.

  3. Low-thrust chemical propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Results from investigations leading to the definition of low thrust chemical engine concepts are described. From the thrust chamber cooling analyses, regenerative/radiation-cooled LO2/H2 thrust chambers offered the largest thrust and chamber pressure operational envelope primarily due to the superior cooling capability of hydrogen and its low critical pressure. Regenerative/radiation-cooled LO2/CH4 offered the next largest operational envelope. The maximum chamber pressure for film/radiation-cooling was significantly lower than for regenerative/radiation-cooling. As in regeneration-cooling, LO2/H2 thrust chambers achieved the highest maximum chamber pressure, LO2/CH4 film/radiation-cooling was found not feasible and LO2/RP-1 film/radiation-cooling was extremely limited. In the engine cycle/configuration evaluation, the engine cycle matrix was defined through the incorporation of the heat transfer results. Engine cycle limits were established with the fuel-cell power cycle achieving the highest chamber pressure; however, the fuel cell system weights were excessive. The staged combustion cycle achieved the next highest chamber pressure but the preburner operational feasibility was in question.

  4. Noise generated by a flight weight, air flow control valve in a vertical takeoff and landing aircraft thrust vectoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Lewis Research Center's Powered Lift Facility to experimentally evaluate the noise generated by a flight weight, 12 in. butterfly valve installed in a proposed vertical takeoff and landing thrust vectoring system. Fluctuating pressure measurements were made in the circular duct upstream and downstream of the valve. This data report presents the results of these tests. The maximum overall sound pressure level is generated in the duct downstream of the valve and reached a value of 180 dB at a valve pressure ratio of 2.8. At the higher valve pressure ratios the spectra downstream of the valve is broad banded with its maximum at 1000 Hz.

  5. Air cushioning in droplet impact. II. Experimental characterization of the air film evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    A liquid drop approaching a solid surface deforms substantially under the influence of the ambient air which needs to be squeezed out before the liquid can actually touch the solid. We use nanometer- and microsecond-resolved dual wavelength interferometry described in Part I (also published in this issue) to reveal the complex spatial and temporal evolution of the squeezed air layer. In low-velocity droplet impact, i.e., We numbers of order unity, the confined air layer below the droplet develops two local minima in thickness. We quantitatively measure the evolution of the droplet bottom interface and find that surface tension determines the air film thickness below the first kink, after which fluid is diverted outward to form a second even sharper kink. Depending on We, one of the two kinks approaches the surface more closely forming liquid-solid contact. The early time spreading of liquid-solid contact is controlled by the capillary driving force and the inertia of the liquid. The cushioned air film geometry, i.e., a flat micrometer-thin gap, induces an increase of the spreading velocity; the contact area first spreads over the cushioned region, only then followed by radial spreading. This spreading mechanism can lead to the entrapment of one or more air bubbles.

  6. Hydrodynamic film thickness measurements and CFD analysis identify the root causes of repetitive thrust bearing failures on a 45 MW hydro generating unit at Hydro-Québec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvin, P.; Huard, P.

    2016-11-01

    High temperature level recorded on the thrust bearing of a 45 MW hydro generating unit was resulting in frequent production stoppage. In spite of improvements brought to the oil cooling system since the rehabilitation in 2008, the operator had to activate the bearing oil lift system to keep the temperature below acceptable limits. Primary root cause analysis first pointed to the design of the shoe that was centrally pivoted, not allowing the formation of a thick hydrodynamic film. The removal of a strip of the soft metal layer near the trailing edge of the shoe resulted in a significant surface temperature reduction (about 15 deg. C), as predicted by a CFD model of the oil film. The goal of this machining was to increase the pivoting angle by moving the centre of hydrodynamic pressure. Proximity sensors were installed at each corner of the redesigned shoe to measure the film thickness and the bearing attitude. Signal analysis revealed a step of a magnitude close to the oil film thickness between the two halves of the rotating thrust block. This was the cause of another failure few hours since restarting the unit. The lessons learnt through these measurements and analyses were carefully applied to the ultimate build. The unit now runs with a robust thrust bearing and even survived a significant cooling flow reduction event. This paper presents the CFD analysis results and the measurements acquired during these events.

  7. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  8. Properties of amphiphilic oligonucleotide films at the air/water interface and after film transfer.

    PubMed

    Keller, R; Kwak, M; de Vries, J W; Sawaryn, C; Wang, J; Anaya, M; Müllen, K; Butt, H-J; Herrmann, A; Berger, R

    2013-11-01

    The self-assembly of amphiphilic hybrid materials containing an oligonucleotide sequence at the air/water interface was investigated by means of pressure-molecular area (Π-A) isotherms. In addition, films were transferred onto solid substrates and imaged using scanning force microscopy. We used oligonucleotide molecules with lipid tails, which consisted of a single stranded oligonucleotide 11 mer containing two hydrophobically modified 5-(dodec-1-ynyl)uracil nucleobases (dU11) at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The air/water interface was used as confinement for the self-assembling process of dU11. Scanning force microscopy of films transferred via Langmuir-Blodgett technique revealed mono-, bi- (Π ≥ 2 mN/m) and multilayer formation (Π ≥ 30 mN/m). The first layer was 1.6 ± 0.1 nm thick. It was oriented with the hydrophilic oligonucleotide moiety facing the hydrophilic substrate while the hydrophobic alkyl chains faced air. In the second layer the oligonucleotide moiety was found to face the air. The second layer was found to cover up to 95% of the sample area. Our measurements indicated that the rearrangement of the molecules into bi- and multiple bilayers happened already at the air/water interface. Similar results were obtained with a second type of oligonucleotide amphiphile, an oligonucleotide block copolymer, which was composed of an oligonucleotide 11 mer covalently attached at the terminus to polypropyleneoxide (PPO).

  9. Summary of Scale-Model Thrust-Reverser Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povolny, John H; Steffen, Fred W; Mcardle, Jack G

    1957-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the characteristics of several basic types of thrust-reverser. Models of three types, target, tailpipe cascade, and ring cascade, were tested with unheated air. The effects of design variables on reverse-thrust performance, reversed-flow boundaries, and thrust modulation characteristics were determined.

  10. Skating on a Film of Air: Drops Impacting on a Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolinski, John M.; Rubinstein, Shmuel M.; Mandre, Shreyas; Brenner, Michael P.; Weitz, David A.; Mahadevan, L.

    2012-02-01

    The commonly accepted description of drops impacting on a surface typically ignores the essential role of the air that is trapped between the impacting drop and the surface. Here we describe a new imaging modality that is sensitive to the behavior right at the surface. We show that a very thin film of air, only a few tens of nanometers thick, remains trapped between the falling drop and the surface as the drop spreads. The thin film of air serves to lubricate the drop enabling the fluid to skate on the air film laterally outward at surprisingly high velocities, consistent with theoretical predictions. Eventually this thin film of air breaks down as the fluid wets the surface via a spinodal-like mechanism. Our results show that the dynamics of impacting drops are much more complex than previously thought, with a rich array of unexpected phenomena that require rethinking classic paradigms.

  11. Visualization and measurement of the air film close ultra-hydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, D.; Gasic, M.; Kotek, M.; Kopecky, Václav

    2016-11-01

    The ultra-hydrophobic surfaces have the prospect of great importance in industry, both in applications demanding easy cleaning, and they are presumed to reduce loss when the active parts of hydraulic machines are treated. Interaction of fluids with ultra-hydrophobic surface is accompanied by creation of layer of air, so called air film, which depends on the quality of the surface. The quality of the surface is influenced by the matrix roughness, the character of physical or chemical cover. This properties lead to monolithic air layer presented as air film, or lead to plurality of bubbles of various sizes seated upon the surface. The air film can be observed visually at sufficient magnification and the dynamic interaction between fluid flow and air film can be studied with Global Imaging methods, particularly Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). There is the velocity profile in the vicinity of the air film in the main interest of the research. Here we present the visualization of air film depending on Reynolds number of flowing liquid.

  12. Drainage of the air-water-quartz film: experiments and theory.

    PubMed

    Manica, Rogerio; Chan, Derek Y C

    2011-01-28

    Experimental results of the kinetics of drainage of the trapped water film between an approaching air bubble and a quartz plate have been analysed using recent theoretical advances in formulating and solving the flow problem in deformable films. Excellent agreement is obtained between experimental data and a model that assumes the bubble-water interface is tangentially immobile in its hydrodynamic response. The coupling between hydrodynamic pressure, disjoining pressure and film deformation is critical in determining the dynamic behaviour of the drainage process. The Reynolds parallel film model that omits the effects of film deformation predicts results that are qualitatively incorrect.

  13. Solid mesostructured polymer-surfactant films at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Jonathan C; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-01

    Pioneering work by Edler et al. has spawned a new sub-set of mesostructured materials. These are solid, self-supporting films comprising surfactant micelles encased within polymer hydrogel; composite polymer-surfactant films can be grown spontaneously at the air-liquid interface and have defined and controllable mesostructures. Addition of siliconalkoxide to polymer-surfactant mixtures allows for the growth of mesostructured hybrid polymer-surfactant silica films that retain film geometry after calcinations and exhibit superior mechanical properties to typically brittle inorganic films. Growing films at the air-liquid interface provides a rapid and simple means to prepare ordered solid inorganic films, and to date the only method for generating mesostructured films thick enough (up to several hundred microns) to be removed from the interface. Applications of these films could range from catalysis to encapsulation of hydrophobic species and drug delivery. Film properties and mesostructures are sensitive to surfactant structure, polymer properties and polymer-surfactant phase behaviour: herein it will be shown how film mesostructure can be tailored by directing these parameters, and some interesting analogies will be drawn with more familiar mesostructured silica materials.

  14. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical study evaluating thrust chamber cooling engine cycles and preliminary engine design for low thrust chemical rocket engines for orbit transfer vehicles is described. Oxygen/hydrogen, oxygen/methane, and oxygen/RP-1 engines with thrust levels from 444.8 N to 13345 N, and chamber pressures from 13.8 N/sq cm to 689.5 N/sq cm were evaluated. The physical and thermodynamic properties of the propellant theoretical performance data, and transport properties are documented. The thrust chamber cooling limits for regenerative/radiation and film/radiation cooling are defined and parametric heat transfer data presented. A conceptual evaluation of a number of engine cycles was performed and a 2224.1 N oxygen/hydrogen engine cycle configuration and a 2224.1 N oxygen/methane configuration chosen for preliminary engine design. Updated parametric engine data, engine design drawings, and an assessment of technology required are presented.

  15. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, Bernard P.; Becse, Imre

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  16. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOEpatents

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  17. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauckert, R. P.; Yost, M. C.; Tobin, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted on the regenerative cooled thrust chamber of the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine. The conditions for the tests and the durations obtained are presented. The tests demonstrated thrust chamber operation over the nominal ranges of chamber pressure mixture ratio. Variations in auxiliary film coolant flowrate were also demonstrated. High pressure tests were conducted to demonstrate the thrust chamber operation at conditions approaching the design chamber pressure for the derivative space tug application.

  18. The cis-bis(decanoate)tin phthalocyanine/DPPC film at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Salvador; Garza, Cristina; Beltran, Hiram I; Campos-Terán, José; Arenas-Alatorre, Jesús; Castillo, Rolando

    2012-03-01

    Films made of cis-bis-decanoate-tin(IV) phthalocyanine (PcSn10) and racemic dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) are studied with compression isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) at the air/water interface. Films enriched in PcSn10 present phase separation elliptical-shaped domains. These domains present optical anisotropy and molecular order. They are enriched in PcSn10, and the film outside these domains is enriched in DPPC, as shown in by high-angle annular dark-field transmission electron microscopy on Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) transferred films. Film collapse area and atomic force microscopy images of LB transferred films on mica indicate that the films are actually multilayers. A computational survey was performed to determine how the PcSn10 molecules prefer to self-assemble, in films basically made of PcSn10. The relative energetic stability for several dimeric assemblies was obtained, and a crystal model of the film was developed through packing and repeating the PcSn10 molecules, along the crystallographic directions of the unit cell. Our results contribute to understanding the strong interaction between PcSn10 and DPPC at the air/water interface, where even small quantities of DPPC (~1-2%) can modify the film in an important way.

  19. Two modes of transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate films in air.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xurong; Han, Joong Tark; Kim, Do Hwan; Cho, Kilwon

    2006-02-16

    Large-area amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) films in air are shown to be transformed into crystalline calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) films via two modes-dissolution-recrystallization and solid-solid phase transition-depending on the relative humidity of the air and the temperature. Moisture in the air promotes the transformation of ACC into crystalline forms via a dissolution-recrystallization process. Increasing the humidity increases the rate of ACC crystallization and gives rise to films with numerous large pores. As the temperature is increased, the effect of moisture in the air is reduced and solid-solid transition by thermal activation becomes the dominant transformation mechanism. At 100 and 120 degrees C, ACC films are transformed into predominantly (110) oriented crystalline films. Collectively, the results show that calcium carbonate films with different morphologies, crystal phases, and structures can be obtained by controlling the humidity and temperature. This ability to control the transformation of ACC should assist in clarifying the role of ACC in the biomineralization of CaCO(3) and should open new avenues for preparing CaCO(3) films with oriented and fine structure.

  20. Residual Bias Phenomenon in Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Capacitive Film Transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen D.; Song, Jun-Ho; Chimenti, D. E.

    2006-03-01

    We discuss in this paper the underlying physics of a residual bias phenomenon, whereby the metalized Mylar films of air-coupled film transducers accept and retain a residual electrostatic charge. Experimental measurements to demonstrate and quantify this effect are reported here, along with a hypothesis of the mechanism of charge transfer and embedding. The measurements show the amplitude performance of the capacitive film transducers as a function of applied bias voltage and frequency. Factors such as humidity and decay time also play roles in the acquisition and holding of charge on a film. We hypothesize that charge transfers from the conductive backplate and collects on the non-metalized side of the film. The charged films therefore are electrostatically attracted to the transducer backplate even with no applied voltage bias. Typically, an externally applied bias voltage is needed to charge the capacitor. With a persistent residual bias effect, these air-coupled capacitive film transducers could be used like conventional piezoelectric transducers with no biasing required. This effect has substantial implications for the operation of air-coupled film transducers.

  1. Variable thrust cartridge

    DOEpatents

    Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2000-11-07

    The present invention is a variable thrust cartridge comprising a water-molten aluminum reaction chamber from which a slug is propelled. The cartridge comprises a firing system that initiates a controlled explosion from the reaction chamber. The explosive force provides a thrust to a slug, preferably contained within the cartridge.

  2. PPT Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haag, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A torsional-type thrust stand has been designed and built to test Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT's) in both single shot and repetitive operating modes. Using this stand, momentum per pulse was determined strictly as a function of thrust stand deflection, spring constant, and natural frequency. No empirical corrections were required. The accuracy of the method was verified using a swinging impact pendulum. Momentum transfer data between the thrust stand and the pendulum were consistent to within 1%. Following initial calibrations, the stand was used to test a Lincoln Experimental Satellite (LES-8/9) thruster. The LES-8/9 system had a mass of approximately 7.5 kg, with a nominal thrust to weight ratio of 1.3 x 10(exp -5). A total of 34 single shot thruster pulses were individually measured. The average impulse bit per pulse was 266 microN-s, which was slightly less than the value of 300 microN-s published in previous reports on this device. Repetitive pulse measurements were performed similar to ordinary steady-state thrust measurements. The thruster was operated for 30 minutes at a repetition rate of 132 pulses per minute and yielded an average thrust of 573 microN. Using average thrust, the average impulse bit per pulse was estimated to be 260 microN-s, which was in agreement with the single shot data. Zero drift during the repetitive pulse test was found to be approximately 1% of the measured thrust.

  3. Tests on Thrust Augmenters for Jet Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Shoemaker, James M

    1932-01-01

    This series of tests was undertaken to determine how much the reaction thrust of a jet could be increased by the use of thrust augmenters and thus to give some indication as to the feasibility of jet propulsion for airplanes. The tests were made during the first part of 1927 at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory. A compressed air jet was used in connection with a series of annular guides surrounding the jet to act as thrust augmenters. The results show that, although it is possible to increase the thrust of a jet, the increase is not large enough to affect greatly the status of the problem of the application of jet propulsion to airplanes.

  4. Droplet-air collision dynamics: Evolution of the film thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opfer, L.; Roisman, I. V.; Venzmer, J.; Klostermann, M.; Tropea, C.

    2014-01-01

    This study is devoted to the experimental and theoretical investigation of aerodynamic drop breakup phenomena. We show that the phenomena of drop impact onto a rigid wall, drop binary collisions, and aerodynamic drop deformation are similar if the correct scaling is applied. Then we use observations of the deforming drop to estimate the evolution of the film thickness of the bag, the value that determines the size of the fine child drops produced by bag breakup. This prediction of film thickness, based on film kinematics, is validated for the initial stage by direct drop thickness measurements and at the latest stage by the data obtained from the velocity of hole expansion in the film. It is shown that the film thickness correlates well with the dimensionless position of the bag apex.

  5. Evaluation of rotating, incompressibly lubricated, pressurized thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, D. P.

    1971-01-01

    Program evaluates a series hybrid, fluid film ball bearing consisting of an orifice compensated pressurized thrust bearing in conjunction with a self-acting journal bearing. Oil viscosities corresponding to experimentally measured ball bearing outer-race temperatures were used.

  6. Denaturation resistance of beta-lactoglobulin in monomolecular films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jhih-Min; White, John W

    2009-10-29

    Using X-ray reflectometry we report strong differences in the denaturation response of beta-lactoglobulin adsorbed as a monomolecular film at the air-water interface from that observed in mixed denaturant/beta-lactoglobulin bulk solutions. Using the "flow trough" technique an isolated monomolecular film of the protein showed little change in structure when subjected to a 4.0 M guanidinium hydrochloride substrate. Unlike the bulk solution where a new protein layer structure appears, small changes in the protein packing and the roughness of the film are the only evidence of change. These parameters have been studied as a function of denaturant concentration and film quality. The strength of the response depends on the degree of perfection of the originally formed film; quickly formed films are more easily denatured. As the response is so subtle, possible interfering effects such as denaturant release of protein adsorbed on the trough have been quantified.

  7. Thrust sensing for small UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchman, Christopher Scott

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have become prevalent in both military and civilian applications. UAVs have many size categories from large-scale aircraft to micro air vehicles. The performance, health, and efficiency for UAVs of smaller sizes can be difficult to assess and few associated instrumentation systems have been developed. Thrust measurements on the ground can characterize systems especially when combined with simultaneous motor power measurements. This thesis demonstrates the use of strain measurements to measure the thrust produced by motor/propeller combinations for such small UAVs. A full-bridge Wheatstone circuit and electrical resistance strain gauges were used in conjunction with constant-stress cantilever beams for static tests and dynamic wind tunnel tests. An associated instrumentation module monitored power from the electric motor. Monitoring the thrust data over time can provide insights into optimal propeller and motor selection and early detection of problems such as component failure. The approach provides a system for laboratory or field measurements that can be scaled for a wide range of small UAVs.

  8. Methods to protect and recover work function of air exposed transition metal oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Irfan; Wang, Chenggong; Turinske, Alexander J.; Gao, Yongli

    2012-09-01

    Insertion of high work function (WF) transition metal oxide (TMO) layers between the anode and the hole transport layer is established to substantially enhance the performance of organic light emitting diodes (OLED). The high WF of transition metal oxide layer has been demonstrated to be the most crucial for the enhancement. The WF of a TMO layer decreases substantially with air exposure, and noticeably by the ambient even inside a low vacuum system. In the present work we discuss various methods to protect and recover the high WF after a TMO thin film has been exposed to air. We report covering a thin organic layer on top of MoOx to protect the high work function. We found that a thin layer of 1-2 nm organic layer was sufficient to protect the work function of MoOx thin film underneath. We further report methods to recover already decreased TMO WF due to air exposure. We performed oxygen plasma cleaning of air exposed MoOx film and found out that oxygen plasma could substantially recover the WF of as deposited MoOx film. We also performed annealing of air exposed MoOx film inside an ultra high vacuum system and observed a thin layer of oxygenrich adsorbate layer, which desorbed upon annealing that in turn substantially recovered the MoOx WF. We discuss the vacuum annealing and the effect of resulting surface on the interface energy level alignment.

  9. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  10. Room temperature, air crystallized perovskite film for high performance solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dubey, Ashish; Kantack, Nicholas; Adhikari, Nirmal; Reza, Khan Mamun; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Kumar, Mukesh; Khatiwada, Devendra; Darling, Seth; Qiao, Qiquan

    2016-05-31

    For the first time, room temperature heating free growth and crystallization of perovskite films in ambient air without the use of thermal annealing is reported. Highly efficient perovskite nanorod-based solar cells were made using ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3PbI3 nanorods/PC60BM/rhodamine/Ag. All the layers except PEDOT:PSS were processed at room temperature thereby eliminating the need for thermal treatment. Perovskite films were spin coated inside a N-2 filled glovebox and immediately were taken outside in air having 40% relative humidity (RH). Exposure to humid air was observed to promote the crystallization process in perovskite films even at room temperature. Perovskite films kept for 5 hours in ambient air showed nanorod-like morphology having high crystallinity, with devices exhibiting the highest PCE of 16.83%, which is much higher than the PCE of 11.94% for traditional thermally annealed perovskite film based devices. Finally, it was concluded that moisture plays an important role in room temperature crystallization of pure perovskite nanorods, showing improved optical and charge transport properties, which resulted in high performance solar cells.

  11. Room temperature, air crystallized perovskite film for high performance solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Dubey, Ashish; Kantack, Nicholas; Adhikari, Nirmal; ...

    2016-05-31

    For the first time, room temperature heating free growth and crystallization of perovskite films in ambient air without the use of thermal annealing is reported. Highly efficient perovskite nanorod-based solar cells were made using ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3PbI3 nanorods/PC60BM/rhodamine/Ag. All the layers except PEDOT:PSS were processed at room temperature thereby eliminating the need for thermal treatment. Perovskite films were spin coated inside a N-2 filled glovebox and immediately were taken outside in air having 40% relative humidity (RH). Exposure to humid air was observed to promote the crystallization process in perovskite films even at room temperature. Perovskite films kept for 5 hours inmore » ambient air showed nanorod-like morphology having high crystallinity, with devices exhibiting the highest PCE of 16.83%, which is much higher than the PCE of 11.94% for traditional thermally annealed perovskite film based devices. Finally, it was concluded that moisture plays an important role in room temperature crystallization of pure perovskite nanorods, showing improved optical and charge transport properties, which resulted in high performance solar cells.« less

  12. Numerical Investigation of Engine Inlet Vane Hot-Air Anti-Icing System with Surface Air Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Chen, Weijian; Zhang, Dalin

    The inlet vane of aircraft engine needs to be equipped with anti-icing system to prevent ice accretion on the leading edge due to flight safety requirements, and the engine bleed hot-air is mostly used to heat the vane surface in anti-icing system. In order to save the energy consumption, a new anti-icing structure was developed and investigated with numerical simulation. Besides the use of small tunnels to enhance the heat transfer characteristics, a narrow gap was opened and assigned on the vane surface at the end of the anti-icing tunnels, and the exhaust hot-air was released from the gap to form an air film on the outside surface, which was supposed to prevent the droplets from impinging to the surface and sweep the droplets away. The droplets impingement on the vane surface was investigated by solving the 3D Eulerian air/droplets twophase model, and the impingement results were compared with the original system. Meanwhile, the thermodynamic analysis of the anti-icing system was presented in this paper. The results indicate that the air film is effective to decrease the droplets impingement area, and the new structure could provide more heat flux for anti-icing than the regular anti-icing structure.

  13. Pulsed laser deposition of air-sensitive hydride epitaxial thin films: LiH

    SciTech Connect

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Shigehito; Kuwano, Hiroki; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-09-01

    We report on the epitaxial thin film growth of an air-sensitive hydride, lithium hydride (LiH), using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). We first synthesized a dense LiH target, which is key for PLD growth of high-quality hydride films. Then, we obtained epitaxial thin films of [100]-oriented LiH on a MgO(100) substrate at 250 °C under a hydrogen pressure of 1.3 × 10{sup −2} Pa. Atomic force microscopy revealed that the film demonstrates a Stranski-Krastanov growth mode and that the film with a thickness of ∼10 nm has a good surface flatness, with root-mean-square roughness R{sub RMS} of ∼0.4 nm.

  14. High-mobility and air-stable organic thin-film transistors with highly ordered semiconducting polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Tokiyoshi; Tokito, Shizuo; Kumaki, Daisuke

    2007-03-01

    We report on high crystalline thin films of liquid-crystalline polythiophene derivative, poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) (PB16TTT) that exhibit terrace structures and molecular steps of its polymer chains by annealing in its liquid-crystalline phase. The crystallinity of the PB16TTT polymer films formed on SiO2 gate insulating layers with smooth self-assembled monolayer was improved by changing the octyltrichlorosilane treatment time for the SiO2, which led to reproducible high field-effect mobilities of the polymer thin-film transistors up to 0.44cm2/Vs. High stability of the transistor for repeated stressing in ambient air was also demonstrated.

  15. Urea-stabilized air-stable Pt nanoparticles for thin film deposition.

    PubMed

    Latour, Virginie; Maisonnat, André; Coppel, Yannick; Collière, Vincent; Fau, Pierre; Chaudret, Bruno

    2010-04-21

    The reduction of [Pt(COD)(CH3)2] with CO in the presence of hexadecylamine (HDA) and oleic acid (OlAc) leads to amine carbonylation and formation of an air-stable colloidal solution of N,N'-bis(hexadecyl)urea-stabilized Pt(0) nanoparticles. These air-stable colloidal solutions can be used to form thin films of Pt nanoparticles on a silicon substrate.

  16. Thrust stand for low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qin; Zhang, Jun; Qian, Min; Jia, Zhen-yuan; Sun, Bao-yuan

    2010-09-01

    A thrust stand is developed for measuring the pulsed thrust generated by low-thrust liquid pulsed rocket engines. It mainly consists of a thrust dynamometer, a base frame, a connecting frame, and a data acquisition and processing system. The thrust dynamometer assembled with shear mode piezoelectric quartz sensors is developed as the core component of the thrust stand. It adopts integral shell structure. The sensors are inserted into unique double-elastic-half-ring grooves with an interference fit. The thrust is transferred to the sensors by means of static friction forces of fitting surfaces. The sensors could produce an amount of charges which are proportional to the thrust to be measured. The thrust stand is calibrated both statically and dynamically. The in situ static calibration is performed using a standard force sensor. The dynamic calibration is carried out using pendulum-typed steel ball impact technique. Typical thrust pulse is simulated by a trapezoidal impulse force. The results show that the thrust stand has a sensitivity of 25.832 mV/N, a linearity error of 0.24% FSO, and a repeatability error of 0.23% FSO. The first natural frequency of the thrust stand is 1245 Hz. The thrust stand can accurately measure thrust waveform of each firing, which is used for fine control of on-orbit vehicles in the thrust range of 5-20 N with pulse frequency of 50 Hz.

  17. 53. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND GASEOUS NITROGEN PURGE CONTROLS ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND GASEOUS NITROGEN PURGE CONTROLS ON EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH DECK. LAUNCHER IN BACKGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  18. Air plasma assisting microcontact deprinting and printing for gold thin film and PDMS patterns.

    PubMed

    Gou, Hong-Lei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Xia, Xing-Hua; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method to fabricate gold film patterns and PDMS patterns by air plasma assisting microcontact deprinting and printing transfer approaches. Chemical gold plating is employed instead of conventional metal evaporation or sputtering to obtain perfect gold film both on flat and topographic PDMS chips, and complicated SAM precoating is replaced by simple air plasma treatment to activate both the surface of gold film and PDMS. In this way, large area patterns of conductive gold film and PDMS patterns could be easily obtained on the elastomeric PDMS substrate. Both the chemical plating gold film and transferred gold film were of good electrochemical properties and similar hydrophilicity with smooth and conductive surface, which made it potentially useful in microfluidic devices and electronics. The gold transfer mechanism is discussed in detail. For typical applications, a cell patterning chip based on the gold pattern was developed to imply the interfacial property, and dielectrophoresis control of live cells was carried out with the patterned gold as interdigital electrodes to show the conductivity.

  19. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems.

  20. Static Performance of Six Innovative Thrust Reverser Concepts for Subsonic Transport Applications: Summary of the NASA Langley Innovative Thrust Reverser Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Langley Configuration Aerodynamics Branch has conducted an experimental investigation to study the static performance of innovative thrust reverser concepts applicable to high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Testing was conducted on a conventional separate-flow exhaust system configuration, a conventional cascade thrust reverser configuration, and six innovative thrust reverser configurations. The innovative thrust reverser configurations consisted of a cascade thrust reverser with porous fan-duct blocker, a blockerless thrust reverser, two core-mounted target thrust reversers, a multi-door crocodile thrust reverser, and a wing-mounted thrust reverser. Each of the innovative thrust reverser concepts offer potential weight savings and/or design simplifications over a conventional cascade thrust reverser design. Testing was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0. All tests were conducted with no external flow and cold, high-pressure air was used to simulate core and fan exhaust flows. Results show that the innovative thrust reverser concepts achieved thrust reverser performance levels which, when taking into account the potential for system simplification and reduced weight, may make them competitive with, or potentially more cost effective than current state-of-the-art thrust reverser systems. All data gathered in this investigation are contained in the CD-ROM.

  1. Oil/Water Emulsion and Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) Treatment Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) Treatment Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Technology January 2003 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704...2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Oil/Water Emulsion and Aqueous Film Forming Foam (AFFF) Treatment Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone Technology...iii LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1. Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Figure 2. ASH

  2. Photodegradation of the electronic structure of PCBM and C60 films in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, Ana S.; Dzwilewski, Andrzej; Svensson, Krister; Moons, Ellen

    2016-05-01

    Fullerenes are common electron acceptors in organic solar cells. Here the photostability in air of the electronic structures of spin-coated PCBM ([6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) and evaporated C60 films are studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. After exposing these materials in air to simulated sunlight, the filled and empty molecular orbitals are strongly altered, indicating that the conjugated π-system of the C60-cage has degraded. Even a few minutes in normal lab light induces changes. These results stress the importance of protecting fullerene-based films from light and air during processing, operation, and storage.

  3. Proton transport by bacteriorhodopsin in planar membranes assembled from air-water interface films

    PubMed Central

    Korenbrot, J. I.; Hwang, S. B.

    1980-01-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin, in known amounts and controlled orientation, is incorporated into planar membrane films. These films are formed by the sequential transfer of two air-water interface films onto a thin, hydrophilic, electrically conductive support cast from nitrocellulose. The films are easily accessible to electrical measurements and to control of the ionic milieu on either side of the membrane. The area of the assembled membrane films can be varied between 2.3 x 10(-2) cm2 and 0.7 cm2. Illumination of these films produces photocurrents, photovoltages, and changes in the pH of the surrounding medium. The peak amplitude of the photocurrent increases linearly with light intensity for dim lights, and it approaches a saturating value for brighter lights. In the linear range, the stoichiometry of transport is 0.65 +/- 0.06 protons/absorbed photon. The rate of transport is linearly proportional to light at all intensities tested. The amplitude and kinetics of the photovoltage measured are accurately predicted by the photocurrent generated and the passive electrical features of the film. Parallel measurements of pH and photocurrent reveal that the light-induced changes in pH are fully accounted for by the rate and amount of charge transport across the membrane. Preceding the transport of protons, a transient photovoltage is detected that exhibits no detectable latency, reaches peak in about 80 microseconds, and probably arises from light-induced intramolecular charge displacements. PMID:10822498

  4. Thrust Augmentation with Mixer/Ejector Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Presz, Walter M., Jr.; Reynolds, Gary; Hunter, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Older commercial aircraft often exceed FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) sideline noise regulations. The major problem is the jet noise associated with the high exhaust velocities of the low bypass ratio engines on such aircraft. Mixer/ejector exhaust systems can provide a simple means of reducing the jet noise on these aircraft by mixing cool ambient air with the high velocity engine gases before they are exhausted to ambient. This paper presents new information on thrust performance predictions, and thrust augmentation capabilities of mixer/ejectors. Results are presented from the recent development program of the patented Alternating Lobe Mixer Ejector Concept (ALMEC) suppressor system for the Gulfstream GII, GIIB and GIII aircraft. Mixer/ejector performance procedures are presented which include classical control volume analyses, compound compressible flow theory, lobed nozzle loss correlations and state of the art computational fluid dynamic predictions. The mixer/ejector thrust predictions are compared to subscale wind tunnel test model data and actual aircraft flight test measurements. The results demonstrate that a properly designed mixer/ejector noise suppressor can increase effective engine bypass ratio and generate large thrust gains at takeoff conditions with little or no thrust loss at cruise conditions. The cruise performance obtained for such noise suppressor systems is shown to be a strong function of installation effects on the aircraft.

  5. Thin-film encapsulation of the air-sensitive organic-based ferrimagnet vanadium tetracyanoethylene

    SciTech Connect

    Froning, I. H.; Harberts, M.; Yu, H.; Johnston-Halperin, E.; Lu, Y.; Epstein, A. J.

    2015-03-23

    The organic-based ferrimagnet vanadium tetracyanoethylene (V[TCNE]{sub x∼2}) has demonstrated potential for use in both microwave electronics and spintronics due to the combination of high temperature magnetic ordering (T{sub C} > 600 K), extremely sharp ferromagnetic resonance (peak to peak linewidth of 1 G), and low-temperature conformal deposition via chemical vapor deposition (deposition temperature of 50 °C). However, air-sensitivity leads to the complete degradation of the films within 2 h under ambient conditions, with noticeable degradation occurring within 30 min. Here, we demonstrate encapsulation of V[TCNE]{sub x∼2} thin films using a UV-cured epoxy that increases film lifetime to over 710 h (30 days) as measured by the remanent magnetization. The saturation magnetization and Curie temperature decay more slowly than the remanence, and the coercivity is unchanged after 340 h (14 days) of air exposure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicates that the epoxy does not react with the film, and magnetometry measurements show that the presence of the epoxy does not degrade the magnetic properties. This encapsulation strategy directly enables a host of experimental protocols and investigations not previously feasible for air-sensitive samples and lays the foundation for the development of practical applications for this promising organic-based magnetic material.

  6. Environmental Thrust Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    This handbook was prepared as a tool to assist U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) employees coordinate their resources and efforts to help people improve their environment. Twenty-two projects are outlined as potential environmental thrusts at the community level. It is the role of USDA employees to encourage and assist, in every way possible,…

  7. Air-stable solution-processed n-channel organic thin film transistors with polymerenhanced morphology

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Shaik, Shoieb; Bi, Sheng; Chen, Jihua; Li, Dawen

    2015-05-04

    N,N0-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN2) is an n-type semiconductor exhibiting high electron mobility and excellent air stability. However, the reported electron mobility based on spin-coated PDIF-CN2 film is much lower than the value of PDIF-CN2 single crystals made from vapor phase deposition, indicating significant room for mobility enhancement. In this study, various insulating polymers, including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PaMS), are pre-coated on silicon substrate aiming to enhance the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 thin film, thereby improving the charge transport and air stability. Atomic force microscopy images reveal that with the pre-deposition of PaMS or PMMA polymers, the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 polycrystalline films is optimized in semiconducting crystal connectivity, domain size, and surface roughness, which leads to significant improvement of organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) performance. Particularly, an electron mobility of up to 0.55 cm2/V s has been achieved from OTFTs based on the PDIF-CN2 film with the pre-deposition of PaMS polymer.

  8. Air-stable solution-processed n-channel organic thin film transistors with polymerenhanced morphology

    DOE PAGES

    He, Zhengran; Shaik, Shoieb; Bi, Sheng; ...

    2015-05-04

    N,N0-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN2) is an n-type semiconductor exhibiting high electron mobility and excellent air stability. However, the reported electron mobility based on spin-coated PDIF-CN2 film is much lower than the value of PDIF-CN2 single crystals made from vapor phase deposition, indicating significant room for mobility enhancement. In this study, various insulating polymers, including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PaMS), are pre-coated on silicon substrate aiming to enhance the morphology of the PDIF-CN2 thin film, thereby improving the charge transport and air stability. Atomic force microscopy images reveal that with the pre-deposition of PaMS or PMMA polymers, the morphologymore » of the PDIF-CN2 polycrystalline films is optimized in semiconducting crystal connectivity, domain size, and surface roughness, which leads to significant improvement of organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) performance. Particularly, an electron mobility of up to 0.55 cm2/V s has been achieved from OTFTs based on the PDIF-CN2 film with the pre-deposition of PaMS polymer.« less

  9. Detachment force of particles from air-liquid interfaces of films and bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ally, Javed; Kappl, Michael; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Amirfazli, A

    2010-12-07

    The detachment force required to pull a microparticle from an air-liquid interface is measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the colloidal probe technique. Water, solutions of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and silicone oils are tested in order to study the effects of surface tension and viscosity. Two different liquid geometries are considered: the air-liquid interface of a bubble and a liquid film on a solid substrate. It was shown that detaching particles from liquid films is fundamentally different than from bubbles or drops due to the restricted flow of the liquid phase. Additional force is required to detach a particle from a film, and the maximum force during detachment is not necessarily at the position where the particle breaks away from the interface (as seen in bubble or drop systems). This is due to the dynamics of meniscus formation and viscous effects, which must be considered if the liquid is constrained in a film. The magnitude of these effects is related to the liquid viscosity, film thickness, and detachment speed.

  10. Work function recovery of air exposed molybdenum oxide thin films with vacuum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, Irfan; Turniske, Alexander; Bao, Zhenan; Gao, Yongli

    2012-02-01

    We report substantial work function (WF) recovery of air exposed molybdenum oxide thin films with vacuum annealing. The high WF (˜6.8 eV) of thermally evaporated MoOx thin film was observed to decrease sharply to ˜5.6 eV with an air exposure of one hour. The drop in the WF was accompanied with a very thin layer of oxygen rich adsorbate on the MoOx film. The WF of the exposed MoOx film started to gradually recover with increasing annealing temperature in a vacuum chamber having base pressure of 8 x 10-11 torr. The saturation in the WF recovery was observed around 460 ^oC, with WF ˜6.4 eV. The adsorb layer was found to be removed after the vacuum annealing. We further studied the interface formation between the annealed MoOx and copper pthalocynine (CuPc). The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) level of CuPc was observed to be almost pinned to the Fermi level, strongly suggesting an efficient hole injection through the vacuum annealed MoOx film.

  11. Experimentally determined stiffness and damping of an inherently compensated air squeeze-film damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Values of damping and stiffness were determined experimentally for an externally pressurized, inherently compensated, compressible squeeze-film damper up to excitation frequencies of 36,000 cycles per minute. Experimental damping values were higher than theory predicted at low squeeze numbers and less than predicted at high squeeze numbers. Experimental values of air film stiffness were less than theory predicted at low squeeze numbers and much greater at higher squeeze numbers. Results also indicate sufficient damping to attenuate amplitudes and forces at the critical speed when using three dampers in the flexible support system of a small, lightweight turborotor.

  12. Dual-action gas thrust bearing for improving load capacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    The principle of utilizing hydrodynamic effects in diverging films to improve the load carrying capacity in gas thrust bearings is discussed. A new concept of a dual action bearing based on that principle is described and analyzed. The potential of the new bearing is demonstrated both analytically for an infinitely long slider and by numerical solution for a flat sector shaped thrust bearing. It is shown that the dual action bearing can extend substantially the range of load carrying capacity in gas lubricated thrust bearings and can improve their efficiency.

  13. Surface shear rheology of WPI-monoglyceride mixed films spread at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Carrera Sánchez, Cecilio; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M

    2004-07-01

    Surface shear viscosity of food emulsifiers may contribute appreciably to the long-term stability of food dispersions (emulsions and foams). In this work we have analyzed the structural, topographical, and shear characteristics of a whey protein isolate (WPI) and monoglyceride (monopalmitin and monoolein) mixed films spread on the air-water interface at pH 7 and at 20 degrees C. The surface shear viscosity (etas) depend on the surface pressure and on the composition of the mixed film. The surface shear viscosity varies greatly with the surface pressure. In general, the greater the surface pressure, the greater are the values of etas. The values of etas for the mixed WPI-monoolein monolayer were more than one order of magnitude lower than those for a WPI-monopalmitin mixed film, especially at the higher surface pressures. At higher surface pressures, collapsed WPI residues may be displaced from the interface by monoglyceride molecules with important repercussions on the shear characteristics of the mixed films. A shear-induced change in the topography and a segregation between domains of the film forming components were also observed. The displacement of the WPI by the monoglycerides is facilitates under shear conditions, especially for WPI-monoolein mixed films.

  14. Monte Mountain thrust, additional confirmation of the central Nevada thrust

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, A.K. ); Chamberlain, R.L. )

    1990-05-01

    The Monte Mountain thrust, a newly identified thrust exposed in the Timpahute Range, east central Nevada places porous Devonian reservoir rocks over rich Mississippian source rocks at the peak oil generating window. The thrust provides insurmountable evidence of a thrust model that may lead to discovery of giant oil and gas fields along the 400-mi long central Nevada thrust belt. The Timpahute Range lies a little over 50 mi on strike to the south of the prolific Grant Canyon field. Scattered remnants of the north-trending thrust belt are obscured by parallel valleys of Tertiary valley fill and volcanics. The fact that the east-west-trending Timpahute Range could contain exposures of the north-south-trending central Nevada thrust belt attracted them to the range, Familiarity with the stratigraphic section led to the discovery of the thrust. As much as 750 ft of Devonian Guilmette sandstones, in the hanging wall just above the thrust contact have been erroneously mapped as Mississippian Scotty Wash sandstones. These Devonian sandstones could be excellent reservoir rocks. Sandstones in the Guilmette increase in thickness westward. East-vergent thrusting has juxtaposed plates of thicker Guilmette sandstones with plates of thinner sandstones, Reconstruction of Devonian paleogeography provides a clue to the amount of displacement along thrust boundaries.

  15. Kelvin–Helmholtz instability in an ultrathin air film causes drop splashing on smooth surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Peng; Xu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    When a fast-moving drop impacts onto a smooth substrate, splashing will be produced at the edge of the expanding liquid sheet. This ubiquitous phenomenon lacks a fundamental understanding. Combining experiment with model, we illustrate that the ultrathin air film trapped under the expanding liquid front triggers splashing. Because this film is thinner than the mean free path of air molecules, the interior airflow transfers momentum with an unusually high velocity comparable to the speed of sound and generates a stress 10 times stronger than the airflow in common situations. Such a large stress initiates Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities at small length scales and effectively produces splashing. Our model agrees quantitatively with experimental verifications and brings a fundamental understanding to the ubiquitous phenomenon of drop splashing on smooth surfaces. PMID:25713350

  16. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in an ultrathin air film causes drop splashing on smooth surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan; Tan, Peng; Xu, Lei

    2015-03-17

    When a fast-moving drop impacts onto a smooth substrate, splashing will be produced at the edge of the expanding liquid sheet. This ubiquitous phenomenon lacks a fundamental understanding. Combining experiment with model, we illustrate that the ultrathin air film trapped under the expanding liquid front triggers splashing. Because this film is thinner than the mean free path of air molecules, the interior airflow transfers momentum with an unusually high velocity comparable to the speed of sound and generates a stress 10 times stronger than the airflow in common situations. Such a large stress initiates Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at small length scales and effectively produces splashing. Our model agrees quantitatively with experimental verifications and brings a fundamental understanding to the ubiquitous phenomenon of drop splashing on smooth surfaces.

  17. Fabrication of superhydrophilic nanostructured surface by thermal annealing of titanium thin films in air.

    PubMed

    Klamchuen, A; Pratontep, S

    2009-02-01

    We report on a novel approach to fabricate a superhydrophilic titanium oxynitride surface by dc magnetron sputtering deposition followed by thermal annealing in air. The annealing was conducted in a furnace with no gas control at temperature ranging from 300-700 degrees C. The chemical composition and the morphology of the films have been investigated by contact angle measurements, optical absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The results reveal that the annealed films consist of a 5-10 nm thick capping titanium composite layer on top of a titanium metal layer. The nitrogen and oxygen composition of this capping layer can be tailored with the annealing temperature. The annealing process also produces nanoscale protrusions on the surface, yielding water contact angles of less than five degrees. This annealing approach in air is a simple yet versatile method, capable of producing nanostructure materials with potential applications in photocatalytic coating and semiconductor fabrication.

  18. Monolayer film behavior of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Thomas; Schooling, Sarah R; Beveridge, Terry J; Katsaras, John

    2008-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an essential biomacromolecule making up approximately 50% of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria. LPS chemistry facilitates cellular barrier and permeability functions and mediates interactions between the cell and its environment. To better understand the local interactions within LPS membranes, the monolayer film behavior of LPS extracted from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen of medical importance, was investigated by Langmuir film balance. LPS formed stable monolayers at the air-water interface and the measured lateral stresses and modulus (rigidity) of the LPS film in the compressed monolayer region were found to be appreciable. Scaling theories for two-dimensional (2D) polymer chain conformations were used to describe the pi-A profile, in particular, the high lateral stress region suggested that the polysaccharide segments reside at the 2D air-water interface. Although the addition of monovalent and divalent salts caused LPS molecules to adopt a compact conformation at the air-water interface, they did not appear to have any influence on the modulus (rigidity) of the LPS monolayer film under biologically relevant stressed conditions. With increasing divalent salt (CaCl2) content in the subphase, however, there is a progressive reduction of the LPS monolayer's collapse pressure, signifying that, at high concentrations, divalent salts weaken the ability of the membrane to withstand elevated stress. Finally, based on the measured viscoelastic response of the LPS films, we hypothesize that this property of LPS-rich outer membranes of bacteria permits the deformation of the membrane and may consequently protect bacteria from catastrophic structural failure when under mechanical-stress.

  19. Air stable, photosensitive, phase pure iron pyrite nanocrystal thin films for photovoltaic application.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yu; Yuan, Yongbo; Exstrom, Christopher L; Darveau, Scott A; Huang, Jinsong

    2011-11-09

    Iron pyrite (FeS(2)) is a naturally abundant and nontoxic photovoltaic material that can potentially make devices as efficient as silicon-based ones; however existing iron pyrite photovoltaic devices contain thermodynamically unstable FeS(2) film surfaces that lead to low open circuit voltages. We report the rational synthesis of phase pure, highly crystalline cubic FeS(2) nanocrystals (NCs) using a trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) assisted hot-injection method. The synthesized pyrite NC films have excellent air stability over one year. In contrast, obvious surface decomposition was observed on the surface of FeS(2) NCs synthesized without TOPO. A high carrier mobility of 80 cm(2)/(V s) and a strong photoconductivity were observed for the first time for pyrite films at room temperature. Our results indicate that TOPO passivates both iron and sulfur atoms on FeS(2) NC surfaces, efficiently inhibiting surface decomposition.

  20. Static Thrust Analysis of the Lifting Airscrew

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Montgomery; Hefner, Ralph A

    1937-01-01

    This report presents the results of a combined theoretical and experimental investigation conducted at the Georgia School of Technology on the static thrust of the lifting air screw of the type used in modern autogiros and helicopters. The theoretical part of this study is based on Glauert's analysis but certain modifications are made that further clarify and simplify the problem. Of these changes the elimination of the solidity as an independent parameter is the most important. The experimental data were obtained from tests on four rotor models of two, four, and five blades and, in general, agree quite well with the theoretical calculations. The theory indicates a method of evaluating scale effects on lifting air screws, and these corrections have been applied to the model results to derive general full-scale static thrust, torque, and figure-of-merit curves for constant-chord, constant-incidence rotors. Convenient charts are included that enable hovering flight performance to be calculated rapidly.

  1. High Performance Polymer Film Dielectrics for Air Force Wide-Temperature Power Electronics Applications (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    perform, display, or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT Air Force currently has a strong need for the development of compact capacitors which are... capacitors typically use polycarbonate (PC) dielectric films in wound capacitors for operation from -55 ºC to 125 ºC, future power electronic systems would...such as fluorinated polybenzoxazoles (6F-PBO) and fluorenyl polyesters incorporating diamond-like hydrocarbon units (FDAPE). The discussion will be

  2. Air-Flow Navigated Crystal Growth for TIPS Pentacene-Based Organic Thin-Film Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Chen, Jihua; Sun, Zhenzhong; Szulczewski, Greg; Li, Dawen

    2012-01-01

    6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS pentacene) is a promising active channel material of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) due to its solubility, stability, and high mobility. However, the growth of TIPS pentacene crystals is intrinsically anisotropic and thus leads to significant variation in the performance of OTFTs. In this paper, air flow is utilized to effectively reduce the TIPS pentacene crystal anisotropy and enhance performance consistency in OTFTs, and the resulted films are examined with optical microscopy, grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, and thin-film transistor measurements. Under air-flow navigation (AFN), TIPS pentacene drop-cast from toluene solution has been observed to form thin films with improved crystal orientation and increased areal coverage on substrates, which subsequently lead to a four-fold increase of average hole mobility and one order of magnitude enhancement in performance consistency defined by the ratio of average mobility to the standard deviation of the field-effect mobilities.

  3. Geometry of blind thrusts

    SciTech Connect

    Kligfield, R.; Geiser, P.; Geiser, J.

    1985-01-01

    Blind thrusts are structures which at no time in their history broke the erosion surface and along which displacement progressively changes upwards. Faults of the stiff layer along which displacement progressively decreases to zero (tip) are one prominent type of blind thrust structure. Shortening above such tips is accommodated entirely by folding whereas shortening below the tip is partitioned between folding and faulting. For these types of faults it is possible to determine the original length of the stiff layer for balancing purposes. A systematic methodology for line length and area restoration is outlined for determining blind thrust geometry. Application of the methodology is particularly suitable for use with microcomputers. If the folded form of the cover is known along with the position of the fault and its tip, then it is possible to locate hanging and footwall cutoffs. If the fault trajectory, tip, and a single hanging wall footwall cutoff pair are known, then the folded form of the cover layer can be determined. In these constructions it is necessary to specify pin lines for balancing purposes. These pin lines may or may not have a zero displacement gradient, depending upon the amount of simple shear deformation. Examples are given from both Laramide structures of the western USA and the Appalachians.

  4. Analytical modeling of squeeze air film damping of biomimetic MEMS directional microphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishfaque, Asif; Kim, Byungki

    2016-08-01

    Squeeze air film damping is introduced in microelectromechanical systems due to the motion of the fluid between two closely spaced oscillating micro-structures. The literature is abundant with different analytical models to address the squeeze air film damping effects, however, there is a lack of work in modeling the practical sensors like directional microphones. Here, we derive an analytical model of squeeze air film damping of first two fundamental vibration modes, namely, rocking and bending modes, of a directional microphone inspired from the fly Ormia ochracea's ear anatomy. A modified Reynolds equation that includes compressibility and rarefaction effects is used in the analysis. Pressure distribution under the vibrating diaphragm is derived by using Green's function. From mathematical modeling of the fly's inspired mechanical model, we infer that bringing the damping ratios of both modes in the critical damping range enhance the directional sensitivity cues. The microphone parameters are varied in derived damping formulas to bring the damping ratios in the vicinity of critical damping, and to show the usefulness of the analytical model in tuning the damping ratios of both modes. The accuracy of analytical damping results are also verified by finite element method (FEM) using ANSYS. The FEM results are in full compliance with the analytical results.

  5. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  6. Ultrafast formation of air-processable and high-quality polymer films on an aqueous substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-08-01

    Polymer solar cells are attracting attention as next-generation energy sources. Scalable deposition techniques of high-quality organic films should be guaranteed to realize highly efficient polymer solar cells in large areas for commercial viability. Herein, we introduce an ultrafast, scalable, and versatile process for forming high-quality organic films on an aqueous substrate by utilizing the spontaneous spreading phenomenon. This approach provides easy control over the thickness of the films by tuning the spreading conditions, and the films can be transferred to a variety of secondary substrates. Moreover, the controlled Marangoni flow and ultrafast removal of solvent during the process cause the films to have a uniform, high-quality nanomorphology with finely separated phase domains. Polymer solar cells were fabricated from a mixture of polymer and fullerene derivatives on an aqueous substrate by using the proposed technique, and the device exhibited an excellent power conversion efficiency of 8.44 %. Furthermore, a roll-to-roll production system was proposed as an air-processable and scalable commercial process for fabricating organic devices.

  7. Ultrafast formation of air-processable and high-quality polymer films on an aqueous substrate

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Polymer solar cells are attracting attention as next-generation energy sources. Scalable deposition techniques of high-quality organic films should be guaranteed to realize highly efficient polymer solar cells in large areas for commercial viability. Herein, we introduce an ultrafast, scalable, and versatile process for forming high-quality organic films on an aqueous substrate by utilizing the spontaneous spreading phenomenon. This approach provides easy control over the thickness of the films by tuning the spreading conditions, and the films can be transferred to a variety of secondary substrates. Moreover, the controlled Marangoni flow and ultrafast removal of solvent during the process cause the films to have a uniform, high-quality nanomorphology with finely separated phase domains. Polymer solar cells were fabricated from a mixture of polymer and fullerene derivatives on an aqueous substrate by using the proposed technique, and the device exhibited an excellent power conversion efficiency of 8.44 %. Furthermore, a roll-to-roll production system was proposed as an air-processable and scalable commercial process for fabricating organic devices. PMID:27507624

  8. MOCVD-growth of thin zinc oxide films from zinc acetylacetonate and air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflitsch, Christian; Nebatti, Abdelkader; Brors, Georg; Atakan, Burak

    2012-06-01

    The metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) of thin zinc oxide films on borosilicate glass and silicon substrates in a hot-wall CVD-reactor (HWR) was studied. Zinc acetylacetonate (Zn(acac)2) and air were used as precursors. The aim of this work was to optimize the deposition parameters, such as pressure and deposition temperature, with respect to the film quality, structure, and homogeneity. Most experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure; this approach avoids the usage of an expensive vacuum system. It turned out that polycrystalline zinc oxide is grown at deposition temperatures above 613 K. Above 823 K, they additionally are c-axis orientated. At atmospheric pressure and lower temperature (<773 K) the film deposition is homogeneously over the whole tube furnace while at higher temperature inhomogeneous film growth and particle formation are observed, indicating a shift of the growth mechanism to the diffusion controlled regime. Although the homogeneity is improved by using higher flow velocities at atmospheric pressure, particle growth cannot be suppressed. Only at reduced pressure, which was 200 mbar in the present case, the deposition at 823 K is kinetically controlled and without particle formation, resulting in the homogeneous growth of well adhering ZnO films with c-axis orientation.

  9. Theoretical and experimental steady-state rotordynamics of an adaptive Air Film Damper with Metal Rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanhong, Ma; Zhichao, Liang; Hong, Wang; Dayi, Zhang; Jie, Hong

    2013-10-01

    An Air Film Damper (AFD) made with a highly damping material called Metal Rubber (MR) as the outer ring is a novel damping structure that aims to reduce the remarkable vibrations produced by a flexible rotor system. The mechanism of an AFD is firstly put forward and the mechanical model describing the fluid structure interaction is constructed. Taking into consideration the complex whirl of the rotor and the precession of the floating ring, the Reynolds equation of AFDs is derived and the air film pressure is obtained. Based on these calculations, the selection of MR stiffness is introduced and the adaptive properties of AFD are analyzed. Then the effects of AFD on the rotordynamics are studied based on the characterization of the parameters of a rotor system in the steady state. The mechanism and the effects of AFD on a rotor system are verified through rotating experimental tests. The theoretical and experimental results both show that AFD can adjust the air film clearance adaptively according to the vibration of the rotor; this can not only decrease the friction between the journal and the floating ring, but can also provide additional stiffness and damping to the rotor system, thus yielding additional vibration control. The mechanism of an AFD is obtained by theoretical and experimental investigations. Due to the elastic MR serving as the outer ring, an AFD can adjust the air film clearance adaptively according to the vibration of the rotor; this not only decreases the friction between the journal and the floating ring, but also provides additional stiffness and damping to the rotor system, as a function of vibration control. Taking into consideration the complex whirl of the rotor and the precession of the floating ring, the Reynolds equation of an AFD is derived and the mechanical model is established, based on the fluid structure interaction. Moreover, based on the maximum radial displacement during the entire operational process and the minimum thickness of

  10. Phase transitions in films of lung surfactant at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Nag, K; Perez-Gil, J; Ruano, M L; Worthman, L A; Stewart, J; Casals, C; Keough, K M

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant maintains a putative surface-active film at the air-alveolar fluid interface and prevents lung collapse at low volumes. Porcine lung surfactant extracts (LSE) were studied in spread and adsorbed films at 23 +/- 1 degrees C using epifluorescence microscopy combined with surface balance techniques. By incorporating small amounts of fluorescent probe 1-palmitoyl-2-nitrobenzoxadiazole dodecanoyl phosphatidylcholine (NBD-PC) in LSE films the expanded (fluid) to condensed (gel-like) phase transition was studied under different compression rates and ionic conditions. Films spread from solvent and adsorbed from vesicles both showed condensed (probe-excluding) domains dispersed in a background of expanded (probe-including) phase, and the appearance of the films was similar at similar surface pressure. In quasistatically compressed LSE films the appearance of condensed domains occurred at a surface pressure (pi) of 13 mN/m. Such domains increased in size and amounts as pi was increased to 35 mN/m, and their amounts appeared to decrease to 4% upon further compression to 45 mN/m. Above pi of 45 mN/m the LSE films had the appearance of filamentous materials of finely divided dark and light regions, and such features persisted up to a pi near 68 mN/m. Some of the condensed domains had typical kidney bean shapes, and their distribution was similar to those seen previously in films of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the major component of surfactant. Rapid cyclic compression and expansion of LSE films resulted in features that indicated a possible small (5%) loss of fluid components from such films or an increase in condensation efficiency over 10 cycles. Calcium (5 mM) in the subphase of LSE films altered the domain distribution, decreasing the size and increasing the number and total amount of condensed phase domains. Calcium also caused an increase in the value of pi at which the maximum amount of independent condensed phase domains were observed to

  11. Improved thrust calculations of active magnetic bearings considering fringing flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Ji-Hwan; Sung, So-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2012-04-01

    A methodology for deriving fringing permeance in axisymmetric devices such as active thrust magnetic bearings (ATMBs) is presented. The methodology is used to develop an improved equivalent magnetic circuit (EMC) for ATMBs, which considers the fringing effect. This EMC was used to characterize the force between the housing and mover and the dependence of thrust and inductance on the air gap and input current, respectively. These characteristics were validated by comparison with those obtained by the finite element method and in experiments.

  12. Jet Propulsion with Special Reference to Thrust Augmenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubauer, G B

    1933-01-01

    An investigation of the possibility of using thrust augmented jets as prime movers was carried out. The augmentation was to be effected by allowing the jet to mix with the surrounding air in the presence of bodies which deflect the air set in motion by the jet.

  13. 10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL SHOWING THRUST MEASURING SYSTEM. Looking up from the test stand deck to east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Comparative AFM nanoscratching tests in air of bulk copper and electrogenerated cuprous oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaal, Lila; Debiemme-Chouvy, Catherine; Deslouis, Claude; Maurin, Georges; Pailleret, Alain; Saidani, Boualem

    2011-01-01

    The normal and lateral spring constants of rectangular silicon AFM cantilevers bearing pyramidal silicon tips were accurately calibrated using a procedure that takes into account their tilt compared to horizontal orientation and their trapezoidal cross section. Such systems were used to carry out nanoscratching tests in air on technical substrates presenting a moderate roughness (RMS ≈ 40 nm) and made either from bulk copper or from cuprous oxide thin films electrogenerated on copper. The various events occurring during these nanoscratching procedures were characterized in details. In particular, the features of the scars appearing on the scratched zones and SEM observations of the AFM tips used during the nanoscratching procedures are described and exploited to establish a better understanding of the effects of the nanoscratching procedures on the targeted samples. In the case of electrodeposited Cu 2O films, these effects are discussed with the help of chemical and structural characterizations using XPS and XRD studies. All this set of information is used i) to describe the history of the nanoscratching tests and ii) to compare mechanical resistance of bulk copper and electrogenerated Cu 2O thin films using these nanoscratching tests carried out in air. The wear mechanism occurring during nanoscratching tests is discussed for both kinds of samples and compared with the one observed during erosion in erosion-corrosion tests.

  15. Biodegradable polyester films from renewable aleuritic acid: surface modifications induced by melt-polycondensation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesús Benítez, José; Alejandro Heredia-Guerrero, José; Inmaculada de Vargas-Parody, María; Cruz-Carrillo, Miguel Antonio; Morales-Flórez, Victor; de la Rosa-Fox, Nicolás; Heredia, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Good water barrier properties and biocompatibility of long-chain biopolyesters like cutin and suberin have inspired the design of synthetic mimetic materials. Most of these biopolymers are made from esterified mid-chain functionalized ω-long chain hydroxyacids. Aleuritic (9,10,16-trihydroxypalmitic) acid is such a polyhydroxylated fatty acid and is also the major constituent of natural lac resin, a relatively abundant and renewable resource. Insoluble and thermostable films have been prepared from aleuritic acid by melt-condensation polymerization in air without catalysts, an easy and attractive procedure for large scale production. Intended to be used as a protective coating, the barrier's performance is expected to be conditioned by physical and chemical modifications induced by oxygen on the air-exposed side. Hence, the chemical composition, texture, mechanical behavior, hydrophobicity, chemical resistance and biodegradation of the film surface have been studied by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindentation and water contact angle (WCA). It has been demonstrated that the occurrence of side oxidation reactions conditions the surface physical and chemical properties of these polyhydroxyester films. Additionally, the addition of palmitic acid to reduce the presence of hydrophilic free hydroxyl groups was found to have a strong influence on these parameters.

  16. Low thrust vehicle concept study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Low thrust chemical (hydrogen-oxygen) propulsion systems configured specifically for low acceleration orbit transfer of large space systems were defined. Results indicate that it is cost effective and least risk to combine the OTV and stowed spacecraft in a single 65 K Shuttle. The study shows that the engine for an optimized low thrust stage (1) does not require very low thrust; (2) 1-3 K thrust range appears optimum; (3) thrust transient is not a concern; (4) throttling probably not worthwhile; and (5) multiple thrusters complicate OTV/LSS design and aggravate LSS loads. Regarding the optimum vehicle for low acceleration missions, the single shuttle launch (LSS and expendable OTV) is most cost effective and least risky. Multiple shuttles increase diameter 20%. The space based radar structure short OTV (which maximizes space available for packaged LSS) favors use of torus tank. Propellant tank pressures/vapor residuals are little affected by engine thrust level or number of burns.

  17. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Pancotti, Anthony; Haag, Thomas; King, Scott; Walker, Mitchell; Blakely, Joseph; Ziemer, John

    2013-01-01

    Accurate, direct measurement of thrust or impulse is one of the most critical elements of electric thruster characterization, and one of the most difficult measurements to make. The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics has started an initiative to develop standards for many important measurement processes in electric propulsion, including thrust measurements. This paper summarizes recommended practices for the design, calibration, and operation of pendulum thrust stands, which are widely recognized as the best approach for measuring micro N- to mN-level thrust and micro Ns-level impulse bits. The fundamentals of pendulum thrust stand operation are reviewed, along with its implementation in hanging pendulum, inverted pendulum, and torsional balance configurations. Methods of calibration and recommendations for calibration processes are presented. Sources of error are identified and methods for data processing and uncertainty analysis are discussed. This review is intended to be the first step toward a recommended practices document to help the community produce high quality thrust measurements.

  18. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors.

  19. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert

    2015-11-15

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors.

  20. Lamellar Bodies Form Solid Three-dimensional Films at the Respiratory Air-Liquid Interface*

    PubMed Central

    Ravasio, Andrea; Olmeda, Bárbara; Bertocchi, Cristina; Haller, Thomas; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for lung function. It is assembled, stored and secreted as particulate entities (lamellar body-like particles; LBPs). LBPs disintegrate when they contact an air-liquid interface, leading to an instantaneous spreading of material and a decline in surface tension. Here, we demonstrate that the film formed by the adsorbed material spontaneously segregate into distinct ordered and disordered lipid phase regions under unprecedented near-physiological conditions and, unlike natural surfactant purified from bronchoalveolar lavages, dynamically reorganized into highly viscous multilayer domains with complex three-dimensional topographies. Multilayer domains, in coexistence with liquid phases, showed a progressive stiffening and finally solidification, probably driven by a self-driven disassembly of LBPs from a sub-surface compartment. We conclude that surface film formation from LBPs is a highly dynamic and complex process, leading to a more elaborated scenario than that observed and predicted by models using reconstituted, lavaged, or fractionated preparations. PMID:20558742

  1. Improvement of Crystalline Quality in GaN Films by Air-Bridged Lateral Epitaxial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidoguchi, Isao; Ishibashi, Akihiko; Sugahara, Gaku; Tsujimura, Ayumu; Ban, Yuzaburoh

    2000-05-01

    Air-bridged lateral epitaxial growth (ABLEG), a new technique of lateral growth of GaN films, has been developed using low-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. A previously grown 1-μm-thick GaN film is grooved along the < 1{\\bar 1}00 >\\textrm{GaN} direction, and the bottoms of the trenches and the sidewalls are covered with a silicon nitride mask. A free-standing GaN material is regrown from the exposed (0001) surface of the ridged GaN seed structure. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis reveals that the dislocations originating from the underlying seed GaN extend straight in the < 0001 > direction and dislocations do not propagate into the wing region. The wing region also exhibits a smooth surface and the root mean square roughness is found to be 0.088 nm by atomic force microscopy measurement of the (0001) face of the wing region.

  2. Characterization of Air-Gap Sealing with Organic Dielectric Using Spin-Coating Film Transfer and Hot-Pressing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Norio; Machida, Katsuyuki; Ishii, Hiromu; Ishimura, Yoji; Saito, Hidenori; Asakuma, Sumitoshi; Kawagoe, Masafumi; Adachi, Hideki

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a dielectric material and its application to sealing air gaps using spin-coating film transfer and hot-pressing (STP) technology. STP technology is a new film-formation process that consists of spin coating a dielectric material on a base film, hot pressing the dielectric film on a wafer with gaps in a vacuum chamber, and peeling the base film off the dielectric adhered to the wafer. In order to seal the gaps with thin dielectric films, it is necessary to prevent the dielectric from breaking during the peel-off step. Thus, a dielectric of poly(benzoxazole) (PBO) with additives for reducing the adhesion strength between the dielectric and the base film is proposed. The experimental results show that 0.3-μm-wide gaps can be sealed with dielectric films as thin as 0.25 μm without film breaking. The mechanism by which adhesion strength decreases in the peel-off step is discussed in terms of its dependence on the proportion of additives. The synergy of the STP process and the type of dielectric material used paves the way for the development of future interconnect schemes using air gaps.

  3. Low-thrust chemical rocket engine study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellish, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Engine data and information are presented to perform system studies on cargo orbit-transfer vehicles which would deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit. Low-thrust engine performance, weight, and envelope parametric data were established, preliminary design information was generated, and technologies for liquid rocket engines were identified. Two major engine design drivers were considered in the study: cooling and engine cycle options. Both film-cooled and regeneratively cooled engines were evaluated. The propellant combinations studied were hydrogen/oxygen, methane/oxygen, and kerosene/oxygen.

  4. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher

  5. Investigation on Novel Methods to Increase Specific Thrust in Pulse Detonation Engines via Imploding Detonations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    to-Detonation Transition, Specific Thrust 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT Unclassified 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS...hydrocarbon fuel-air mixtures such as acetylene -air, ethylene-air, propane-air and even JP10-air mixtures based on the required length of the induction zone

  6. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  7. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report. 57 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Low-thrust rocket trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, P.W.

    1987-03-01

    The development of low-thrust propulsion systems to complement chemical propulsion systems will greatly enhance the evolution of future space programs. Two advantages of low-thrust rockets are stressed: first, in a strong gravitational field, such as occurs near the Earth, freighter missions with low-thrust engines require one-tenth as much propellant as do chemical engines. Second, in a weak gravitational field, such as occurs in the region between Venus and Mars, low-thrust rockets are faster than chemical rockets with comparable propellant mass. The purpose here is to address the physics of low-thrust trajectories and to interpret the results with two simple models. Analytic analyses are used where possible - otherwise, the results of numerical calculations are presented in graphs. The author has attempted to make this a self-contained report.

  9. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  10. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Ernest J.

    1998-01-01

    A micro thrust and heat generator has a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator's ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA).

  11. Design and Analysis of an Electromagnetic Thrust Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, Bibhuti; Rao, Dantam K.

    1996-01-01

    A double-acting electromagnetic thrust bearing is normally used to counter the axial loads in many rotating machines that employ magnetic bearings. It essentially consists of an actuator and drive electronics. Existing thrust bearing design programs are based on several assumptions. These assumptions, however, are often violated in practice. For example, no distinction is made between maximum external loads and maximum bearing forces, which are assumed to be identical. Furthermore, it is assumed that the maximum flux density in the air gap occurs at the nominal gap position of the thrust runner. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear theoretical basis for the design of the electromagnetic thrust bearing which obviates such assumptions.

  12. Rapid prototype fabrication processes for high-performance thrust cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, K.; Chwiedor, T.; Diab, J.; Williams, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Thrust Cell Technologies Program (Air Force Phillips Laboratory Contract No. F04611-92-C-0050) is currently being performed by Rocketdyne to demonstrate advanced materials and fabrication technologies which can be utilized to produce low-cost, high-performance thrust cells for launch and space transportation rocket engines. Under Phase 2 of the Thrust Cell Technologies Program (TCTP), rapid prototyping and investment casting techniques are being employed to fabricate a 12,000-lbf thrust class combustion chamber for delivery and hot-fire testing at Phillips Lab. The integrated process of investment casting directly from rapid prototype patterns dramatically reduces design-to-delivery cycle time, and greatly enhances design flexibility over conventionally processed cast or machined parts.

  13. A novel approach to the analysis of squeezed-film air damping in microelectromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weilin; Li, Hongxia; Chatterjee, Aveek N.; Elfadel, Ibrahim (Abe M.; Ender Ocak, Ilker; Zhang, TieJun

    2017-01-01

    Squeezed-film damping (SFD) is a phenomenon that significantly affects the performance of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The total damping force in MEMS mainly include the viscous damping force and elastic damping force. Quality factor (Q factor) is usually used to evaluate the damping in MEMS. In this work, we measure the Q factor of a resonator through experiments in a wide range of pressure levels. In fact, experimental characterizations of MEMS have some limitations because it is difficult to conduct experiments at very high vacuum and also hard to differentiate the damping mechanisms from the overall Q factor measurements. On the other hand, classical theoretical analysis of SFD is restricted to strong assumptions and simple geometries. In this paper, a novel numerical approach, which is based on lattice Boltzmann simulations, is proposed to investigate SFD in MEMS. Our method considers the dynamics of squeezed air flow as well as fluid-solid interactions in MEMS. It is demonstrated that Q factor can be directly predicted by numerical simulation, and our simulation results agree well with experimental data. Factors that influence SFD, such as pressure, oscillating amplitude, and driving frequency, are investigated separately. Furthermore, viscous damping and elastic damping forces are quantitatively compared based on comprehensive simulation. The proposed numerical approach as well as experimental characterization enables us to reveal the insightful physics of squeezed-film air damping in MEMS.

  14. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man; Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-01

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H2O), glycerol (C3H8O3) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  15. Electrochemical Nanolithography on Amorphous WO3 Thin Films Using Scanning Tunneling Microscope in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Hong; Lu, Yong-Feng; Mai, Zhi-Hong

    2001-11-01

    Tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films have shown interesting properties as lithography resist materials. In this study, the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) was used in air for nanometer etching of α-WO3-x thin films, an n-type semiconductor. The current-voltage (I-V) curve was found to be affected by the water layer absorbed on the surface. For low voltage (< 3 V) with long duration (˜ 10 s) or high voltage pulse (> 3 V) with short pulsewidth (˜ 200 ms), holes were formed on the film surface at high humidity (> 70%) by applying a pulse voltage. A threshold voltage existed for hole formation. Higher pulse voltage and negative polarity corresponded to larger modified size. All the structures formed in STM images were topographical in nature by comparison with the AFM images. The hole formation was reasonably attributed to electrochemistry and high dissolution of WO3 in high pH solutions, which was co-manifested by links between the holes and eroded materials on the surface. Alkaline solutions instead of deionized water were chosen to act in the tip-surface gap. Alkaline ions being expelled from the tip due to electric polarity demonstrated the ion movement and their effect on etching. Lines of nanometer width were fabricated.

  16. Cinema audiences reproducibly vary the chemical composition of air during films, by broadcasting scene specific emissions on breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jonathan; Stönner, Christof; Wicker, Jörg; Krauter, Nicolas; Derstroff, Bettina; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Klüpfel, Thomas; Kramer, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Human beings continuously emit chemicals into the air by breath and through the skin. In order to determine whether these emissions vary predictably in response to audiovisual stimuli, we have continuously monitored carbon dioxide and over one hundred volatile organic compounds in a cinema. It was found that many airborne chemicals in cinema air varied distinctively and reproducibly with time for a particular film, even in different screenings to different audiences. Application of scene labels and advanced data mining methods revealed that specific film events, namely “suspense” or “comedy” caused audiences to change their emission of specific chemicals. These event-type synchronous, broadcasted human chemosignals open the possibility for objective and non-invasive assessment of a human group response to stimuli by continuous measurement of chemicals in air. Such methods can be applied to research fields such as psychology and biology, and be valuable to industries such as film making and advertising.

  17. Cinema audiences reproducibly vary the chemical composition of air during films, by broadcasting scene specific emissions on breath.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan; Stönner, Christof; Wicker, Jörg; Krauter, Nicolas; Derstroff, Bettina; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Klüpfel, Thomas; Kramer, Stefan

    2016-05-10

    Human beings continuously emit chemicals into the air by breath and through the skin. In order to determine whether these emissions vary predictably in response to audiovisual stimuli, we have continuously monitored carbon dioxide and over one hundred volatile organic compounds in a cinema. It was found that many airborne chemicals in cinema air varied distinctively and reproducibly with time for a particular film, even in different screenings to different audiences. Application of scene labels and advanced data mining methods revealed that specific film events, namely "suspense" or "comedy" caused audiences to change their emission of specific chemicals. These event-type synchronous, broadcasted human chemosignals open the possibility for objective and non-invasive assessment of a human group response to stimuli by continuous measurement of chemicals in air. Such methods can be applied to research fields such as psychology and biology, and be valuable to industries such as film making and advertising.

  18. Cinema audiences reproducibly vary the chemical composition of air during films, by broadcasting scene specific emissions on breath

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan; Stönner, Christof; Wicker, Jörg; Krauter, Nicolas; Derstroff, Bettina; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Klüpfel, Thomas; Kramer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Human beings continuously emit chemicals into the air by breath and through the skin. In order to determine whether these emissions vary predictably in response to audiovisual stimuli, we have continuously monitored carbon dioxide and over one hundred volatile organic compounds in a cinema. It was found that many airborne chemicals in cinema air varied distinctively and reproducibly with time for a particular film, even in different screenings to different audiences. Application of scene labels and advanced data mining methods revealed that specific film events, namely “suspense” or “comedy” caused audiences to change their emission of specific chemicals. These event-type synchronous, broadcasted human chemosignals open the possibility for objective and non-invasive assessment of a human group response to stimuli by continuous measurement of chemicals in air. Such methods can be applied to research fields such as psychology and biology, and be valuable to industries such as film making and advertising. PMID:27160439

  19. Operating characteristics of a cantilever-mounted resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1979-01-01

    A resilient-pad gas thrust bearing consisting of pads mounted on cantilever beams was tested to determine its operating characteristic. The bearing was run at a thrust load of 74 newtons to a speed of 17000 rpm. The pad film thickness and bearing friction torque were measured and compared with theory. The measured film thickness was less than that predicted by theory. The bearing friction torque was greater than that predicted by theory.

  20. Thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, H. J.

    1985-01-01

    The reusable life of the Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) is influenced by the cyclic life of the regeneratively liquid cooled main combustion chamber (MCC). During an operational duty cycle the MCC liner is subjected to a large transient thermal gradient that imparts a high thermal cyclic strain to the liner hot gas wall. Life predictions of such chambers have usually been based on low cycle fatigue (LCF) evaluations. Hot-fire testing, however, has shown significant mid-channel wall deformation and thinning during accrued cyclic testing. This phenomenon is termed cyclic creep and appears to be significantly accelerated at elevated temperatures. An analytical method that models the cyclic creep phenomenon and its application to thrust chamber life prediction is presented. The chamber finite element geometry is updated periodically to account for accrued wall thinning and distortion. Failure is based on the tensile instability failure criterion. Cyclic life results for several chamber life enhancing coolant channel designs are compared to the typically used LCF analysis that neglects cyclic creep. The results show that the usable cyclic creep life is approximately 30 to 50% of the commonly used LCF life.

  1. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  2. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  3. Steady film flow over 2D topography with air inclusion formed inside the trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamopoulos, John; Varchanis, Stylianos; Dimakopoulos, Yannis

    2016-11-01

    Liquid film flow along an inclined, solid substrate featuring periodic rectangular trenches may either completely wet the trench floor (Wenzel state) or pin on the entrance and exit corners of the trench (Cassie state) or assume any other configuration in between these two extremes. In the intermediate cases a second gas-liquid interface inside the trench is formed, which adheres to the walls of the trench forming two three-phase contact lines, and encloses a different amount of air under different physical conditions. The Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations in a physical domain, which is adaptively re-meshed. Multiple steady solutions, connected by turning points and transcritical bifurcations as well as isolated solution branches, are revealed by pseudo arc-length continuation. Two possible cases of a single air inclusion inside the trench are examined. The penetration of the liquid inside the trench is enhanced primarily by increasing either the wettability of the substrate or the capillarity or by decreasing the flow rate. Flow hysteresis may occur when the liquid does not penetrate deep enough inside the trench leading to different flow patterns. The interplay of inertia, viscous, gravity and capillary forces along with substrate wettability determines the volume of the air encapsulated in the trench and the extent of free surface deformation. GSRT of Greece via the program "Excellence" and the LIMMAT foundation.

  4. Low thrust optimal orbital transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobb, Shannon S.

    1994-01-01

    For many optimal transfer problems it is reasonable to expect that the minimum time solution is also the minimum fuel solution. However, if one allows the propulsion system to be turned off and back on, it is clear that these two solutions may differ. In general, high thrust transfers resemble the well known impulsive transfers where the burn arcs are of very short duration. The low and medium thrust transfers differ in that their thrust acceleration levels yield longer burn arcs and thus will require more revolutions. In this research, we considered two approaches for solving this problem: a powered flight guidance algorithm previously developed for higher thrust transfers was modified and an 'averaging technique' was investigated.

  5. In-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    The major aspects of processes that may be used for the determination of in-flight thrust are reviewed. Basic definitions are presented as well as analytical and ground-test methods for gathering data and calculating the thrust of the propulsion system during the flight development program of the aircraft. Test analysis examples include a single-exhaust turbofan, an intermediate-cowl turbofan, and a mixed-flow afterburning turbofan.

  6. Nonreciprocal optical transmission through a single conical air hole in an Ag film.

    PubMed

    Peng, Nan; Li, Xiaokang; She, Weilong

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we propose a simple metal micro-nano structure having the character of nonreciprocal optical zero-order transmission. The structure is a single conical air hole (CAH) in an Ag film whose optical absorption with geometric asymmetry breaks the time reversal symmetry of the electromagnetic field. By comparing the transmissions of Ag CAH with those of ideal conductor (IC) CAH, three effects of Ag CAH, including diffraction, Fabry-Perot-like (FPL) resonance and localized surface plasmon (LSP) resonance, are analyzed and discussed. Under optimized conditions, we find that the ratio of forward transmission to backward one can be larger than 9 at a proper wavelength in visible range. This kind of Ag CAH is expected to have the potential served as all-optical diode.

  7. 14 CFR 33.73 - Power or thrust response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... whenever the power control lever is moved from the minimum to the maximum position in not more than 1... control operation requiring control scheduling; and (b) From the fixed minimum flight idle power lever... thrust response must occur from a stabilized static condition using only the bleed air and...

  8. 14 CFR 33.73 - Power or thrust response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... whenever the power control lever is moved from the minimum to the maximum position in not more than 1... control operation requiring control scheduling; and (b) From the fixed minimum flight idle power lever... thrust response must occur from a stabilized static condition using only the bleed air and...

  9. 14 CFR 33.73 - Power or thrust response.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... whenever the power control lever is moved from the minimum to the maximum position in not more than 1... control operation requiring control scheduling; and (b) From the fixed minimum flight idle power lever... thrust response must occur from a stabilized static condition using only the bleed air and...

  10. 49. VIEW OF EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH PAD. THRUST SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. VIEW OF EAST SIDE OF LAUNCH PAD. THRUST SECTION HEATER AND DUCTS ON RIGHT; UMBILICAL MAST POWER CONNECTORS ON LEFT; RAIL SYSTEM AND FIRE SUPPRESSION NOZZLES IN FOREGROUND. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  11. Cooling Effectiveness Measurements for Air Film Cooling of Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces in a Burner Rig Environment Using Phosphor Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    While the effects of thermal barrier coating (TBC) thermal protection and air film cooling effectiveness are usually studied separately, their contributions to combined cooling effectiveness are interdependent and are not simply additive. Therefore, combined cooling effectiveness must be measured to achieve an optimum balance between TBC thermal protection and air film cooling. In this investigation, surface temperature mapping was performed using recently developed Cr-doped GdAlO3 phosphor thermometry. Measurements were performed in the NASA GRC Mach 0.3 burner rig on a TBC-coated plate using a scaled up cooling hole geometry where both the mainstream hot gas temperature and the blowing ratio were varied. Procedures for surface temperature and cooling effectiveness mapping of the air film-cooled TBC-coated surface are described. Applications are also shown for an engine component in both the burner rig test environment as well as an engine afterburner environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  12. Air-bridged lateral epitaxial overgrowth of GaN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidoguchi, Isao; Ishibashi, Akihiko; Sugahara, Gaku; Ban, Yuzaburoh

    2000-06-01

    A promising technique of selective lateral epitaxy, namely air-bridged lateral epitaxial overgrowth, is demonstrated in order to reduce the wing tilt as well as the threading dislocation density in GaN thin films. A seed GaN layer was etched to make ridge-stripe along <11¯00>GaN direction and a GaN material was regrown from the exposed (0001) top facet of the ridged GaN seed structures, whose sidewalls and etched bottoms were covered with silicon nitride mask, using low-pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The density of dislocations in the wing region was reduced to be <107cm-2, which was at least two orders of magnitude lower than that of underlying GaN. The magnitude of the wing tilt was determined to be 0.08° by x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, which was smaller than other lateral epitaxial overgrown GaN thin films. The full width at half maximum of XRD for the wing region was 138 arc sec, indicating high uniformity of c-axis orientation.

  13. Investigation of a Full-scale, Cascade-type Thrust Reverser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Robert C; Algranti, Joseph S

    1957-01-01

    A double set of turning vanes was carried inside the jet tailpipe. To produce reverse thrust, the tailpipe opens into two side sections and the turning vanes move outward to form a V-shaped cascade, which deflects the exhaust-gas flow. Forward and reverse net thrust were measured over a range of engine speeds with the airplane stationary. Taxi tests were made to determine the comparative stopping distances using wheel braking and reverse thrust separately, and a combination of both. The effect of turning-vane spacing on thrust-reverser performance was determined by scale-model tests using unheated air.

  14. Army (MANTECH) thrust area concept: Optics thrust area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-04-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  15. Army (MANTECH) Thrust Area Concept: Optics Thrust Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopacz, Stanley P.

    1992-01-01

    With the shrinking of the U.S. Army's material needs and the compression of defense requirements, the Army Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program has the opportunity to advance the manufacturing state-of-the-art and solve near term production problems of the U.S. industrial base. To exploit this opportunity, the Army restructured its MANTECH efforts in FY 90 based on a thrust area concept. Each of the ten current thrusts, directed by a thrust area manager, has a broad technical objective selected to improve specific manufacturing processes. The manager is charged with setting objectives, selecting tasks, monitoring execution, leveraging external resources, and establishing microfactories to promote technology transfer. The Optics Manufacturing Thrust is an example of the concept. It is currently directed at revitalizing the domestic precision optics manufacturing base, now characterized by high labor costs and 1940's technology, through introduction of revolutionary machines, new processes, and Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) principles. Leveraging of MANTECH dollars with those of industry, academia, and state governments led to the establishment of the center for Optics Manufacturing and plans for regional centers. Recognition of the U.S. as a world leader in precision optics manufacturing and a dramatic reduction of both manufacturing time and cost should accrue from thrust area efforts.

  16. Uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernethy, Robert B.; Adams, Gary R.; Steurer, John W.; Ascough, John C.; Baer-Riedhart, Jennifer L.; Balkcom, George H.; Biesiadny, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    Methods for estimating the measurement error or uncertainty of in-flight thrust determination in aircraft employing conventional turbofan/turbojet engines are reviewed. While the term 'in-flight thrust determination' is used synonymously with 'in-flight thrust measurement', in-flight thrust is not directly measured but is determined or calculated using mathematical modeling relationships between in-flight thrust and various direct measurements of physical quantities. The in-flight thrust determination process incorporates both ground testing and flight testing. The present text is divided into the following categories: measurement uncertainty methodoogy and in-flight thrust measurent processes.

  17. Evaluation of fluidic thrust vectoring nozzle via thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Hirota, M.; Ouchi, K.; Saito, T.

    2017-01-01

    Shock vector control (SVC) in a converging-diverging nozzle with a rectangular cross-section is discussed as a fluidic thrust vectoring (FTV) method. The interaction between the primary nozzle flow and the secondary jet is examined using experiments and numerical simulations. The relationships between FTV parameters [nozzle pressure ratio (NPR) and secondary jet pressure ratio (SPR)] and FTV performance (thrust pitching angle and thrust pitching moment) are investigated. The experiments are conducted with an NPR of up to 10 and an SPR of up to 2.7. Numerical simulations of the nozzle flow are performed using a Navier-Stokes solver with input parameters set to match the experimental conditions. The thrust pitching angle and moment computed from the force-moment balance are used to evaluate FTV performance. The experiment and numerical results indicate that the FTV parameters (NPR and SPR) directly affect FTV performance. Conventionally, FTV performance evaluated by the common method using thrust pitching angle is highly dependent on the location of evaluation. Hence, in this study, we show that the thrust pitching moment, a parameter which is independent of the location, is the appropriate figure of merit to evaluate the performance of FTV systems.

  18. Ag-Cu nanoalloyed film as a high-performance cathode electrocatalytic material for zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yimin; Chen, Fuyi; Jin, Yachao; Liu, Zongwen

    2015-04-01

    A novel Ag50Cu50 film electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The electrocatalyst actually is Ag-Cu alloyed nanoparticles embedded in amorphous Cu film, based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization. The rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements provide evidence that the ORR proceed via a four-electron pathway on the electrocatalysts in alkaline solution. And it is much more efficient than pure Ag catalyst. The catalytic layer has maximum power density of 67 mW cm-2 and an acceptable cell voltage at 0.863 V when current densities increased up to 100 mA cm-2 in the Ag50Cu50-based primary zinc-air battery. The resulting rechargeable zinc-air battery exhibits low charge-discharge voltage polarization of 1.1 V at 20 mAcm-2 and high durability over 100 cycles in natural air.

  19. Analytic Modeling of the Hydrodynamic, Thermal, and Structural Behavior of Foil Thrust Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Prahl, Joseph M.

    2005-01-01

    A simulation and modeling effort is conducted on gas foil thrust bearings. A foil bearing is a self acting hydrodynamic device capable of separating stationary and rotating components of rotating machinery by a film of air or other gaseous lubricant. Although simple in appearance these bearings have proven to be complicated devices in analysis. They are sensitive to fluid structure interaction, use a compressible gas as a lubricant, may not be in the fully continuum range of fluid mechanics, and operate in the range where viscous heat generation is significant. These factors provide a challenge to the simulation and modeling task. The Reynolds equation with the addition of Knudsen number effects due to thin film thicknesses is used to simulate the hydrodynamics. The energy equation is manipulated to simulate the temperature field of the lubricant film and combined with the ideal gas relationship, provides density field input to the Reynolds equation. Heat transfer between the lubricant and the surroundings is also modeled. The structural deformations of the bearing are modeled with a single partial differential equation. The equation models the top foil as a thin, bending dominated membrane whose deflections are governed by the biharmonic equation. A linear superposition of hydrodynamic load and compliant foundation reaction is included. The stiffness of the compliant foundation is modeled as a distributed stiffness that supports the top foil. The system of governing equations is solved numerically by a computer program written in the Mathematica computing environment. Representative calculations and comparisons with experimental results are included for a generation I gas foil thrust bearing.

  20. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Reusable thrust chamber and injector concepts were evaluated for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine (OME). Parametric engine calculations were carried out by computer program for N2O4/amine, LOX/amine and LOX/hydrocarbon propellant combinations for engines incorporating regenerative cooled and insulated columbium thrust chambers. The calculation methods are described including the fuel vortex film cooling method of combustion gas temperature control, and performance prediction. A method of acceptance of a regeneratively cooled heat rejection reduction using a silicone oil additive was also demonstrated by heated tube heat transfer testing. Regeneratively cooled thrust chamber operation was also demonstrated where the injector was characterized for the OME application with a channel wall regenerative thrust chamber. Bomb stability testing of the demonstration chambers/injectors demonstrated recovery for the nominal design of acoustic cavities. Cavity geometry changes were also evaluated to assess their damping margin. Performance and combustion stability was demonstrated of the originally developed 10 inch diameter combustion pattern operating in an 8 inch diameter thrust chamber.

  1. Flow-induced molecular segregation in beta-casein-monoglyceride mixed films spread at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M

    2004-07-20

    In this work, we have used different and complementary interfacial techniques (surface film balance, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial shear rheology) to analyze the static (structure, topography, reflectivity, miscibility, and interactions) and flow characteristics (surface shear characteristics) of beta-casein and monoglyceride (monopalmitin and monoolein) mixed films spread on the air-water interface. The structural, topographical, and shear characteristics of the mixed films depend on the surface pressure and on the composition of the mixed film. The surface shear viscosity (etas) varies greatly with the surface pressure. In general, the greater the surface pressure, the greater the values of etas. At higher surface pressures, collapsed beta-casein residues may be displaced from the interface by monoglyceride molecules with important repercussions on the shear characteristics of the mixed films. A shear-induced change in the topography of monoglyceride and beta-casein domains, on one hand, and a segregation between domains of the film-forming components, on the other hand, were also observed. The displacement of the beta-casein by the monoglycerides is facilitated under shear conditions, especially for beta-casein-monoolein mixed films.

  2. One-dimensional analytical model for oxide thin film growth on Ti metal layers during laser heating in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Pérez, J. L.; Sakanaka, P. H.; Algatti, M. A.; Mendoza-Alvarez, J. G.; Cruz Orea, A.

    2001-05-01

    This paper presents the theoretical and experimental results for oxide thin film growth on titanium films previously deposited over glass substrate. Ti films of thickness 0.1 μm were heated by Nd:YAG laser pulses in air. The oxide tracks were created by moving the samples with a constant speed of 2 mm/s, under the laser action. The micro-topographic analysis of the tracks was performed by a microprofiler. The results taken along a straight line perpendicular to the track axis revealed a Gaussian profile that closely matches the laser's spatial mode profile, indicating the effectiveness of the surface temperature gradient on the film's growth process. The sample's micro-Raman spectra showed two strong bands at 447 and 612 cm -1 associated with the TiO 2 structure. This is a strong indication that thermo-oxidation reactions took place at the Ti film surface that reached an estimated temperature of 1160 K just due to the action of the first pulse. The results obtained from the numerical integration of the analytical equation which describes the oxidation rate (Wagner equation) are in agreement with the experimental data for film thickness in the high laser intensity region. This shows the partial accuracy of the one-dimensional model adopted for describing the film growth rate.

  3. Distribution and congener profiles of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in indoor/outdoor glass window surface films and their film-air partitioning in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Wu, Jing; Wang, Yawei; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-02-01

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are a group of n-alkanes with carbon chain length of 10-13. In this work, paired indoor/outdoor samples of organic films on window glass surfaces from urban buildings in Beijing, China, were collected to measure the concentrations and congener distributions of SCCPs. The total SCCP levels ranged from 337 ng/m(2) to 114 μg/m(2), with total organic carbon (TOC) normalized concentrations of 365 μg/m(2)-365 mg/m(2). Overall, the concentrations of SCCPs on the interior films were higher than the concentrations on the exterior films, suggesting an important indoor environmental exposure of SCCPs to the general public. A significant linear relationship was found between the SCCP concentrations and TOC, with a correlation coefficient of R = 0.34 (p < 0.01). A film-air partitioning model suggests that the indoor gas-phase SCCPs are related to their corresponding window film levels.

  4. Saturn: A Giant Thrust into Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    Saturn: A Giant Thrust into Space. The film provides an introduction and overview of the Saturn launch vehicle. It is designed with stages to drop off as fuel is spent. There may be two, three, or four stages, depending on the payload. The Saturn rocket will be used to send Apollo missions to the Moon and back. Guidance systems and booster engine rockets are based on proven mechanisms. Scale models are used to test the engines. Hardware, airframes, guidance systems, instrumentation, and the rockets are produced at sites throughout the country. The engines go to Marshall Space Flight Center for further tests. After partial assembly, the vehicle is shipped to Cape Canaveral in large pieces where it is assembled using specially built equipment and structures. Further trials are performed to assure successful launches. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030961. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  5. Surface Partitioning and Stability of Mixed Films of Fluorinated Alcohols and Acids at the Air- Water Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rontu, N. A.; Vaida, V.

    2007-05-01

    The production of fluorinated compounds over the past 50 years has had numerous industrial applications. For example, perfluorinated carboxylic acids are used in the synthesis of polymers and fire retardants, perfluoroalkyl sulfonates act as surface protectors, and fluorotelomer alcohols are incorporated into products such as paints, coatings, polymers, and adhesives. Fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) are linear polyfluorinated alcohols with the formula CF3(CF2)nCH2CH2OH (n=1,3,5,...). They have been suggested as possible precursors for perfluorinated carboxylic acids and detected in the troposphere over several North American sites. Perfluorocarboxylic acids have even been detected in the arctic food chain, human blood, tissues of animals and environmental waters. We report the surface activity of fluorotelomer alcohols and perfluorinated carboxylic acids at the air-water interface by using a Langmuir trough. Isotherms of the pure compounds along with mixed films with other organic carboxylic acids were collected. The main objective of these experiments was to understand their heterogeneous chemistry by characterizing the pure and mixed films, which serves as a representative model for organic films on atmospheric surfaces such as those found on oceans and aqueous aerosols. Film properties and behavior, notably stabilization, evaporation from the subphase, and miscibility in the single-component mixtures as well as in the mixed films will be discussed. An important consequence of FTOHs and perfluorocarboxylic acids being found to partition to the air-water interface is the possibility of their transport and widespread distribution and deposition using atmospheric aerosols.

  6. Air-stable solution-processed n-channel organic thin film transistors with polymer-enhanced morphology

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Shaik, Shoieb; Bi, Sheng; Li, Dawen; Chen, Jihua

    2015-05-04

    N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) is an n-type semiconductor exhibiting high electron mobility and excellent air stability. However, the reported electron mobility based on spin-coated PDIF-CN{sub 2} film is much lower than the value of PDIF-CN{sub 2} single crystals made from vapor phase deposition, indicating significant room for mobility enhancement. In this study, various insulating polymers, including poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and poly(alpha-methylstyrene) (PαMS), are pre-coated on silicon substrate aiming to enhance the morphology of the PDIF-CN{sub 2} thin film, thereby improving the charge transport and air stability. Atomic force microscopy images reveal that with the pre-deposition of PαMS or PMMA polymers, the morphology of the PDIF-CN{sub 2} polycrystalline films is optimized in semiconducting crystal connectivity, domain size, and surface roughness, which leads to significant improvement of organic thin-film transistor (OTFT) performance. Particularly, an electron mobility of up to 0.55 cm{sup 2}/V s has been achieved from OTFTs based on the PDIF-CN{sub 2} film with the pre-deposition of PαMS polymer.

  7. Experimental Determination of Exhaust Gas Thrust, Special Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkel, Benjamin; Voss, Fred

    1940-01-01

    This investigation presents the results of tests made on a radial engine to determine the thrust that can be obtained from the exhaust gas when discharged from separate stacks and when discharged from the collector ring with various discharge nozzles. The engine was provided with a propeller to absorb the power and was mounted on a test stand equipped with scales for measuring the thrust and engine torque. The results indicate that at full open throttle at sea level, for the engine tested, a gain in thrust horsepower of 18 percent using separate stacks, and 9.5 percent using a collector ring and discharge nozzle, can be expected at an air speed of 550 miles per hour.

  8. Recommended Practices in Thrust Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Turin.5,38 This stand consists of two BeCu plates which hang from flexible BeCu mounts on a rigid block of Zerodur c, a material with a very low coe...2013 Figure 4. Example of a state-of-the-art hanging pendulum thrust stand. 38 Two spherical mirrors mounted on the plates form an optical cavity for...the Zerodur frame. Temperature control and careful choice of materials were used to minimize and correct for thermal drift. 2. Thrust Stand Performance

  9. Low thrust propulsion literature survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monroe, Darrel

    1989-01-01

    A literature search was performed to investigate the area of low thrust propulsion. In an effort to evaluate this technology, a number of articles, obtained through the use of the NASA-RECON database, were collected and categorized. The study indicates that although much was done, particularly in the 1960's and 1970's, more can be done in the area of practical navigation and guidance. It is suggested that the older studies be reinvestigated to see what potential there exists for future low thrust applications.

  10. Thrust-vectored differential turns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, H. J.; Cliff, E. M.; Lefton, L.

    1980-01-01

    Barrier surface construction in the joint space of the differential turning game for thrust-vectored vs. conventional aircraft is discussed. Differential-turn studies are based on modifications of existing computer programs including an energy-turn program, and one which generates hodograph data. Optimal turning flight in energy approximation is discussed for the conventional aircraft configurations. It is concluded that any advantages realized from thrust-vectoring are minor, unless hover is possible, where advantages would be major at low energies, and affect tactics at high energies as well.

  11. High-quality GaN films obtained by air-bridged lateral epitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Akihiko; Kidoguchi, Isao; Sugahara, Gaku; Ban, Yuzaburoh

    2000-12-01

    High-quality GaN films with low dislocation density and low wing tilt of c-axis orientation have been successfully obtained by a promising technique of selected area growth, namely air-bridged lateral epitaxial growth (ABLEG). A GaN film was grown from the exposed (0 0 0 1) top facet of the ridged GaN seed structures, whose side walls and etched bottoms were covered with silicon nitride mask, using low-pressure metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The ridge-stripe structures of the GaN seed were constructed in the 1 1¯00 GaN direction. At the optimum growth temperature of 950°C, only the 1 1 2¯ 0 and {0 0 0 1} facets were obtained. Continuing the growth led to fabricating the air-bridged structure, where the coalescence of the wing region occurred. From the transmission electron microscopy study, it was found that most of the vertical dislocations along the c-axis were confined to the seed region, while the horizontal dislocations were newly generated in the vicinity of coalescence boundary. The densities of the vertical dislocations were about 9×10 8 cm -2 in the seed region, while below 1×10 6 cm -2 in other regions. The densities of the horizontal dislocations were about 1×10 6 cm -2 in the wing region and 4×10 7 cm -2 in the vicinity of the coalescence boundary, respectively. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements revealed that the tilt angle of c-axis relative to underlying seed GaN was about 297 arcsec (0.083°), and the full-width at half-maximum of the XRD curve for the wing region was 138 arcsec, indicating that the wing region has high uniformity of c-axis orientation. Both of the wing and the coalescence boundary region exhibited atomically smooth surfaces with stepped terraces, whose root mean square roughness was found to be 0.089 nm by atomic force microscopy measurements.

  12. Internal performance characteristics of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, Milton

    1995-01-01

    A series of thrust-vectored axisymmetric ejector nozzles were designed and experimentally tested for internal performance and pumping characteristics at the Langley research center. This study indicated that discontinuities in the performance occurred at low primary nozzle pressure ratios and that these discontinuities were mitigated by decreasing expansion area ratio. The addition of secondary flow increased the performance of the nozzles. The mid-to-high range of secondary flow provided the most overall improvements, and the greatest improvements were seen for the largest ejector area ratio. Thrust vectoring the ejector nozzles caused a reduction in performance and discharge coefficient. With or without secondary flow, the vectored ejector nozzles produced thrust vector angles that were equivalent to or greater than the geometric turning angle. With or without secondary flow, spacing ratio (ejector passage symmetry) had little effect on performance (gross thrust ratio), discharge coefficient, or thrust vector angle. For the unvectored ejectors, a small amount of secondary flow was sufficient to reduce the pressure levels on the shroud to provide cooling, but for the vectored ejector nozzles, a larger amount of secondary air was required to reduce the pressure levels to provide cooling.

  13. Liquid Surface X-ray Studies of Gold Nanoparticle-Phospholipid Films at the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    You, Siheng Sean; Heffern, Charles T R; Dai, Yeling; Meron, Mati; Henderson, J Michael; Bu, Wei; Xie, Wenyi; Lee, Ka Yee C; Lin, Binhua

    2016-09-01

    Amphiphilic phospholipids and nanoparticles functionalized with hydrophobic capping ligands have been extensively investigated for their capacity to self-assemble into Langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface. However, understanding of composite films consisting of both nanoparticles and phospholipids, and by extension, the complex interactions arising between nanomaterials and biological membranes, remains limited. In this work, dodecanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) with an average core diameter of 6 nm were incorporated into 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayers with surface densities ranging from 0.1 to 20% area coverage at a surface pressure of 30 mN/m. High resolution liquid surface X-ray scattering studies revealed a phase separation of the DPPC and Au-NP components of the composite film, as confirmed with atomic force microscopy after the film was transferred to a substrate. At low Au-NP content, the structural organization of the phase-separated film is best described as a DPPC film containing isolated islands of Au-NPs. However, increasing the Au-NP content beyond 5% area coverage transforms the structural organization of the composite film to a long-range interconnected network of Au-NP strands surrounding small seas of DPPC, where the density of the Au-NP network increases with increasing Au-NP content. The observed phase separation and structural organization of the phospholipid and nanoparticle components in these Langmuir monolayers are useful for understanding interactions of nanoparticles with biological membranes.

  14. Oxidation of nano-multilayered AlTiSiN thin films between 600 and 1000 degrees C in air.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chun; Kim, Sun Kyu; Nguyen, Thuan Dinh; Lee, Dong Bok

    2011-07-01

    Multilayered AlTiSiN films with a composition of 32.0Al-12.4Ti-4.9Si-50.7N (at.%) were deposited on a steel substrate in a nitrogen atmosphere by cathodic arc plasma deposition. The films consisted of crystalline approximately 8 nm-thick AISiN nanolayers that originated from the Al-Si target and approximately 3 nm-thick TiN nanolayers that originated from the Ti target. Their oxidation characteristics were studied between 600 and 1000 degrees C for up to 20 h in air. They displayed good oxidation resistance due to the formation of a thin, dense Al2O3 surface scale below which an (Al2O3, TiO2, SiO2)-intermixed inner scale existed. They oxidized slower than TiN films because protective Al2O3-rich scales formed on the surface. However, they oxidized faster than CrN films because impure Al2O3 scale formed on the AlTiSiN film. Their oxidation progressed primarily by the outward diffusion of nitrogen and substrate elements, combined with the inward transport of oxygen that gradually reacted with Al, Ti, and Si in the film.

  15. Effects of thrust reversing in ground proximity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, P. B.; Hughes, R. V.

    1987-01-01

    The changes in stability and control characteristics encountered by a thrust reversing aircraft during its final approach, landing, and ground roll are described. These changes include a strong pitch-up accompanied by the loss of horizontal tail and aileron control effectiveness. The magnitude of reverser induced changes in ground effect are much larger than corresponding changes in free air. Some unexpected unsteady motions exhibited in wind tunnel by an aircraft model with reversers operating in ground proximity are also described. The cause of this oscillatory behavior was determined to be an unsteady interaction between the wall jets formed by impingement of reverser jets on the ground and the on-coming free stream. Time histories of rolling moments measured by the wind tunnel balance or support system were removed and frequencies were scaled by Strouhal number to full scale. Corrected time series were used to simulate the motion of a fighter aircraft with thrust reversers in ground effect. The simulation predicted large roll angles and nose down attitude at touchdown. Some phenomena of jet attachment to solid surfaces are discussed and areas for future research are recommended.

  16. Another Look at Rocket Thrust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hester, Brooke; Burris, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Rocket propulsion is often introduced as an example of Newton's third law. The rocket exerts a force on the exhaust gas being ejected; the gas exerts an equal and opposite force--the thrust--on the rocket. Equivalently, in the absence of a net external force, the total momentum of the system, rocket plus ejected gas, remains constant. The law of…

  17. Surface treatment of polypropylene (PP) film by 50 Hz dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ujjwal Man Subedi, Deepak Prasad

    2015-07-31

    Thin films of polypropylene (PP) are treated for improving hydrophilicity using non-thermal plasma generated by 50 Hz line frequency dielectric barrier discharge produced in air and argon/air mixture at atmospheric pressure. PP samples before and after the treatments are studied using contact angle measurements, surface free energy calculations and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Distilled water (H{sub 2}O), glycerol (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}O{sub 3}) and diiodomethane (CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}) are used as test liquids. The contact angle measurements between test liquids and PP samples are used to determine total surface free energy using sessile drop technique. PP films show a remarkable increase in surface free energy after plasma treatment. SEM analysis of the plasma-treated PP films shows that plasma treatment introduces greater roughness on the surface leading to the increased surface free energy. Furthermore, it is found that introducing a small quantity of argon can enhance the surface treatment remarkably.

  18. Pulsed Electric Propulsion Thrust Stand Calibration Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Andrea R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2011-01-01

    The evaluation of the performance of any propulsion device requires the accurate measurement of thrust. While chemical rocket thrust is typically measured using a load cell, the low thrust levels associated with electric propulsion (EP) systems necessitate the use of much more sensitive measurement techniques. The design and development of electric propulsion thrust stands that employ a conventional hanging pendulum arm connected to a balance mechanism consisting of a secondary arm and variable linkage have been reported in recent publications by Polzin et al. These works focused on performing steady-state thrust measurements and employed a static analysis of the thrust stand response. In the present work, we present a calibration method and data that will permit pulsed thrust measurements using the Variable Amplitude Hanging Pendulum with Extended Range (VAHPER) thrust stand. Pulsed thrust measurements are challenging in general because the pulsed thrust (impulse bit) occurs over a short timescale (typically 1 micros to 1 millisecond) and cannot be resolved directly. Consequently, the imparted impulse bit must be inferred through observation of the change in thrust stand motion effected by the pulse. Pulsed thrust measurements have typically only consisted of single-shot operation. In the present work, we discuss repetition-rate pulsed thruster operation and describe a method to perform these measurements. The thrust stand response can be modeled as a spring-mass-damper system with a repetitive delta forcing function to represent the impulsive action of the thruster.

  19. Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Board of Education, PA. Div. of Instructional Materials.

    The Affective Curriculum Research Project produced five films and two records during a series of experimental summer programs. The films and records form part of a curriculum designed to teach to the concerns of students. The films were an effort to describe the Philadelphia Cooperative Schools Program, to explain its importance, and to…

  20. Properties of the seawater-air interface. 2. Rates of surface film formation under steady state conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dragcevic, D.; Pravdic, V.

    1981-05-01

    The laboratory techniques of dynamic surface tension and of surface electrical potential measurements were used to determine rates of formation and of reorientation of organic surface films at the seawater-air interface. Relaxation times of surface films were determined for three characteristic samples obtained by screen and bottle sampling in the coastal waters of the northern Adriatic area. These data were compared with those for model samples produced by spreading oleic acid and crude oil on or dissolving polyethyleneglycol and sodium dodecyl sulfate in artificial seawater. Relaxation times were in the range of 0.1-1 s for most of the samples. A good representative value for field samples is 0.2 s. The temperature-dependence (the energies of activation) for the surface film relaxation indicates that several processes control material transport toward the seawater-air interface. The findings are interpreted as showing that an almost ever-present organic surface film influences the mechanism and the rate of material transport across the sea-atmosphere boundary.

  1. Decomposition of benzene and toluene in air streams in fixed-film photoreactors coated with TiO2 catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ku, Young; Chen, Juan-Shiang; Chen, Hua-Wei

    2007-03-01

    The decomposition of benzene and toluene in air streams by UV/TiO2 process was studied in different annular photoreactors under various operating conditions. The shells of reactors used in this research are made of stainless steel, Pyrex glass, or titanium. The TiO2 film was coated to the inner surface of the reactors by either rotating coating or sol-gel techniques. The TiO2 films coated by sol-gel technique were found to be smoother and more uniform than those coated by rotating coating. However, experimental results indicated that the photocatalysis of benzene or toluene in a glass reactor with rotating-coated TiO2 film delivered higher decompositions in air streams than that with sol-gel coated reactors. Benzene and toluene were decomposed more effectively in a coated glass reactor than in a coated stainless steel reactor under the same operating conditions. The presence of water vapor in air-stream plays an important role in the decomposition of benzene and toluene, and a relative humidity of approximately 5-6% was found to be adequate. The presence of excessive amounts of humidity retarded the decomposition to certain extents possibly results from the competitive adsorption of water molecules on the active sites of TiO2.

  2. Measuring forces and spatiotemporal evolution of thin water films between an air bubble and solid surfaces of different hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

    2015-01-27

    A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, θ(w) < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -γ(1 - cos θ(w))exp(-h/D(H)) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with γ being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < θ(w) < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness.

  3. Low-thrust vehicles concept studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketchum, W. J.

    1980-01-01

    Low thrust chemical (hydrogen-oxygen) propulsion systems configured specifically for low acceleration orbit transfer of large space systems were studied in order to provide the required additional data to better compare new, low thrust chemical propulsion systems with other propulsion approaches such as advanced electric systems. Study results indicate that it is cost-effective and least risk to combine the low thrust OTV and stowed spacecraft in a single 65 K shuttle. Mission analysis indicates that there are 25 such missions, starting in 1987. Multiple shuttles (LSS in one, OTV in another) result in a 20% increase in LSS (SBR) diameter over single shuttle launches. Synthesis and optimization of the LSS characteristics and OTV capability resulted in determination of the optimum thrust-to-weight and thrust level. For the space based radar with radial truss arms (center thrust application), the optimum thrust-to-weight (maximum) is 0.1, giving a thrust of 2000 lb. For the annular truss (edge-on thrust application) the structure is not as sensitive, and thrust of 1000 lb appears optimum. For the geoplatform, optimum T/W is .15 (3000 lb thrust). The effects of LSS structure material, weight distribution, and unit area density were evaluated, as were the OTV engine thrust transient and number of burns.

  4. Growth of CdS thin films on indium coated glass substrates via chemical bath deposition and subsequent air annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Biswajit; Kumar, Kamlesh; Singh, Balwant Kr; Banerjee, Pushan; Das, Subrata

    2014-11-01

    In the present work attempts were made to synthesize indium doped CdS films by fabricating In/CdS bilayers using CBD-CdS on vacuum evaporated In thin films and subsequent air annealing. 135 nm CdS films were grown onto 20 nm and 35 nm indium coated glass substrate employing chemical bath deposition technique. The In/CdS bilayers thus formed were subjected to heat treatment at the temperatures between 200 and 400 °C for 4 min in the muffle furnace to facilitate indium to diffuse into the CdS films. XRD pattern ascertained no noticeable shift in lattice constant implying grain boundary metal segregation, while secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated the diffusion profile of indium into CdS matrices. Mass spectrometry results showed that substantial diffusion of indium had been taken place within CdS at 400 °C. Dark and photocurrent with different illumination time were measured to ascertain the photosensitivity of pure and composite CdS films.

  5. Controllable Growth of Perovskite Films by Room-Temperature Air Exposure for Efficient Planar Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Keum, Jong; Das, Sanjib; Puretzky, Alexander; Aytug, Tolga; Joshi, Pooran C; Rouleau, Christopher M; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2015-12-01

    A two-step solution processing approach has been established to grow void-free perovskite films for low-cost high-performance planar heterojunction photovoltaic devices. A high-temperature thermal annealing treatment was applied to drive the diffusion of CH3NH3I precursor molecules into a compact PbI2 layer to form perovskite films. However, thermal annealing for extended periods led to degraded device performance owing to the defects generated by decomposition of perovskite into PbI2. A controllable layer-by-layer spin-coating method was used to grow "bilayer" CH3NH3I/PbI2 films, and then drive the interdiffusion between PbI2 and CH3NH3I layers by a simple air exposure at room temperature for making well-oriented, highly crystalline perovskite films without thermal annealing. This high degree of crystallinity resulted in a carrier diffusion length of ca. 800 nm and a high device efficiency of 15.6%, which is comparable to values reported for thermally annealed perovskite films.

  6. Controllable Growth of Perovskite Films by Room-Temperature Air Exposure for Efficient Planar Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Keum, Jong; Das, Sanjib; Puretzky, Alexander; Aytug, Tolga; Joshi, Pooran C.; Rouleau, Christopher M.; Duscher, Gerd; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2015-12-01

    A two-step-solution-processing approach has been established to grow void-free perovskite films for low-cost and high-performance planar heterojunction photovoltaic devices. We generally applied a high-temperature thermal annealing treatment in order to drive the diffusion of CH3NH3I precursor molecules into the compact PbI2 layer to form perovskite films. But, thermal annealing for extended periods would lead to degraded device performance due to the defects generated by decomposition of perovskite into PbI2. In this work, we explored a controllable layer-by-layer spin-coating method to grow bilayer CH3NH3I/PbI2 films, and then drive the interdiffusion between PbI2 and CH3NH3I layers by a simple room-temperature-air-exposure for making well-oriented, highly-crystalline perovskite films without thermal annealing. This high degree of crystallinity resulted in a carrier diffusion length of ~ 800 nm and high device efficiency of 15.6%, which is comparable to the reported values from thermally-annealed perovskite films based counterparts. Finally, the simplicity and high device performance of this processing approach is highly promising for direct integration into industrial-scale device manufacture.

  7. Controllable Growth of Perovskite Films by Room-Temperature Air Exposure for Efficient Planar Heterojunction Photovoltaic Cells

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Bin; Dyck, Ondrej; Poplawsky, Jonathan; ...

    2015-12-01

    A two-step-solution-processing approach has been established to grow void-free perovskite films for low-cost and high-performance planar heterojunction photovoltaic devices. We generally applied a high-temperature thermal annealing treatment in order to drive the diffusion of CH3NH3I precursor molecules into the compact PbI2 layer to form perovskite films. But, thermal annealing for extended periods would lead to degraded device performance due to the defects generated by decomposition of perovskite into PbI2. In this work, we explored a controllable layer-by-layer spin-coating method to grow bilayer CH3NH3I/PbI2 films, and then drive the interdiffusion between PbI2 and CH3NH3I layers by a simple room-temperature-air-exposure for makingmore » well-oriented, highly-crystalline perovskite films without thermal annealing. This high degree of crystallinity resulted in a carrier diffusion length of ~ 800 nm and high device efficiency of 15.6%, which is comparable to the reported values from thermally-annealed perovskite films based counterparts. Finally, the simplicity and high device performance of this processing approach is highly promising for direct integration into industrial-scale device manufacture.« less

  8. On Film

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Marty

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the role of window films in enhancing indoor air quality in schools. Historically, window film has been used to reduce temperatures in buildings prone to overheating. Too much solar energy entering through windows makes occupants uncomfortable and air conditioning more costly. Film has been a simple solution…

  9. Frictional Characteristics of Thrust Bearing in Scroll Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hajime; Itoh, Takahide; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    This paper presents frictional characteristics of thrust bearing in scroll compressor focusing on the behavior of sliding portion which affects the generation of oil film. The coefficient of friction and tilt angle of sliding portion in the thrust bearing are obtained through both elemental friction test and cylinder pressure measurement of actual scroll compressor. Both tests showed that the coefficient of friction in low contact pressure rose with increase of tilt angle of sliding portion. The value of contact pressure which the coefficient of friction turns into increase was in agreement of the value which tilt angle become to increase. Numerical analysis using mixed lubrication theory was also performed. Analytical result indicated the same characteristics as the experiments, and the correlation between the coefficient of friction and the behavior of sliding portion was confirmed. Based on the experimental and the analytical results obtained here, the optimization of thrust bearing for commercial scroll compressor was applied. 2% improvement of total efficiency in rated condition was archived by optimization of thrust bearing.

  10. Highly air- and moisture-stable hole-doped carbon nanotube films achieved using boron-based oxidant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funahashi, Kazuma; Tanaka, Naoki; Shoji, Yoshiaki; Imazu, Naoki; Nakayama, Ko; Kanahashi, Kaito; Shirae, Hiroyuki; Noda, Suguru; Ohta, Hiromichi; Fukushima, Takanori; Takenobu, Taishi

    2017-03-01

    Hole doping into carbon nanotubes can be achieved. However, the doped nanotubes usually suffer from the lack of air and moisture stability, thus, they eventually lose their improved electrical properties. Here, we report that a salt of the two-coordinate boron cation Mes2B+ (Mes: 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl group) can serve as an efficient hole-doping reagent to produce nanotubes with markedly high stability in the presence of air and moisture. Upon doping, the resistances of the nanotubes decreased, and these states were maintained for one month in air. The hole-doped nanotube films showed a minimal increase in resistance even upon humidification with a relative humidity of 90%.

  11. Low thrust orbit determination program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, P. E.; Shults, G. L.; Huling, K. R.; Ratliff, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Logical flow and guidelines are provided for the construction of a low thrust orbit determination computer program. The program, tentatively called FRACAS (filter response analysis for continuously accelerating spacecraft), is capable of generating a reference low thrust trajectory, performing a linear covariance analysis of guidance and navigation processes, and analyzing trajectory nonlinearities in Monte Carlo fashion. The choice of trajectory, guidance and navigation models has been made after extensive literature surveys and investigation of previous software. A key part of program design relied upon experience gained in developing and using Martin Marietta Aerospace programs: TOPSEP (Targeting/Optimization for Solar Electric Propulsion), GODSEP (Guidance and Orbit Determination for SEP) and SIMSEP (Simulation of SEP).

  12. Parametric Investigation of Thrust Augmentation by Ejectors on a Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Sgondea, Alexandru; Paxson, Daniel E.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2005-01-01

    A parametric investigation has been made of thrust augmentation of a 1 inch diameter pulsed detonation tube by ejectors. A set of ejectors was used which permitted variation of the ejector length, diameter, and nose radius, according to a statistical design of experiment scheme. The maximum augmentations for each ejector were fitted using a polynomial response surface, from which the optimum ejector diameters, and nose radius, were found. Thrust augmentations above a factor of 2 were measured. In these tests, the pulsed detonation device was run on approximately stoichiometric air-hydrogen mixtures, at a frequency of 20 Hz. Later measurements at a frequency of 40 Hz gave lower values of thrust augmentation. Measurements of thrust augmentation as a function of ejector entrance to detonation tube exit distance showed two maxima, one with the ejector entrance upstream, and one downstream, of the detonation tube exit. A thrust augmentation of 2.5 was observed using a tapered ejector.

  13. Thrust-Vector-Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Jonathan

    1992-01-01

    Control gains computed via matrix Riccati equation. Software-based system controlling aim of gimbaled rocket motor on spacecraft adaptive and optimal in sense it adjusts control gains in response to feedback, according to optimizing algorithm based on cost function. Underlying control concept also applicable, with modifications, to thrust-vector control on vertical-takeoff-and-landing airplanes, control of orientations of scientific instruments, and robotic control systems.

  14. Simplified installation of thrust bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sensenbaugh, N. D.

    1980-01-01

    Special handling sleeve, key to method of installing thrust bearings, was developed for assembling bearings on shaft of low-pressure oxygen turbo-pump. Method eliminates cooling and vacuum-drying steps which saves time, while also eliminating possibility of corrosion formation. Procedure saves energy because it requires no liquid nitrogen for cooling shaft and no natural gas or electric power for operating vacuum oven.

  15. Space Shuttle booster thrust imbalance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, W. R.; Blackwell, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis of the Shuttle SRM thrust imbalance during the steady-state and tailoff portions of the boost phase of flight are presented. Results from flights STS-1 through STS-13 are included. A statistical analysis of the observed thrust imbalance data is presented. A 3 sigma thrust imbalance history versus time was generated from the observed data and is compared to the vehicle design requirements. The effect on Shuttle thrust imbalance from the use of replacement SRM segments is predicted. Comparisons of observed thrust imbalances with respect to predicted imbalances are presented for the two space shuttle flights which used replacement aft segments (STS-9 and STS-13).

  16. Air annealing effects on the optical properties of ZnO SnO2 thin films deposited by a filtered vacuum arc deposition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çetinörgü, E.; Goldsmith, S.; Boxman, R. L.

    2006-03-01

    ZnO-SnO2 transparent and conducting thin films were deposited on microscope glass substrates by a filtered vacuum arc deposition (FVAD) system. The cathode was prepared with 50%:50% atomic concentration of Zn:Sn. The films were annealed in air at 500 °C for 1 h. Structural and compositional analyses were obtained using XRD and XPS diagnostics. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that as-deposited and air-annealed thin ZnO-SnO2 films were amorphous. The atomic ratio of Zn to Sn in the film obtained using the 50%:50% cathode as determined by XPS analysis was ~2.7:1 in the bulk film. The optical properties were determined from normal incidence transmission measurements. Film transmission in the visible was 70% to 90%, affected by interference effects. Annealed films did not show higher transmission in the VIS compared to as-deposited films. Assuming that the interband electron transition is direct, the optical band gap was found to be in the range 3.34-3.61 eV for both as-deposited and annealed films. However, the average Eg for annealed films was 3.6 eV, larger by 0.2 eV than that of as-deposited. The refractive index n increased while the extinction index k decreased significantly with annealing.

  17. Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Shao, Yayun; Zeng, Min; Zhang, Zhang; Gao, Xingsen; Lu, Xubing; Liu, J.-M.; Ishiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we investigated the microstructure and electrical properties of Bi2SiO5 (BSO) doped SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) films deposited by chemical solution deposition. X-ray diffraction observation indicated that the crystalline structures of all the BSO-doped SBT films are nearly the same as those of a pure SBT film. Through BSO doping, the 2Pr and 2Ec values of SBT films were changed from 15.3 μC/cm2 and 138 kV/cm of pure SBT to 1.45 μC/cm2 and 74 kV/cm of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The dielectric constant at 1 MHz for SBT varied from 199 of pure SBT to 96 of 10 wt.% BSO-doped SBT. The doped SBT films exhibited higher leakage current than that of non-doped SBT films. Nevertheless, all the doped SBT films still had small dielectric loss and low leakage current. Our present work will provide useful insights into the BSO doping effects to the SBT films, and it will be helpful for the material design in the future nonvolatile ferroelectric memories.

  18. Shear characteristics, miscibility, and topography of sodium caseinate-monoglyceride mixed films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Patino, Juan M; Carrera Sánchez, Cecilio

    2004-01-01

    In this contribution, we are concerned with the study of structure, topography, and surface rheological characteristics (under shear conditions) of mixed sodium caseinate and monoglycerides (monopalmitin and monoolein) at the air/water interface. Combined surface chemistry (surface film balance and surface shear rheometry) and microscopy (Brewster angle microscopy, BAM) techniques have been applied in this study to mixtures of insoluble lipids and sodium caseinate spread at the air-water interface. At a macroscopic level, sodium caseinate and monoglycerides form an heterogeneous and practically immiscible monolayer at the air-water interface. The images from BAM show segregated protein and monoglyceride domains that have different topography. At surface pressures higher than that for the sodium caseinate collapse, this protein is displaced from the interface by monoglycerides. These results and those derived from interfacial shear rheology (at a macroscopic level) appear to support the idea that immiscibility and heterogeneity of these emulsifiers at the interface have important repercussions on the shear characteristics of the mixed films, with the alternating flow of segregated monoglyceride domains (of low surface shear viscosity, etas) and protein domains (of high etas) across the canal.

  19. Ag-Cu nanoalloyed film as a high-performance cathode electrocatalytic material for zinc-air battery.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yimin; Chen, Fuyi; Jin, Yachao; Liu, Zongwen

    2015-01-01

    A novel Ag50Cu50 film electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The electrocatalyst actually is Ag-Cu alloyed nanoparticles embedded in amorphous Cu film, based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization. The rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements provide evidence that the ORR proceed via a four-electron pathway on the electrocatalysts in alkaline solution. And it is much more efficient than pure Ag catalyst. The catalytic layer has maximum power density of 67 mW cm(-2) and an acceptable cell voltage at 0.863 V when current densities increased up to 100 mA cm(-2) in the Ag50Cu50-based primary zinc-air battery. The resulting rechargeable zinc-air battery exhibits low charge-discharge voltage polarization of 1.1 V at 20 mAcm(-2) and high durability over 100 cycles in natural air.

  20. Field deployment of thin film passive air samplers for persistent organic pollutants: a study in the urban atmospheric boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Farrar, N J; Harner, T; Shoeib, M; Sweetman, A; Jones, K C

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the first field deployment of rapidly equilibrating thin-film passive air samplers under ambient conditions. The POlymer-coated Glass (POG) samplers have a coating of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) less than 1 microm thick applied to a glass surface. This can be dissolved off after exposure and prepared for the quantification of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) that have partitioned into the film during field exposure. In this study, POGs were deployed at various heights on the CN Tower in Toronto, Canada, to investigate the vertical distribution of selected compounds (PCBs, PAHs, organochlorine pesticides) in the atmospheric boundary layer of an urban area. The feasibility of the method to detect POPs from a few cubic meters of air was demonstrated, indicating the potential for rapid, low-volume sampling of air for ambient levels of POPs. PAH levels declined sharply with height, confirming ground-level emissions in urban areas as sources of these compounds; PCBs did the same, although less strongly. Different sampling events detected different vertical distributions of OC pesticides which could be related to local or distantsources, and variations in POPs on the samplers in these different events/heights demonstrate the dynamic nature of sources and atmospheric mixing of POPs.

  1. Modular multi-engine thrust control assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sakurai, S.

    1986-02-04

    This patent describes a modular thrust control lever assembly for controling forward/reverse thrust generated by an aircraft engine. It includes an electric/electronic engine thrust control system, an inhibit mechanism for preventing inadverent or premature establishment of at least one of forward and reverse engine thrust. It consists of a (a) housing; (b) a control lever assembly pivotally mounted within the housing for fore and aft pivotal movement in a single vertical plane; (c) movable inhibit mechanism normally mounted in the path of movement of the laterally projecting roller on the control lever assembly between at least one of the maximum thrust limit positions of the assembly and the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (d) a electric/electronic engine thrust control system including an mechanism for reconfiguring the thrust controls of the engine upon movement of the thrust control lever assembly to the adjacent intermediate idle thrust position; (e) a mechanism responsive to the output signal for shifting the inhibit mechanism out of the path of movement of the control lever assembly.

  2. Tongue thrust and its influence in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Cary

    2006-01-01

    The oral myofunctional disorder of tongue thrust has been described in various ways, such as 'deviate swallow' 'infantile swallow, and 'abnormal swallow' to name a few. The term 'tongue thrust' has been adopted, mainly because of its greater usage among authors, and since it gives a more accurate description of the lingual behavior about to be discussed. 'Tongue thrust' and 'tongue thrusting' are used in preference to 'tongue thrust swallow' or 'tongue thrust swallowing' because this behavior is generally thought to be less associated with the act of swallowing and more with the resting posture of the tongue. 'Thrust' is still an inappropriate word since the tongue is not really 'thrusting' during rest. However, it must be remembered that 'thrusting' in this instance is still a mild but continuous lingual pressure factor. The significance lies in whether or not this 'thrust, either during swallowing and other functional behaviors, or during rest, is responsible for, contributes to, or is a consequence of the development of a malocclusion.

  3. Thrust generator for boring tools

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, N.B.

    1984-03-13

    The present invention provides an electrically powered system for advancing a rotary boring tool in situations where the inclination of the bore hole is such that the force of gravity does not provide sufficient forward thrust. One or more marine screw propellers are rotated by the motor which itself is restrained from rotation by being fixedly connected to a flexible, twist resistant conduit for conducting the drilling fluid and electric power from the surface. The system may also provide for different rotative speeds for propeller and bit and for counter-rotating propellers to minimize torque forces on the conduit.

  4. Bulk-Flow Analysis of Hybrid Thrust Bearings for Advanced Cryogenic Turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanAndres, Luis

    1998-01-01

    on a Windows 95/NT personal computer. The program, help files and examples are licensed by Texas A&M University Technology License Office. The study of the static and dynamic performance of two hydrostatic/hydrodynamic bearings demonstrates the importance of centrifugal and advection fluid inertia effects for operation at high rotational speeds. The first example considers a conceptual hydrostatic thrust bearing for an advanced liquid hydrogen turbopump operating at 170,000 rpm. The large axial stiffness and damping coefficients of the bearing should provide accurate control and axial positioning of the turbopump and also allow for unshrouded impellers, therefore increasing the overall pump efficiency. The second bearing uses a refrigerant R134a, and its application in oil-free air conditioning compressors is of great technological importance and commercial value. The computed predictions reveal that the LH2 bearing load capacity and flow rate increase with the recess pressure (i.e. increasing orifice diameters). The bearing axial stiffness has a maximum for a recess pressure rati of approx. 0.55. while the axial damping coefficient decreases as the recess pressure ratio increases. The computer results from three flow models are compared. These models are a) inertialess, b) fluid inertia at recess edges only, and c) full fluid inertia at both recess edges and film lands. The full inertia model shows the lowest flow rates, axial load capacity and stiffness coefficient but on the other hand renders the largest damping coefficients and inertia coefficients. The most important findings are related to the reduction of the outflow through the inner radius and the appearance of subambient pressures. The performance of the refrigerant hybrid thrust bearing is evaluated at two operating speeds and pressure drops. The computed results are presented in dimensionless form to evidence consistent trends in the bearing performance characteristics. As the applied axial load

  5. Internal-liquid-film-cooling Experiments with Air-stream Temperatures to 2000 Degrees F. in 2- and 4-inch-diameter Horizontal Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, George R; Abramson, Andrew E; Sloop, John L

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the effectiveness of liquid-cooling films on the inner surfaces of tubes containing flowing hot air. Experiments were made in 2- and 4-inch-diameter straight metal tubes with air flows at temperatures from 600 degrees to 2000 degrees F. and diameter Reynolds numbers from 2.2 to 14 x 10(5). The film coolant, water, was injected around the circumference at a single axial position on the tubes at flow rates from 0.02 to .24 pound per second per foot of tube circumference (0.8 to 12 percent of the air flow). Liquid-coolant films were established and maintained around and along the tube wall in concurrent flow with the hot air. The results indicated that, in order to film cool a given surface area with as little coolant flow as possible, it may be necessary to limit the flow of coolant introduced at a single axial position and to introduce it at several axial positions. The flow rate of inert coolant required to maintain liquid-film cooling over a given area of tube surface can be estimated when the gas-flow conditions are known by means of a generalized plot of the film-cooling data.

  6. Synthesis of perm-selective membranes by grafting acrylic acid into air-irradiated Teflon-FEP films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzi, Annick; Chapiro, Adolphe

    Grafting acrylic acid into air-irradiated Teflon-FEP films was investigated. Pre-irradiation doses ranged from 0.5 to 10 kGy. Grafting occurred at 45 or 60°C. Homopolymerization inhibitors, ferrous ions or methylene blue, were added to the system. It was found that after completion of the reaction, within 40-100 min, membranes were obtained with very low electric resistivities. The influence of added inhibitors, pre-irradiation dose and grafting temperature was studied. From the results it is concluded that the initiating centers in air-irradiated Teflon-FEP are, on the one hand, peroxides of structure POOP', in which P is a polymeric radical and Pprime; a small fragment, and on the other trapped PO .2 radicals. The latter only react after losing their oxygen. In the presence of polymerization inhibitors, initiation involves a redox process which reduces the overall activation energy.

  7. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  8. Simulation of low thrust guidance problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawkins, G. S.; Long, D.

    1974-01-01

    The determination of optimal rocket control profiles and the guidance procedures used to approximate these profiles have received much attention. Simple guidance procedures have sufficed for the Apollo flights. A modified version of the linear tangent guidance law is developed which can be used for a low-thrust orbital maneuvering system such as the space shuttle. The modification allows the estimation of gravity over long thrusting arcs which is necessary for low thrust systems.

  9. Thrust control system design of ducted rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Juntao; Li, Bin; Bao, Wen; Niu, Wenyu; Yu, Daren

    2011-07-01

    The investigation of the thrust control system is aroused by the need for propulsion system of ducted rockets. Firstly the dynamic mathematical models of gas flow regulating system, pneumatic servo system and ducted rocket engine were established and analyzed. Then, to conquer the discussed problems of thrust control, the idea of information fusion was proposed to construct a new feedback variable. With this fused feedback variable, the thrust control system was designed. According to the simulation results, the introduction of the new fused feedback variable is valid in eliminating the contradiction between rapid response and stability for the thrust control system of ducted rockets.

  10. Solar electric propulsion thrust beam interactive effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Interactive effects between ion engine thrust beams and an SEP spacecraft and its science payload have been examined. AC electric contamination from thrust beam potential fluctuations of both 'common mode' and 'point-to-point' forms has been evaluated. Quenching of point-to-point E-fields by both thrust ion and charge exchange ion plasmas is expected. Reduction methods for AC electric contamination from common mode thrust beam potential fluctuations have been developed. Charged particle contamination of ambient space and plasma wave contamination may result from density magnitude and spatial extent of charge exchange plasma plumes. Reduction methods for cone of directions of high angle charge exchange ions have been examined.

  11. Effects of air annealing on CdS quantum dots thin film grown at room temperature by CBD technique intended for photosensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Shaheed U.; Desale, Dipalee J.; Siddiqui, Farha Y.; Ghosh, Arindam; Birajadar, Ravikiran B.; Ghule, Anil V.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of different intensities (40, 60 100 and 200 W) of light on CdS quantum dots thin film annealed at 350 °C indicating enhancement in (a) photo-current and (b) photosensitivity. Highlights: ► The preparation of CdS nanodot thin film at room temperature by M-CBD technique. ► Study of air annealing on prepared CdS nanodots thin film. ► The optimized annealing temperature for CdS nanodot thin film is 350 °C. ► Modified CdS thin films can be used in photosensor application. -- Abstract: CdS quantum dots thin-films have been deposited onto the glass substrate at room temperature using modified chemical bath deposition technique. The prepared thin films were further annealed in air atmosphere at 150, 250 and 350 °C for 1 h and subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, electrical resistivity and I–V system. The modifications observed in morphology and opto-electrical properties of the thin films are presented.

  12. Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Actuators Thrust-Measurement Methodology Incorporating New Anti-Thrust Hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Laun, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    We discuss thrust measurements of Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) plasma actuators devices used for aerodynamic active flow control. After a review of our experience with conventional thrust measurement and significant non-repeatability of the results, we devised a suspended actuator test setup, and now present a methodology of thrust measurements with decreased uncertainty. The methodology consists of frequency scans at constant voltages. The procedure consists of increasing the frequency in a step-wise fashion from several Hz to the maximum frequency of several kHz, followed by frequency decrease back down to the start frequency of several Hz. This sequence is performed first at the highest voltage of interest, then repeated at lower voltages. The data in the descending frequency direction is more consistent and selected for reporting. Sample results show strong dependence of thrust on humidity which also affects the consistency and fluctuations of the measurements. We also observed negative values of thrust or "anti-thrust", at low frequencies between 4 Hz and up to 64 Hz. The anti-thrust is proportional to the mean-squared voltage and is frequency independent. Departures from the parabolic anti-thrust curve are correlated with appearance of visible plasma discharges. We propose the anti-thrust hypothesis. It states that the measured thrust is a sum of plasma thrust and anti-thrust, and assumes that the anti-thrust exists at all frequencies and voltages. The anti-thrust depends on actuator geometry and materials and on the test installation. It enables the separation of the plasma thrust from the measured total thrust. This approach enables more meaningful comparisons between actuators at different installations and laboratories. The dependence on test installation was validated by surrounding the actuator with a large diameter, grounded, metal sleeve.

  13. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A data dump is presented containing space shuttle orbiter maneuvering engine performance, weight, envelope, and interface pressure requirements for candidate propellant combinations (NTO/MMH, NTO50-50, LOX/MMH, LOX/50-50, LOX/N2H4, LOX/C3H8, and LOX/RP-1) and cooling concepts (regenerative and dump/film). These data are presented parametrically for the thrust, chamber pressure, nozzle expansion ratio, and engine mixture ratio ranges of interest. Also included is information describing sensitivity to system changes; reliability, maintainability and safety; development programs and associated critical technology areas; engine cost comparisons during development and operation; and ecological effects.

  14. Weakening inside incipient thrust fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Tesei, T.; Collettini, C.; Oliot, E.

    2013-12-01

    In fold-and-thrust belts, shortening is mainly accommodated by thrust faults that nucleate along décollement levels. Geological and geophysical evidence suggests that these faults might be weak because of a combination of processes such as pressure-solution, phyllosilicates reorientation and delamination, and fluid pressurization. In this study we aim to decipher the processes and the kinetics responsible for weakening of tectonic décollements. We studied the Millaris thrust (Southern Pyrenees): a fault representative of a décollement in its incipient stage. This fault accommodated a total shortening of about 30 meters and is constituted by a 10m thick, intensively foliated phyllonite developed inside a homogeneous marly unit. Detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses have been carried out to characterize the mineralogical change, the chemical transfers and volume change in the fault zone compared to non-deformed parent sediments. We also carried out microstructural analysis on natural and experimentally deformed rocks. Illite and chlorite are the main hydrous minerals. Inside fault zone, illite minerals are oriented along the schistosity whereas chlorite coats the shear surfaces. Mass balance calculations demonstrated a volume loss of up to 50% for calcite inside fault zone (and therefore a relative increase of phyllosilicates contents) because of calcite pressure solution mechanisms. We performed friction experiments in a biaxial deformation apparatus using intact rocks sheared in the in-situ geometry from the Millaris fault and its host sediments. We imposed a range of normal stresses (10 to 50 MPa), sliding velocity steps (3-100 μm/s) and slide-hold slide sequences (3 to 1000 s hold) under saturated conditions. Mechanical results demonstrate that both fault rocks and parent sediments are weaker than average geological materials (friction μ<<0.6) and have velocity-strengthening behavior because of the presence of phyllosilicate horizons. Fault rocks are

  15. Modeling air-driven flow of a viscous film coating the interior of a rigid, vertical tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogrosky, Reed; Camassa, Roberto; Forest, Greg; Olander, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    The upwards, air-driven flow of a viscous fluid film coating the interior of a rigid, vertical tube is studied theoretically and numerically. The free surface of the film develops instabilities due to the interplay between interfacial stress from the airflow and surface tension from azimuthal curvature. Simple closure models for turbulent airflow coupled to long-wave asymptotic models for the liquid film have been shown to reproduce qualitatively the dynamics of the instabilities past initial transients observed in experiments. However, quantitative agreement requires improving the turbulent airflow modeling beyond leading order theories of free surface stress. An attempt in this direction is described here; the resulting model is compared with others in the literature and with experiments, for the case where the free surface is replaced by a rigid, wavy wall. This comparison is made for both wavy pipe and wavy channel flows, and the mean stress is seen to be out of phase with the wavy wall itself by a phase shift dependent on both the Reynolds number and the amplitude of the wall modulations. The free surface model is then studied through linear stability analysis and numerical solutions, both of which show improved agreement with experiments. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF RTG DMS-0943851 and NIEHS 534197-3411.

  16. Routine preparation of air-dried negatively stained and unstained specimens on holey carbon support films: a review of applications.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin; Scheffler, Dirk

    2002-01-01

    Several representative examples are given of the successful application of negative staining across the holes of holey carbon support films using 5% (w/v) ammonium molybdate solution containing trehalose. The inclusion of 0.1% (w/v) trehalose is considered to be most satisfactory, although good data have also been obtained in the presence of 0.01 and 1.0% (w/v) trehalose. The examples given fall into the following groups: protein molecules in the absence of polyethylene glycol (PEG), protein molecules in the presence of PEG (Mr 1000), lipoproteins, lipids and membranes, filaments and tubules, viruses in the absence of PEG, viruses in the presence of PEG, aqueous polymer solutions, and finally for comparison purposes, four unstained samples studied in the presence of trehalose alone. In all these cases, and many others not documented here, successful spreading of the sample across holes has been achieved, with the sample embedded within a thin film of air-dried ammonium molybdate+trehalose. These specimens can be rapidly produced and provide an alternative to negatively stained specimens on carbon support films. Specimen stability in the electron bean is good and such specimens can usually generate superior negatively stained TEM images without flattening and adsorption artefacts. The formation of 2-D arrays/crystals of protein molecules and viruses, suspended across holes in the presence of ammonium molbybdate+trehalose, and trehalose alone, is also demonstrated.

  17. The Beaufort Sea fold-and-thrust belt, northwestern Canada: Implications for thrust-belt evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Root, K.G. )

    1991-06-01

    The northeasternmost segment of the Cordilleran thrust belt of western North American underlies the Beaufort Sea continental margin. Folds and associated northesat-directed thrusts in this region formed synchronously with Tertiary sedimentation. As a result, the times of fold development can be determined from reflection seismic data by analyzing lateral thickness changes in stratigraphic sequences of known ages, and onlap and truncation relationships at unconformities. Thrust faulting occurred throughout the late Paleocene-Pliocene. The abundant temporal data indicate the deformational seuqence was significantly differet from the simple, steplike, foreland-propagating model formulated in other less well-dated thrust belts. Many thrusts were active simultaneously, especially during the late Eocnee, when the region of active thrusting had an across-strike width of greater than 200 km. This observation calls into question the popular concept that only one thrust moves at a time as a thrust belt develops. The thrust belt propagated along, as well as across, strike. During the late Paleocene-middle Eocene, the area of active thrusting was bounded on the southeast by poorly imaged zones of right-lateral strike-slip faults that apparently are the northern offshore continuation of the Rapid fault array. The change in the age of thrusting along strike results in no obvious geometrical anomalies and could not be deduced without timing information. This has an important implication: temporal data cannot necessarily be projected along strike in a thrust belt.

  18. Low thrust rocket test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrington, Lynn A.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1990-01-01

    A low thrust chemical rocket test facility has recently become operational at the NASA-Lewis. The new facility is used to conduct both long duration and performance tests at altitude over a thruster's operating envelope using hydrogen and oxygen gas for propellants. The facility provides experimental support for a broad range of objectives, including fundamental modeling of fluids and combustion phenomena, the evaluation of thruster components, and life testing of full rocket designs. The major mechanical and electrical systems are described along with aspects of the various optical diagnostics available in the test cell. The electrical and mechanical systems are designed for low down time between tests and low staffing requirements for test operations. Initial results are also presented which illustrate the various capabilities of the cell.

  19. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra K.; Lee, Jonathan; Holmes, Richard; Zimmerman, Frank; Effinger, Mike; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has successfully applied new materials and fabrication techniques to create actively cooled thrust chambers that operate 200-400 degrees hotter and weigh 50% lighter than conventional designs. In some vehicles, thrust assemblies account for as much as 20% of the engine weight. So, reducing the weight of these components and increasing their operating range will benefit many engines and vehicle designs, including Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) concepts. Obviously, copper and steel alloys have been used successfully for many years in the chamber components of thrust assemblies. Yet, by replacing the steel alloys with Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) and/or Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials, design weights can be drastically reduced. In addition, replacing the traditional copper alloys with a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) or an advanced copper alloy (Cu-8Cr-4Nb, also known as GRCop-84) significantly increases allowable operating temperatures. Several small MMC and PMC demonstration chambers have recently been fabricated with promising results. Each of these designs included GRCop-84 for the cooled chamber liner. These units successfully verified that designs over 50% lighter are feasible. New fabrication processes, including advanced casting technology and a low cost vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process, were also demonstrated with these units. Hot-fire testing at MSFC is currently being conducted on the chambers to verify increased operating temperatures available with the GRCop-84 liner. Unique CMC chamber liners were also successfully fabricated and prepared for hot-fire testing. Yet, early results indicate these CMC liners need significantly more development in order to use them in required chamber designs. Based on the successful efforts with the MMC and PMC concepts, two full size "lightweight" chambers are currently being designed and fabricated for hot

  20. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti3+, Ti4+, O2−, oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift. PMID:27572095

  1. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti(3+) state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-08-30

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti(3+), Ti(4+), O(2-), oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift.

  2. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-08-01

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti3+, Ti4+, O2‑, oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift.

  3. Thrust bolting: roof bolt support apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tadolini, Stephen C.; Dolinar, Dennis R.

    1992-01-01

    A method of installing a tensioned roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads by applying thrust to the bolt (19) as the bonding material (7') is curing to compress the strata (3) surrounding the borehole (1), and then relieving the thrust when the bonding material (7') has cured.

  4. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a…

  5. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Thrust reversers. 33.97 Section 33.97 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If...

  6. Changes in the electro-physical properties of MCT epitaxial films affected by a plasma volume discharge induced by an avalanche beam in atmospheric-pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, D. V.; Voitsekhovskii, A. V.; Lozovoy, K. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Shulepov, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the influence of the plasma volume discharge of nanosecond duration formed in a non-uniform electric field at atmospheric pressure on samples of epitaxial films HgCdTe (MCT) films are discussed. The experimental data show that the action of pulses of nanosecond volume discharge in air at atmospheric pressure leads to changes in the electrophysical properties of MCT epitaxial films due to formation of a near-surface high- conductivity layer of the n-type conduction. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies for the controlled change of the properties of MCT.

  7. Vortex Ring State and Asymmetric Thrust Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Gregory; Savas, Omer; Caradonna, Francis

    2008-11-01

    When the helical vortices of a rotor are not convected away, the vortices may form a ring-like structure about the rotor disk. This vortex ring state (VRS) is most common during rapid descent and leads to thrust oscillations coupled to the formation and subsequent breakdown of the ring. Experimental observations at and near VRS were made using strobed particle image velocimetry on a three-blade rotor in a towing tank. Simultaneous strain gage readings allowed direct measurement of the rotor's thrust history in this state. Operating conditions near the cusp of VRS were investigated to offer insight into the initial evolution of this undesirable state. In addition, asymmetries in the periodic thrust histories during non-axial descent are analyzed in conjunction with corresponding vorticity evolutions. Salient features of the vortex wake structure during highly asymmetric thrust oscillations are discussed in contrast to VRS cases with nearly symmetric thrust oscillations.

  8. Computational Investigation of Fluidic Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craig A.; Deere, Karen A.

    1999-01-01

    A computational study of fluidic counterflow thrust vectoring has been conducted. Two-dimensional numerical simulations were run using the computational fluid dynamics code PAB3D with two-equation turbulence closure and linear Reynolds stress modeling. For validation, computational results were compared to experimental data obtained at the NASA Langley Jet Exit Test Facility. In general, computational results were in good agreement with experimental performance data, indicating that efficient thrust vectoring can be obtained with low secondary flow requirements (less than 1% of the primary flow). An examination of the computational flowfield has revealed new details about the generation of a countercurrent shear layer, its relation to secondary suction, and its role in thrust vectoring. In addition to providing new information about the physics of counterflow thrust vectoring, this work appears to be the first documented attempt to simulate the counterflow thrust vectoring problem using computational fluid dynamics.

  9. The Effect of monoglycerides on structural and topographical characteristics of adsorbed beta-casein films at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Marta Cejudo; Sánchez, Cecilio Carrera; Rodríguez Niño, M Rosario; Rodríguez Patino, Juan M

    2006-02-01

    The effect of monoglycerides (monopalmitin and monoolein) on the structural and topographical characteristics of beta-casein adsorbed film at the air-water interface has been analyzed by means of surface pressure (pi)-area (A) isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). At surface pressures lower than that for the beta-casein collapse (pi(c)(beta-casein)), attractive interactions between beta-casein and monoglycerides were observed. At higher surface pressures, the collapsed beta-casein is partially displaced from the interface by monoglycerides. However, beta-casein displacement by monoglycerides is not quantitative at the monoglyceride concentrations studied in this work. From the results derived from these experiments, we have concluded that interactions, miscibility, and displacement of proteins by monoglycerides in adsorbed mixed monolayers at the air-water interface depend on the particular protein-monoglyceride system, the interactions between film-forming components being higher for adsorbed than for spread films. The adsorbed films are more segregated than spread films, and both collapsed protein domains and monoglyceride domains in adsorbed films are smaller than for spread films.

  10. Interfacial diffusion of metal atoms during air annealing of chemically deposited ZnS-CuS and PbS-CuS thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Zingaro, R.A.; Meyers, E.A. . Dept. of Chemistry); Nair, P.K.; Nair, M.T.S. . Lab. de Energia Solar)

    1994-09-01

    The authors report on the interfacial diffusion of metal ions occurring during air annealing of multilayer CuS films (0.15-0.6[mu]m) deposited on thin coating of ZnS or PbS ([approximately]0.06 [mu]m) on glass substrates. All the films are deposited from chemical baths at room temperature. The interfacial diffusion on the metal atoms during the air annealing is illustrate by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. A multilayer of 0.3 [mu]m thick CuS film deposited over a thin film of ZnS upon annealing at 150 C shows atomic ratios of Zn to Cu of [approximately]0.15 and [approximately]0.48 at the surface layers of the samples annealed for 12 and 24 h, respectively. In the case of CuS on PbS film, the corresponding Pb to Cu atomic ratios at the surface layers are 0.43 and 0.83. The optical transmittance spectra and sheet resistance of these multilayer films indicate thermal stabilities superior to that of the CuS-only coatings. Application of the interfacial diffusion process in the production of thermally stable solar control coatings, solar absorber coating, or p-type films for solar cell structures is discussed.

  11. Comparison of three thrust calculation methods using in-flight thrust data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    The gross thrust of an experimental airplane was determined by each method using the same flight maneuvers and generally the same data parameters. Coefficients determined from thrust stand calibrations for each of the three methods were then extrapolated to cruise flight conditions. The values of total aircraft gross thrust calculated by the three methods for cruise flight conditions agreed within + or - 3 percent. The disagreement in the values of thrust calculated by the different techniques manifested itself as a bias in the data. There was little scatter (0.5 percent) for the thrust levels examined in flight.

  12. Note: Radial-thrust combo metal mesh foil bearing for microturbomachinery.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol Hoon; Choi, Sang Kyu; Hong, Doo Euy; Yoon, Tae Gwang; Lee, Sung Hwi

    2013-10-01

    This Note proposes a novel radial-thrust combo metal mesh foil bearing (MMFB). Although MMFBs have advantages such as higher stiffness and damping over conventional air foil bearings, studies related to MMFBs have been limited to radial MMFBs. The novel combo MMFB is composed of a radial top foil, thrust top foils, and a ring-shaped metal mesh damper--fabricated by compressing a copper wire mesh--with metal mesh thrust pads for the thrust bearing at both side faces. In this study, the combo MMFB was fabricated in half-split type to support the rotor for a micro gas turbine generator. The manufacture and assembly process for the half-split-type combo MMFB is presented. In addition, to verify the proposed combo MMFB, motoring test results up to 250,000 rpm and axial displacements as a function of rotational speed are presented.

  13. Oxygen/Alcohol Dual Thrust RCS Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angstadt, Tara; Hurlbert, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A non-toxic dual thrust RCS engine offers significant operational, safety, and performance advantages to the space shuttle and the next generation RLVs. In this concept, a single engine produces two thrust levels of 25 and 870 lbf. The low thrust level is provided by the spark torch igniter, which, with the addition of 2 extra valves, can also be made to function as a vernier. A dual thrust RCS engine allows 38 verniers to be packaged more efficiently on a vehicle. These 38 vemiers improve translation and reduce cross coupling, thereby providing more pure roll, pitch, and yaw maneuvers of the vehicle. Compared to the 6 vemiers currently on the shuttle, the 38 dual thrust engines would be 25 to 40% more efficient for the same maneuvers and attitude control. The vernier thrust level also reduces plume impingement and contamination concerns. Redundancy is also improved, thereby improving mission success reliability. Oxygen and ethanol are benign propellants which do not create explosive reaction products or contamination, as compared to hypergolic propellants. These characteristics make dual-thrust engines simpler to implement on a non-toxic reaction control system. Tests at WSTF in August 1999 demonstrated a dual-thrust concept that is successful with oxygen and ethanol. Over a variety of inlet pressures and mixture ratios at 22:1 area ratio, the engine produced between 230 and 297 sec Isp, and thrust levels from 8 lbf. to 50 lbf. This paper describes the benefits of dual-thrust engines and the recent results from tests at WSTF.

  14. Humidity-dependent compression-induced glass transition of the air-water interfacial Langmuir films of poly(D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid) (PLGA).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Chang; Lee, Hoyoung; Jung, Hyunjung; Choi, Yun Hwa; Meron, Mati; Lin, Binhua; Bang, Joona; Won, You-Yeon

    2015-07-28

    Constant rate compression isotherms of the air-water interfacial Langmuir films of poly(D,L-lactic acid-ran-glycolic acid) (PLGA) show a distinct feature of an exponential increase in surface pressure in the high surface polymer concentration regime. We have previously demonstrated that this abrupt increase in surface pressure is linked to the glass transition of the polymer film, but the detailed mechanism of this process is not fully understood. In order to obtain a molecular-level understanding of this behavior, we performed extensive characterizations of the surface mechanical, structural and rheological properties of Langmuir PLGA films at the air-water interface, using combined experimental techniques including the Langmuir film balance, X-ray reflectivity and double-wall-ring interfacial rheometry methods. We observed that the mechanical and structural responses of the Langmuir PLGA films are significantly dependent on the rate of film compression; the glass transition was induced in the PLGA film only at fast compression rates. Surprisingly, we found that this deformation rate dependence is also dependent on the humidity of the environment. With water acting as a plasticizer for the PLGA material, the diffusion of water molecules through the PLGA film seems to be the key factor in the determination of the glass transformation properties and thus the mechanical response of the PLGA film against lateral compression. Based on our combined results, we hypothesize the following mechanism for the compression-induced glass transformation of the Langmuir PLGA film; (1) initially, a humidified/non-glassy PLGA film is formed in the full surface-coverage region (where the surface pressure shows a plateau) during compression; (2) further compression leads to the collapse of the PLGA chains and the formation of new surfaces on the air side of the film, and this newly formed top layer of the PLGA film is transiently glassy in character because the water evaporation rate

  15. Phases, line tension and pattern formation in molecularly thin films at the air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Pritam

    A Langmuir film, which is a molecularly thin insoluble film on a liquid substrate, is one practical realization of a quasi-two dimensional matter. The major advantages of this system for the study of phase separation and phase co-existence are (a) it allows accurate control of the components and molecular area of the film and (b) it can be studied by various methods that require very flat films. Phase separation in molecularly thin films plays an important role in a range of systems from biomembranes to biosensors. For example, phase-separated lipid nano-domains in biomembranes are thought to play crucial roles in membrane function. I use Brewster Angel Microscopy (BAM) coupled with Fluorescence Microscopy (FM) and static Light Scattering Microscopy (LSM) to image phases and patterns within Langmuir films. The three microscopic techniques --- BAM, FM and LSM --- are complimentary to each other, providing distinct sets of information. They allow direct comparison with literature results in lipid systems. I have quantitatively validated the use of detailed hydrodynamic simulations to determine line tension in monolayers. Line tension decreases as temperature rises. This decrease gives us information on the entropy associated with the line, and thus about line structure. I carefully consider the thermodynamics of line energy and entropy to make this connection. In the longer run, LSM will be exploited to give us further information about line structure. I have also extended the technique by testing it on domains within the curved surface of a bilayer vesicle. I also note that in the same way that the presence of surface-active agents, known as surfactants, affects surface energy, the addiction of line active agents alters the inter-phase line energy. Thus my results set to stage to systematically study the influence of line active agents ---'linactants' --- on the inter-phase line energy. Hierarchal self-assembled chiral patterns were observed as a function of

  16. CdSe:In-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings with n-type conductivity produced by air annealing of CdSe-In thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, V.M.; George, P.J.; Nair, M.T.S.; Nair, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    Conversion of chemically deposited intrinsic CdSe thin films to n-type coatings by a postdeposition process is described. A Cd:Se-In thin film consisting of a CdSe thin film {approximately}0.15 {micro}m thick and a thermally evaporated indium film {approximately} 0.02 {micro}m thick was air annealed at 325 C for 1 h. The resulting thin film coating of CdSe:In (0.15 {micro}m)-In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0.03 {micro}m) exhibits a sheet resistance of 790 {Omega}/{open_square} and an n-type conductivity of {approximately} 400 {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1} for the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} top layer. Etching of the film with 1 M HCl for 6 h removes the superficial In{sub 2}O{sub 3} from the coating, and the underlying CdSe with indium doping shows a sheet resistance of 15 k{Omega}/{open_square} which corresponds to electrical conductivity (n-type) of {approximately}0.4 {Omega}{sup {minus}1} cm{sup {minus}1}. The composition of the film and its variation along the depth are established through analyses of X-ray diffraction pattern and x-ray fluorescence spectra as well as the photocurrent response of the annealed films recorded before and after chemical etching.

  17. Gold-on-Polymer-Based Sensing Films for Detection of Organic and Inorganic Analytes in the Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, Kenneth; Homer, Margie; Ryan, Margaret; Kisor, Adam; Shevade, Abhijit; Jewell, April; Zhou, Hanying

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses gold-on-polymer as one of the novel sensor types developed for part of the sensor development task. Standard polymer-carbon composite sensors used in the JPL Electronic Nose (ENose) have been modified by evaporating 15 nm of metallic gold on the surface. These sensors have been shown to respond to alcohols, aromatics, ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and elemental mercury in the parts-per-million and parts-per-billion concentration ranges in humidified air. The results have shown good sensitivity of these films operating under mild conditions (operating temperatures 23-28 C and regeneration temperature up to 40 C). This unique sensor combines the diversity of polymer sensors for chemical sensing with their response to a wide variety of analytes with the specificity of a gold sensor that shows strong reaction/binding with selected analyte types, such as mercury or sulfur.

  18. Simulated afterburner performance with hydrogen peroxide injection for thrust augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, Allen J; Grobman, Jack S

    1956-01-01

    Combustion performance of three afterburner configurations was evaluated at simulated altitude flight conditions with liquid augmentation to the primary combustor. Afterburner combustion efficiency and stability were better with injection of high-strength hydrogen peroxide than with no injection or with water injection. Improvements were observed in afterburner configurations with and without flameholders and in a short-length afterburner. At a peroxide-air ratio of 0.3, combustion was stable and 85 to 90 percent efficient in all configurations tested. Calculated augmented net-thrust ratios for peroxide injection with afterburning were approximately 60 percent greater than those for water injection.

  19. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel having the configuration of an assembly having a combustion chamber portion connected to a nozzle portion through a throat portion is wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The width of the tape is positioned at an angle of 30 to 50 deg. to the axis of the mandrel such that one edge of the tape contacts the mandrel while the other edge is spaced from the mandrel. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined to provide a frusto-conical surface extending at an angle of 15 to 30 deg. with respect to the axis of the mandrel for starting a second wrap on the mandrel to cover the throat portion. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape having its width positioned at a angle of 5 to 20 deg. from the axis of the mandrel. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined to provide a smooth outer surface. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  20. Collar nut and thrust ring

    DOEpatents

    Lowery, Guy B.

    1991-01-01

    A collar nut comprises a hollow cylinder having fine interior threads at one end for threadably engaging a pump mechanical seal assembly and an inwardly depending flange at the other end. The flange has an enlarged portion with a groove for receiving an O-ring for sealing against the intrusion of pumpage from the exterior. The enlarged portion engages a thrust ring about the pump shaft for crushing a hard O-ring, such as a graphite O-ring. The hard O-ring seals the interior of the mechanical seal assembly and pump housing against the loss of lubricants or leakage of pumpage. The fine threads of the hollow cylinder provide the mechanical advantage for crushing the hard O-ring evenly and easily with a hand tool from the side of the collar nut rather than by tightening a plurality of bolts from the end and streamlines the exterior surface of the mechanical seal. The collar nut avoids the spatial requirements of bolt heads at the end of a seal and associated bolt head turbulence.

  1. Benchmarking numerical models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Schreurs, Guido; Albertz, Markus; Gerya, Taras V.; Kaus, Boris; Landry, Walter; le Pourhiet, Laetitia; Mishin, Yury; Egholm, David L.; Cooke, Michele; Maillot, Bertrand; Thieulot, Cedric; Crook, Tony; May, Dave; Souloumiac, Pauline; Beaumont, Christopher

    2016-11-01

    We report quantitative results from three brittle thrust wedge experiments, comparing numerical results directly with each other and with corresponding analogue results. We first test whether the participating codes reproduce predictions from analytical critical taper theory. Eleven codes pass the stable wedge test, showing negligible internal deformation and maintaining the initial surface slope upon horizontal translation over a frictional interface. Eight codes participated in the unstable wedge test that examines the evolution of a wedge by thrust formation from a subcritical state to the critical taper geometry. The critical taper is recovered, but the models show two deformation modes characterised by either mainly forward dipping thrusts or a series of thrust pop-ups. We speculate that the two modes are caused by differences in effective basal boundary friction related to different algorithms for modelling boundary friction. The third experiment examines stacking of forward thrusts that are translated upward along a backward thrust. The results of the seven codes that run this experiment show variability in deformation style, number of thrusts, thrust dip angles and surface slope. Overall, our experiments show that numerical models run with different numerical techniques can successfully simulate laboratory brittle thrust wedge models at the cm-scale. In more detail, however, we find that it is challenging to reproduce sandbox-type setups numerically, because of frictional boundary conditions and velocity discontinuities. We recommend that future numerical-analogue comparisons use simple boundary conditions and that the numerical Earth Science community defines a plasticity test to resolve the variability in model shear zones.

  2. Libby thrust belt and adjacent structures - new factors to consider in thrust tectonics of northwestern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.E.; Cressman, E.R.

    1985-05-01

    About 40 mi (65 km) west of the Rocky Mountain trench and at least 9 mi (15 km) above the sole detachment of the Rocky Mountain thrust belt is a zone of Cretaceous-Tertiary thrust faults up to 25 mi (40 km) wide in middle Proterozoic and Cambrian rocks. This zone (the Libby thrust belt) extends northward from the Lewis and Clark line to the northwest corner of Montana. Within the Libby thrust belt is a series of complex ramps, horsts, splays, and folds that accommodate a tectonic shortening of about 6.2 mi (10 km). Backsliding has occurred on some listric thrust faults, and middle Tertiary(.) extensional horst-and-graben faults offset or join most thrust faults. On the east, the lead thrust ramps up onto the broad open Purcell anticlinorium. On the west, the Libby thrust belt is overridden in the north by the lead thrust of the Yaak plate (whose central part is the broad, open Sylvanite anticline), and in the south, it is overridden by the Moyie thrust (which trends northwest and also overrides the west edge of the Yaak plate). Geologic cross sections suggest that the Belt rocks have overridden the Cambrian at shallow depths only and that Cambrian and younger Phanerozoic strata probably do not occur at greater depths beneath and west of the Purcell anticlinorium. This interpretation differs significantly from interpretations that suggest intercalation of major wedges of Paleozoic and Belt rocks at depth in this same area.

  3. Orbital motion under continuous tangential thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, Frederick W.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of continuous tangential thrust on the orbital motion and mass loss of a vehicle initially in a circular orbit is investigated analytically. It is shown that, for a thrust-to-weight ratio of greater than 0.16175, escape speed will eventually be reached along an unwinding spiral trajectory. For lower thrust-to-weight ratios, escape speed is never attained, and the flight path oscillates around a logarithmic spiral trajectory. Formulas are obtained for the approximate orbital motion and time of flight along each type of trajectory and for mass loss due to expenditure of rocket propellant.

  4. Improvement of propeller static thrust estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, J.; Kettleborough, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of improving the performance estimation of propellers operating in the heavily loaded static thrust condition was studied. The Goldstein theory was assessed as it applies to propellers operating in the static thrust. A review of theoretical considerations is presented along with a summary of the attempts made to obtain a numerical solution. The chordwise pressure distribution was determined during operation at a tip speed of 500 ft/sec. Chordwise integration of the pressures leads to the spanwise load distribution and further integration would give the axial thrust.

  5. Low-thrust chemical orbit transfer propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelouch, J. J., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The need for large structures in high orbit is reported in terms of the many mission opportunities which require such structures. Mission and transportation options for large structures are presented, and it is shown that low-thrust propulsion is an enabling requirement for some missions and greatly enhancing to many others. Electric and low-thrust chemical propulsion are compared, and the need for an requirements of low-thrust chemical propulsion are discussed in terms of the interactions that are perceived to exist between the propulsion system and the large structure.

  6. An Experimental Study of Thrust Augmenting Ejectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    A , AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THRUST AUG’XENTING EJECTORS THESIS William D. Lewis Captain 11. S. Army AFIT/GAE/Ai/83D- 13 1 DTIC Li~i ELECTE JANI...83D-13 AN LEPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THRUST AUG-M..TING EJECTORS "l•HSIS William D. Levis Captain U. S. Army AF1T/GAAE/AA/$3D- 13 ’jK Approved for public...release; distribution unliaited I V .,, AFIT/GAE/AA/83D- 13 AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF THRUST AUGMENTING EJECTORS THESIS Presented to *he Faculty of the

  7. Study on structural, morphological and thermal properties of surface modified polyvinylchloride (PVC) film under air, argon and oxygen discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganya, Arjunan; Shanmugavelayutham, Gurusamy; Serra Rodríguez, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    The effect of air, argon, oxygen DC glow discharge plasma on the polyvinylchloride (PVC) film synthesized by solution casting technique, were evaluated via changes in physio-chemical properties such as structural, morphological, crystalline, thermal properties. The PVC film was plasma treated as a function of exposure time and different plasma forming gases, while other operating parameters such as power and pressure remained constant at 100 W and 2 Pa respectively. The plasma treated PVC were characterized by static contact angle, ATR-FTIR, XPS, AFM and T-peel analysis. It was found that various gaseous plasma treatments have improved the polar components, surface roughness on the surface of PVC which was confirmed by XPS, AFM, resulting in highly enhanced wettability and adhesion. X-ray diffraction study showed that plasma treatment does not persuade considerable change, even though it vaguely induces the crystallinity. The thermal properties of plasma treated PVC were evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry and it was observed that O2 plasma treatment gives higher glass transition temperature of 87.21 °C compared with the untreated one. The glass transition temperature slightly increased for Oxygen plasma treated material due to the presence of higher concentration of the polar functional groups on the PVC surface due to strong intramolecular bonding.

  8. Influence of pulsed nanosecond volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air on the electrical characteristics of MCT epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, Denis V.; Voitsekhovskii, Alexandr V.; Lozovoy, Kirill A.; Nesmelov, Sergey N.; Dzyadukh, Stanislav M.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shulepov, Michail A.; Dvoretskii, Sergei A.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was investigating the effect of volume nanosecond discharge in air at atmospheric pressure on the electro-physical properties of the HgCdTe (MCT) epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Hall measurements of electro-physical parameters of MCT samples after irradiation have shown that there is a layer of epitaxial films exhibiting n-type conductivity that is formed in the near-surface area. After more than 600 pulses of influence parameters and thickness of the resulting n-layer is such that the measured field dependence of Hall coefficient corresponds to the material of n-type conductivity. Also it is shown that the impact of the discharge leads to significant changes in electro-physical characteristics of MIS structures. This fact is demonstrated by increase in density of positive fixed charge, change in the hysteresis type of the capacitance-voltage characteristic, an increase in density of surface states. The preliminary results show that it is possible to use such actions in the development of technologies of the controlled change in the properties of MCT.

  9. A method to form semiconductor quantum dot (QD) thin films by igniting a flame at air-liquid interface: CdS and WO3.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Aarti H; Patil, Sagar H; Sathaye, Shivaram D; Patil, Kashinath R

    2015-02-01

    We reveal an easy, inexpensive, efficient one stepflame synthesis of semiconductor/metal oxide thin films at air-liquid interface, subsequently, transferred on suitable substrate. The method has been illustrated by the formation of CdS and WO3 QDs thin films. The features of the present method are (1) Growth of thin films consisting of0.5-2.0nm sized Quantum Dots (QDs)/(ultra-small nanoparticles) in a short time, at the air-liquid interface which can be suitably transferred by a well-known Blodgett technique to an appropriate substrate, (2) The method is suitable to apply layer by layer (LbL) technique to increase the film thickness as well as forming various compositions as revealed by AFM measurements. The films are characterized for their structure (SAED), morphology (TEM), optical properties (UV-Vis.) and photoluminescence (PL). Possible mechanism of formation of QDs thin film and effect of capping in case of CdS QDs is discussed.

  10. Demonstration, Testing and Qualification of a High Temperature, High Speed Magnetic Thrust Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    The gas turbine industry has a continued interest in improving engine performance and reducing net operating and maintenance costs. These goals are being realized because of advancements in aeroelasticity, materials, and computational tools such as CFD and engine simulations. These advancements aid in increasing engine thrust-to-weight ratios, specific fuel consumption, pressure ratios, and overall reliability through higher speed, higher temperature, and more efficient engine operation. Currently, rolling element bearing and squeeze film dampers are used to support rotors in gas turbine engines. Present ball bearing configurations are limited in speed (<2 million DN) and temperature (<5OO F) and require both cooling air and an elaborate lubrication system. Also, ball bearings require extensive preventative maintenance in order to assure their safe operation. Since these bearings are at their operational limits, new technologies must be found in order to take advantage of other advances. Magnetic bearings are well suited to operate at extreme temperatures and higher rotational speeds and are a promising solution to the problems that conventional rolling element bearings present. Magnetic bearing technology is being developed worldwide and is considered an enabling technology for new engine designs. Using magnetic bearings, turbine and compressor spools can be radically redesigned to be significantly larger and stiffer with better damping and higher rotational speeds. These advances, a direct result of magnetic bearing technology, will allow significant increases in engine power and efficiency. Also, magnetic bearings allow for real-time, in-situ health monitoring of the system, lower maintenance costs and down time.

  11. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Elizabeth S.

    1986-01-01

    In previous tests of liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastropic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed here.

  12. Analysis of the gas-lubricated flat-sector-pad thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A flat sector-shaped pad geometry for a gas-lubricated thrust bearing is analyzed considering both the pitch and roll of the pad. It is shown that maximum load capacity is achieved when the pad is tilted so as to create uniform minimum film thickness along the pad trailing edge. Performance characteristics for various geometries and operating conditions of gas thrust bearings are presented in the form of design curves, and a comparison is made with the rectangular slider approximation. It is found that this approximation is unsafe for practical design, since it always overestimates load capacity.

  13. Combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing is disclosed that allows for both radial and thrust axes control of an associated shaft. The combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing comprises a rotor and a stator. The rotor comprises a shaft, and first and second rotor pairs each having respective rotor elements. The stator comprises first and second stator elements and a magnet-sensor disk. In one embodiment, each stator element has a plurality of split-poles and a corresponding plurality of radial force coils and, in another embodiment, each stator element does not require thrust force coils, and radial force coils are replaced by double the plurality of coils serving as an outer member of each split-pole half.

  14. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If the engine incorporates a reverser, the endurance calibration, operation, and vibration tests prescribed...

  15. Torsional thrust stand for characterization of microthrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheah, K. H.; Low, K. S.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the setup of a precise thrust stand based on torsional pendulum design for characterizing the performance of microthrusters. Calibration has been carried out by using an improved version of electrostatic calibrator, which produces a wide range of accurate and repeatable calibration force. After the calibration, the thrust stand can resolve constant force from 40μN to 3.4mN and impulse bit from 7μNs to 340μNs. The usefulness of the thrust stand has been demonstrated by measuring the performance of two different microthrusters: a pulsed plasma thruster that produces impulse bit of 23.15μNs and a vaporizing liquid microthruster that produces steady state thrust of 633.5μN.

  16. Thrust measurement of dimethyl ether arcjet thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakami, Akira; Beppu, Shinji; Maiguma, Muneyuki; Tachibana, Takeshi

    2011-04-01

    The present paper describes thrust measurement results for an arcjet thruster using Dimethyl ether (DME) as the propellant. DME is an ether compound and can be stored as a liquid due to its relatively low freezing point and preferable vapor pressure. The thruster successfully produced high-voltage mode at DME mass flow rates above 30 mg/s, whereas it yielded low-voltage mode below 30 mg/s. Thrust measurements yielded a thrust of 0.15 N and a specific impulse of 270 s at a mass flow rate of 60 mg/s with a discharge power of 1300 W. The DME arcjet thruster was comparable to a conventional one for thrust and discharge power.

  17. GSFC Technology Thrusts and Partnership Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le Moigne, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the technology thrusts and the opportunities to partner in developing software in support of the technological advances at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). There are thrusts in development of end-to-end software systems for mission data systems in areas of flight software, ground data systems, flight dynamic systems and science data systems. The required technical expertise is reviewed, and the supported missions are shown for the various areas given.

  18. A multi-channel, low velocity, hot film anemometry system for measuring air flows in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Guire, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A complete analytical and experimental development of a multichannel anemometry system is presented. The system consists of an array of low velocity sensors (0.0 m/s to 1.0 m/s), a constant current power supply, and the required data acquisition equipment. The velocity sensors can be scanned simultaneously yielding absolute air velocities and absolute ambient air temperatures at each of the probe positions in the array. One of the key results that this system can produce is the relationship between boundary layer flow and pressure driven flow through a large irregular aperture, such as a doorway, which up until now has been difficult to accomplish with regard to cost and experimental error incurred. 7 refs., 57 figs.

  19. The Importance of Nanometric Passivating Films on Cathodes forLi - Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Brian D.; Black, Robert; Radtke, Claudio; Williams, Zach; Mehdi, Beata L.; Browning, Nigel D.; Nazar, Linda F.

    2014-12-23

    Recently, there has been a transition from fully carbonaceous positive electrodes for the aprotic lithium oxygen battery to alternative materials and the use of redox mediator additives, in an attempt to lower the large electrochemical overpotentials associated with the charge reaction. However, the stabilizing or catalytic effect of these materials can become complicated due to the presence of major side-reactions observed during dis(charge). Here, we isolate the charge reaction from the discharge by utilizing electrodes prefilled with commercial lithium peroxide with a crystallite size of about 200-800 nm. Using a combination of S/TEM, online mass spectrometry, XPS, and electrochemical methods to probe the nature of surface films on carbon and conductive Ti-based nanoparticles, we show that oxygen evolution from lithium peroxide is strongly dependent on their surface properties. Insulating TiO2 surface layers on TiC and TiN - even as thin as 3 nm*can completely inhibit the charge reaction under these conditions. On the other hand, TiC, which lacks this oxide film, readily facilitates oxidation of the bulk Li2O2 crystallites, at a much lower overpotential relative to carbon. Since oxidation of lithium oxygen battery cathodes is inevitable in these systems, precise control of the surface chemistry at the nanoscale becomes of upmost importance.

  20. The importance of nanometric passivating films on cathodes for Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brian D; Black, Robert; Radtke, Claudio; Williams, Zack; Mehdi, B Layla; Browning, Nigel D; Nazar, Linda F

    2014-12-23

    Recently, there has been a transition from fully carbonaceous positive electrodes for the aprotic lithium oxygen battery to alternative materials and the use of redox mediator additives, in an attempt to lower the large electrochemical overpotentials associated with the charge reaction. However, the stabilizing or catalytic effect of these materials can become complicated due to the presence of major side-reactions observed during dis(charge). Here, we isolate the charge reaction from the discharge by utilizing electrodes prefilled with commercial lithium peroxide with a crystallite size of about 200-800 nm. Using a combination of S/TEM, online mass spectrometry, XPS, and electrochemical methods to probe the nature of surface films on carbon and conductive Ti-based nanoparticles, we show that oxygen evolution from lithium peroxide is strongly dependent on their surface properties. Insulating TiO2 surface layers on TiC and TiN - even as thin as 3 nm-can completely inhibit the charge reaction under these conditions. On the other hand, TiC, which lacks this oxide film, readily facilitates oxidation of the bulk Li2O2 crystallites, at a much lower overpotential relative to carbon. Since oxidation of lithium oxygen battery cathodes is inevitable in these systems, precise control of the surface chemistry at the nanoscale becomes of upmost importance.

  1. Modes of thrust generation in flying animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Song, Jialei; Tobalske, Bret; Luo Team; Tobalske Team

    2016-11-01

    For flying animals in forward flight, thrust is usually much smaller as compared with weight support and has not been given the same amount of attention. Several modes of thrust generation are discussed in this presentation. For insects performing slow flight that is characterized by low advance ratios (i.e., the ratio between flight speed and wing speed), thrust is usually generated by a "backward flick" mode, in which the wings moves upward and backward at a faster speed than the flight speed. Paddling mode is another mode used by some insects like fruit flies who row their wings backward during upstroke like paddles (Ristroph et al., PRL, 2011). Birds wings have high advance ratios and produce thrust during downstroke by directing aerodynamic lift forward. At intermediate advance ratios around one (e.g., hummingbirds and bats), the animal wings generate thrust during both downstroke and upstroke, and thrust generation during upstroke may come at cost of negative weight support. These conclusions are supported by previous experiment studies of insects, birds, and bats, as well as our recent computational modeling of hummingbirds. Supported by the NSF.

  2. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  3. Bio-inspired evaporation through plasmonic film of nanoparticles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenhui; Liu, Yanming; Tao, Peng; Shen, Qingchen; Yi, Nan; Zhang, Fangyu; Liu, Quanlong; Song, Chengyi; Zhang, Di; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-08-27

    Plasmonic gold nanoparticles self-assembled at the air-water interface to produce an evaporative surface with local control inspired by skins and plant leaves. Fast and efficient evaporation is realized due to the instant and localized plasmonic heating at the evaporative surface. The bio-inspired evaporation process provides an alternative promising approach for evaporation, and has potential applications in sterilization, distillation, and heat transfer.

  4. Studies of Athabasca asphaltene Langmuir films at air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Yan; Lawrence, Steven; Xu, Zhenghe; Masliyah, Jacob H

    2003-08-01

    Asphaltenes are present in heavy oils and bitumen. They are a mixture of hydrocarbons having complex structures of polyaromatic rings and short side chains. In general, the high-molecular-weight asphaltene is the most aromatic fraction with the highest number of side chains and the low-molecular-weight asphaltene contains the lowest number of side chains, while the number of side chains of the whole asphaltene fraction lies in between. In this study, asphaltenes were extracted and/or fractionated from Athabasca oil sand bitumen. Subfractions of high and low molecular weight and the whole asphaltenes were characterized using a Langmuir trough and complementary techniques such as VPO, FTIR, AFM, and contact angle measurements. At an air-water interface, amphiphilic asphaltene molecules can form a monolayer. Various fractions (high, low, and whole) of the asphaltene molecules behave similarly at the air-water interface, characterized by close resemblance of their surface pressure-area, hysteresis, and relaxation isotherms. The high-molecular-weight asphaltene is the most expanded fraction, while the low-molecular-weight asphaltene fraction is the most condensed, with the whole asphaltene lying in between. At the air-water interface a monolayer of the low-molecular-weight asphaltene relaxes at a faster rate than one of the high-molecular-weight asphaltene.

  5. Toward air-stable multilayer phosphorene thin-films and transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-Seok; Liu, Yingnan; Zhu, Weinan; Kim, Seohee; Wu, Di; Tao, Li; Dodabalapur, Ananth; Lai, Keji; Akinwande, Deji

    2015-03-11

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP), also known as phosphorene, is poised to be the most attractive graphene analogue owing to its high mobility approaching that of graphene, and its thickness-tunable band gap that can be as large as that of molybdenum disulfide. In essence, phosphorene represents the much sought after high-mobility, large direct band gap two-dimensional layered crystal that is ideal for optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability in air is of paramount concern for practical applications. Here, we demonstrate air-stable BP devices with dielectric and hydrophobic encapsulation. Microscopy, spectroscopy, and transport techniques were employed to elucidate the aging mechanism, which can initiate from the BP surface for bare samples, or edges for samples with thin dielectric coating, highlighting the ineffectiveness of conventional scaled dielectrics. Our months-long studies indicate that a double layer capping of Al2O3 and hydrophobic fluoropolymer affords BP devices and transistors with indefinite air-stability for the first time, overcoming a critical material challenge for applied research and development.

  6. 4. COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, DETAIL OF THRUST MOUNTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND, DETAIL OF THRUST MOUNTING STRUCTURE AT ENGINE END OF PLANE. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. Thrusting and sedimentation along an emergent thrust front: an example from the External Sierras of the Southern Pyrenees, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasio, D.J.; De Paor, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Depending on the relative rates of thrusting and erosion, emergent thrusts, like glaciers, may advance or retreat while continually moving forward. The relative rates of thrusting and erosion as a thrust ruptures the land surface also control the mountain front geometry. For listric thrusts, the high angle of intersection with the land surface results in primarily upward rather than horizontal movement. If thrust movement is much faster than the prevailing erosion a large emergent toe will develop as the thrust sheet advances over its synorogenic deposits. Alternatively, if the erosion rates are generally faster than thrusting, synorogenic deposits will progressively onlap onto a receding mountain front. Comparable rates of thrusting and erosion result in steady state uplift and denudation. In the External Sierras the thrust front reached the synorogenic surface during the Paleogene and resulted in the accumulation of thick synorogenic deposits. Relatively slow rates of thrusting (<1mm/a) and uplift (<0.5mm/a) of the External Sierras, coupled with moderate erosion rates resulted in a near stationary mountain front. Despite this, temporal and spatial fluctuations in the thrusting resulted in three different mountain front geometries. In places, the thrust front has been buried by molasse, elsewhere, the emergent thrust sheet has deformed its proximal molasse by bulldozing, producing deposits analogous to push moraines, and in other places the frontal thrust has overridden its molasse. Striated cobbles within the molasse immediately below the frontal thrust may have functioned like ball bearings, reducing the friction with the overriding thrust sheet.

  8. Static investigation of two fluidic thrust-vectoring concepts on a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.

    1994-01-01

    A static investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel of two thrust-vectoring concepts which utilize fluidic mechanisms for deflecting the jet of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzle. One concept involved using the Coanda effect to turn a sheet of injected secondary air along a curved sidewall flap and, through entrainment, draw the primary jet in the same direction to produce yaw thrust vectoring. The other concept involved deflecting the primary jet to produce pitch thrust vectoring by injecting secondary air through a transverse slot in the divergent flap, creating an oblique shock in the divergent channel. Utilizing the Coanda effect to produce yaw thrust vectoring was largely unsuccessful. Small vector angles were produced at low primary nozzle pressure ratios, probably because the momentum of the primary jet was low. Significant pitch thrust vector angles were produced by injecting secondary flow through a slot in the divergent flap. Thrust vector angle decreased with increasing nozzle pressure ratio but moderate levels were maintained at the highest nozzle pressure ratio tested. Thrust performance generally increased at low nozzle pressure ratios and decreased near the design pressure ratio with the addition of secondary flow.

  9. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket Booster Disassembly & Refurbishment Complex, Thrust Vector Control Deservicing Facility, Hangar Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. Impact of air-exposure on the chemical and electronic structure ofZnO:Zn3N2 thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Bar, M.; Ahn, K.-S.; Shet, S.; Yan, Y.; Weinhardt, L.; Fuchs, O.; Blum, M.; Pookpanratana, S.; George, K.; Yang, W.; Denlinger, J.D.; Al-Jassim, M.; Heske, C.

    2008-09-08

    The chemical and electronic surface structure of ZnO:Zn3N2 ("ZnO:N") thin films with different N contents was investigated by soft x-ray emission spectroscopy. Upon exposure to ambient air (in contrast to storage in vacuum), the chemical and electronic surface structure of the ZnO:N films changes substantially. In particular, we find that the Zn3N2/(Zn3N2+ZnO) ratio decreases with exposure time and that this change depends on the initial N content. We suggest a degradation mechanism based on the reaction of the Zn3N2 content with atmospheric humidity.

  11. Combined effect of grid turbulence and unsteady wake on film effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient of a gas turbine blade with air and CO{sub 2} film injection

    SciTech Connect

    Ekkad, S.V.; Mehendale, A.B.; Han, J.C.; Lee, C.P.

    1997-07-01

    Experiments were performed to study the combined effect of grid turbulence and unsteady wake on film effectiveness and heat transfer coefficient of a turbine blade model. Tests were done on a five-blade linear cascade at the chord Reynolds number of 3.0 {times} 10{sup 5} at cascade inlet. Several combinations of turbulence grids, their locations, and unsteady wake strengths were used to generate various upstream turbulence conditions. The test blade had three rows of film holes in the leading edge region and two rows each on the pressure and suction surfaces. Air and CO{sub 2} were used as injectants. Results show that Nusselt numbers for a blade with film injection are much higher than that without film holes. An increase in mainstream turbulence level causes an increase in Nusselt numbers and a decrease in film effectiveness over most of the blade surface, for both density injectants, and at all blowing ratios. A free-stream turbulence superimposed on an unsteady wake significantly affects Nusselt numbers and film effectiveness compared with only an unsteady wake condition.

  12. On the Thrust of a Single Electrode Electrohydrodynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilit', Tomáš; Váry, Michal; Valko, Pavol

    2015-03-01

    Linear thrust generation by a single pin emitter electrode under AC excitation has been studied. Presented are thrust measurements of a single electrode thruster, in comparison with classical, two electrode electrohydrodynamic thruster. The experiments show comparable thrust for both configurations at low voltage levels, suggesting higher thrust-to-weight ratio of single electrode thrusters at low applied voltages. Further, a hypothesis of single electrode thrust creation is proposed.

  13. Combustion effects on film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.; Ewen, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of: (1) a reactive environment on film cooling effectiveness, and (2) film cooling on rocket engine performance were determined experimentally in a rocket thrust chamber assembly operating with hydrogen and oxygen propellants at 300 psi chamber pressure. Tests were conducted using hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen film coolants in an instrumented, thin walled, steel thrust chamber. The film cooling, performance loss, and heat transfer coefficient data were correlated with the ALRC entrainment film cooling model which relates film coolant effectiveness and mixture ratio at the wall to the amount of mainstream gases entrained with the film coolant in a mixing layer. In addition, a comprehensive thermal analysis computer program, HOCOOL, was prepared from previously existing ALRC computer programs and analytical techniques.

  14. Film effectiveness over a flat surface with air and CO{sub 2} injection through compound angle holes using a transient liquid crystal image method

    SciTech Connect

    Ekkad, S.V.; Zapata, D.; Han, J.C.

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents detailed film effectiveness distributions over a flat surface with one row of injection holes inclined streamwise at 35 deg for three blowing ratios (M = 0.5, 1.0, 2.0). Three compound angles of 0, 45, and 90 deg with air (D.R. = 0.98) and CO{sub 2} (D.R. = 1.46) as coolants are tested at an elevated free-stream turbulence condition (Tu {approx} 8.5%). A transient liquid crystal technique is used to measure local heat transfer coefficients and film effectiveness. Detailed film effectiveness results are presented near and around film injection holes. Compound angle injection provides higher film effectiveness than simple angle injection for both coolants. Higher density injectant produces higher effectiveness for simple injection. However, lower density coolant produces higher effectiveness obtained using the transient liquid crystal technique, particularly in the near-hole region, provided a better understanding of the film cooling process in gas turbine components.

  15. Effect of substrate roughness and working pressure on photocatalyst of N-doped TiOx films prepared by reactive sputtering with air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seon-Hong; Yamasue, Eiji; Okumura, Hideyuki; Ishihara, Keiichi N.

    2015-01-01

    N-doped TiOx films on the glass substrate were prepared by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron reactive sputtering of Ti target in a mixed gas of argon and dry air. The effect of substrate roughness and working pressure on the physical properties and the photocatalytic properties of the N-doped TiOx films was investigated. The surface roughness of glass substrate has little influence on the film properties such as produced phases, lattice parameters, introduced nitrogen contents, and atomic bonding configurations, but significant influence on the surface roughness of film resulting in the variation of the photocatalytic ability. The working pressure has little influence on the produced phases and the atomic bonding configurations, but significant influence on the atomic concentration of the N-doped TiOx film, resulting in the large variation of optical, structural, and photocatalytic properties. It is suggested that the high photocatalysis of N-doped TiOx film requires a certain range of the N doping concentration which shows the interstitial complex N doping states in TiO2.

  16. X-ray Lithography on Perovskite Nanocrystals Films: From Patterning with Anion-Exchange Reactions to Enhanced Stability in Air and Water

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Films of colloidal CsPbX3 (X = I, Br or Cl) nanocrystals, prepared by solution drop-casting or spin-coating on a silicon substrate, were exposed to a low flux of X-rays from an X-ray photoelectron spectrometer source, causing intermolecular C=C bonding of the organic ligands that coat the surface of the nanocrystals. This transformation of the ligand shell resulted in a greater stability of the film, which translated into the following features: (i) Insolubility of the exposed regions in organic solvents which caused instead complete dissolution of the unexposed regions. This enabled the fabrication of stable and strongly fluorescent patterns over millimeter scale areas. (ii) Inhibition of the irradiated regions toward halide anion exchange reactions, when the films were exposed either to halide anions in solution or to hydrohalic vapors. This feature was exploited to create patterned regions of different CsPbIxBryClz compositions, starting from a film with homogeneous CsPbX3 composition. (iii) Resistance of the films to degradation caused by exposure to air and moisture, which represents one of the major drawbacks for the integration of these materials in devices. (iv) Stability of the film in water and biological buffer, which can open interesting perspectives for applications of halide perovskite nanocrystals in aqueous environments. PMID:26617344

  17. Aqueous chemical growth of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films: Air annealing and photoelectrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shinde, N.M.; Deshmukh, P.R.; Patil, S.V.; Lokhande, C.D.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Facile and efficient route for synthesis of CZTS film. ► Effect of annealing on structural, morphological and electrical properties of CZTS films. ► Solar cell study. - Abstract: In present investigation, Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} (CZTS) thin films have been deposited on to glass substrates by novel chemical successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The effect of air annealing in the temperature range between 573 and 773 K on the structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties has been studied. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of polycrystalline CZTS films. The surface morphological study showed smooth, compact and uniform film formation after annealing formation. The band gap was in between range from 1.5 to 1.8 eV depending on annealing temperature. The thermo emf measurement revealed that the CZTS exhibits p-type electrical conductivity. Further, photoactivity of CZTS thin films was tested by forming the photoelectrochemical cell.

  18. Few-cycle pulse laser-induced damage of thin films in air and vacuum ambience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafka, Kyle R. P.; Talisa, Noah; Tempea, Gabriel; Austin, Drake R.; Neacsu, Catalin; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced damage mechanisms were investigated for an ultra-broadband chirped mirror, as part of a systematic study of few-cycle pulse laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of widely-used ultra-broadband optics, in vacuum and in air, for single and multi-pulse regimes (S-on-1). Microscopic analysis of damage morphology suggests that three different damage mechanisms occur across the fluence range 0.15-0.4J/cm2, while no ablation was yet observed. The three regimes resulted in shallow swelling (< 10 nm tall), tall blistering ( 150 nm tall), and annular blistering (damage suppressed at highest intensity, forming a ring shape). Descriptions of the potential mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, T. E.; Jones, J. E.; Cox, M. D.

    2004-01-01

    An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting thrusters with total mass of up to 125 kg and 1 mN to 1 N thrust levels has been developed and tested. The mechanical design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that transforms horizontal motion into amplified vertical motion, with accommodation for variable displacement sensitivity. Unlike conventional hanging pendulum thrust stands, the deflection is independent of the length of the pendulum arm, and no reference structure is required at the end of the pendulum. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer. Mechanical oscillations are attenuated using a passive, eddy current damper. An on-board microprocessor-based level control system, which includes a two axis accelerometer and two linear-displacement stepper motors, continuously maintains the level of the balance mechanism - counteracting mechanical %era drift during thruster testing. A thermal control system, which includes heat exchange panels, thermocouples, and a programmable recirculating water chiller, continuously adjusts to varying thermal loads to maintain the balance mechanism temperature, to counteract thermal drifts. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady state calibration both prior to and during thruster testing. Thrust measurements were carried out on a well-characterized 1 kW Hall thruster; the thrust stand was shown to produce repeatable results consistent with previously published performance data.

  20. Vorticity dynamics and thrust during VRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, Omer; Green, Richard; Caradonna, Francis

    2007-11-01

    Under certain conditions of rapid descent of a rotorcraft, the vortices that usually trail below a rotor disk to form the helical vortex wake collapse into a ring-like structure around the plane of the disk, which is known as the vortex ring state (VRS). The formation and subsequent breakdown of the ring-like vortex is accompanied by large thrust excursions. In axial descent the thrust excursions are aperiodic, while in non-axial descent a periodicity on the order of several tens of rotor revolutions is observed. We discuss here experimental observations of the phase relation between the thrust cycle and vorticity distribution. The experiments were performed in a towing tank using a three-blade rotor. Rotor thrust was measured by strain gages and the vorticity fields using PIV. The flow structure as marked by vorticity distribution highlight the changes in the flow topology during the VRS cycles contrast the flow behavior at the leading and the trailing edges. The flow over the trailing edge exhibits large variations, whereas that over the leading edge is more tamed. Maxima of the VRS thrust oscillations correlate well with the maxima of enstrophy observed at the trailing edge of the rotor disk.

  1. Thrust distribution for attitude control in a variable thrust propulsion system with four ACS nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yeerang; Lee, Wonsuk; Bang, Hyochoong; Lee, Hosung

    2017-04-01

    A thrust distribution approach is proposed in this paper for a variable thrust solid propulsion system with an attitude control system (ACS) that uses a reduced number of nozzles for a three-axis attitude maneuver. Although a conventional variable thrust solid propulsion system needs six ACS nozzles, this paper proposes a thrust system with four ACS nozzles to reduce the complexity and mass of the system. The performance of the new system was analyzed with numerical simulations, and the results show that the performance of the system with four ACS nozzles was similar to the original system while the mass of the whole system was simultaneously reduced. Moreover, a feasibility analysis was performed to determine whether a thrust system with three ACS nozzles is possible.

  2. Static performance of a cruciform nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring and reverse-thrust capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wing, David J.; Asbury, Scott C.

    1992-01-01

    A multiaxis thrust vectoring nozzle designed to have equal flow turning capability in pitch and yaw was conceived and experimentally tested for internal, static performance. The cruciform-shaped convergent-divergent nozzle turned the flow for thrust vectoring by deflecting the divergent surfaces of the nozzle, called flaps. Methods for eliminating physical interference between pitch and yaw flaps at the larger multiaxis deflection angles was studied. These methods included restricting the pitch flaps from the path of the yaw flaps and shifting the flow path at the throat off the nozzle centerline to permit larger pitch-flap deflections without interfering with the operation of the yaw flaps. Two flap widths were tested at both dry and afterburning settings. Vertical and reverse thrust configurations at dry power were also tested. Comparison with two dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles showed lower but still competitive thrust performance and thrust vectoring capability.

  3. Investigation into the optoelectrical properties of tungsten oxide thin films annealed in an oxygen air

    SciTech Connect

    Arfaoui, A.; Ouni, B. Touihri, S.; Mannoubi, T.

    2014-12-15

    Tungsten oxide (WO{sub x}) thin film have been deposited onto glass substrates using the thermal vacuum evaporation technique, monitored by an annealing process in a variable oxygen atmosphere. Analysis by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed the structural changes from orthorhombic to monoclinic which depend on the annealing temperature and the oxygen content. AFM study shows that the increase of oxygen content leads to a decrease of the root-mean-square from 94.64 nm to 2 nm. Ellipsometric measurements have been used to evaluate the optical constants. Further, it is found that when the oxygen content increases, the band gap of the annealed layer varies from 3.01 eV to 3.52 eV by against, the Urbach energy decreases. The AC conductivity plot showed a universal power law according to the Jonscher model. Moreover, at high frequency semiconductor-to-metallic behavior has been observed. Finally, the effect of annealing in oxygen atmosphere on their structural modifications, morphological, optical properties and electrical conductivity are reported.

  4. Earthquake Surface Rupture of the Salt Range Thrust at the Himalayan Thrust Front in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigs, A.; Yule, J. D.; Madden, C.; Yeats, R.; Hussain, A.; Akhtar, S. S.; Latif, A.; Waliullah, A.; Ashraf, M.; Ramzan, S.; Dasti, N.

    2007-12-01

    Considerable evidence from Nepal and India now indicates that the basal detachment of the Himalaya produces great earthquakes that result in large coseismic displacements at the thrust front in India and Nepal (the Main Frontal thrust). In contrast, knowledge of the earthquake potential of the Salt Range thrust in Pakistan (SRT) is virtually absent. It has been clear since the publication of the Salt Range maps of Gee (1989) that the SRT deforms young surficial deposits and is an active fault. What remains uncertain is whether surface rupturing events occur on the SRT, with what frequency those events occur, and what is the size of the associated earthquakes. In a field reconnaissance of the SRT in Spring, 2007, we were able to confirm that this thrust is an active fault, and we discovered numerous localities where the fault nearly reaches the surface, cutting all but the youngest few meters of colluvial deposits. Whereas our observations suggest that surface rupturing events occur on the SRT, a number of characteristics of the Pakistani Himalaya suggests the earthquake behavior of the basal detachment and thrust front may be substantially different than it is in India and Nepal to the southeast. Key differences include an uncertain, but lower, convergence rate at the thrust front (5 to 13 mm/yr), a low tapered thrust wedge, and localization of the basal detachment in a weak evaporite unit. In this sense, the front of the Zagros fold-and-thrust belt in Iran may be a more appropriate analog for the thrust front in Pakistan than the Himalayan thrust front to the southeast. Future mapping of deformed geomorphic surfaces and paleoseismic trenching along the SRT will provide the first direct evidence of the earthquake potential and recurrence of plate- boundary earthquakes in Pakistan. This knowledge is critical for hazard assessment in north-central Pakistan where more than 7 million people are likely to be affected by a great earthquake on the plate boundary.

  5. Oil-Free Turbomachinery Research Enhanced by Thrust Bearing Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center s Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team is developing aircraft turbine engines that will not require an oil lubrication system. Oil systems are required today to lubricate rolling-element bearings used by the turbine and fan shafts. For the Oil-Free Turbomachinery concept, researchers combined the most advanced foil (air) bearings from industry with NASA-developed high-temperature solid lubricant technology. In 1999, the world s first Oil-Free turbocharger was demonstrated using these technologies. Now we are working with industry to demonstrate Oil-Free turbomachinery technology in a small business jet engine, the EJ-22 produced by Williams International and developed during Glenn s recently concluded General Aviation Propulsion (GAP) program. Eliminating the oil system in this engine will make it simpler, lighter (approximately 15 percent), more reliable, and less costly to purchase and maintain. Propulsion gas turbines will place high demands on foil air bearings, especially the thrust bearings. Up until now, the Oil-Free Turbomachinery research team only had the capability to test radial, journal bearings. This research has resulted in major improvements in the bearings performance, but journal bearings are cylindrical, and can only support radial shaft loads. To counteract axial thrust loads, thrust foil bearings, which are disk shaped, are required. Since relatively little research has been conducted on thrust foil air bearings, their performance lags behind that of journal bearings.

  6. An Oil-Free Thrust Foil Bearing Facility Design, Calibration, and Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steve

    2005-01-01

    New testing capabilities are needed in order to foster thrust foil air bearing technology development and aid its transition into future Oil-Free gas turbines. This paper describes a new test apparatus capable of testing thrust foil air bearings up to 100 mm in diameter at speeds to 80,000 rpm and temperatures to 650 C (1200 F). Measured parameters include bearing torque, load capacity, and bearing temperatures. This data will be used for design performance evaluations and for validation of foil bearing models. Preliminary test results demonstrate that the rig is capable of testing thrust foil air bearings under a wide range of conditions which are anticipated in future Oil-Free gas turbines. Torque as a function of speed and temperature corroborates results expected from rudimentary performance models. A number of bearings were intentionally failed with no resultant damage whatsoever to the test rig. Several test conditions (specific speeds and loads) revealed undesirable axial shaft vibrations which have been attributed to the magnetic bearing control system and are under study. Based upon these preliminary results, this test rig will be a valuable tool for thrust foil bearing research, parametric studies and technology development.

  7. Influence of variable thrust parameters on swirl injector fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenny, Robert J.

    Current swirl injector design methodologies do not consider elevated chamber pressure and less than design mass flow rate operation found in variable thrust liquid rocket engines. The objective of this work is to study the effects of elevated chamber pressure and off-design mass flow rate operation on swirl injector fluid mechanics. Using a high pressure chamber, water flowed through a swirl injector at various combinations of elevated chamber pressure and reduced mass flow rate. The optically-accessible swirl injector allowed for determination of the film thickness profile down the swirl injector nozzle section. High speed video and digital stills showed significant increases in the film thickness profile at high chamber pressure and low mass flow rate operation. At prescribed combinations of chamber pressure and mass flow rate, a jump was noted in the film thickness profile. This jump was assumed related to a vortex breakdown phenomenon. Measured injector discharge coefficient values showed different trends with increasing chamber pressure at low mass flow rate operation as opposed to near-design mass flow rate operation. Downstream spray angles showed classic changes in morphology as the mass flow rate was decreased below the design value. Increasing chamber pressure worked to decrease the spray angle at any injection mass flow rate. A new set of fundamental relations linking swirl injector design parameters to injector geometry and flow conditions were derived. Impacts of the research findings to the swirl injector design process were assessed.

  8. Magnetic thrust bearing operation and industrial pump application

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Maslen, E.H.; Lewis, D.W.; Flack, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic bearings represent a new bearing technology, which has some advantages over conventional fluid film and rolling element bearings for some applications. The paper describes the basic concepts of magnetic thrust bearing operation involving the magnetic actuator, electronic controls, power amplifier, and sensor. The magnetic actuator is a magnetic circuit, which generates attractive forces. These support the rotating shaft. While it is often thought that magnetic bearings are highly nonlinear devices, this paper demonstrates that they are linear in both the perturbation flux and current when used in a double acting configuration. Electronic feedback controls are used to stabilize the bearing. Example design parameters are presented for an application to an industrial canned motor pump.

  9. Temperature Mapping of Air Film-Cooled Thermal Barrier Coated Surfaces Using Cr-Doped GdAlO3 Phosphor Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Shyam, Vikram; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    It has been recently shown that the high luminescence intensity from a Cr-doped GdAlO3 (Cr:GdAlO3) thermographic phosphor enables non-rastered full-field temperature mapping of thermal barrier coating (TBC) surfaces to temperatures above 1000C. In this presentation, temperature mapping by Cr:GdAlO3 based phosphor thermometry of air film-cooled TBC-coated surfaces is demonstrated for both scaled-up cooling hole geometries as well as for actual components in a burner rig test environment. The effects of thermal background radiation and flame chemiluminescence on the measurements are investigated, and advantages of this method over infrared thermography as well as the limitations of this method for studying air film cooling are discussed.

  10. Status of Low Thrust Work at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Condon, Gerald L.

    2004-01-01

    High performance low thrust (solar electric, nuclear electric, variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket) propulsion offers a significant benefit to NASA missions beyond low Earth orbit. As NASA (e.g., Prometheus Project) endeavors to develop these propulsion systems and associated power supplies, it becomes necessary to develop a refined trajectory design capability that will allow engineers to develop future robotic and human mission designs that take advantage of this new technology. This ongoing work addresses development of a trajectory design and optimization tool for assessing low thrust (and other types) trajectories. This work targets to advance the state of the art, enable future NASA missions, enable science drivers, and enhance education. This presentation provides a summary of the low thrust-related JSC activities under the ISP program and specifically, provides a look at a new release of a multi-gravity, multispacecraft trajectory optimization tool (Copernicus) along with analysis performed using this tool over the past year.

  11. Pulsed thrust measurements using electromagnetic calibration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Haibin; Shi Chenbo; Zhang Xin'ai; Zhang Zun; Cheng Jiao

    2011-03-15

    A thrust stand for accurately measuring impulse bits, which ranged from 10-1000 {mu}N s using a noncontact electromagnetic calibration technique is described. In particular, a permanent magnet structure was designed to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a multiturn coil was made to produce a calibration force less than 10 mN. The electromagnetic calibration force for pulsed thrust measurements was linear to the coil current and changed less than 2.5% when the distance between the coil and magnet changed 6 mm. A pulsed plasma thruster was first tested on the thrust stand, and afterward five single impulse bits were measured to give a 310 {mu}N s average impulse bit. Uncertainty of the measured impulse bit was analyzed to evaluate the quality of the measurement and was found to be 10 {mu}N s with 95% credibility.

  12. Functionalization of Hydrogen-free Diamond-like Carbon Films using Open-air Dielectric Barrier Discharge Atmospheric Plasma Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA; Instituto de Materiales de Madrid, C.S.I.C., Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid, Spain; Instituto de Quimica-Fisica"Rocasolano"C.S.I.C., 28006 Madrid, Spain; Mahasarakham University, Mahasarakham 44150, Thailand; CASTI, CNR-INFM Regional Laboratory, L'Aquila 67100, Italy; SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA; Endrino, Jose; Endrino, J. L.; Marco, J. F.; Poolcharuansin, P.; Phani, A.R.; Allen, M.; Albella, J. M.; Anders, A.

    2007-12-28

    A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique has been employed to produce uniform atmospheric plasmas of He and N2 gas mixtures in open air in order to functionalize the surface of filtered-arc deposited hydrogen-free diamond-like carbon (DLC) films. XPS measurements were carried out on both untreated and He/N2 DBD plasma treated DLC surfaces. Chemical states of the C 1s and N 1s peaks were collected and used to characterize the surface bonds. Contact angle measurements were also used to record the short- and long-term variations in wettability of treated and untreated DLC. In addition, cell viability tests were performed to determine the influence of various He/N2 atmospheric plasma treatments on the attachment of osteoblast MC3T3 cells. Current evidence shows the feasibility of atmospheric plasmas in producing long-lasting variations in the surface bonding and surface energy of hydrogen-free DLC and consequently the potential for this technique in the functionalization of DLC coated devices.

  13. Superhydrophobic metallic surfaces functionalized via femtosecond laser surface processing for long term air film retention when submerged in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhlke, Craig A.; Anderson, Troy P.; Li, Pengbo; Lucis, Michael J.; Roth, Nick; Shield, Jeffrey E.; Terry, Benjamin; Alexander, Dennis R.

    2015-03-01

    Femtosecond laser surface processing (FLSP) is a powerful technique used to create self-organized microstructures with nanoscale features on metallic surfaces. By combining FLSP surface texturing with surface chemistry changes, either induced by the femtosecond laser during processing or introduced through post processing techniques, the wetting properties of metals can be altered. In this work, FLSP is demonstrated as a technique to create superhydrophobic surfaces on grade 2 titanium and 304 stainless steel that can retain an air film (plastron) between the surface and a surrounding liquid when completely submerged. It is shown that the plastron lifetime when submerged in distilled water or synthetic stomach acid is critically dependent on the specific degree of surface micro- and nano-roughness, which can be tuned by controlling various FLSP parameters. The longest plastron lifetime was on a 304 stainless steel sample that was submerged in distilled water and maintained a plastron for 41 days, the length of time of the study, with no signs of degradation. Also demonstrated for the first time is the precise control of pulse fluence and pulse count to produce three unique classes of surface micron/nano-structuring on titanium.

  14. Small field diode correction factors derived using an air core fibre optic scintillation dosimeter and EBT2 film.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Anna; Liu, Paul; Warrener, Kirbie; McKenzie, David; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2012-05-07

    There is no commercially available real-time dosimeter that can accurately measure output factors for field sizes down to 4 mm without the use of correction factors. Silicon diode detectors are commonly used but are not dosimetrically water equivalent, resulting in energy dependence and fluence perturbation. In contrast, plastic scintillators are nearly dosimetrically water equivalent. A fibre optic dosimeter (FOD) with a 0.8 mm(3) plastic scintillator coupled to an air core light guide was used to measure the output factors for Novalis/BrainLab stereotactic cones of diameter 4-30 mm and Novalis MLC fields of width 5-100 mm. The FOD data matched the output factors measured by a 0.125 cm(3) Semiflex ion chamber for the MLC fields above 30 mm and those measured with the EBT2 radiochromic film for the cones and MLC fields below 30 mm. Relative detector readings were obtained with four diode types (IBA SFD, EFD, PFD, PTW 60012) for the same fields. Empirical diode correction factors were determined by taking the ratio of FOD output factors to diode relative detector readings. The diodes were found to over-respond by 3%-16% for the smallest field. There was good agreement between different diodes of the same model number.

  15. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion

  16. Genesis of Bénard-Marangoni Patterns in Thin Liquid Films Drying into Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colinet, P.; Chauvet, F.; Dehaeck, S.

    Inspired by many years of motivating collaboration between the first author and Prof. Manuel G. Velarde, in the field of surface-tension-driven instabilities, pattern formation, and transition to turbulence, this paper presents recent experimental results obtained in collaboration with the second and third authors at the TIPs laboratory in Brussels. Namely, the evolution of Bénard-like patterns is explored for pure liquid layers evaporating into air, from chaotic regimes down to more stable structures with predominant hexagonal symmetry. Drying liquid layers indeed appear as a particularly simple example of system where, due to the decreasing liquid depth, the preferred wavelength of the pattern is continuously decreased in time, hence requiring perpetual creation of new convective cells. Such pattern "genesis" appears to lead to disordered structures with interesting characteristics, whose preliminary experimental investigation is carried out here. This paper is dedicated to Prof. Manuel G. Velarde, at the occasion of his 70th birthday, as a mark of deep gratitude for all positive scientific and cultural influences he had and he still has on many young scientists.

  17. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    At present, actuation systems for the Thrust Vector Control (TVC) for launch vehicles are hydraulic systems. The Advanced Launch System (ALS), a joint initiative between NASA and the Air Force, is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost effective, highly reliable and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. As part of this initiative, an electromechanical actuation system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems used today. NASA-Lewis is developing and demonstrating an Induction Motor Controller Actuation System with a 40 hp peak rating. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) technology and Pulse Population Modulation (PPM) techniques to implement Field Oriented Vector Control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. Through PPM, multiphase variable frequency, variable voltage waveforms can be synthesized from the 20 kHz source. FOVC shows that varying both the voltage and frequency and their ratio (V/F), permits independent control of both torque and speed while operating at maximum efficiency at any point on the torque-speed curve. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a Built-in Test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA TVC system. The design and fabrication of the motor controller is being done by General Dynamics Space Systems Division. The University of Wisconsin-Madison will assist in the design of the advanced induction motor and in the implementation of the FOVC theory. A 75 hp electronically controlled dynamometer will be used to test the motor controller in all four quadrants of operation using flight type

  18. Friction losses in a lubricated thrust-loaded cageless angular-contract bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Allen, C. W.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1973-01-01

    The NASA spinning torque apparatus was modified to measure the spinning torque on a cageless ball thrust bearing. Friction torque was measured for thrust loads varying from 44.5 to 403 newtons (10 to 90 lb) at speeds of 1000, 2000, and 3000 rpm. Tests were conducted with di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate and a synthetic paraffinic oil. These tests were run with either oil jet lubrication or with a thin surface film of lubricant only. An analytical model which included rolling resistance was developed and extended from previous models for spinning torque and lubricant rheology. The model was extended by the inclusion of rolling resistance. The computed values were in fair agreement with the experimental results and confirmed previous hypotheses that a thin lubricant film gives minimum bearing torque and an oil jet flow of a viscous lubricant will result in considerable rolling torque in addition to the torque due to ball spin.

  19. SEP thrust subsystem performance sensitivity analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, K. L.; Sauer, C. G., Jr.; Kerrisk, D. J.

    1973-01-01

    This is a two-part report on solar electric propulsion (SEP) performance sensitivity analysis. The first part describes the preliminary analysis of the SEP thrust system performance for an Encke rendezvous mission. A detailed description of thrust subsystem hardware tolerances on mission performance is included together with nominal spacecraft parameters based on these tolerances. The second part describes the method of analysis and graphical techniques used in generating the data for Part 1. Included is a description of both the trajectory program used and the additional software developed for this analysis. Part 2 also includes a comprehensive description of the use of the graphical techniques employed in this performance analysis.

  20. The induced thrust effect - A propulsion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pais, Salvatore C.

    1991-09-01

    The 'induced thrust' (IT) method whose theoretical fundamentals and basic implementation are presented is applicable to both nuclear and chemical rocket-propulsion systems. IT principles are illustrated in the framework of the back-to-back 'joined ship' model, in which the combustion chamber pressure within one vehicle is caused to act as the back pressure of the other vehicle to which it is joined (and vice versa). The IT impulse generated by mutual plume impingement as the vehicles move away from each other constitutes an additional propulsive force which exceeds the individual thrust capacity of the separate powerplants. A unique mathematical algorithm is used to analyze the concept.

  1. Wing design with attainable thrust considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.; Shrout, B. L.; Darden, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    A CAD process that includes leading-edge thrust considerations for wings with high aerodynamic efficiencies is outlined. Rectangular grids are used for evaluation of both subsonic and supersonic pressure loadings. Account is taken of the Mach number, Re, the wing planform, the presence of camber, the airfoil geometry and the locations and forces induced by shed vortices. Optimization techniques are applied to the candidate surfaces in order to consider the attainable thrust. Inclusion of the optimization techniques permits analyses of mission-adaptive wings and various flap systems and the elimination of singularities in the flight envelope.

  2. Thrust chamber thermal barrier coating techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Methods for applying thermal barrier coatings to the hot-gas side wall of rocket thrust chambers in order to significantly reduce the heat transfer in high heat flux regions has been the focus of technology efforts for many years. A successful technique developed by NASA-Lewis that starts with the coating on a mandrel and then builds the thrust chamber around it by electroforming appropriate materials is described. This results in a smooth coating with exceptional adherence, as was demonstrated in hot fire rig tests. The low cycle fatigue life of chambers with coatings applied in this manner was increased dramatically compared to uncoated chambers.

  3. Thrust chamber thermal barrier coating techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quentmeyer, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for applying thermal barrier coatings to the hot-gas side wall of rocket thrust chambers in order to significantly reduce the heat transfer in high heat flux regions was the focus of technology efforts for many years. This paper describes a successful technique developed by the Lewis Research Center that starts with the coating of a mandrel and then builds the thrust chamber around it by electroforming appropriate materials. This results in a smooth coating with exceptional adherence, demonstrated in hot fire rig tests. The low cycle fatigue life of chambers with coatings applied in this manner was increased dramatically compared to uncoated chambers.

  4. Enhanced Optoelectronic Quality of Perovskite Films with Excess CH3NH3I for High-efficient Solar Cells in Ambient Air.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunhai; Lv, Huiru; Cui, Can; Xu, Lingbo; Wang, Peng; Wang, Hao; Yu, Xuegong; Xie, Jiangsheng; Huang, Jiabin; Tang, Zeguo; Yang, Deren

    2017-03-27

    The solution-processed polycrystalline perovskite film contributes critically to the high photovoltaic performance of perovskite based solar cells (PSCs). The inevitable electronic trap states at grain boundaries and the intrinsic defects such as metallic lead (Pb0) and halide vacancies in perovskite film cause serious carrier recombination loss. Furthermore, the film can easily decompose into PbI2 in moisture atmosphere. Here, we introduce a simple strategy through a small increase in methylammonium iodide (CH3NH3I, MAI) molar proportion (5%) for perovskite fabrication in ambient air with a ~50% relative humidity. The analysis of morphology and crystallography demonstrates that excess MAI significantly promotes the grain growth without decomposition. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) shows that no metallic Pb0 exists in the perovskite film and the I/Pb ratio is improved. The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurement indicates an efficient suppression of non-radiative recombination in perovskite layer. As a result, the device yields improved power conversion efficiency (PCE) from 14.06% to 18.26% with reduced hysteresis and higher stability under AM1.5G illumination (100 mW/cm2). This work strongly provides a feasible and low-cost way to develop high-efficient PSCs in ambient air.

  5. A microNewton thrust stand for average thrust measurement of pulsed microthruster.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Jing; Hong, Yan-Ji; Chang, Hao

    2013-12-01

    A torsional thrust stand has been developed for the study of the average thrust for microNewton pulsed thrusters. The main body of the thrust stand mainly consists of a torsional balance, a pair of flexural pivots, a capacitive displacement sensor, a calibration assembly, and an eddy current damper. The behavior of the stand was thoroughly studied. The principle of thrust measurement was analyzed. The average thrust is determined as a function of the average equilibrium angle displacement of the balance and the spring stiffness. The thrust stand has a load capacity up to 10 kg, and it can theoretically measure the force up to 609.6 μN with a resolution of 24.4 nN. The static calibrations were performed based on the calibration assembly composed of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet. The calibration results demonstrated good repeatability (less than 0.68% FSO) and good linearity (less than 0.88% FSO). The assembly of the multiturn coil and the permanent magnet was also used as an exciter to simulate the microthruster to further research the performance of the thrust stand. Three sets of force pulses at 17, 33.5, and 55 Hz with the same amplitude and pulse width were tested. The repeatability error at each frequency was 7.04%, 1.78%, and 5.08%, respectively.

  6. Development of a Lightweight Thrust Chamber Assembly Utilizing In-Situ Reinforced Silicon Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvander, J.; Wherley, B.; Claflin, S.

    1999-06-01

    The paper describes the status of the Light Weight Thrust Chamber Assembly (LWTCA) program currently underway at Boeing Rocketdyne Propulsion and Power, under contract with the US Air Force Research Laboratory. The goal of the program is to demonstrate technology which will lead to a 40% reduction in weight (including the nozzle), a 50% reduction in cost, a 75% reduction in part count and a 3% increase in specific impulse on a full scale, 400 klbf thrust LOX/hydrogen booster engine. The demonstration will be performed through the use of manufacturing technology demonstrator hardware and 60 klbf thrust hot-fire tests. The primary means to achieving these goals is by using in-situ reinforced silicon nitride for structural components. Silicon nitride is an advanced ceramic material that has high specific strength and fracture toughness, and can be cast to near- net part shape. Tests to validate the material properties of in-situ reinforced silicon nitride are discussed, along with the resulting changes to traditional thrust chamber design as a result of the improved properties. The progress towards manufacturing and hot-fire testing a thrust chamber assembly from the material is also described.

  7. Parametric Investigation of Thrust Augmentation by Ejectors on a Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Jack; Sgondea, Alexandru; Paxson, Daniel E.; Rosenthal, Bruce N.

    2006-01-01

    A parametric investigation has been made of thrust augmentation of a 1 in. diameter pulsed detonation tube by ejectors. A set of ejectors was used which permitted variation of the ejector length, diameter, and nose radius, according to a statistical design of experiment scheme. The maximum augmentation ratios for each ejector were fitted using a polynomial response surface, from which the optimum ratios of ejector diameter to detonation tube diameter, and ejector length and nose radius to ejector diameter, were found. Thrust augmentation ratios above a factor of 2 were measured. In these tests, the pulsed detonation device was run on approximately stoichiometric air-hydrogen mixtures, at a frequency of 20 Hz. Later measurements at a frequency of 40 Hz gave lower values of thrust augmentation. Measurements of thrust augmentation as a function of ejector entrance to detonation tube exit distance showed two maxima, one with the ejector entrance upstream, and one downstream, of the detonation tube exit. A thrust augmentation of 2.5 was observed using a tapered ejector.

  8. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Bloomer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady-state reverse and forward-to-reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original QCSEE 4-segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30-deg half-angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30-deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress and approximately a 20% improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35% of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff-to-reverse thrust transients.

  9. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  10. Facile and Scalable Fabrication of Highly Efficient Lead Iodide Perovskite Thin-Film Solar Cells in Air Using Gas Pump Method.

    PubMed

    Ding, Bin; Gao, Lili; Liang, Lusheng; Chu, Qianqian; Song, Xiaoxuan; Li, Yan; Yang, Guanjun; Fan, Bin; Wang, Mingkui; Li, Chengxin; Li, Changjiu

    2016-08-10

    Control of the perovskite film formation process to produce high-quality organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite thin films with uniform morphology, high surface coverage, and minimum pinholes is of great importance to highly efficient solar cells. Herein, we report on large-area light-absorbing perovskite films fabrication with a new facile and scalable gas pump method. By decreasing the total pressure in the evaporation environment, the gas pump method can significantly enhance the solvent evaporation rate by 8 times faster and thereby produce an extremely dense, uniform, and full-coverage perovskite thin film. The resulting planar perovskite solar cells can achieve an impressive power conversion efficiency up to 19.00% with an average efficiency of 17.38 ± 0.70% for 32 devices with an area of 5 × 2 mm, 13.91% for devices with a large area up to 1.13 cm(2). The perovskite films can be easily fabricated in air conditions with a relative humidity of 45-55%, which definitely has a promising prospect in industrial application of large-area perovskite solar panels.

  11. Nonhomogeneous surface properties of parylene-C film etched by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 micro-plasma jet in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Xiaolin; Yang, Chunsheng; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-10-01

    Surface properties of parylene-C film etched by an atmospheric pressure He/O2 micro-plasma jet in ambient air were investigated. The morphologies and chemical compositions of the etched surface were analyzed by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS, XPS and ATR-FTIR. The microscopy and SEM images showed the etched surface was nonhomogeneous with six discernable ring patterns from the center to the outside domain, which were composed of (I) a central region; (II) an effective etching region, where almost all of the parylene-C film was removed by the plasma jet with only a little residual parylene-C being functionalized with carboxyl groups (Cdbnd O, Osbnd Cdbnd O-); (III) an inner etching boundary; (IV) a middle etching region, where the film surface was smooth and partially removed; (V) an outer etching boundary, where the surface was decorated with clusters of debris, and (VI) a pristine parylene-C film region. The analysis of the different morphologies and chemical compositions illustrated the different localized etching process in the distinct regions. Besides, the influence of O2 flow rate on the surface properties of the etched parylene-C film was also investigated. Higher volume of O2 tended to weaken the nonhomogeneous characteristics of the etched surface and improve the etched surface quality.

  12. Influence of complex impact of the picosecond electron beam and volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air on the electronic properties of MCT epitaxial films surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoryev, Denis V.; Novikov, Vadim A.; Bezrodnyy, Dmitriy A.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shulepov, Michail A.; Dvoretskii, Sergei A.

    2015-12-01

    In the present report we studied the distribution of surface potential of the HgCdTe epitaxial films grown by molecular beam epitaxy after the impact of picosecond electron beam and volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure air. The surface potential distribution was studied by the Kelvin Force Probe Microscopy. The experimental data obtained for the variation of the contact potential difference (ΔCPD) between the V-defect and the main matrix of the epitaxial film. The investigation of the origin epitaxial films show that variation of the spatial distribution of surface potential in the V-defect region can be related to the variation of the material composition. The experimental data obtained for the irradiated samples show that the mean value of ΔCPD for the original surface differs from the one for the irradiated surface for 55 eV. At the same time the mean value of ΔCPD changes its sign indicating that the original surface of the epitaxial HgCdTe film predominantly contains the grains with increased cadmium content while after the irradiation the grains possess an increased content of mercury. Therefore, during the irradiation process a decrease of the mercury content in the near-surface region of the semiconductor takes place resulting in the alteration of the electrophysical properties in the films near-surface region.

  13. Self-consistent modelling of X-ray photoelectron spectra from air-exposed polycrystalline TiN thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greczynski, G.; Hultman, L.

    2016-11-01

    We present first self-consistent modelling of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) Ti 2p, N 1s, O 1s, and C 1s core level spectra with a cross-peak quantitative agreement for a series of TiN thin films grown by dc magnetron sputtering and oxidized to different extent by varying the venting temperature Tv of the vacuum chamber before removing the deposited samples. So-obtained film series constitute a model case for XPS application studies, where certain degree of atmosphere exposure during sample transfer to the XPS instrument is unavoidable. The challenge is to extract information about surface chemistry without invoking destructive pre-cleaning with noble gas ions. All TiN surfaces are thus analyzed in the as-received state by XPS using monochromatic Al Kα radiation (hν = 1486.6 eV). Details of line shapes and relative peak areas obtained from deconvolution of the reference Ti 2p and N 1 s spectra representative of a native TiN surface serve as an input to model complex core level signals from air-exposed surfaces, where contributions from oxides and oxynitrides make the task very challenging considering the influence of the whole deposition process at hand. The essential part of the presented approach is that the deconvolution process is not only guided by the comparison to the reference binding energy values that often show large spread, but in order to increase reliability of the extracted chemical information the requirement for both qualitative and quantitative self-consistency between component peaks belonging to the same chemical species is imposed across all core-level spectra (including often neglected O 1s and C 1s signals). The relative ratios between contributions from different chemical species vary as a function of Tv presenting a self-consistency check for our model. We propose that the cross-peak self-consistency should be a prerequisite for reliable XPS peak modelling as it enhances credibility of obtained chemical information, while relying

  14. Take-off and propeller thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrenk, Martin

    1933-01-01

    As a result of previous reports, it was endeavored to obtain, along with the truest possible comprehension of the course of thrust, a complete, simple and clear formula for the whole take-off distance up to a certain altitude, which shall give the correct relative weight to all the factors.

  15. Ascent thrust vector control system test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Testing of the Ascent Thrust Vector Control System in support of the Ares 1-X program at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available

  16. AIR Model Preflight Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, H.; Wilson, J. W.; Maiden, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) ER-2 preflight analysis, one of the first attempts to obtain a relatively complete measurement set of the high-altitude radiation level environment, is described in this paper. The primary thrust is to characterize the atmospheric radiation and to define dose levels at high-altitude flight. A secondary thrust is to develop and validate dosimetric techniques and monitoring devices for protecting aircrews. With a few chosen routes, we can measure the experimental results and validate the AIR model predictions. Eventually, as more measurements are made, we gain more understanding about the hazardous radiation environment and acquire more confidence in the prediction models.

  17. Thrust Stand for Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Markusic, Thomas E.; Stanojev, Boris J.; Dehoyos, Amado; Spaun, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    An electric propulsion thrust stand capable of supporting testing of thrusters having a total mass of up to 125 kg and producing thrust levels between 100 microN to 1 N has been developed and tested. The design features a conventional hanging pendulum arm attached to a balance mechanism that converts horizontal deflections produced by the operating thruster into amplified vertical motion of a secondary arm. The level of amplification is changed through adjustment of the location of one of the pivot points linking the system. Response of the system depends on the relative magnitudes of the restoring moments applied by the displaced thruster mass and the twisting torsional pivots connecting the members of the balance mechanism. Displacement is measured using a non-contact, optical linear gap displacement transducer and balance oscillatory motion is attenuated using a passive, eddy-current damper. The thrust stand employs an automated leveling and thermal control system. Pools of liquid gallium are used to deliver power to the thruster without using solid wire connections, which can exert undesirable time-varying forces on the balance. These systems serve to eliminate sources of zero-drift that can occur as the stand thermally or mechanically shifts during the course of an experiment. An in-situ calibration rig allows for steady-state calibration before, during and after thruster operation. Thrust measurements were carried out on a cylindrical Hall thruster that produces mN-level thrust. The measurements were very repeatable, producing results that compare favorably with previously published performance data, but with considerably smaller uncertainty.

  18. Performance of 4600-pound-thrust centrifugal-flow-type turbojet engine with water-alcohol injection at inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasser, Philip W

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the effects of injecting a water-alcohol mixture of 2:1 at the compressor inlet of a centrifugal-flow type turbojet engine was conducted in an altitude test chamber at static sea-level conditions and at an altitude of 20,000 feet with a flight Mach number of 0.78 with an engine operating at rated speed. The net thrust was augmented by 0.16 for both flight conditions with a ratio of injected liquid to air flow of 0.05. Further increases in the liquid-air ratio did not give comparable increases in thrust.

  19. Morphological changes in adsorbed protein films at the air-water interface subjected to large area variations, as observed by brewster angle microscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rong; Dickinson, Eric; Murray, Brent S

    2007-04-24

    Adsorbed films of proteins at the air-water interface have been imaged using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). The proteins beta-lactoglobulin (beta-L) and ovalbumin (OA) were studied at a range of protein concentrations and surface ages at 25.0 degrees C and two pH values (7 and 5) in a Langmuir trough. The adsorbed films were periodically subjected to compression and expansion cycles such that the film area was typically varied between 125% and 50% of the original film area. With beta-L on its own, no structural changes were observable at pH 7. When a low-area fraction (less than 0.01%) of 20 mum polystyrene latex particles was spread at the interface before adsorption of beta-L, the particles became randomly distributed throughout the interface, but after protein adsorption and compression/expansion, the particles highlighted notable structural features not visible in their absence. Such features included the appearance of long (several hundred micrometers or more) folds and cracks in the films, generally oriented at right angles to the direction of compression, and also aggregates of protein and/or particles. Such structuring was more visible the longer the film was aged or at higher initial protein concentrations for shorter adsorption times. At pH 5, close to the isoelectric pH of beta-L, such features were just noticeable in the absence of particles but were much more pronounced than at pH 7 in the presence of particles. Similar experiments with OA revealed even more pronounced structural features, both in the absence and presence of particles, particularly at pH 5 (close to the isoelectric pH of OA also), producing striking stripelike and meshlike domains. Changes in the dilatational elasticity of the films could be correlated with the variations in the structural integrity of the films as observed via BAM. The results indicate that interfacial area changes of this type, typical of those that occur in food colloid processing, will lead to highly

  20. Study on development of ejector of Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) - measurement of thrust -

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, B.; Nakashima, K.; Shigematsu, T.; Morishita, K.

    2009-02-01

    The AUV (Autonomous Under-water Vehicle), which is used for the present seabed investigations, has obtained the thrust with the screw driven by the battery. However, it has a disadvantage because of its size and cost. Therefore, this research is carried out to propose the Bubble Jet Engine (BJE) as an alternative propulsion device. It can directly transform combustion energy into kinetic energy, so it is expected that BJE can also rise the level of propulsion efficiency. This research aims at measuring exhaled mass flow rate and thrust to design ejectors, which become the core of BJE, and exploring practical possibility of BJE. Vertical type gas-water ejector experimental apparatus for measuring water entrainment was employed in order to understand the characteristics of operation conditions, such as inlet distance, air pressure of nozzle, diameter of nozzle, and so on. In addition, experiments for measuring the thrust in the condition of ejector were executed with horizontal type apparatus in water. However, the influence of the ejector to improve thrust can't have been recognized with high-pressure air at room temperature yet.

  1. Direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B.; Rawlin, V.; Weigand, A. J.; Walker, J.

    1975-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement of a 30-cm diameter ion thruster was accomplished by means of a laser interferometer thrust stand. The thruster was supported in a pendulum manner by three 3.65-m long wires. Electrical power was provided by means of 18 mercury filled pots. A movable 23-button planar probe rake was used to determine thrust loss due to ion beam divergence. Values of thrust, thrust loss due to ion beam divergence, and thrust loss due to multiple ionization were measured for ion beam currents ranging from 0.5 A to 2.5 A. Measured thrust values indicate an accuracy of approximately 1% and are in good agreement with thrust values calculated by indirect measurements.

  2. Measured force/current relations in solid magnetic thrust bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Allaire, P.E.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.; Wakefield, W.C.

    1997-01-01

    When magnetic bearings are employed in a pump, compressor, turbine, or other rotating machine, measurement of the current in the bearing coils provides knowledge of the forces imposed on the bearings. This can be a significant indicator of machine problems. Additionally, magnetic bearings can be utilized as a load cell for measuring impeller forces in test rigs. The forces supported by magnetic bearings are directly related to the currents, air gaps, and other parameters in the bearings. This paper discusses the current/force relation for magnetic thrust bearings. Force versus current measurements were made on a particular magnetic bearing in a test rig as the bearing coil currents were cycled at various time rates of change.d the quasi-static force versus current relations were measured for a variety of air gaps and currents. The thrust bearing exhibits a hysteresis effect, which creates a significant difference between the measured force when the current is increasing as compared to that when the current is decreasing. For design current loops, 0.95 A to 2.55 A, at the time rate of change of 0.1 A/s, the difference between increasing and decreasing current curves due to hysteresis ranged from 4 to 8%. If the bearing is operated in small trajectories about a fixed (nonzero) operation point on the F/I (force/current) curve, the scatter in the measurement error could be expected to be on the order of 4%. A quasi-static nonlinear current/force equation was developed to model the data and curve-fit parameters established for the measured data. The effects of coercive force and iron reluctance, obtained from conventional magnetic materials tests, were included to improve the model, but theoretically calculated values from simple magnetic circuit theory do not produce accurate results. Magnetic fringing, leakage, and other effects must be included.

  3. A workflow for 3D model building in fold-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Hannah; Bond, Clare; Butler, Rob

    2016-04-01

    3D geological models can be used in fold-thrust belts for many purposes such as analysing geometric variation in folds, kinematic modelling to restore fold surfaces, generating strain distribution maps and predicting fracture network distribution. We present a workflow for 3D model building using outcrop bedding data, geological maps, Digital Terrain Models (DTM's), air photos and field photographs. We discuss the challenges of software limitations for 3D kinematic restoration and forward modelling in fold-thrust belt settings. We then discuss the sensitivity of model building approaches to the application of 3D geological models in fold-thrust belts for further analysis e.g. changes in along strike fold geometry, restoration using kinematic and geomechanical modelling, strain prediction and Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) modelling. To create 3D models geological maps and bedding data are digitised using Move software; digitised maps and data are then draped onto DTM's. A series of closely spaced cross section lines are selected; the orientation of these is calculated by determining the average orientation of bedding dip direction. Fault and horizon line intersections, along with bedding data from within a narrow margin of the section lines are projected onto each cross section. Field photographs and sketches are integrated into the cross sections to determine thrust angles at the surface. Horizon lines are then constructed using bedding data. Displacement profiles for thrusts are plotted to ensure thrust displacements are valid with respect to neighbouring cross section interpretations; any discrepancies are alleviated by making minor adjustments to horizon and thrust lines, while ensuring that resultant cross section geometries still adhere to bedding data and other field observations. Once the cross sections have been finalised, 3D surfaces are created using the horizon and thrust line interpretations on each cross section. The simple curvature of 3D surfaces

  4. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel burning thrust augmentor. Each fuel burning thrust augmentor, including the nozzle, must— (a) Provide cutoff...

  5. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel burning thrust augmentor. Each fuel burning thrust augmentor, including the nozzle, must— (a) Provide cutoff...

  6. 14 CFR 33.79 - Fuel burning thrust augmentor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Fuel burning thrust augmentor. 33.79... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.79 Fuel burning thrust augmentor. Each fuel burning thrust augmentor, including the nozzle, must— (a) Provide cutoff...

  7. Thrust and Propulsive Efficiency from an Instructive Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    In a typical engineering or physics curriculum, the momentum equation is used for the determination of jet engine thrust. Even a simple thrust analysis requires a heavy emphasis on mathematics that can cause students and engineers to lose a physical perspective on thrust. This article provides for this physical understanding using only static…

  8. Relationship between Biomechanical Characteristics of Spinal Manipulation and Neural Responses in an Animal Model: Effect of Linear Control of Thrust Displacement versus Force, Thrust Amplitude, Thrust Duration, and Thrust Rate.

    PubMed

    Reed, William R; Cao, Dong-Yuan; Long, Cynthia R; Kawchuk, Gregory N; Pickar, Joel G

    2013-01-01

    High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM) is used frequently to treat musculoskeletal complaints. Little is known about the intervention's biomechanical characteristics that determine its clinical benefit. Using an animal preparation, we determined how neural activity from lumbar muscle spindles during a lumbar HVLA-SM is affected by the type of thrust control and by the thrust's amplitude, duration, and rate. A mechanical device was used to apply a linear increase in thrust displacement or force and to control thrust duration. Under displacement control, neural responses during the HVLA-SM increased in a fashion graded with thrust amplitude. Under force control neural responses were similar regardless of the thrust amplitude. Decreasing thrust durations at all thrust amplitudes except the smallest thrust displacement had an overall significant effect on increasing muscle spindle activity during the HVLA-SMs. Under force control, spindle responses specifically and significantly increased between thrust durations of 75 and 150 ms suggesting the presence of a threshold value. Thrust velocities greater than 20-30 mm/s and thrust rates greater than 300 N/s tended to maximize the spindle responses. This study provides a basis for considering biomechanical characteristics of an HVLA-SM that should be measured and reported in clinical efficacy studies to help define effective clinical dosages.

  9. Thrust measurements of a hollow-cathode discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, A.; Banks, B. A.

    1972-01-01

    Thrust measurements of a hollow cathode mercury discharge were made with a synthetic mica target on a torsion pendulum. Thrust measurements were made for various target angles, tip temperatures, flow rates, keeper discharge powers, and accelerator electrode voltages. The experimental thrust data are compared with theoretical values for the case where no discharge power was employed.

  10. An Optimal Performance Design on Lubrication Mechanism at Thrust Slide-Bearing of Scroll Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oku, Tatsuya; Ishii, Noriaki; Anami, Keiko; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Morimoto, Takashi; Iida, Noboru

    This study presents an establishment of optimal design method for lubrication at the thrust slide-bearing of scroll compressors, where, the analysis method using the average Reynolds equation by Patir & Cheng and the solid contact theory by Greenwood & Williamson were applied to calculate the resultant lubrication performance. For given values of friction area, thrust load and orbiting speed, the oil film pressure, the solid contact force and the friction forces were calculated to determine the friction coefficient. The friction coefficient decreased gradually with decreasing the friction area, because of decreased oil viscous force. When the friction area became quite small, however, the influence of the effect of surface roughness became large, thus resulting in increased friction coefficient. Thereby, the optimum performance appeared, which changes according to the friction area. In addition, the optimal friction area changed with the orbiting speed, the thrust load, the oil viscosity and the wedge angle. It was concluded that the optimal design values of the thrust slide-bearing can be calculated for given working conditions of the compressor.

  11. Study on the Conductance and Photo-Conductance of ZnO Thin Films at Different Temperatures in Air and N2-Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burruel-Ibarra, S. E.; Cruz-Vázquez, C.; Bernal, R.; Aceves, R.; Orante-Barrón, V. R.; Grijalva-Monteverde, H.; Piters, T. M.; Castaño, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    We report the photoconductance of ZnO thin films obtained from thermally treated ZnS films grown by a chemical bath deposition method. The measurements of photo-conductance were performed in an atmosphere of air or nitrogen (N2) at different temperatures between 300 K and 375 K. The augmented conductance after ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (330-380 nm) in air fades away slowly to its original value, whereas in a nitrogen atmosphere, a significant part of the augmented conductance remains. Measurements of electrical conductance as a function of temperature in N2 or air, in the dark or the light, seem to indicate that the donor concentration is increased during the UV irradiation, suggesting that oxygen vacancies and interstitials are created. An alternative model for the photoconduction in ZnO is proposed in which the slow increase of conduction during irradiation is explained by an increase of donors instead of photoelectrons. In this model, the photoelectrons would only play a role in the mechanism of the creation of donors.

  12. Measuring Model Rocket Engine Thrust Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, Kim; Slaton, William V.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a method and setup to quickly and easily measure a model rocket engine's thrust curve using a computer data logger and force probe. Horst describes using Vernier's LabPro2 and force probe to measure the rocket engine's thrust curve; however, the method of attaching the rocket to the force probe is not discussed. We show how a simple engine holder can be constructed and used with Vernier's LabPro and force probe to record data that students can use to compare to sample data from the rocket manufacturer or the National Association of Rocketry's3 engine certification sheets, calculate total impulse, and make predictions for model rocket launches. PASCO markets a rocket engine test bracket4 that mounts to its PASPORT force sensor for similar measurements. The engine holder described here is very economical, and all the parts can be obtained from a local hardware store or home center.

  13. NATURAL BARRIERS TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    NA

    2005-07-27

    This booklet contains project descriptions of work performed by the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), Office of Science and Technology and International's (OST&I) Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust during Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The Natural Barriers Targeted Thrust is part of OST&I's Science and Technology Program which supports the OCRWM mission to manage and dispose of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. In general, the projects described will continue beyond FY 2004 assuming that the technical work remains relevant to the proposed Yucca Mountain Repository and sufficient funding is made available to the Science and Technology Program.

  14. MATERIALS PERFORMANCE TARGETED THRUST FY 2004 PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect

    DOE

    2005-09-13

    The Yucca Mountain site was recommended by the President to be a geological repository for commercial spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The multi-barrier approach was adopted for assessing and predicting system behavior, including both natural barriers and engineered barriers. A major component of the long-term strategy for safe disposal of nuclear waste is first to completely isolate the radionuclides in waste packages for long times and then to greatly retard the egress and transport of radionuclides from penetrated packages. The goal of the Materials Performance Targeted Thrust program is to further enhance the understanding of the role of engineered barriers in waste isolation. In addition, the Thrust will explore technical enhancements and seek to offer improvements in materials costs and reliability.

  15. Low-thrust Isp sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison of the cooling requirements and attainable specific impulse performance of engines in the 445 to 4448N thrust class utilizing LOX/RP-1, LOX/Hydrogen and LOX/Methane propellants is presented. The unique design requirements for the regenerative cooling of low-thrust engines operating at high pressures (up to 6894 kPa) were explored analytically by comparing single cooling with the fuel and the oxidizer, and dual cooling with both the fuel and the oxidizer. The effects of coolant channel geometry, chamber length, and contraction ratio on the ability to provide proper cooling were evaluated, as was the resulting specific impulse. The results show that larger contraction ratios and smaller channels are highly desirable for certain propellant combinations.

  16. Thrust production by a mechanical swimming lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, M. C.; Smits, A. J.

    2011-05-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey to investigate the formation of the wake structure, the shedding vorticity from the body, and the relationship between thrust production and pressure on the surface of the robot. The robot mimics the motion of living lamprey in steady swimming by using a programmable microcomputer to actuate 13 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments. This indicates that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined, showing a clear connection between the location of vortex structures and the fluctuations of the pressure signal.

  17. Solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, T. D.

    1973-01-01

    The Solar Electric Propulsion System developed under this program was designed to demonstrate all the thrust subsystem functions needed on an unmanned planetary vehicle. The demonstration included operation of the basic elements, power matching input and output voltage regulation, three-axis thrust vector control, subsystem automatic control including failure detection and correction capability (using a PDP-11 computer), operation of critical elements in thermal-vacuum-, zero-gravity-type propellant storage, and data outputs from all subsystem elements. The subsystem elements, functions, unique features, and test setup are described. General features and capabilities of the test-support data system are also presented. The test program culminated in a 1500-h computer-controlled, system-functional demonstration. This included simultaneous operation of two thruster/power conditioner sets. The results of this testing phase satisfied all the program goals.

  18. Thrust vectoring for lateral-directional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peron, Lee R.; Carpenter, Thomas

    1992-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of using thrust vectoring for lateral-directional control and the effects of reducing the tail size of a single-engine aircraft were investigated. The aerodynamic characteristics of the F-16 aircraft were generated by using the Aerodynamic Preliminary Analysis System II panel code. The resulting lateral-directional linear perturbation analysis of a modified F-16 aircraft with various tail sizes and yaw vectoring was performed at several speeds and altitudes to determine the stability and control trends for the aircraft compared to these trends for a baseline aircraft. A study of the paddle-type turning vane thrust vectoring control system as used on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle is also presented.

  19. Pulsed thrust propellant reorientation - Concept and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, John I.; Patag, Alfredo E.; Korakianitis, T. P.; Chato, David J.

    1992-01-01

    The use of pulsed thrust to optimize the propellant reorientation process is proposed. The ECLIPSE code is used to study the performance of pulsed reorientation in small-scale and full-scale propellant tanks. A dimensional analysis of the process is performed and the resulting dimensionless groups are used to present and correlate the computational predictions of reorientation performance. Based on the results obtained from this study, it is concluded that pulsed thrust reorientation seems to be a feasible technique for optimizing the propellant reorientation process across a wide range of spacecraft, for a variety of missions, for the entire duration of a mission, and with a minimum of hardware design and qualification.

  20. Advanced tube-bundle rocket thrust chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced rocket thrust chamber for future space application is described along with an improved method of fabrication. Potential benefits of the concept are improved cyclic life, reusability, and performance. Performance improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced heat transfer into the coolant which will enable higher chamber pressure in expander cycle engines. Cyclic life, reusability and reliability improvements are anticipated because of the enhanced structural compliance inherent in the construction. The method of construction involves the forming of the combustion chamber with a tube-bundle of high conductivity copper or copper alloy tubes, and the bonding of these tubes by an electroforming operation. Further, the method of fabrication reduces chamber complexity by incorporating manifolds, jackets, and structural stiffeners while having the potential for thrust chamber cost and weight reduction.

  1. Low-thrust mission risk analysis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, C. L.; Smith, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    A computerized multi-stage failure process simulation procedure is used to evaluate the risk in a solar electric space mission. The procedure uses currently available thrust-subsystem reliability data and performs approximate simulations of the thrust subsystem burn operation, the system failure processes, and the retargetting operations. The application of the method is used to assess the risks in carrying out a 1980 rendezvous mission to Comet Encke. Analysis of the results and evaluation of the effects of various risk factors on the mission show that system component failure rates is the limiting factor in attaining a high mission reliability. But it is also shown that a well-designed trajectory and system operation mode can be used effectively to partially compensate for unreliable thruster performance.

  2. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  3. Low thrust viscous nozzle flow fields prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, G. S.; Mo, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes code was developed for low thrust viscous nozzle flow field prediction. An implicit finite volume in an arbitrary curvilinear coordinate system lower-upper (LU) scheme is used to solve the governing Navier-Stokes equations and species transportation equations. Sample calculations of carbon dioxide nozzle flow are presented to verify the validity and efficiency of this code. The computer results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, S.; Effinger, M.; Holmes, R.; Lee, J.; Jaskowiak, M.

    2000-01-01

    Traditional metals like steel and copper alloys have been used for many years to fabricate injector and chamber components of thruster assemblies. While the materials perform well, reducing engine weights would help existing and future vehicles gain performance and payload capability. It may now be possible to reduce current thruster weights up to 50% by applying composite materials. In this task, these materials are being applied to an existing thrust cell design to demonstrate new fabrication processes and potential weight savings. Two ceramic matrix composite (CMC) designs, three polymer matrix composite (PMC) designs, and two metal matrix composite (MMC) designs are being fabricated as small chamber demonstration units. In addition, a new alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is being investigated for thrust chamber liners since it offers higher strength and increased cycle life over traditional alloys. This new alloy is being used for the liner in each MMC and PMC demonstration unit. During June-August of 2000, hot-fire testing of each unit is planned to validate designs in an oxygen/hydrogen environment at chamber pressures around 850 psi. Although the weight savings using CMC materials is expected to be high, they have proven to be much harder to incorporate into chamber designs based on current fabrication efforts. However, the PMC & MMC concepts using the Cu-8Cr-4Nb liner are nearly complete and ready for testing. Additional efforts intend to use the PMC & MMC materials to fabricate a full size thrust chamber (60K lb(sub f) thrust class). The fabrication of this full size unit is expected to be complete by October 2000, followed by hot-fire testing in November-December 2000.

  5. Benchmarking analogue models of brittle thrust wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreurs, Guido; Buiter, Susanne J. H.; Boutelier, Jennifer; Burberry, Caroline; Callot, Jean-Paul; Cavozzi, Cristian; Cerca, Mariano; Chen, Jian-Hong; Cristallini, Ernesto; Cruden, Alexander R.; Cruz, Leonardo; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Da Poian, Gabriela; Garcia, Victor H.; Gomes, Caroline J. S.; Grall, Céline; Guillot, Yannick; Guzmán, Cecilia; Hidayah, Triyani Nur; Hilley, George; Klinkmüller, Matthias; Koyi, Hemin A.; Lu, Chia-Yu; Maillot, Bertrand; Meriaux, Catherine; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Pan, Chang-Chih; Pillot, Daniel; Portillo, Rodrigo; Rosenau, Matthias; Schellart, Wouter P.; Schlische, Roy W.; Take, Andy; Vendeville, Bruno; Vergnaud, Marine; Vettori, Matteo; Wang, Shih-Hsien; Withjack, Martha O.; Yagupsky, Daniel; Yamada, Yasuhiro

    2016-11-01

    We performed a quantitative comparison of brittle thrust wedge experiments to evaluate the variability among analogue models and to appraise the reproducibility and limits of model interpretation. Fifteen analogue modeling laboratories participated in this benchmark initiative. Each laboratory received a shipment of the same type of quartz and corundum sand and all laboratories adhered to a stringent model building protocol and used the same type of foil to cover base and sidewalls of the sandbox. Sieve structure, sifting height, filling rate, and details on off-scraping of excess sand followed prescribed procedures. Our analogue benchmark shows that even for simple plane-strain experiments with prescribed stringent model construction techniques, quantitative model results show variability, most notably for surface slope, thrust spacing and number of forward and backthrusts. One of the sources of the variability in model results is related to slight variations in how sand is deposited in the sandbox. Small changes in sifting height, sifting rate, and scraping will result in slightly heterogeneous material bulk densities, which will affect the mechanical properties of the sand, and will result in lateral and vertical differences in peak and boundary friction angles, as well as cohesion values once the model is constructed. Initial variations in basal friction are inferred to play the most important role in causing model variability. Our comparison shows that the human factor plays a decisive role, and even when one modeler repeats the same experiment, quantitative model results still show variability. Our observations highlight the limits of up-scaling quantitative analogue model results to nature or for making comparisons with numerical models. The frictional behavior of sand is highly sensitive to small variations in material state or experimental set-up, and hence, it will remain difficult to scale quantitative results such as number of thrusts, thrust spacing

  6. Feedback Control Design for Counterflow Thrust Vectoring

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    thrust vector angle. A model 27N pneumatic R-DDV servovalve from HR Textron is used in the test rig for this purpose. Data acquisition and control are...support this research. We also thank Robert Avant, Fritz Dittus and Mohammed I. Alidu for helping in the experimental setup. References ’Alvi, F. S... Thomson , M., "Minimal Controller Synthesis for Time-delay Systems Using a Smith Predictor," IEE Colloquium on Adaptive Controllers in Practice - Part Two

  7. Low Carbon Propulsion Strategic Thrust Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Jay

    2014-01-01

    NASA is taking a leadership role with regard to developing new options for low-carbon propulsion. Work related to the characterization of alternative fuels is coordinated with our partners in government and industry, and NASA is close to concluding a TC in this area. Research on alternate propulsion concepts continues to grow and is an important aspect of the ARMD portfolio. Strong partnerships have been a key enabling factor for research on this strategic thrust.

  8. Thrust bolting: Roof-bolt-support apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Tadolini, S.C.; Dolinar, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for installing a roof bolt in a borehole of a rock formation and more specifically to tensioning the unit without the aid of a mechanical anchoring device or threaded tensioning threads. The bolt is capable of being placed into tension along the length and the levels of active support can be controlled by varying the length of the grouted portion and the level of thrust applied to the bolt during installation.

  9. Minimum Time Turns Using Vectored Thrust.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    small, typicilly on the order of 10 seconds, the fuel consumed during the maneuver is negligible and the aircraft weight remains constant. The aircraft...practical (2, 3), these angles were allowed full range in order to determine how much range of thrust vectoring would be exploited if it were available...angle. 15q 15 *q 111. The Optimial Control Problem The formulation of the minimum turning time problem involves first- order non-linear differential

  10. CFD Code Survey for Thrust Chamber Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Klaus W.

    1990-01-01

    In the quest fo find analytical reference codes, responses from a questionnaire are presented which portray the current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program status and capability at various organizations, characterizing liquid rocket thrust chamber flow fields. Sample cases are identified to examine the ability, operational condition, and accuracy of the codes. To select the best suited programs for accelerated improvements, evaluation criteria are being proposed.

  11. Pressure-loss and flow coefficients inside a chordwise-finned, impingement, convection, and film air-cooled turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Total-pressure-loss coefficients, flow discharge coefficients, and friction factors were determined experimentally for the various area and geometry changes and flow passages within an air-cooled turbine vane. The results are compared with those of others obtained on similar configurations, both actual and large models, of vane passages. The supply and exit air pressures were controlled and varied. The investigation was conducted with essentially ambient-temperature air and without external flow of air over the vane.

  12. Tailoring a compact and stable Langmuir bi-dimensional PbX-based layered perovskite film at the air-water interface and on solid support.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Carmona, Luisa; García-Espejo, Gonzalo; Martín-Romero, María T; Camacho, Luis

    2017-03-14

    The present work studies the stability of Langmuir organic-inorganic superlattice materials thin films consisting of layered perovskite-based films with controlled 2D framework as well as to design experimental conditions for increasing the efficiency of the organic-inorganic perovskite motif by mechanical stimulus. Therefore, a whole covering of the air/water interface by a compact and stable lead-based layered perovskite structure is pursued. A 2D layered perovskite-type hybrid structure of the form [(CH3(CH2)19NH3)2(PbX4)], X=Cl, and Br, in which, two-dimensional sheets stabilized by a inner bilayer of organic monoammonium cation matrix, is mechanically tailored by successive compression-expansion cycles. The formation of 2D molecular patterns has been characterized by ΔR, BAM, XRD and XPS.

  13. Thrust Vector Control for Nuclear Thermal Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ensworth, Clinton B. F.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions may use Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) stages for human and cargo missions to Mars and other destinations. The vehicles are likely to require engine thrust vector control (TVC) to maintain desired flight trajectories. This paper explores requirements and concepts for TVC systems for representative NTR missions. Requirements for TVC systems were derived using 6 degree-of-freedom models of NTR vehicles. Various flight scenarios were evaluated to determine vehicle attitude control needs and to determine the applicability of TVC. Outputs from the models yielded key characteristics including engine gimbal angles, gimbal rates and gimbal actuator power. Additional factors such as engine thrust variability and engine thrust alignment errors were examined for impacts to gimbal requirements. Various technologies are surveyed for TVC systems for the NTR applications. A key factor in technology selection is the unique radiation environment present in NTR stages. Other considerations including mission duration and thermal environments influence the selection of optimal TVC technologies. Candidate technologies are compared to see which technologies, or combinations of technologies best fit the requirements for selected NTR missions. Representative TVC systems are proposed and key properties such as mass and power requirements are defined. The outputs from this effort can be used to refine NTR system sizing models, providing higher fidelity definition for TVC systems for future studies.

  14. Calculating track thrust with track functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsi-Ming; Procura, Massimiliano; Thaler, Jesse; Waalewijn, Wouter J.

    2013-08-01

    In e+e- event shapes studies at LEP, two different measurements were sometimes performed: a “calorimetric” measurement using both charged and neutral particles and a “track-based” measurement using just charged particles. Whereas calorimetric measurements are infrared and collinear safe, and therefore calculable in perturbative QCD, track-based measurements necessarily depend on nonperturbative hadronization effects. On the other hand, track-based measurements typically have smaller experimental uncertainties. In this paper, we present the first calculation of the event shape “track thrust” and compare to measurements performed at ALEPH and DELPHI. This calculation is made possible through the recently developed formalism of track functions, which are nonperturbative objects describing how energetic partons fragment into charged hadrons. By incorporating track functions into soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate the distribution for track thrust with next-to-leading logarithmic resummation. Due to a partial cancellation between nonperturbative parameters, the distributions for calorimeter thrust and track thrust are remarkably similar, a feature also seen in LEP data.

  15. MHD thrust vectoring of a rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Tholin, Fabien; Chemartin, Laurent; Stillace, Thierry; Masson, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the possibility to use MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) to vectorize the thrust of a solid propellant rocket engine exhaust is investigated. Using a magnetic field for vectoring offers a mass gain and a reusability advantage compared to standard gimbaled, elastomer-joint systems. Analytical and numerical models were used to evaluate the flow deviation with a 1 Tesla magnetic field inside the nozzle. The fluid flow in the resistive MHD approximation is calculated using the KRONOS code from ONERA, coupling the hypersonic CFD platform CEDRE and the electrical code SATURNE from EDF. A critical parameter of these simulations is the electrical conductivity, which was evaluated using a set of equilibrium calculations with 25 species. Two models were used: local thermodynamic equilibrium and frozen flow. In both cases, chlorine captures a large fraction of free electrons, limiting the electrical conductivity to a value inadequate for thrust vectoring applications. However, when using chlorine-free propergols with 1% in mass of alkali, an MHD thrust vectoring of several degrees was obtained.

  16. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Schmid, T. E.; Torrey, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques and materials were developed and evaluated for the fabrication and coating of advanced, long life, regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. Materials were analyzed as fillers for sputter application of OFHC copper as a closeout layer to channeled inner structures; of the materials evaluated, aluminum was found to provide the highest bond strength and to be the most desirable for chamber fabrication. The structures and properties were investigated of thick sputtered OFHC copper, 0.15 Zr-Cu, Al2O3,-Cu, and SiC-Cu. Layered structures of OFHC copper and 0.15 Zr-Cu were investigated as means of improving chamber inner wall fatigue life. The evaluation of sputtered Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, NASA IIb-11, aluminum and Al2O3-Al alloys as high strength chamber outer jackets was performed. Techniques for refurbishing degraded thrust chambers with OFHC copper and coating thrust chambers with protective ZrO2 and graded ZrO2-copper thermal barrier coatings were developed.

  17. Evolutionary Computing for Low-thrust Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Fink, Wolfgang; vonAllmed, Paul; Petropoulos, Anastassios E.; Russell, Ryan P.; Terrile, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    The development of new mission concepts requires efficient methodologies to analyze, design and simulate the concepts before implementation. New mission concepts are increasingly considering the use of ion thrusters for fuel-efficient navigation in deep space. This paper presents parallel, evolutionary computing methods to design trajectories of spacecraft propelled by ion thrusters and to assess the trade-off between delivered payload mass and required flight time. The developed methods utilize a distributed computing environment in order to speed up computation, and use evolutionary algorithms to find globally Pareto-optimal solutions. The methods are coupled with two main traditional trajectory design approaches, which are called direct and indirect. In the direct approach, thrust control is discretized in either arc time or arc length, and the resulting discrete thrust vectors are optimized. In the indirect approach, a thrust control problem is transformed into a costate control problem, and the initial values of the costate vector are optimized. The developed methods are applied to two problems: 1) an orbit transfer around the Earth and 2) a transfer between two distance retrograde orbits around Europa, the closest to Jupiter of the icy Galilean moons. The optimal solutions found with the present methods are comparable to other state-of-the-art trajectory optimizers and to analytical approximations for optimal transfers, while the required computational time is several orders of magnitude shorter than other optimizers thanks to an intelligent design of control vector discretization, advanced algorithmic parameterization, and parallel computing.

  18. Statistical error model for a solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bantell, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The solar electric propulsion thrust subsystem statistical error model was developed as a tool for investigating the effects of thrust subsystem parameter uncertainties on navigation accuracy. The model is currently being used to evaluate the impact of electric engine parameter uncertainties on navigation system performance for a baseline mission to Encke's Comet in the 1980s. The data given represent the next generation in statistical error modeling for low-thrust applications. Principal improvements include the representation of thrust uncertainties and random process modeling in terms of random parametric variations in the thrust vector process for a multi-engine configuration.

  19. A Layman's Guide to Thrust Engine Development for Super/Hyper Sonic Flight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiesse, James L.

    The intention of this paper is to discuss the advances in thrust engines from the initial development of the J58/SR-71 (JT11D-20) of the U.S. Air Force's SR-71 Blackbird to the development of the RAM and SCRAM engines necessary to propel the new generations of high-flying super-speed aircraft. Engineering complexities suggest that the engines and…

  20. Initiation process of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Dotare, Tatsuya; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-04-01

    We conducted 2D (cross-sectional) analog experiments with dry sand using a high resolution digital image correlation (DIC) technique to reveal initiation process of a thrust fault in detail, and identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the thrust initiation. The observations suggest that the process can be divided into three stages. Stage 1: characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will be generated later. Before initiation of the fault, the area to be the hanging wall starts to uplift. Stage 2: defined by the generation of the new thrust and its active displacement. The location of the new thrust seems to be constrained by its associated back-thrust, produced at the foot of the surface slope (by the previous thrust). The activity of the previous thrust turns to zero once the new thrust is generated, but the timing of these two events is not the same. Stage 3: characterized by a constant displacement along the (new) thrust. Similar minor shear bands can be seen in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan and we can correlate the along-strike variations in seismic profiles to the model results that show the characteristic features in each thrust development stage.

  1. Polysaccharide films at an air/liquid and a liquid/silicon interface: effect of the polysaccharide and liquid type on their physical properties.

    PubMed

    Taira, Yasunori; McNamee, Cathy E

    2014-11-14

    We investigated the effect of the polysaccharide type, the subphase on which the Langmuir monolayers were prepared, and the liquid in which the properties of the transferred monolayers were measured on the physical properties of the polysaccharide films at an air/aqueous interface and at a silicon substrate, and the forces and friction of the polysaccharide transferred films when measured in solution against a silica probe. Chitosan was modified with a silane coupling agent to make chitosan derived compounds with a low and a medium molecular weight. Chitin and the chitosan-derived compounds were used to make Langmuir monolayers at air/water and air/pH 9 buffer interfaces. The monolayers were transferred to silicon substrates via Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, and the chitosan-derived compounds subsequently chemically reacted with the silicon substrates. Atomic force microscope force and friction measurements were made in water and in the pH 9 buffer, where the water and the pH 9 buffer acted as a good and a bad solvent for the polysaccharides, respectively. The polysaccharide type affected the friction of the polysaccharide film, where the physically adsorbed chitin gave the lowest friction. The friction of L-chitosan was higher than that of M-chitosan in water, suggesting that the molecular weight of the polymer affects its lubricating ability. The forces and friction of the polysaccharide films changed when the subphase on which the Langmuir monolayers were formed was changed or when the liquid in which the properties of the films adsorbed at the silicon substrate were measured was changed. The friction increased significantly when the liquid was changed from water to the pH 9 buffer. This increase was explained by the reduced charge of the chitin and chitosan-derived materials due to the pH increase, the screening of the charges by the salts in the buffer, and the possible hardening of the monolayer caused by the adsorption of salts from the buffer.

  2. Three-dimensional geometry and kinematics of experimental piggyback thrusting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulugeta, Genene; Koyi, Hemin

    1987-11-01

    The three-dimensional geometry and kinematics of piggyback stacks of imbricate thrust sheets are illustrated and discussed using a single model shortened in a squeeze box. Strike-parallel geometric elements simulated include lateral ramps, eyed sheath folds, splays, and thrust/thrust interference. Fine details of these structures were exposed by eroding a shortened wedge of sand using a newly developed vacuum-eroding technique. A kinematic analysis of the model shows a stepwise increase in imbricate thrust spacing and/or a decrease in rate of nucleation of imbricate thrusts in the direction of thrust transport. Despite the steady forward advance of a rear wall, the piggyback wedge accreted episodically, recording different strain domains in longitudinal cross sections. Strain partitioning in single layers by bed-length balancing showed an increase in layer shortening with volume loss and a corresponding decrease in imbricate thrusting and ramp folding with depth.

  3. Conjunction challenges of low-thrust geosynchronous debris removal maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul V.; Schaub, Hanspeter

    2016-06-01

    The conjunction challenges of low-thrust engines for continuous thrust re-orbiting of geosynchronous (GEO) objects to super-synchronous disposal orbits are investigated, with applications to end-of-life mitigation and active debris removal (ADR) technologies. In particular, the low maneuverability of low-thrust systems renders collision avoidance a challenging task. This study investigates the number of conjunction events a low-thrust system could encounter with the current GEO debris population during a typical re-orbit to 300 km above the GEO ring. Sensitivities to thrust level and initial longitude and inclination are evaluated, and the impact of delaying the start time for a re-orbiting maneuver is assessed. Results demonstrate that the mean number of conjunctions increases hyperbolically as thrust level decreases, but timing the start of the maneuver appropriately can reduce the average conjunction rate when lower thrust levels are applied.

  4. Ouachita Mountain thrust front: An integrated approach to prospect analysis in thrust belts

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, R.L. ); Keeling, M.A. ); Cassiani, D. )

    1990-05-01

    The thrust front of the Ouachita Mountains in western Arkansas is defined by the prominent asymmetric Washburn anticline. Previously interpreted as a complexly thrust-faulted anticline, the feature has been reinterpreted as a delta or triangle structure based on integration of surface mapping from thematic mapper (TM) data with subsurface interpretation of seismic and well-log cross sections. The northern limb of the Washburn anticline consists of a relatively unfaulted steeply north-dipping sheet above a major north-dipping backthrust. The southern limb consists of several steeply south-dipping thrust sheets that form a duplex zone in the center of the delta structure. Seismic and well-log interpretations suggested the presence of the imbrication in the core of the structure, but poor seismic resolution within the structure made interpretation of the backthrust and duplex geometry difficult. Surface mapping from TM imagery indicates the presence of the backthrust and the extent and geometry of the delta structure. Thrust sheets and horses also crop out, and their geometry is a guide to interpretation of subsurface data sets. The new model of the Ouachita thrust front as a delta structure has aided in subsurface data analysis and has resulted in a better understanding of trap geometry and distribution. This study also demonstrates the application of detailed surface mapping from satellite remote-sensing data to prospect-scale analysis.

  5. Static investigation of a two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle with multiaxis thrust-vectoring capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, John G.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Static Test Facility of the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance of two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles designed to have simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring capability. This concept utilized divergent flap rotation of thrust vectoring in the pitch plane and deflection of flat yaw flaps hinged at the end of the sidewalls for yaw thrust vectoring. The hinge location of the yaw flaps was varied at four positions from the nozzle exit plane to the throat plane. The yaw flaps were designed to contain the flow laterally independent of power setting. In order to eliminate any physical interference between the yaw flap deflected into the exhaust stream and the divergent flaps, the downstream corners of both upper and lower divergent flaps were cut off to allow for up to 30 deg of yaw flap deflection. The impact of varying the nozzle pitch vector angle, throat area, yaw flap hinge location, yaw flap length, and yaw flap deflection angle on nozzle internal performance characteristics, was studied. High-pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust at nozzle pressure ratios up to 7.0. Static results indicate that configurations with the yaw flap hinge located upstream of the exit plane provide relatively high levels of thrust vectoring efficiency without causing large losses in resultant thrust ratio. Therefore, these configurations represent a viable concept for providing simultaneous pitch and yaw thrust vectoring.

  6. Aroma sensing and indoor air monitoring by quartz crystal resonators with sensory films prepared by sputtering of biomaterials and sintered polymers.

    PubMed

    Seyama, Michiko; Sugimoto, Iwao; Nakamura, Masayuki

    2004-11-01

    Thickness shear mode quartz-crystal resonator coated with plasma polymer films (PPFs) produced by radio-frequency sputtering of biomaterials and synthetic polymers were examined with respect to their abilities to continuously monitor indoor air. We confirmed the sensory capabilities of an array of PPF sensors to aromas emitted from essential oils at concentrations as low as the detection threshold of human olfaction. Changes in humidity induced a drift in the response curves of PPF sensors. On the contrary, volatile compounds exhibited pulse signals. The pulse signals of a D-phenylalanine sensor and a polyethylene sensor were synchronous, but the direction of the peaks was inverted in most cases. Compared with a photo-ionization detector sensor, the PPF sensors were able to detect subtle changes in the concentrations of volatile compounds in indoor air.

  7. Extended performance solar electric propulsion thrust system study. Volume 2: Baseline thrust system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.; Hawthorne, E. I.

    1977-01-01

    Several thrust system design concepts were evaluated and compared using the specifications of the most advanced 30- cm engineering model thruster as the technology base. Emphasis was placed on relatively high-power missions (60 to 100 kW) such as a Halley's comet rendezvous. The extensions in thruster performance required for the Halley's comet mission were defined and alternative thrust system concepts were designed in sufficient detail for comparing mass, efficiency, reliability, structure, and thermal characteristics. Confirmation testing and analysis of thruster and power-processing components were performed, and the feasibility of satisfying extended performance requirements was verified. A baseline design was selected from the alternatives considered, and the design analysis and documentation were refined. The baseline thrust system design features modular construction, conventional power processing, and a concentractor solar array concept and is designed to interface with the space shuttle.

  8. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  9. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed-Detonation Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Namtran C.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation actuator. The device utilized a fuel mixture of H2 and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at approx.600 Hz, for the lambda/4 mode. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to specific impulse of 2611 s. This value is comparable to other H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs) experiments. The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was approx.600 Hz, and was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the model and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 lb/cu in, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume values of approximately 0.01 lb/cu in.

  10. Pressure and Thrust Measurements of a High-Frequency Pulsed Detonation Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, N.; Cutler, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of a small-scale, high-frequency pulsed detonation tube. The device utilized a mixture of H2 fuel and air, which was injected into the device at frequencies of up to 1200 Hz. Pulsed detonations were demonstrated in an 8-inch long combustion volume, at about 600 Hz, for the quarter wave mode of resonance. The primary objective of this experiment was to measure the generated thrust. A mean value of thrust was measured up to 6.0 lb, corresponding to H2 flow based specific impulse of 2970 s. This value is comparable to measurements in H2-fueled pulsed detonation engines (PDEs). The injection and detonation frequency for this new experimental case was much higher than typical PDEs, where frequencies are usually less than 100 Hz. The compact size of the device and high frequency of detonation yields a thrust-per-unit-volume of approximately 2.0 pounds per cubic inch, and compares favorably with other experiments, which typically have thrust-per-unit-volume of order 0.01 pound per cubic inch. This much higher volumetric efficiency results in a potentially much more practical device than the typical PDE, for a wide range of potential applications, including high-speed boundary layer separation control, for example in hypersonic engine inlets, and propulsion for small aircraft and missiles.

  11. Initiation of a thrust fault revealed by analog experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotare, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Adam, Juergen; Hori, Takane; Sakaguchi, Hide

    2016-08-01

    To reveal in detail the process of initiation of a thrust fault, we conducted analog experiments with dry quartz sand using a high-resolution digital image correlation technique to identify minor shear-strain patterns for every 27 μm of shortening (with an absolute displacement accuracy of 0.5 μm). The experimental results identified a number of "weak shear bands" and minor uplift prior to the initiation of a thrust in cross-section view. The observations suggest that the process is closely linked to the activity of an adjacent existing thrust, and can be divided into three stages. Stage 1 is characterized by a series of abrupt and short-lived weak shear bands at the location where the thrust will subsequently be generated. The area that will eventually be the hanging wall starts to uplift before the fault forms. The shear strain along the existing thrust decreases linearly during this stage. Stage 2 is defined by the generation of the new thrust and active displacements along it, identified by the shear strain along the thrust. The location of the new thrust may be constrained by its back-thrust, generally produced at the foot of the surface slope. The activity of the existing thrust falls to zero once the new thrust is generated, although these two events are not synchronous. Stage 3 of the thrust is characterized by a constant displacement that corresponds to the shortening applied to the model. Similar minor shear bands have been reported in the toe area of the Nankai accretionary prism, SW Japan. By comparing several transects across this subduction margin, we can classify the lateral variations in the structural geometry into the same stages of deformation identified in our experiments. Our findings may also be applied to the evaluation of fracture distributions in thrust belts during unconventional hydrocarbon exploration and production.

  12. Observation of selective surface element substitution in FeTe0.5Se0.5 superconductor thin film exposed to ambient air by synchrotron radiation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nian; Liu, Chen; Zhao, Jia-Li; Lei, Tao; Wang, Jia-Ou; Qian, Hai-Jie; Wu, Rui; Yan, Lei; Guo, Hai-Zhong; Ibrahim, Kurash

    2016-09-01

    A systematic investigation of oxidation on a superconductive FeTe0.5Se0.5 thin film, which was grown on Nb-doped SrTiO3 (001) by pulsed laser deposition, has been carried out. The sample was exposed to ambient air for one month for oxidation. Macroscopically, the exposed specimen lost its superconductivity due to oxidation. The specimen was subjected to in situ synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements following cycles of annealing and argon ion etching treatments to unravel what happened in the electronic structure and composition after exposure to air. By the spectroscopic measurements, we found that the as-grown FeTe0.5Se0.5 superconductive thin film experienced an element selective substitution reaction. The oxidation preferentially proceeds through pumping out the Te and forming Fe-O bonds by O substitution of Te. In addition, our results certify that in situ vacuum annealing and low-energy argon ion etching methods combined with spectroscopy are suitable for depth element and valence analysis of layered structure superconductor materials. Project supported by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. 1G2009312311750101) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11375228, 11204303, and U1332105).

  13. Temporary tongue thrust: failure during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Piyapattamin, Thosapol; Soma, Kunimichi; Hisano, Masataka

    2002-03-01

    This report presents the case of a 25-year-old male patient who sought orthodontic treatment. Oral examination revealed an Angle Class I relation, with a bimaxillary dento-alveolar protrusion, evidence of anterior crowding, and a large overbite and overjet. Radiographic examination revealed a skeletal Class I occlusion. During the distal movement of the canines, occlusal interferences between the canines occurred and the commencement of a tongue thrust was observed. After correction of the applied forces, the canine movement was completed and the habit was no longer detectable. The incident indicates that an unusual oral habit suspiciously occurring during treatment should lead to an immediate reconsideration of the orthodontic treatment strategy.

  14. STOL landing thrust: Reverser jet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotansky, D. R.; Glaze, L. W.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis tools and modeling concepts for jet flow fields encountered upon use of thrust reversers for high performance military aircraft are described. A semi-empirical model of the reverser ground wall jet interaction with the uniform cross flow due to aircraft forward velocity is described. This ground interaction model is used to demonstrate exhaust gas ingestion conditions. The effects of control of exhaust jet vector angle, lateral splay, and moving versus fixed ground simulation are discussed. The Adler/Baron jet-in-cross flow model is used in conjunction with three dimensional panel methods to investigate the upper surface jet induced flow field.

  15. Entrainment and mixing in thrust augmenting ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernal, L.; Sarohia, V.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation of two-dimensional thrust augmenting ejector flows has been conducted. Measurements of the shroud surface pressure distribution, mean velocity, turbulent intensities and Reynolds stresses were made in two shroud geometries at various primary nozzle pressure ratios. The effects of shroud geometry and primary nozzle pressure ratio on the shroud surface pressure distribution, mean flow field and turbulent field were determined. From these measurements the evolution of mixing within the shroud of the primary flow and entrained fluid was obtained. The relationship between the mean flow field, the turbulent field and the shroud surface pressure distribution is discussed.

  16. Effects of Ambient Air and Temperature on Ionic Gel Gated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Thin-Film Transistor and Circuits.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaping; Zhou, Lili

    2015-10-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotube thin-film transistor (SWCNT TFT) and circuits were fabricated by fully inkjet printing gold nanoparticles as source/drain electrodes, semiconducting SWCNT thin films as channel materials, PS-PMMA-PS/EMIM TFSI composite gel as gate dielectrics, and PEDOT/PSS as gate electrodes. The ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT shows reversible conversion from p-type transistor behavior in air to ambipolar features under vacuum due to reversible oxygen doping in semiconducting SWCNT thin films. The threshold voltages of ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT and inverters are largely shifted to the low value (0.5 V for p-region and 1.0 V for n-region) by vacuum annealing at 140 °C to exhausively remove water that is incorporated in the ionic gel as floating gates. The vacuum annealed ionic gel gated SWCNT TFT shows linear temperature dependent transconductances and threshold voltages for both p- and n-regions. The strong temperature dependent transconductances (0.08 μS/K for p-region, 0.4 μS/K for n-region) indicate their potential application in thermal sensors. In the other hand, the weak temperature dependent threshold voltages (-1.5 mV/K for p-region, -1.1 mV/K for n-region) reflect their excellent thermal stability.

  17. Comparison study of laboratory and production spray guns in film coating: effect of pattern air and nozzle diameter.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ronny; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2006-01-01

    An optimal atomization air/pattern air ratio is necessary for a good coating process. The influences of variations in pattern air and nozzle diameter on the spray characteristics, such as droplet size, droplet velocity, and spray density, are investigated by using laboratory and production Schlick spray guns, both equipped with a new antibearding cap (ABC). An increase in the pattern air results in a wider spray accompanied with a decrease in droplet size in the spray center for both spray guns. Furthermore, an increase in the pattern air leads to a reduction in spray density in the spray center and, simultaneously, to an increase in spray density at the spray rim. A variation in nozzle diameter does not influence the spray characteristics for both spray guns.

  18. 3D Two-way coupled TEHD analysis on the lubricating characteristics of thrust bearings in pump-turbine units by combining CFD and FEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Liming; Luo, Yongyao; Wang, Zhengwei; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal elastic hydro dynamic (TEHD) lubrication analysis for the thrust bearing is usually conducted by combining Reynolds equation with finite element analysis (FEA). But it is still a problem to conduct the computation by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and FEA which can simulate the TEHD more accurately. In this paper, by using both direct and separate coupled solutions together, steady TEHD lubrication considering the viscosity-temperature effect for a bidirectional thrust bearing in a pump-turbine unit is simulated combining a 3D CFD model for the oil film with a 3D FEA model for the pad and mirror plate. Cyclic symmetry condition is used in the oil film flow as more reasonable boundary conditions which avoids the oil temperature assumption at the leading and trailing edge. Deformations of the pad and mirror plate are predicted and discussed as well as the distributions of oil film thickness, pressure, temperature. The predicted temperature shows good agreement with measurements, while the pressure shows a reasonable distribution comparing with previous studies. Further analysis of the three-coupled-field reveals the reason of the high pressure and high temperature generated in the film. Finally, the influence of rotational speed of the mirror plate on the lubrication characteristics is illustrated which shows the thrust load should be balanced against the oil film temperature and pressure in optimized designs. This research proposes a thrust bearing computation method by combining CFD and FEA which can do the TEHD analysis more accurately.

  19. Reconciling Himalayan midcrustal discontinuities: The Main Central thrust system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kyle P.; Ambrose, Tyler K.; Webb, A. Alexander G.; Cottle, John M.; Shrestha, Sudip

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence of thrust-sense tectonometamorphic discontinuities within the exhumed Himalayan metamorphic core can be explained as part of the Main Central thrust system. This imbricate thrust structure, which significantly thickened the orogenic midcrustal core, comprises a series of thrust-sense faults that all merge into a single detachment. The existence of these various structures, and their potential for complex overprinting along the main detachment, may help explain the contention surrounding the definition, mapping, and interpretation of the Main Central thrust. The unique evolution of specific segments of the Main Central thrust system along the orogen is interpreted to be a reflection of the inherent basement structure and ramp position, and structural level of exposure of the mid-crust. This helps explain the variation in the timing and structural position of tectonometamorphic discontinuities along the length of the mountain belt.

  20. Design and analysis of thrust active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Lee, Un-Ho; Choi, Jang-Young; Hong, Jung-Pyo

    2008-04-01

    This paper deals with the design and analysis of thrust active magnetic bearing (AMB). Using the analytical solutions for thrust, resistance, and inductance obtained from equivalent magnetic circuits method, we determine initial design parameters such as the size of magnetic circuit, coil diameter, and the number of turns by investigating the variation of thrust according to design parameters. Then, using nonlinear finite element analysis, a detailed design considering saturation is performed in order to meet required thrust under restricted conditions. Finally, by confirming that the design result is shown in good agreement with experimental results, the validity of design procedures for thrust AMB used in this paper is proved. In particular, the dynamic test results of the thrust AMB are also given to confirm the validity of the design.

  1. Fluid storage and transport in thrust belts: the Gavarnie Thrust system revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaig, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    There has been renewed interest in the pressure and movement of fluids in thrust systems in recent years with the discovery and increasing importance of slow slip earthquakes. Unfortunately the overpressured regime thought to be the source region for both normal and slow-slip earthquakes is inaccessible to direct observation, so information about the actual water content, flow regimes and permeability structure at the time of thrusting can only be obtained in exhumed rocks. The Gavarnie Thrust System in the Pyrenees (including the immediate footwall of the thrust and overlying thrust sheets) is exceptionally well studied in terms of structural and microstructural work, fluid inclusions, and isotopic tracing of fluid flow. Southward thrusting by 12-15 km occurred during the Eocene, and the current geometry of the thrust is a broad dome, allowing sampling at many locations. There is abundant evidence for near-lithostatic fluid pressures at depths of 8-15 km in the crust and temperatures of 300-400 °C, and fluids at these levels are dominated by hypersaline brines with Cl/Br ratios indicating evaporation of seawater. They are inferred to be derived from widespread Triassic evaporates, and stored in underlying redbeds and fractured basement rocks. There is also evidence from fluid inclusions for periodic pressure cycling down to near-hydrostatic values. This is thought to be related to co-seismic fault valve behaviour with release of fluid both into the shallow thrust and into steeply dipping shear zones in the hangingwall. Isotopic studies of carbonate mylonites along the Gavarnie thrust indicate unidirectional southward (structurally upward) flow of fluid , again probably mainly during transient veining events. These relatively slow moving fluids appear to have fed into a hydrostatic regime with topographically driven flow at higher levels. If time averaged permeability was high, most of the fluid would have rapidly escaped, since there is little opportunity to

  2. Rocket thrust chamber thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batakis, A. P.; Vogan, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to generate data and develop analytical techniques to predict the performance and reliability of ceramic thermal barrier coatings in high heat flux environments. A finite element model was used to analyze the thermomechanical behavior of coating systems in rocket thrust chambers. Candidate coating systems (using a copper substrate, NiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2.8Y2O3 ceramic overcoat) were selected for detailed study based on photomicrographic evaluations of experimental test specimens. The effects of plasma spray application parameters on the material properties of these coatings were measured and the effects on coating performance evaluated using the finite element model. Coating design curves which define acceptable operating envelopes for seleted coating systems were constructed based on temperature and strain limitations. Spray gun power levels was found to have the most significant effect on coating structure. Three coating systems were selected for study using different power levels. Thermal conductivity, strain tolerance, density, and residual stress were measured for these coatings. Analyses indicated that extremely thin coatings ( 0.02 mm) are required to accommodate the high heat flux of a rocket thrust chamber and ensure structural integrity.

  3. MPD (magnetoplasmadynamic) thrust chamber flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-09-01

    Performance characteristics of Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arcjets depend on proper matching of electromagnetic and fluid mechanical constraints within the thrust chamber. Experimental measurements of internal flow conditions during MPD arcjet operation are needed to guide development of flow models and to assess the validity of theoretical predictions. Efforts are continuing in a corporative effort to apply an array of diagnostic techniques including time-, space-, and spectrally-resolved photography to examine MPD arcjet internal flows. Experimental elucidation of the internal flow structure is used to develop predictive models for optimal geometries and operating parameters. Probes have been used to map the current and voltage distributions within uniform height and flared annular channels. This work is concerned with the effect of thruster channel variations on the current conduction regions of the MPD internal flow. Other aspects of the internal flow structure that have been modeled involve the transition of the input mass flow from neutral gas to electrically-conducting plasma. Scale sizes for the transition region were estimated in terms of the electrical and thermodynamic properties of the propellant gas (e.g., argon). These estimates indicate that the electrical conductivity of the flow can be established in distances that are small compared to the characteristic dimension for current conduction near the entrance to the arcjet thrust chamber.

  4. Emergency Control Aircraft System Using Thrust Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J. (Inventor); Burcham, Frank W., Jr. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A digital longitudinal Aircraft Propulsion Control (APC system of a multiengine aircraft is provided by engine thrust modulation in response to comparing an input flightpath angle signal (gamma)c from a pilot thumbwheel. or an ILS system with a sensed flightpath angle y to produce an error signal (gamma)e that is then integrated (with reasonable limits) to generate a drift correction signal to be added to the error signal (gamma)e after first subtracting a lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) for phugoid damping. The output error signal is multiplied by a constant to produce an aircraft thrust control signal ATC of suitable amplitude to drive a throttle servo for all engines. each of which includes its own full-authority digital engine control (FADEC) computer. An alternative APC system omits sensed flightpath angle feedback and instead controls the flightpath angle by feedback of the lowpass filtered velocity signal Vel(sub f) which also inherently provides phugoid damping. The feature of drift compensation is retained.

  5. Experimental Results of Schlicher's Thrusting Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Niedra, Janis M.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test the claims by Rex L. Schlicher, et al., (Patent 5,142,86 1) that a certain antenna geometry produces thrust greatly exceeding radiation reaction, when driven by repetitive, fast rise, and relatively slower decay current pulses. In order to test this hypothesis, the antenna was suspended by strings as a 3 in pendulum. Current pulses were fed to the antenna along the suspension path by a very flexible coaxial line constructed from loudspeaker cable and copper braid sheath. When driving the antenna via this cabling, our pulser was capable of sustaining 1200 A pulses at a rate of 30 per second up to a minute. In this way, bursts of pulses could be delivered in synch with the pendulum period in order to build up any motion. However, when using a laser beam passing through a lens attached to the antenna to amplify linear displacement by a factor of at least 25, no correlated motion of the beam spot could be detected on a distant wall. We conclude, in agreement with the momentum theorem of classical electromagnetic theory, that any thrust produced is far below practically useful levels. Hence, within classical electrodynamics, there is little hope of detecting any low level motion that cannot be explained by interactions with surrounding structural steel and the Earth's magnetic field.

  6. Film ispalators

    SciTech Connect

    Startsev, Aleksandr V; Stoilov, Yurii Yu

    2002-05-31

    New physical objects, ispalators based on free soap films, exhibit persistent flows of the soap solution in open and closed volumes in air with additions of gases of the C{sub 8}F{sub 18} type (p = 20 Torr) at temperature drops on the films of the order of tenths and hundredths of kelvin. The flows move continuously at a velocity of 5 - 20 cm s{sup -1}. It is found that the parts of an inclined ispalator film show anomalous behaviour upon heating: their weight increases and they move downward over the film, whereas the unheated parts of the film move upward. Continuous radial vortex flows accompanied by the formation and washing of the regions of a thin black film are observed on circular films in closed volumes upon their uniform external cooling by evaporating water for 5 - 10 hours. The rapid flows make film ispalators the efficient heat carriers, which operate at small temperature drops (tenths and hundredths of kelvin) and surpass copper in the amount of thermal energy being transferred. The outlook for the further study and applications of film ispalators for detecting thermal fields and laser radiation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  7. Design and test of a magnetic thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Mikula, A.; Banerjee, B.; Lewis, D. W.; Imlach, J.

    1993-01-01

    A magnetic thrust bearing can be employed to take thrust loads in rotating machinery. The design and construction of a prototype magnetic thrust bearing for a high load per weight application is described. The theory for the bearing is developed. Fixtures were designed and the bearing was tested for load capacity using a universal testing machine. Various shims were employed to have known gap thicknesses. A comparison of the theory and measured results is presented.

  8. Design and test of a magnetic thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaire, P. E.; Mikula, A.; Banerjee, B.; Lewis, D. W.; Imlach, J.

    A magnetic thrust bearing can be employed to take thrust loads in rotating machinery. The design and construction of a prototype magnetic thrust bearing for a high load per weight application is described. The theory for the bearing is developed. Fixtures were designed and the bearing was tested for load capacity using a universal testing machine. Various shims were employed to have known gap thicknesses. A comparison of the theory and measured results is presented.

  9. Explicit Low-Thrust Guidance for Reference Orbit Targeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Try; Udwadia, Firdaus E.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of a low-thrust spacecraft controlled to a reference orbit is addressed in this paper. A simple and explicit low-thrust guidance scheme with constrained thrust magnitude is developed by combining the fundamental equations of motion for constrained systems from analytical dynamics with a Lyapunov-based method. Examples are given for a spacecraft controlled to a reference trajectory in the circular restricted three body problem.

  10. Vista/F-16 Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) control law design and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwerneman, W. D.; Eller, B. G.

    1994-01-01

    For the Multi-Axis Thrust Vectoring (MATV) program, a new control law was developed using multi-axis thrust vectoring to augment the aircraft's aerodynamic control power to provide maneuverability above the normal F-16 angle of attack limit. The control law architecture was developed using Lockheed Fort Worth's offline and piloted simulation capabilities. The final flight control laws were used in flight test to demonstrate tactical benefits gained by using thrust vectoring in air-to-air combat. Differences between the simulator aerodynamics data base and the actual aircraft aerodynamics led to significantly different lateral-directional flying qualities during the flight test program than those identified during piloted simulation. A 'dial-a-gain' flight test control law update was performed in the middle of the flight test program. This approach allowed for inflight optimization of the aircraft's flying qualities. While this approach is not preferred over updating the simulator aerodynamic data base and then updating the control laws, the final selected gain set did provide adequate lateral-directional flying qualities over the MATV flight envelope. The resulting handling qualities and the departure resistance of the aircraft allowed the 422nd_squadron pilots to focus entirely on evaluating the aircraft's tactical utility.

  11. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the

  12. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of potential reusable thrust chamber concepts is studied. Propellant condidates were examined and analytically combined with potential cooling schemes. A data base of engine data which would assist in a configuration selection was produced. The data base verification was performed by the demonstration of a thrust chamber of a selected coolant scheme design. A full scale insulated columbium thrust chamber was used for propellant coolant configurations. Combustion stability of the injectors and a reduced size thrust chamber were experimentally verified as proof of concept demonstrations of the design and study results.

  13. A review of thrust-vectoring schemes for fighter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, B. L.; Re, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a review of thrust vectoring schemes for advanced fighter applications. Results are presented from wind tunnel and system integration studies on thrust vectoring nozzle concepts. Vectoring data are presented from wind tunnel tests of axisymmetric C-D (convergent-divergent) and nonaxisymmetric wedge, C-D, single ramp and USB (upper-surface blowing) nozzle concepts. Results from recent airframe/nozzle integration studies on the impact of thrust vectoring on weight, cooling and performance characteristics are discussed. This review indicates that the aircraft designer has, at his disposal, a wide range of thrust vectoring schemes which offer potential for added or improved aircraft capability.

  14. Improved Propulsion Modeling for Low-Thrust Trajectory Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knittel, Jeremy M.; Englander, Jacob A.; Ozimek, Martin T.; Atchison, Justin A.; Gould, Julian J.

    2017-01-01

    Low-thrust trajectory design is tightly coupled with spacecraft systems design. In particular, the propulsion and power characteristics of a low-thrust spacecraft are major drivers in the design of the optimal trajectory. Accurate modeling of the power and propulsion behavior is essential for meaningful low-thrust trajectory optimization. In this work, we discuss new techniques to improve the accuracy of propulsion modeling in low-thrust trajectory optimization while maintaining the smooth derivatives that are necessary for a gradient-based optimizer. The resulting model is significantly more realistic than the industry standard and performs well inside an optimizer. A variety of deep-space trajectory examples are presented.

  15. Simultaneous sampling and analysis of indoor air infested with Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) by solid phase microextraction, thin film microextraction and needle trap device.

    PubMed

    Eom, In-Yong; Risticevic, Sanja; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2012-02-24

    Air in a room infested by Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) was sampled simultaneously by three different sampling devices including solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coatings, thin film microextraction (TFME) devices, and needle trap devices (NTDs) and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The main focus of this study was to fully characterize indoor air by identifying compounds extracted by three different microextraction formats and, therefore, perform both the device comparison and more complete characterization of C. lectularius pheromone. The NTD technique was capable of extracting both (E)-2-hexenal and (E)-2-octenal, which were previously identified as alarm pheromones of bedbugs, and superior NTD recoveries for these two components allowed reliable identification based on mass spectral library searching and linear temperature programmed retention index (LTPRI) technique. While the use of DVB/CAR/PDMS SPME fiber coatings provided complementary sample fingerprinting and profiling results, TFME sampling devices provided discriminative extraction coverage toward highly volatile analytes. In addition to two alarm pheromones, relative abundances of all other analytes were recorded for all three devices and aligned across all examined samples, namely, highly infested area, less infested area, and control samples which were characterized by different bedbug populations. The results presented in the current study illustrate comprehensive characterization of infested indoor air samples through the use of three different non-invasive SPME formats and identification of novel components comprising C. lectularius pheromone, therefore, promising future alternatives for use of potential synthetic pheromones for detection of infestations.

  16. High-mobility, air stable bottom-contact n-channel thin film transistors based on N,N′-ditridecyl perylene diimide

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Lanchao; Guo, Yunlong; Wen, Yugeng; Liu, Yunqi E-mail: liuyq@iccas.ac.cn; Zhan, Xiaowei E-mail: liuyq@iccas.ac.cn

    2013-11-11

    Bottom-gate bottom-contact (BGBC) organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) based on N,N′-ditridecyl perylene diimide exhibit electron mobility as high as 3.54 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} in nitrogen, higher than that (1 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}) of bottom-gate top-contact devices. The better performance of BGBC configuration in N{sub 2} is attributed to lower contact resistance, which is further reduced by thermal annealing. After thermally annealing the BGBC OTFTs at 180 °C, electron mobility as high as 3.5 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, current on/off ratio of 10{sup 6} and threshold voltage of 9 V are achieved in air, and the mobility retains above 1 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} after storage for two months in air. Thermal treatment enhanced crystalline grains, reduced grain boundaries, and suppressed the adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}, leading to excellent performance in air.

  17. Fluidic scale model multi-plane thrust vector control test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiarelli, Charles; Johnsen, Raymond K.; Shieh, Chih F.; Wing, David J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted at the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel Static Test Facility to determine the concept feasibility of using fluidics to achieve multiplane thrust vector control in a 2D convergent-divergent (2D-CD) fixed aperture nozzle. Pitch thrust vector control is achieved by injection of flow through a slot in the divergent flap into the primary nozzle flow stream. Yaw vector control results from secondary air delivered tangentially to vertical Coanda flaps. These flaps are offset laterally and aligned parallel to the primary nozzle side walls. All tests were conducted at static (no external flow) conditions. Flow visualization was conducted using a paint flow technique and Focus Schlieren. Significant levels of pitch deflection angles (19 deg) were achieved at low pressure ratios and practical levels (14 deg) resulted at typical intermediate power settings. The ability of the Coanda surface blowing concept to produce yaw deflection was limited to NPR not greater than 4.

  18. The Effects of Reduced Atmospheric Pressure on Thermal Contact Resistance and Electronic Component Forced Air Film Coefficients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-15

    two parallel flat plates with an intersticial uniform air gap. Rearranging terms for thermal resistance, this relationship is as follows: = + 4I Xm 2...gap ranging from 0.0005" to 0.003" between itself and an aluminum card guide and where the intersticial air is at 50°C, it is a relatively simple...correlations were carried out over a wide range of variables including contact materials, intersticial fluids, surface finishes and roughnesses, contact

  19. An investigation of corner separation within a thrust augmenter having Coanda jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiler, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    The development of separation in corners of thrust augmentor wings having Coanda jets was investigated using hot film surface sensors and pressure transducers. Separation on the test augmentor began at a corner very close to the augmentor exit and then rapidly proceeded upstream. Measurements of the pressure fields in the corner region indicated that a modified form of the Stratford criterion could be used to predict the onset of separation. Testing was conducted over a range of nozzle pressure ratios, aspect ratios, diffuser angles, and designs of the boundary layer and Coanda nozzles.

  20. Thrust Production in a Mechanical Swimming Lamprey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leftwich, Megan; Smits, Alexander

    2008-11-01

    To develop a comprehensive model of lamprey locomotion, we use a robotic lamprey as a means of investigating the surface pressure and wake structure during swimming. A programmable microcomputer actuates 11 servomotors that produce a traveling wave along the length of the lamprey body. The waveform is based on the motion of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata), as described by Tytell and Lauder (2004) and kinematic studies of living lamprey. The amplitude of the phase-averaged surface pressure distribution along the centerline of the robot increases toward the tail, which is consistent with previous momentum balance experiments indicating that thrust is produced mainly at the tail. The phase relationship between the pressure signal and the vortex shedding from the tail is also examined. The project is supported by NIH CNRS Grant 1R01NS054271.

  1. Secondary production of massive quarks in thrust

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, André H.; Mateu, Vicent; Pietrulewicz, Piotr

    2016-01-22

    We present a factorization framework that takes into account the production of heavy quarks through gluon splitting in the thrust distribution for e{sup +}e{sup −} → hadrons. The explicit factorization theorems and some numerical results are displayed in the dijet region where the kinematic scales are widely separated, which can be extended systematically to the whole spectrum. We account for the necessary two-loop matrix elements, threshold corrections, and include resummation up to N{sup 3}LL order. We include nonperturbative power corrections through a field theoretical shape function, and remove the O(Λ{sub QCD}) renormalon in the partonic soft function by appropriate mass-dependent subtractions. Our results hold for any value of the quark mass, from an infinitesimally small (merging to the known massless result) to an infinitely large one (achieving the decoupling limit). This is the first example of an application of a variable flavor number scheme to final state jets.

  2. Initiation system for low thrust motor igniter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strand, L. D.; Davis, D. P.; Shafer, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    A test program was carried out to demonstrate an igniter motor initiation system utilizing the bimetallic material Pyrofuze for a solid propellant rocket with controlled low rate of thrust buildup. The program consisted of a series of vacuum ignition tests using a slab burning window motor that simulated the principal initial ballistic parameters of the full scale igniter motor. A Pyrofuze/pyrotechnic igniter system was demonstrated that uses a relatively low electrical current level for initiation and that eliminates the necessity of a pyrotechnic squib, with its accompanying accidental firing hazards and the typical basket of pyrotechnic pellets. The Pyrofuze ignition system does require an initial constraining of the igniter motor nozzle flow, and at the low initiating electrical current level the ignition delay time of this system was found to be quite sensitive to factors affecting local heat generation or loss rates.

  3. Small centrifugal pumps for low thrust rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulbrandsen, N. C.; Furst, R. B.; Burgess, R. M.; Scheer, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a combined analytical and experimental investigation of low specific speed pumps for potential use as components of propellant feed systems for low thrust rocket engines. Shrouded impellers and open face impellers were tested in volute type and vaned diffuser type pumps. Full- and partial-emission diffusers and full- and partial-admission impellers were tested. Axial and radial loads, head and efficiency versus flow, and cavitation tests were conducted. Predicted performance of two pumps are compared when pumping water and liquid hydrogen. Detailed pressure loss and parasitic power values are presented for two pump configurations. Partial-emission diffusers were found to permit use of larger impeller and diffuser passages with a minimal performance penalty. Normal manufacturing tolerances were found to result in substantial power requirement variation with only a small pressure rise change. Impeller wear ring leakage was found to reduce pump pressure rise to an increasing degree as the pump flowrate was decreased.

  4. The Chevron Foil Thrust Bearing: Improved Performance Through Passive Thermal Management and Effective Lubricant Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An improved foil thrust bearing is described that eliminates or reduces the need for forced cooling of the bearing foils while at the same time improves the load capacity of the bearing, enhances damping, provides overload tolerance, and eliminates the high speed load capacity drop-off that plagues the current state of the art. The performance improvement demonstrated by the chevron foil thrust bearing stems from a novel trailing edge shape that splays the hot lubricant in the thin film radially, thus preventing hot lubricant carry-over into the ensuing bearing sector. Additionally, the chevron shaped trailing edge induces vortical mixing of the hot lubricant with the gas that is naturally resident within the inter-pad region of a foil thrust bearing. The elimination of hot gas carry-over in combination with the enhanced mixing has enabled a completely passive thermally managed foil bearing design. Laboratory testing at NASA has confirmed the original analysis and reduced this concept to practice.

  5. Test program to provide confidence in liquid oxygen cooling of hydrocarbon fueled rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental program has been planned at the NASA Lewis Research Center to build confidence in the feasibility of liquid oxygen cooling for hydrocarbon fueled rocket engines. Although liquid oxygen cooling has previously been incorporated in test hardware, more runtime is necessary to gain confidence in this concept. In the previous tests, small oxygen leaks developed at the throat of the thrust chamber and film cooled the hot-gas side of the chamber wall without resulting in catastrophic failure. However, more testing is necessary to demonstrate that a catastrophic failure would not occur if cracks developed further upstream between the injector and the throat, where the boundary layer has not been established. Since under normal conditions cracks are expected to form in the throat region of the thrust chamber, cracks must be initiated artificially in order to control their location. Several methods of crack initiation are discussed in this report. Four thrust chambers, three with cracks and one without, should be tested. The axial location of the cracks should be varied parametrically. Each chamber should be instrumented to determine the effects of the cracks, as well as the overall performance and durability of the chambers.

  6. Design and Fabrication of Oxygen/RP-2 Multi-Element Oxidizer-Rich Staged Combustion Thrust Chamber Injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, C. P.; Medina, C. R.; Protz, C. S.; Kenny, R. J.; Kelly, G. W.; Casiano, M. J.; Hulka, J. R.; Richardson, B. R.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Combustion Stability Tool Development project funded by the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was contracted to assemble and hot-fire test a multi-element integrated test article demonstrating combustion characteristics of an oxygen/hydrocarbon propellant oxidizer-rich staged-combustion engine thrust chamber. Such a test article simulates flow through the main injectors of oxygen/kerosene oxidizer-rich staged combustion engines such as the Russian RD-180 or NK-33 engines, or future U.S.-built engine systems such as the Aerojet-Rocketdyne AR-1 engine or the Hydrocarbon Boost program demonstration engine. On the current project, several configurations of new main injectors were considered for the thrust chamber assembly of the integrated test article. All the injector elements were of the gas-centered swirl coaxial type, similar to those used on the Russian oxidizer-rich staged-combustion rocket engines. In such elements, oxidizer-rich combustion products from the preburner/turbine exhaust flow through a straight tube, and fuel exiting from the combustion chamber and nozzle regenerative cooling circuits is injected near the exit of the oxidizer tube through tangentially oriented orifices that impart a swirl motion such that the fuel flows along the wall of the oxidizer tube in a thin film. In some elements there is an orifice at the inlet to the oxidizer tube, and in some elements there is a sleeve or "shield" inside the oxidizer tube where the fuel enters. In the current project, several variations of element geometries were created, including element size (i.e., number of elements or pattern density), the distance from the exit of the sleeve to the injector face, the width of the gap between the oxidizer tube inner wall and the outer wall of the sleeve, and excluding the sleeve entirely. This paper discusses the design rationale for each of these element variations, including hydraulic, structural

  7. The configuration of water on rough natural surfaces: Implications for understanding air-water interfacial area, film thickness, and imaging resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibbey, Tohren C. G.

    2013-08-01

    Previous studies of air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated porous media have often distinguished between interfacial area corresponding to water held by capillary forces between grains and area corresponding to water associated with solid surfaces. The focus of this work was on developing a better understanding of the nature of interfacial area associated with solid surfaces following drainage of porous media. Stereoscopic scanning electron microscopy was used to determine surface elevation maps for eight different surfaces of varying roughness. An algorithm was developed to calculate the true configuration of an air-water interface in contact with the solid surface as a function of capillary pressure. The algorithm was used to calculate surface-associated water configurations for capillary pressures ranging from 10 to 100 cm water. The results of the work show that, following drainage, the configuration of surface-associated water is dominated by bridging of macroscopic surface roughness features over the range of capillary pressures studied, and nearly all of the surface-associated water is capillary held. As such, the thicknesses of surface-associated water were found to be orders-of-magnitude greater than might be expected at the same capillary pressures based on calculations of adsorbed film thickness. The fact that capillary forces in air-water interfaces dominate surface-associated water configuration means that interface shapes are largely unaffected by microscopic surface roughness, and interfaces are considerably smoother than the underlying solid. As such, calculations suggest that microscopic surface roughness likely has minimal impact on the accuracy of surface-associated air-water interfacial areas determined by limited-resolution imaging methods such as computed microtomography.

  8. The Star Thrust Experiment, FRC Formation and Sustainment Using RMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kenneth; Slough, John

    1998-11-01

    The same qualities that make the FRC attractive as a terrestrial power source make them even more attractive as a fusion engine for space missions due to strict constraints on size, complexity and weight. The first step toward attaining a viable FRC reactor/propulsion unit is the development of a simplified formation process that allows for subsequent sustainment. The Star Thrust Experiment (STX) has been designed to do this using a 50G 330 kHz Rotating Magnetic Field (RMF) for current drive. Two 10 MW solid state supplies (IGBT switched) drive the RMF antennas for milliseconds through a 20:1 99% efficient air core transformer. The 2 m long by 0.35 m radius RMF antennas are the inductors of LC resonant circuits. With Q ~ 60, the square wave IGBT output is filtered into a clean sinusoid, and 60 MW of circulating power is attained. Solenoidal magnets create ~ 1 kG axial confining field in the STX vacuum chamber, a 3 m long by 0.4 m diameter quartz tube. An axial discharge, 100 MW Alfven heater, and confining field reversal are available for plasma ionization and heating. At densities of 10^20 m-3, temperatures of ~ 15 eV are needed for RMF field penetration and effective current drive. Major system development and construction has been completed, and initial operation has begun. Supported by NASA and USDOE.

  9. Heat pipe technology for advanced rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousar, D. C.

    1971-01-01

    The application of heat pipe technology to the design of rocket engine thrust chambers is discussed. Subjects presented are: (1) evaporator wick development, (2) specific heat pipe designs and test results, (3) injector design, fabrication, and cold flow testing, and (4) preliminary thrust chamber design.

  10. A magnetic coupling thrust stand for microthrust measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, W. P.; Ferrer, P.

    2016-01-01

    A direct thrust measurement system that is based on a horizontal lever and utilizes a novel magnetic coupling mechanism to measure thrust has been developed. The system is capable of measuring thrusts as low as 10’s of μN. While zero drift is observed in the balance, tests have shown that they do not have an appreciable effect on thrust measurements. The thrust stand’s sensitivity can be adjusted by shifting the position of the coupling magnet inside the stand’s thrust support member, which allows flexibility for testing both higher and lower powered thrusters. The thrust stand has been modeled theoretically and the predicted results from the model are compared with experimentally measured data. The system was tested using a simple cold gas thruster and provided credible results that can be compared with other systems studied in the literature. Advantages include that the thrust stand is very cheap and easy to construct and further, the calibration process takes no longer than half an hour, facilitating rapid turnaround times while still retaining accuracy. Repeatability tests have shown that the balance gives consistent results.

  11. The 30-centimeter ion thrust subsystem design manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The principal characteristics of the 30-centimeter ion propulsion thrust subsystem technology that was developed to satisfy the propulsion needs of future planetary and early orbital missions are described. Functional requirements and descriptions, interface and performance requirements, and physical characteristics of the hardware are described at the thrust subsystem, BIMOD engine system, and component level.

  12. Tarp rotor system thrust, yaw and load control

    SciTech Connect

    Weisbrich, A. L.

    1985-09-10

    Presented is a means for thrust and, hence, yaw and load control of a TARP twin rotor system by means of initiating a thrust differential between said rotors which, in turn, yaws the twin rotor assembly into a protected low flow velocity region about a TARP and alleviates load on said assembly.

  13. Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Area report FY'84

    SciTech Connect

    Minichino, C.; Phelps, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    This report describes the work of the Electronics Engineering Department Thrust Areas for FY'84: diagnostics and microelectronic engineering; signal and control engineering; microwave and pulsed power engineering; computer-aided engineering; engineering modeling and simulation; and systems engineering. For each Thrust Area, an overview and a description of the goals and achievements of each project is provided.

  14. Impact of plasma noise on a direct thrust measurement system.

    PubMed

    Pottinger, S J; Lamprou, D; Knoll, A K; Lappas, V J

    2012-03-01

    In order to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of a pendulum-type thrust measurement system, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) and a laser optical displacement sensor have been used simultaneously to determine the displacement resulting from an applied thrust. The LVDT sensor uses an analog interface, whereas the laser sensor uses a digital interface to communicate the displacement readings to the data acquisition equipment. The data collected by both sensors show good agreement for static mass calibrations and validation with a cold gas thruster. However, the data obtained using the LVDT deviate significantly from that of the laser sensor when operating two varieties of plasma thrusters: a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma thruster, and a DC powered plasma thruster. Results establish that even with appropriate shielding and signal filtering the LVDT sensor is subject to plasma noise and radio frequency interactions which result in anomalous thrust readings. Experimental data show that the thrust determined using the LVDT system in a direct current plasma environment and a RF discharge is approximately a factor of three higher than the thrust values obtained using a laser sensor system for the operating conditions investigated. These findings are of significance to the electric propulsion community as LVDT sensors are often utilized in thrust measurement systems and accurate thrust measurement and the reproducibility of thrust data is key to analyzing thruster performance. Methods are proposed to evaluate system susceptibility to plasma noise and an effective filtering scheme presented for DC discharges.

  15. Thrust augmentation nozzle (TAN) concept for rocket engine booster applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forde, Scott; Bulman, Mel; Neill, Todd

    2006-07-01

    Aerojet used the patented thrust augmented nozzle (TAN) concept to validate a unique means of increasing sea-level thrust in a liquid rocket booster engine. We have used knowledge gained from hypersonic Scramjet research to inject propellants into the supersonic region of the rocket engine nozzle to significantly increase sea-level thrust without significantly impacting specific impulse. The TAN concept overcomes conventional engine limitations by injecting propellants and combusting in an annular region in the divergent section of the nozzle. This injection of propellants at moderate pressures allows for obtaining high thrust at takeoff without overexpansion thrust losses. The main chamber is operated at a constant pressure while maintaining a constant head rise and flow rate of the main propellant pumps. Recent hot-fire tests have validated the design approach and thrust augmentation ratios. Calculations of nozzle performance and wall pressures were made using computational fluid dynamics analyses with and without thrust augmentation flow, resulting in good agreement between calculated and measured quantities including augmentation thrust. This paper describes the TAN concept, the test setup, test results, and calculation results.

  16. Thrust faults and back thrust in Madison range of southwestern Montana foreland

    SciTech Connect

    Tysdal, R.G.

    1986-04-01

    In the Rocky Mountain foreland of southwestern Montana, a zone of Late Cretaceous thrust faults, named the Hilgard fault system, extends along the west side of the Madison Range from Hebgen Lake northward for about 50 mi (80 km). The thrust faults are steep at their leading edges but flatten westward beneath the associated plates, where they commonly dip 25/sup 0/-30/sup 0/. Structural lows and highs are apparent beneath the Beaver Creek plate, the major thrust sheet of the system, and correlate with salients and reentrants of the plate. The Beaver Creek plate consists primarily of Archean metamorphic rocks, but Phanerozoic strata are preserved along the northern part of the plate's leading edge. Only the forward part of the plate is preserved in the Madison Range because Cenozoic normal faults of the Madison Range fault system dropped much of the plate beneath the Madison Valley on the west. The Kirkwood plate lies east of and beneath the Beaver Creek plate, and contains structures of the eastern part of the Hilgard system. The central segment of the leading edge of the Kirkwood plate is not completely detached from underlying strata. The leading edge of the northern part of the plate, defined by the Cache Creek fault, is flanked on the west by an associated anticline. The southern end of the Cache Creek fault is an eastward-dipping back thrust, which abruptly steepens on the west adjacent to the anticline. Both the fault and the anticline are believed to have formed above a concealed detachment fault. The southern part of the Kirkwood plate displays structures interpreted to represent displacement transfer from the Beaver Creek plate. 9 figures.

  17. Thin films under chemical stress

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The goal of work on this project has been develop a set of experimental tools to allow investigators interested in transport, binding, and segregation phenomena in composite thin film structures to study these phenomena in situ. Work to-date has focuses on combining novel spatially-directed optical excitation phenomena, e.g. waveguide eigenmodes in thin dielectric slabs, surface plasmon excitations at metal-dielectric interfaces, with standard spectroscopies to understand dynamic processes in thin films and at interfaces. There have been two main scientific thrusts in the work and an additional technical project. In one thrust we have sought to develop experimental tools which will allow us to understand the chemical and physical changes which take place when thin polymer films are placed under chemical stress. In principle this stress may occur because the film is being swelled by a penetrant entrained in solvent, because interfacial reactions are occurring at one or more boundaries within the film structure, or because some component of the film is responding to an external stimulus (e.g. pH, temperature, electric field, or radiation). However all work to-date has focused on obtaining a clearer understanding penetrant transport phenomena. The other thrust has addressed the kinetics of adsorption of model n-alkanoic acids from organic solvents. Both of these thrusts are important within the context of our long-term goal of understanding the behavior of composite structures, composed of thin organic polymer films interspersed with Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and self-assembled monolayers. In addition there has been a good deal of work to develop the local technical capability to fabricate grating couplers for optical waveguide excitation. This work, which is subsidiary to the main scientific goals of the project, has been successfully completed and will be detailed as well. 41 refs., 10 figs.

  18. An alternative view of phospholipid phase behavior at the air-water interface. Microscope and film balance studies.

    PubMed Central

    von Tscharner, V; McConnell, H M

    1981-01-01

    Pure-lipid films at the water interface have surface-pressures vs. area isotherms that are often interpreted as involving first-order phase transitions from a condensed region to a liquid-expanded region. Two phases are presumed to coexist in the intermediate part of the isotherm. We constructed a film balance that could be placed on the stage of an epifluorescence microscope. A dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine film containing a low concentration of a fluorescent lipid probe showed an inhomogeneous fluorescence distribution in the so-called liquid-expanded region of the isotherm. Only the intermediate and condensed regions could be prepared so as to be optically homogeneous below 25 degrees C. We investigated membrane flow and lateral lipid diffusion in the membrane on the trough. The isotherms and isochores were measured. The results require, at least, a modified description of the monolayer structure in various regions of the isotherms. The solid-condensed region corresponds to a gel phase of the lipids where there is no flow in the membrane, lateral diffusion is low, the compressibility is low, and the membrane is optically homogeneous. The "liquid-condensed/liquid-expanded" region appears to be a homogeneous membrane where lateral diffusion and membrane flow are both rapid. This is a region of high compressibility. The "liquid-expanded" region is not homogeneous as seen under the microscope, and the flow of the surface layer can be very fast. PMID:6895478

  19. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David A.; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the test campaigns designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster (QVPT), but instead will describe the recent test campaign. In addition, it contains a brief description of the supporting radio frequency (RF) field analysis, lessons learned, and potential applications of the technology to space exploration missions. During the first (Cannae) portion of the campaign, approximately 40 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 935 megahertz and 28 watts. During the subsequent (tapered cavity) portion of the campaign, approximately 91 micronewtons of thrust were observed in an RF resonant cavity test article excited at approximately 1933 megahertz and 17 watts. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level. Test campaign results indicate that the RF resonant cavity thruster design, which is unique as an electric propulsion device, is producing a force that is not attributable to any classical electromagnetic phenomenon and therefore is potentially demonstrating an interaction with the quantum vacuum virtual plasma.

  20. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres, the two largest members of the main asteroid belt. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional low-thrust design objectives (like minimum change in velocity or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that cannot be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and turned out to be essential to the successful navigation of Dawn at Vesta.

  1. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the two largest members of the main asteroid belt, the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional thrust design objectives (like minimum (Delta)V or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that can not be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and necessary to successfully navigate Dawn through all orbital transfers at Vesta.

  2. Fold and thrust systems in Mass Transport Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, G. I.; Marco, S.; Levi, T.; Weinberger, R.

    2017-01-01

    Improvements in seismic reflection data from gravity-driven fold and thrust systems developed in offshore Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) reveal a number of significant features relating to displacement along thrusts. However, the data are still limited by the resolution of the seismic method, and are unable to provide detail of local fold and thrust processes. Investigation of exceptional gravity-driven contractional structures forming part of MTDs in lacustrine deposits of the Dead Sea Basin, enables us to present the first detailed outcrop analysis of fold and thrust systems cutting unlithified 'soft' sediments. We employ a range of established geometric techniques to our case study, including dip isogons, fault-propagation fold charts and displacement-distance diagrams previously developed for investigation of thrusts and folds in lithified rocks. Fault-propagation folds in unlithified sediments display tighter interlimb angles compared to models developed for lithified sequences. Values of stretch, which compares the relative thickness of equivalent hangingwall and footwall sequences measured along the fault plane, may be as low as only 0.3, which is significantly less than the minimum 0.5 values reported from thrusts cutting lithified rocks, and reflects the extreme variation in stratigraphic thickness around thrust-related folds. We suggest that the simple shear component of deformation in unlithified sediments may modify the forelimb thickness and interlimb angles to a greater extent than in lithified rocks. The average spacing of thrust ramps and the thickness of the thrust sequence display an approximate 5:1 ratio across a range of scales in MTDs. In general, thicker hangingwall and footwall sequences occur with larger thrust displacements, although displacement patterns on thrusts cutting unlithified (yet cohesive) sediments are more variable than those in lithified rocks. Line-length restoration of thrust systems in MTDs reveals 42% shortening, which

  3. Analysis of properties of thrust bearing in ship propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhu-Xin; Liu, Zheng-Lin

    2010-06-01

    Thrust bearing is a key component of the propulsion system of a ship. It transfers the propulsive forces from the propeller to the ship’s hull, allowing the propeller to push the ship ahead. The performance of a thrust bearing pad is critical. When the thrust bearing becomes damaged, it can cause the ship to lose power and can also affect its operational safety. For this paper, the distribution of the pressure field of a thrust pad was calculated with numerical method, applying Reynolds equation. Thrust bearing properties for loads were analyzed, given variations in outlet thickness of the pad and variations between the load and the slope of the pad. It was noticed that the distribution of pressure was uneven. As a result, increases of both the outlet thickness and the slope coefficient of the pad were able to improve load bearing capability.

  4. New Highly Dynamic Approach for Thrust Vector Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, M.; Ettl, J.; Grothe, D.; Hrbud, I.

    2015-09-01

    For a new launcher system a thrust vector control system is needed. This launch vehicle system consists of two rockets which are namely the VS-50 (two-stage suborbital vehicle) and the VLM-1 (three-stage microsatellite launch vehicle). VLM-1 and VS-50 are developed in a cooperation between the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the Brazilian Aeronautics and Space Institute (IAE). To keep these two rockets on its trajectory during flight a highly dynamic thrust vector control system is required. For the purpose of developing such a highly dynamic thrust vector control system a master thesis was written by the author. The development includes all mechanical constructions as well as control algorithms and electronics design. Moreover an optimization of control algorithms was made to increase the dynamic capabilities of the thrust vector control system. The composition of the right components plus the sophisticated control algorithm make the thrust vector control system highly dynamic.

  5. Convective Heat Transfer with and without Film Cooling in High Temperature, Fuel Rich and Lean Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Nathan J.

    Modern turbine engines require high turbine inlet temperatures and pressures to maximize thermal efficiency. Increasing the turbine inlet temperature drives higher heat loads on the turbine surfaces. In addition, increasing pressure ratio increases the turbine coolant temperature such that the ability to remove heat decreases. As a result, highly effective external film cooling is required to reduce the heat transfer to turbine surfaces. Testing of film cooling on engine hardware at engine temperatures and pressures can be exceedingly difficult and expensive. Thus, modern studies of film cooling are often performed at near ambient conditions. However, these studies are missing an important aspect in their characterization of film cooling effectiveness. Namely, they do not model effect of thermal property variations that occur within the boundary and film cooling layers at engine conditions. Also, turbine surfaces can experience significant radiative heat transfer that is not trivial to estimate analytically. The present research first computationally examines the effect of large temperature variations on a turbulent boundary layer. Subsequently, a method to model the effect of large temperature variations within a turbulent boundary layer in an environment coupled with significant radiative heat transfer is proposed and experimentally validated. Next, a method to scale turbine cooling from ambient to engine conditions via non-dimensional matching is developed computationally and the experimentally validated at combustion temperatures. Increasing engine efficiency and thrust to weight ratio demands have driven increased combustor fuel-air ratios. Increased fuel-air ratios increase the possibility of unburned fuel species entering the turbine. Alternatively, advanced ultra-compact combustor designs have been proposed to decrease combustor length, increase thrust, or generate power for directed energy weapons. However, the ultra-compact combustor design requires a

  6. Initial Thrust Measurements of Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Natalie R. S.; Scogin, Tyler; Liu, Thomas M.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Dankanich, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Electronegative ion thrusters are a variation of traditional gridded ion thruster technology differentiated by the production and acceleration of both positive and negative ions. Benefits of electronegative ion thrusters include the elimination of lifetime-limiting cathodes from the thruster architecture and the ability to generate appreciable thrust from both charge species. While much progress has been made in the development of electronegative ion thruster technology, direct thrust measurements are required to unambiguously demonstrate the efficacy of the concept and support continued development. In the present work, direct thrust measurements of the thrust produced by the MINT (Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster) are performed using an inverted-pendulum thrust stand in the High-Power Electric Propulsion Laboratory's Vacuum Test Facility-1 at the Georgia Institute of Technology with operating pressures ranging from 4.8 x 10(exp -5) and 5.7 x 10(exp -5) torr. Thrust is recorded while operating with a propellant volumetric mixture ratio of 5:1 argon to nitrogen with total volumetric flow rates of 6, 12, and 24 sccm (0.17, 0.34, and 0.68 mg/s). Plasma is generated using a helical antenna at 13.56 MHz and radio frequency (RF) power levels of 150 and 350 W. The acceleration grid assembly is operated using both sinusoidal and square waveform biases of +/-350 V at frequencies of 4, 10, 25, 125, and 225 kHz. Thrust is recorded for two separate thruster configurations: with and without the magnetic filter. No thrust is discernable during thruster operation without the magnetic filter for any volumetric flow rate, RF forward Power level, or acceleration grid biasing scheme. For the full thruster configuration, with the magnetic filter installed, a brief burst of thrust of approximately 3.75 mN +/- 3 mN of error is observed at the start of grid operation for a volumetric flow rate of 24 sccm at 350 W RF power using a sinusoidal waveform grid bias at 125 kHz and +/- 350 V

  7. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of aluminum-copper systems: Air-formed films to complex conversion coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    Understanding the mechanism of corrosion inhibition by carcinogenic chromates is critical to the development of environmentally safe coatings containing benign chromate substitutes. An integrated approach to correlate the surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of a wide range of systems has been undertaken. Electrochemical behavior was studied by open circuit potential (OCP) measurements, potentiodynamic polarization, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Surface chemistry was studied using variable-angle X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VAXPS), X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), infrared spectroscopy and synchrotron infrared micro spectroscopy (SIRMS) and Raman spectroscopy. Using SIRMS, the ASTM recommended acetone degreasing was shown to initiate pitting of AA2024-T3 via photochemical formation of acetic acid. Due to the known tendency for photoreduction of Cr6+(3d0) following soft X-ray dosage during XPS, a novel method has been developed to prevent this reduction. This method yields, for the first time, an accurate determination of the Cr6+ content of a CCC. The pretreatment of the alloy prior to conversion coating has been shown to have significant influence on the surface intermetallic distribution, composition and corrosion resistance of the initial oxide film and subsequent conversion coating. AlconoxRTM pretreatment was found to result in a highly protective surface film that inhibits the subsequent formation of CCC. The study also shows that coupling of the alloy to platinum during the bromate pretreatment increases the corrosion resistance of the subsequently formed CCC by over an order of magnitude due to reduction in surface copper content. Adsorption of chromate ion on the passive oxide film formed on the metal surface was observed to induce fixed negative charges that inhibit chloride ingress on planar surfaces. While deprotonation of the aluminum hydroxide film by chromate was

  8. Sandbox modelling of sequential thrusting in a mechanically two-layered system and its implications in fold-and-thrust belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Puspendu; Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-10-01

    Many fold-and-thrust belts display multi-storied thrust sequences, characterizing a composite architecture of the thrust wedges. Despite dramatic progress in sandbox modelling over the last three decades, our understanding of such composite thrust-wedge mechanics is limited and demands a re-visit to the problem of sequential thrusting in mechanically layered systems. This study offers a new approach to sandbox modelling, designed with a two-layered sandpack simulating a mechanically weak Coulomb layer, resting coherently upon a stronger Coulomb layer. Our experimental models reproduce strikingly similar styles of the multi-storied frontal thrust sequences observed in natural fold-and- thrust belts. The upper weak horizon undergoes sequential thrusting at a high spatial frequency, forming numerous, closely spaced frontal thrusts, whereas the lower strong horizon produces widely spaced thrusts with progressive horizontal shortening. This contrasting thrust progression behaviour gives rise to composite thrust architecture in the layered sandpack. We show the evolution of such composite thrust sequences as a function of frictional strength (μb) at the basal detachment and thickness ratio (Tr) between the weak and strong layers. For any given values of Tr and μb, the two thrust sequences progress at different rates; the closely-spaced, upper thrust sequence advances forelandward at a faster rate than the widely-spaced, lower thrust sequence. Basal friction (μb) has little effects on the vergence of thrusts in the upper weak layer; they verge always towards foreland, irrespective of Tr values. But, the lower strong layer develops back-vergent thrusts when μb is low (∼0.36). In our experiments, closely spaced thrusts in the upper sequence experience intense reactivation due to their interaction with widely spaced thrusts in the lower sequence. The interaction eventually affects the wedge topography, leading to two distinct parts: inner and outer wedges

  9. Lift and thrust generation by a butterfly-like 3D flapping wing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kosuke; Inamuro, Takaji

    2013-11-01

    The flapping flight of tiny insects such as a butterfly is of fundamental interest not only in biology itself but also in its practical use for the development of micro air vehicles. It is known that a butterfly flaps downward for generating lift force and backward for generating thrust force. In this study, we consider a simple butterfly-like 3D flapping wing model whose body is a thin rod, wings are rigid and rectangular, and wing motion is simplified. We investigate the lift and thrust generation by the butterfly-like flapping wing model by using the immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method. Firstly, we compute the lift and thrust forces when the body of the model is fixed for Reynolds numbers in the range of 50 - 1000. In addition, we evaluate the supportable mass for each Reynolds number by using the computed lift force. Secondly, we simulate the free flight where the body can move translationally but cannot rotate. As results, we find that the evaluated supportable mass can be supported even in the free flight, and the wing model with the mass and the Reynolds number of a fruit fly can go upward against the gravity. Finally, we simulate the effect of the rotation of the body. As results, we find that the body has a large pitching motion and consequently gets off-balance.

  10. Thrust shock vector control of an axisymmetric conical supersonic nozzle via secondary transverse gas injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zmijanovic, V.; Lago, V.; Sellam, M.; Chpoun, A.

    2014-01-01

    Transverse secondary gas injection into the supersonic flow of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle is investigated to describe the effects of the fluidic thrust vectoring within the framework of a small satellite launcher. Cold-flow dry-air experiments are performed in a supersonic wind tunnel using two identical supersonic conical nozzles with the different transverse injection port positions. The complex three-dimensional flow field generated by the supersonic cross-flows in these test nozzles was examined. Valuable experimental data were confronted and compared with the results obtained from the numerical simulations. Different nozzle models are numerically simulated under experimental conditions and then further investigated to determine which parameters significantly affect thrust vectoring. Effects which characterize the nozzle and thrust vectoring performances are established. The results indicate that with moderate secondary to primary mass flow rate ratios, ranging around 5 %, it is possible to achieve pertinent vector side forces. It is also revealed that injector positioning and geometry have a strong effect on the shock vector control system and nozzle performances.

  11. Thrust kinematics in the Kohat Plateau, Trans Indus Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Iftikhar Ahmed; McElroy, Ronan

    The Kohat Plateau consists of a heavily deformed and structurally elevated thrust sheet. Pop-ups, broad synclines and narrow fault- and evaporite-cored anticlines record high-level translation of a large thrust mass along Eocene evaporites. A lower detachment level is also inferred, located at the base of the Mesozoic-Palaeozoic section. This lower detachment is common to both the Kohat and the adjacent Potwar Plateaux whereas the upper level is restricted to the Kohat. Beneath the Kohat, a blind imbricate stack of pre-Tertiary rocks is developed. Above their roof thrust, the foreland basin-fill of Kohat records greater internal deformation compared to that of the adjacent Potwar Plateau. In contrast, the Potwar thrust belt displays a greater amount of overthrusting on its basal surface, this displacement emerging in the Salt Range. Total shortening across the two plateaux is comparable, but is accommodated in an areally smaller thrust belt with a higher structural relief in the Kohat as compared to the Potwar structural province. The resultant geographical offset of the thrust front is denoted by the Hukni-Kalabagh lateral ramp. The differences in the thrust kinematics are tentatively suggested to be caused by the mechanical response of the orogenic wedge to different imposed geometries of the wedge laterally within the basin. The Kohat Plateau appears to have a lower basal dip than does the western Potwar, and thus shows greater internal deformation.

  12. Structural style of the Marathon thrust belt, West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Robert G.; Varga, Robert J.; Altany, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    The Marathon portion of the Ouachita thrust belt consists of a highly deformed allochthonous wedge of Cambrian-Pennsylvanian slope strata (Marathon facies) that was transported to the northwest and emplaced over Pennsylvanian foredeep sediments. The foredeep strata in turn overlie early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments which are deformed by late Paleozoic basement-involved reverse faults. The Dugout Creek thrust is the basal thrust of the allochthon. Shortening in this sheet and overlying sheets is ˜80%. Steep imbricate faults link the Dugout Creek thrust to upper level detachments forming complex duplex zones. Progressive thrusting and shortening within the allochthon folded the upper level detachments and associated thrust sheets. The Caballos Novaculite is the most competent unit within the Marathon facies and controlled development of prominent detachment folds. Deeper imbricate sheets composed of the Late Pennsylvanian foredeep strata, and possibly early-middle Paleozoic shelfal sediments developed concurrently with emplacement of the Marathon allochthon and folded the overlying allochthon. Following termination of thrusting in the earliest Permian, subsidence and deposition shifted northward to the Delaware, Midland and Val Verde foreland basins.

  13. Thrust Stand Characterization of the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamant, Kevin D.; Pollard, James E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Direct thrust measurements have been made on the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion engine using a standard pendulum style thrust stand constructed specifically for this application. Values have been obtained for the full 40-level throttle table, as well as for a few off-nominal operating conditions. Measurements differ from the nominal NASA throttle table 10 (TT10) values by 3.1 percent at most, while at 30 throttle levels (TLs) the difference is less than 2.0 percent. When measurements are compared to TT10 values that have been corrected using ion beam current density and charge state data obtained at The Aerospace Corporation, they differ by 1.2 percent at most, and by 1.0 percent or less at 37 TLs. Thrust correction factors calculated from direct thrust measurements and from The Aerospace Corporation s plume data agree to within measurement error for all but one TL. Thrust due to cold flow and "discharge only" operation has been measured, and analytical expressions are presented which accurately predict thrust based on thermal thrust generation mechanisms.

  14. An optical spot test for the detection of dopamine in human urine using stabilized in air lipid films.

    PubMed

    Nikolelis, Dimitrios P; Drivelos, Dimitrios A; Simantiraki, Maria G; Koinis, Spyros

    2004-04-15

    The present technique describes a simple, sensitive spot test for the rapid one-shot detection of dopamine in human urine using lipid films with incorporated resorcin[4]arene receptor that are synthesized by a chemical reaction with a methacrylate polymer on a glass fiber filter. The lipid films without the receptor provided fluorescence under a UV lamp. The use of the receptor in these films quenched this fluorescence, and the color became similar to that of the filters without the lipid films. A drop of dopamine or urine containing this stimulant provided a "switching on" of the fluorescence, which allows the rapid detection of this stimulant in human urine at 10(-8) M concentrations. The novelty of the present work is that it opens new routes in the field of biosensing, i.e., development of sensitive, rapid, and simple methods for detecting species based on the fluorescence of the lipid membranes on a polymer film, and provides a spot test technique for the rapid detection of dopamine. The effect of potent interferences including a wide range of compounds usually found in human urine (i.e., ascorbic aid, glucose, leucine, glycine, tartrate, citrate, bicarbonate, and caffeine) was examined using an aqueous buffered solution that contained the potent interference and dopamine at two lower concentration levels (i.e., 3 x 10(-8)-10(-8) M). The effect of proteins and lipids was also investigated at these two lower dopamine concentration levels in aqueous buffered solution. The results showed no interferences from all these constituents at concentrations usually found in human urine samples; for example, albumin up to 3.22 g/L concentration levels did not provide any interference (i.e., no fluorescence). A drop of urine containing this stimulant provided similar results, i.e., a "switching on" of the fluorescence that allows a technique for the rapid detection of this stimulant in human urine at 10(-8) M concentrations. The technique is not based on a calibration

  15. Propeller thrust analysis using Prandtl's lifting line theory, a comparison between the experimental thrust and the thrust predicted by Prandtl's lifting line theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesler, Steven R.

    The lifting line theory was first developed by Prandtl and was used primarily on analysis of airplane wings. Though the theory is about one hundred years old, it is still used in the initial calculations to find the lift of a wing. The question that guided this thesis was, "How close does Prandtl's lifting line theory predict the thrust of a propeller?" In order to answer this question, an experiment was designed that measured the thrust of a propeller for different speeds. The measured thrust was compared to what the theory predicted. In order to do this experiment and analysis, a propeller needed to be used. A walnut wood ultralight propeller was chosen that had a 1.30 meter (51 inches) length from tip to tip. In this thesis, Prandtl's lifting line theory was modified to account for the different incoming velocity depending on the radial position of the airfoil. A modified equation was used to reflect these differences. A working code was developed based on this modified equation. A testing rig was built that allowed the propeller to be rotated at high speeds while measuring the thrust. During testing, the rotational speed of the propeller ranged from 13-43 rotations per second. The thrust from the propeller was measured at different speeds and ranged from 16-33 Newton's. The test data were then compared to the theoretical results obtained from the lifting line code. A plot in Chapter 5 (the results section) shows the theoretical vs. actual thrust for different rotational speeds. The theory over predicted the actual thrust of the propeller. Depending on the rotational speed, the error was: at low speeds 36%, at low to moderate speeds 84%, and at high speeds the error increased to 195%. Different reasons for these errors are discussed.

  16. Electronegative Gas Thruster - Direct Thrust Measurement Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John (Principal Investigator); Aanesland, Ane; Polzin, Kurt; Walker, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    This effort is an international collaboration and academic partnership to mature an innovative electric propulsion (EP) thruster concept to TRL 3 through direct thrust measurement. The initial target application is for Small Satellites, but can be extended to higher power. The Plasma propulsion with Electronegative GASES (PEGASES) concept simplifies ion thruster operation, eliminates a neutralizer requirement and should yield longer life capabilities and lower cost implementation over conventional gridded ion engines. The basic proof-of concept has been demonstrated and matured to TRL 2 over the past several years by researchers at the Laboratoire de Physique des Plasma in France. Due to the low maturity of the innovation, there are currently no domestic investments in electronegative gas thrusters anywhere within NASA, industry or academia. The end product of this Center Innovation Fund (CIF) project will be a validation of the proof-of-concept, maturation to TRL 3 and technology assessment report to summarize the potential for the PEGASES concept to supplant the incumbent technology. Information exchange with the foreign national will be one-way with the exception of the test results. Those test results will first go through a standard public release ITAR/export control review, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum, and the results will be presented in a public technical forum.

  17. Electromechanical actuation for thrust vector control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Mary Ellen

    1990-01-01

    The advanced launch system (ALS), is a launch vehicle that is designed to be cost-effective, highly reliable, and operationally efficient with a goal of reducing the cost per pound to orbit. An electromechanical actuation (EMA) system is being developed as an attractive alternative to the hydraulic systems. The controller will integrate 20 kHz resonant link power management and distribution (PMAD) technology and pulse population modulation (PPM) techniques to implement field-oriented vector control (FOVC) of a new advanced induction motor. The driver and the FOVC will be microprocessor controlled. For increased system reliability, a built-in test (BITE) capability will be included. This involves introducing testability into the design of a system such that testing is calibrated and exercised during the design, manufacturing, maintenance, and prelaunch activities. An actuator will be integrated with the motor controller for performance testing of the EMA thrust vector control (TVC) system. The EMA system and work proposed for the future are discussed.

  18. Powered Descent Guidance with General Thrust-Pointing Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, John M., III; Acikmese, Behcet; Blackmore, Lars

    2013-01-01

    The Powered Descent Guidance (PDG) algorithm and software for generating Mars pinpoint or precision landing guidance profiles has been enhanced to incorporate thrust-pointing constraints. Pointing constraints would typically be needed for onboard sensor and navigation systems that have specific field-of-view requirements to generate valid ground proximity and terrain-relative state measurements. The original PDG algorithm was designed to enforce both control and state constraints, including maximum and minimum thrust bounds, avoidance of the ground or descent within a glide slope cone, and maximum speed limits. The thrust-bound and thrust-pointing constraints within PDG are non-convex, which in general requires nonlinear optimization methods to generate solutions. The short duration of Mars powered descent requires guaranteed PDG convergence to a solution within a finite time; however, nonlinear optimization methods have no guarantees of convergence to the global optimal or convergence within finite computation time. A lossless convexification developed for the original PDG algorithm relaxed the non-convex thrust bound constraints. This relaxation was theoretically proven to provide valid and optimal solutions for the original, non-convex problem within a convex framework. As with the thrust bound constraint, a relaxation of the thrust-pointing constraint also provides a lossless convexification that ensures the enhanced relaxed PDG algorithm remains convex and retains validity for the original nonconvex problem. The enhanced PDG algorithm provides guidance profiles for pinpoint and precision landing that minimize fuel usage, minimize landing error to the target, and ensure satisfaction of all position and control constraints, including thrust bounds and now thrust-pointing constraints.

  19. Role of detachments and thrust kinematics in Structural evolution of Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belt in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, Humaad; Zeilinger, Gerold; Sobel, Edward; Heidarzadeh, Ghasem

    2016-04-01

    The Kohat and Potwar fold thrust belts in Pakistan represent the outermost external zone of the Himalayan fold and thrust system. The Main Boundary thrust marks their northern extent, showing that they are genetically linked; however, both exhibit a distinct contrast between the structural style at the surface and subsurface. This contrast becomes more conspicuous at the leading edge of the thrust belt where the Potwar allochothon extends further south, linked to Kohat in the north via an active strike-slip fault. Previous workers explained the structural evolution of the two belts separately, disregarding the influence of similar fold and thrusts developed in both belts. This research focuses on the preparation of a 3D structural model at the boundary of the two thrust belts to understand similarities and differences in their structural style and evolution. The model is constrained by integrating field, seismic and well data for better subsurface interpretation. Cross sections show that Potwar evolved on thrust faults originating from a basal detachment in Precambrian (pC) salt and terminating in Miocene Molasse forming duplexes of pre Himalayan strata. To the south, the Potwar allochothon is glided over a salt detachment with rare internal deformation toward its leading edge, forming fault bend fold thrust structure known as Salt range. The structural evolution towards the west in Kohat results from deformation on multiple detachment horizons at the pC salt, Eocene evaporites and Miocene Molasse. Disharmonic folding over Eocene evaporites is evident from their presence in the cores of outcropping folds. In the subsurface, closely spaced thrusts cut up section from basal detachment terminates in Eocene evaporites forming duplex in northern part of area. In south change of lithological facies from evaporites to limestone shift detachment level upward in to molasse strata which resemble structural style in northern Potwar. Thrusts at the surface evolved from the

  20. Managing Momentum on the Dawn Low Thrust Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Brett A.; Vanelli, Charles A.; Swenka, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    Dawn is low-thrust interplanetary spacecraft enroute to the asteroids Vesta and Ceres in an effort to better understand the early creation of the solar system. After launch in September 2007, the spacecraft will flyby Mars in February 2009 before arriving at Vesta in summer of 2011 and Ceres in early 2015. Three solar electric ion-propulsion engines are used to provide the primary thrust for the Dawn spacecraft. Ion engines produce a very small but very efficient force, and therefore must be thrusting almost continuously to realize the necessary change in velocity to reach Vesta and Ceres.

  1. The Role of Stress Interaction in Thrust and Subduction Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. R.; Lin, J.

    2003-12-01

    Key features of thrust earthquake triggering, inhibition, and clustering can be explained by Coulomb stress changes. Whereas slip on surface-cutting thrust faults drops the stress in most of the adjacent crust, slip on blind thrust faults increases the stress on some nearby zones, particularly above the source fault. Blind thrusts can thus trigger slip on secondary faults at shallow depth, and typically produce broadly distributed aftershocks. Short thrust ruptures are effective at triggering earthquakes of similar size on adjacent thrust faults. We calculate that during a progressive thrust sequence in central California during 1982-1985, the Mw=6.7 Coalinga earthquake brought the subsequent 1983 Mw=6.0 Nuñez and 1985 Mw=6.0 Kettleman Hills ruptures 10 and 1 bars closer to Coulomb failure. On a larger scale, slip on major strike-slip faults modulates the stress acting on nearby thrust faults. We calculate that the 1857 Mw=7.9 Fort Tejon San Andreas earthquake and subsequent interseismic slip brought the Coalinga fault ~1 bar closer to failure, and inhibited failure elsewhere on the Coast Ranges thrust faults. The 1857 event also promoted failure on the White Wolf thrust fault by 8 bars, which ruptured in the 1952 Mw=7.3 Kern County shock. The idealized stress-change calculations also explain key features of seismicity accompanying large subduction events. Subduction zone ruptures are calculated to promote normal faulting events in the outer rise, and to promote thrust faulting events on the periphery of the seismic rupture and on its downdip extension. These features are evident in aftershocks of the 1957 Mw=9.1 Aleutian and other large subduction earthquakes. We further examine stress changes on the rupture surface imparted by the 1960 Mw=9.5 and 1995 Mw=8.1 Chile earthquakes, for which detailed slip models are available. Calculated Coulomb stress increases of 2-20-bars correspond closely to sites of aftershocks and postseismic slip, whereas aftershocks are

  2. A Regeneratively-Cooled Thrust Chamber for the Fastrac Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kendall; Sparks, Dave; Woodcock, Gordon; Jim Turner (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of presentation slides about the development of the regeneratively cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine. The Fastrac engine was originally developed to demonstrate low cost design and fabrication methods. It was intended to be used in an expendable booster. The regen thrust chamber enables a more cost efficient test program. Using the low cost design and fabrication methodology designed for the 12K regeneratively cooled chamber, the contractor designed, developed and fabricated a regeneratively cooled thrust chamber for the Fastrac engine.

  3. Breadboard RL10-11B low thrust operating mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmiec, Thomas D.; Galler, Donald E.

    1987-01-01

    Cryogenic space engines require a cooling process to condition engine hardware to operating temperature before start. This can be accomplished most efficiently by burning propellants that would otherwise be dumped overboard after cooling the engine. The resultant low thrust operating modes are called Tank Head Idle and Pumped Idle. During February 1984, Pratt & Whitney conducted a series of tests demonstrating operation of the RL10 rocket engines at low thrust levels using a previously untried hydrogen/oxygen heat exchanger. The initial testing of the RL10-11B Breadboard Low Thrust Engine is described. The testing demonstrated operation at both tank head idle and pumped idle modes.

  4. Characteristics of thrust fault imbrication near the frontal edge of the Blue Ridge thrust sheet, Buffalo Mountain, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Duddy, M.M.; Woodward, N.B.

    1985-01-01

    The Buffalo Mountain thrust sheet, located along the western margin of the Blue Ridge in northeastern Tennessee, provides an excellent opportunity to examine transitional structural styles and deformation mechanisms between the Valley and Ridge and Blue Ridge. Previous interpretation suggests that, because of pre-fault tilting, thrust faults within the Buffalo Mountain complex cut down stratigraphic section. Geometric data from the present study indicate, however, that the thrust faults cut up section with stratigraphic separations of up to 16,500'. Footwall and hanging wall bedding orientations reveal a stair-step thrust geometry; the Unicoi Fm. (basal Chilhowee Gp. quartzite) is a hanging wall flat, and the Knox Gp. (Cambro-Ordovician carbonate) is a footwall ramp. Ductile and brittle deformation mechanisms are represented by mesofabric elements. Important deformation mechanisms and elements include: flexural slip and flexural flow folding styles, pressure solution cleavage, extensional and contractional fractures, quartz filled tensional fractures and cataclastic fault zones. Although previous workers have determined that thrusting within the Blue Ridge occurs in an out-of-sequence pattern, the Buffalo Mountain thrust complex provides an example of in-sequence thrusting. Thus, based on this example, deformation styles and mechanisms within the Blue Ridge appear to be similar to Valley and Ridge deformation styles and mechanisms.

  5. Interplay of thrust, back-thrust, strike-slip and salt tectonics in a fold and thrust belt system: an example from Zakynthos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelilidis, A.; Papatheodorou, G.; Maravelis, A. G.; Christodoulou, D.; Tserolas, P.; Fakiris, E.; Dimas, X.; Georgiou, N.; Ferentinos, G.

    2016-10-01

    The southwestern flank of the Hellenic fold and thrust belt, situated along the southern edge of the Dinarides-Albanides-Hellenides continental convergent zone, was examined for reconstructing the tectonic deformation. This investigation presents an integrated study of onshore sedimentological and structural analyses, as well as offshore seismic lines, across the Pliocene-Pleistocene sedimentary succession in Zakynthos Island. Back-thrust faults, using the Triassic evaporites as decollement surface, during the Pliocene, and coeval diapiric intrusions formed three sub-basins on the hangingwall of the Kalamaki back-thrust fault. This interaction is responsible for the growth of the Skopos Mountain and the soft sediment deformation that formed synclines and slumps, respectively. Back-thrust and strike-slip faults were active during the early Pleistocene, and diapiric intrusions modified the bathymetry on the sea floor, giving rise to slumps and recumbent folds. At least five events of synsedimentary diapiric intrusions have been recognized and are marked by five slump horizons. During the Holocene, the diapiric intrusions between the Kalamaki back-thrust and the Vrachionas anticline could be either related to normal faults or gravitationally driven.

  6. ZnO-based thin film transistors employing aluminum titanate gate dielectrics deposited by spray pyrolysis at ambient air.

    PubMed

    Afouxenidis, Dimitrios; Mazzocco, Riccardo; Vourlias, Georgios; Livesley, Peter J; Krier, Anthony; Milne, William I; Kolosov, Oleg; Adamopoulos, George

    2015-04-08

    The replacement of SiO2 gate dielectrics with metal oxides of higher dielectric constant has led to the investigation of a wide range of materials with superior properties compared with SiO2. Despite their attractive properties, these high-k dielectrics are usually manufactured using costly vacuum-based techniques. To overcome this bottleneck, research has focused on the development of alternative deposition methods based on solution-processable metal oxides. Here we report the application of spray pyrolysis for the deposition and investigation of Al2x-1·TixOy dielectrics as a function of the [Ti(4+)]/[Ti(4+)+2·Al(3+)] ratio and their implementation in thin film transistors (TFTs) employing spray-coated ZnO as the active semiconducting channels. The films are studied by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, impedance spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and field-effect measurements. Analyses reveal amorphous Al2x-1·TixOy dielectrics that exhibit a wide band gap (∼4.5 eV), low roughness (∼0.9 nm), high dielectric constant (k ∼ 13), Schottky pinning factor S of ∼0.44 and very low leakage currents (<5 nA/cm(2)). TFTs employing stoichiometric Al2O3·TiO2 gate dielectrics and ZnO semiconducting channels exhibit excellent electron transport characteristics with low operating voltages (∼10 V), negligible hysteresis, high on/off current modulation ratio of ∼10(6), subthreshold swing (SS) of ∼550 mV/dec and electron mobility of ∼10 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1).

  7. Computational Study of Surface Tension and Wall Adhesion Effects on an Oil Film Flow Underneath an Air Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celic, Alan; Zilliac, Gregory G.

    1998-01-01

    The fringe-imaging skin friction (FISF) technique, which was originally developed by D. J. Monson and G. G. Mateer at Ames Research Center and recently extended to 3-D flows, is the most accurate skin friction measurement technique currently available. The principle of this technique is that the skin friction at a point on an aerodynamic surface can be determined by measuring the time-rate-of-change of the thickness of an oil drop placed on the surface under the influence of the external air boundary layer. Lubrication theory is used to relate the oil-patch thickness variation to shear stress. The uncertainty of FISF measurements is estimated to be as low as 4 percent, yet little is known about the effects of surface tension and wall adhesion forces on the measured results. A modified version of the free-surface Navier-Stokes solver RIPPLE, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratories, was used to compute the time development of an oil drop on a surface under a simulated air boundary layer. RIPPLE uses the volume of fluid method to track the surface and the continuum surface force approach to model surface tension and wall adhesion effects. The development of an oil drop, over a time period of approximately 4 seconds, was studied. Under the influence of shear imposed by an air boundary layer, the computed profile of the drop rapidly changes from its initial circular-arc shape to a wedge-like shape. Comparison of the time-varying oil-thickness distributions computed using RIPPLE and also computed using a greatly simplified numerical model of an oil drop equation which does not include surface tension and wall adhesion effects) was used to evaluate the effects of surface tension on FISF measurement results. The effects of surface tension were found to be small but not necessarily negligible in some cases.

  8. Deployable Engine Air Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    On approach, next-generation aircraft are likely to have airframe noise levels that are comparable to or in excess of engine noise. ATA Engineering, Inc. (ATA) is developing a novel quiet engine air brake (EAB), a device that generates "equivalent drag" within the engine through stream thrust reduction by creating a swirling outflow in the turbofan exhaust nozzle. Two Phase II projects were conducted to mature this technology: (1) a concept development program (CDP) and (2) a system development program (SDP).

  9. Out-of-sequence thrusting in polycyclic thrust belts: An example from the Mesozoic Yanshan belt, North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengming; Zhang, Changhou; Cope, Tim D.; Lin, Yi

    2016-09-01

    The EW trending Yanshan belt, an intraplate fold-thrust belt located in the northern North China Craton that has experienced several episodes of deformation widely separated in time, is characterized by out-of-sequence thrusts. According to detailed mapping in the central Yanshan belt, five geometric and stratigraphic criteria used to aid in determining whether a thrust has an out-of-sequence geometry or not can be recognized. They are (1) unconformable relationships, (2) inclination of fault surfaces, (3) irregular changes in apparent offset along strike, (4) short fault length relative to apparent offset, and (5) in-sequence geometry. With the help of these criteria, two generations of out-of-sequence thrusts that postdate the original in-sequence thrusting in the central Yanshan belt are recognized. The ancestral southward verging fold-and-thrust belt that formed prior to 180 Ma was deformed and cut by two younger generations of faults that are probably more deeply rooted and are constrained to between 172-165 Ma and 152-135 Ma. A series of thrusts with opposite vergence formed during the last period, resulting in abundant abnormal field relationships such as younger-on-older thrust relations, fold truncation, and cutting down-section. The nature and occurrence of faults in the Yanshan belt implies that superimposed deformation, a common feature in polycyclic orogenic belts, is a mechanism for the generation of out-of-sequence thrusting. This adds to mechanisms already described in the literature, such as maintaining constant critical taper at an orogenic scale, inhibition of the deformation front, and lateral changes in the nature of the décollement horizons.

  10. Development of pneumatic thrust-deflecting powered-lift systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, R. J.; Nichols, J. H., Jr.; Harris, M. J.; Eppel, J. C.; Shovlin, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Improvements introduced into the Circulation Control Wing/Upper Surface Blowing (CCW/USB) STOL concept (Harris et al., 1982) are described along with results of the full-scale static ground tests and model-scale wind tunnel investigations. Tests performed on the full-scale pneumatic thrust-deflecting system installed on the NASA QSRA aircraft have demonstrated that, relative to the original baseline configuration, a doubling of incremental thrust deflection due to blowing resulted from improvements that increased the blowing span and momentum, as well as from variations in blowing slot height and geometry of the trailing edge. A CCW/Over the Wing model has been built and tested, which was shown to be equivalent to the CCW/USB system in terms of pneumatic thrust deflection and lift generation, while resolving the problem of cruise thrust loss due to exhaust scrubbing on the wing upper surface.

  11. Aerodynamics of thrust vectoring by Navier-Stokes solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tseng, Jing-Biau; Lan, C. Edward

    1991-01-01

    Induced aerodynamics from thrust vectoring are investigated by a computational fluid dynamic method. A thin-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes code with multiblock capability is used. Jet properties are specified on the nozzle exit plane to simulate the jet momentum. Results for a rectangular jet in a cross flow are compared with data to verify the code. Further verification of the calculation is made by comparing the numerical results with transonic data for a wing-body combination. Additional calculations were performed to elucidate the following thrust vectoring effects: the thrust vectoring effect on shock and expansion waves, induced effects on nearby surfaces, and the thrust vectoring effect on the leading edge vortex.

  12. Low-thrust solar electric propulsion navigation simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagar, H. J.; Eller, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    An interplanetary low-thrust, solar electric propulsion mission simulation program suitable for navigation studies is presented. The mathematical models for trajectory simulation, error compensation, and tracking motion are described. The languages, input-output procedures, and subroutines are included.

  13. Control-Volume Analysis Of Thrust-Augmenting Ejectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.

    1990-01-01

    New method of analysis of transient flow in thrust-augmenting ejector based on control-volume formulation of governing equations. Considered as potential elements of propulsion subsystems of short-takeoff/vertical-landing airplanes.

  14. Interactions between polymers and lipid monolayers at the air/water interface: surface behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate)-cholesterol mixed films.

    PubMed

    Miñones Conde, M; Conde, O; Trillo, J M; Miñones, J

    2010-08-26

    The behavior of mixed monolayers of cholesterol and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) with molecular weights of M(w) = 120,000 g/mol and M(w) = 15,000 g/mol was investigated at the air/water interface using Langmuir and Brewster angle microscopy techniques. From the data of surface pressure (pi)-area (A) isotherms, compressional modulus-surface pressure (C(s)(-1)-pi) curves, and film thickness, complemented with Brewster angle microscopy images, the interaction between the components was analyzed. Regardless of the surface pressure (pi = 10, 20, or 30 mN/m) at which the mean molecular/monomer areas (Am) were calculated, the Am-mole fraction plots (corresponding to X(PMMA) = 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9) show that all the experimental points obtained are placed on the theoretical straight line calculated according to the additivity rule. This fact, together with the existence of two collapses in the mixed monolayers and with the fact that the surface pressure of the liquid-expanded LE-L'E phase transition of PMMA does not change with the monolayer composition, demonstrates the immiscibility of the film components at the interface. The application of the Crisp phase rule to the phase diagram of PMMA-cholesterol mixed monolayers helps to explain the existence of a biphasic system, regardless of their composition and surface pressure. Besides, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) images showed the existence of heterogeneous cholesterol domains with high reflectivity immersed in a homogeneous polymer separate phase with low reflectivity.

  15. Thrust Enhancement in Hypervelocity Nozzles by Chemical Catalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Carpenter, Mark H.; Drummond, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    In the hypersonic flight regime, the air-breathing supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) has been shown to be a viable propulsion system. The current designs of scramjet engines provide performance benefits only up to a Mach number of 14. Performance losses increase rapidly as the Mach number increases. To extend the applicability of scram'jets beyond Mach 14, research is being conducted in the area of inlet and wave drag reduction, skin-friction and heat-transfer reduction, nozzle loss minimization, low-loss mixing, and combustion enhancement. For high Mach number applications, hydrogen is the obvious fuel choice because of its high energy content per unit mass in comparison with conventional fuels. These flight conditions require engines to operate at supersonic internal velocities, high combustor temperatures, and low static pressures. The high static temperature condition enhances the production of radicals such as H and OH, and the low-pressure condition slows the reaction rates, particularly the recombination reactions. High-temperature and low-pressure constraints, in combination with a small residence time, result in a radical-rich exhaust gas mixture exiting the combustor. At high Mach number conditions (due to low residence time), H and OH do not have enough time to recombine ; thus, a significant amount of energy is lost as these high-energy free radical are exhausted. The objective of the present study is to conduct a flowfield analysis for a typical nozzle geometry for NASP-type vehicle to assess for thrust enhancement in hypervelocity nozzles by substituting small amount of phosphine for hydrogen.

  16. Lower extremity thrust and non-thrust joint mobilization for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Brad G; Simon, Corey B

    2014-05-01

    A 40-year old female presented to physical therapy with a one-year history of insidious right anteromedial and anterolateral knee pain. Additionally, the patient had a history of multiple lateral ankle sprains bilaterally, the last sprain occurring on the right ankle 1 year prior to the onset of knee pain. The patient was evaluated and given a physical therapy diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), with associated talocrural and tibiofemoral joint hypomobility limiting ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension, respectively. Treatment included a high-velocity low amplitude thrust manipulation to the talocrural joint, which helped restore normal ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. The patient also received tibiofemoral joint non-thrust manual therapy to regain normal knee extension mobility prior to implementing further functional progression exercises to her home program (HEP). This case report highlights the importance of a detailed evaluation of knee and ankle joint mobility in patients presenting with anterior knee pain. Further, manual physical therapy to the lower extremity was found to be successful in restoring normal movement patterns and pain-free function in a patient with chronic anterior knee pain.

  17. A double pendulum plasma thrust balance and thrust measurement at a tandem mirror exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.F.; Liu, P.; Chang-Diaz, F.R.; Lander, H.; Childs, R.A.; Becker, H.D.; Fairfax, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    For the purpose of measuring the plasma momentum flux in a plasma system, a highly sensitive and precision balance has been developed. It can measure a force, an impulse, or thrust as low as 0.1 mN free of mechanical noise, electrical and magnetic pickups. The double pendulum system consists of two parallel conducting plates. One or both of the plates can be suspended by needles. The needle suspended plate (or plates) can swing freely with negligible friction because of the sharp points of the needles. When one of the plates is impacted by an impulse it will swing relatively to the fixed plate or other movable plate. The capacitance between the plates changes as a result of such a motion. The change of capacitance as a function of time is recorded as an oscillating voltage signal. The amplitude of such a voltage signal is proportional to the impacting force or impulse. The proportional factor can be calibrated. The forces can thus be read out from the recorded value of the voltage. The equation of motion for the pendulum system has been solved analytically. The circuit equation for the electronic measurement system has been formulated and solved numerically. Using this balance the thrust at the exhaust of a Tandem Mirror plasma thruster has been measured. The analytical solution of the overall characteristics agrees greatly with the measurement. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Early use of thrust manipulation versus non-thrust manipulation: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad; Learman, Kenneth; Showalter, Chris; Kabbaz, Vincent; O'Halloran, Bryan

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the comparative effectiveness of early use of thrust (TM) and non-thrust manipulation (NTM) in sample of patients with mechanical low back pain (LBP). The randomized controlled trial included patients with mechanically reproducible LBP, ≥ age 18-years who were randomized into two treatment groups. The main outcome measures were the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and a Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), with secondary measures of Rate of Recovery, total visits and days in care, and the work subscale of the Fears Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire work subscale (FABQ-w). A two-way mixed model MANCOVA was used to compare ODI and pain, at baseline, after visit 2, and at discharge and total visits, days in care, and rate of recovery (while controlling for patient expectations and clinical equipoise). A total of 149 subjects completed the trial and received care over an average of 35 days. There were no significant differences between TM and NTM at the second visit follow-up or at discharge with any of the outcomes categories. Personal equipoise was significantly associated with ODI and pain. The findings suggest that there is no difference between early use of TM or NTM, and secondarily, that personal equipoise affects study outcome. Within-groups changes were significant for both groups.

  19. Wind tunnel test of model target thrust reversers for the Pratt and Whitney aircraft JT8D-100 series engines installed on a 727-200 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambly, D.

    1974-01-01

    The results of a low speed wind tunnel test of 0.046 scale model target thrust reversers installed on a 727-200 model airplane are presented. The full airplane model was mounted on a force balance, except for the nacelles and thrust reversers, which were independently mounted and isolated from it. The installation had the capability of simulating the inlet airflows and of supplying the correct proportions of primary and secondary air to the nozzles. The objectives of the test were to assess the compatibility of the thrust reversers target door design with the engine and airplane. The following measurements were made: hot gas ingestion at the nacelle inlets; model lift, drag, and pitching moment; hot gas impingement on the airplane structure; and qualitative assessment of the rudder effectiveness. The major parameters controlling hot gas ingestion were found to be thrust reverser orientation, engine power setting, and the lip height of the bottom thrust reverser doors on the side nacelles. The thrust reversers tended to increase the model lift, decrease the drag, and decrease the pitching moment.

  20. Control of a Thrust Alignment Table for Modeling the Coning Dynamics of a Spinning Spacecraft with a Follower Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halsmer, Dominic; Bennett, J. Damon; DeHaven, Max; Ligard, Vidar

    1999-01-01

    This document presents a system controlling the motion of a spherical air bearing used in the modeling of spacecraft dynamics and controls in a laboratory environment. The system is part of the Spinning Rocket Simulator (SRS), used to simulate the coning of spacecraft during a thrusting stage. The reaction force at the spherical air bearing supporting the spacecraft model must coincide with the thrust axis of the model for proper simulation. Therefore, the bearing is translated in a circular path to introduce a centrifugal force. This horizontal force along with the gravitational reaction force at the bearing combines to simulate the direction of the spacecraft's thrust force. The control system receives attitude information from the spacecraft model via a laser beam embedded in the model that impinges on a photosensitive array. The non-linear system is controlled using high-speed lookup tables and digital techniques. A vector-controlled motor and a stepper motor are given the necessary signals to accurately control the turntable and platform supporting the air bearing. Preliminary performance data is presented. Mechanical elements of the table and platform are described in detail. A wireless (RF) data path for all devices on the spacecraft model to an off-table command computer is also described.

  1. Orbital and angular motion construction for low thrust interplanetary flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelnikov, R. V.; Mashtakov, Y. V.; Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Tkachev, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    Low thrust interplanetary flight is considered. Firstly, the fuel-optimal control is found. Then the angular motion is synthesized. This motion provides the thruster tracking of the required by optimal control direction. And, finally, reaction wheel control law for tracking this angular motion is proposed and implemented. The numerical example is given and total operation time for thrusters is found. Disturbances from solar pressure, thrust eccentricity, inaccuracy of reaction wheels installation and errors of inertia tensor are taken into account.

  2. Thrust enhancement of the gasdynamic mirror (GDM) fusion propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammash, Terry; Lee, Myoung-Jae; Poston, David I.

    1997-01-01

    The gasdynamic mirror propulsion system is a device that utilizes a magnetic mirror configuration to confine a hot plasma to allow fusion reactions to take place while ejecting a fraction of the energetic charged particles through one end to generate thrust. Because the fusion fuel is generally an isotope of hydrogen, e.g., deuterium or tritium, this propulsion device is capable of producing very large specific impulses (e.g., 200,000 seconds) but at modest thrusts. Since large thrusts are desirable, not only for reducing travel time but also for lifting sizable payloads, we have examined methods by which GDM's thrust could be enhanced. The first consists of utilizing the radiation generated by the plasma, namely bremsstrahlung and synchrotron radiation, to heat a hydrogen propellant which upon exhausting through a nozzle produces the additional thrust. We asses the performance in this case by using an ideal model that ignores heat transfer considerations of the chamber wall, and one that takes into account heat flow and wall temperature limitations. We find in the case of a DT burning plasma that although thrust enhancement is significant, it was more than offset by the large drop in the specific impulse and a concomitant increase in travel time. The second method consisted of not altering the original GDM operation, but simply increasing the density of the injected plasma to achieve higher thrust. It is shown that the latter approach is more effective since it is compatible with improved performance in that it reduces trip time but at the expense of larger vehicle mass. For a D-He3 burning device the use of hydrogen to enhance thrust appears to be more desirable since the radiated power that goes into heating the hydrogen propellant is quite large.

  3. Acoustically shielded exhaust system for high thrust jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, John P. (Inventor); Lee, Robert (Inventor); Majjigi, Rudramuni K. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A flade exhaust nozzle for a high thrust jet engine is configured to form an acoustic shield around the core engine exhaust flowstream while supplementing engine thrust during all flight conditions, particularly during takeoff. The flade airflow is converted from an annular 360.degree. flowstream to an arcuate flowstream extending around the lower half of the core engine exhaust flowstream so as to suppress exhaust noise directed at the surrounding community.

  4. Thrust Vectoring to Eliminate the Vertical Stabilizer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    111. I would like to thank my advisor, Captain James T. Silverthorn of Aeronautics nd Astronautics of the Air Force Institute of Technology faculty...increments for these variables. rpp Figure 11 Tail-off State Space Model An existing computer program developed by Capt J. T. Silverthorn (AFIT

  5. Anomalous Thrust Production from an RF Test Device Measured on a Low-Thrust Torsion Pendulum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, David; White, Harold G.; March, Paul; Lawrence, James T.; Davies, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the eight-day August 2013 test campaign designed to investigate and demonstrate viability of using classical magnetoplasmadynamics to obtain a propulsive momentum transfer via the quantum vacuum virtual plasma. This paper will not address the physics of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster, but instead will describe the test integration, test operations, and the results obtained from the test campaign. Approximately 30-50 micro-Newtons of thrust were recorded from an electric propulsion test article consisting primarily of a radio frequency (RF) resonant cavity excited at approximately 935 megahertz. Testing was performed on a low-thrust torsion pendulum that is capable of detecting force at a single-digit micronewton level, within a stainless steel vacuum chamber with the door closed but at ambient atmospheric pressure. Several different test configurations were used, including two different test articles as well as a reversal of the test article orientation. In addition, the test article was replaced by an RF load to verify that the force was not being generated by effects not associated with the test article. The two test articles were designed by Cannae LLC of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. The torsion pendulum was designed, built, and operated by Eagleworks Laboratories at the NASA Johnson Space Center of Houston, Texas. Approximately six days of test integration were required, followed by two days of test operations, during which, technical issues were discovered and resolved. Integration of the two test articles and their supporting equipment was performed in an iterative fashion between the test bench and the vacuum chamber. In other words, the test article was tested on the bench, then moved to the chamber, then moved back as needed to resolve issues. Manual frequency control was required throughout the test. Thrust was observed on both test articles, even though one of the test articles was designed with the expectation that it would not

  6. Design and evaluation of a 3 million DN series-hybrid thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scibbe, H. W.; Winn, L. W.; Eusepi, M.

    1976-01-01

    The design and experimental evaluation of a series-hybrid thrust bearing, consisting of a 150-mm ball bearing and a centrifugally actuated, conical, fluid-film bearing, is presented. Tests were conducted up to 16,000 rpm and at this speed an axial load of 15,600 N (3500 lb) was safely supported by the hybrid bearing system. Through the series-hybrid bearing principle, the effective ball bearing speed was reduced to approximately one-half of the shaft speed. A speed reduction of this magnitude would result in a tenfold increase in the ball bearing fatigue life. A successful evaluation of fluid-film bearing lubricant supply failure was performed repeatedly at an operating speed of 10,000 rpm. A complete and smooth changeover to full-scale ball bearing operation was effected when the oil supply to the fluid-film bearing was cut off. Reactivation of the fluid-film oil supply system produced a flawless return to the original mode of hybrid operation.

  7. Momentum Flux Measurements Using an Impact Thrust Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavers, Greg; Chang-Diaz, Franklin; Breizman, Boris; Bengtson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A device has been developed to measure the force caused by a beam of charged and neutral particles impacting a target plate. This device, an impact thrust stand, was developed to allow thrusters, during early stages of development, to be quickly and easily exhausted and compared to other thrusters. Since some thruster concepts are tested using laboratory equipment that is heavy and cumbersome, measuring the momentum flux of the particles in the plume can be much simpler than placing the entire thruster on a thrust stand. Conservation of momentum requires the momentum flux measured in the plume to be related to the thrust produced by the thruster. The impact thrust stand was designed to be placed in the plume of an electric thruster and has been tested and compared to the thrust measured from a Hall thruster placed on a pendulum thrust stand. Force measurements taken at several axial locations in the magnetic nozzle region of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket will be presented.

  8. Advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoji, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of the advanced hydrogen/oxygen thrust chamber design analysis program. The primary objectives of this program were to: (1) provide an in-depth analytical investigation to develop thrust chamber cooling and fatigue life limitations of an advanced, high pressure, high performance H2/O2 engine design of 20,000-pounds (88960.0 N) thrust; and (2) integrate the existing heat transfer analysis, thermal fatigue and stress aspects for advanced chambers into a comprehensive computer program. Thrust chamber designs and analyses were performed to evaluate various combustor materials, coolant passage configurations (tubes and channels), and cooling circuits to define the nominal 1900 psia (1.31 x 10 to the 7th power N/sq m) chamber pressure, 300-cycle life thrust chamber. The cycle life capability of the selected configuration was then determined for three duty cycles. Also the influence of cycle life and chamber pressure on thrust chamber design was investigated by varying in cycle life requirements at the nominal chamber pressure and by varying the chamber pressure at the nominal cycle life requirement.

  9. Central Nevada thrust belt: its preseismic state of knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, D.; Cameron, G.; Chamberlain, R. )

    1989-03-01

    The Central Nevada thrust belt (CNTB) is an east-vergent intra-Cordilleran fold-thrust belt of probable Cretaceous age. It is 100 km (60 mi) wide and more than 300 km (190 mi) long and merges near Las Vegas with the Sevier segment of the Overthrust belt. The CNTB affects 7 km (22,000 ft) of Paleozoic shelf deposits and contains significant Paleozoic-sourced oil in Tertiary fault blocks with uncertain but possibly thrust-related internal structure. Ongoing frontier exploration in the CNTB looks for thrust juxtaposition (present over the full width of the CNTB) of Mississippian source rocks beneath Devonian reefal and fractured carbonate reservoirs. Source and reservoir are involved in subunconformity traps beneath the valley fill and in subthrust duplex traps anywhere. Surface sampling suggests that maturation of Mississippian organic matter was achieved by stratigraphic burial and was little affected by thrust loading and Neogene volcanism. Present knowledge of the CNTB is based on early wells in foothills anticlines, extensive surface mapping, the Cordilleran COCORP line, and seismic data of limited scope. Their regional synthesis and chance location of some prospective trends have been done by arranging the data into semibalanced cross sections. The authors have used Dahlstromian and Suppean geometry, the authors have assumed crustal responses to thrusting, and they have applied a modified Wernicke model of Tertiary extensional tectonics.

  10. Full Flight Envelope Direct Thrust Measurement on a Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conners, Timothy R.; Sims, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Direct thrust measurement using strain gages offers advantages over analytically-based thrust calculation methods. For flight test applications, the direct measurement method typically uses a simpler sensor arrangement and minimal data processing compared to analytical techniques, which normally require costly engine modeling and multisensor arrangements throughout the engine. Conversely, direct thrust measurement has historically produced less than desirable accuracy because of difficulty in mounting and calibrating the strain gages and the inability to account for secondary forces that influence the thrust reading at the engine mounts. Consequently, the strain-gage technique has normally been used for simple engine arrangements and primarily in the subsonic speed range. This paper presents the results of a strain gage-based direct thrust-measurement technique developed by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center and successfully applied to the full flight envelope of an F-15 aircraft powered by two F100-PW-229 turbofan engines. Measurements have been obtained at quasi-steady-state operating conditions at maximum non-augmented and maximum augmented power throughout the altitude range of the vehicle and to a maximum speed of Mach 2.0 and are compared against results from two analytically-based thrust calculation methods. The strain-gage installation and calibration processes are also described.

  11. Polyphase thrust tectonic in the Barberton greenstone belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, I. A.

    1986-01-01

    In the circa 3.5 by-old Barberton greenstone belt, the supracrustal rocks form a thick and strongly deformed thrust complex. Structural studies in the southern part of the belt have shown that 2 separate phases of over-thrusting (D sub 1 and D sub 2) successively dismembered the original stratigraphy. Thrust nappes were subsequently refolded during later deformations (D sub 3 and D sub 4). This report deals with the second thrusting event which, in the study region appears to be dominant, and (unlike the earlier thrusting), affects the entire supracrustal pile. The supracrustal rocks form a predominantly NE/SW oriented, SE dipping tectonic fan (the D sub 2 fan) in which tectonic slices of ophiolitic-like rocks are interleaved with younger sedimentary sequences of the Diepgezet and malalotcha groups. Structural and sedimentological data indicate that the D sub 2 tectonic fan was formed during a prolonged, multi-stage regional horizontal shortening event during which several types of internal deformation mechanisms were successively and/or simultaneously active. Movement appears to have been predominantly to the NW and to the N. During D sub 2, periods of quiescence and sedimentation followed periods of thrust propagation. Although the exact kinematics which led to the formation of this fan is not yet known, paleoenvironmental interpretations together with structural data suggest that D sub 2 was probably related to (an) Archean collision(s).

  12. Application of Chaboche Model in Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asraff, Ahmedul Kabir; Suresh Babu, Sheela; Babu, Aneena; Eapen, Reeba

    2015-12-01

    Liquid Propellant Rocket Engines are commonly used in space technology. Thrust chamber is one of the most important subsystems of a rocket engine. The thrust chamber generates propulsive thrust force for flight of the rocket by ejection of combustion products at supersonic speeds. Often double walled construction is employed for these chambers. The thrust chamber investigated here has its hot inner wall fabricated out of a high thermal conductive material like copper alloy and outer wall made of stainless steel. Inner wall is subjected to high thermal and pressure loads during operation of engine due to which it will be in the plastic regime. Main reasons for the failure of such chambers are fatigue in the plastic range (called as low cycle fatigue since the number of cycles to failure will be low in plastic range), creep and thermal ratcheting. Elasto plastic material models are required to simulate the above effects through a cyclic stress analysis. This paper gives the details of cyclic stress analysis carried out for the thrust chamber using different plasticity model combinations available in ANSYS (Version 15) FE code. The best model among the above is applied in the cyclic stress analysis of two dimensional (plane strain and axisymmetric) and three dimensional finite element models of thrust chamber. Cyclic life of the chamber is calculated from stress-strain graph obtained from above analyses.

  13. Development of a Thrust Stand to Meet LISA Mission Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, William D., III; Zakrzwski, Charles M.; Merkowitz, Stephen M.

    2002-01-01

    A thrust stand has been built to measure the force-noise produced by electrostatic micro-Newton (muN) thrusters. The LISA mission's Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) requires thrusters that are capable of producing continuous thrust levels between 1-100 muN with a resolution of 0.1 muN. The stationary force-noise produced by these thrusters must not exceed 0.1 muN/dHz in the measurement bandwidth 10(exp -4) to 1 Hz. The LISA Thrust Stand (LTS) is a torsion-balance type thrust stand designed to meet the following requirements: stationary force-noise measurements from l0( -4) to 1 Hz with 0.1 muN/dHz sensitivity, absolute thrust measurements from 1-100 muN with better than 0.1 muN resolution, and dynamic thruster response from to 10 Hz. The LTS employs a unique vertical configuration, autocollimator for angular position measurements, and electrostatic actuators that are used for dynamic pendulum control and null-mode measurements. Force-noise levels are measured indirectly by characterizing the thrust stand as a spring-mass system. The LTS was initially designed to test the indium FEEP thruster developed by the Austrian Research Center in Seibersdorf (ARCS), but can be modified for testing other thrusters of this type.

  14. Thrust Stand for Vertically Oriented Electric Propulsion Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally-stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A non-contact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational restoring force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN-level thrusts, while those tests conducted on 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 micro at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  15. Thrust stand for vertically oriented electric propulsion performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, Trevor; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-11-15

    A variation of a hanging pendulum thrust stand capable of measuring the performance of an electric thruster operating in the vertical orientation is presented. The vertical orientation of the thruster dictates that the thruster must be horizontally offset from the pendulum pivot arm, necessitating the use of a counterweight system to provide a neutrally stable system. Motion of the pendulum arm is transferred through a balance mechanism to a secondary arm on which deflection is measured. A noncontact light-based transducer is used to measure displacement of the secondary beam. The members experience very little friction, rotating on twisting torsional pivots with oscillatory motion attenuated by a passive, eddy-current damper. Displacement is calibrated using an in situ thrust calibration system. Thermal management and self-leveling systems are incorporated to mitigate thermal and mechanical drifts. Gravitational force and torsional spring constants associated with flexure pivots provide restoring moments. An analysis of the design indicates that the thrust measurement range spans roughly four decades, with the stand capable of measuring thrust up to 12 N for a 200 kg thruster and up to approximately 800 mN for a 10 kg thruster. Data obtained from calibration tests performed using a 26.8 lbm simulated thruster indicated a resolution of 1 mN on 100 mN level thrusts, while those tests conducted on a 200 lbm thruster yielded a resolution of roughly 2.5 mN at thrust levels of 0.5 N and greater.

  16. Superposed fold-thrust events at the Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cashman, Patricia H.; Cole, James C.; Trexler, James H.

    2000-01-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), in southern Nye County, Nevada, straddles significant pre-Tertiary structural and stratigraphic boundaries. Detailed stratigraphy and biostratigraphy of the Upper Paleozoic section delineates the regional trust sheets and constrains their burial histories. The Paleozoic rocks record three phases of contractional deformation, overprinted by strike-slip faulting. These occured in the folloing order: (1) foreland-vergant folding and imbricate thrusting in the footwall of the Belted Range thrust; (2) hinterland-vergent folding and thrusting; and (3) north-vergant folding that we interpret as footwall deformation below a third major thrust system. Sinistral slip, typically accompanied by minor east-west shortening, has occured along a series of north-northeast--north-northwest--striking faults around Yucca Flat. This strike-slip faulting postdates both foreland-vergent and hinterland-vergent deformation, and predates the Cretaceous Climax stock; its age relative to the north-vergent folding and thrusting is unknown. Our new understanding of the geometry of these structures provides new insights into the correlation and interpretation of regional structural features. Field trip stops will examine: (1) the stratigraphic differences that allow us to distinguish the regional thrust sheets and constrain their burial histories; and (2) the field relationships that document the kinematics and relative ages of the penetrative deformational events.

  17. Underwater thrust and power generation using flexible piezoelectric composites: an experimental investigation toward self-powered swimmer-sensor platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erturk, Alper; Delporte, Ghislain

    2011-12-01

    Fiber-based flexible piezoelectric composites offer several advantages to use in energy harvesting and biomimetic locomotion. These advantages include ease of application, high power density, effective bending actuation, silent operation over a range of frequencies, and light weight. Piezoelectric materials exhibit the well-known direct and converse piezoelectric effects. The direct piezoelectric effect has received growing attention for low-power generation to use in wireless electronic applications while the converse piezoelectric effect constitutes an alternative to replace the conventional actuators used in biomimetic locomotion. In this paper, underwater thrust and electricity generation are investigated experimentally by focusing on biomimetic structures with macro-fiber composite piezoelectrics. Fish-like bimorph configurations with and without a passive caudal fin (tail) are fabricated and compared. The favorable effect of having a passive caudal fin on the frequency bandwidth is reported. The presence of a passive caudal fin is observed to bring the second bending mode close to the first one, yielding a wideband behavior in thrust generation. The same smart fish configuration is tested for underwater piezoelectric power generation in response to harmonic excitation from its head. Resonant piezohydroelastic actuation is reported to generate milli-newton level hydrodynamic thrust using milli-watt level actuation power input. The average actuation power requirement for generating a mean thrust of 19 mN at 6 Hz using a 10 g piezoelastic fish with a caudal fin is measured as 120 mW. This work also discusses the feasibility of thrust generation using the harvested energy toward enabling self-powered swimmer-sensor platforms with comparisons based on the capacity levels of structural thin-film battery layers as well as harvested solar and vibrational energy.

  18. Evolution of the Puente Hills Thrust Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, K. J.; Shaw, J. H.; Dolan, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to assess the evolution of the blind Puente Hills thrust fault system (PHT) by determining its age of initiation, lateral propagation history, and changes in slip rate over time. The PHT presents one of the largest seismic hazards in the United States, given its location beneath downtown Los Angeles. The PHT is comprised of three fault segments: the Los Angeles (LA), Santa Fe Springs (SFS), and Coyote Hills (CH). The LA and SFS segments are characterized by growth stratigraphy where folds formed by uplift on the fault segments have been continually buried by sediment from the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers. The CH segment has developed topography and is characterized by onlapping growth stratigraphy. This depositional setting gives us the unique opportunity to measure uplift on the LA and SFS fault segments, and minimum uplift on the CH fault segment, as the difference in sediment thicknesses across the buried folds. We utilize depth converted oil industry seismic reflection data to image the fold geometries. Identifying time-correlative stratigraphic markers for slip rate determination in the basin has been a problem for researchers in the past, however, as the faunal assemblages observed in wells are time-transgressive by nature. To overcome this, we utilize the sequence stratigraphic model and well picks of Ponti et al. (2007) as a basis for mapping time-correlative sequence boundaries throughout our industry seismic reflection data from the present to the Pleistocene. From the Pleistocene to Miocene we identify additional sequence boundaries in our seismic reflection data from imaged sequence geometries and by correlating industry well formation tops. The sequence and formation top picks are then used to build 3-dimensional surfaces in the modeling program Gocad. From these surfaces we measure the change in thicknesses across the folds to obtain uplift rates between each sequence boundary. Our results show three distinct phases of

  19. Electromagnetic launch, then lessening chemical thrust over time as laser beam powered ion thrust grows—to any orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Thomas M.

    1996-03-01

    The ElectroMagnetic (EM) Launch Tube (LT), using High-Temp SuperConduction (HTSC) EM launch coils if developed, will be built in a tall building, or, if not, at a steep angle up the west slope of an extinct volcano. The Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) exits the LT at such high velocity that the otherwise violent entry into the atmosphere is made possible by Special-Laser-Launch-Assist (SLLA), which ionizes and expands the atmosphere immediately ahead of the RLV. At first a brief period of chemical thrust is followed by a long period of ion thrust during ascent to orbit. As decades pass and greater ion thrust is developed, the period of chemical thrust shortens until it is no longer needed. The RLV's ion thrusters are powered by laser/maser, beamed first from the launch site, then from two large Solar-Power-Satellites (SPS) 180° apart in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) orbit. In orbit, the RLV is limited in where it can go only by the amount of propellant it carries or is stored in various orbits. The RLV can land at a launch site on Earth by using both chemical and ion thrust at first, and later by ion thrust alone as developments cause a far lighter RLV to carry no chemical engines/fuel/tanks.

  20. Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accomodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part I-Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2-Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25.800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3-Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine, two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and BPR

  1. Exoskeletal Engine Concept: Feasibility Studies for Medium and Small Thrust Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Ian

    2001-01-01

    The exoskeletal engine concept is one in which the shafts and disks are eliminated and are replaced by rotating casings that support the blades in spanwise compression. Omission of the shafts and disks leads to an open channel at the engine centerline. This has immense potential for reduced jet noise and for the accommodation of an alternative form of thruster for use in a combined cycle. The use of ceramic composite materials has the potential for significantly reduced weight as well as higher working temperatures without cooling air. The exoskeletal configuration is also a natural stepping-stone to complete counter-rotating turbomachinery. Ultimately this will lead to reductions in weight, length, parts count and improved efficiency. The feasibility studies are in three parts. Part 1: Systems and Component Requirements addressed the mechanical aspects of components from a functionality perspective. This effort laid the groundwork for preliminary design studies. Although important, it is not felt to be particularly original, and has therefore not been included in the current overview. Part 2: Preliminary Design Studies turned to some of the cycle and performance issues inherent in an exoskeletal configuration and some initial attempts at preliminary design of turbomachinery were described. Twin-spoon and single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofans were used as reference vehicles in a mid-size commercial subsonic category in addition to a single-spool 5,000-lbf-thrust turbofan that represented a general aviation application. The exoskeletal engine, with its open centerline, has tremendous potential for noise suppression and some preliminary analysis was done which began to quantify the benefits. Part 3: Additional Preliminary Design Studies revisited the design of single-spool 25,800-lbf-thrust turbofan configurations, but in addition to the original FPR = 1.6 and BPR = 5.1 reference engine. two additional configurations used FPR = 2.4 and BPR = 3.0 and FPR = 3.2 and

  2. Thrusting and back-thrusting as post-emplacement kinematics of the Almora klippe: Insights from Low-temperature thermochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. C.; Singh, Paramjeet; Lal, Nand

    2015-06-01

    Crystalline klippen over the Lesser Himalayan Sequence (LHS) in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions of NW-Himalaya, are the representative of southern portion of the Main Central Thrust (MCT) hanging wall. These were tectonically transported over the juxtaposed thrust sheets (Berinag, Tons and Ramgarh) of the LHS zone along the MCT. These klippen comprise of NW-SE trending synformal folded thrust sheet bounded by thrusts in the south and north. In the present study, the exhumation histories of two well-known klippen namely Almora and Baijnath, and the Ramgarh thrust sheet, in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions vis-a-vis Himalayan orogeny have been investigated using Apatite Fission Track (AFT) ages. Along a ~ 60 km long orogen perpendicular transect across the Almora klippe and the Ramgarh thrust sheet, 16 AFT cooling ages from the Almora klippe and 2 from the Ramgarh thrust sheet have been found to range from 3.7 ± 0.8 to 13.2 ± 2.7 Ma, and 6.3 ± 0.8 to 7.2 ± 1.0 Ma respectively. From LHS meta-sedimentary rocks only a single AFT age of 3.6 ± 0.8 Ma could be obtained. Three AFT ages from the Baijnath klippe range between 4.7 ± 0.5 and 6.6 ± 0.8 Ma. AFT ages and exhumation rates of different klippen show a dynamic coupling between tectonic and erosion processes in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions of NW-Himalaya. However, the tectonic processes play a dominant role in controlling the exhumation. Thrusting and back thrusting within the Almora klippe and Ramgarh thrust sheet are the post-emplacement kinematics that controlled the exhumation of the Almora klippe. Combining these results with the already published AFT ages from the crystalline klippen and the Higher Himalayan Crystalline (HHC), the kinematics of emplacement of the klippen over the LHS and exhumation pattern across the MCT in the Kumaon and Garhwal regions of NW-Himalaya have been investigated.

  3. Ionic Liquid Films at the Water-Air Interface: Langmuir Isotherms of Tetra-alkylphosphonium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Karina; Canongia Lopes, José N; Gonçalves da Silva, Amélia M P S

    2015-08-04

    The behavior of ionic liquids trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide and trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium dicyanamide, [P6 6 6 14][Ntf2] and [P6 6 6 14][N(CN)2], respectively, at the water-air interface was investigated using the Langmuir trough technique. The obtained surface pressure versus mean molecular area (MMA) isotherms, π-A, and surface potential versus MMA isotherms, ΔV-A, show distinct interfacial behavior between the two systems. The results were interpreted at a molecular level using molecular dynamics simulations: the different compression regimes along the [P6 6 6 14][Ntf2] isotherm correspond to the self-organization of the ions at the water surface into compact and planar monolayers that coalesce at an MMA value of ca. 1.85 nm(2)/ion pair to form an expanded liquidlike layer. Upon further compression, the monolayer collapses at around 1.2 nm(2)/ion pair to yield a progressively thicker and less organized layer. These transitions are much more subdued in the [P6 6 6 14][N(CN)2] system because of the more hydrophilic nature of the dicyanamide anion. The numerical density profiles obtained from the MD simulation trajectories are also able to emphasize the very unusual packing of the four long alkyl side chains of the cation above and below the ionic layer that forms at the water surface. Such a distribution is also different for the two studied systems during the different compression regimes.

  4. Geologic mapping delineates new thrust sheets, duplex structures, and timing relationships between the Meade and Crawford thrusts in Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Coogan, J.C.

    1993-04-01

    New geologic maps of nine complete and six partial 7.5[prime] quadrangles delineate a large-scale duplex comprised of at least five thrust sheets that together form the Sheep Creek culmination in the footwall of the Meade thrust. From west to east, the Sheep Creek culmination includes the Home Canyon, Sheep Creek, Red Mountain, northern Crawford, and Afton thrust sheets. The thrusts are floored by the regional sole decollement in the Cambrian Gros Ventre Formation and merge upward with a roof thrust that lies along the Meade thrust in the west and decollements in the Jurassic Gypsum Spring and Preuss salt intervals in the east. The individual thrusts of Sheep Creek culmination are generally blind thrusts that are recognized by integrating the surface mapping with subsurface well and seismic data in balanced cross sections. The common map expression for individual thrust sheets is marked by translated fault-propagation anticlines in upper Paleozoic, Triassic, and lower Jurassic rocks that are bordered to the east by frontal decollement fold trains in middle and upper Jurassic rocks. The Meade thrust is folded above the Sheep Creek culmination in the northern part of the map area, and it is specifically folded above the Crawford fault-propagation fold, Sublette anticline, north of the map area at Elk Valley, Idaho. Thus, the Meade and Crawford thrusts are not coeval, linked thrusts as previously assumed. Instead, the individual thrusts of Sheep Creek culmination form a linked, eastward-younging thrust system along which 30 km of Crawford thrust displacement in Utah is partitioned between the Sheep Creek, Red Mountain, northern Crawford, and Afton thrusts in Idaho and Wyoming.

  5. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  6. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  7. Non-Toxic Dual Thrust Reaction Control Engine Development for On-Orbit APS Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Philip J.; Veith, Eric M.

    2003-01-01

    A non-toxic dual thrust proof-of-concept demonstration engine was successfully tested at the Aerojet Sacramento facility under a technology contract sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The goals of the NASA MSFC contract (NAS8-01109) were to develop and expand the technical maturity of a non-toxic, on-orbit auxiliary propulsion system (APS) thruster under the Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) program. The demonstration engine utilized the existing Kistler K-1 870 lbf LOX/Ethanol orbital maneuvering engine ( O m ) coupled with some special test equipment (STE) that enabled engine operation at 870 lbf in the primary mode and 25 lbf in the vernier mode. Ambient testing in primary mode varied mixture ratio (MR) from 1.28 to 1.71 and chamber pressure (P(c) from 110 to 181 psia, and evaluated electrical pulse widths (EPW) of 0.080, 0.100 and 0.250 seconds. Altitude testing in vernier mode explored igniter and thruster pulsing characteristics, long duration steady state operation (greater than 420 sec) and the impact of varying the percent fuel film cooling on vernier performance and chamber thermal response at low PC (4 psia). Data produced from the testing provided calibration of the performance and thermal models used in the design of the next version of the dual thrust Reaction Control Engine (RCE).

  8. Experimental investigation of the flow in a simplified model of water lubricated axial thrust bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschner, O.; Ruprecht, A.; Riedelbauch, S.

    2014-03-01

    In hydropower plants the axial thrust bearing takes up the hydraulic axial thrust of the runner and, in case of vertical shafts, the entire weight of all rotating masses. The use of water lubricated bearings can eliminate the oil leakage risk possibly contaminating the environment. A complex flow is generated by the smaller film thickness due to the lower viscosity of water compared with oil. Measurements on a simplified hydrostatic axial trust bearing model were accomplished for validating CFD analysis of water lubricated bearings. In this simplified model, fixed pads are implemented and the width of the gap was enlarged to create a higher resolution in space for the measurements. Most parts of the model were manufactured from acrylic glass to get optical access for measurement with PIV. The focus of these measurements is on the flow within the space between two pads. Additional to the PIV- measurement, the pressure on the wall of the rotating disk is captured by pressure transducers. The model bearing measurement results are presented for varied operating conditions.

  9. Development of the Himalayan frontal thrust zone: Salt Range, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Dan M.; Lillie, Robert J.; Yeats, Robert S.; Johnson, Gary D.; Yousuf, Mohammad; Zamin, Agha Sher Hamid

    1988-01-01

    The Salt Range is the active frontal thrust zone of the Himalaya in Pakistan. Seismic reflection data show that a 1 km offset of the basement acted as a buttress that caused the central Salt Range-Potwar Plateau thrust sheet to ramp to the surface, exposing Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata. The frontal part of the thrust sheet was folded passively as it overrode the subthrust surface on a ductile layer of Eocambrian salt. Lack of internal deformation of the rear part of the thrust sheet is due to decoupling of sediments from the basement along this salt layer. Early to middle Pliocene (˜4.5 Ma) conglomerate deposition in the southern Potwar Plateau, previously interpreted in terms of compressional deformation, may instead document uplift related to basement normal faulting. Stratigraphic evidence, paleomagnetic dating of unconformities, and sediment-accumulation rates suggest that the thrust sheet began to override the basement offset from 2.1 to 1.6 Ma. Cross-section balancing demonstrates at least 20 to 23 km of shortening across the ramp. The rate of Himalayan convergence that can be attributed to underthrusting of Indian basement beneath sediments in the Pakistan foreland is therefore at least 9-14 mm/yr, about 20%-35% of the total plate convergence rate.

  10. Development of the Himalayan frontal thrust zone: Salt Range, Pakistan

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.M.; Lillie, R.J.; Yeats, R.S.; Johnson, G.D.; Yousuf, M.; Zamin, A.S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Salt Range is the active frontal thrust zone of the Himalaya in Pakistan. Seismic reflection data show that a 1 km offset of the basement acted as a buttress that caused the central Salt Range-Potwar Plateau thrust sheet to ramp to the surface, exposing Mesozoic and Paleozoic strata. The frontal part of the thrust sheet was folded passively as it overrode the subthrust surface on a ductile layer of Eocambrian salt. Lack of internal deformation of the rear part of the thrust sheet is due to decoupling of sediments from the basement along this salt layer. Early to middle Pliocene (approx. 4.5 Ma) conglomerate deposition in the southern Potwar Plateau, previously interpreted in terms of compressional deformation, may instead document uplift related to basement normal faulting. Stratigraphic evidence, paleomagnetic dating of unconformities, and sediment-accumulation rates suggest that the thrust sheet began to override the basement offset from 2.1 to 1.6 Ma. Cross-section balancing demonstrates at least 20 to 23 km of shortening across the ramp. The rate of Himalayan convergence that can be attributed to underthrusting of Indian basement beneath sediments in the Pakistan foreland is therefore at least 9-14 mm/yr, about 20-35% of the total plate convergence rate.

  11. Grenville foreland thrust belt hidden beneath the eastern US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Hauser, E.C. )

    1993-01-01

    Grenville foreland thrust structures are observed beneath the eastern US midcontinent on COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) line OH-1 and a short seismic line in southwest Ohio. These structures represent the first evidence for a significant Grenville foreland thrust belt preserved in eastern North America. On the COCORP lines, the structures include a thrust ramp anticline and an associated asymmetric syncline. The Grenville front tectonic zone appears to truncate these foreland structures, indicating a later, second phase expressed as a deeply penetrating, out-of-sequence thrust zone associated with the main uplift of the Grenville province on the east. A short, shallow seismic line in southwestern Ohio reveals an east-dipping sequence of prominently layered rocks that may lie above a footwall ramp to a deeper Grenville thrust fault. A drill hole into the less reflective top of this dipping sequence encountered unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks like those increasingly reported from other drill holes in southwestern Ohio and adjacent states. Although possibly part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift, these clastic sedimentary rocks may instead preserve evidence of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin in eastern North America. Alternatively these Precambrian sedimentary rocks together with an underlying, but yet undrilled, strongly layered sequence may correlate with similarly layered rocks observed on COCORP and industrial seismic lines within the Middle Proterozoic granite-rhyolite province to the west in Indiana and Illinois and indicate that unmetamorphosed sedimentary material is an important constituent of the granite-rhyolite province. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  12. FEEP micro-thrust balance characterization and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocca, S.; Menon, C.; Nicolini, D.

    2006-04-01

    A micro-thrust stand developed by the National Physical Laboratory under ESA funding was calibrated and characterized. The balance is based on the nulled-pendulum principle. The thruster is positioned in a constrained pendulum that is free to move only along the line of thrust. A capacitive displacement sensor measures the movement of the pendulum and is connected via a servo closed loop to a force actuator that preserves the nulled position of the pendulum. The force exerted by the actuator is the measurement of the thrust generated by the field effect electric propulsion thruster. Part of the environmental vibration noise is cancelled by subtracting the signal produced by a dummy pendulum (not subjected to thrust) from the signal produced by the principal pendulum. The interface between the thruster and balance was designed with the aim of minimizing the interference of the electrical wires. This paper presents the results of the measurements that fully characterize the balance in terms of accuracy, resolution and thrust range. Improvements to the balance are suggested in order to increase its metrological performance.

  13. Simple control laws for low-thrust orbit transfers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petropoulos, Anastassios E.

    2003-01-01

    Two methods are presented by which to determine both a thrust direction and when to apply thrust to effect specified changes in any of the orbit elements except for true anomaly, which is assumed free. The central body is assumed to be a point mass, and the initial and final orbits are assumed closed. Thrust, when on, is of a constant value, and specific impulse is constant. The thrust profiles derived from the two methods are not propellant-optimal, but are based firstly on the optimal thrust directions and location on the osculating orbit for changing each of the orbit elements and secondly on the desired changes in the orbit elements. Two examples of transfers are presented, one in semimajor axis and inclination, and one in semimajor axis and eccentricity. The latter compares favourably with a propellant-optimized transfer between the same orbits. The control laws have few input parameters, but can still capture the complexity of a wide variety of orbit transfers.

  14. Sandbox modeling of evolving thrust wedges with different preexisting topographic relief: Implications for the Longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chuang; Jia, Dong; Yin, Hongwei; Chen, Zhuxin; Li, Zhigang; Shen, Li; Wei, Dongtao; Li, Yiquan; Yan, Bin; Wang, Maomao; Fang, Shaozhi; Cui, Jian

    2016-06-01

    To understand the effects of substantial topographic relief on deformation localization in the seismically active mountains, like the Longmen Shan thrust belt in the eastern Tibet, sandbox experiments were performed based on the framework of the critical taper theory. First, a reference experiment revealed that the critical taper angle was 12° for our experimental materials. Subsequently, different proto wedges (subcritical (6° in taper angle), critical (12°), and supercritical (20°)) were introduced to cover the range of natural topographic relief, and we used two setups: setup A considered only across-strike topographic relief, whereas setup B investigated along-strike segmentation of topography, consist of two adjacent proto wedges. In all experiments, thrust wedges grew by in-sequence accretion of thrust sheets. Setup A revealed an alternating mode of slip partitioning on the accreted thrusts, with large-displacement thrust and small-displacement thrust developing in turn. And contrasting wedge evolutions occurred according to whether the proto wedge was subcritical or critical-supercritical. In setup B, the differential deformation along the strike produced transverse structures such as tear fault and lateral ramp during frontal accretion. The observed tear fault and its associated thrust system resemble the seismogenic fault system of the 2008 Mw7.9 Wenchuan earthquake. Our experimental results could also explain first-order deformation features observed in the Longmen Shan. Consequently, we conclude that topographic features, including topographic relief across the range and along-strike segmentation of topography, contribute significantly to the kinematics and deformation localization in such active mountains.

  15. Effects of Gas Rarefaction on Dynamic Characteristics of Micro Spiral-Grooved Thrust Bearing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Qing

    2012-04-01

    The effects of gas-rarefaction on dynamic characteristics of micro spiral-grooved-thrust-bearing are studied. The Reynolds equation is modified by the first order slip model, and the corresponding perturbation equations are then obtained on the basis of the linear small perturbation method. In the converted spiral-curve-coordinates system, the finite-volume-method (FVM) is employed to discrete the surface domain of micro bearing. The results show, compared with the continuum-flow model, that under the slip-flow regime, the decrease in the pressure and stiffness become obvious with the increasing of the compressibility number. Moreover, with the decrease of the relative gas-film-thickness, the deviations of dynamic coefficients between slip-flow-model and continuum-flow-model are increasing.

  16. Cyclic fatigue analysis of rocket thrust chambers. Volume 2: Attitude control thruster high cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A finite element stress analysis was performed for the film cooled throat section of an attitude control thruster. The anlaysis employed the RETSCP finite element computer program. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the thruster operating cycle. The configuration and operating conditions considered, correspond to a flightweight integrated thruster assembly which was thrust pulse tested. The computed strain range was used in conjuction with Haynes 188 Universal Slopes minimum life data to predict throat section fatigue life. The computed number of cycles to failure was greater than the number of pulses to which the thruster was experimentally subjected without failure.

  17. Geometry of a large-scale low-angle mid-crustal thrust (Woodroffe Thrust, Central Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Sebastian; Mancktelow, Neil S.; Hawemann, Friedrich; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Camacho, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    Young orogens, such as the Alps, mainly expose the upper part of the continental crust and it is not possible to follow large-scale thrusts (e.g. the Glarus Thrust) to great depth in order to study their changing rheological behavior. This knowledge, however, is crucial for determining the overall kinematic and dynamic response during collision, as middle to lower crustal rocks represent the major part of the total crustal section. Information from deeper parts of the continental crust can only be obtained directly by investigating regions where these levels are now exhumed. The Musgrave Ranges in Central Australia is a very well exposed, semi-desert area, in which numerous large-scale shear zones developed during the Petermann Orogeny around 550 Ma. The most prominent structure is the ˜400 km long E-W trending Woodroffe Thrust, which placed ˜1.2 Ga granulites onto similarly-aged amphibolite and granulite facies gneisses along a generally south-dipping thrust plane with a top-to-north shear sense. Geothermobarometric calculations on the associated mylonites established that the structure developed under mid-crustal conditions (500-650°C, 0.8-1 GPa). Regional P/T variations in the direction of thrusting are small, but show trends consistent with the south-dipping orientation of the thrust plane, which predicts deeper levels and a higher metamorphic grade in the south than in the north. They imply a very low gradient of only around 3°C/km for a distance of some 30 km in the movement direction of the thrust. Combined with a geothermal gradient on the order of 20°C/km, calculated from four separate P/T estimates from the hanging wall and footwall, this regional gradient indicates that the Woodroffe Thrust was originally shallow-dipping at an average angle of only around 9°. This suggests that upper crustal brittle thrusts do not necessarily steepen into the middle to lower crust, but can define very shallow-dipping, large-scale planar features, with dimensions in

  18. Viscoplastic analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber liner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, Vinod K.; Arnold, Steven M.

    1991-01-01

    A viscoplastic stress-strain analysis of an experimental cylindrical thrust chamber is presented. A viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating a single internal state variable that represents kinematic hardening was employed to investigate whether such a viscoplastic model could predict the experimentally observed behavior of the thrust chamber. Two types of loading cycles were considered: a short cycle of 3.5 sec. duration that corresponded to the experiments, and an extended loading cycle of 485.1 sec. duration that is typical of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operating cycle. The analysis qualitatively replicated the deformation behavior of the component as observed in experiments designed to simulate SSME operating conditions. The analysis also showed that the mode and location in the component may depend on the loading cycle. The results indicate that using viscoplastic models for structural analysis can lead to a more realistic life assessment of thrust chambers.

  19. Full-scale thrust reverser testing in an altitude facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehalic, Charles M.; Lottig, Roy A.

    1987-01-01

    A two-dimensional convergent-divergent exhaust nozzle designed and fabricated by Pratt and Whitney Aircraft was installed on a PW1128 turbofan engine and tested during thrust reverser operation in an altitude facility at NASA Lewis Research Center. A unique collection system was used to capture the thrust reverser exhaust gas and transport it to the primary exhaust collector. Tests were conducted at three flight conditions with varying amounts of thrust reverse at each condition. Some reverser exhaust gas spillage by the collection system was encountered but engine performance was unaffected at all flight conditions tested. Based on the results of this test program, the feasibility of altitude testing of advanced multi-function exhaust nozzle systems has been demonstrated.

  20. Methods for determining atypical gate valve thrust requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, R. Jr.; Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G.

    1995-04-01

    Evaluating the performance of rising stem, wedge type, gate valves used in nuclear power plant is not a problem when the valves can be design-basis tested and their operability margins determined diagnostically. The problem occurs when they cannot be tested because of plant system limitations or when they can be tested only at some less-than-design-basis condition. To evaluate the performance of these valves requires various analytical and/or extrapolation methods by which the design-basis stem thrust requirement can be determined. This has been typically accomplished with valve stem thrust models used to calculate the requirements or by extrapolating the results from a less-than-design-basis test. The stem thrust models used by the nuclear industry to determine the opening or closing stem thrust requirements for these gate valves have generally assumed that the highest load the valve experiences during closure (but before seating) is at flow isolation and during unwedging or before flow initiation in the opening direction. However, during full-scale valve testing conducted for the USNRC, several of the valves produced stem thrust histories that showed peak closing stem forces occurring before flow isolation in the closing direction and after flow initiation in the opening direction. All of the valves that exhibited this behavior in the closing direction also showed signs of internal damage. Initially, we dismissed the early peak in the closing stem thrust requirement as damage-induced and labeled it nonpredictable behavior. Opening responses were not a priority in our early research, so that phenomenon was set aside for later evaluation.

  1. Flow Visualizations and Extended Thrust Time Histories of Rotor Vortex Wakes in Descent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, James; Caradonna, Frank; Savas, Omer

    2003-11-01

    An experimental study is performed on a three-bladed rotor model in a water tow tank. The blade pitch and rotational velocity, the rotor plane angle of attack (descent angle), and the carriage speed are all varied in order to simulate a wide range of rotorcraft operating states, with the focus being on descent speeds and angles where the rotor is operating in or near vortex ring state an area in which there is currently very little available data. Circulation and blade Reynolds numbers are of order 10^5. Flow visualization is done by injecting air bubbles and fluorescent dye tangentially from the blade tips to mark the vortex core, showing the development of both short-wave (sinuous) and long-wave (leapfrogging) instabilities on the helical vortices in the wake. Strain gages are used to record transient loads, allowing a correlation between the rotor thrust performance and the development of the vortex wake. Test runs are performed for extended periods up to 500 rotor revolutions demonstrating the repeatability of the patterns of thrust variation. The data indicate that as the instabilities develop, adjacent vortices merge and form thick vortex rings, especially during descent. Periodic shedding of these rings from the wake associated with vortex ring state is observed, resulting in peak-to-peak thrust fluctuations of up to 95% of the mean and occurring at regular intervals of 2050 rotor revolutions, depending on flow parameters. Preliminary particle image velocimetry (PIV) data provide a quantitative measure of the entire rotor flow field for the case of a hovering rotor. The data yield additional information on the vortex filament instability, in particular the axial flow in the vortex cores.

  2. Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a 3000-Pound-Thrust Axial-Flow Turbojet Engine. 6; Analysis of Effects of Inlet Pressure Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Newell D.; Palasics, John

    1948-01-01

    The losses in the inlet air ducts, the diffusers, and the de-icing equipment associated with turbojet engine installations cause a reduction in the total pressure at the inlet of the engine and result in reduced thrust and increased specific fuel consumption. An analytical evaluation of the effects of inlet losses on the net thrust and the fuel economy of a 3000-pound-thrust axial flow turbojet engine with a two-stage turbine is presented. The analysis is based on engine performance characteristics that were determined from experiments in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The experimental investigation did not include tests in which inlet losses were systematically varied, but the effects of these losses can be accurately estimated from the experimentally determined performance characteristics of the engine.

  3. An experimental investigation of thrust vectoring two-dimensional convergent-divergent nozzles installed in a twin-engine fighter model at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, Francis J.; Mason, Mary L.; Leavitt, Laurence D.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine thrust vectoring capability of subscale 2-D convergent-divergent exhaust nozzles installed on a twin engine general research fighter model. Pitch thrust vectoring was accomplished by downward rotation of nozzle upper and lower flaps. The effects of nozzle sidewall cutback were studied for both unvectored and pitch vectored nozzles. A single cutback sidewall was employed for yaw thrust vectoring. This investigation was conducted at Mach numbers ranging from 0 to 1.20 and at angles of attack from -2 to 35 deg. High pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust and provide values of nozzle pressure ratio up to 9.

  4. Experimental investigation of leading-edge thrust at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, R. M.; Miller, D. S.

    1983-01-01

    Wings, designed for leading edge thrust at supersonic speeds, were investigated in the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.80, 2.00, 2.16, and 2.36. Experimental data were obtained on a uncambered wing which had three interchangeable leading edges that varied from sharp to blunt. The leading edge thrust concept was evaluated. Results from the investigation showed that leading edge flow separation characteristics of all wings tested agree well with theoretical predictions. The experimental data showed that significant changes in wing leading edge bluntness did not affect the zero lift drag of the uncambered wings.

  5. Problems of millipound thrust measurement. The "Hansen Suspension"

    SciTech Connect

    Carta, David G.

    2014-03-31

    Considered in detail are problems which led to the need and use of the 'Hansen Suspension'. Also discussed are problems which are likely to be encountered in any low level thrust measuring system. The methods of calibration and the accuracies involved are given careful attention. With all parameters optimized and calibration techniques perfected, the system was found capable of a resolution of 10 {mu} lbs. A comparison of thrust measurements made by the 'Hansen Suspension' with measurements of a less sophisticated device leads to some surprising results.

  6. Fabrication of liquid-rocket thrust chambers by electroforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duscha, R. A.; Kazaroff, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Electroforming has proven to be an excellent fabrication method for building liquid rocket regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. NASA sponsored technology programs have investigated both common and advanced methods. Using common procedures, several cooled spool pieces and thrust chambers have been made and successfully tested. The designs were made possible through the versatility of the electroforming procedure, which is not limited to simple geometric shapes. An advanced method of electroforming was used to produce a wire-wrapped, composite, pressure-loaded electroformed structure, which greatly increased the strength of the structure while still retaining the advantages of electroforming.

  7. Thrust involvement of metamorphic rocks, southwestern Brooks Range, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Till, A.B.; Schmidt, J.M.; Nelson, S.W. )

    1988-10-01

    Most models for the tectonic history of the western Brooks Range treat Proterozoic and lower Paleozoic metamorphic rocks exposed in the southern part of the range as passive structural basement vertically uplifted late in the Mesozoic orogenic episode. Mapping in the metamorphic rocks shows that they can de divided into two structurally and metamorphically distinct belts, both of which were folded and thrust during the orogeny. Recognition of these belts and the nature of the contact separating them is critical to construction of accurate tectonic models of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt.

  8. Low-thrust chemical propulsion system pump technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabiers, R. L.; Siebenhaar, A.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate pump and driver systems for low thrust cargo orbit transfer vehicle engines which deliver large space structures to geosynchronous equatorial orbit and beyond are evaluated. The pumps operate to 68 atmospheres (1000 psi) discharge pressure and flowrates suited to cryogenic engines using either LOX/methane or LOX/hydrogen propellants in thrust ranges from 445 to 8900 N (100 to 2000 lb F). Analysis of the various pumps and drivers indicate that the low specific speed requirement will make high fluid efficiencies difficult to achieve. As such, multiple stages are required. In addition, all pumps require inducer stages. The most attractive main pumps are the multistage centrifugal pumps.

  9. Thrusting, halotectonics, and sedimentation in the Spanish Pyrenees

    SciTech Connect

    Anastasio, D.J.

    1988-08-01

    The Spanish Pyrenees are a linked system of regional thrust sheets and intermontane basins which formed during the Tertiary collision of the European and Iberian plates. The structural evolution of the Pyrenees was controlled by Mesozoic extensional structures and evaporite-bearing strata which served as the regional decollement and produced widespread pre- to postthrusting halotectonic folds. Palinspastic restoration of Cretaceous strata from the Pyrenean realm delineates a large normal-faulted embayment in the northern Iberian margin. Thicker sediments within the bay, coupled with the southward emplacement of the Cotiella-Montsec thrust sheet, caused underlying evaporites to flow toward the basin margins, producing folds such as the Mediano anticline.

  10. Low thrust power-limited transfer for a pole squatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakwell, J. V.; Golan, O. M.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of minimum fuel transfer in a central gravity field for power-limited low thrust propulsion has been studied by several investigators. Orbital averaging was used by Edelbaum in the co-axial and co-planar cases, and by Marec and Vinh for the general transfer between elliptical orbits. The co-latus rectum transfer, which has a complete analytical solution, can be applied to the Pole Squatter. Typical results for the evolution of the orbit parameters and the variation of the thrust acceleration along the orbit are shown.

  11. F-15B ACTIVE with thrust vectoring nozzles in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's F-15 ACTIVE (Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles) research aircraft takes off from Edwards, California. The twin-engine F-15 is equipped with new Pratt & Whitney nozzles that can turn up to 20 degrees in any direction, giving the aircraft thrust control in the pitch (up and down) and yaw (left and right) directions. On March 27, 1996, NASA began flight testing a new thrust vectoring concept on the F-15 research aircraft to improve performance and aircraft control. The new concept should lead to signifigant increases in performance of both civil and military aircraft flying at subsonic and supersonic speeds.

  12. Accurate analytical approximation of asteroid deflection with constant tangential thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombardelli, Claudio; Baù, Giulio

    2012-11-01

    We present analytical formulas to estimate the variation of achieved deflection for an Earth-impacting asteroid following a continuous tangential low-thrust deflection strategy. Relatively simple analytical expressions are obtained with the aid of asymptotic theory and the use of Peláez orbital elements set, an approach that is particularly suitable to the asteroid deflection problem and is not limited to small eccentricities. The accuracy of the proposed formulas is evaluated numerically showing negligible error for both early and late deflection campaigns. The results will be of aid in planning future low-thrust asteroid deflection missions.

  13. Design, synthesis, and characterization of ladder-type molecules and polymers. Air-stable, solution-processable n-channel and ambipolar semiconductors for thin-film transistors via experiment and theory.

    PubMed

    Usta, Hakan; Risko, Chad; Wang, Zhiming; Huang, Hui; Deliomeroglu, Murat K; Zhukhovitskiy, Aleksandr; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J

    2009-04-22

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of new high-performance n-channel molecular/polymeric semiconductors that are solution-processable and air-stable is of great interest for the development of p-n junctions, bipolar transistors, and organic complementary circuitry (CMOS). While over the past two decades there have been many reports on n-channel materials, solution-processability and air-stability still remain as major challenges. We report here the synthesis and detailed characterization of a highly electron-deficient class of indeno[1,2-b]fluorene-6,12-dione, 2,2'-(indeno[1,2-b]fluorene-6,12-diylidene) dimalononitrile, bisindenofluorene-12,15-dione, and 2,2'-(bisindenofluorene-12,15-diylidene) dimalononitrile-based ladder-type building blocks (1-12) and their corresponding homo- and copolymers (P1-P14), and examine in detail the effects of core size, thiophene vs core regiochemistry, carbonyl vs dicyanovinylene functionality, and alkyl chain orientation on the physicochemical properties, thin film microstructures, and OFET device performance. New compounds are characterized by DSC, TGA, melting point, single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), solution/thin film optical, PL, and cyclic voltammetry measurements to evaluate frontier molecular orbital energetics and intermolecular cohesive forces. Thin films are grown by vacuum deposition and spin-coating, and investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and AFM. By tuning the HOMO/LUMO energetics of the present materials over a 1.1 eV range, p-type, n-type, or ambipolar charge transport characteristics can be observed, thus identifying the MO energetic windows governing majority carrier polarity and air stability. One of these systems, thiophene-terminated indenofluorenedicyanovinylene 10 exhibits an electron mobility of 0.16 cm(2)/V x s and an I(on)/I(off) ratio of 10(7)-10(8), one of the highest to date for a solution-cast air-stable n-channel semiconductor. Here we also report solution-processed ambipolar films

  14. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-activated liquid hydrogen reorientation with Geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Efficient technique are studied for accomplishing propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage through impulsive thrust. A comparison between the use of constant-thrust and impulsive-thrust accelerations for the activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive thrust is superior to constant thrust for liquid reorientation in a reduced-gravity environment. This study shows that when impulsive thrust with 0.1-1.0-, and 10-Hz frequencies for liquid-fill levels in the range between 30-80 percent is considered, the selection of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive thrust over the other frequency ranges of impulsive thrust is the optimum. Characteristics of the slosh waves excited during the course of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive-thrust liquid reorientation were also analyzed.

  15. Importance of combining convection with film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    The interaction of film and convection cooling and its effect on wall cooling efficiency is investigated analytically for two cooling schemes for advanced gas turbine applications. The two schemes are full coverage- and counterflow-film cooling. In full coverage film cooling, the cooling air issues from a large number of small discrete holes in the surface. Counterflow film cooling is a film-convection scheme with film injection from a slot geometry. The results indicate that it is beneficial to utilize as much of the cooling air heat sink as possible for convection cooling prior to ejecting it as a film.

  16. Importance of combining convection with film cooling.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colladay, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    The interaction of film and convection cooling and its effect on wall cooling efficiency is investigated analytically for two cooling schemes for advanced gas turbine applications. The two schemes are full coverage- and counterflow-film cooling. In full coverage film cooling, the cooling air issues from a large number of small discrete holes in the surface. Counterflow film cooling is a film-convection scheme with film injection from a slot geometry. The results indicate that it is beneficial to utilize as much of the cooling air heat sink as possible for convection cooling prior to ejecting it as a film.

  17. Was Himalayan normal faulting triggered by initiation of the Ramgarh-Munsiari Thrust?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Delores M.; Pearson, Ofori N.

    2013-01-01

    The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is a major orogen-scale fault that extends for more than 1,500 km along strike in the Himalayan fold-thrust belt. The fault can be traced along the Himalayan arc from Himachal Pradesh, India, in the west to eastern Bhutan. The fault is located within the Lesser Himalayan tectonostratigraphic zone, and it translated Paleoproterozoic Lesser Himalayan rocks more than 100 km toward the foreland. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust is always located in the proximal footwall of the Main Central thrust. Northern exposures (toward the hinterland) of the thrust sheet occur in the footwall of the Main Central thrust at the base of the high Himalaya, and southern exposures (toward the foreland) occur between the Main Boundary thrust and Greater Himalayan klippen. Although the metamorphic grade of rocks within the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust sheet is not significantly different from that of Greater Himalayan rock in the hanging wall of the overlying Main Central thrust sheet, the tectonostratigraphic origin of the two different thrust sheets is markedly different. The Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust became active in early Miocene time and acted as the roof thrust for a duplex system within Lesser Himalayan rocks. The process of slip transfer from the Main Central thrust to the Ramgarh–Munsiari thrust in early Miocene time and subsequent development of the Lesser Himalayan duplex may have played a role in triggering normal faulting along the South Tibetan Detachment system.

  18. Thrust Augmentation of a Turbojet Engine at Simulated Flight Conditions by Introduction of a Water-Alcohol Mixture into the Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Useller, James W.; Auble, Carmon M.; Harvey, Ray W., Sr.

    1952-01-01

    An investigation was conducted at simulated high-altitude flight conditions to evaluate the use of compressor evaporative cooling as a means of turbojet-engine thrust augmentation. Comparison of the performance of the engine with water-alcohol injection at the compressor inlet, at the sixth stage of the compressor, and at the sixth and ninth stages was made. From consideration of the thrust increases achieved, the interstage injection of the coolant was considered more desirable preferred over the combined sixth- and ninth-stage injection because of its relative simplicity. A maximum augmented net-thrust ratio of 1.106 and a maximum augmented jet-thrust ratio of 1.062 were obtained at an augmented liquid ratio of 2.98 and an engine-inlet temperature of 80 F. At lower inlet temperatures (-40 to 40 F), the maximum augmented net-thrust ratios ranged from 1.040 to 1.076 and the maximum augmented jet-thrust ratios ranged from 1.027 to 1.048, depending upon the inlet temperature. The relatively small increase in performance at the lower inlet-air temperatures can be partially attributed to the inadequate evaporation of the water-alcohol mixture, but the more significant limitation was believed to be caused by the negative influence of the liquid coolant on engine- component performance. In general, it is concluded that the effectiveness of the injection of a coolant into the compressor as a means of thrust augmentation is considerably influenced by the design characteristics of the components of the engine being used.

  19. Aircraft ground test and subscale model results of axial thrust loss caused by thrust vectoring using turning vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven A.

    1992-01-01

    The NASA-Dryden F/A-18 high alpha research vehicle was modified to incorporate three independently controlled turning vanes located aft of the primary nozzle of each engine to vector thrust for pitch and yaw control. Ground measured axial thrust losses were compared with the results from a 14.25 pct. cold jet model for single and dual vanes inserted up to 25 degs into the engine exhaust. Data are presented for nozzle pressure ratios of 2.0 and 3.0 and nozzle exit areas of 253 and 348 sq in. The results indicate that subscale nozzle test results properly predict trends but underpredict the full scale results by approx. 1 to 4.5 pct. in thrust loss.

  20. Quiet Clean Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) acoustic and aerodynamic tests on a scale model over-the-wing thrust reverser and forward thrust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimpert, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    An acoustic and aerodynamic test program was conducted on a 1/6.25 scale model of the Quiet, Clean, Short-Haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE) forward thrust over-the-wing (OTW) nozzle and OTW thrust reverser. In reverse thrust, the effect of reverser geometry was studied by parametric variations in blocker spacing, blocker height, lip angle, and lip length. Forward thrust nozzle tests determined the jet noise levels of the cruise and takeoff nozzles, the effect of opening side doors to achieve takeoff thrust, and scrubbing noise of the cruise and takeoff jet on a simulated wing surface. Velocity profiles are presented for both forward and reverse thrust nozzles. An estimate of the reverse thrust was made utilizing the measured centerline turning angle.