Science.gov

Sample records for air flow channels

  1. Thermal performance evaluation of MSFC hot air collectors with various flow channel depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The test procedures used and the results obtained during the evaluation test program on the MSFC air collector with flow channel depth of 3 in., 2 in., and 1 in., under simulated conditions are presented. The MSFC hot air collector consists of a single glass cover with a nonselective coating absorber plate and uses air as the heat transfer medium. The absorber panel consists of a thin flat sheet of aluminum.

  2. Simulation of 3-D Nonequilibrium Seeded Air Flow in the NASA-Ames MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D nonequilibrium seeded air flow in the NASA-Ames experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed us ing a 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime: The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. The algorithm has been extended in the present study to account for nonequilibrium seeded air flows. The electrical conductivity of the flow is determined using the program of Park. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the seeded flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. An investigation of channel flow with a smooth air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madad, Reza; Elsnab, John; Chin, Cheng; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-06-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation are used to investigate fully developed laminar and turbulent channel flow with an air-water interface as the lower boundary condition. Laser Doppler velocimetry measurements of streamwise and wall-normal velocity components are made over a range of Reynolds number based upon channel height and bulk velocity from 1100 to 4300, which encompasses the laminar, transitional and low Reynolds numbers turbulent regimes. The results show that the airflow statistics near the stationary wall are not significantly altered by the air-water moving interface and reflect those found in channel flows. The mean statistics on the water interface side largely exhibit results similar to simulated Poiseuille-Couette flow (PCF) with a solid moving wall. For second-order statistics, however, the simulation and experimental results show some discrepancies near the moving water surface, suggesting that a full two-phase simulation is required. A momentum and energy transport tubes analysis is investigated for laminar and turbulent PCFs. This analysis builds upon the classical notion of a streamtube and indicates that part of the energy from the pressure gradient is transported towards the stationary wall and is dissipated as heat inside the energy tubes, while the remainder is transmitted to the moving wall. For the experiments, the airflow energy is transmitted towards the water to overcome the drag force and drive the water forward; therefore, the amount of energy transferred to the water is higher than the energy transferred to a solid moving wall.

  4. Drag reductions and the air-water interface stability of superhydrophobic surfaces in rectangular channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingxian; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Flow in a rectangular channel with superhydrophobic (SH) top and bottom walls was investigated experimentally. Different SH surfaces, including hierarchical structured surfaces and surfaces with different micropost sizes (width and spacing) but the same solid fraction, were fabricated and measured. Pressure loss and flow rate in the channel with SH top and bottom walls were measured, with Reynolds number changing from 700 to 4700, and the corresponding friction factor for the SH surface was calculated. The statuses of the air plastron on different SH surfaces were observed during the experiment. In our experiment, compared with the experiment for the smooth surface, drag reductions were observed for all SH surfaces, with the largest drag reduction of 42.2%. It was found that the hierarchy of the microstructure can increase the drag reduction by decreasing the solid fraction and enhancing the stability of the air-water interface. With a fixed solid fraction, the drag reduction decreases as the post size (width and spacing) increases, due to the increasing curvature and instability effects of the air-water interface. A correlation parameter between the contact angle hysteresis, the air-water interface stability, and the drag reduction of the SH surfaces was found.

  5. Drag reductions and the air-water interface stability of superhydrophobic surfaces in rectangular channel flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxian; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Flow in a rectangular channel with superhydrophobic (SH) top and bottom walls was investigated experimentally. Different SH surfaces, including hierarchical structured surfaces and surfaces with different micropost sizes (width and spacing) but the same solid fraction, were fabricated and measured. Pressure loss and flow rate in the channel with SH top and bottom walls were measured, with Reynolds number changing from 700 to 4700, and the corresponding friction factor for the SH surface was calculated. The statuses of the air plastron on different SH surfaces were observed during the experiment. In our experiment, compared with the experiment for the smooth surface, drag reductions were observed for all SH surfaces, with the largest drag reduction of 42.2%. It was found that the hierarchy of the microstructure can increase the drag reduction by decreasing the solid fraction and enhancing the stability of the air-water interface. With a fixed solid fraction, the drag reduction decreases as the post size (width and spacing) increases, due to the increasing curvature and instability effects of the air-water interface. A correlation parameter between the contact angle hysteresis, the air-water interface stability, and the drag reduction of the SH surfaces was found.

  6. The effects of channel diameter on flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in circular micro-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Saisorn, Sira; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-05-15

    Two-phase air-water flow characteristics are experimentally investigated in horizontal circular micro-channels. Test sections are made of fused silica. The experiments are conducted based on three different inner diameters of 0.53, 0.22 and 0.15 mm with the corresponding lengths of 320, 120 and 104 mm, respectively. The test runs are done at superficial velocities of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-42.36 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow visualisation is facilitated by systems mainly including stereozoom microscope and high-speed camera. The flow regime maps developed from the observed flow patterns are presented. The void fractions are determined based on image analysis. New correlation for two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical applications. (author)

  7. The effect of different inlet conditions of air in a rectangular channel on convection heat transfer: Turbulence flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtbas, Irfan

    2008-10-15

    Theoretical and empirical correlations for duct flow are given for hydrodynamically and thermally developed flow in most of previous studies. However, this is commonly not a realistic inlet configuration for heat exchanger, in which coolant flow generally turns through a serpentine shaped passage before entering heat sinks. Accordingly, an experimental investigation was carried out to determine average heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated rectangular channel with 45 and 90 turned flow, and with wall mounted a baffle. The channel was heated through bottom side with the baffle. In present work, a detailed study was conducted for three different height of entry channel (named as the ratio of the height of entry channel to the height of test section (anti H{sub c}=h{sub c}/H)) by varying Reynolds number (Re{sub Dh}). Another variable parameter was the ratio of the baffle height to the channel height (anti H{sub b}=h{sub b}/H). Only one baffle was attached on the bottom (heating) surface. The experimental procedure was validated by comparing the data for the straight channel with no baffle. Reynolds number (Re{sub Dh}) was varied from 2800 to 30,000, so the flow was considered as only turbulent regime. All experiments were conduced with air accordingly; Prandtl number (Pr) was approximately fixed at 0.71. The results showed that average Nusselt number for {theta}=45 and {theta}=90 were 9% and 30% higher, respectively, than that of the straight channel without baffle. Likewise, the pressure drop increased up to 4.4 to 5.3 times compare to the straight channel. (author)

  8. Flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in a horizontal circular micro-channel

    SciTech Connect

    Saisorn, Sira; Wongwises, Somchai

    2008-01-15

    Adiabatic two-phase air-water flow characteristics, including the two-phase flow pattern as well as the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop, in a circular micro-channel are experimentally studied. A fused silica channel, 320 mm long, with an inside diameter of 0.53 mm is used as the test section. The test runs are done at superficial velocity of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-16 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow pattern map is developed from the observed flow patterns i.e. slug flow, throat-annular flow, churn flow and annular-rivulet flow. The flow pattern map is compared with those of other researchers obtained from different working fluids. The present single-phase experiments also show that there are no significant differences in the data from the use of air or nitrogen gas, and water or de-ionized water. The void fraction data obtained by image analysis tends to correspond with the homogeneous flow model. The two-phase pressure drops are also used to calculate the frictional multiplier. The multiplier data show a dependence on flow pattern as well as mass flux. A new correlation of two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical application. (author)

  9. 3-Dimensional numerical study of cooling performance of a heat sink with air-water flow through mini-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sambit; Majumder, Abhik; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-07-01

    The present microelectronics market demands devices with high power dissipation capabilities having enhanced cooling per unit area. The drive for miniaturizing the devices to even micro level dimensions is shooting up the applied heat flux on such devices, resulting in complexity in heat transfer and cooling management. In this paper, a method of CPU processor cooling is introduced where active and passive cooling techniques are incorporated simultaneously. A heat sink consisting of fins is designed, where water flows internally through the mini-channel fins and air flows externally. Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed for large set of Reynolds number in laminar region using finite volume method for both developing flows. The dimensions of mini-channel fins are varied for several aspect ratios such as 1, 1.33, 2 and 4. Constant temperature (T) boundary condition is applied at heat sink base. Channel fluid temperature, pressure drop are analyzed to obtain best cooling option in the present study. It has been observed that as the aspect ratio of the channel decreases Nusselt number decreases while pressure drop increases. However, Nusselt number increases with increase in Reynolds number.

  10. A multi-channel, low velocity, hot film anemometry system for measuring air flows in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Guire, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A complete analytical and experimental development of a multichannel anemometry system is presented. The system consists of an array of low velocity sensors (0.0 m/s to 1.0 m/s), a constant current power supply, and the required data acquisition equipment. The velocity sensors can be scanned simultaneously yielding absolute air velocities and absolute ambient air temperatures at each of the probe positions in the array. One of the key results that this system can produce is the relationship between boundary layer flow and pressure driven flow through a large irregular aperture, such as a doorway, which up until now has been difficult to accomplish with regard to cost and experimental error incurred. 7 refs., 57 figs.

  11. Experimental and numerical analysis of air flow in a dead-end channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branny, M.; Jaszczur, M.; Wodziak, W.; Szmyd, J.

    2016-09-01

    This study summarises the results of experimental testing and numerical simulations of airflow in a laboratory model of a blind channel aired by a forced ventilation system. The aim of the investigation is qualitative and quantitative verification of computer modelling data. The components of the velocity vector are measured using Particle Image Velocimetry. Two turbulence models, the standard k-ε model and the Reynolds Stress Model, were used in a numerical calculation. A comparison of the magnitude of the velocity vector and the kinetic energy of turbulence obtained by the experimental methods and numerical calculations shows that in qualitative terms, the predicted velocity field correlates well with the measurement data. The mean relative error between the results of the calculations and measurements for the magnitude of the velocity vector and the kinetic energy of turbulence is about 29% for the Reynolds Stress Model and 33% for the standard k-ε model.

  12. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics of air-water two-phase flow in micro-channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kaji, Masuo; Sawai, Toru; Kagi, Yosuke; Ueda, Tadanobu

    2010-05-15

    Heat transfer, pressure drop, and void fraction were simultaneously measured for upward heated air-water non-boiling two-phase flow in 0.51 mm ID tube to investigate thermo-hydro dynamic characteristics of two-phase flow in micro-channels. At low liquid superficial velocity j{sub l} frictional pressure drop agreed with Mishima-Hibiki's correlation, whereas agreed with Chisholm-Laird's correlation at relatively high j{sub l}. Void fraction was lower than the homogeneous model and conventional empirical correlations. To interpret the decrease of void fraction with decrease of tube diameter, a relation among the void fraction, pressure gradient and tube diameter was derived. Heat transfer coefficient fairly agreed with the data for 1.03 and 2.01 mm ID tubes when j{sub l} was relatively high. But it became lower than that for larger diameter tubes when j{sub l} was low. Analogy between heat transfer and frictional pressure drop was proved to hold roughly for the two-phase flow in micro-channel. But satisfactory relation was not obtained under the condition of low liquid superficial velocity. (author)

  13. A Heuristic Approach to Determining Cargo Flow and Scheduling for Air Mobility Command’s Channel Cargo System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    COMMAND’S CHANNEL CARGO SYSTEM THESIS Presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School of Engineering of the Air Force Institute of Technology Air...can take up to four days to complete. This two-phase process has also been used for other 4 applications , such as special studies of proposed...modifications to the channel system (Del Rosario, 1993:6). 1.3 Previoe AFiT Research The Air Force Institute of Technology (AFMIT has conducted several research

  14. An Experimental Investigation of the Flow of Air in a Flat Broadening Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedernikoff, A. N.

    1944-01-01

    The wide use of diffusers, in various fields of technology, has resulted in several experimental projects to study the action and design of diffusers. Most of the projects dealt with steam (steam turbine nozzles). But diffusers have other applications - that is, ventilators, smoke ducts, air coolers, refrigeration, drying, and so forth. At present there is another application for diffusers in wind-tunnel design. Because of higher requirements and increased power of such installations more attention must be paid to the correctness of work and the decrease in losses due to every section of the tunnel. A diffuser, being one of the component parts of a tunnel , can in the event of faulty construction introduce considerable losses. Therefore, in the design of the new CAHI wind tunnel, it was suggested that an experimental study of diffusers be made, with a view to applying the results to wind tunnels. The experiments conducted by K. K. Baulin in the laboratories of CAHI upon models of diffusers of different cross sections, lengths, and angles of divergence, were a valuable source of experimental data. They were of no help, however, in reaching any conclusion regarding the optimum shape because of the complexity and diversity of the factors which all appeared simultaneously, thereby precluding the.study of the effects of any one factor separately. On the suggestion of the director of the CAHI,Prof. B. N. Ureff, it was decided to experiment on a two-dimensional diffuser model and determine the effect, of the angle of divergence. The author is acquainted with two experimental projects of like nature: the first was conducted with water, the other with air. The first of these works, although containing a wealth of experimental data, does not indicate the nature of flow or its relation to the angle of divergence. The second work is limited to four angles - that is, 12 deg, 24 deg, 45 deg, 90 deg. The study of this diffuser did not supply any information about the effect of

  15. Natural Flow Air Cooled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanagnostopoulos, Y.; Themelis, P.

    2010-01-01

    Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. We performed experiments using a prototype based on three silicon photovoltaic modules placed in series to simulate a typical sloping building roof with photovoltaic installation. In this system the air flows through a channel on the rear side of PV panels. The potential for increasing the heat exchange from the photovoltaic panel to the circulating air by the addition of a thin metal sheet (TMS) in the middle of air channel or metal fins (FIN) along the air duct was examined. The operation of the device was studied with the air duct closed tightly to avoid air circulation (CLOSED) and the air duct open (REF), with the thin metal sheet (TMS) and with metal fins (FIN). In each case the experiments were performed under sunlight and the operating parameters of the experimental device determining the electrical and thermal performance of the system were observed and recorded during a whole day and for several days. We collected the data and form PV panels from the comparative diagrams of the experimental results regarding the temperature of solar cells, the electrical efficiency of the installation, the temperature of the back wall of the air duct and the temperature difference in the entrance and exit of the air duct. The comparative results from the measurements determine the improvement in electrical performance of the photovoltaic cells because of the reduction of their temperature, which is achieved by the naturally circulating air.

  16. FAITH Water Channel Flow Visualization

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water channel flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the complex fluid flow around the hi...

  17. Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Rock, Jeffrey Allan

    2000-08-08

    A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

  18. Time-resolved fast-neutron radiography of air-water two-phase flows in a rectangular channel by an improved detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Zboray, Robert; Dangendorf, Volker; Bromberger, Benjamin; Tittelmeier, Kai; Mor, Ilan

    2015-07-15

    In a previous work, we have demonstrated the feasibility of high-frame-rate, fast-neutron radiography of generic air-water two-phase flows in a 1.5 cm thick, rectangular flow channel. The experiments have been carried out at the high-intensity, white-beam facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, using an multi-frame, time-resolved detector developed for fast neutron resonance radiography. The results were however not fully optimal and therefore we have decided to modify the detector and optimize it for the given application, which is described in the present work. Furthermore, we managed to improve the image post-processing methodology and the noise suppression. Using the tailored detector and the improved post-processing, significant increase in the image quality and an order of magnitude lower exposure times, down to 3.33 ms, have been achieved with minimized motion artifacts. Similar to the previous study, different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. The enhanced imaging quality enables an improved prediction of two-phase flow parameters like the instantaneous volumetric gas fraction, bubble size, and bubble velocities. Instantaneous velocity fields around the gas enclosures can also be more robustly predicted using optical flow methods as previously.

  19. Acoustic resonance phenomena in air bleed channels in aviation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksentsev, A. A.; Sazhenkov, A. N.; Sukhinin, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    The existence of axial-radial acoustic resonance oscillations of the basic air flow in bleed channels of aviation engines is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. Numerical and analytical methods are used to determine the frequency of acoustic resonance oscillations for the lowest modes of open and closed bleed channels of the PS-90A engine. Experimental investigations reveal new acoustic resonance phenomena arising in the air flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of this engine owing to instability of the basic air flow. The results of numerical, analytical, and experimental studies of the resonance frequencies reached in the flow in bleed channel cavities in the core duct of the PS-90A engine are found to be in reasonable agreement. As a result, various types of resonance oscillations in bleed channels can be accurately described.

  20. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  1. Liquid infused surfaces in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Matthew; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang; Wang, Karen; Lee, Kevin; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    A turbulent channel flow facility is used to measure the drag reduction capabilities and dynamic behavior of liquid-infused micro-patterned surfaces. Liquid infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust alternative to traditional air-cushion-based superhydrophobic surfaces. The mobile liquid lubricant creates a surface slip with the outer turbulent shear flow as well as an energetic sink to dampen turbulent fluctuations. Micro-manufactured surfaces can be mounted flush in the channel and exposed to turbulent flows. Two configurations are possible, both capable of producing laminar and turbulent flows. The first configuration allows detailed investigation of the infused liquid layer and the other allows well resolved pressure gradient measurements. Both of the configurations have high aspect ratios 15-45:1. Drag reduction for a variety of liquid-infused surface architectures is quantified by measuring pressure drop in the channel. Flow in the oil film is simultaneously visualized using fluorescent dye. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  2. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  3. Thermotechnical performance of an air-cooled tuyere with air cooling channels in series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuansheng; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Tao; Duan, Guangbin

    2017-01-01

    To reduce the cooling air consumption for an air-cooled tuyere, an air-cooled tuyere with air cooling channels in series is developed based on several hypotheses, i.e., a transparent medium in the blast furnace, among others, and the related mathematical models are introduced and developed. Referring to the data from a BF site, the thermotechnical computation for the air-cooled tuyere was performed, and the results show that when the temperature of the inlet cooling air increases, the temperatures for the outlet cooling air, the outer surface of the tuyere, the walls of the air cooling channels and the center channel as well as the heat going into the center channel increase, but the heat absorbed by the cooling air flowing through the air cooling channels decreases. When the cooling air flow rate under the standard state increases, the physical parameters mentioned above change in an opposite directions. Compared to a water-cooled tuyere, the energy savings for an air-cooled tuyere are more than 0.23 kg/min standard coal.

  4. Two-Phase Annular Flow in Helical Coil Flow Channels in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, Edward G.; Lin, Chin S.

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of both single- and two-phase flow studies in curved and coiled flow geometries is first presented. Some of the complexities of two-phase liquid-vapor flow in curved and coiled geometries are discussed, and serve as an introduction to the advantages of observing such flows under a low-gravity environment. The studies proposed -- annular two-phase air-water flow in helical coil flow channels are described. Objectives of the studies are summarized.

  5. Annular fuel and air co-flow premixer

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Melton, Patrick Benedict; York, William David

    2013-10-15

    Disclosed is a premixer for a combustor including an annular outer shell and an annular inner shell. The inner shell defines an inner flow channel inside of the inner shell and is located to define an outer flow channel between the outer shell and the inner shell. A fuel discharge annulus is located between the outer flow channel and the inner flow channel and is configured to inject a fuel flow into a mixing area in a direction substantially parallel to an outer airflow through the outer flow channel and an inner flow through the inner flow channel. Further disclosed are a combustor including a plurality of premixers and a method of premixing air and fuel in a combustor.

  6. Fluid flow through the larynx channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. A.; Pereira, J. C.; Thomas, D. W.

    1988-03-01

    The classic two-mass model of the larynx channel is extended by including the false vocal folds and the laryngeal ventricle. Several glottis profiles are postulated to exist which are the result of the forces applied to the mucus membrane due to intraglottal pressure variation. These profiles constrain the air flow which allows the formation of one or two "venae contractae". The location of these influences the pressure in the glottis and layrngeal ventricle and also gives rise to additional viscous losses as well as losses due to flow enlargement. Sampled waveforms are calculated from the model for volume velocity, glottal area, Reynolds number and fluid forces over the vocal folds for various profiles. Results show that the computed waveforms agree with physiological data [1,2] and that it is not necessary to use any empirical constants to match the simulation results. Also, the onset of phonation is shown to be possible either with abduction or adduction of the vocal folds.

  7. Air channel distribution during air sparging: A field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Leeson, A.; Hinchee, R.E.; Headington, G.L.; Vogel, C.M.

    1995-12-31

    Air sparging may have the potential to improve upon conventional groundwater treatment technologies. However, judging from studies published to date and theoretical analyses, it is possible that air sparging may have a limited effect on aquifer contamination. The basic mechanisms controlling air sparging are not well understood, and current monitoring practice does not appear adequate to quantitatively evaluate the process. During this study, the effective zone of influence, defined as the areas in which air channels form, was studied as a function of flowrate and depth of injection points. This was accomplished by conducting the air sparging test in an area with shallow standing water. Air sparging points were installed at various depths, and the zone of influence was determined visually.

  8. Inertial (non-Darcian) channeled seepage flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foda, Mostafa A.

    1994-10-01

    A slow wave solution is identified for an infinite elastic medium intersected by a two-dimensional fluid channel. Because the wave speed is much slower than the medium's elastic shear wave, the response in the elastic medium is governed by elastostatics. The inertia of the wave is essentially focused in the fluid channel. Furthermore, wave damping is caused by fluid viscous friction on the channel in an elastic solid. It is proposed that these solutions may also be used in the case of a granular porous medium. The seepage channels would then represent a network of preferential flow paths. Therefore we would allow, in this case, the channel porosity to be different from the average granular porosity. For a strongly channel seepage flow or for a low channel porosity the solution is shown to approach that of a single-channel solution, giving rise to a slow propagating wave mode. On the other hand, for weak channeling or nearly `homogeneous' seepage flow the solution is shown to reproduce Biot's (1956) critically damped wave of the second kind. It is proposed that the resonance observed by Foda and Tzang (1994) are in the form of these strongly channeled wave modes.

  9. Counter-current flow limitation in thin rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lap Y.

    The phenomenon of counter-current flow limitation (CCFL) in thin rectangular channels is important in determining the heat removal capability of research reactors which use plate-type fuel elements similar to the MTR design. An analytical expression for predicting CCFL in narrow rectangular channels was derived from the momentum equations for the liquid and gas phase. The model assumes that the liquid downflow is in the form of a film along the narrower side walls of the channel, while the gas flow occupies the wide span of the rectangular channel. The average thickness of liquid film is related to the rate of gas flow through a stability criterion for the liquid film. The CCFL correlation agrees with air/water data taken at relatively high gas velocities. Depending on the magnitude of the dimensionless channel width, the new CCFL correlation approaches zero liquid penetration either in the form of a Wallis correlation or in terms of a Kutateladze number. The new correlation indicates that for a thin rectangular channel, the constant C in the Wallis flooding correlation depends on the aspect ratio of the channel. The approach to the appropriate asymptotic solutions also justifies the use of twice the wide span as the correct length scale for thin rectangular channels.

  10. Electroosmotic Flow in Nanofluidic Channels

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the measurement of electroosmotic mobilities in nanofluidic channels with rectangular cross sections and compare our results with theory. Nanofluidic channels were milled directly into borosilicate glass between two closely spaced microchannels with a focused ion beam instrument, and the nanochannels had half-depths (h) of 27, 54, and 108 nm and the same half-width of 265 nm. We measured electroosmotic mobilities in NaCl solutions from 0.1 to 500 mM that have Debye lengths (κ–1) from 30 to 0.4 nm, respectively. The experimental electroosmotic mobilities compare quantitatively to mobilities calculated from a nonlinear solution of the Poisson–Boltzmann equation for channels with a parallel-plate geometry. For the calculations, ζ-potentials measured in a microchannel with a half-depth of 2.5 μm are used and range from −6 to −73 mV for 500 to 0.1 mM NaCl, respectively. For κh > 50, the Smoluchowski equation accurately predicts electroosmotic mobilities in the nanochannels. However, for κh < 10, the electrical double layer extends into the nanochannels, and due to confinement within the channels, the average electroosmotic mobilities decrease. At κh ≈ 4, the electroosmotic mobilities in the 27, 54, and 108 nm channels exhibit maxima, and at 0.1 mM NaCl, the electroosmotic mobility in the 27 nm channel (κh = 1) is 5-fold lower than the electroosmotic mobility in the 2.5 μm channel (κh = 100). PMID:25365680

  11. Two-Phase Flow Hydrodynamics in Superhydrophobic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Kimberly; Crockett, Julie; Maynes, Daniel; Iverson, Brian

    2016-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have been shown to reduce drag in single-phase channel flow; however, little work has been done to characterize the drag reduction found in two-phase channel flow. Adiabatic, air-water mixtures were used to gain insight into the effect of hydrophobicity on two-phase flows and the hydrodynamics which might be present in flow condensation. Pressure drop in a parallel plate channel with one superhydrophobic wall (cross-section 0.5 x 10 mm) and a transparent hydrophilic wall were explored. Data for air/water mixtures with superficial Reynolds numbers from 20-215 and 50-210, respectively, were obtained for superhydrophobic surfaces with three different cavity fractions. Agreement between experimentally obtained two-phase pressure drops and correlations in the literature for conventional smooth control surfaces was better than 20 percent. The reduction in pressure drop for channels with a single superhydrophobic wall were found to be more significant than that for single phase flow. The effect of cavity fraction on drag reduction was within experimental error.

  12. Simulation of the Turbulent air Flow Over a Circular Cavity with a Variable Opening Angle in an U-Shaped Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Usachov, A. E.; Zhukova, Yu. V.; Vysotskaya, A. A.; Malyshkin, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    A numerical investigation of the influence of the opening angle of a circular cavity in an U-shaped channel and the Reynolds number of a fluid fl ow in this channel on the local characteristics and turbulence of this fl ow has been performed based on the solution of the Reynolds equations, closed by the old and new Menter shear-stress transfer models and two variants of this model accounting for the curvature of streamlines, with the use of multiblock computational technologies realized in the VP2/3 package. The results of calculations were compared with each other and with experimental data of I. Castro and R. Savelsberg. This comparison has shown that the best agreement between the numerical predictions and experiments is obtained in the case where calculations are performed within the framework of the Leshtsiner-Rody-Isaev approach with correction for the eddy viscosity of the fluid fl ow. It was established that with increase in the Reynolds number and in the opening angle of the cavity the circulation flow in the near-wall layer of the vortex trapped in the cavity intensifies at a practically constant vorticity in the core of the vortex.

  13. Flow rate limitation in open capillary channel flows.

    PubMed

    Haake, Dennis; Rosendahl, Uwe; Ohlhoff, Antje; Dreyer, Michael E

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and theoretical investigations of forced liquid flows through open capillary channels under reduced gravity conditions. An open capillary channel is a structure that establishes a liquid flow path at low Bond numbers, when the capillary pressure caused by the surface tension force dominates in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure induced by gravitational or residual accelerations. In case of steady flow through the channel, the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the pressure difference between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. Because of convective and viscous momentum transport, the pressure along the flow path decreases and causes the free surface to bend inward. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the free surface collapses and gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. This critical flow rate depends on the geometry of the channel and the properties of the liquid. In this paper we present a comparison of the theoretical and experimental critical flow rates and surface profiles for convective dominated flows. For the prediction of the critical flow rate a one-dimensional theoretical model taking into account the entrance pressure loss and the frictional pressure loss in the channel is developed.

  14. Nonstationary flow in a channel with variable cross section under conditions of periodic pulsed energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2007-04-01

    The effect of a periodic pulsed supply of energy, equal to that of hydrogen combustion in air, on the structure of a supersonic flow in a channel of variable cross section modeling a ramjet tract has been studied. The flow has been numerically simulated based on two-dimensional gasdynamic equations. Various flow regimes are obtained depending on the configuration of energy supply zones and the excess air ratio in the channel.

  15. Investigation of supersonic chemically reacting and radiating channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, Mortaza; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    The 2-D time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows undergoing finite rate chemical reaction and radiation interaction for a hydrogen-air system. The explicit multistage finite volume technique of Jameson is used to advance the governing equations in time until convergence is achieved. The chemistry source term in the species equation is treated implicitly to alleviate the stiffness associated with fast reactions. The multidimensional radiative transfer equations for a nongray model are provided for a general configuration and then reduced for a planar geometry. Both pseudo-gray and nongray models are used to represent the absorption-emission characteristics of the participating species. The supersonic inviscid and viscous, nonreacting flows are solved by employing the finite volume technique of Jameson and the unsplit finite difference scheme of MacCormack. The specified problem considered is of the flow in a channel with a 10 deg compression-expansion ramp. The calculated results are compared with those of an upwind scheme. The problem of chemically reacting and radiating flows are solved for the flow of premixed hydrogen-air through a channel with parallel boundaries, and a channel with a compression corner. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interaction can have a significant influence on the entire flow field.

  16. Numerical investigation of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Kim, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fully developed turbulent channel flow was simulated numerically at Reynolds number 13800, based on centerline velocity and channel halt width. The large-scale flow field was obtained by directly integrating the filtered, three dimensional, time dependent, Navier-Stokes equations. The small-scale field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model. The calculations were carried out on the ILLIAC IV computer with up to 516,096 grid points. The computed flow field was used to study the statistical properties of the flow as well as its time dependent features. The agreement of the computed mean velocity profile, turbulence statistics, and detailed flow structures with experimental data is good. The resolvable portion of the statistical correlations appearing in the Reynolds stress equations are calculated. Particular attention is given to the examination of the flow structure in the vicinity of the wall.

  17. Turbulent particle clustering in a fully developed square channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villafane, Laura; Banko, Andrew; Elkins, Chris; Eaton, John

    2015-11-01

    Particle-turbulence interactions are investigated in a fully developed turbulent channel air flow to determine the gas phase effect on the particle concentration and velocity fields. The experimental apparatus is a vertical channel with square cross section. The Reynolds number based on channel width is about 104. The 12 um nominal diameter nickel particles are smaller than the Kolmogorov length scale and the corresponding Stokes number is of the order of one. Low volume and mass loading ratios are considered. Under these conditions preferential concentration is expected to be strong while the effect of particles on the gas flow negligible. The square channel flow contains mean secondary flows not present in high aspect ratio channels studied previously. These will increase transport of particles away from the walls and raise turbulence levels in the central region. Current experiments are focused on the statistics of the particle phase including particle concentration inhomogeneities and particle velocities. The particle concentration field is analyzed from high resolution laser illuminated planar images. Particle velocity distributions are measured by PIV techniques and compared to the carrier-phase mean velocities from aerodynamic pressure measurements in the unladen case. The effect of increasing mass loading ratio on the particle velocities is analyzed. This Material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0002373-1.

  18. Critical Velocity in Open Capillary Channel Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosendahl, Uwe; Dreyer, Michael E.; Rath, Hans J.; Motil, Brian; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate forced liquid flows through open capillary channels with free surfaces experimentally. The experiments were performed under low gravity conditions in the Bremen Drop Tower and on board the sounding rocket TEXUS-37. Open capillary channels (vanes) are used in surface tension tanks to transport the propellant and to provide a flow path for the bubble-free liquid supply to the thrusters. Since the free surfaces can only withstand a certain pressure differential between the liquid and ambient, the flow rate in the channel is limited. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the surfaces collapse and gas is ingested into the outlet. Since experimental and theoretical data of this flow rate limitation is lacking, the safety factors for the application of vanes in surface tension tanks must be unnecessary high. The aim of the investigation is to determine the maximum liquid flow rate and the corresponding critical flow velocity. The characteristic nondimensional parameters, OHNESORGE number, and gap ratio, cover a wide range of usual vanes. For the theoretical approach a one-dimensional momentum balance was set up. The numerical solution yields the maximum volume flux and the position of the free surface in good agreement with the experiments.

  19. Granular flow over inclined channels with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak; Weinhart, Thomas; Thornton, Anthony; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Study of granular flows down inclined channels is essential in understanding the dynamics of natural grain flows like landslides and snow avalanches. As a stepping stone, dry granular flow over an inclined channel with a localised constriction is investigated using both continuum methods and particle simulations. Initially, depth-averaged equations of motion (Savage & Hutter 1989) containing an unknown friction law are considered. The shallow-layer model for granular flows is closed with a friction law obtained from particle simulations of steady flows (Weinhart et al. 2012) undertaken in the open source package Mercury DPM (Mercury 2010). The closed two-dimensional (2D) shallow-layer model is then width-averaged to obtain a novel one-dimensional (1D) model which is an extension of the one for water flows through contraction (Akers & Bokhove 2008). Different flow states are predicted by this novel one-dimensional theory. Flow regimes with distinct flow states are determined as a function of upstream channel Froude number, F, and channel width ratio, Bc. The latter being the ratio of the channel exit width and upstream channel width. Existence of multiple steady states is predicted in a certain regime of F - Bc parameter plane which is in agreement with experiments previously undertaken by (Akers & Bokhove 2008) and for granular flows (Vreman et al. 2007). Furthermore, the 1D model is verified by solving the 2D shallow granular equations using an open source discontinuous Galerkin finite element package hpGEM (Pesch et al. 2007). For supercritical flows i.e. F > 1 the 1D asymptotics holds although the two-dimensional oblique granular jumps largely vary across the converging channel. This computationally efficient closed 1D model is validated by comparing it to the computationally more expensiveaa three-dimensional particle simulations. Finally, we aim to present a quasi-steady particle simulation of inclined flow through two rectangular blocks separated by a gap

  20. Optimal feedback control of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, Thomas; Choi, Haecheon; Temam, Roger; Moin, Parviz

    1993-01-01

    Feedback control equations were developed and tested for computing wall normal control velocities to control turbulent flow in a channel with the objective of reducing drag. The technique used is the minimization of a 'cost functional' which is constructed to represent some balance of the drag integrated over the wall and the net control effort. A distribution of wall velocities is found which minimizes this cost functional some time shortly in the future based on current observations of the flow near the wall. Preliminary direct numerical simulations of the scheme applied to turbulent channel flow indicates it provides approximately 17 percent drag reduction. The mechanism apparent when the scheme is applied to a simplified flow situation is also discussed.

  1. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S.

    2009-09-01

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector.

  2. Measurements of gravity driven granular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facto, Kevin

    This dissertation presents experiments that studied two gravity driven granular channel flows. The first experiment used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the density and displacement distributions of poppy seeds flowing in a rough walled channel. Time-averaged measurements of normalized velocity and density showed little flow speed dependence. Instantaneous measurements, however, showed marked velocity dependence in the displacement distributions. There was evidence of aperiodic starting and stopping at lower flow speeds and the onset of density waves on a continuous flow at higher speeds. The second experiment measured forces in all three spatial directions at the boundary of a flow of steel balls. The relationship between the normal and the tangential forces were examined statistically and compared to the Coulomb friction model. For both large and small forces, the tangential and normal forces are unrelated, as there appears to be a strong tendency for the tangential force to maintain a value that will bear the weight the weight of the particles in flow.

  3. Probability density functions in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinavahi, Surya P. G.

    1992-01-01

    The probability density functions (pdf's) of the fluctuating velocity components, as well as their first and second derivatives, are calculated using data from the direct numerical simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulent channel flow. It is observed that, beyond the buffer region, the pdf of each of these quantities is independent of the distance from the channel wall. It is further observed that, beyond the buffer region, the pdf's for all the first derivatives collapse onto a single universal curve and those of the second derivatives also collapse onto another universal curve, irrespective of the distance from the wall. The kinetic-energy dissipation rate exhibits log normal behavior.

  4. 78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, GASEOUS NITROGEN, AND HELIUM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  5. Flow pattern and pressure drop of vertical upward gas-liquid flow in sinusoidal wavy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-06-15

    Flow patterns and pressure drop of upward liquid single-phase flow and air-water two-phase flow in sinusoidal wavy channels are experimentally studied. The test section is formed by a sinusoidal wavy wall of 1.00 m length with a wave length of 67.20mm, an amplitude of 5.76mm. Different phase shifts between the side walls of the wavy channel of 0{sup o}, 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} are investigated. The flow phenomena, which are bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow, and dispersed bubbly flow are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. When the phase shifts are increased, the onset of the transition from the bubbly flow to the churn flow shifts to a higher value of superficial air velocity, and the regions of the slug flow and the churn flow are smaller. In other words, the regions of the bubbly flow and the dispersed bubbly flow are larger as the phase shift increases. The slug flow pattern is only found in the test sections with phase shifts of 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Recirculating gas bubbles are always found in the troughs of the corrugations. The recirculating is higher when the phase shifts are larger. The relationship between the two-phase multipliers calculated from the measured pressure drops, and the Martinelli parameter is compared with the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation. The correlation in the case of turbulent-turbulent condition is shown to fit the data very well for the phase shift of 0{sup o} but shows greater deviation when the phase shifts are higher. (author)

  6. Stochastic Modeling of Buoyancy driven Gas Flow Pattern: Can Continuum Models describe Channelized Gas Flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, H. W.; Samani, S.

    2010-12-01

    The injection of gases into the subsurface has become an important research topic in groundwater remediation technology, e.g. air sparging, and in CCS-technology, e.g. CO2-sequestration into saline aquifers. In both cases risk assessment is based on 2-phase flow modeling assuming that the stochastic gas flow patterns can be described by the continuum approach. As Cinar et al. (2009) have stated: “The fundamental understanding of drainage, as it applies to CO2 sequestration process, is limited primarily by the lack of well characterized experiments that allow a detailed classification of the microscopic flow regimes”. In case of air sparging the two important flow regimes are capillary fingering and viscous fingering. Using pore scale network modeling Ewing and Berkowitz (1998) were able to describe the transition from capillary fingering (= incoherent channelized flow) to viscous fingering (= coherent channelized flow). In order to investigate the stability of buoyancy-driven gas flow and the transition between coherent channelized flow and incoherent channelized flow we conducted high-resolution optical bench scale experiments. Our main results, which are in strong contradiction to the commonly used continuum models (CM) are: (1) Capillary trapping can already occur during injection and at the front of the plume (Lazik and Geistlinger, 2008) (2) Gas clusters or bubbles can be mobile (incoherent gas flow) and immobile (capillary trapping), and (3) Incoherent gas flow can not be described by a generalized Darcy law (Geistlinger et al., 2006, 2009). Glass et al. (2000) conducted CO2-gas injection experiments. Based on their experimental results they also questioned the validity of CM to describe coherent and incoherent gas flow and the validity of homogeneous stability analysis to predict channel width, channel number and channel velocity in heterogeneous porous media. Despite these findings there is an ongoing controversial discussion in the literature about

  7. Viscosity stratified fluids in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldati, Alfredo; Ahmadi, Somayeh; Roccon, Alessio; Zonta, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) is used to study the turbulent Poiseuille flow of two immiscible liquid layers inside a rectangular channel. A thin liquid layer (fluid 1) flows on top of a thick liquid layer (fluid 2), such that their thickness ratio is h1 /h2 = 1 / 9 . The two liquid layers have the same density but different viscosities (viscosity-stratified fluids). In particular, we consider three different values of the viscosity ratio λ =ν1 /ν2 : λ = 1 , λ = 0 . 875 and λ = 0 . 75 . Numerical Simulations are based on a Phase Field method to describe the interaction between the two liquid layers. Compared with the case of a single phase flow, the presence of a liquid-liquid interface produces a remarkable turbulence modulation inside the channel, since a significant proportion of the kinetic energy is subtracted from the mean flow and converted into work to deform the interface. This induces a strong turbulence reduction in the proximity of the interface and causes a substantial increase of the volume-flowrate. These effects become more pronounced with decreasing λ.

  8. Connecting exact coherent states to turbulent dynamics in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Sung; Graham, Michael D.

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of nonlinear traveling wave solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations or exact coherent states has greatly advanced the understanding of the nature of turbulent shear flows. These solutions are unstable saddle points in state space, while the time evolution of a turbulent flow is a dynamical trajectory wandering around them. In this regard, it is of interest to investigate how closely the turbulent trajectories approach these invariant states. Here, we present connections between turbulent trajectories and one intriguing solution family in channel flow. A state space visualization of turbulent trajectories is presented in a three-dimensional space. The lifetime of the trajectories is well represented by closeness to two distinct solutions resembling in many ways the active and hibernating phases of minimal channel turbulence (Xi & Graham PRL 2010). The connections are then examined by comparing mean profiles and flow structures. More importantly, the connections are confirmed by calculating the L2 distance between the trajectories and the traveling waves. Lastly, paths of an intermittent bursting phenomenon are identified in state space and the relationship between bursting paths and the traveling waves or hibernating turbulence is further discussed. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through grant FA9550-15-1-0062 (Flow Interactions and Control Program).

  9. Flow of foam through a convergent channel.

    PubMed

    Dollet, Benjamin; Bocher, Claire

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the flow of a foam confined as a bubble monolayer between two plates through a convergent channel. We quantify the velocity, the distribution and orientation of plastic events, and the elastic stress, using image analysis. We use two different soap solutions: a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, with a negligible wall friction between the bubbles and the confining plates, and a mixture containing a fatty acid, giving a large wall friction. We show that for SDS solutions, the velocity profile obeys a self-similar form which results from the superposition of plastic events, and the elastic deformation is uniform. For the other solution, the velocity field differs and the elastic deformation increases towards the exit of the channel. We discuss and quantify the role of wall friction on the velocity profile, the elastic deformation, and the rate of plastic events.

  10. Liquid Infused Surfaces in Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Matthew; Liu, Ying; Stone, Howard; Hultmark, Marcus

    2016-11-01

    Liquid infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust method for turbulent drag reduction. These surfaces consist of functionalized roughness elements wetted with a liquid lubricant that is immiscible with external fluids. The presence of the lubricant creates mobile, fluid-fluid interfaces, each of which can support a localized slip. Collectively, these interfaces yield a finite slip velocity at the effective surface, which has been demonstrated to reduce skin friction drag in turbulent flows. Retention of the lubricant layer is critical to maintaining the drag reduction effect. A turbulent channel-flow facility is used to characterize the drag reduction and robustness of various liquid infused surfaces. Micro-manufactured surfaces are mounted flush in the channel and exposed to turbulent flows. The retention of fluorescent lubricants and pressure drop are monitored to characterize the effects of surface geometry and lubricant properties. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim) and by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  11. Flow-activated ion channels in vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Gojova, Andrea; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-01-01

    The ability of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) to respond to fluid mechanical forces associated with blood flow is essential for flow-mediated vasoregulation and arterial wall remodeling. Abnormalities in endothelial responses to flow also play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. Although our understanding of the endothelial signaling pathways stimulated by flow has greatly increased over the past two decades, the mechanisms by which ECs sense flow remain largely unknown. Activation of flow-sensitive ion channels is among the fastest known endothelial responses to flow; therefore, these ion channels have been proposed as candidate flow sensors. This review focuses on: 1) describing the various types of flow-sensitive ion channels that have been reported in ECs, 2) discussing the implications of activation of these ion channels for endothelial function, and 3) proposing candidate mechanisms for activation of flow-sensitive ion channels.

  12. Vortex statistics in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsas, José Hugo; Augusto Moriconi, Luca Roberto

    2016-11-01

    In order to address the role of coherent structures in wall bounded turbulence, we study the statistics of morphological and kinematic properties of vortices, such as circulation, radius and height distributions. To accomplish that, we introduce a novel vortex identification method named as "vorticity curvature criterion" which is based on the local properties of the vorticity field. We furthermore employ a background subtraction procedure to remove shearing background effects expected to be present in the topology of the streamwise/wall-normal plane flow configurations. We discuss, through a comparative study of performance with the usual swirling strength criterion, and extending the previous analyses to the detection of coherent structures in the spanwise/wall normal planes, isotropization issues for the paradigmatic case of numerical turbulent channel flows. We acknowledge the funding from CNPq, CAPES and Faperj.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Surface and Volumetric Cooling using Optimal T- and Y-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    The T- and Y-shaped flow channels can be optimized for reduced pressure drop and pumping power. The results of the optimization are in the form of geometric parameters such as length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. While these flow channels are optimized for minimum pressure drop, they can also be used for surface and volumetric cooling applications such as heat exchangers, air conditioning and electronics cooling. In this paper, we studied the heat transfer characteristics of multiple T- and Y-shaped flow channel configurations using numerical simulations. All configurations are subjected to same pumping power and heat generation constraints and their heat transfer performance is studied.

  14. Mass conservation: 1-D open channel flow equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, Lewis L.

    1989-01-01

    Unsteady flow simulation in natural rivers is often complicated by meandering channels of compound section. Hydraulic properties and the length of the wetted channel may vary significantly as a meandering river inundates its adjacent floodplain. The one-dimensional, unsteady, open-channel flow equations can be extended to simulate floods in channels of compound section. It will be shown that equations derived from the addition of differential equations individually describing flow in main and overbank channels do not in general conserve mass when overbank and main channels are of different lengths.

  15. Static flow instability in subcooled flow boiling in parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; McDuffee, J.L.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    A series of tests for static flow instability or flow excursion (FE) at conditions applicable to the proposed Advanced Neutron Source reactor was completed in parallel rectangular channels configuration with light water flowing vertically upward at very high velocities. True critical heat flux experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. The FE data reported in this study considerably extend the velocity range of data presently available worldwide. Out of the three correlations compared, the Saha and Zuber correlation had the best fit with the data. However, a modification was necessary to take into account the demonstrated dependence of the Stanton (St) and Nusselt (Nu) numbers on subcooling levels, especially in the low subcooling regime.

  16. Low-drag exact coherent states in Newtonian channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Sung; Graham, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Exact coherent states have been known to nicely capture the main features of turbulent flows such as near-wall coherent structures and streak spacing. In this study, we numerically calculate new classes of exact coherent states, specifically nonlinear traveling wave solutions, for Newtonian channel flow, which display low-drag flow features such as weak streamwise vortices and nearly nonexistent streamwise variations like those observed in polymer solutions and in Newtonian hibernating turbulence. Traveling wave solutions with various symmetries are found. While some of the structures clearly display nonlinear critical layer dynamics, in others this connection is not as clear. Dynamical trajectories are computed and some of the solutions are shown to lie on the basin boundary between laminar and turbulent flows and are thus edge-states of the flow. Lastly, the dependence of Reynolds number for the solutions is investigated. We find one intriguing family whose mean velocity profile appears to approach the so-called maximum drag reduction asymptote found in polymer solutions, despite the fact that fluid studied here is Newtonian. Our results suggest that these traveling wave solutions may play a role as promising targets for turbulence control strategies for drag reduction. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through grant FA9550-11-1-0094 (Flow Interactions and Control Program).

  17. A clean air continuous flow propulsion facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, R. H.; Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a contaminant-free, high enthalpy, continuous flow facility designed to obtain detailed code validation measurements of high speed combustion. The facility encompasses uncontaminated air temperature control to within 5 K, fuel temperature control to 2 K, a ceramic flow straightener, drying of inlet air, and steady state continuous operation. The air heating method provides potential for independent control of contaminant level by injection, mixing, and heating upstream. Particular attention is given to extension of current capability of 1250 K total air temperature, which simulates Scramjet enthalpy at Mach 5.

  18. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels.

  19. Lattice Boltzmann method and channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensholt, Sigvat; Mongstad Hope, Sigmund

    2016-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann methods are presented at an introductory level with a focus on fairly simple simulations that can be used to test and illustrate the model’s capabilities. Two scenarios are presented. The first is a simple laminar flow in a straight channel driven by a pressure gradient (Poiseuille flow). The second is a more complex, including a wedge where Moffatt vortices may be induced if the wedge is deep enough. Simulations of the Poiseuille flow scenario accurately capture the theoretical velocity profile. The experiment shows the location of the fluid-wall boundary and the effects viscosity has on the velocity and convergence time. The numerical capabilities of the lattice Boltzmann model are tested further by simulating the more complex Moffatt vortex scenario. The method reproduces with high accuracy the theoretical predction that Moffat vortices will not form in a wedge if the vertex angle exceeds 146°. Practical issues limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method are discussed. In particular the accuracy of the bounce-back boundary condition is first order dependent on the grid resolution.

  20. Health woes tied to low air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J.

    1984-01-23

    Occupants in buildings with heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems which limit fresh air flow may suffer a variety of illnesses because of the buildup of noxious contaminants. Building managers need to continue conservation efforts, but they should also meet the air standards set by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) which are in the process of being strengthened. Cases of building sickness caused by indoor air pollution have increased during the past decade, prompting ASHRAE to expedite the revision of its specifications.

  1. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  2. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  3. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  4. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  5. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  6. Simulator Of Rain In Flowing Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Richard M.; Cho, Young I.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Back, Lloyd H.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes relatively inexpensive apparatus that creates simulated precipitation from drizzle to heavy rain in flowing air. Small, positive-displacement pump and water-injecting device positioned at low-airspeed end of converging section of wind tunnel 10 in. in diameter. Drops injected by array entrained in flow of air as it accelerates toward narrower outlet, 15 in. downstream. Outlet 5 in. in diameter.

  7. Saltation of particles in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Chunning; Munjiza, Ante; Avital, Eldad; Xu, Dong; Williams, John

    2014-05-01

    This paper numerically investigates particle saltation in a turbulent channel flow having a rough bed consisting of two to three layers of densely packed spheres. The Shields function is 0.065 which is just above the sediment entrainment threshold to give a bed-load regime. The applied methodology is a combination of three technologies, i.e., the direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow; the combined finite-discrete element modeling of the deformation, movement, and collision of the particles; and the immersed boundary method for the fluid-solid interaction. It is shown that the presence of entrained particles significantly modifies the flow profiles of velocity, turbulent intensities, and shear stresses in the vicinity of a rough bed. The quasi-streamwise-aligned streaky structures are not observed in the near-wall region and the particles scatter on the rough bed owing to their large size. However, in the outer flow region, the turbulent coherent structures recover due to the weakening rough-bed effects and particle interferences. First- and second-order statistical features of particle translational and angular velocities, together with sediment concentration and volumetric flux density profiles, are presented. Several key parameters of the particle saltation trajectory are calculated and agree closely with published experimental data. Time histories of the hydrodynamic forces exerted upon a typical saltating particle, together with those of the particle's coordinates and velocities, are presented. A strong correlation is shown between the abruptly decreasing streamwise velocity and increasing vertical velocity at collision which indicates that the continuous saltation of large-grain-size particles is controlled by collision parameters such as particle incident angle, local bed packing arrangement, and particle density, etc.

  8. Saltation of particles in turbulent channel flow.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chunning; Munjiza, Ante; Avital, Eldad; Xu, Dong; Williams, John

    2014-05-01

    This paper numerically investigates particle saltation in a turbulent channel flow having a rough bed consisting of two to three layers of densely packed spheres. The Shields function is 0.065 which is just above the sediment entrainment threshold to give a bed-load regime. The applied methodology is a combination of three technologies, i.e., the direct numerical simulation of turbulent flow; the combined finite-discrete element modeling of the deformation, movement, and collision of the particles; and the immersed boundary method for the fluid-solid interaction. It is shown that the presence of entrained particles significantly modifies the flow profiles of velocity, turbulent intensities, and shear stresses in the vicinity of a rough bed. The quasi-streamwise-aligned streaky structures are not observed in the near-wall region and the particles scatter on the rough bed owing to their large size. However, in the outer flow region, the turbulent coherent structures recover due to the weakening rough-bed effects and particle interferences. First- and second-order statistical features of particle translational and angular velocities, together with sediment concentration and volumetric flux density profiles, are presented. Several key parameters of the particle saltation trajectory are calculated and agree closely with published experimental data. Time histories of the hydrodynamic forces exerted upon a typical saltating particle, together with those of the particle's coordinates and velocities, are presented. A strong correlation is shown between the abruptly decreasing streamwise velocity and increasing vertical velocity at collision which indicates that the continuous saltation of large-grain-size particles is controlled by collision parameters such as particle incident angle, local bed packing arrangement, and particle density, etc.

  9. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained from a numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow are described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving periodic suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  10. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow is reported. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time-evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction-blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  11. Turbulent Channel Flow Measurements Using Matched Hot-Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estejab, Baraheh; Bailey, Sean

    2011-11-01

    We present an experimental study conducted in a turbulent channel flow facility using hot-wire probes with both constant and varying viscous-scaled wire length. The objectives of the study were threefold: first, to validate the flow produced by the channel flow facility; second, to investigate the validity of recently proposed spatial filtering corrections for Reynolds stress profiles; and third, to extend the investigation of the near-wall peak Reynolds number dependence in turbulent pipe flow conducted by Hultmark, Bailey and Smits (see J. Fluid Mech. (2010), vol. 649, pp. 103-113). We found that in channel flow, unlike in the pipe flow experiments, the near-wall peak exhibited the same Reynolds number dependence observed in turbulent boundary layer studies and channel flow DNS. Since the same measurement techniques and procedures were used in the current study as used in the pipe flow study, this demonstrated that the near-wall Reynolds number independence observed in the pipe study was not due to error introduced by measurement methodology. Furthermore, comparison of results from wires of different length verified that spatial filtering corrections work in channel flow as well as pipe and boundary layer flows. Corrected results were in good agreement with channel flow DNS, thus verifying that the flow in the facility approximates one-dimensional turbulent Poiseuille flow.

  12. Guiding supersonic projectiles using optically generated air density channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Luke A.; Sprangle, Phillip

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using optically generated channels of reduced air density to provide trajectory correction (guiding) for a supersonic projectile. It is shown that the projectile experiences a force perpendicular to its direction of motion as one side of the projectile passes through a channel of reduced air density. A single channel of reduced air density can be generated by the energy deposited from filamentation of an intense laser pulse. We propose changing the laser pulse energy from shot-to-shot to build longer effective channels. Current femtosecond laser systems with multi-millijoule pulses could provide trajectory correction of several meters on 5 km trajectories for sub-kilogram projectiles traveling at Mach 3.

  13. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-03-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disc on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  14. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  15. Characteristics of coal mine ventilation air flows.

    PubMed

    Su, Shi; Chen, Hongwei; Teakle, Philip; Xue, Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a greenhouse gas but also a wasted energy resource if not utilised. Underground coal mining is by far the most important source of fugitive methane emissions, and approximately 70% of all coal mining related methane is emitted to the atmosphere through mine ventilation air. Therefore, research and development on mine methane mitigation and utilisation now focuses on methane emitted from underground coal mines, in particular ventilation air methane (VAM) capture and utilisation. To date, most work has focused on the oxidation of very low concentration methane. These processes may be classified based on their combustion kinetic mechanisms into thermal oxidation and catalytic oxidation. VAM mitigation/utilisation technologies are generally divided into two basic categories: ancillary uses and principal uses. However, it is possible that the characteristics of ventilation air flows, for example the variations in methane concentration and the presence of certain compounds, which have not been reported so far, could make some potential VAM mitigation and utilisation technologies unfeasible if they cannot cope with the characteristics of mine site ventilation air flows. Therefore, it is important to understand the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows. Moreover, dust, hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide, and other possible compounds emitted through mine ventilation air into the atmosphere are also pollutants. Therefore, this paper presents mine-site experimental results on the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows, including methane concentration and its variations, dust loadings, particle size, mineral matter of the dust, and other compounds in the ventilation air flows. The paper also discusses possible correlations between ventilation air characteristics and underground mining activities.

  16. Compressible Flow Tables for Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcher, Marie A.

    1947-01-01

    This paper contains a tabulation of functions of the Mach number which are frequently used in high-speed aerodynamics. The tables extend from M = 0 to M = 10.0 in increments of 0.01 and are based on the assumption that air is a perfect gas having a specific heat ratio of 1.400.

  17. Coupling a mechanosensitive channel with a vesicle under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan Nan; Veerapaneni, Shravan; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Mechanosensitive channels enable cells to respond to their local environment. Continuum mechanical models have been proposed to describe how bilayer deformation induced by the transmembrane protein and the membrane tension influence the free energy of channel gating under static conditions. The dynamics of mechanosensitive channels under flow conditions however remains largely unexplored. Cells under flow display interesting features not observed under static environments. Here we present a model coupling a mechanosensitive channel with the dynamics of a vesicle under shear flow to investigate how the channel gating responds to hydrodynamic stress. The model could be used to investigate the release of signaling molecules, transport of ions or drugs across cell membranes under flow in biological systems, as well as the design and control of channel gating in synthetic cells.

  18. Characterization and Control of Separated Entrance Flow in a Branched Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the flow downstream of the inlet of a rectangular channel that is branched along the entire span of the side wall of a primary channel of the same height is investigated experimentally in an air facility. Of particular interest is the formation and scaling of a separated flow domain downstream of the entrance plane into the secondary channel and its interaction with the flow surfaces at speeds up to M = 0 . 4 . The separation is actively controlled using a spanwise array of fluidic actuators on the primary channel's surface upstream of the inlet plane of the secondary duct. The effects of the actuation on the evolution of the separation and attachment of the vorticity layer between upstream surface of the primary duct and the surface of the secondary duct downstream of the branched inlet in the presence of a strong confined adverse pressure gradient are investigated using particle image velocimetry coupled with detailed static surface pressure distributions. The effects of the controlled separation within the secondary channel on the global flow within the primary duct and on flow split between primary and secondary channels are assessed, and it is demonstrated that actuation can effect significant changes in the flow fractions between the channels. Copyright 2015 Boeing. All rights reserved.

  19. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  20. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  1. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  2. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  3. Air flow through poppet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G W; Nutting, E M

    1920-01-01

    Report discusses the comparative continuous flow characteristics of single and double poppet valves. The experimental data presented affords a direct comparison of valves, single and in pairs of different sizes, tested in a cylinder designed in accordance with current practice in aviation engines.

  4. Improving flow distribution in influent channels using computational fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, No-Suk; Yoon, Sukmin; Jeong, Woochang; Lee, Seungjae

    2016-10-01

    Although the flow distribution in an influent channel where the inflow is split into each treatment process in a wastewater treatment plant greatly affects the efficiency of the process, and a weir is the typical structure for the flow distribution, to the authors' knowledge, there is a paucity of research on the flow distribution in an open channel with a weir. In this study, the influent channel of a real-scale wastewater treatment plant was used, installing a suppressed rectangular weir that has a horizontal crest to cross the full channel width. The flow distribution in the influent channel was analyzed using a validated computational fluid dynamics model to investigate (1) the comparison of single-phase and two-phase simulation, (2) the improved procedure of the prototype channel, and (3) the effect of the inflow rate on flow distribution. The results show that two-phase simulation is more reliable due to the description of the free-surface fluctuations. It should first be considered for improving flow distribution to prevent a short-circuit flow, and the difference in the kinetic energy with the inflow rate makes flow distribution trends different. The authors believe that this case study is helpful for improving flow distribution in an influent channel.

  5. Capillary-Driven Flow in Liquid Filaments Connecting Orthogonal Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    Capillary phenomena plays an important role in the management of product water in PEM fuel cells because of the length scales associated with the porous layers and the gas flow channels. The distribution of liquid water within the network of gas flow channels can be dramatically altered by capillary flow. We experimentally demonstrate the rapid movement of significant volumes of liquid via capillarity through thin liquid films which connect orthogonal channels. The microfluidic experiments discussed provide a good benchmark against which the proper modeling of capillarity by computational models may be tested. The effect of surface wettability, as expressed through the contact angle, on capillary flow will also be discussed.

  6. Flow, Sediment Transport, and Erosion in Steep Mountain Channels: an Alpine Symphony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.; Beer, A. R.; Heimann, F.; Rickenmann, D.; Schneider, J. M.; von Boetticher, A.; Turowski, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Steep headwater channels comprise a large fraction of the total channel length in mountainous regions. They control the transport of water, solutes, and sediments to larger rivers downstream, and regulate the erosional development of many mountain landscapes. Flow and transport processes in these steep channels contrast with those in their lower-gradient counterparts. Steep streams have complex bed morphology, with large roughness relative to the flow depth, and the flow is likewise complex, often comprising a variable mixture of air and water. Here we present several examples from Switzerland highlighting recent research into hydraulics, sediment transport, and bedrock erosion in steep Alpine channels. The Riedbach presents a striking natural experiment, in which the channel gradient steepens from roughly 3% to more than 40% in less than 1km, while the discharge, flow width, and sediment transport rates remain roughly constant. Measurements at the Riedbach illustrate the self-adjustment of flow velocity and bed roughness in steep mountain channels. Data from the Erlenbach, an intensively instrumented stream in the Alpine foothills, illustrate how the bed configuration of such streams regulates the relationship between flow and sediment transport. Field studies at the Gornera illustrate how flow patterns control the spatial distribution of bedrock erosion in this glacier-fed stream in the shadow of the Matterhorn. We present an overview of these studies and discuss their implications.

  7. Nonstationary flow in the model channel of a ramjet engine in pulse-periodic energy supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2008-05-01

    A study has been made of the influence of the pulse-periodic supply of energy that is equal to the energy released in the combustion of hydrogen in air on the structure of supersonic flow in a channel of variable cross section, modeling the duct of a ramjet engine. The flow has been modeled on the basis of two-dimensional nonstationary gas-dynamic equations. Different flow regimes have been obtained depending on the configuration of the zones of energy supply and the excess-air coefficients.

  8. Turbulence Modulation and Particle Segregation in a Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Kee Onn; Toloui, Mostafa; Amili, Omid; Hong, Jiarong; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    Particle-laden flows are ubiquitous in biological, environmental, and engineering flows, but our understanding of the mechanism by which particles modulate turbulence is incomplete. Simulations involve a wide range of scales, and shall be corroborated by measurements that reconstruct the motion of both the continuous and dispersed phases. We present experimental observations on the interaction between inertial particles and turbulent flow through a vertical channel in two-way coupled regime. The working fluid is air laden with size-selected glass particles, which we investigate by planar particle image velocimetry and digital inline holography. Unlike most previous experiments, we focus on a regime in which particle segregation and turbulence modulation are both strong. PIV shows that turbulence modulation is especially pronounced near the wall, where particles accumulate by turbophoresis. The segregation, however, is much weaker than what suggested by one-way coupled simulations. Results from digital holography confirm the trends in particle concentration and velocities, and additionally provide information on the three-dimensional clustering. The findings are compared to previous investigations and discussed in the context of modeling strategies.

  9. Advanced porous electrodes with flow channels for vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattarai, Arjun; Wai, Nyunt; Schweiss, Ruediger; Whitehead, Adam; Lim, Tuti M.; Hng, Huey Hoon

    2017-02-01

    Improving the overall energy efficiency by reducing pumping power and improving flow distribution of electrolyte, is a major challenge for developers of flow batteries. The use of suitable channels can improve flow distribution through the electrodes and reduce flow resistance, hence reducing the energy consumption of the pumps. Although several studies of vanadium redox flow battery have proposed the use of bipolar plates with flow channels, similar to fuel cell designs, this paper presents the use of flow channels in the porous electrode as an alternative approach. Four types of electrodes with channels: rectangular open channel, interdigitated open cut channel, interdigitated circular poked channel and cross poked circular channels, are studied and compared with a conventional electrode without channels. Our study shows that interdigitated open channels can improve the overall energy efficiency up to 2.7% due to improvement in flow distribution and pump power reduction while interdigitated poked channel can improve up to 2.5% due to improvement in flow distribution.

  10. Plural voltage minima in an arc-heated channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasoh, A.

    2001-04-01

    In flows through a channel with varying cross-sectional area, the impulse and total enthalpy can be increased by superimposing an electrical discharge. The flow field is determined from the inlet flow condition, channel geometry, and discharge specifications. In this study, steady-state, quasi-one-dimensional flows interacting with an arc discharge are computed numerically. Once the arc column configuration is given, the discharge voltage is computed from the solution of flow field variables. For a constant discharge current, there exist plural column configurations which yield a minimum discharge voltage. This result explains the fluid-dynamic mechanisms of the existence of plural voltage modes in an arcjet operation.

  11. Transport Of Passive Scalars In A Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulation of transport of passive scalars in turbulent channel flow described in report. Shows flow structures and statistical properties. As used here, "passive scalars" means scalar quantities like fluctuations in temperature or concentrations of contaminants that do not disturb flow appreciably. Examples include transport of heat in heat exchangers, gas turbines, and nuclear reactors and dispersal of pollution in atmosphere.

  12. Transition in Plane Channel Flow with Spatially Periodic Perturbations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schatz, Michael Francis

    We studied experimentally the primary and secondary instabilities in a plane channel flow perturbed by a streamwise -periodic array of cylinders. Wall-bounded shear flow in plane channels typically undergoes a direct transition from simple laminar behavior to turbulence with complex spatial and temporal intermittency; such behavior is characteristic of open flows, where fluid can advect through the system. However, the spatially perturbed channel flow displays bifurcations to well-ordered stable states, similar to transition exhibited by closed flows (flows confined in a box). The primary transition is a supercritical Hopf bifurcation arising from convective rather than absolute instability. The critical value of Reynolds number R _1 = 130 for the transition is more than an order of magnitude less than that for the unperturbed flow (R_1 = 5772 from linear stability theory). The stable secondary flow, a two-dimensional travelling-wave, resembles Tollmein-Schlichting waves, the linear modes of plane Poiseuille flow. As in the spatially unperturbed case, intentionally imposed, controlled disturbances are required to reveal transition since the bifurcation arises from convective instability. Numerical simulations are in quantitative agreement with the experimental observations. The secondary flow loses stability at R _2~ 160 to a three-dimensional state with a preferred spanwise periodicity. This tertiary flow demonstrates standing-wave behavior as it evolves along the streamwise direction; equivalent behavior results from differing initial disturbances. The flow structure and the strictly periodic spectra resemble the beginning stages of turbulent breakdown typically displayed by unperturbed plane channel flow; however, we observed no evidence in our experiment that the three-dimensional states continue to evolve toward turbulence. For R _sp {~}{>} 200, power spectra from our experiment have broad subharmonics that are also observed in other wall-bounded shear flows

  13. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Je, Jongdoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are to suggest a proper boundary condition at the interface between a permeable block and turbulent channel flow and to investigate the characteristics of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls. The boundary condition suggested is an extended version of that applied to laminar channel flow by Beavers & Joseph (1967) and describes the behaviour of slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the permeable block and turbulent channel flow. With the proposed boundary condition, direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow that is bounded by the permeable wall are performed and significant skin-friction reductions at the permeable wall are obtained with modification of overall flow structures. The viscous sublayer thickness is decreased and the near-wall vortical structures are significantly weakened by the permeable wall. The permeable wall also reduces the turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress, and pressure and vorticity fluctuations throughout the channel except very near the wall. The increase of some turbulence quantities there is due to the slip-velocity fluctuations at the wall. The boundary condition proposed for the permeable wall is validated by comparing solutions with those obtained from a separate direct numerical simulation using both the Brinkman equation for the interior of a permeable block and the Navier Stokes equation for the main channel bounded by a permeable block.

  14. Origin and Control of the Flow Structure on Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Prescrtbed by ANSI Ski Z3S.18 AFOSR Final Repot 013108 ORIGIN AND CONTROL OF THE FLOW STRUCTURE ON UNMANNED COMBAT AIR VEHICLES AFOSR GRANT #FA9550-05...1991) described low-dimensional models for flows past a grooved channel and circular cylinders. By employing a Galerkin method, a governing partial

  15. 47 CFR 22.805 - Channels for general aviation air-ground service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Channels for general aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service General Aviation Air-Ground Stations § 22.805 Channels for general aviation air-ground service. The following channels are...

  16. 47 CFR 22.805 - Channels for general aviation air-ground service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channels for general aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service General Aviation Air-Ground Stations § 22.805 Channels for general aviation air-ground service. The following channels are...

  17. 47 CFR 22.805 - Channels for general aviation air-ground service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Channels for general aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service General Aviation Air-Ground Stations § 22.805 Channels for general aviation air-ground service. The following channels are...

  18. 47 CFR 22.805 - Channels for general aviation air-ground service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Channels for general aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service General Aviation Air-Ground Stations § 22.805 Channels for general aviation air-ground service. The following channels are...

  19. 47 CFR 22.805 - Channels for general aviation air-ground service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Channels for general aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service General Aviation Air-Ground Stations § 22.805 Channels for general aviation air-ground service. The following channels are...

  20. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  1. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  2. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  3. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  4. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  5. Very-large-scale coherent motions in open channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Qiang; Hussain, Fazle; Li, Dan-Xun

    2016-11-01

    Very-large-scale coherent structures (VLSSs) - whose characteristic length is of the order of 10 h (h is the water depth) - are found to exist in the log and outer layers near the bed of open channel flows. For decades researchers have speculated that large coherent structures may exist in open channel flows. However, conclusive evidence is still lacking. The present study employed pre-multiplied velocity power spectral and co-spectral analyses of time-resolved PIV data obtained in open channel flows. In all cases, two modes - large-scale structures (of the order of h) and VLSSs - dominate the log and outer layers of the turbulent boundary layer. More than half of TKE and 40% of the Reynolds shear stress in the log and outer layers are contributed by VLSSs. The strength difference of VLSSs between open and closed channel flows leads to pronounced redistribution of TKE near the free surface of open channel flows, which is a unique phenomenon that sets the open channel flows apart from other wall-bounded turbulent flows. Funded by China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No.2015M580105), National Natural Science Foundation of China (No.51127006).

  6. Two-phase flow instabilities in a vertical annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Babelli, I.; Nair, S.; Ishii, M.

    1995-09-01

    An experimental test facility was built to study two-phase flow instabilities in vertical annular channel with emphasis on downward flow under low pressure and low flow conditions. The specific geometry of the test section is similar to the fuel-target sub-channel of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Mark 22 fuel assembly. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was observed following flow excursion and flow reversal in the test section. Density wave instability was not recorded in this series of experimental runs. The results of this experimental study show that flow excursion is the dominant instability mode under low flow, low pressure, and down flow conditions. The onset of instability data are plotted on the subcooling-Zuber (phase change) numbers stability plane.

  7. 6. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OUTLET CHANNEL FLOWING INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OUTLET CHANNEL FLOWING INTO POND A WITH DIVERSION GATES LONG EAST (LEFT) SIDE OF OUTLET CHANNEL, LOOKING SOUTH FROM DOWNSTREAM FACE OF THE DAM - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  8. Evaporation from flowing channels ( mass-transfer formulas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Sturm, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stability-dependent and Dalton-type mass transfer formulas are determined from experimental evaporation data in ambient and heated channels and are shown to have similar performance in prediction of evaporation. The formulas developed are compared with those proposed by other investigators for lakes and flowing channels. -from ASCE Publications Information

  9. Erosional processes in channelized water flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1979-01-01

    A hypothesis is investigated according to which the Martian outflow channels were formed by high-velocity flows of water or dynamically similar liquid. It is suggested that the outflow channels are largely the result of several interacting erosional mechanisms, including fluvial processes involving ice covers, macroturbulence, streamlining, and cavitation.

  10. Channel morphology and flow structure of an abandoned channel under varying stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, Katie H.; Gerken, Joseph E.

    2016-07-01

    Abandoned channels are those channels left behind as meandering rivers migrate over their floodplains and remain among the most enigmatic features of the riverscape, especially related to their hydraulics and geomorphology. Abandoned channels are being considered and implemented as restoration and rehabilitation strategies for large rivers but we do not yet have a sound understanding of their hydromorphodynamics. The overall objectives of this work were to assess the bed morphology and flow structure of a large, dynamically connected abandoned channel (e.g., the channel is inundated during annual or decadal floods through bank overflow) under varying stages. Here we document the hydromorphodynamics of an abandoned channel during 3.4, 9.2, and 37.9 return interval discharges using an acoustic Doppler current profiler. Flow separation was observed along the channel entrance during the lowest flow surveying campaign but was not seen during the higher flow campaign. Width to depth ratio and channel width at the exit both progressively decreased from the first surveying campaign, despite the final campaign having the highest measured discharge. Large zones of flow stagnation and recirculation were observed, with depth-averaged velocity vectors not aligning in one direction, in the abandoned channel where water from the entrance was meeting water coming up from the exit during moderate discharges. The abandoned channel has been maintained for at least 25 years due to its low diversion angle and it being perched above the Kansas River. Results of this study provide insights of how flow hydraulics and physical characteristics of abandoned channel change under varying stages.

  11. Channel networks within lava flows: Formation, evolution, and implications for flow behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, Hannah R.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2014-08-01

    New high-resolution maps of Hawaiian lava flows highlight complex topographically controlled channel networks. Network geometries range from distributary systems dominated by branching around local obstacles, to tributary systems constricted by topography. We combine 2-D network analysis tools developed for river systems and neural networks with 3-D lidar morphologic analysis and historical records of flow emplacement to investigate both the origins of channel networks and their influence on flow morphology and behavior. We find that network complexity is a function of underlying slope and that the degree of flow branching, network connectivity, and longevity of individual channels all influence the final flow morphology (flow and channel widths and levee heights). Furthermore, because channel networks govern the distribution of lava supply within a flow, changes in the channel topology can dramatically alter the effective volumetric flux in any one branch, which affects both flow length and advance rate. Specifically, branching will slow and shorten flows, while merging can accelerate and lengthen them. Consideration of channel networks is thus important for predicting lava flow behavior and mitigating flow hazards with diversion barriers. Observed relationships between network geometry, flow parameters, and morphology also offer insight into the interpretation of these features elsewhere on Earth and other terrestrial planets.

  12. On the magnetohydrodynamics flows in curved coaxial channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brushlinskii, K. V.; Styopin, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    Stationary plasma flows obtained by using numerical solutions of corresponding stationary problems in curved coaxial channels are considered. It is supposed that plasma interacts with own azimuthal magnetic field. The main attention of the paper is focused on accelerating transonic flows, which attract a considerable interest in the theory of plasma accelerators. It was demonstrated that a curvilinear configuration of a channel makes the significant contribution to distributions of basic plasma parameters.

  13. Supercritical transition in plane channel flow with spatially periodic perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, Michael F.; Tagg, Randall P.; Swinney, Harry L.; Fischer, Paul F.; Patera, Anthony T.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations have been conducted for plane channel flow with a streamwise-periodic array of cylinders. The primary transition in this open flow occurs as a convective rather than absolute instability and leads to traveling-wave packets, which advect out of the system. The ordered secondary state is characteristic of closed flows, in contrast with other open flows where the primary transition often leads directly to turbulence.

  14. Unsteady compressible flows in channel with varying walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pořízková, P.; Kozel, K.; Horáček, J.

    2014-03-01

    This study deals with numerical solution of a 2D and 3D unsteady flows of a compressible viscous fluid in 2D and 3D channel for low inlet airflow velocity. The unsteadiness of the flow is caused by a prescribed periodic motion of a part of the channel wall, nearly closing the channel during oscillations. The channels shape is a simplified geometry of the glottal space in the human vocal tract. Goal is numerical simulation of flow in the channels which involves attributes of real flow causing acoustic perturbations. The system of Navier-Stokes equations closed with static pressure expression for ideal gas describes the unsteady laminar flow of compressible viscous fluid. The numerical solution is implemented using the finite volume method and the predictor-corrector MacCormack scheme with artificial viscosity using a grid of quadrilateral cells. The unsteady grid of quadrilateral cells is considered in the form of conservation laws using Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. The application of developed method for numerical simulations of flow fields in the 2D and 3D channels, acquired from a developed program, are presented for inlet velocity u=4.12 m/s, inlet Reynolds number Re=4481 and the wall motion frequency 100 Hz.

  15. Flow resistance in open channels with fixed movable bed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of an increasingly large body of research by many investigators, accurate quantitative prediction of open channel flow resistance remains a challenge. In general, the relations between the elements influencing resistance (turbulence, boundary roughness, and channel shape features, such as discrete obstacles, bars, channel curvature, recirculation areas, secondary circulation, etc.) and mean flow variables are complex and poorly understood. This has resulted in numerous approaches to compute friction using many and diverse variables and equally diverse prescriptions for their use. In this paper, a new resistance law for surface (grain) resistance, the resistance due to the flow viscous effects on the channel boundary roughness elements, is presented for the cases of flow in the transition (5 < Re* <70) and fully rough (Re* ≥ 70) turbulent flow regimes, where Re* is the Reynolds number based on shear velocity and sediment particle mean diameter. It is shown that the new law is sensitive to bed movement without requiring previous knowledge of sediment transport conditions. Comparisons between computation and measurements, as well as comparisons with other well-known existing roughness predictors, are presented to demonstrate its accuracy and range of application. It is shown that the method accurately predicts total friction losses in channels and natural rivers with plane beds, regardless of sediment transport conditions. This work is useful to hydraulic engineers involved with the derivation of depth-discharge relations in open channel flow and with the estimation of sediment transport rates for the case of bedload transport.

  16. New design of a cathode flow-field with a sub-channel to improve the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yulin; Yue, Like; Wang, Shixue

    2017-03-01

    The cathode flow-field design of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells determines the distribution of reactant gases and the removal of liquid water. A suitable design can result in perfect water management and thus high cell performance. In this paper, a new design for a cathode flow-field with a sub-channel was proposed and had been experimentally analyzed in a parallel flow-field PEM fuel cell. Three sub-channel inlets were placed along the cathode channel. The main-channel inlet was fed with moist air to humidify the membrane and maintain high proton conductivity, whereas, the sub-channel inlet was fed with dry air to enhance water removal in the flow channel. The experimental results indicated that the sub-channel design can decrease the pressure drop in the flow channel, and the sub-channels inlet positions (SIP, where the sub-channel inlets were placed along the cathode channel) and flow rates (SFR, percentage of air from the sub-channel inlet in the total cathode flow rate) had a considerable impact on water removal and cell performance. A proposed design that combines the SIP and SFR can effectively eliminate water from the fuel cell, increasing the maximum power density by more than 13.2% compared to the conventional design.

  17. Flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction of two-phase gas-liquid flow in an inclined narrow annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wongwises, Somchai; Pipathattakul, Manop

    2006-03-01

    Two-phase flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction in horizontal and inclined upward air-water two-phase flow in a mini-gap annular channel are experimentally studied. A concentric annular test section at the length of 880mm with an outer diameter of 12.5mm and inner diameter of 8mm is used in the experiments. The flow phenomena, which are plug flow, slug flow, annular flow, annular/slug flow, bubbly/plug flow, bubbly/slug-plug flow, churn flow, dispersed bubbly flow and slug/bubbly flow, are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. A slug flow pattern is found only in the horizontal channel while slug/bubbly flow patterns are observed only in inclined channels. When the inclination angle is increased, the onset of transition from the plug flow region to the slug flow region (for the horizontal channel) and from the plug flow region to slug/bubbly flow region (for inclined channels) shift to a lower value of superficial air velocity. Small shifts are found for the transition line between the dispersed bubbly flow and the bubbly/plug flow, the bubbly/plug flow and the bubbly/slug-plug flow, and the bubbly/plug flow and the plug flow. The rest of the transition lines shift to a higher value of superficial air velocity. Considering the effect of flow pattern on the pressure drop in the horizontal tube at low liquid velocity, the occurrence of slug flow stops the rise of pressure drop for a short while, before rising again after the air velocity has increased. However, the pressure does not rise abruptly in the tubes with {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o} when the slug/bubbly flow occurs. At low gas and liquid velocity, the pressure drop increases, when the inclination angles changes from horizontal to 30{sup o} and 60{sup o}. Void fraction increases with increasing gas velocity and decreases with increasing liquid velocity. After increasing the inclination angle from horizontal to {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o}, the void fraction appears to be similar, with a

  18. Three-dimensional flow dynamics of an active submarine channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumner, E. J.; Dorrell, R. M.; Peakall, J.; Darby, S. E.; Parsons, D. R.; Wynn, R.

    2012-12-01

    Field scale submarine channel gravity currents are notoriously difficult to measure and thus directly investigate due to their inaccessible location and infrequent nature, which is compounded by present sea-level high-stand. An exception to this is the almost continuous density-driven current that results from the inflow of saline Mediterranean water, via the Bosporus strait, into the Black Sea. This flow has carved a sinuous channel system in water depths of 70 to 120 m. The relatively shallow depths of the channel and the continuous nature of this current provide a rare opportunity to study three-dimensional flow dynamics and the interaction of the flow with a seafloor channel network. Thus, it provides a rare analogue for channelized dilute sediment-laden turbidity currents. Sediment erosion, transport and deposition within submarine channel bends is primarily controlled by the magnitude and direction of near bed flow. Flow around channel bends is characterized by a helical or spiralling structure. In rivers this helical flow is characterized by near-surface fluid moving toward the outer bank and near-bed fluid moving toward the inner bank. Following fierce debate over the last decade, it is now accepted that helical flow in submarine channel bends can display a variety of complex structures. Most importantly for understanding sediment transport, near bed flow can be directed towards the outer bank, which is in the opposite sense to in a river. The next challenge is to understand what the exact controls on the orientation of helical flow cells within submarine flows are, and their spatial evolution around bends. We present data from the Black Sea showing how the three-dimensional velocity and density of a submarine gravity current evolves at multiple cross sections as the flow travels around a bend. We use this data to calculate the magnitude, relative importance and interaction of centrifugal, coriolis and pressure gradients in controlling the structure of

  19. Flow splitting modifies the helical motion in submarine channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. Ashraful; Imran, Jasim; Pirmez, Carlos; Cantelli, Alessandro

    2008-11-01

    Intricately meandering channels of various scales constitute a major morphological feature of the submarine slope and fan systems. These channels act as conduits of density-driven gravity underflows and in turn are shaped by these underflows. The relationship between channel curvature and the dynamics of sediment-laden underflows commonly known as turbidity current has been an enigma, and recently, a subject of controversy. This contribution unravels the flow field of turbidity current at submarine channel bends captured from large scale laboratory experiments. The experimental results show that a mildly sloping channel bank greatly enhances the tilt of the turbidity current-ambient water interface, so much so that the current completely separates from the convex or the inside bank. We also show that irrespective of the shape of the channel cross section, two cells of helical flow appear in confined submarine bend flow. The near-bed cell has a circulation pattern similar to that observed in fluvial channels; the other cell has an opposite sense of rotation. If, on the other hand, a portion of the flow detaches from the body of the current and spills to the concave or outside overbank area, the upper circulation cell becomes suppressed by the resulting lateral convection.

  20. Enhancing Capillary-Driven Flow for Paper-Based Microfluidic Channels.

    PubMed

    Songok, Joel; Toivakka, Martti

    2016-11-09

    Paper-based microfluidic devices have received considerable interest due to their benefits with regards to low manufacturing costs, simplicity, and the wide scope of applications. However, limitations including sample retention in paper matrix and evaporation as well as low liquid flow rates have often been overlooked. This paper presents a paper-based capillary-driven flow system that speeds up flow rates by utilizing narrow gap geometry between two parallel surfaces separated by a spacer. The top surface is hydrophobic, while the bottom surface is a hydrophobic paper substrate with a microfluidic channel defined by a hydrophilic pathway, leaving sides of the channel open to air. The liquid flows on the hydrophilic path in the gap without spreading onto the hydrophobic regions. The closed-channel flow system showed higher spreading distances and accelerated liquid flow. An average flow rate increases of 200 and 100% were obtained for the nanoparticle-coated paperboard and the blotting papers used, respectively. Fast liquid delivery to detection zones or reaction implies rapid results from analytical devices. In addition, liquid drying and evaporation can be reduced in the proposed closed-channel system.

  1. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  2. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  3. ABSORBING BOUNDARY TECHNIQUE FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An absorbing boundary condition is formulated and applied to the one-dimensional open channel flow equations in conjunction with an explicit MacCormack scheme. The physical flow domain has been truncated by introducing an artificial pseudo-boundary. By using an appropriate bounda...

  4. Piecewise uniform conduction-like flow channels and method therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Eric B.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.

    2006-02-28

    A low-dispersion methodology for designing microfabricated conduction channels for on-chip electrokinetic-based systems is presented. The technique relies on trigonometric relations that apply for ideal electrokinetic flows, allowing faceted channels to be designed on chips using common drafting software and a hand calculator. Flows are rotated and stretched along the abrupt interface between adjacent regions with differing permeability. Regions bounded by interfaces form flow "prisms" that can be combined with other designed prisms to obtain a wide range of turning angles and expansion ratios while minimizing dispersion. Designs are demonstrated using two-dimensional numerical solutions of the Laplace equation.

  5. Single phase channel flow forced convection heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, J.P.

    1999-04-01

    A review of the current knowledge of single phase forced convection channel flow of liquids (Pr > 5) is presented. Two basic channel geometries are considered, the circular tube and the rectangular duct. Both laminar flow and turbulent flow are covered. The review begins with a brief overview of the heat transfer behavior of Newtonian fluids followed by a more detailed presentation of the behavior of purely viscous and viscoelastic Non-Newtonian fluids. Recent developments dealing with aqueous solutions of high molecular weight polymers and aqueous solutions of surfactants are discussed. The review concludes by citing a number of challenging research opportunities.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flows in Expanding Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobieff, Peter; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

    2008-10-24

    We present an experimental realization of the classical Jeffery-Hamel flows inside a wedge-shaped channel. We compare the measured velocity fields with the predictions of Jeffery-Hamel theory. A detailed experimental study of bifurcation diagrams for the solutions reveals the absolute stability of the pure outflow solution and an interesting hysteretic structure for bifurcations. We also observe a multiple vortex flow regime predicted earlier numerically and analytically. Experimental studies of the stability of the flow to perturbations at the channel exit are also conducted.

  7. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  8. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  9. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  10. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  11. Vortex structures in turbulent channel flow behind an orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Soichiro; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a channel flow with an orifice has been performed for Reτ0=10 - 600, where uτ0 is the friction velocity calculated from the mean pressure gradient, δ the channel half width and ν the kinematic viscosity. In the wake region, the mean flow becomes asymmetric by the Coanda effect. The degree of asymmetry increases with increasing the Reynolds number for the laminar flow at Reτ0< 50. The degree decreases abruptly at Reτ0=50, where the transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow take places. Large-scale spanwise vortices generated at the orifice edges. They become deformed and break up into disordered small-scale structures in shear layer. The small-scale vortices are convected towards the channel center. The large-scale vortices have an important effect upon the reattachment locations and streamwise vortices near the wall in the wake region.

  12. Flows and mixing in channels with misaligned superhydrophobic walls.

    PubMed

    Nizkaya, Tatiana V; Asmolov, Evgeny S; Zhou, Jiajia; Schmid, Friederike; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2015-03-01

    Aligned superhydrophobic surfaces with the same texture orientation reduce drag in the channel and generate secondary flows transverse to the direction of the applied pressure gradient. Here we show that a transverse shear can be easily generated by using superhydrophobic channels with misaligned textured surfaces. We propose a general theoretical approach to quantify this transverse flow by introducing the concept of an effective shear tensor. To illustrate its use, we present approximate theoretical solutions and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations for striped superhydrophobic channels. Our results demonstrate that the transverse shear leads to complex flow patterns, which provide a new mechanism of a passive vertical mixing at the scale of a texture period. Depending on the value of Reynolds number two different scenarios occur. At relatively low Reynolds number the flow represents a transverse shear superimposed with two corotating vortices. For larger Reynolds number these vortices become isolated, by suppressing fluid transport in the transverse direction.

  13. Air flow patterns in the operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Howorth, F H

    1980-04-01

    Bacteria-carrying particles and exhaled anaesthetic gases are the two contaminants found in the air flow patterns of operating rooms. Their origin, direction and speed were illustrated by a motion picture using Schlieren photography and smoke tracers. Compared with a conventionally well air conditioned operating theatre, it was shown that a downward flow of clean air reduced the number of bacteria-carrying particles at the wound site by sixty times. The Exflow method of achieving this without the restriction of any side panels or floor obstruction was described. The total body exhaust worn by the surgical team was shown to reduce the bacteria count by a further eleven times. Clinical results show that when both these systems are used together, patient infection was reduced from 9 per cent to between 0.3 per cent and 0.5 per cent, even when no pre-operative antibiotics were used. Anaesthetic gas pollution was measured and shown to be generally 1000 p.p.m. at the head of the patient, in induction, operating and recovery rooms, also in dental and labour rooms. A high volume low pressure active scavenging system was described together with its various attachments including one specially for paediatric scavenging. Results showed a reduction of nitrous oxide pollution to between zero and 3 p.p.m. The economy and cost effectiveness of both these pollution control systems was shown to be good due to the removal of health hazards from patients and theatre staff.

  14. Multiscale modeling of turbulent channel flow over porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogaraj, Sudhakar; Lacis, Ugis; Bagheri, Shervin

    2016-11-01

    We perform direct numerical simulations of fully developed turbulent flow through a channel coated with a porous material. The Navier-stokes equations governing the fluid domain and the Darcy equations of the porous medium are coupled using an iterative partitioned scheme. At the interface between the two media, boundary conditions derived using a multiscale homogenization approach are enforced. The main feature of this approach is that the anisotropic micro-structural pore features are directly taken into consideration to derive the constitutive coefficients of the porous media as well as of the interface. The focus of the present work is to study the influence of micro-structure pore geometry on the dynamics of turbulent flows. Detailed turbulence statistics and instantaneous flow field are presented. For comparison, flow through impermeable channel flows are included. Supported by the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Grant agreement No 708281.

  15. A Numerical simulation of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goglia, G.; Biringen, S.

    1982-08-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 7500 is described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 by 33 by 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and which are characteristic of various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streak-like formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), implementation of subgrid-scale terms are necessary to obtain proper turbulent statistics.

  16. A Numerical simulation of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G.; Biringen, S.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 7500 is described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 by 33 by 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and which are characteristic of various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streak-like formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), implementation of subgrid-scale terms are necessary to obtain proper turbulent statistics.

  17. Generation of Martian chaos and channels by debris flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nummedal, D.; Prior, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    A debris flow mechanism is proposed to account for the formation of chaos and the large channels debouching into Crysae Planitia from the adjacent southern uplands of Mars. Based on considerations of the juxtaposition of individual channel environments, the morphological assemblages within each environment and flow dynamics, it is suggested that the debris flows were triggered by the large-scale failure of subsurface sediments, possibly initiated by a seismic event. During the initial, slow-moving phase of the flow, the debris would have formed gently sinuous channels with multiple side-wall slumps, grooves and ridges, and elongate erosional remnants. The flow would have gained mobility as the debris moved downslope, producing travel distances greatly in excess of those characteristic of terrestrial examples, and eroded, streamlined remnants at the distal reaches of the channel. Finally, due to internal and boundary friction, the flow would have been slowed down once it entered the Chryse plains, resulting in a thin debris blanket with no depositional relief.

  18. Experimental observation of fluid flow channels in a single fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Stephen; Caprihan, Arvind; Hardy, Robert

    1998-03-01

    A method for obtaining precise replicas of real fracture surfaces using transparent epoxy resins was developed, allowing detailed study of fluid flow paths within a fracture plane. A natural rock fracture was collected from the field and prepared for study. Silicon rubber molds of the fracture surfaces were used to make a transparent epoxy replica of the original fracture. Clear and dyed water were injected into the fracture pore space allowing examination of the flow field. Digitized optical images were used to observe wetting, saturated flow, and drying of the specimen. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging was used for quantitative measurements of flow velocity. Both video imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques show distinct and strong channeling of the flow at the submillimeter to several-centimeter scale. Each phenomenon, including wetting, drying, dye transport, and velocity channeling, has its own distinct geometric structure and scale. We find that fluid velocities measured simultaneously at various locations in the fracture plane during steady state flow range over several orders of magnitude, with the maximum velocity a factor of 5 higher than the mean velocity. This suggests that flow channeling in fractured rock can cause the breakthrough velocity of contaminants to far exceed the mean flow.

  19. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  20. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  1. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  2. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  3. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  4. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  5. Magnetic fluid driven flow in a capillary channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, Nickolaus M.; Ciocanel, Constantin

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents simulated and experimental results on the flow induced in a closed channel by a magnetic fluid (i.e. magnetorheological (MR) fluid and a ferrofluid) plunger. The results are used to assess the feasibility of using such fluids for development of milli-micro-scale pumps. The magnetic fluid plunger acts as a piston that is moved along the channel by an array of drive coils (or by a permanent magnet) to displace an immiscible fluid. The excited drive coils produce a traveling magnetic field wave inside the channel which in turn produces magnetic dipoles in the magnetic fluid. The dipoles react with the traveling wave leading to a Kelvin force that drags the magnetic fluid plunger through the channel. The flow rates achievable in this approach are a function of channel geometry, magnetic fluid properties, plug size, frequency of the current passing through the drive coils, and the location of the drive coils along the channel. Representative results of the analysis of the effect of these parameters on the flow rates are presented here. While the simulations indicate that both, MR and ferrofluids may be used for fluid actuation in the selected geometry, the experiments validated only the MR fluid option.

  6. Temporal and spatial intermittencies within channel flow turbulence near transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Anubhav; Park, Jae Sung; Graham, Michael D.

    2017-02-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of plane Poiseuille flow are performed in an extended domain at friction Reynolds numbers ranging from 70 to 100. In minimal domains, turbulence in this Reynolds number range displays substantial intermittency that is associated with chaotic movement of turbulent trajectories between lower and upper branch invariant solutions known as exact coherent states (ECS). The present work aims to address the relationship between temporal dynamics in minimal channels and spatiotemporal dynamics in extended domains. Both temporal and spatial analyses of the turbulent velocity fields are performed, the latter using image analysis methods. These analyses partition the flow characteristics into low-, intermediate- and high-drag classes; we present the differences between flows fields in these classes in terms of simple quantities like mean velocity, wall shear stress, and flow structures. The temporal and spatial analysis methods, although completely independent of one another, yield very similar results for both low- and high-drag regions. In particular, the conditional mean profiles in regions of low drag closely resemble those found in low-drag temporal intervals in the minimal channel. Finally, we address the possibility of similarities between turbulence and exact coherent states in two ways: (1) comparing wall shear stress in localized patches the size of minimal channels in large domains with those in actual minimal channel and (2) comparing conditional mean velocity profiles during low-drag events with mean profiles from lower branch ECS. These analyses show that both the local near-wall flow structure in the low-drag patches of the large domain and the conditional mean profiles in the region y+≲30 resemble those of a lower branch minimal domain ECS. In summary, the results presented here suggest that spatiotemporal intermittency in transitional channel flow turbulence is related to temporal intermittency, and by extension to the

  7. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in inclined channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-08-01

    Linear stability of the stratified gas-liquid and liquid-liquid plane-parallel flows in the inclined channels is studied with respect to all wavenumber perturbations. The main objective is to predict the parameter regions in which the stable stratified configuration in inclined channels exists. Up to three distinct base states with different holdups exist in the inclined flows, so that the stability analysis has to be carried out for each branch separately. Special attention is paid to the multiple solution regions to reveal the feasibility of the non-unique stable stratified configurations in inclined channels. The stability boundaries of each branch of the steady state solutions are presented on the flow pattern map and are accompanied by the critical wavenumbers and the spatial profiles of the most unstable perturbations. Instabilities of different nature are visualized by the streamlines of the neutrally stable perturbed flows, consisting of the critical perturbation superimposed on the base flow. The present analysis confirms the existence of two stable stratified flow configurations in a region of low flow rates in the countercurrent liquid-liquid flows. These configurations become unstable with respect to the shear mode of instability. It was revealed that in slightly upward inclined flows the lower and middle solutions for the holdup are stable in the part of the triple solution region, while the upper solution is always unstable. In the case of downward flows, in the triple solution region, none of the solutions are stable with respect to the short-wave perturbations. These flows are stable only in the single solution region at low flow rates of the heavy phase, and the long-wave perturbations are the most unstable ones.

  8. A numerical investigation of particulate channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Gregory John

    2001-10-01

    A technique for the numerical simulation of suspensions of particles in fluid based on the extended finite element method (X-FEM) is developed. In this method, the particle surfaces need not conform to the finite element boundaries, so that moving particles can be simulated without remeshing. The near field form of the fluid flow about each particle, along with the lubrication theory solution between particles, is built into the finite element basis using a partition of unity enrichment, allowing the simple enforcement of boundary conditions and improved accuracy over other methods on a coarser mesh. Example problems are solved for various flows incorporating fixed and freely moving particles; the accuracy of the method is shown by comparing results with refined finite element solutions or, where available, analytical solutions. Simulations of dilute and concentrated suspensions in two dimensions are performed. For dilute suspensions, we find that the effective viscosity is linearly proportional to the particle fraction. For more concentrated suspensions, the effective viscosity is highly dependent on the instantaneous particle configuration; longer simulations with more particles are necessary to obtain accurate averaged rheological properties. In order to mimic the effects of lateral forces caused by particle deformability, as in the case of red blood cells flowing through the microcirculatory system, a forcing term is added to our concentrated suspension simulations. Results are compared with a modified suspension balance model that accounts for this lateral force. Predictions of this suspension balance model are also compared with experimental data for blood flow compiled from the literature; agreement is fairly good considering the simplicity of the model and the uncertainty in the experimental data.

  9. Decentralized and Tactical Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odoni, Amedeo R.; Bertsimas, Dimitris

    1997-01-01

    This project dealt with the following topics: 1. Review and description of the existing air traffic flow management system (ATFM) and identification of aspects with potential for improvement. 2. Identification and review of existing models and simulations dealing with all system segments (enroute, terminal area, ground) 3. Formulation of concepts for overall decentralization of the ATFM system, ranging from moderate decentralization to full decentralization 4. Specification of the modifications to the ATFM system required to accommodate each of the alternative concepts. 5. Identification of issues that need to be addressed with regard to: determination of the way the ATFM system would be operating; types of flow management strategies that would be used; and estimation of the effectiveness of ATFM with regard to reducing delay and re-routing costs. 6. Concept evaluation through identification of criteria and methodologies for accommodating the interests of stakeholders and of approaches to optimization of operational procedures for all segments of the ATFM system.

  10. Liquid droplet behavior and instability in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbur, E. C.; Sharp, K. V.; Mench, M. M.

    A combined theoretical and experimental study of the influence of controllable engineering parameters, including surface PTFE (Teflon™) coverage (ranging from 5 to 20 wt.%), channel geometry, droplet chord length and height, and operational air flow rate, on liquid droplet deformation at the interface of the diffusion media (DM) and the gas flow channel was performed. The theoretical model reasonably predicts the measured contact angle hysteresis and identifies conditions under which the droplet tends toward an unstable state. The results presented in this study indicate that operational conditions, droplet height, chord length, channel size and level of surface hydrophobicity of the DM directly affect the droplet instability. Based on the analytical force balance model, the critical Reynolds number at which a droplet of given dimensions tends towards instability (i.e. may be removed from the channel) is predicted. Experimental data in both the stable and unstable regions as defined by the critical Reynolds number curve generally corresponds to the stability predictions. Empirical correlations relating surface tension and DM PTFE content were developed. At high flow rates, the surface hydrophobicity of the DM surface enhances efficacy of droplet removal, and may help to prevent local channel flooding. However, at low flow rates, hydrophobicity of the DM surface has only a minimal impact on efficacy of droplet removal and therefore high PTFE content may not be necessary, or desirable, since it also increases the electrical resistance of the system. It is also suggested that for constant air velocity and droplet size and shape, reduced channel height is preferred for effective water droplet removal where practical.

  11. Bifurcations in Flow through a Wavy Walled Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Zachary; Sup Song, Won; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Using computational modeling, we examine the bifurcations that occur in laminar flow of a Newtonian fluid in a channel with sinusoidal walls, driven by a constant pressure gradient. The lattice Boltzmann method was used as our computational model. Our simulations revealed that for a set of geometric parameters the flow in the channel undergoes multiple bifurcations across the range of flow rates investigated. These bifurcations take the form of an initial Hopf bifurcation where the flow transitions from steady to unsteady. The subsequent bifurcations in the flow take the form of additional Hopf, and period-doubling bifurcations. The type and pressure drop at which these bifurcations occur is highly dependent on the geometry of the channel. By performing simulations to determine the critical pressure drops where bifurcations occur and the type for various geometries we developed a flow regime map. The results are important for designing laminar heat/mass exchangers utilizing unsteady flows for enhancing transport processes. This work is supported by General Motors Corporation.

  12. Open-channel integrating-type flow meter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koopman, K.C.

    1971-01-01

    A relatively inexpensive meter for measuring cumulative flow in open channels with a rated control,. called a "totalizer", was developed. It translates the nonlinear function of gage height to flow by use of a cam and a float. A variable resistance element in an electronic circuit is controlled by the float so that the electron flow in the circuit corresponds to the flow of water. The flow of electricity causes electroplating of an electrode with silver. The amount of silver deposited is proportionate to the flow of water. The total flow of water is determined by removing the silver from the electrode at a fixed rate with ·an electronic device and recording the time for removal with a counter. The circuit is designed so that the ,resultant reading on the counter is in acre-feet of water.

  13. Effect of synthetic roughness on a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combariza, Javier; Ramirez-Pastran, Jesus; Duque-Daza, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    A turbulent channel flow featuring single step synthetic roughness at the bottom wall was examined using numerical experiments. An incompressible flow solver using LES as turbulence model was employed to study some turbulence variables as well as Q-criterion coherent structures. Roughness was attained by inserting a small step, stretching along the channel spanwise direction in the bottom wall. Three different values for the step width were used. Correlations between the steps width and skin-friction coefficients are calculated. Coherent structures using the Q-Criterion are constructed using different threshold values. By examining the evolution of the Q-structures, the effect of the perturbation is characterized in the near-wall region. Consistency between skin-friction coefficients and Q-structures evolution trends is observed in each case. Comparison between some of the TKE terms in the modified channel flow and those in a smooth channel flow, allow to identify the effect of the the synthetic roughness on the turbulent behaviour. Finally, a simple description of the overall effect of the presence of the perturbation on the turbulent flow is brought about by associating the Q-structures with the strong recirculation zones formed in the near-wall region close to the steps.

  14. Flow structure in submarine meandering channels, a continuous discussion on secondary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, J. D.; Parker, G.; Sequeiros, O.; Spinewine, B.; Garcia, M. H.; Pirmez, C.

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the flow structure in deep-sea turbidity currents is important for the formation of submarine meandering channels. Similarly to the case of subaerial channels, several types of secondary flows include turbulence-, curvature- and bed morphodynamic-driven flow structures that modulate sediment transport and channel bed morphodynamics. This study focuses on [1] a review of long-time research effort (Abad et al., 2011) that tackles the description of the secondary flow associated with a subaqueous bottom current (saline) in a high-curvature meandering channel and [2] ongoing numerical simulations of similar settings as the experiments to describe the entire flow structure. In the case of subaerial channels, the classical Rozovskiian paradigm is often invoked which indicates that the near-bottom secondary flow in a bend is directed inward. It has recently been suggested based on experimental and theoretical considerations, however, that this pattern is reversed (near-bottom secondary flow is directed outward) in the case of submarine meandering channels. Experimental results presented here, on the other hand, indicate near-bottom secondary flows that have the same direction as observed in a river (normal secondary flow). The implication is an apparent contradiction between experimental results. This study combines theory, experiments, reconstructions of field flows and ongoing simulations to resolve this apparent contradiction based on the flow densimetric Froude number. Three ranges of densimetric Froude number are found, such that a) in an upper regime, secondary flow is reversed, b) in a middle regime, it is normal and c) in a lower regime, it is reversed. These results are applied to field scale channel-forming turbidity currents in the Amazon submarine canyon-fan system (Amazon Channel) and the Monterey canyon and a saline underflow in the Black Sea flowing from the Bosphorus. Our analysis indicates that secondary flow should be normal

  15. Three-Dimensional Flow in Compressors and Channels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-01

    case where shock waves occur, were begun. Considerable effort was expanded upon the problem by both principal investigators, Dr. R. * L. Enlow , visiting...done by Dr. Enlow ()was presented at the Second Australian * Mathematics Convention. 9 Because the flow relative to the blades has a gradient, the angle...34Transonic Shear Flow in a Three-Dimensional Channel," Technical Report N00014-79-C-0285-T, January 1981. 6. Enlow , R.L., "Wavefront Propagation in Non

  16. Dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flames in mesoscale channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pizza, Gianmarco; Frouzakis, Christos E.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mantzaras, John; Tomboulides, Ananias G.

    2008-10-15

    Direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry and transport is used to study the stabilization and dynamics of lean ({phi}=0.5) premixed hydrogen/air atmospheric pressure flames in mesoscale planar channels. Channel heights of h=2, 4, and 7 mm, and inflow velocities in the range 0.3{<=}U{sub IN}{<=}1100cm/ s are investigated. Six different burning modes are identified: mild combustion, ignition/extinction, closed steady symmetric flames, open steady symmetric flames, oscillating and, finally, asymmetric flames. Chaotic behavior of cellular flame structures is observed for certain values of U{sub IN}. Stability maps delineating the regions of the different flame types are finally constructed. (author)

  17. Dynamic Flow Management Problems in Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Sarah Stock

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, over six hundred thousand licensed pilots flew nearly thirty-five million flights into over eighteen thousand U.S. airports, logging more than 519 billion passenger miles. Since demand for air travel has increased by more than 50% in the last decade while capacity has stagnated, congestion is a problem of undeniable practical significance. In this thesis, we will develop optimization techniques that reduce the impact of congestion on the national airspace. We start by determining the optimal release times for flights into the airspace and the optimal speed adjustment while airborne taking into account the capacitated airspace. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Problem (TFMP). We address the complexity, showing that it is NP-hard. We build an integer programming formulation that is quite strong as some of the proposed inequalities are facet defining for the convex hull of solutions. For practical problems, the solutions of the LP relaxation of the TFMP are very often integral. In essence, we reduce the problem to efficiently solving large scale linear programming problems. Thus, the computation times are reasonably small for large scale, practical problems involving thousands of flights. Next, we address the problem of determining how to reroute aircraft in the airspace system when faced with dynamically changing weather conditions. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Rerouting Problem (TFMRP) We present an integrated mathematical programming approach for the TFMRP, which utilizes several methodologies, in order to minimize delay costs. In order to address the high dimensionality, we present an aggregate model, in which we formulate the TFMRP as a multicommodity, integer, dynamic network flow problem with certain side constraints. Using Lagrangian relaxation, we generate aggregate flows that are decomposed into a collection of flight paths using a randomized rounding heuristic. This collection of paths is used in a packing integer

  18. Basic hydraulic principles of open-channel flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Froehlich, David C.

    1988-01-01

    The three basic principles of open-channel-flow analysis--the conservation of mass, energy, and momentum--are derived, explained, and applied to solve problems of open-channel flow. These principles are introduced at a level that can be comprehended by a person with an understanding of the principles of physics and mechanics equivalent to that presented in the first college level course of the subject. The reader is assumed to have a working knowledge of algebra and plane geometry as well as some knowledge of calculus. Once the principles have been derived, a number of example applications are presented that illustrate the computation of flow through culverts and bridges, and over structures, such as dams and weirs. Because resistance to flow is a major obstacle to the successful application of the energy principle to open-channel flow, procedures are outlined for the rational selection of flow resistance coefficients. The principle of specific energy is shown to be useful in the prediction of water-surface profiles both in the qualitative and quantitative sense. (USGS)

  19. Using DNS and Statistical Learning to Model Bubbly Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ming; Lu, Jiacai; Tryggvason, Gretar

    2015-11-01

    The transient evolution of laminar bubbly flow in a vertical channel is examined by direct numerical simulation (DNS). Nearly spherical bubbles, initially distributed evenly in a fully developed parabolic flow, are driven relatively quickly to the walls, where they increase the drag and reduce the flow rate on a longer time scale. Once the flow rate has been decreased significantly, some of the bubbles move back into the channel interior and the void fraction there approaches the value needed to balance the weight of the mixture and the imposed pressure gradient. A database generated by averaging the DNS results is used to model the closure terms in a simple model of the average flow. Those terms relate the averaged lateral flux of the bubbles, the velocity fluctuations and the averaged surface tension force to the fluid shear, the void fraction and its gradient, as well as the distance to the nearest wall. An aggregated neural network is used for the statistically leaning of unknown closures, and closure relationships are tested by following the evolution of bubbly channel flow with different initial conditions. It is found that the model predictions are in reasonably good agreement with DNS results. Supported by NSF.

  20. Flow-noise and turbulence in two tidal channels.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Christopher; Thomson, Jim; Dahl, Peter H; Polagye, Brian

    2014-04-01

    Flow-noise resulting from oceanic turbulence and interactions with pressure-sensitive transducers can interfere with ambient noise measurements. This noise source is particularly important in low-frequency measurements (f < 100 Hz) and in highly turbulent environments such as tidal channels. This work presents measurements made in the Chacao Channel, Chile, and in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, WA. In both environments, peak currents exceed 3 m/s and pressure spectral densities attributed to flow-noise are observed at frequencies up to 500 Hz. At 20 Hz, flow-noise exceeds mean slack noise levels by more than 50 dB. Two semi-empirical flow-noise models are developed and applied to predict flow-noise at frequencies from 20 to 500 Hz using measurements of current velocity and turbulence. The first model directly applies mean velocity and turbulence spectra while the second model relies on scaling arguments that relate turbulent dissipation to the mean velocity. Both models, based on prior formulations for infrasonic (f < 20 Hz) flow-noise, agree well with observations in Chacao Channel. In Admiralty Inlet, good agreement is shown only with the model that applies mean velocity and turbulence spectra, as the measured turbulence violates the scaling assumption in the second model.

  1. Flow model for open-channel reach or network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Formulation of a one-dimensional model for simulating unsteady flow in a single open-channel reach or in a network of interconnected channels is presented. The model is both general and flexible in that it can be used to simulate a wide range of flow conditions for various channel configurations. It is based on a four-point (box), implicit, finite-difference approximation of the governing nonlinear flow equations with user-definable weighting coefficients to permit varying the solution scheme from box-centered to fully forward. Unique transformation equations are formulated that permit correlation of the unknowns at the extremities of the channels, thereby reducing coefficient matrix and execution time requirements. Discharges and water-surface elevations computed at intermediate locations within a channel are determined following solution of the transformation equations. The matrix of transformation and boundary-condition equations is solved by Gauss elimination using maximum pivot strategy. Two diverse applications of the model are presented to illustrate its broad utility. (USGS)

  2. Morphology of Cryogenic Flows and Channels on Dwarf Planet Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Otto, Katharina A.; von der Gathen, Isabel; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Williams, David A.; Pieters, Carle M.; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland J.; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2016-04-01

    Cereś surface is affected by numerous impact craters and some of them show features such as channels or multiple flow events forming a smooth, less cratered surface, indicating possible post-impact resurfacing [1,2]. Flow features occur on several craters on Ceres such as Haulani, Ikapati, Occator, Jarimba and Kondos in combination with smooth crater floors [3,4], appearing as extended plains, ponded material, lobate flow fronts and in the case of Haulani lobate flows originating from the crest of the central ridge [3] partly overwhelming the mass wasting deposits from the rim. Haulanís crater flanks are also affected by multiple flow events radiating out from the crater and partly forming breakages. Flows occur as fine-grained lobes with well-defined margins and as smooth undifferentiated streaky flows covering the adjacent surface. Thus, adjacent craters are covered by flow material. Occator also exhibits multiple flows but in contrast to Haulani, the flows originating from the center overwhelm the mass wasting deposits from the rim [4]. The flows have a "bluish" signature in the FC color filters ratio. Channels occur at relatively fresh craters. They also show the "bluish" signature like the flows and plains. Only few channels occur at older "reddish" craters. They are relatively fresh incised into flow features or crater ejecta. Most are small, narrow and have lobated lobes with predominant distinctive flow margins. The widths vary between a few tens of meters to about 3 km. The channels are found on crater flanks as well as on the crater floors. The occurrence of flow features indicates viscous material on the surface. Those features could be formed by impact melt. However, impact melt is produced during the impact, assuming similar material properties as the ejecta it is expected to have nearly the same age as the impact itself, but the flows and plains are almost free of craters, thus, they seem to be much younger than the impact itself. In addition, the

  3. Development of Channeled Flow in Partially Molten Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, S.; Kumagai, I.; Kurita, K.

    2002-12-01

    There exist two contrasting models as to the style of melt migration in the partially molten medium; homogeneous permeable flow on grain scale and heterogeneous localized one (channeled flow on larger scale than the grain scale). It is considered that the style evolves from the homogeneous flow to the heterogeneous one as the degree of melting increases, but the physics responsible for this flow organization is not yet clarified. Several models as to this process and the melt segregation are proposed based on numerical simulation, though the experimental verification is not given yet. Here we present simple experimental results on the flow organization. We utilized highly deformable transparent gel as the solid phase. Due to this high deformability the matrix composed of the gel is easy to vary its internal structure. We have conducted the following experiments; the gel (about 5mm in diameter) is mingled with methyl-cellulose solution (MS) with almost same density as the gel, 1.01g/cm3, packed in a rectangular parallelepiped case (2.4cm*18cm*14.4cm), and a compaction state is realized by covering with wire netting at the upper boundary. Gel fraction of this mixture system is controlled by changing the ratio of the gel to MS (about 100% to 60%). Glycerol solution (GS) with density of 1.2g/cm3 is poured at the upper boundary. This is a kind of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and the dense GS flows downward through the mixture. The flow pattern of the GS is analyzed. A series of these procedures is carried out at various gel fractions (from about 100% to 60%), and how the flow style varies with the gel fraction is investigated. At median fraction of the gel about 80% to 70% the evolution from homogeneous permeable flow to heterogeneous localized flow was observed. At higher gel fraction, liquid phase flows as homogeneous permeable flow. Fragility of the solid frame is a most important factor for flow organization. The structure of the partially molten medium can be easily

  4. Flow-induced polymer translocation through narrow and patterned channels.

    PubMed

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Likos, Christos N

    2010-08-21

    We consider linear and branched polymers driven through narrow and patterned channels by imposing a Poiseuille flow on the ambient solvent. We establish, by means of scaling arguments, that the translocation probability of dendrimers through the pore is independent of the number of monomers and that it takes place above a viscosity-dependent critical external current. When the channel walls are smooth, the translocation times of linear and branched polymers with the same monomer number are very similar. However, for walls that are decorated with attractive patches, dramatic differences show up: whereas a dendrimer successively docks at the patches and "walks" from one to the next, being carried away by the solvent flow, linear chains spread themselves along the channel wall without achieving translocation within simulation times. Our findings are relevant for, e.g., drug delivery through dendritic carrier molecules in capillary arterioles.

  5. Stabililty and laminarisation of turbulent rotating channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, S.; Grundestam, O.; Johansson, A. V.

    The influence of moderate rotation rate on turbulent channel flow is that the turbulence is suppressed on the stable side and augmented on the unstable side because of the Coriolis force. With increasing rotation rate the turbulent region becomes restricted to a decreasing zone near the unstable wall. For the rotation number, Ro > 3 (normalized by bulk velocity and channel height) inviscid linear theory yields a stable laminar flow [1] and a recent DNS study [2] indicates that the turbulent flow laminarizes for Ro below 3. The critical Ro has been identified by a standard text-book linear stability analysis of rotating laminar channel flow including the viscous effects. The Reynolds number, Re = 10800 based on the bulk velocity and channel half height, is the same as in the recent DNS [2]. The most unstable mode consists of tilted slightly oblique streamwise vortices with a critical rotation number of Ro c = 2.805 and streamwise and spanwise wave numbers of α = 2.7 and β = 19 respectivelly. Steady streamwise roll-cells are slightly more stable.

  6. Flow resistance and its prediction methods in compound channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kejun; Cao, Shuyou; Liu, Xingnian

    2007-02-01

    A series of experiments was carried out in a large symmetric compound channel composed of a rough main channel and rough floodplains to investigate the resistance characteristics of inbank and overbank flows. The effective Manning, Darcy-Weisbach, Chezy coefficients and the relative Nikuradse roughness height were analyzed. Many different representative methods for predicting the composite roughness were systematically summarized. Besides the measured data, a vast number of laboratory data and field data for compound channels were collected and used to check the validity of these methods for different subsection divisions including the vertical, horizontal, diagonal and bisectional divisions. The computation showed that these methods resulted in big errors in assessing the composite roughness in compound channels, and the reasons were analyzed in detail. The error magnitude is related to the subsection divisions.

  7. Air flow exploration of abrasive feed tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shijin; Li, Xiaohong; Gu, Yilei

    2009-12-01

    An abrasive water-jet cutting process is one in which water pressure is raised to a very high pressure and forced through a very small orifice to form a very thin high speed jet beam. This thin jet beam is then directed through a chamber and then fed into a secondary nozzle, or mixing tube. During this process, a vacuum is generated in the chamber, and garnet abrasives and air are pulled into the chamber, through an abrasive feed tube, and mixes with this high speed stream of water. Because of the restrictions introduced by the abrasive feed tube geometry, a vacuum gradient is generated along the tube. Although this phenomenon has been recognized and utilized as a way to monitor nozzle condition and abrasive flowing conditions, yet, until now, conditions inside the abrasive feed line have not been completely understood. A possible reason is that conditions inside the abrasive feed line are complicated. Not only compressible flow but also multi-phase, multi-component flow has been involved in inside of abrasive feed tube. This paper explored various aspects of the vacuum creation process in both the mixing chamber and the abrasive feed tube. Based on an experimental exploration, an analytical framework is presented to allow theoretical calculations of vacuum conditions in the abrasive feed tube.

  8. Evaporative cooling of air in an adiabatic channel with partially wetted zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, V. I.; Gorbachev, M. V.; Khafaji, H. Q.

    2016-03-01

    The paper deals with the numerical study of heat and mass transfer in the process of direct evaporation air cooling in the laminar flow of forced convection in a channel between two parallel insulated plates with alternating wet and dry zones along the length. The system of Navier-Stokes equations and equations of energy and steam diffusion are being solved in two-dimensional approximation. At the channel inlet, all thermal gas-dynamic parameters are constant over the cross section, and the channel walls are adiabatic. The studies were carried out with varying number of dry zones ( n = 0-16), their relative length ( s/l = 0-1) and Reynolds number Re = 50-1000 in the flow of dry air (φ0 = 0) with a constant temperature at the inlet (T 0 = 30 °C). The main attention is paid to optimization analysis of evaporation cell characteristics. It is shown that an increase in the number of alternating steps leads to an increase in the parameters of thermal and humid efficiency. With an increase in Re number and a decrease in the extent of wet areas, the efficiency parameter reduces.

  9. Power formula for open-channel flow resistance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1988-01-01

    This paper evaluates various power formulas for flow resistance in open channels. Unlike the logarithmic resistance equation that can be theoretically derived either from Prandtl's mixing-length hypothesis or von Karman's similarity hypothesis, the power formula has long had an appearance of empiricism. Nevertheless, the simplicity in the form of the power formula has made it popular among the many possible forms of flow resistance formulas. This paper reexamines the concept and rationale of the power formulation, thereby addressing some critical issues in the modeling of flow resistance.

  10. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  11. Structure parameters in rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, George H.; Sather, D.

    1986-01-01

    It is well-known that a number of steady state problems in fluid mechanics involving systems of nonlinear partial differential equations can be reduced to the problem of solving a single operator equation of the form: v + lambda Av + lambda B(v) = 0, v is the summation of H, lambda is the summation of one-dimensional Euclid space, where H is an appropriate (real or complex) Hilbert space. Here lambda is a typical load parameter, e.g., the Reynolds number, A is a linear operator, and B is a quadratic operator generated by a bilinear form. In this setting many bifurcation and stability results for problems were obtained. A rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow was studied, and it showed that, in general, the superposition of a Poiseuille flow on a rotating Couette channel flow is destabilizing.

  12. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrath, M.; Canfield, P. J.; Bronowicki, P. M.; Dreyer, M. E.; Weislogel, M. M.; Grah, A.

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  13. Movement of a finite body in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Frank T.; Johnson, Edward R.

    2016-07-01

    A body of finite size is moving freely inside, and interacting with, a channel flow. The description of this unsteady interaction for a comparatively dense thin body moving slowly relative to flow at medium-to-high Reynolds number shows that an inviscid core problem with vorticity determines much, but not all, of the dominant response. It is found that the lift induced on a body of length comparable to the channel width leads to differences in flow direction upstream and downstream on the body scale which are smoothed out axially over a longer viscous length scale; the latter directly affects the change in flow directions. The change is such that in any symmetric incident flow the ratio of slopes is found to be cos ⁡(π / 7 ), i.e. approximately 0.900969, independently of Reynolds number, wall shear stresses and velocity profile. The two axial scales determine the evolution of the body and the flow, always yielding instability. This unusual evolution and linear or nonlinear instability mechanism arise outside the conventional range of flow instability and are influenced substantially by the lateral positioning, length and axial velocity of the body.

  14. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  15. The pulsating laminar flow in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valueva, E. P.; Purdin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    The finite difference method is used to solve the task of the developed pulsating laminar flow in a rectangular channel. The optimum of the difference scheme parameters was determined. Data on the amplitude and phase of the longitudinal velocity oscillations, the hydraulic and friction drag coefficients, the shear stress on the wall have been obtained. Using the dimensionless value of the frequency pulsations two characteristic regimes — the quasisteady-state regime and the high-frequency regime have been identified. In the quasi-steady-state regime, the values of all hydrodynamic quantities at each instant of time correspond to the velocity value averaged over the cross section at a given moment of time. It is shown that in the high-frequency regime, the dependences on the dimensionless oscillation frequency of oscillating components of hydrodynamic quantities are identical for rectilinear channels with a different cross-sectional form (round pipe, flat and a rectangular channels). The effect of the aspect ratio of the rectangular channel sides channel on the pulsating flow dynamics has been analyzed.

  16. Overland flow erosion inferred from Martian channel network geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    The controversy about the origin of Mars' channel networks is almost as old as their discovery 150 years ago. Over the last few decades, new Mars probes have revealed more detailed structures in Martian The controversy about the origin of Mars' channel networks is almost as old as their discovery 150 years ago. Over the last few decades, new Mars probes have revealed more detailed structures in Martian drainage networks, and new studies suggest that Mars once had large volumes of surface water. But how this water flowed, and how it could have carved the channels, remains unclear. Simple scaling arguments show that networks formed by similar mechanisms should have similar branching angles on Earth and Mars, suggesting that Earth analogues can be informative here. A recent analysis of high-resolution data for the continental United States shows that climate leaves a characteristic imprint in the branching geometry of stream networks. Networks growing in humid regions have an average branching angle of α = 2π/5 = 72° [1], which is characteristic of network growth by groundwater sapping [2]. Networks in arid regions, where overland flow erosion is more dominant, show much smaller branching angles. Here we show that the channel networks on Mars have branching angles that resemble those created by surficial flows on Earth. This result implies that the growth of Martian channel networks was dominated by near-surface flow, and suggests that deeper infiltration was inhibited, potentially by permafrost or by impermeable weathered soils. [1] Climate's Watermark in the Geometry of River Networks, Seybold et al.; under review [2] Ramification of stream networks, Devauchelle et al.; PNAS (2012)

  17. Large eddy simulation of the flow in a transpired channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Moin, Parviz; Ferziger, Joel

    1989-01-01

    The flow in a transpired channel has been computed by large eddy simulation. The numerical results compare very well with experimental data. Blowing decreases the wall shear stress and enhances turbulent fluctuations, while suction has the opposite effect. The wall layer thickness normalized by the local wall shear velocity and kinematic viscosity increases on the blowing side of the channel and decreases on the suction side. Suction causes more rapid decay of the spectra, larger mean streak spacing and higher two-point correlations. On the blowing side, the wall layer structures lie at a steeper angle to the wall, whereas on the suction side this angle is shallower.

  18. Model reduction and feedback control of transitional channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilak, Milos

    This dissertation examines the use of reduced-order models for design of linear feedback controllers for fluid flows. The focus is on transitional channel flow, a canonical shear flow case with a simple geometry yet complex dynamics. Reduced-order models of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, which describe the evolution of perturbations in transitional channel flow, are computed using two methods for snapshot-based balanced truncation, Balanced Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (BPOD) and Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA). The performance of these models in feedback control is evaluated in both linearized and nonlinear Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of channel flow. The first part of the dissertation describes the application of BPOD to very large systems, and the detailed evaluation of the resulting reduced-order models. Exact balanced truncation, a standard method from control theory, is not computationally tractable for very large systems, such as those typically encountered in fluid flow simulations. The BPOD method, introduced by Rowley (2005), provides a close approximation. We first show that the approximation is indeed close by applying the method to a 1-D linear perturbation to channel flow at a single spatial wavenumber pair, for which exact balanced truncation is tractable. Next, as the first application of BPOD to a very high-dimensional linear system, we show that reduced-order BPOD models of a localized 3-D perturbation capture the dynamics very well. Moreover, the BPOD models significantly outperform standard Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) models, as illustrated by a striking example where models using the POD modes that capture most of the perturbation energy fail to capture the perturbation dynamics. Next, reduced-order models of a complete control system for linearized channel flow are obtained using ERA, a computationally efficient method that results in the same reduced-order models as BPOD. Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG

  19. Computational heat transfer analysis for oscillatory channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Kannapareddy, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    An accurate finite-difference scheme has been utilized to investigate oscillatory, laminar and incompressible flow between two-parallel-plates and in circular tubes. The two-parallel-plates simulate the regenerator of a free-piston Stirling engine (foil type regenerator) and the channel wall was included in the analysis (conjugate heat transfer problem). The circular tubes simulate the cooler and heater of the engine with an isothermal wall. The study conducted covered a wide range for the maximum Reynolds number (from 75 to 60,000), Valensi number (from 2.5 to 700), and relative amplitude of fluid displacement (0.714 and 1.34). The computational results indicate a complex nature of the heat flux distribution with time and axial location in the channel. At the channel mid-plane we observed two thermal cycles (out of phase with the flow) per each flow cycle. At this axial location the wall heat flux mean value, amplitude and phase shift with the flow are dependent upon the maximum Reynolds number, Valensi number and relative amplitude of fluid displacement. At other axial locations, the wall heat flux distribution is more complex.

  20. Numerical modeling of turbulent flow in a channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, Y. W.; Ghoniem, A. F.; Sherman, F. S.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Two-dimensional incompressible turbulent flow in a channel with a backward-facing step was studied numerically by Chorin's Random Vortex Method (RVM), an algorithm capable of tracing the action of elementary turbulent eddies and their cumulative effects without imposing any restrictions upon their motions. The step occurs in one side of a channel with otherwise flat, parallel walls; its height equals 1/3, 1/4 or 1/5 the width of the channel downstream. The main objective was to investigate the behavior of the large-scale turbulent eddies in a flow and the flow characteristics in the separated shear layer, the reattached zone, and the rebuilding boundary layer after reattachment. The unsteady vorticity field and the distribution of time-averaged turbulent statistics were obtained. The effects of expansion step height and initial boundary layer state were also studied. Comparisons were made with the available experimental results. The agreement is satisfactory in the velocity profiles and in the reattachment length, and fairly good in the turbulence profiles. Also a mechanism of the development of the reattaching turbulent flow was suggested by the numerical results.

  1. Dynamic wall shear stress measurements in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amili, Omid; Soria, Julio

    2010-11-01

    To quantify and understand the dynamics of near wall momentum transfer, high spatial resolution, time-resolved measurements of wall shear stress distribution are essential. In this study, a film-based shear stress sensor has been used to measure the time-resolved local wall shear stress distribution in a turbulent channel flow. Measurements have been undertaken in a turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers up to 130,000 based on the bulk velocity and channel height. The measured fluctuating wall shear stress distribution provides spatio-temporal information of the characteristics of near wall structures by detecting their footprints. The span-wise extent of the positive two-point correlation of the stream-wise shear stress fluctuations provides the average width in the order of 100 wall units for the near-wall coherent structures. An investigation of the topological features of the velocity gradient and rate of strain tensors enables us to show an intrinsic characteristic of the near wall flow, which follows a two-dimensional flow pattern.

  2. Direct simulation of isothermal-wall supersonic channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Gary N.

    1993-01-01

    The motivation for this work is the fact that in turbulent flows where compressibility effects are important, they are often poorly understood. A few examples of such flows are those associated with astrophysical phenomena and those found in combustion chambers, supersonic diffusers and nozzles, and over high-speed airfoils. For this project, we are primarily interested in compressibility effects near solid surfaces. Our main objective is an improved understanding of the fundamentals of compressible wall-bounded turbulence, which can in turn be used to cast light upon modeling concepts such as the Morkovin hypothesis and the Van Driest transformation. To this end, we have performed a direct numerical simulation (DNS) study of supersonic turbulent flow in a plane channel with constant-temperature walls. All of the relevant spatial and temporal scales are resolved so that no sub grid scale or turbulence model is necessary. The channel geometry was chosen so that finite Mach number effects can be isolated by comparing the present results to well established incompressible channel data. Here the fluid is assumed to be an ideal gas with constant specific heats, constant Prandtl number, and power-law temperature-dependent viscosity. Isothermal-wall boundary conditions are imposed so that a statistically stationary state may be obtained. The flow is driven by a uniform (in space) body force (rather than a mean pressure gradient) to preserve stream wise homogeneity, with the body force defined so that the total mass flux is constant.

  3. Numerical study of a novel micro-diaphragm flow channel with piezoelectric device for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H. K.; Huang, S. H.; Chen, B. R.; Cheng, L. W.

    Previous studies have shown that the amplitude of the vibration of a piezoelectric (PZT) device produces an oscillating flow that changes the chamber volume along with a curvature variation of the diaphragm. In this study, an actuating micro-diaphragm with piezoelectric effects is utilized as an air-flow channel in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) systems, called PZT-PEMFC. This newly designed gas pump, with a piezoelectric actuation structure, can feed air into the system of an air-breathing PEMFC. When the actuator moves outward to increase the cathode channel volume, the air is sucked into the chamber; moving inward decreases the channel's volume and thereby compresses air into the catalyst layer and enhancing the chemical reaction. The air-standard PZT-PEMFC cycle is proposed to describe an air-breathing PZT-PEMFC. A novel design for PZT-PEMFCs has been proposed and a three-dimensional, transitional model has been successfully built to account for its major phenomena and performance. Moreover, at high frequencies, PZT actuation leads to a more stable current output, more drained water, higher sucked air, higher hydrogen consumption, and also overcomes concentration losses.

  4. Final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper involves a numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 1500. Three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two- and three-dimensional finite-amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 x 51 x 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and characteristics of the various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a upside-down-V-shaped vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the primary elements of transition. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streaklike formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), the introduction of subgrid-scale terms seems necessary to obtain fully developed turbulence statistics.

  5. Femtosecond laser flow tagging in non-air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibin; Calvert, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    The Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) [Michael, J. B. et al., Applied optics, 50(26), 2011] method is studied in nitrogen-containing gaseous flows. The underlying mechanism behind the FLEET process is the dissociation of molecular nitrogen into atomic nitrogen, which produces long-lived florescence as the nitrogen atoms recombine. Spectra and images of the resulting tagged line provide insight into the effects of different atmospheric gases on the FLEET process. The ionization cross-section, conductivity and energy states of the gaseous particles are each brought into consideration. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility for long-lived flow tagging on the order of hundreds of microseconds in non-air environments. Of particular interest are the enhancement of the FLEET signal with the addition of argon gas, and the non-monotonic quenching effect of oxygen on the length, duration and intensity of the resulting signal and spectra. FLEET is characterized in number of different atmospheric gases, including that simulating Mar's atmospheric composition.

  6. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  7. Superelevation and overspill control secondary flow dynamics in submarine channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorrell, R. M.; Darby, S. E.; Peakall, J.; Sumner, E. J.; Parsons, D. R.; Wynn, R. B.

    2013-08-01

    In subaerial and submarine meander bends, fluid flow travels downstream in a helical spiral, the structure of which is determined by centrifugal, hydrostatic, baroclinic, and Coriolis forces that together balance frictional stresses generated by the flow. The sense of rotation of this helical flow, and in particular, whether the near bed flow is directed toward the inner bank, e.g., "river-normal," or outer bank, e.g., "river-reversed," is crucial to the morphodynamic evolution of the channel. However, in recent years, there has been a debate over the river-normal or river-reversed nature of submarine flows. Herein, we develop a novel three-dimensional closure of secondary flow dynamics, incorporating downstream convective material transport, to cast new light on this debate. Specifically, we show that the presence of net radial material transport, arising from flow superelevation and overspill, exerts a key control on the near bed orientation of secondary flow in submarine meanders. Our analysis implies that river-reversed flows are likely to be much more prevalent throughout submarine-canyon fan systems than prior studies have indicated.

  8. Rivulet Flow In Vertical Parallel-Wall Channel

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. Mc Creery; P. Meakin

    2006-04-01

    In comparison with studies of rivulet flow over external surfaces, rivulet flow confined by two surfaces has received almost no attention. Fully-developed rivulet flow in vertical parallel-wall channels was characterized, both experimentally and analytically for flows intermediate between a lower flow limit of drop flow and an upper limit where the rivulets meander. Although this regime is the most simple rivulet flow regime, it does not appear to have been previously investigated in detail. Experiments were performed that measured rivulet widths for aperture spacing ranging from 0.152 mm to 0.914 mm. The results were compared with a simple steadystate analytical model for laminar flow. The model divides the rivulet cross-section into an inner region, which is dominated by viscous and gravitational forces and where essentially all flow is assumed to occur, and an outer region, dominated by capillary forces, where the geometry is determined by the contact angle between the fluid and the wall. Calculations using the model provided excellent agreement with data for inner rivulet widths and good agreement with measurements of outer rivulet widths.

  9. Two-phase Flow Characteristics in a Gas-Flow Channel of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung Chan

    Fuel cells, converting chemical energy of fuels directly into electricity, have become an integral part of alternative energy and energy efficiency. They provide a power source of high energy-conversion efficiency and zero emission, meeting the critical demands of a rapidly growing society. The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also called polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs), are the major type of fuel cells for transportation, portable and small-scale stationary applications. They provide high-power capability, work quietly at low temperatures, produce only water byproduct and no emission, and can be compactly assembled, making them one of the leading candidates for the next generation of power sources. Water management is one of the key issues in PEM fuel cells: appropriate humidification is critical for the ionic conductivity of membrane while excessive water causes flooding and consequently reduces cell performance. For efficient liquid water removal from gas flow channels of PEM fuel cells, in-depth understanding on droplet dynamics and two-phase flow characteristics is required. In this dissertation, theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental testing with visualization are carried out to understand the two-phase flow characteristics in PEM fuel cell channels. Two aspects of two-phase phenomena will be targeted: one is the droplet dynamics at the GDL surface; the other is the two-phase flow phenomena in gas flow channels. In the former, forces over a droplet, droplet deformation, and detachment are studied. Analytical solutions of droplet deformation and droplet detachment velocity are obtained. Both experiments and numerical simulation are conducted to validate analytical results. The effects of contact angle, channel geometry, superficial air velocity, properties of gas phase fluids are examined and criteria for the detachment velocity are derived to relate the Reynolds number to the Weber number. In the latter, two-phase flow

  10. An improved near-wall treatment for turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gharbi, Najla; Absi, Rafik; Benzaoui, Ahmed; Bennacer, Rachid

    2011-01-01

    The success of predictions of wall-bounded turbulent flows requires an accurate description of the flow in the near-wall region. This article presents a comparative study between different near-wall treatments and presents an improved method. The study is applied to fully developed plane channel flow (i.e. the flow between two infinitely large plates). Simulations were performed using Fluent. Near-wall treatments available in Fluent were tested: standard wall functions, non-equilibrium wall function and enhanced wall treatment. A user defined function (UDF), based on an analytical profile for the turbulent kinetic energy (Absi, R., 2008. Analytical solutions for the modeled k-equation. ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics, 75 (4), 044501), is developed and implemented. Predicted turbulent kinetic energy profiles are presented and validated by DNS data.

  11. Coherent vorticity extraction in turbulent channel flow using anisotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Sakurai, Teluo; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Morishita, Koji; Ishihara, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    We examine the role of coherent vorticity in a turbulent channel flow. DNS data computed at friction-velocity based Reynolds number 320 is analyzed. The vorticity is decomposed using three-dimensional anisotropic orthogonal wavelets. Thresholding of the wavelet coefficients allows to extract the coherent vorticity, corresponding to few strong wavelet coefficients. It retains the vortex tubes of the turbulent flow. Turbulent statistics, e.g., energy, enstrophy and energy spectra, are close to those of the total flow. The nonlinear energy budgets are also found to be well preserved. The remaining incoherent part, represented by the large majority of the weak coefficients, corresponds to a structureless, i.e., a noise-like background flow.

  12. Ion channel networks in the control of cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Longden, Thomas A; Hill-Eubanks, David C

    2015-01-01

    One hundred and twenty five years ago, Roy and Sherrington made the seminal observation that neuronal stimulation evokes an increase in cerebral blood flow.1 Since this discovery, researchers have attempted to uncover how the cells of the neurovascular unit—neurons, astrocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, vascular endothelial cells and pericytes—coordinate their activity to control this phenomenon. Recent work has revealed that ionic fluxes through a diverse array of ion channel species allow the cells of the neurovascular unit to engage in multicellular signaling processes that dictate local hemodynamics. In this review we center our discussion on two major themes: (1) the roles of ion channels in the dynamic modulation of parenchymal arteriole smooth muscle membrane potential, which is central to the control of arteriolar diameter and therefore must be harnessed to permit changes in downstream cerebral blood flow, and (2) the striking similarities in the ion channel complements employed in astrocytic endfeet and endothelial cells, enabling dual control of smooth muscle from either side of the blood–brain barrier. We conclude with a discussion of the emerging roles of pericyte and capillary endothelial cell ion channels in neurovascular coupling, which will provide fertile ground for future breakthroughs in the field. PMID:26661232

  13. Linear stability analysis of flows in a grooved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Alireza; Floryan, Jerzy Maciej

    2015-11-01

    It is known that longitudinal grooves which are parallel to the flow direction may either stabilize or destabilize the travelling wave instability in a pressure-gradient-driven channel flow depending on the groove wave number. These waves reduce to the classical Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves in the smooth channel limit. It is shown that another class of travelling wave instability exists if grooves with sufficiently high amplitude and proper wavelengths are used. It is demonstrated that the new instability is driven by inviscid mechanisms, with the disturbance motion having the form of a wave propagating in the streamwise direction with the phase speed approximately four times larger than the TS wave speed and with its streamwise wavelength being approximately twice the spanwise groove wavelength. The instability motion is concentrated mostly in the middle of the channel and has a primarily planar character, i.e. the dominant velocity components are parallel to the walls. A significant reduction of the corresponding critical Reynolds number can be achieved by increasing the groove amplitude. This mode reduces to the highly attenuated Squire mode in the smooth channel limit. This work has been carried out with support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada.

  14. Static-flow-instability in subcooled flow boiling in wide rectangular parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; McDuffee, J.L.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a state-of-the-art research reactor facility that will be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is designed to become the world`s most advanced thermal neutron flux source for scientific experiments. Therefore, the core of the ANS reactor (ANSR) must be designed to accommodate very high power densities using very high coolant mass fluxes and subcooling levels, The nominal average and peak heat fluxes in the ANSR are approximately 6 and 12 MW/M{sup 2}, respectively, with a nominal total thermal power of 303 MW. Highly subcooled heavy-water coolant (1.7 MPa and 85{degrees}C at the core exit) flows vertically upward at a very high mass flux of almost 27 Mg/M{sup 2}-s. The cooling channels in each fuel assembly are all parallel and share common inlet and outlet plenums, effectively imposing a common pressure drop across all the channels. This core configuration is subject to flow excursion (FE) and/or flow instability that may occur once boiling is initiated in any one of the channels. The FE phenomenon constitutes a different thermal limit than a true critical heat flux (CHF) or departure from nucleate boiling (DNB). In such a system, initiation of boiling in one of the channels (i.e., the hot channel) can result in flow redistribution to the other cooler channels. This report details testing to document this phenomenon.

  15. Distribution of incompressible flow within interdigitated channels and porous electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Robert J.; Zhu, Huayang

    2015-12-01

    This paper develops a general model with which to evaluate flow uniformity and pressure drop within interdigitated-channel structures, especially in the context of redox flow batteries. The governing equations are cast in dimensionless variables, leading to a set of characteristic dimensionless parameter groups. The systems of governing equations are solved computationally, with the results presented graphically. Because the results are general, the underlying model itself is not needed to apply the quantitative design guidelines. However, the paper presents and discusses all the information required to recreate the model as needed.

  16. Initiation of granular surface flows in a narrow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jop, Pierre; Forterre, Yoël; Pouliquen, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    We experimentally investigate how a long granular pile confined in a narrow channel destabilizes when it is inclined above the angle of repose. A uniform flow then develops, which is localized at the free surface. It first accelerates before reaching a steady uniform regime. During this process, an apparent erosion is observed and the thickness of the flowing layer increases. We precisely study the evolution of the vertical velocity profile in this transient regime. The measurements are compared with the prediction of a viscoplastic model [Jop et al., Nature 441, 727 (2006)].

  17. Mechanics of drag reduction by shallow dimples in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, C. M. J.; Khoo, B. C.; Chew, Y. T.

    2015-03-01

    Arrays of shallow dimples with depth to diameter ratios of 1.5% and 5% are studied in a turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers between 5000 and 35 000. Pressure measurements show that drag reduction of up to 3% is possible. The mechanism of skin friction drag reduction with dimples is the same as that observed for flat surfaces using active methods such as spanwise wall motions or transverse wall jets. The three dimensional dimples introduce streamwise vorticity into the flow which results in spanwise flow components near the wall. The result is that the normal energy cascade to the smaller scales is suppressed, which leads to a reduction in turbulent skin friction drag because of the stabilized flow. Increasing the dimple depth from 1.5% to 5% of its diameter increases the streamwise vorticity introduced, which leads to a greater reduction in skin friction. However, increasing the dimple depth also results in flow separation which increases form drag. The net effect to the total drag depends on the relative dominance between the drag reducing streamwise vorticity and the drag increasing flow separation region. As the Reynolds number increases, the region of flow separation can shrink and result in increasing drag reduction. By understanding the flow physics of drag reduction in dimples, there is opportunity to minimize the form drag by passive contouring of the dimples using non-spherical shapes to optimize the dimple performance.

  18. River flow mass exponents with fractal channel networks and rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Over, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    An important problem in hydrologic science is understanding how river flow is influenced by rainfall properties and drainage basin characteristics. In this paper we consider one approach, the use of mass exponents, in examining the relation of river flow to rainfall and the channel network, which provides the primary conduit for transport of water to the outlet in a large basin. Mass exponents, which characterize the power-law behavior of moments as a function of scale, are ideally suited for defining scaling behavior of processes that exhibit a high degree of variability or intermittency. The main result in this paper is an expression relating the mass exponent of flow resulting from an instantaneous burst of rainfall to the mass exponents of spatial rainfall and that of the network width function. Spatial rainfall is modeled as a random multiplicative cascade and the channel network as a recursive replacement tree; these fractal models reproduce certain types of self-similar behavior seen in actual rainfall and networks. It is shown that under these modeling assumptions the scaling behavior of flow mirrors that of rainfall if rainfall is highly variable in space, and on the other hand flow mirrors the structure of the network if rainfall is not so highly variable. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Streamline segment scaling behavior in a turbulent wavy channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubbert, A.; Hennig, F.; Klaas, M.; Pitsch, H.; Schröder, W.; Peters, N.

    2017-02-01

    A turbulent flow in a wavy channel was investigated by tomographic particle-image velocimetry measurements and direct numerical simulations. To analyze the turbulent structures and their scaling behavior in a flow undergoing favorable and adverse pressure gradients, the streamline segmentation method proposed by Wang (J Fluid Mech 648:183-203, 2010) was employed. This method yields joint statistical information about velocity fluctuations and length scale distributions of non-overlapping structures within the flow. In particular, the joint statistical properties are notably influenced by the pressure distribution. Previous findings from flat channel flows and synthetic turbulence simulations concerning the normalized segment length distribution could be reproduced and therefore appear to be largely universal. However, the mean streamline segment length of accelerating and decelerating segments varies within one wavelength typically elongating segments of the type which corresponds to the local mean flow. Furthermore, the local pressure gradient was found to significantly impact local joint streamline segmentation statistics as a main influence on their inherent asymmetry.

  20. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  1. Heat exchange at laminar flow in rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valueva, E. P.; Purdin, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    Numerical modeling of heat exchange at a laminar stationary and pulsatile flow in rectangular channels with different aspect ratios of side lengths γ has been carried out by a finite difference method for two boundary conditions: a constant wall temperature and a constant heat flux density on the wall. For the boundary condition of the first kind, the similarity of distributions of the heat flux density and shear stress on the walls over the channel perimeter has been established. The reasons for a nonmonotonous dependence of the initial thermal interval length on γ are discussed. For the boundary condition of the second kind, the difference of the Nusselt number averaged over the perimeter at γ → 0 from its value for a flow in a flat channel has been explained. An increase in the Nusselt number averaged over the perimeter and the period of oscillations has been revealed for a pulsatile flow in the quasi-stationary regime at large amplitudes of the oscillations of the velocity averaged over the cross section.

  2. Temporal coherence of turbulent dynamics in minimal channel flow and its connection to exact coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Sung; Graham, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of the turbulent near-wall region is known to be dominated by coherent structures. These near-wall coherent structures are observed to burst in an intermittent way, exporting turbulent kinetic energy to the rest of the flow. In addition, they are closely related to invariant solutions known as exact coherent states (ECS), some of which display nonlinear critical layer dynamics. In this study, temporal coherence in minimal channel flow relevant to burst and critical layer dynamics is investigated. The turbulence displays frequencies very close to the critical layer frequency displayed by an ECS family recently identified in the channel flow geometry. The bursting frequency is predominant near the wall, while the critical layer frequency becomes predominant over the bursting frequency as we move away from the wall. In particular, the critical layer frequency becomes more prominent near the channel center and at higher Reynolds number. Finally, turbulent bursts are classified into strong and relatively weak classes with respect to an intermittent approach to a lower branch ECS. The relationship between the strong burst class and the instability of the lower branch ECS is further discussed. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through Grant FA9550-15-1-0062 (Flow Interactions and Control Program).

  3. Effects of filter housing and ductwork configuration on air flow uniformity inside air cleaning filter housings

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    Each new HEPA filter installation presents a different physical configuration based on the system requirements the available space and designer preference. Each different configuration can result in variations of air flow uniformity inside the filter housing across the filter banks. This paper will present the results of air flow uniformity testing for six different filter housing/ductwork configurations and discuss if any of the variations in air flow uniformity is attributable to the difference in the physical arrangements for the six cases.

  4. Effects of filter housing and ductwork configuration on air flow uniformity inside air cleaning filter housings

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Each new HEPA filter installation presents a different physical configuration based on the system requirements the available space and designer preference. Each different configuration can result in variations of air flow uniformity inside the filter housing across the filter banks. This paper will present the results of air flow uniformity testing for six different filter housing/ductwork configurations and discuss if any of the variations in air flow uniformity is attributable to the difference in the physical arrangements for the six cases.

  5. Flow-induced activation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels stimulates Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel causing membrane hyperpolarization.

    PubMed

    Cha, Seung-Kuy; Kim, Ji-Hee; Huang, Chou-Long

    2013-12-01

    TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels are expressed in distal renal tubules and play important roles in the transcellular Ca(2+) reabsorption in kidney. They are regulated by multiple intracellular factors including protein kinases A and C, membrane phospholipid PIP2, protons, and divalent ions Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). Here, we report that fluid flow that generates shear force within the physiological range of distal tubular fluid flow activated TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels expressed in HEK cells. Flow-induced activation of channel activity was reversible and did not desensitize over 2min. Fluid flow stimulated TRPV5 and 6-mediated Ca(2+) entry and increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. N-glycosylation-deficient TRPV5 channel was relatively insensitive to fluid flow. In cells coexpressing TRPV5 (or TRPV6) and Slo1-encoded maxi-K channels, fluid flow induced membrane hyperpolarization, which could be prevented by the maxi-K blocker iberiotoxin or TRPV5 and 6 blocker La(3+). In contrast, fluid flow did not cause membrane hyperpolarization in cells coexpressing ROMK1 and TRPV5 or 6 channel. These results reveal a new mechanism for the regulation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels. Activation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 by fluid flow may play a role in the regulation of flow-stimulated K(+) secretion via maxi-K channels in distal renal tubules and in the mechanism of pathogenesis of thiazide-induced hypocalciuria.

  6. Flow-Induced Activation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 Channel Stimulates Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel Causing Membrane Hyperpolarization

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Seung-Kuy; Kim, Ji-Hee; Huang, Chou-Long

    2014-01-01

    TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels are expressed in distal renal tubules and play important roles in the transcellular Ca2+ reabsorption in kidney. They are regulated by multiple intracellular factors including protein kinase A and C, membrane phospholipid PIP2, protons, and divalent ions Ca2+ and Mg2+. Here, we report that fluid flow that generates shear force within the physiological range of distal tubular fluid flow activated TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels expressed in HEK cells. Flow-induced activation of channel activity was reversible and did not desensitize over 2 minutes. Fluid flow stimulated TRPV5 and 6-mediated Ca2+ entry and increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration. N-glycosylation-deficient TRPV5 channel was relatively insensitive to fluid flow. In cells coexpressing TRPV5 (or TRPV6) and Slo1-encoded maxi-K channels, fluid flow induced membrane hyperpolarization, which could be prevented by the maxi-K blocker iberiotoxin or TRPV5 and 6 blocker La3+. In contrast, fluid flow did not cause membrane hyperpolarization in cells coexpressing ROMK1 and TRPV5 or 6 channels. These results reveal a new mechanism for regulation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 channels. Activation of TRPV5 and TRPV6 by fluid flow may play a role in the regulation of flow-stimulated K+ secretion via maxi-K channels in distal renal tubules and in the mechanism of pathogenesis of thiazide-induced hypocalciuria. PMID:24001793

  7. Eruption Constraints for a Young Channelized Lava Flow, Marte Vallis, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Therkelsen, J. P.; Santiago, S. S.; Grosfils, E. B.; Sakimoto, S. E. H.; Mendelson, C. V.; Bleacher, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    This study constrains flow rates for a specific channelized lava flow in Marte Vallis, Mars. We measured slope-gradient, channel width, and channel depth. Our results are similar to other recent studies which suggests similarities to long, terrestrial basaltic flow. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Direction of scalar transport in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Chiranth; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2011-11-01

    The concept of reverse diffusion, introduced by Corrsin to describe the motion of particles as they move towards a location in the flow field, is fundamental to the understanding of mixing. In this work, direct numerical simulations in conjunction with the tracking of scalar markers are utilized in infinitely long channels to study the principal direction of transport of heat (or mass) for both forwards and backwards single particle dispersion. The viscous sub-layer, the transition region (between the viscous sub-layer and the logarithmic region), and the logarithmic region of a Poiseuille flow and a plane Couette flow channel are studied. Fluctuating velocities of scalar markers captured in these regions are used to obtain the full autocorrelation coefficient tensor forwards and backwards with time. The highest eigenvalue of the velocity correlation coefficient tensor quantifies the highest amount of turbulent heat transport, while the corresponding eigenvector points to the main direction of transport. Different Prandtl number, Pr, fluids are simulated for the two types of flow. It is found that the highest eigenvalues are higher in the case of backwards dispersion compared to the case of forwards dispersion for any Pr, in both flow cases. The principal direction for backwards and forwards dispersion is different than for forwards dispersion, for all Pr, and in all flow regions for both flows. Fluids with lower Pr behave different than the higher Pr fluids because of increased molecular diffusion effects. The current study also establishes an interesting analogy of turbulent dispersion to optics defining the turbulent dispersive ratio, a parameter that can be used to identify the differences in the direction of turbulent heat transport between forwards and backwards dispersion. A spectral analysis of the auto-correlation coefficient for both forwards and backwards dispersion shows a universal behavior with slope of -1 at intermediate frequencies.

  9. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  10. Deposition patterns and dispersion in reactive channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angheluta, L.; Hawkins, C.; Jamtveit, B.

    2015-12-01

    Flow of natural fluids is often associated with dispersion of dissolved chemical species and their surface deposition either by precipitation kinetics or aggregation. For most industrial or practical flows, this wall deposition has a detrimental effect that hiders transport by clogging or alters the fluid container; therefore it is important to gain a better understanding of transport in reactive flows and the range of deposition patterns developed. This talk has two main aims. Firstly, it is to present a combined theoretical and numerical approach to explore the diverse yet generic wall morphologies that develop in channel flows either due to precipitation kinetics or aggregation of spherical particles. These deposition patterns range from dendrites to needles and fan-like structures growing against the mean flow direction, and depend strongly on flow perturbations and dispersion properties. The second goal is to revisit classical Taylor's theory of dispersion in turbulent pipe flows and to show that, in fully developed turbulence, it predicts a nontrivial connection between longitudinal dispersion and the turbulent energy spectrum that we can also test and observe in numerical simulations.

  11. New insight into flow development and two dimensionality of turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinuesa, Ricardo; Bartrons, Eduard; Chiu, Daniel; Dressler, Kristofer M.; Rüedi, J.-D.; Suzuki, Yasumasa; Nagib, Hassan M.

    2014-06-01

    The experimental conditions required for a turbulent channel flow to be considered fully developed and nominally two dimensional remain a challenging objective. In this study, we show that the flow obtained in a high-aspect-ratio channel facility cannot be reproduced by direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of spanwise-periodic channel flows; therefore, we reserve the term "channel" for spanwise-periodic DNSs and denote the experimental flow by the term "duct." Oil film interferometry (OFI) and static pressure measurements were carried out over the range in an adjustable-geometry duct flow facility. Three-dimensional effects were studied by considering different aspect ratio (AR) configurations and also by fixing the AR and modifying the hydraulic diameter of the section. The conditions at the centerplane of the duct were characterized through the local skin friction from the OFI and the centerline velocity at four different streamwise locations and through the wall shear based on the streamwise global pressure gradient. The skin friction obtained from pressure gradient overestimated the local shear measurements obtained from the OFI and did not reproduce the same AR dependence observed with OFI. Differences between the local and global techniques were also reflected in the flow development. For the range of Reynolds numbers tested, the development length of high-aspect-ratio ducts scales with the duct full-height and is around , much larger than the values of around 100-150 H previously reported in the literature.

  12. Rain and channel flow supplements to subsurface water beneath hyper-arid ephemeral stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Faulconer, Joshua; Shaw, Jeremy R.; Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Cooper, David J.

    2016-05-01

    In hyper-arid regions, ephemeral stream channels are important sources of subsurface recharge and water supply for riparian vegetation, but few studies have documented the subsurface water content dynamics of these systems. This study examines ephemeral channels in the hyper-arid western Sonoran Desert, USA to determine how frequently water recharges the alluvial fill and identify variables that affect the depth and persistence of recharge. Precipitation, stream stage, and subsurface water content measurements were collected over a three-year study at six channels with varying contributing areas and thicknesses of alluvial fill. All channels contain coarse alluvium composed primarily of sands and gravels, and some locations also have localized layers of fine sediment at 2-3 m depth. Rain alone contributed 300-400 mm of water input to these channels over three years, but water content responses were only detected for 36% of the rain events at 10 cm depth, indicating that much of the rain water was either quickly evaporated or taken up by plants. Pulses of water from rain events were detected only in the top meter of alluvium. The sites each experienced ⩽5 brief flow events, which caused transient saturation that usually lasted only a few hours longer than flow. These events were the only apparent source of water to depths >1 m, and water from flow events quickly percolated past the deepest measurement depths (0.5-3 m). Sustained saturation in the shallow subsurface only developed where there was a near-surface layer of finer consolidated sediments that impeded deep percolation.

  13. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of curved turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, R. D.; Moin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Low Reynolds number, mildly curved, turbulent channel flow has been simulated numerically without subgrid scale models. A new spectral numerical method developed for this problem was used, and the computations were performed with 2 million degrees of freedom. A variety of statistical and structural information has been extracted from the computed flow fields. These include mean velocity, turbulence stresses, velocity skewness, and flatness factors, space time correlations and spectra, all the terms in the Reynolds stress balance equations, and contour and vector plots of instantaneous velocity fields. The effects of curvature on this flow were determined by comparing the concave and convex sides of the channel. The observed effects are consistent with experimental observations for mild curvature. The most significant difference in the turbulence statistics between the concave and convex sides was in the Reynolds shear stress. This was accompanied by significant differences in the terms of the Reynolds shear stress balance equations. In addition, it was found that stationary Taylor-Gortler vortices were present and that they had a significant effect on the flow by contributing to the mean Reynolds shear stress, and by affecting the underlying turbulence.

  15. A correlation for nucleate flow boiling in small channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.N. |; Wambsganss, M.W.; Chyu, M.C.; France, D.M.

    1997-08-01

    Compact heat exchangers are becoming more attractive for applications in which energy conservation, space saving, and cost are important considerations. Applications exist in the process industries where phase-change heat transfer realizes more compact designs and improved performance compared to single-phase heat transfer. However, there have been only a few studies in the literature reporting on phase-change heat transfer and two-phase flow in compact heat exchangers, and validated design correlations are lacking. Recent data from experiments on flow boiling of refrigerants in small channels have led researchers to conclude that nucleation is the dominant heat transfer mechanism over a broad range of heat flux and wall superheats. Local heat transfer coefficients and overall two-phase pressure drops were measured for three different refrigerants with circular and non-circular channels in a range of pressures. This data base supports the nucleate boiling mechanism, and it was used to develop a new correlation for heat transfer in nucleate flow boiling. The correlation is based on the Rohsenow boiling model, introducing a confinement number defined by Kew and Cornwell. The new correlation predicts the experimental data for nucleate flow boiling of three refrigerants within {+-}15%.

  16. Pressure-driven flow in a channel with porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The finite-Reynolds-number three-dimensional flow in a channel bounded by one and two parallel porous walls is studied numerically. The porous medium is modelled by spheres in a simple cubic arrangement. The results for the slip velocity at the surface of the porous layers are compared with the phenomenological Beavers-Joseph model. It is found that the value of the slip coefficient is different for pressure-driven and shear-driven flow. A modification of the relation is suggested to deal with this feature. Furthermore, detailed results on the flow structure and the hydrodynamic forces and couple acting on the sphere layer bounding the porous medium are reported and their dependence on the Reynolds number illustrated. It is shown that, at finite Reynolds numbers, a lift force acts on the spheres, which may be expected to contribute to the the mobilization of bottom sediments.

  17. Flows and hypoxic blackwater events in managed ephemeral river channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hladyz, Sally; Watkins, Susanne C.; Whitworth, Kerry L.; Baldwin, Darren S.

    2011-04-01

    SummaryAs pressure increases on the availability of water resources worldwide, especially in the face of climatic change, it is probable that the likelihood of streams undergoing at least some periods of drying will increase in arid and semi-arid regions. This has implications for the ongoing management of waterways in these areas. One area of concern is the potential occurrence of hypoxic blackwater events upon re-instatement of flows in creek and river channels following periods of drying. Hypoxic blackwater events are characterised by high levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the metabolism of which results in low dissolved oxygen (DO) in the water column, which can cause fish and crustacean mortality. Therefore, understanding hypoxic blackwater events is important in order to reduce the potential for fish mortalities and other water quality impacts from both managed and natural flows. In this study, we set out to determine the factors that influenced the occurrence of a hypoxic blackwater event in the Edward-Wakool river system, in southern NSW, Australia during the previous austral summer (2008-2009). Standing stocks of plant litter, emergent macrophytes and river red gum saplings ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehn.), as well as rates of litterfall, were determined in dry and inundated channels. A series of mesocosm experiments were undertaken to determine which carbon source was the greatest contributor to DOC and to DO depletion, and what loadings could result in hypoxia. These experiments were then used to create a simple algorithm relating carbon loading in a dry channel to DOC in the overlying water column following inundation. Results revealed that plant litter was the main contributor to water column DOC and to DO depletion. Litter loadings equal to or greater than 370 g m -2 were found to cause DO in a shallow (20 cm) water column at 20 °C to fall to zero within two days. This loading was approximately half of that found in dry channels in the

  18. Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang; Lim, Hyug

    2010-11-15

    Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

  19. Turbulent flow statistics of vegetative channel with seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Thokchom Bebina; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2015-12-01

    The present study is carried out for studying the impact of submerged, flexible vegetation in a channel where downward seepage occurs. Laboratory experiments on artificial vegetation of two different heights, 8 cm and 6 cm, were conducted for no-seepage, 10% seepage and 15% seepage cases. Vegetation height is an important parameter in influencing the flow characteristics in a vegetated channel, where velocity is reduced near the top of the vegetation. Results show that velocity measured at upstream vegetation section is always higher than the downstream section even with the application of downward seepage. The maximum value of Reynolds stress occurs near the top of the vegetation. When the flow enters the vegetation section, the local effect of the presence of vegetation on sediment transport is more at the upstream vegetation section and then decreases which is shown by higher Reynolds stress at the upstream as compared to downstream vegetation section highlighting the importance of vegetation in providing as an erosion control. The maximum Reynolds stress at no seepage is increased by a percentage of 17% for 10% seepage and average of 30.5% for 15% seepage. The turbulence intensities at no seepage are increased by an average value of 15% for 10% seepage and 25% for 15% seepage. The reduction of Reynolds stress and turbulent intensities along the longitudinal direction implies the importance of using vegetation as a river restoration measure providing considerable stability to channels. Third order moments highlight that downward seepage increases the streamwise flux and decreases the upward flux.

  20. Study on airflow characteristics in the semi-closed irregular narrow flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuzhen; Hu, Xiaodong; Zhu, Linhang; Hu, Xudong; Jin, Yingzi

    2016-04-01

    The air-jet loom is widely used in the textile industry. The interaction mechanism of airflow and yarn is not clear in such a narrow flow channel, the gas consumption is relatively large, the yarn motion is unstable and the weft insertion is often interrupted during the operation. In order to study the characteristics of the semi-closed flow field in profiled dents, the momentum conservation equation is modified and the model parameters and boundary conditions are set. Compared with the different r, the ratio of profiled dent's thickness and gap, the results show that the smaller the r is, the smaller the velocity fluctuations of the airflow is. When the angle of profiled dents α is close to zero, the diffusion of the airflow will be less. The experiment is also conducted to verify the result of the simulation with a high-speed camera and pressure sensor in profiled dents. The airflow characteristics in the semi-closed irregular narrow flow channel in the paper would provide the theoretical basis for optimizing the weft insertion process of the air-jet loom.

  1. A Flow-Channel Analysis for the Mars Hopper

    SciTech Connect

    W. Spencer Cooley

    2013-02-01

    The Mars Hopper is an exploratory vehicle designed to fly on Mars using carbon dioxide from the Martian atmosphere as a rocket propellant. The propellent gasses are thermally heated while traversing a radioisotope ther- mal rocket (RTR) engine’s core. This core is comprised of a radioisotope surrounded by a heat capacitive material interspersed with tubes for the propellant to travel through. These tubes, or flow channels, can be manu- factured in various cross-sectional shapes such as a special four-point star or the traditional circle. Analytical heat transfer and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) anal- yses were performed using flow channels with either a circle or a star cross- sectional shape. The nominal total inlet pressure was specified at 2,805,000 Pa; and the outlet pressure was set to 2,785,000 Pa. The CO2 inlet tem- perature was 300 K; and the channel wall was 1200 K. The steady-state CFD simulations computed the smooth-walled star shape’s outlet temper- ature to be 959 K on the finest mesh. The smooth-walled circle’s outlet temperature was 902 K. A circle with a surface roughness specification at 0.01 mm gave 946 K and at 0.1 mm yielded 989 K. The The effects of a slightly varied inlet pressure were also examined. The analytical calculations were based on the mass flow rates computed in the CFD simulations and provided significantly higher outlet temperature results while displaying the same comparison trends. Research relating to the flow channel heat transfer studies was also done. Mathematical methods to geometrically match the cross-sectional areas of the circle and star, along with a square and equilateral triangle, were derived. A Wolfram Mathematica 8 module was programmed to analyze CFD results using Richardson Extrapolation and calculate the grid convergence index (GCI). A Mathematica notebook, also composed, computes and graphs the bulk mean temperature along a flow channel’s length while the user dynam- ically provides the input

  2. Investigation on Online Multiphase Flow Meter in oilfield Based on Open Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L. Y.; Wang, W. C.; Li, Y. X.; Zhang, J.; Dong, S. P.

    2010-03-01

    Flow metering of multiphase pipeline is an urgently problem needed to be solved in oilfield producing in China. Based on the principle of multiphase oil and gas flow in the open channel, four liquid metering models(Falling Model I, Falling Model II, Open Channel Model and Element Resistance Model) and one gas model were obtained to calculate the gas and liquid flow rate, in which the water cut was measured by the differential pressure. And then a new type of multiphase meter system was developed based on these models and neural networks were developed to improve the estimating results of gas and liquid flow rate with the new metering system. At last a lot of experiments of multiphase metering were finished in lab and field. According to the experiments, the results of the metering system show that the liquid flow rate error was no more than 10%, and gas flow rate error was no more than 15%, which can meet the demand of the field flow rate measurement. Furthermore the relationship between liquid and gas flow rate and characteristic signals was found out through the experiments so as to deepening the study on multiphase flow metering technology.

  3. Microscopic Origin of Channeled Flow in Lamellar Titanium Aluminide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzarov, Ivaylo H.; Paxton, Anthony T.

    2010-06-01

    We employ a quantum mechanical bond order potential in an atomistic simulation of channeled flow. We show that the original hypothesis that this is achieved by a cooperative deployment of slip and twinning is correct, first because a twin is able to “protect” a 60° ordinary dislocation from becoming sessile, and second because the two processes are found to be activated by Peierls stresses of similar magnitude. In addition we show an explicit demonstration of the lateral growth of a twin, again at a similar level of stress. Thus these simultaneous processes are shown to be capable of channeling deformation into the observed state of plane strain in so-called “A”-oriented mechanical testing of titanium aluminide superalloy.

  4. Microscopic origin of channeled flow in lamellar titanium aluminide.

    PubMed

    Katzarov, Ivaylo H; Paxton, Anthony T

    2010-06-04

    We employ a quantum mechanical bond order potential in an atomistic simulation of channeled flow. We show that the original hypothesis that this is achieved by a cooperative deployment of slip and twinning is correct, first because a twin is able to "protect" a 60° ordinary dislocation from becoming sessile, and second because the two processes are found to be activated by Peierls stresses of similar magnitude. In addition we show an explicit demonstration of the lateral growth of a twin, again at a similar level of stress. Thus these simultaneous processes are shown to be capable of channeling deformation into the observed state of plane strain in so-called "A"-oriented mechanical testing of titanium aluminide superalloy.

  5. Limiting photocurrent analysis of a wide channel photoelectrochemical flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Jonathan T.; Esposito, Daniel V.

    2017-03-01

    The development of efficient and scalable photoelectrochemical (PEC) reactors is of great importance for the eventual commercialization of solar fuels technology. In this study, we systematically explore the influence of convective mass transport and light intensity on the performance of a 3D-printed PEC flow cell reactor based on a wide channel, parallel plate geometry. Using this design, the limiting current density generated from the hydrogen evolution reaction at a p-Si metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS) photocathode was investigated under varied reactant concentration, fluid velocity, and light intensity. Additionally, a simple model is introduced to predict the range of operating conditions (reactant concentration, light intensity, fluid velocity) for which the photocurrent generated in a parallel plate PEC flow cell is limited by light absorption or mass transport. This model can serve as a useful guide for the design and operation of wide-channel PEC flow reactors. The results of this study have important implications for PEC reactors operating in electrolytes with dilute reactant concentrations and/or under high light intensities where high fluid velocities are required in order to avoid operation in the mass transport-limited regime.

  6. Simulating unsteady flow and sediment transport in vegetated channel network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Duan, Jennifer G.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional model for simulating flood routing and sediment transport over mobile alluvium in a vegetated channel network. The modified St. Venant equations together with the governing equations for suspended sediment and bed load transport were solved simultaneously to obtain flow properties and sediment transport rate. The Godunov-type finite volume method is employed to discretize the governing equations. Then, the Exner equation was solved for bed elevation change. Since sediment transport is non-equilibrium when bed is degrading or aggrading, a recovery coefficient for suspended sediment and an adaptation length for bed load transport were used to quantify the differences between equilibrium and non-equilibrium sediment transport rate. The influence of vegetation on floodplain and main channel was accounted for by adjusting resistance terms in the momentum equations for flow field. A procedure to separate the grain resistance from the total resistance was proposed and implemented to calculate sediment transport rate. The model was tested by a flume experiment case and an unprecedented flood event occurred in the Santa Cruz River, Tucson, Arizona, in July 2006. Simulated results of flow discharge and bed elevation changes showed satisfactory agreements with the measurements. The impacts of vegetation density on sediment transport and significance of non-equilibrium sediment transport model were discussed.

  7. Vortex reconnection in the K-type transitional channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yaomin; Yang, Yue; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-11-01

    Vortex reconnection, as the topological change of vortex lines or surfaces, is a critical process in transitional flows, but is challenging to accurately characterize in shear flows. We apply the vortex-surface field (VSF), whose isosurface is the vortex surface consisting of vortex lines, to study vortex reconnection in the K-type temporal transition in channel flow. Based on the VSF, both qualitative visualization and quantitative analysis are used to investigate the reconnection between the hairpin-like vortical structures evolving from the opposite channel halves. The incipient vortex reconnection is characterized by the vanishing minimum distance between a pair of vortex surfaces and the reduction of vorticity flux through the region enclosed by the VSF isolines on the spanwise symmetric plane. In addition, we find that the surge of the wall friction coefficient begins at the identified reconnection time, which is discussed with the induced velocity during reconnection and the Biot-Sarvart law. This work has been supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11522215 and 11521091), and the Thousand Young Talents Program of China.

  8. Simulation of finite-size fibers in turbulent channel flows.

    PubMed

    Do-Quang, M; Amberg, G; Brethouwer, G; Johansson, A V

    2014-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of almost neutrally buoyant finite-size rigid fibers or rods in turbulent channel flow is studied by direct numerical simulations. The time evolution of the fiber orientation and translational and rotational motions in a statistically steady channel flow is obtained for three different fiber lengths. The turbulent flow is modeled by an entropy lattice Boltzmann method, and the interaction between fibers and carrier fluid is modeled through an external boundary force method. Direct contact and lubrication force models for fiber-fiber interactions and fiber-wall interaction are taken into account to allow for a full four-way interaction. The density ratio is chosen to mimic cellulose fibers in water. It is shown that the finite size leads to fiber-turbulence interactions that are significantly different from earlier reported results for pointlike particles (e.g., elongated ellipsoids smaller than the Kolmogorov scale). An effect that becomes increasingly accentuated with fiber length is an accumulation in high-speed regions near the wall, resulting in a mean fiber velocity that is higher than the mean fluid velocity. The simulation results indicate that the finite-size fibers tend to stay in the high-speed streaks due to collisions with the wall. In the central region of the channel, long fibers tend to align in the spanwise direction. Closer to the wall the long fibers instead tend to toward to a rotation in the shear plane, while very close to the wall they become predominantly aligned in the streamwise direction.

  9. Instability of a cantilevered flexible plate in viscous channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, T. S.; Lucey, A. D.

    2005-10-01

    The stability of a flexible cantilevered plate in viscous channel flow is studied as a representation of the dynamics of the human upper airway. The focus is on instability mechanisms of the soft palate (flexible plate) that cause airway blockage during sleep. We solve the Navier Stokes equations for flow with Reynolds numbers up to 1500 fully coupled with the dynamics of the plate motion solved using finite-differences. The study is 2-D and based upon linearized plate mechanics. When both upper and lower airways are open, the plate is found to lose its stability through a flutter mechanism and a critical Reynolds number exists. When one airway is closed, the plate principally loses its stability through a divergence mechanism and a critical flow speed exists. However, below the divergence-onset flow speed, flutter can exist for low levels of structural damping in the flexible plate. Our results serve to extend understanding of flow-induced instability of cantilevered flexible plates and will ultimately improve the diagnosis and treatment of upper-airway disorders.

  10. The structure of turbulent channel flow with passive scalar transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guezennec, Y.; Stretch, D.; Kim, J.

    1990-01-01

    The simulation of turbulent channel flow, with various passive markers, was examined to investigate the local mechanisms of passive scalar transport. We found significant differences between the local transport of heat and momentum, even when the molecular and turbulent Prandtl numbers are of order one. These discrepancies can be attributed to the role of the pressure. We also found that the heat is a poor marker of the vorticity field outside of the near wall region and that scalar transport over significant distances results from the aggregate effect of many turbulent eddies.

  11. Analysis of Air Flow in the Ventilated Insulating Air Layer of the External Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katunská, Jana; Bullová, Iveta; Špaková, Miroslava

    2016-12-01

    The paper deals with problems of impact of air flow in ventilated insulating air layer of the external wall on behaviour of thermal-technical parameters of the proposed external structure (according principles of STN 73 0549, which is not valid now), by comparing them in the calculation according to the valid STN standards, where air flow in the ventilated air layer is not taken into account, as well as by comparing them with behavior of thermal-technical parameters in the proposal of sandwich external wall with the contact heat insulation system without air cavity.

  12. Parallel, open-channel lateral flow (immuno) assay substrate based on capillary-channeled polymer films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lynn X; Jiang, Liuwei; Willett, Daniel R; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2016-02-07

    Presented here is a novel implementation of polypropylene capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) films, functionalized for bioaffinity separations and implemented as a platform for lateral flow (immuno) assays. The parallel ∼80 μm × 80 μm channels pass test solutions down the 30 mm film length via spontaneous wicking action, setting up the possibility for immobilizing different capture agents in the respective channels. The base-film modification process is divided into two steps: ultraviolet light treatment to improve hydrophillicity of the polypropylene substrate and the physical adsorption of a functionalized lipid tethered ligand (LTL) as a selective capture agent. The entire modification procedure is performed under ambient conditions in an aqueous solution without extreme pH conditions. In this demonstration, physical adsorption of a biotinylated-LTL onto the UV-treated PP surface selectively captures Texas Red-labeled streptavidin (SAv-TR) in the presence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), which passes without retention in less than 5 s. In addition to the fluorescence imaging of the protein solutes, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used to confirm the formation of the LTL-SAv conjugates on the channel surface as well as to demonstrate an alternative means of probing the capture step. The present effort sets the groundwork for further development of C-CP films as a parallel, multi-analyte LFA platform; a format that to-date has not been described.

  13. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  14. Flow and Diffusion in Channel-Guided Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Zorn, Matthias; Klingner, Christoph; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Frey, Erwin; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2014-01-01

    Collective migration of mechanically coupled cell layers is a notable feature of wound healing, embryonic development, and cancer progression. In confluent epithelial sheets, the dynamics have been found to be highly heterogeneous, exhibiting spontaneous formation of swirls, long-range correlations, and glass-like dynamic arrest as a function of cell density. In contrast, the flow-like properties of one-sided cell-sheet expansion in confining geometries are not well understood. Here, we studied the short- and long-term flow of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as they moved through microchannels. Using single-cell tracking and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we found that a defined averaged stationary cell current emerged that exhibited a velocity gradient in the direction of migration and a plug-flow-like profile across the advancing sheet. The observed flow velocity can be decomposed into a constant term of directed cell migration and a diffusion-like contribution that increases with density gradient. The diffusive component is consistent with the cell-density profile and front propagation speed predicted by the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. To connect diffusion-mediated transport to underlying cellular motility, we studied single-cell trajectories and occurrence of vorticity. We discovered that the directed large-scale cell flow altered fluctuations in cellular motion at short length scales: vorticity maps showed a reduced frequency of swirl formation in channel flow compared with resting sheets of equal cell density. Furthermore, under flow, single-cell trajectories showed persistent long-range, random-walk behavior superimposed on drift, whereas cells in resting tissue did not show significant displacements with respect to neighboring cells. Our work thus suggests that active cell migration manifests itself in an underlying, spatially uniform drift as well as in randomized bursts of short-range correlated motion that lead to a diffusion-mediated transport

  15. Streamwise decay of localized states in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zammert, Stefan; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Channel flow, the pressure driven flow between parallel plates, has exact coherent structures that show various degrees of localization. For states which are localized in streamwise direction but extended in spanwise direction, we show that they are exponentially localized, with decay constants that are different on the upstream and downstream sides. We extend the analysis of Brand and Gibson [J. Fluid Mech. 750, R1 (2014)], 10.1017/jfm.2014.285 for stationary states to the case of advected structures that is needed here, and derive expressions for the decay in terms of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of certain second order differential equations. The results are in very good agreement with observations on exact coherent structures of different transversal wavelengths.

  16. Conservation-form equations of unsteady open-channel flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, C.; Baltzer, R.A.; Schaffranek, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    The unsteady open-channel flow equations are typically expressed in a variety of forms due to the imposition of differing assumptions, use of varied dependent variables, and inclusion of different source/sink terms. Questions often arise as to whether a particular equation set is expressed in a form consistent with the conservation-law definition. The concept of conservation form is developed to clarify the meaning mathematically. Six sets of unsteady-flow equations typically used in engineering practice are presented and their conservation properties are identified and discussed. Results of the theoretical development and analysis of the equations are substantiated in a set of numerical experiments conducted using alternate equation forms. Findings of these analytical and numerical efforts demonstrate that the choice of dependent variable is the fundamental factor determining the nature of the conservation properties of any particular equation form.

  17. Direct simulations of a rough-wall channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tomoaki

    Rough-wall turbulence arises in many applications. Besides, most walls should often be considered to be rough in the high Reynolds number limit. Our objective has been to understand turbulence modifications for their relevance to statistical closure models on the rough-wall boundary layer via Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). In this study, we performed the simulations of turbulent flow over rectangular-rib roughness, provided on one side of a plane in a channel, with the other side being smooth. The separation between ribs is large enough to reproduce k-type, or sand-grain roughness. The Reynolds number Retau of our representative DNS case is 460 based on the smooth-wall friction velocity and the channel half width. The roughness height h is estimated as 110 in wall units based on the rough-wall friction velocity. Our study consists of two main parts. First, a numerical issue due to mesh stretch is discussed. It was found that statistical data were noticeably affected by the numerical mesh highly stretched in both the streamwise and wall-normal directions. Truncation error analysis shows that the energy conserving scheme produces anti-diffusion error if mesh is stretched, or positive diffusion if narrowed. However, high frequencies in turbulent flow cause further adverse effect on statistics, if solely the lowest-order error is removed. An appropriate form of convection scheme that minimizes the mesh-stretch error is proposed and evaluated through numerical analyses. In the second part, the simulation results of the asymmetric channel flow are presented. The velocity profile and kinetic energy budget verify the presence of an equilibrium, logarithmic layer at y ≳ 2h. In the roughness sublayer, however, a significant turbulent energy flux was observed. Visualizations of vortical streaks, disrupted in all the three directions in the roughness sublayer, indicate that the three-dimensional flow structure of sand-grain roughness is replicated by the two

  18. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurement in wavy channels with flow disturbers

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, S.; Veronesi, R.; Hryniewicz, E.V.

    1999-07-01

    In the current work, the transient method was employed to obtain the local heat transfer coefficient for a 6 in. x 3/8 in. x 12 in. (15.24cm x .9525cm x 30.48cm) Plexiglas {reg_sign} wavy channel with and without flow disturbers. A short duration transient test was performed to measure the heat transfer coefficient by introducing heated air over test specimen that had been sprayed with calibrated thermochromic liquid crystals. This technique allowed the experimenter to observe the temperature changes using a video camera. because a Plexiglas surface has a low thermal diffusivity, a one-dimensional assumption is a reasonable approximation because the surface temperature response is limited to a thin layer near the surface and lateral conduction is small. The heat transfer coefficient using the transient technique is then determined from the response of the surface temperature to a step change in the local temperature. Using this method, the axial variation in the heat transfer coefficient for Reynolds numbers in the laminar (1100) and turbulent region (2900) were obtained. These Reynolds numbers were based on the hydraulic diameter at the inlet of the wavy channel. Also, in this investigation, the region of greatest heat transfer and the pressure drop were both experimentally and analytically determined and the friction factor across an in-phase corrugated wall channel (wavy channel) at Reynolds numbers of 1100 and 2900 were obtained. A manometer and a pressure transducer were employed to measure pressure drop across the channel. The effect of flow disturbers mounted on each peak, alternate peaks and the first six peaks of a twelve-peak channel were also investigated. For all cases, the pressure drop and friction factor were shown to moderately increase with rib placement in the test section when compared to the results obtained from a similar smooth wavy channel without ribs. Additionally, for all cases, the friction factor also decreased with an increase in the

  19. Experimental study of convective heat transfer of compressed air flow in radially rotating ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, G.J,; Tzeng, S.C.; Mao, C.P.

    1999-07-01

    The convective heat transfer of pressurized air flow in radially rotating serpentine channel is investigated experimentally in the present study. The main governing parameters are the Prandtl number, the Reynolds number for forced convection, the rotation number for the Coriolis force induced cross stream secondary flow and the Grashof number for natural convection. To simulate the operation conditions of a real gas turbine, the present study kept the parameters in the test rig approximately the same as those in a real engine. The air in the present serpentine channel was pressurized to increase the air density for making up the low rotational speed in the experiment. Before entering the rotating ducts, the air was also cooled to gain a high density ratio of approximately 1/3 in the ducts. This high density ratio will give a similar order of magnitude of Grashof number in a real operation condition. The local heat transfer rate on the four channel walls are present and compared with that in existing literature.

  20. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor.

  1. INVITED PAPER: Control of sudden releases in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katopodes, Nikolaos D.

    2009-12-01

    We present a method for the detection and real-time control of chemical releases in channel flow. Sensor arrays capable of detecting a broad menu of chemical agents are required at strategic locations of the channel. The sensors detect the instantaneous, spatially distributed concentration of the chemical agent and transmit the associated information to a predictive control model. The model provides optimal operation scenarios for computer controlled bleed valves mounted on the channel walls and connected to a common manifold. Control and elimination of the chemical cloud are achieved by optimal blowing and suction of ambient fluid. Gradient information is obtained by use of adjoint equations, so optimization of the control actions is achieved with the highest possible efficiency. The control is optimized over a finite prediction horizon and instructions are sent to the valve manifold. Next, the sensor arrays detect all changes effected by the control and report them to the control model, which advances the process over the next control horizon. Non-reflective boundary conditions for the adjoint equations are derived by a characteristic analysis, which minimizes spurious information in the computation of sensitivities.

  2. On the similarity in shape between debris-flow channels and high-gradient flood channels: Initial insight from continuum models for granular and water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; McCoy, S. W.; Tucker, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    The cross-sectional shape of high-gradient bedrock channels carved by debris flows is often very similar to that of channels formed by fluvial erosion. Both tend to have narrow U-shapes with width-to-depth ratios much less than 10. Gullies and channels cut into colluvium by both water erosion and debris-flow erosion have similarly narrow geometries. Given that the physics governing debris flow and turbulent water flow are very different, why are channels eroded by these two processes so similar in shape? To begin to investigate this question, we conducted a series of numerical simulations using continuum models for the end-member cases of granular flow and water flow. Each model is used to evolve the steady-state channel shape formed by uniform flow of the respective material. The granular model is based on the constitutive equation for dense granular flow proposed by Jop et al. (Nature, 2006). They demonstrated that without any fitting parameters, a numerical model using this constitutive equation could reproduce the velocity and depth profiles observed in granular-flow laboratory experiments. The model for water flow uses a ray-isovel turbulence closure to calculate the boundary shear stress across the wetted perimeter of the channel. This fully predictive model has also been shown to be in good agreement with laboratory data. We start the calculations for the granular and water-flow cases by determining the velocity and boundary shear-stress fields in an initial V-shape cross section. We then erode both channels using a simple wear law scaled linearly by the bed-normal boundary shear stress. The calculation is repeated until the channel reaches an equilibrium shape. Initial comparisons of the granular and water-flow channels show that they have very similar width-to-depth ratios of about four, and only moderate differences in bottom geometries and boundary shear-stress distributions. The structure of the velocity field differs more substantially between the two

  3. Modeling of transitional channel flow using balanced proper orthogonal decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilak, Miloš; Rowley, Clarence W.

    2008-03-01

    We study reduced-order models of three-dimensional perturbations in linearized channel flow using balanced proper orthogonal decomposition (BPOD). The models are obtained from three-dimensional simulations in physical space as opposed to the traditional single-wavenumber approach, and are therefore better able to capture the effects of localized disturbances or localized actuators. In order to assess the performance of the models, we consider the impulse response and frequency response, and variation of the Reynolds number as a model parameter. We show that the BPOD procedure yields models that capture the transient growth well at a low order, whereas standard POD does not capture the growth unless a considerably larger number of modes is included, and even then can be inaccurate. In the case of a localized actuator, we show that POD modes which are not energetically significant can be very important for capturing the energy growth. In addition, a comparison of the subspaces resulting from the two methods suggests that the use of a nonorthogonal projection with adjoint modes is most likely the main reason for the superior performance of BPOD. We also demonstrate that for single-wavenumber perturbations, low-order BPOD models reproduce the dominant eigenvalues of the full system better than POD models of the same order. These features indicate that the simple, yet accurate BPOD models are a good candidate for developing model-based controllers for channel flow.

  4. A note on optimal transient growth in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujals, Gregory; García-Villalba, Manuel; Cossu, Carlo; Depardon, Sebastien

    2009-01-01

    We compute the optimal transient growth of perturbations sustained by a turbulent channel flow following the same approach recently used by del Álamo and Jiménez [J. Fluid Mech. 559, 205 (2006)]. Contrary to this previous analysis, we use generalized Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire operators consistent with previous investigations of mean flows with variable viscosity. The optimal perturbations are streamwise vortices evolving into streamwise streaks. In accordance with del Álamo and Jiménez, it is found that for very elongated structures and for sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, the optimal energy growth presents a primary peak in the spanwise wavelength, scaling in outer units, and a secondary peak scaling in inner units and corresponding to λz+≈100. Contrary to the previous results, however, it is found that the maximum energy growth associated with the primary peak increases with the Reynolds number. This growth, in a first approximation, scales linearly with an effective Reynolds number based on the centerline velocity, the channel half width and the maximum eddy viscosity associated. The optimal streaks associated with the primary peak have an optimal spacing of λz=4h and scale in outer units in the outer region and in wall units in the near wall region, where they still have up to 50% of their maximum amplitude near y+=10.

  5. Compressible Turbulent Channel Flows: DNS Results and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Coleman, G. N.; Bradshaw, P.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses some topical issues in modeling compressible turbulent shear flows. The work is based on direct numerical simulation of two supersonic fully developed channel flows between very cold isothermal walls. Detailed decomposition and analysis of terms appearing in the momentum and energy equations are presented. The simulation results are used to provide insights into differences between conventional time-and Favre-averaging of the mean-flow and turbulent quantities. Study of the turbulence energy budget for the two cases shows that the compressibility effects due to turbulent density and pressure fluctuations are insignificant. In particular, the dilatational dissipation and the mean product of the pressure and dilatation fluctuations are very small, contrary to the results of simulations for sheared homogeneous compressible turbulence and to recent proposals for models for general compressible turbulent flows. This provides a possible explanation of why the Van Driest density-weighted transformation is so successful in correlating compressible boundary layer data. Finally, it is found that the DNS data do not support the strong Reynolds analogy. A more general representation of the analogy is analysed and shown to match the DNS data very well.

  6. Effect of air flow on tubular solar still efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An experimental work was reported to estimate the increase in distillate yield for a compound parabolic concentrator-concentric tubular solar still (CPC-CTSS). The CPC dramatically increases the heating of the saline water. A novel idea was proposed to study the characteristic features of CPC for desalination to produce a large quantity of distillate yield. A rectangular basin of dimension 2 m × 0.025 m × 0.02 m was fabricated of copper and was placed at the focus of the CPC. This basin is covered by two cylindrical glass tubes of length 2 m with two different diameters of 0.02 m and 0.03 m. The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. Findings The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. Conclusions On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. PMID:23587020

  7. The flow feature of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of micro air jets in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Amini, Younes; Ganji, D. D.; Takam, ​M. Rahimi

    2017-03-01

    Scramjet is found to be the efficient method for the space shuttle. In this paper, numerical simulation is performed to investigate the fundamental flow physics of the interaction between an array of fuel jets and multi air jets in a supersonic transverse flow. Hydrogen as a fuel is released with a global equivalence ratio of 0.5 in presence of micro air jets on a flat plate into a Mach 4 crossflow. The fuel and air are injected through streamwise-aligned flush circular portholes. The hydrogen is injected through 4 holes with 7dj space when the air is injected in the interval of the hydrogen jets. The numerical simulation is performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Both the number of air jets and jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio are varied in a parametric study. The interaction of the fuel and air jet in the supersonic flow present extremely complex feature of fuel and air jet. The results present various flow features depending upon the number and mass flow rate of micro air jets. These flow features were found to have significant effects on the penetration of hydrogen jets. A variation of the number of air jets, along with the jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio, induced a variety of flow structure in the downstream of the fuel jets.

  8. Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

    2012-07-08

    A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

  9. Modeling of Multi-Scale Channeling Phenomena in Porous Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel; Yarushina, Viktoriya; Simon, Nina; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    Predictive modeling of fluid percolation through tight porous rocks is critical to evaluate environmental risks associated with waste storage and reservoir operations. To understand the evolution of two-phase mixtures of fluid and solid it is insufficient to only combine single-phase fluid flow methods and solid mechanics. A proper coupling of these two different multi-scales physical processes is required to describe the complex evolution of permeability and porosity in space and in time. We conduct numerical modeling experiments in geometrically simple but physically complex systems of stressed rocks containing self-focusing porous flow. Our model is physically and thermodynamically consistent and describes the formation and evolution of fluid pathways. The model consists of a system of coupled equations describing poro-elasto-viscous deformation and flow. Nonlinearity of the solid rheology is also taken into account. We have developed a numerical application based on an iterative finite difference scheme that runs on mutli-GPUs cluster in parallel. In order to validate these models, we consider the largest CO2 sequestration project in operation at the Sleipner field in the Norwegian North Sea. Attempts to match the observations at Sleipner using conventional reservoir simulations fail to capture first order observations, such as the seemingly effortless vertical flow of CO2 through low permeability shale layers and the formation of focused flow channels or chimneys. Conducted high-resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations predict the formation of dynamically evolving high porosity and permeability pathways as a natural outcome of porous flow nonlinearly coupled with rock deformation, which may trigger leakage through low permeability barriers.

  10. Formation of bubbles in a simple co-flowing micro-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Renqiang; Bai, Mo; Chung, Jacob N.

    2007-05-01

    Bubble generation in a simple co-flowing micro-channel with a cross-sectional area of 1.69 × 0.07 mm2 was experimentally and numerically investigated. Air and water were used as the gas and liquid, respectively. Mixtures of water-glycerol and water-Tween 20 were also used to obtain the effects of viscosity and surface tension. The experimental data show that the break-up process is periodic under certain operating conditions. The break-up dynamics are also examined using three-dimensional incompressible two-phase flow numerical simulation based on the volume of fluid (VOF) method. The simulation successfully predicts the flow behavior and provides a more detailed examination of the bubble shape. The physics can be further explained by the detailed micro-PIV measurements, which show that the bubble is formed due to the velocity component perpendicular to the gas flow created by the sudden change of the liquid velocity distribution around the barrier. The bubble length L is dependent on the liquid flow rate Ql and the gas flow rate Qg, and the ratio of L to the channel width w is a function of the ratio of gas and liquid flow rates Qg/Ql which is similar to that previously used in the T-junction case. The formulation of bubble frequency f is derived under current conditions and it shows a good agreement with the experimental data at the low frequency region. Different bubble shapes can be obtained at different liquid viscosities and surface tensions. The ratio L/w can still be predicted by a modified equation which uses the real bubble width wb or an equivalent bubble length Le.

  11. Ramification of Channel Networks Incised by Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, R. S.; Seybold, H. F.; Petroff, A. P.; Devauchelle, O.; Rothman, D.

    2011-12-01

    The geometry of channel networks has been a source of fascination since at least Leonardo da Vinci's time. Yet a comprehensive understanding of ramification---the mechanism of branching by which a stream network acquires its geometric complexity---remains elusive. To investigate the mechanisms of ramification and network growth, we consider channel growth driven by groundwater flow as a model system, analogous to a medical scientist's laboratory rat. We test our theoretical predictions through analysis of a particularly compelling example found on the Florida Panhandle north of Bristol. As our ultimate goal is to understand ramification and growth dynamics of the entire network, we build a computational model based on the following growth hypothesis: Channels grow in the direction that captures the maximum water flux. When there are two such directions, tips bifurcate. The direction of growth can be determined from the expansion of the ground water field around each tip, where each coefficient in this expansion has a physical interpretation. The first coefficient in the expansion determines the ground water discharge, leading to a straight growth of the channel. The second term describes the asymmetry in the water field leading to a bending of the stream in the direction of maximal water flux. The ratio between the first and the third coefficient determines a critical distance rc over which the tip feels inhomogeneities in the ground water table. This initiates then the splitting of the tip. In order to test our growth hypothesis and to determine rc, we grow the Florida network backward. At each time step we calculate the solution of the ground water field and determine the appropriate expansion coefficients around each tip. Comparing this simulation result to the predicted values provides us with a stringent measure for rc and the significance of our growth hypothesis.

  12. Computational fluid dynamics for modeling the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Guillén, I.; Xamán, J.; Álvarez, G.; Arce, J.; Hernández-Pérez, I.; Gijón-Rivera, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the modeling of the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney (SC-DC) and its comparison with a single air-channel solar chimney (SC-C). Prediction of the mass flow and the thermal behavior of the SC-DC were obtained under three different climates of Mexico during one summer day. The climates correspond to: tropical savannah (Mérida), arid desert (Hermosillo) and temperate with warm summer (Mexico City). A code based on the Finite Volume Method was developed and a k-ω turbulence model has been used to model air turbulence in the solar chimney (SC). The code was validated against experimental data. The results indicate that during the day the SC-DC extracts about 50% more mass flow than the SC-C. When the SC-DC is located in Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, the air-changes extracted along the day were 60, 63 and 52, respectively. The air temperature at the outlet of the chimney increased up to 33%, 38% and 61% with respect to the temperature it has at the inlet for Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, respectively.

  13. Localized reconnection in the magnetotail driven by lobe flow channels: Global MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.

    2016-02-01

    Recent ionospheric measurements suggest polar cap flow channels often trigger nightside auroral brightening. However, measurements were limited to the ionosphere, and it was not understood if such flow channels can exist in the lobe and can trigger magnetotail reconnection in a localized cross-tail extent. We examined if localized flow channels can form self-consistently in a global MHD regime, and if so, how such flow channels originate and relate to localized magnetotail reconnection. We show that lobe convection became nonuniform with azimuthally narrow flow channels (enhanced dawn-dusk electric fields) of ~3 RE cross-tail width. The flow channels propagated from the dayside toward the plasma sheet as an interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) discontinuity swept tailward. The plasma sheet around the lobe flow channels became thinner with a similar cross-tail extent and then localized reconnection occurred. These results suggest that localized flow channels can propagate tailward across the lobe and drive localized magnetotail reconnection, that the cross-tail width of reconnection and resulting plasma sheet flow channels and dipolarization fronts are related to the width of inflow from the lobe, and that IMF discontinuities drive lobe flow channels.

  14. Flow distribution and maximum current density studies in redox flow batteries with a single passage of the serpentine flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xinyou; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2014-12-01

    Flow batteries show promise for very large-scale stationary energy storage such as needed for the grid and renewable energy implementation. In recent years, researchers and developers of redox flow batteries (RFBs) have found that electrode and flow field designs of PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) technology can increase the power density and consequently push down the cost of flow battery stacks. In this paper we present a macroscopic model of a typical PEMFC-like RFB electrode-flow field design. The model is a layered system comprised of a single passage of a serpentine flow channel and a parallel underlying porous electrode (or porous layer). The effects of the inlet volumetric flow rate, permeability of the porous layer, thickness of the porous layer and thickness of the flow channel on the flow penetration into the porous layer are investigated. The maximum current density corresponding to stoichiometry is estimated to be 377 mA cm-2 and 724 mA cm-2, which compares favorably with experiments of ∼400 mA cm-2 and ∼750 mA cm-2, for a single layer and three layers of the carbon fiber paper, respectively.

  15. Determination and characteristics of the transition to two-phase slug flow in small channels

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; France, D.M.

    1992-12-01

    Two-phase pressure drop was measured in a small horizontal rectangular channel (hydraulic diameter = 5.44 mm). The two-phase fluid was an air/water mixture at atmospheric pressure tested over a mass flux range of 50 to 2000 kg/m{sup 2}{center_dot}s. Two-phase flow patterns were identified and an objective method was found for determining the flow pattern transition from bubble or plug flow to slug flow. The method is based on an RMS pressure measurement. In particular, it is shown that the transition is accompanied by a clear and abrupt increase in the RMS pressure when plotted as a function of mass quality. Use of the RMS pressure as a two-phase flow pattern transition indicator is shown to have advantages over pressure-versus-time trace evaluations reported in the literature. The transition is substantiated by a clear local change in slope in the curve of two-phase pressure drop plotted as a function of either Martinelli parameter or mass quality. For high mass fluxes, the change in slope is distinguished by a local peak. Some degree of substantiation was found in previous work for both of the results (the RMS pressure change and the local pressure drop change) at the transition to slug flow.

  16. Determination and characteristics of the transition to two-phase slug flow in small channels

    SciTech Connect

    Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A. ); France, D.M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Two-phase pressure drop was measured in a small horizontal rectangular channel (hydraulic diameter = 5.44 mm). The two-phase fluid was an air/water mixture at atmospheric pressure tested over a mass flux range of 50 to 2000 kg/m[sup 2][center dot]s. Two-phase flow patterns were identified and an objective method was found for determining the flow pattern transition from bubble or plug flow to slug flow. The method is based on an RMS pressure measurement. In particular, it is shown that the transition is accompanied by a clear and abrupt increase in the RMS pressure when plotted as a function of mass quality. Use of the RMS pressure as a two-phase flow pattern transition indicator is shown to have advantages over pressure-versus-time trace evaluations reported in the literature. The transition is substantiated by a clear local change in slope in the curve of two-phase pressure drop plotted as a function of either Martinelli parameter or mass quality. For high mass fluxes, the change in slope is distinguished by a local peak. Some degree of substantiation was found in previous work for both of the results (the RMS pressure change and the local pressure drop change) at the transition to slug flow.

  17. A Study of Air Flow in an Engine Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1939-01-01

    A 4-stroke-cycle test engine was equipped with a glass cylinder and the air movements within it were studied while the engine was being motored. Different types of air flow were produced by using shrouded intake valves in various arrangements and by altering the shape of the intake-air passage in the cylinder head. The air movements were made visible by mixing feathers with the entering air, and high-speed motion pictures were taken of them so that the air currents might be studied in detail and their velocities measured. Motion pictures were also taken of gasoline sprays injected into the cylinder on the intake stroke. The photographs showed that: a wide variety of induced air movements could be created in the cylinder; the movements always persisted throughout the compression stroke; and the only type of movement that persisted until the end of the cycle was rotation about the cylinder axis.

  18. Contrasts between debris flows, hyperconcentrated flows and stream flows at a channel of Mount Semeru, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, Franck; Suwa, Hiroshi

    2004-07-01

    In order to differentiate between different types of sediment-laden-flows in volcanic channels, we carried out observation of debris flows, hyperconcentrated flows, and stream flows in the Curah Lengkong river on the southeast slope of Mount Semeru in East Java, Indonesia. The aims of this study are: (1) to provide quantitative data for these flows in motion; (2) to compare the data for different types of flow that occur in the same river; (3) to assess the influence of rainfall on debris flows, hyperconcentrated flows, and streamflow generation. The Curah Lengkong river transports large volumes of sediment, in the range of 1×10 5 to 5×10 5 m 3 per debris flow, and 10 3 to 10 5 m 3 per hyperconcentrated flow and stream flow. Large sediment discharges result from the following factors: continuous and voluminous sediment supply of fine juvenile material by daily explosions of the Semeru volcano, pyroclastic source material emplaced on steep slopes, strong erosion of weathered river banks, and strong rainfall intensities. The occurrence of the flows focuses in the period from November through April, and the daily timing of it is the mid to late afternoon. Nearly all debris flows are triggered by stationary rainfall confined to the upper slopes of Mount Semeru, whereas hyperconcentrated flows and stream flows are mainly generated by migratory or regional rains driven upwards on the eastern slope. This slope receives its maximum of annual rainfall (3800 mm) at 800 m asl. The peak surface velocity of debris flows is always greater than the peak frontal velocity. The peak discharge of debris flows occurs several minutes after the passage of the flow front. Volumetric concentrations of sediment are high (48% to 69%) between the debris flow front and the point of peak discharge; after the peak discharge it usually decreases gradually. Contrary to the case of debris flows, high concentration of sediment appears in various portion of hyperconcentrated flows and stream flows

  19. Bedrock erosion by sliding wear in channelized granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C. Y.; Stark, C. P.; Capart, H.; Smith, B.; Maia, H. T.; Li, L.; Reitz, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Boundary forces generated by debris flows can be powerful enough to erode bedrock and cause considerable damage to infrastructure during runout. Bedrock wear can be separated into impact and sliding wear processes. Here we focus on sliding wear. We have conducted experiments with a 40-cm-diameter grainflow-generating rotating drum designed to simulate dry channelized debris flows. To generate sliding erosion, we placed a 20-cm-diameter bedrock plate axially on the back wall of the drum. The rotating drum was half filled with 2.3-mm-diameter grains, which formed a thin grain-avalanching layer with peak flow speed and depth close to the drum axis. The whole experimental apparatus was placed on a 100g-ton geotechnical centrifuge and, in order to scale up the stress level, spun to a range of effective gravity levels. Rates and patterns of erosion of the bedrock plate were mapped after each experiment using 3d micro-photogrammetry. High-speed video and particle tracking were employed to measure granular flow dynamics. The resulting data for granular velocities and flow geometry were used to estimate impulse exchanges and forces on the bedrock plate. To address some of the complexities of granular flow under variable gravity levels, we developed a continuum model framed around a GDR MiDi rheology. This model allowed us to scale up boundary forcing while maintaining the same granular flow regime, and helped us to understand important aspects of the flow dynamics including e.g. fluxes of momentum and kinetic energy. In order to understand the detailed processes of boundary forcing, we performed numerical simulations with a new contact dynamics model. This model confirmed key aspects of our continuum model and provided information on second-order behavior such as fluctuations in the forces acting on the wall. By combining these measurements and theoretical analyses, we have developed and calibrated a constitutive model for sliding wear that is a threshold function of

  20. Burning of the Supersonic Propane-Air Mixture in the Aerodynamic Channel With the Stagnant Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    V.Chernikov, V.Shibkov, O.Surkont. Mechanisms of transversal electric discharge sustention in supersonic air and propane-air flows. -American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, AIAA Paper, 2003, No.03-0872, p. 1 -6 .

  1. Centrifuge modeling of air sparging - a study of air flow through saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Marulanda, C; Culligan, P J; Germaine, J T

    2000-02-25

    The success of air sparging as a remedial technology for treatment of contaminated aquifers is well documented. However, there is no consensus, to date, on the mechanisms that control the flow of injected air through the saturated ground. Currently, only qualitative results from laboratory experiments are available to predict the zone of influence of a sparging well. Given that the patterns of air flow through the soil will ultimately determine the efficiency of an air sparging treatment, it is important to quantify how sparged air travels through a saturated porous medium. The main objective of this research is to develop a model that describes air transport through saturated porous media. This paper presents results from an ongoing study that employs centrifuge modeling to reproduce in situ air sparging conditions. Centrifuge testing is an experimental technique that allows reduced-scale duplication, in the laboratory, of the stresses and pressure distributions encountered in the field. In situ conditions are critical in the development of actual air flow patterns. Experiments are being conducted in a transparent porous medium consisting of crushed borosilicate glass submerged in fluids of matching indices of refraction. Air is observed as it flows through the porous medium at varying gravitational accelerations. Recorded images of experiments allow the determination of flow patterns, breakthrough velocities, and plume shapes as a function of g-level and injection pressure. Results show that air flow patterns vary from fingering, at low g-levels, to pulsing at higher accelerations. Grain and pore size distribution of the porous medium do not exclusively control air flow characteristics. Injector geometry has a definite effect on breakthrough velocities and air plume shapes. Experiments have been conducted to compare the velocity of air flow through the saturated porous medium to that of air in pure liquids. Results show that the velocity of air through the medium

  2. Numerical Study on a Detailed Air Flows in an Urban Area Using a CFD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, detailed air flows in an urban area were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. For this model buildings used as the surface boundary in the model were constructed using Los Angeles Region Imagery Acquisition Consortium 2 Geographic Information System (LARIAC2 GIS) data. Three target areas centered at the cross roads of Broadway & 7th St., Olive & 12th St., and Wilshire blvd. & Carondelet, Los Angeles, California were considered. The size of each numerical domain is 400 m, 400 m, and 200 m in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions, respectively. The grid sizes in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions are 2 m, 2 m, and 2 m, respectively. Based on the inflow wind data provided by California Air Resources Board, detailed flow characteristics were investigated for each target area. Descending air flow were developed at the leeward area of tall building and ascending air current were occurred on the windward area of tall building. Vertically rotating vortices were formed in spaces between buildings, so-called, street canyons and horizontally rotating vortices appeared near cross roads. When flows came into narrow street canyon from wide street canyon, channeling effects appeared and flow speed increased for satisfying mass continuity.

  3. Penetration process and instabilities arisen on a liquid jet impinged to a liquid flowing in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kaoru; Ueno, Ichiro

    2010-11-01

    We conduct a series of experiments with a special interest on a penetration process and instabilities arisen on a liquid jet impinged to a liquid of the same kind flowing in a channel. The impinged jet penetrates into the flowing bath accompanying with entrainment of the ambient immiscible gas, which results in the impinged jet wrapped by the entrained gas as a "sheath." This sheath formation enables the impinged jet to survive in the fluid in the channel without coalescing until the entrained-air sheath breaks down. Occasionally a "cap" of the entrained air is formed at the tip of the penetrated jet, and the jet elongates like a long balloon. Dynamic behaviors of the penetrated jet and the departure of the bubble of warring gas at the tip of the collapsing jet observed by use of a high-speed camera are discussed.

  4. The initial-value problem for viscous channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Jackson, T. L.; Lasseigne, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    Plane viscous channel flows are perturbed and the ensuing initial-value problems are investigated in detail. Unlike traditional methods where traveling wave normal modes are assumed for solution, this works offers a means whereby completely arbitrary initial input can be specified without having to resort to eigenfunction expansions. The full temporal behavior, including both early time transients and the long time asymptotics, can be determined for any initial disturbance. Effects of three-dimensionality can be assessed. The bases for the analysis are: (a) linearization of the governing equations; (b) Fourier decomposition in the spanwise and streamwise directions of the flow; and (c) direct numerical integration of the resulting partial differential equations. All of the stability data that are known for such flows can be reproduced. Also, the optimal initial condition can be determined in a straight forward manner and such optimal conditions clearly reflect transient growth data that is easily determined by a rational choice of a basis for the initial conditions. Although there can be significant transient growth for subcritical values of the Reynolds number using this approach it does not appear possible that arbitrary initial conditions will lead to the exceptionally large transient amplitudes that have been determined by optimization of normal modes. The approach is general and can be applied to other classes of problems where only a finite discrete spectrum exists, such as the boundary layer for example.

  5. Noninvasive fluid flow measurements in microfluidic channels with backscatter interferometry.

    PubMed

    Markov, Dmitry A; Dotson, Stephen; Wood, Scott; Bornhop, Darryl J

    2004-11-01

    The ability to measure fluid velocity within picoliter volumes or on-chip noninvasively, is important toward fully realizing the potential of microfluidics and micrototal analysis systems, particularly in applications such as micro-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or in metering mixing where the flow rate must be quantified. Additionally, these measurements need to be performed directly on moving fluids in a noninvasive fashion. We presented here the proof of principle experiments showing nonintrusive fluid flow measurements can be accomplished on-chip using a pump and probe configuration with backscattering interferometry. The on-chip interferometric backscatter detector (OCIBD) is based on a fiber-coupled HeNe laser that illuminates a portion of an isotropically etched 40 microm radius channel and a position sensitive transducer to measure fringe pattern shifts. An infrared laser with a mechanical shutter is used to heat a section of a flowing volume and the resulting refractive index (RI) change is detected with the OCIBD downstream as a time-dependent RI perturbation. Fluid velocity is quantified as changes in the phase difference between the shutter signal and the OCIBD detected signal in the Fourier domain. The experiments are performed in the range of 3-6 microL/h with 3sigma detection limits determined to be 0.127 nL/s. Additionally, the RI response of the system is calibrated using temperature changes as well as glycerol solutions.

  6. Model-Based Predictive Control of Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Steven M.; Collis, S. Scott

    1999-11-01

    In recent simulations of optimal turbulence control, the time horizon over which the control is determined matches the time horizon over which the flow is advanced. A popular workhorse of the controls community, Model-Based Predictive Control (MBPC), suggests using longer predictive horizons than advancement windows. Including additional time information in the optimization may generate improved controls. When the advancement horizon is smaller than the predictive horizon, part of the optimization and resulting control are discarded. Although this inherent inefficiency may be justified by improved control predictions, it has hampered prior investigations of MBPC for turbulent flow due to the expense associated with optimal control based on Direct Numerical Simulation. The current approach overcomes this by using our optimal control formulation based on Large Eddy Simulation. This presentation summarizes the results of optimal control simulations for turbulent channel flow using various ratios of advancement and predictive horizons. These results provide clues as to the roles of foresight, control history, cost functional, and turbulence structures for optimal control of wall-bounded turbulence.

  7. Controlling a Linear Process in Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Junwoo; Kim, John

    1999-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that controllers developed based on a linear system theory work surprisingly well in reducing the viscous drag in turbulent boundary layers, suggesting that the essential dynamics of near-wall turbulence may well be approximated by the linearized model. Of particular interest is the linear process due to the coupling term between the wall-normal velocity and wall-normal vorticity terms in the linearized Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations, which enhances non-normality of the linearized system. This linear process is investigated through numerical simulations of a turbulent channel flow. It is shown that the linear coupling term plays an important role in fully turbulent -- and hence, nonlinear -- flows. Near-wall turbulence is shown to decay in the absence of the linear coupling term. The fact that the coupling term plays an essential role in maintaining near-wall turbulence suggests that an effective control algorithm for the drag reduction in turbulent flows should be aimed at reducing the effect of the coupling term in the wall region. Designing a control algorithm that directly accounts for the coupling term in a cost to be minimized will be discussed.

  8. The air-liquid flow in a microfluidic airway tree.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Baudoin, Michael; Manneville, Paul; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidic techniques are employed to investigate air-liquid flows in the lung. A network of microchannels with five generations is made and used as a simplified model of a section of the pulmonary airway tree. Liquid plugs are injected into the network and pushed by a flow of air; they divide at every bifurcation until they reach the exits of the network. A resistance, associated with the presence of one plug in a given generation, is defined to establish a linear relation between the driving pressure and the total flow rate in the network. Based on this resistance, good predictions are obtained for the flow of two successive plugs in different generations. The total flow rate of a two-plug flow is found to depend not only on the driving pressure and lengths of the plugs, but also the initial distance between them. Furthermore, long range interactions between daughters of a dividing plug are observed and discussed, particularly when the plugs are flowing through the bifurcations. These interactions lead to different flow patterns for different forcing conditions: the flow develops symmetrically when subjected to constant pressure or high flow rate forcing, while a low flow rate driving yields an asymmetric flow.

  9. Low power, constant-flow air pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, M.D.; Albert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A rugged, yet small and lightweight constant-flow air pump system has been designed. Flow control is achieved using a novel approach which is three times more power efficient than previous designs. The resultant savings in battery size and weight makes these pumps ideal for sampling air on balloon platforms. The pump package includes meteorological sensors and an onboard computer that stores time and sensor data and turns the constant-flow pump circuit on/off. Some applications of these systems are also presented in this report.

  10. Design and Implementation of Automatic Air Flow Rate Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, A.; Saputra, C.; Munir, M. M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    Venturimeter is an apparatus that can be used to measure the air flow rate. In this experiment we designed a venturimeter which equipped with a valve that is used to control the air flow rate. The difference of pressure between the cross sections was measured with the differential pressure sensor GA 100-015WD which can calculate the difference of pressures from 0 to 3737.33 Pa. A 42M048C Z36 stepper motor was used to control the valve. The precision of this motor rotation is about 0.15 °. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed to monitor and set the value of flow rate then an 8-bit microcontroller was used to process the control system In this experiment- the venturimeter has been examined to get the optimal parameter of controller. The results show that the controller can set the stable output air flow rate.

  11. Transport of passive scalars in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation of a turbulent channel flow with three passive scalars at different molecular Prandtl numbers is performed. Computed statistics including the turbulent Prandtl numbers are compared with existing experimental data. The computed fields are also examined to investigate the spatial structure of the scalar fields. The scalar fields are highly correlated with the streamwise velocity; the correlation coefficient between the temperature and the streamwise velocity is as high as 0.95 in the wall region. The joint probability distributions between the temperature and velocity fluctuations are also examined; they suggest that it might be possible to model the scalar fluxes in the wall region in a manner similar to the Reynolds stresses.

  12. Solute dispersion in open channel flow with bed absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Chen, G. Q.

    2016-12-01

    Reactive solute dispersion is of essential significance in various ecological and environmental applications. It is only qualitatively known that boundary absorption depletes pollutant around the boundary and reduces the concentration nearby. All the existing studies on this topic have been focused on the longitudinally distributed mean concentration, far from enough to fully characterize the transport process with tremendous cross-sectional concentration nonuniformity. This work presents an analytical study of the evolution of two-dimensional concentration distribution for solute dispersion in a laminar open channel flow with bed absorption. The fourth order Aris-Gill expansion proposed in our previous study (Wang and Chen, 2016b) is further extended for the case with bed absorption to cover the transitional effects of skewness and kurtosis. Results reveal the extremely nonuniform cross-sectional concentration distribution, and demonstrate that concentration at the bed instead of the mean should be used for reliable quantification of the absorption flux. The accurate two-dimensional concentration distribution presented in this study brings important environmental implications such as risk assessment associated with peak concentration position and duration of toxic pollutant cloud in open channel waters.

  13. Hydrodynamics and heat transfer for pulsating laminar flow in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valueva, E. P.; Purdin, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    The problem about laminar pulsating flow and heat transfer with high pulsation amplitudes of average cross-section velocity in a round tube and in a flat channel is solved using the finite element method. The difference scheme's optimal parameters are determined. Data on the pulsation amplitude and phase are obtained for the hydraulic friction coefficient, tangential stress on the wall, liquid temperature, heat flux on the wall q w (at ϑw = const), and wall temperature ϑw (at q w = const) are obtained. Two characteristic modes, namely, quasi steady-state and high-frequency ones are separated based on the value of dimensionless pulsation frequency. During operation in the quasi steady-state mode, the values of all hydrodynamic and thermal quantities correspond to the values of time-average velocity at the given time instant. For operation in the high-frequency mode, it is shown that the dependences of the pulsating components of hydrodynamic and thermal quantities on the dimensionless pulsation frequency have the same pattern for rectilinear channels having different shapes of their cross section. It is found that certain nodal points exist on the distribution of thermal characteristics along the tube (liquid temperature, heat flux density on the wall at ϑw = const, and wall temperature at q w = const) in which the values of these quantities remain unchanged. The distances between the nodal points decrease with increasing the pulsation frequency. The pulsations of thermal quantities decay over the tube length.

  14. Kelvin-Helmholtz Unstable Magnetotail Flow Channels: Deceleration and Radiation of MHD Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkakin, H.; Mann, I. R.; Rankin, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of magnetotail flow channels associated with burstybulk flows (BBFs) is investigated. MHD oscillations of the channel in both kink and sausage modes areinvestigated for KHI, and both the primary and secondary KHIs are found that drive MHD waves. Theseinstabilities are likely to be important for flow channel braking where the KHI removes energy from the flow.At flow speeds above the peak growth rate, the MHD modes excited by KHI develop from surface modesinto propagating modes leading to the radiation of MHD waves from the flow channel. The coupling ofBBF-driven shear flow instabilities to MHD waves presented here represents a new paradigm to explain BBFexcitation of tail flapping. Our model can also explain, for the first time, the generation mechanism for theobservations of waves propagating toward both flanks and emitted from BBF channels in the magnetotail.

  15. Channel Geometry and Flood Flows: Quantifying over-bank flow dynamics during high-flow events in North Carolina's floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovette, J. P.; Duncan, J. M.; Vimal, S.; Band, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Natural riparian areas play numerous roles in the maintenance and improvement of stream water quality. Both restoration of riparian areas and improvement of hydrologic connectivity to the stream are often key goals of river restoration projects. These management actions are designed to improve nutrient removal by slowing and treating overland flow delivered from uplands and by storing, treating, and slowly releasing streamwater from overbank inundation during flood events. A major question is how effective this storage of overbank flow is at treating streamwater based on the cumulative time stream discharge at a downstream location has spent in shallower, slower overbank flow. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program maintains a detailed statewide Flood Risk Information System (FRIS) using HEC-RAS modeling, lidar, and detailed surveyed river cross-sections. FRIS provides extensive information regarding channel geometry on approximately 39,000 stream reaches (a slightly coarser spatial resolution than the NHD+v2 dataset) with tens of cross-sections for each reach. We use this FRIS data to calculate volume and discharge from floodplain riparian areas separately from in-channel flow during overbank events. Preliminary results suggest that a small percentage of total annual discharge interacts with the full floodplain extent along a stream reach due to the infrequency of overbank flow events. However, with the significantly different physical characteristics of the riparian area when compared to the channel itself, this overbank flow can provide unique services to water quality. Our project aims to use this information in conjunction with data from the USGS SPARROW program to target non-point source hotspots of Nitrogen and Phosphorus addition and removal. By better understanding the flow dynamics within riparian areas during high flow events, riparian restoration projects can be carried out with improved efficacy.

  16. Air flow analysis in the upper Río Negro Valley (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogliati, M. G.; Mazzeo, N. A.

    2006-06-01

    The so called Upper Río Negro Valley in Argentina is one of the most important fruit and vegetable production regions of the country. It comprises the lower valleys of the Limay and Neuquén rivers and the upper Negro river valley. Out of the 41,671 cultivated hectares, 84.6% are cultivated with fruit trees, especially apple, pear and stone fruit trees. Late frosts occurring when trees are sensitive to low temperatures have a significant impact on the regional production. This study presents an analysis of air flow characteristics in the Upper Río Negro Valley and its relationship with ambient air flow. To such effect, observations made when synoptic-scale weather patterns were favorable for radiative frosts (light wind and clear sky) or nocturnal temperature inversion in the lower layer were used. In the Negro river valley, both wind channeling and downward horizontal momentum transport from ambient wind were observed; in nighttime, very light wind events occurred, possibly associated with drainage winds from the nearby higher levels of the barda. In the Neuquén river valley, the prevailing effect appeared to be forced channeling, consistent with the results obtained in valleys where the synoptic scale wind crossed the axis of the valley. In the Limay river valley, the flow was observed to blow parallel to the longitudinal valley axis, possibly influenced by pressure gradient and forced channeling.

  17. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  18. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  19. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  20. Effect of an entrained air bubble on the acoustics of an ink channel.

    PubMed

    Jeurissen, Roger; de Jong, Jos; Reinten, Hans; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-05-01

    Piezo-driven inkjet systems are very sensitive to air entrapment. The entrapped air bubbles grow by rectified diffusion in the ink channel and finally result in nozzle failure. Experimental results on the dynamics of fully grown air bubbles are presented. It is found that the bubble counteracts the pressure buildup necessary for the droplet formation. The channel acoustics and the air bubble dynamics are modeled. For good agreement with the experimental data it is crucial to include the confined geometry into the model: The air bubble acts back on the acoustic field in the channel and thus on its own dynamics. This two-way coupling limits further bubble growth and thus determines the saturation size of the bubble.

  1. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  2. Velocity Vector Field Visualization of Flow in Liquid Acquisition Device Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Chao, David F.; Hall, Nancy R.; Zhang, Nengli

    2012-01-01

    A capillary flow liquid acquisition device (LAD) for cryogenic propellants has been developed and tested in NASA Glenn Research Center to meet the requirements of transferring cryogenic liquid propellants from storage tanks to an engine in reduced gravity environments. The prototypical mesh screen channel LAD was fabricated with a mesh screen, covering a rectangular flow channel with a cylindrical outlet tube, and was tested with liquid oxygen (LOX). In order to better understand the performance in various gravity environments and orientations at different liquid submersion depths of the screen channel LAD, a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of LOX flow through the LAD screen channel was undertaken. The resulting velocity vector field visualization for the flow in the channel has been used to reveal the gravity effects on the flow in the screen channel.

  3. Large eddy simulation of incompressible turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    The three-dimensional, time-dependent primitive equations of motion were numerically integrated for the case of turbulent channel flow. A partially implicit numerical method was developed. An important feature of this scheme is that the equation of continuity is solved directly. The residual field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model, while the large-scale field was obtained directly from the solution of the governing equations. An important portion of the initial velocity field was obtained from the solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The pseudospectral method was used for numerical differentiation in the horizontal directions, and second-order finite-difference schemes were used in the direction normal to the walls. The large eddy simulation technique is capable of reproducing some of the important features of wall-bounded turbulent flows. The resolvable portions of the root-mean square wall pressure fluctuations, pressure velocity-gradient correlations, and velocity pressure-gradient correlations are documented.

  4. Statistical estimates for channel flows driven by a pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, F.; Rosa, R.; Temam, R.

    2008-07-01

    We present rigorous estimates for some physical quantities related to turbulent and non-turbulent channel flows driven by a uniform pressure gradient. Such results are based on the concept of stationary statistical solutions, which is related to the notion of ensemble averages for flows in statistical equilibrium. We provide a lower bound estimate for the mean skin friction coefficient and improve on a previous upper bound estimate for the same quantity; both estimates are derived in terms of the Reynolds number. We also present lower and upper bound estimates for the mean rate of energy dissipation, the mean longitudinal bulk velocity (in the direction of the pressure gradient), and the mean kinetic energy in terms of various physical parameters. In particular, we obtain an upper bound related to the energy dissipation law, namely that the mean rate of energy dissipation is essentially bounded by a non-dimensional universal constant times the cube of the mean longitudinal bulk velocity over a characteristic macro-scale length. Finally, we investigate the scale-by-scale energy injection due to the pressure gradient, proving an upper bound estimate for the decrease of this energy injection as the scale length decreases.

  5. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent channel flow at one bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, for bulk Mach numbers Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs). The IBCs are formulated in the time domain following Fung and Ju (2004) and coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. The impedance model adopted is a three-parameter Helmholtz oscillator with resonant frequency tuned to the outer layer eddies. The IBC's resistance, R, has been varied in the range, R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00. Tuned IBCs result in a noticeable drag increase for sufficiently high Mb and/or low R, exceeding 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01, and thus represents a promising passive control technique for delaying boundary layer separation and/or enhancing wall heat transfer. Alterations to the turbulent flow structure are confined to the first 15% of the boundary layer thickness where the classical buffer-layer coherent vortical structures are replaced by an array of Kelvin-Helmholtz-like rollers. The non-zero asymptotic value of the Reynolds shear stress gradient at the wall results in the disappearance of the viscous sublayer and very early departure of the mean velocity profiles from the law of the wall.

  6. Cooling channels design analysis with chaotic laminar trajectory for closed cathode air-cooled PEM fuel cells using non-reacting numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, W. Mohamed W. A.

    2015-09-01

    The thermal management of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells contributes directly to the overall power output of the system. For a closed cathode PEM fuel cell design, the use of air as a cooling agent is a non-conventional method due to the large heat load involved, but it offers a great advantage for minimizing the system size. Geometrical aspects of the cooling channels have been identified as the basic parameter for improved cooling performance. Numerical investigation using STAR-CCM computational fluid dynamics platform was applied for non-reacting cooling effectiveness study of various channel geometries for fuel cell application. The aspect ratio of channels and the flow trajectory are the parametric variations. A single cooling plate domain was selected with an applied heat flux of 2400 W/m2 while the cooling air are simulated at Reynolds number of 400 that corresponds to normal air flow velocities using standard 6W fans. Three channel designs of similar number of channels (20 channels) are presented here to analyze the effects of having chaotic laminar flow trajectory compared to the usual straight path trajectory. The total heat transfer between the cooling channel walls and coolant were translated into temperature distribution, maximum temperature gradient, average plate temperature and overall cooling effectiveness analyses. The numerical analysis shows that the chaotic flow promotes a 5% to 10% improvement in cooling effectiveness, depending on the single-axis or multi-axis flow paths applied. Plate temperature uniformity is also more realizable using the chaotic flow designs.

  7. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.

  8. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of isothermal-wall compressible turbulent channel flow with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) for the wall-normal velocity component and no-slip conditions for the tangential velocity components. Three bulk Mach numbers, Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with a fixed bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, have been investigated. For each Mb, nine different combinations of IBC settings were tested, in addition to a reference case with impermeable walls, resulting in a total of 30 simulations. The adopted numerical coupling strategy allows for a spatially and temporally consistent imposition of physically realizable IBCs in a fully explicit compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The IBCs are formulated in the time domain according to Fung and Ju ["Time-domain impedance boundary conditions for computational acoustics and aeroacoustics," Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 18(6), 503-511 (2004)]. The impedance adopted is a three-parameter damped Helmholtz oscillator with resonant angular frequency, ωr, tuned to the characteristic time scale of the large energy-containing eddies. The tuning condition, which reads ωr = 2πMb (normalized with the speed of sound and channel half-width), reduces the IBCs' free parameters to two: the damping ratio, ζ, and the resistance, R, which have been varied independently with values, ζ = 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00, for each Mb. The application of the tuned IBCs results in a drag increase up to 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01. It is shown that for tuned IBCs, the resistance, R, acts as the inverse of the wall-permeability and that varying the damping ratio, ζ, has a secondary effect on the flow response. Typical buffer-layer turbulent structures are completely suppressed by the application of tuned IBCs. A new resonance buffer layer is established characterized by large spanwise-coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers, with a well-defined streamwise wavelength λx, traveling downstream with

  9. Correlations of Surface Deformation and 3D Flow Field in a Compliant Wall Turbulent Channel Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the correlations between surface deformation and flow features, including velocity, vorticity and pressure, in a turbulent channel flow over a flat, compliant Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wall. The channel centerline velocity is 2.5 m/s, and the friction Reynolds number is 2.3x103. Analysis is based on simultaneous measurements of the time resolved 3D velocity and surface deformation using tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder Interferometry. The volumetric pressure distribution is calculated plane by plane by spatially integrating the material acceleration using virtual boundary, omni-directional method. Conditional sampling based on local high/low pressure and deformation events reveals the primary flow structures causing the deformation. High pressure peaks appear at the interface between sweep and ejection, whereas the negative deformations peaks (dent) appear upstream, under the sweeps. The persistent phase lag between flow and deformations are presumably caused by internal damping within the PDMS. Some of the low pressure peaks and strong ejections are located under the head of hairpin vortices, and accordingly, are associated with positive deformation (bump). Others bumps and dents are correlated with some spanwise offset large inclined quasi-streamwise vortices that are not necessarily associated with hairpins. Sponsored by ONR.

  10. Numerical simulations of non-homogeneous viscoelastic turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas; Beris, Antony

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the polymer mixing in turbulent channel flow is studied through numerical simulations, using a spectral technique. In particular, we simulate injection of polymeric material through a slit very close to the wall and parallel to it in pre-established Newtonian turbulent flow. The governing equations consist of the mass conservation, the modified Navier-Stokes equation (in order to take into account the polymer extra-stress), the evolution equation for the conformation tensor and an advection-diffusion equation for the polymer concentration. The injection process is simulated by dividing the computational domain in three different regions: (a) the entrance region where the polymer is introduced (b) the developing region where the polymer is allowed to convect freely interacting/modifying the turbulent flow and (c) the recovering region where we use a reacting sink to force the removal of the polymer from the solvent in order to re-establish the inlet conditions. A fully spectral method is used in order to solve the set of governing equations similar to that developed for homogenous viscoelastic turbulent DNS (Housiadas & Beris, Phys. Fluids, 15, (2003)). Although a significantly improved numerical algorithm has been successfully used before (Housiadas & Beris, to appear in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. (2004)) a further improved version of that algorithm is presented in this work. The new algorithm has enabled us to extend the simulations for much wider range of viscoelasticity parameter values as well as for many viscoelastic models like the FENE-P, Giesekus, Oldroyd-B and the modified Giesekus/FENE-P model. Results for illustrative sets of parameter values are going to be presented.

  11. Comparisons of the hydraulics of water flows in Martian outflow channels with flows of similar scale on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    The hydraulics of channelized water flows on Mars and the resulting sediment transport rates are calculated, and similar computations are performed for such terrestrial analogs as the Mississippi River and the catastrophic Lake Missoula floods that formed the Channeled Scabland in eastern Washington State. The morphologies of deep-sea channels formed by catastrophic turbidity currents are compared with the Martian channels, many similarities are pointed out, and the hydraulics of the various flows are compared. The results indicate that the velocities, discharges, bottom shear stresses, and sediment-transport capacity of water flows along the Martian channels would be comparable to those of the oceanic turbidity currents and the Lake Missoula floods. It is suggested that the submarine canyons from which turbidity currents originate are the terrestrial counterparts to the chaotic-terrain areas or craters that serve as sources for many of the Martian channels.

  12. Cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel: effects of wind on snow bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savijärvi, Hannu

    2015-08-01

    Wintertime cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel or a long lake can become destructive if the related bands of heavy snowfall hit onto land. The forcing for such bands is studied with a 2D numerical model set across an east-west sea channel at 60oN (`Gulf of Finland'), varying the basic geostrophic wind V g. Without any V g opposite coastal land breezes emerge with convergence. This results in a quasi-steady rising motion w max ~ 7.5 cm/s at 600 m in the middle of the gulf, which can force a snow band. During weak V g, the rising motion is reduced but least so for winds from 60o to 80o (~ENE), when modest alongshore bands could exist near the downstream (Estonian) coast. During V g of 4-6 m/s from any direction, the land breezes and rising motions are reduced more effectively, so snow bands are not expected during moderate basic flow. In contrast, during a strong V g of 20-25 m/s from 110o to 120o (~ESE) the land breeze perturbations are intense with w max up to 15-18 cm/s. The induced alongshore bands of heavy snowfall are located in these cases at the sea but quite close to the downstream (Finnish) coast. They can suddenly make a landfall if the basic wind turns clockwise.

  13. On the effect of riblets in fully developed laminar channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Haecheon; Moin, Parviz; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    The effect of longitudinal riblet surfaces on viscous drag in fully developed laminar channel flows was investigated. Unlike turbulent flows, drag reduction was not obtained in the laminar flows. Results were independent of Reynolds number. Wall-shear rates on most regions of the cross-sectional perimeter of riblets were smaller than that of corresponding plane channel flow even though the net drag was increased.

  14. Flow structure in self-sustaining and intermittently turbulent reciprocating channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Alireza; White, Christopher; Dubief, Yves; UVM Team; UNH Team

    2016-11-01

    The leading order terms in the Reynolds-averaged momentum equation are studied to better understand the underlying mechanism of transition to turbulence in reciprocating channel flow. The balance of the leading order terms confirms that fully-developed turbulence first emerges at the early phases in the decelerating portion of the cycle. The underlying mechanism of this transition appears to be the emergence of an internal layer that first develops during the late phases of the accelerating portion of the cycle. In the absence of this internal layer, the flow remains transitional over the entire cycle. The turbulent structure associated with the internal layer is investigated using different flow structure identification schemes. In particular, the Q-R criteria and the triple decomposition of the strain rate tensor.

  15. Morphology of the 1984 open-channel lava flow at Krafla volcano, northern Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Matti J.

    1997-09-01

    An open-channel lava flow of olivine tholeiite basalt, 9 km long and 1-2 km wide, formed in a volcanic eruption that took place in the Krafla volcano, Iceland, on the 4-18 September 1984. The eruption started with emplacement of a pahoehoe sheet which was fed by a 8.5-km-long fissure. After two days of eruption, lava effusion from the fissure ceased but one crater at the northern end of the fissure continued to release lava for another twelve days. That crater supplied an open-channel flow that moved toward the north along the rift valley. The lava was emplaced on a slope of 1°. The final lava flow is composed of five flow facies: (1) the initial pahoehoe sheet; (2) proximal slab pahoehoe and aa; (3) shelly-type overflows from the channel; (4) distal rubbly aa lava; and (5) secondary outbreaks of toothpaste lava and cauliflower aa. The main lava channel within the flow is 6.4 km long. The mean width of this channel is 189 m (103 m S.D.). An initial lava channel that forms in a Bingham plastic substance is fairly constant in width. This channel, however, varies in width especially in the proximal part indicating channel erosion. Large drifted blocks of channel walls are found throughout the flow front area and on the top of overflow levees. This suggests that the channel erosion was mainly mechanical. The lava flow has a mean height of 6 m above its surroundings, measured at the flow margins. However, a study of the pre-flow topography indicates that the lava filled a considerable topographic depression. Combined surface and pre-flow profiles give an average lava-flow thickness of 11 m; the thickness of the initial sheet-flow is estimated as 2 m. The volume of the lava flow calculated from these figures is 0.11 km 3. The mean effusion rate was 91 m 3/s. When lava flow models are used to deduce the rheological properties of this type of lava flow, the following points must be considered: (1) when a lava flow is emplaced along tectonic lineaments, its depth and

  16. The significance of micro-topography in generating flow structures in open channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    This poster investigates the effect of micro-topographic roughness on the generation, evolution and dissipation of turbulent flow structures in open channel flow. Primarily, a series of flume experiment were undertaken where natural fluvial gravel was placed in a flume and water worked until a stable bed with no sediment transport was obtained. The surface topography was measured to create a digital elevation model (DEM) enabling particle size characteristics to be measured and roughness lengths to be calculated. Flow was measured, at flow Reynolds numbers over two orders of magnitude, using Particle Imaging Velocimetry at data frequencies up to 100 Hz at a spatial resolution of 2×10-3 m. The flume conditions also provided the necessary boundary conditions for Large Eddy Simulation of flow over these heterogeneous surfaces. The data generated by these two separate methodologies was analyzed through a series of approaches, and included: i) standard Reynolds decomposition to the flow fields; ii) Eulerian coherent structure detection methods based on the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor; iii) Lagrangian coherent structure identification methods based upon direct Lyapunov exponents (DLE) and; iv) Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) analysis to obtain a full understanding of the turbulent flow structures. Once the LES scheme had been fully validated against the PIV data, scales of topography were removed from the DEM. The LES simulations were then recalculated to assess the influence of topography on the generation of turbulent flow structures. The results demonstrate that the generative mechanism for these bed-generated coherent flow structures are merging hairpin-type vortices that form around bed clasts and generate larger-scale roller-type structures. This mechanism of generation appears consistent over the range of Reynolds numbers but the spatial and temporal length scales appear dependent upon the bed roughness.

  17. Influence of air flow rate and backwashing on the hydraulic behaviour of a submerged filter.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Becerra, Yazmin Lucero; González-Martínez, Simón

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate backwashing effects on the apparent porosity of the filter media and on the hydraulic behaviour of a pilot scale submerged filter, prior to biofilm colonization, under different hydraulic retention times, and different air flow rates. Tracer curves were analysed with two mathematical models for ideal and non-ideal flow (axial dispersion and Wolf and Resnick models). The filter media was lava stones sieved to 4.5 mm. Backwashing causes attrition of media particles, decreasing the void volume of the filter media and, consequently, the tracer flow is more uniform. The eroded media presented lower dead volumes (79% for the filter with aeration and 8% for the filter without aeration) compared with the new media (83% for the filter with aeration and 22% for the filter without aeration). The flow patterns of eroded and new media were different because the more regular shape of the particles decreases the void volume of the filter media. The dead volume is attributed, in the case of the filter with aeration, to the turbulence caused by the air bubbles that generate preferential channelling of the bulk liquid along the filter media, creating large zones of stagnant liquid and, for the filter without aeration, to the channels formed due to the irregular shaped media.

  18. Study of hairpin vortex structure in DNS channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. C.; Adrian, R. J.

    1998-11-01

    DNS of fully developed turbulent channel flows have been performed at Reynolds numbers of Re_τ = 150 and 300. A vortex identification technique based on the imaginary part of the complex conjugate eigenvalue of the velocity gradient tensor, as defined as swirling strength, has been utilized for detection and visualization of vortices in DNS velocity field in a 3D domain. The swirling strength is sensitive and advantageous for capturing vortices in velocity field: it does not depend on the framework of an observer, and it discriminates the shearing motions that have large vorticity. Interestingly, the rms of the swirling strength in the near wall region exhibits Reynolds number similarity. The peak of the rms of the swirling strength for both Reynolds numbers appears at about 20 to 25 wall units away from the wall in the buffer layer of the channel. Using iso-surface of the swirling strength successfully locates hairpin vortices as well as quasi-streamwise vortices near the walls. The results demonstrate that hairpin vortices are neither rare nor random events. They occur frequently in wall turbulence and align coherently in the quasi-streamwise direction in the form of packets with spacing of about 100-200 wall units in the spanwise direction. The present results also show that hairpin vortices and packets are associated with low-momentum streaks, Q2/Q4 events and regions of large Reynolds stress. The structure of hairpin vortices found in the present simulation is consistent with and substantiates the earlier DNS study of the evolution of a single hairpin into packets and 2D PIV experimental observations.

  19. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  20. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  1. An experimental and analytical study of flow through a supersonic open channel with contoured floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saheli, F. P.; Dunn, B.; Marrs, K.; Kumar, A.; Peery, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was performed to study the characteristics of supersonic airflow (M(infinity) = 2.5-3.86) through an open channel with a contoured floor. The measured static pressures along the centerline of the channel floor exhibited an unexpected rise at the end of the channel. Complex three-dimensional interactions of compression and expansion waves within the channel coupled with external flow perturbations caused by model/tunnel wall interference were the suspected sources of this flow behavior. Three-dimensional inviscid flow analysis procedures were used to investigate and explain this phenomenon. The results of the computations and the experiment are presented and discussed.

  2. A weakly nonlinear theory for wave-vortex interactions in curved channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Zang, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear theory is developed to study the interaction of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and Dean vortices in curved channel flow. The predictions obtained from the theory agree well with results obtained from direct numerical simulations of curved channel flow, especially for low amplitude disturbances. Some discrepancies in the results of a previous theory with direct numerical simulations are resolved.

  3. Flow sensitive actuators for micro-air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Hays, M.; Fernandez, E.; Oates, W.; Alvi, F. S.

    2011-10-01

    A macrofiber piezoelectric composite has been developed for boundary layer management of micro-air vehicles (MAVs). Specifically, a piezoelectric composite that is capable of self-sensing and controlling flow has been modeled, designed, fabricated, and tested in wind tunnel studies to quantify performance characteristics, such as the velocity field response to actuation, which is relevant for actively managing boundary layers (laminar and transition flow control). A nonlinear piezoelectric plate model was utilized to design the active structure for flow control. The dynamic properties of the piezoelectric composite actuator were also evaluated in situ during wind tunnel experiments to quantify sensing performance. Results based on velocity field measurements and unsteady pressure measurements show that these piezoelectric macrofiber composites can sense the state of flow above the surface and provide sufficient control authority to manipulate the flow conditions for transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  4. Downward flow of water with entrained air in a nonuniformaly heated subdivided annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.S.; May, C.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study in which water was fed to a vertical annulus, entraining air in downward flow. The annulus was subdivided by longitudinal fins into four subchannels and was heated with an azimuthally varying heat flux. A bypass was provided to simulate flow in parallel channels. For steady liquid flow, inlet temperature, and pressure boundary conditions, the power was increased until critical heat flux was reached. Overheating characteristics were grouped according to the prevailing flow pattern. In annular flows (j{sub L} < 0.3 m/s) overheating of the whole test section occurs when steam production causes countercurrent flooding. In intermittent flows (0.3 < j{sub L} < 0.9 m/s) the overheating is confined to a portion of the hot subchannel. The mechanism is postulated to be stagnation of a large bubble. In bubble flows (0.9 m/s < j{sub L}) overheating occurs by diverting inlet flow to the bypass and again involves the whole test section. Except at the very lowest flow rates, critical heat flux occurs when the effluent liquid temperature is below saturation.

  5. Downward flow of water with entrained air in a nonuniformaly heated subdivided annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.S.; May, C.P.

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes an experimental study in which water was fed to a vertical annulus, entraining air in downward flow. The annulus was subdivided by longitudinal fins into four subchannels and was heated with an azimuthally varying heat flux. A bypass was provided to simulate flow in parallel channels. For steady liquid flow, inlet temperature, and pressure boundary conditions, the power was increased until critical heat flux was reached. Overheating characteristics were grouped according to the prevailing flow pattern. In annular flows (j{sub L} < 0.3 m/s) overheating of the whole test section occurs when steam production causes countercurrent flooding. In intermittent flows (0.3 < j{sub L} < 0.9 m/s) the overheating is confined to a portion of the hot subchannel. The mechanism is postulated to be stagnation of a large bubble. In bubble flows (0.9 m/s < j{sub L}) overheating occurs by diverting inlet flow to the bypass and again involves the whole test section. Except at the very lowest flow rates, critical heat flux occurs when the effluent liquid temperature is below saturation.

  6. Heat transfer performance comparison of steam and air in gas turbine cooling channels with different rib angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaojun; Gao, Jianmin; Xu, Liang; Li, Fajin

    2013-11-01

    Using steam as working fluid to replace compressed air is a promising cooling technology for internal cooling passages of blades and vanes. The local heat transfer characteristics and the thermal performance of steam flow in wide aspect ratio channels ( W/ H = 2) with different angled ribs on two opposite walls have been experimentally investigated in this paper. The averaged Nusselt number ratios and the friction factor ratios of steam and air in four ribbed channels were also measured under the same test conditions for comparison. The Reynolds number range is 6,000-70,000. The rib angles are 90°, 60°, 45°, and 30°, respectively. The rib height to hydraulic diameter ratio is 0.047. The pitch-to-rib height ratio is 10. The results show that the Nusselt number ratios of steam are 1.19-1.32 times greater than those of air over the range of Reynolds numbers studied. For wide aspect ratio channels using steam as the coolant, the 60° angled ribs has the best heat transfer performance and is recommended for cooling design.

  7. Dynamic evolution process of turbulent channel flow after opposition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Mingwei; Tian, De; Yongqian, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic evolution of turbulent channel flow after application of opposition control (OC), together with the mechanism of drag reduction, is studied through direct numerical simulation (DNS). In the simulation, the pressure gradient is kept constant, and the flow rate increases due to drag reduction. In the transport of mean kinetic energy (MKE), one part of the energy from the external pressure is dissipated by the mean shear, and the other part is transported to the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) through a TKE production term (TKP). It is found that the increase of MKE is mainly induced by the reduction of TKP that is directly affected by OC. Further analysis shows that the suppression of the redistribution term of TKE in the wall normal direction plays a key role in drag reduction, which represses the wall normal velocity fluctuation and then reduces TKP through the attenuation of its main production term. When OC is suddenly applied, an acute imbalance of energy in space is induced by the wall blowing and suction. Both the skin-friction and TKP terms exhibit a transient growth in the initial phase of OC, which can be attributed to the local effect of and <-u‧v‧> in the viscous sublayer. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11402088 and Grant No. 51376062) , State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources (Grant No. LAPS15005), and ‘the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities’ (Grant No.2014MS33).

  8. Behavior of Heavy Particles in Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Lee, Changhoon

    2010-11-01

    The motion of heavy particles in turbulent channel flow was investigated by using direct numerical simulation. We assumed that Stokes drag, Saffman lift and Magnus lift act on the motion of heavy spherical particles in turbulence. In this study, Stokes number is defined as the particle response time normalized by the wall units. The range of the Stokes number is 0.1˜50 and the diameter of a particle is 0.06˜0.3 in wall unit. Collision of particles with the wall is modelled by an elastic collision. Relevant velocity and acceleration statistics of heavy particles for the given range of Stokes number were investigated to interpret the particle accumulation near the wall. Particle accumulation at the wall is maximized when the Stokes number is around 15. And we found that Saffman lift force has a great effect on particle acceleration in the wall-normal direction near the wall. Detailed statistics including probability density function and autocorrelation of particle velocity and acceleration will be presented in the meeting.

  9. Study of flow channel geometry using current distribution measurement in a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Justo; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Pinar, F. Javier; Úbeda, Diego

    To improve fuel cell design and performance, research studies supported by a wide variety of physical and electrochemical methods have to be carried out. Among the different techniques, current distribution measurement owns the desired feature that can be performed during operation, revealing information about internal phenomena when the fuel cell is working. Moreover, short durability is one of the main problems that is hindering fuel cell wide implementation and it is known to be related to current density heterogeneities over the electrode surface. A good flow channel geometry design can favor a uniform current density profile, hence hypothetically extending fuel cell life. With this, it was thought that a study on the influence of flow channel geometry on the performance of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell using current distribution measurement should be a very solid work to optimize flow field design. Results demonstrate that the 4 step serpentine and pin-type geometries distribute the reactants more effectively, obtaining a relatively flat current density map at higher current densities than parallel or interdigitated ones and yielding maximum powers up to 25% higher when using oxygen as comburent. If air is the oxidant chosen, interdigitated flow channels perform almost as well as serpentine or pin-type due to that the flow conditions are very important for this geometry.

  10. Evolutionary Concepts for Decentralized Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Milton; Kolitz, Stephan; Milner, Joseph; Odoni, Amedeo

    1997-01-01

    Alternative concepts for modifying the policies and procedures under which the air traffic flow management system operates are described, and an approach to the evaluation of those concepts is discussed. Here, air traffic flow management includes all activities related to the management of the flow of aircraft and related system resources from 'block to block.' The alternative concepts represent stages in the evolution from the current system, in which air traffic management decision making is largely centralized within the FAA, to a more decentralized approach wherein the airlines and other airspace users collaborate in air traffic management decision making with the FAA. The emphasis in the discussion is on a viable medium-term partially decentralized scenario representing a phase of this evolution that is consistent with the decision-making approaches embodied in proposed Free Flight concepts for air traffic management. System-level metrics for analyzing and evaluating the various alternatives are defined, and a simulation testbed developed to generate values for those metrics is described. The fundamental issue of modeling airline behavior in decentralized environments is also raised, and an example of such a model, which deals with the preservation of flight bank integrity in hub airports, is presented.

  11. Thermohydraulic analysis of the cooling air flow in a rack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natusch, Andreas; Huchler, Markus

    Manned space laboratories like the US Space Station Freedom or the European COLUMBUS APM are equipped with so-called racks for subsystem and payload accommodation. An important resource is air for cooling the unit internal heat sources, the avionics air. Each unit inside the rack must be supplied with sufficient amount of air to cool down the unit to the allowable maximum temperature. In the course of the COLUMBUS Environmental Control and Life Support Subsystem (ECLSS) project, a thermohydraulic mathematical model (THMM) of a representative COLUMBUS rack was developed to analyze and optimize the distribution of avionic air inside this rack. A sensitivity and accuracy study was performed to determine the accuracy range of the calculated avionics flow rate distribution to the units. These calculations were then compared to measurement results gained in a rack airflow distribution test, which was performed with an equipped COLUMBUS subsystem rack to show the pressure distribution inside the rack. In addition to that cold flow study, the influence of the avionics air heating due to the unit dissipations on the airflow distribution and the cooling tenmperature was investigated in a detailed warm flow analysis.

  12. Distribution of air-water mixtures in parallel vertical channels as an effect of the header geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Marchitto, Annalisa; Fossa, Marco; Guglielmini, Giovanni

    2009-07-15

    Uneven phase distribution in heat exchangers is a cause of severe reductions in thermal performances of refrigeration equipment. To date, no general design rules are available to avoid phase separation in manifolds with several outlet channels, and even predicting the phase and mass distribution in parallel channels is a demanding task. In the present paper, measurements of two-phase air-water distributions are reported with reference to a horizontal header supplying 16 vertical upward channels. The effects of the operating conditions, the header geometry and the inlet port nozzle were investigated in the ranges of liquid and gas superficial velocities of 0.2-1.2 and 1.5-16.5 m/s, respectively. Among the fitting devices used, the insertion of a co-axial, multi-hole distributor inside the header confirmed the possibility of greatly improving the liquid and gas flow distribution by the proper selection of position, diameter and number of the flow openings between the supplying distributor and the system of parallel channels connected to the header. (author)

  13. Measurement of the Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in a Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian; Skor, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow systems play vital roles in the design of some current and anticipated space applications of two-phase systems which include: thermal management systems, transfer line flow in cryogenic storage, space nuclear power facilities, design and operation of thermal bus, life support systems, propulsion systems, In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), and space processes for pharmaceutical applications. The design of two-phase flow systems for space applications requires a clear knowledge of the behaviors of the dispersed phase (bubble), its interaction with the continuous phase (liquid) and its effect on heat and mass transfer processes, The need to understand the bubble generation process arises from the fact that for all space applications, the size and distribution of bubbles are extremely crucial for heat and mass transfer control. One important force in two-phase flow systems is the lift force on a bubble or particle in a liquid shear flow. The shear lift is usually overwhelmed by buoyancy in normal gravity, but it becomes an important force in reduced gravity. Since the liquid flow is usually sheared because of the confining wall, the trajectories of bubbles and particles injected into the liquid flow are affected by the shear lift in reduced gravity. A series of experiments are performed to investigate the lift force on a bubble in a liquid shear flow and its effect on the detachment of a bubble from a wall under low gravity conditions. Experiments are executed in a Poiseuille flow in a channel. An air-water system is used in these experiments that are performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. A bubble is injected into the shear flow from a small injector and the shear lift is measured while the bubble is held stationary relative to the fluid. The trajectory of the bubble prior, during and after its detachment from the injector is investigated. The measured shear lift force is calculated from the trajectory of the bubble at the detachment point. These

  14. Influence of outlet channel width to the flow velocity and pressure of a flow focusing microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fhong Soon, Chin; Hiung Yin, Yap; Sek Tee, Kian; Khairul Ahmad, Mohd; Zainizan Sahdan, Mohd; Nayan, Nafarizal

    2016-11-01

    Microencapsulation using flow focusing microfluidic devices attract great interest because of the simple fabrication technique using polymeric material. Simulation of the microfluidic device provides the advantage of reducing the waste of material before actual implementation of the fabrication. This paper reports the design of a flow focusing microfluidic device based on emulsification of two immiscible fluids. The system was build and simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics software by varying the outlet width in examining the effects of the flow and pressure at the outlet. The simulation results reveal that both the flow rate and the pressure decreased dramatically when the ratio of outlet channel to inlet channel (R) is greater than 2. The width of the outlet is critical in ensuring the flow of microcapsules without accumulation of microcapsules at the output pool due to the poor flow rate at the outlet channel and avoidance of leakage problem. The recommended R to achieve the objective of microencapsulation is between 2 and 4.

  15. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, R.F.

    1987-11-24

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs. 4 figs.

  16. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs.

  17. Thin-film flow in helically wound shallow channels of arbitrary cross-sectional shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, D. J.; Stokes, Y. M.; Green, J. E. F.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the steady, gravity-driven flow of a thin film of viscous fluid down a helically wound shallow channel of arbitrary cross-sectional shape with arbitrary torsion and curvature. This extends our previous work [D. J. Arnold et al., "Thin-film flow in helically-wound rectangular channels of arbitrary torsion and curvature," J. Fluid Mech. 764, 76-94 (2015)] on channels of rectangular cross section. The Navier-Stokes equations are expressed in a novel, non-orthogonal coordinate system fitted to the channel bottom. By assuming that the channel depth is small compared to its width and that the fluid depth in the vertical direction is also small compared to its typical horizontal extent, we are able to solve for the velocity components and pressure analytically. Using these results, a differential equation for the free surface shape is obtained, which must in general be solved numerically. Motivated by the aim of understanding flows in static spiral particle separators used in mineral processing, we investigate the effect of cross-sectional shape on the secondary flow in the channel cross section. We show that the competition between gravity and inertia in non-rectangular channels is qualitatively similar to that in rectangular channels, but that the cross-sectional shape has a strong influence on the breakup of the secondary flow into multiple clockwise-rotating cells. This may be triggered by small changes to the channel geometry, such as one or more bumps in the channel bottom that are small relative to the fluid depth. In contrast to the secondary flow which is quite sensitive to small bumps in the channel bottom, the free-surface profile is relatively insensitive to these. The sensitivity of the flow to the channel geometry may have important implications for the design of efficient spiral particle separators.

  18. Flow-induced channel formation in the cytoplasm of motile cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert D.; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Wright, Grady B.

    2011-07-01

    A model is presented to explain the development of flow channels within the cytoplasm of the plasmodium of the giant amoeba Physarum polycephalum. The formation of channels is related to the development of a self-organizing tubular network in large cells. Experiments indicate that the flow of cytoplasm is involved in the development and organization of these networks, and the mathematical model proposed here is motivated by recent experiments involving the observation of development of flow channel in small cells. A model of pressure-driven flow through a polymer network is presented in which the rate of flow increases the rate of depolymerization. Numerical solutions and asymptotic analysis of the model in one spatial dimension show that under very general assumptions this model predicts the formation of channels in response to flow.

  19. Effect of air pollution on peak expiratory flow rate variability.

    PubMed

    Singh, Virendra; Khandelwal, Rakesh; Gupta, A B

    2003-02-01

    Exposure to air pollution affects pulmonary functions adversely. Effect of exposure to pollution on diurnal variation of peak flow was assessed in healthy students. Three hundred healthy age-matched nonsmoker students were studied. They were categorized into two groups on the basis of their residence: commuters and living on campus. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings were made twice daily for 2 days with the Pink City Flow Meter. The measurement was then used to calculate for each subject the amplitude percentage mean, which is an index for expressing PEF variability for epidemiological purposes (Higgins BG, Britton JR, Chinns Jones TD, Jenkinson D, Burnery PG, Tattersfield AE. Distribution of peak expiratory flow variability in a population sample. Am Rev Respir Dis 1989; 140:1368-1372). Air pollution parameters were quantified by measurement of sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM) in the ambient air at the campus and on the roadside. The mean values of PEF variability (amplitude percent mean) in the students living on campus and in the commuters were 5.7 +/- 3.2 and 11 +/- 3.6, respectively (P < .05). Among the commuters, maximum number of subjects showed amplitude percentage mean PEFR at the higher end of variability distribution, as compared to the students living on campus, among whom the majority of subjects fell in the lower ranges of variability distribution. The ambient air quality parameters, namely SO2, NO2, CO, and RSPM were significantly lower on the campus. It can be concluded that long-term periodic exposure to air pollution can lead to increased PEF variability even in healthy subjects. Measurement of PEF variability may prove to be a simple test to measure effect of air pollution in healthy subjects.

  20. Discovery about temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-02-01

    The law of spatial fluctuations of temperature in a turbulent flow in the atmosphere was studied. The turbulent movement of air in the atmosphere manifests itself in random changes in wind velocity and in the dispersal of smoke. If a miniature thermometer with sufficient sensitivity and speed of response were placed in a air flow, its readings would fluctuate chaotically against the background of average temperature. This is Characteristic of practically every point of the flow. The temperature field forms as a result of the mixing of the air. A method using the relation of the mean square of the difference in temperatures of two points to the distance between these points as the structural characteristic of this field was proposed. It was found that the dissipation of energy in a flow and the equalization of temperatures are connected with the breaking up of eddies in a turbulent flow into smaller ones. Their energy in turn is converted into heat due to the viscosity of the medium. The law that has been discovered makes for a much broader field of application of physical methods of analyzing atmospheric phenomena.

  1. Development of bipolar plates with different flow channel configurations for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddu, Rajesh; Marupakula, Uday Kumar; Summers, Benjamin; Majumdar, Pradip

    Bipolar plates include separate gas flow channels for anode and cathode electrodes of a fuel cell. These gases flow channels supply reactant gasses as well as remove products from the cathode side of the fuel cell. Fluid flow, heat and mass transport processes in these channels have significant effect on fuel cell performance, particularly to the mass transport losses. The design of the bipolar plates should minimize plate thickness for low volume and mass. Additionally, contact faces should provide a high degree of surface uniformity for low thermal and electrical contact resistances. Finally, the flow fields should provide for efficient heat and mass transport processes with reduced pressure drops. In this study, bipolar plates with different serpentine flow channel configurations are analyzed using computational fluid dynamics modeling. Flow characteristics including variation of pressure in the flow channel across the bipolar plate are presented. Pressure drop characteristics for different flow channel designs are compared. Results show that with increased number of parallel channels and smaller sizes, a more effective contact surface area along with decreased pressured drop can be achieved. Correlations of such entrance region coefficients will be useful for the PEM fuel cell simulation model to evaluate the affects of the bipolar plate design on mass transfer loss and hence on the total current and power density of the fuel cell.

  2. Phase distribution of nitrogen-water two-phase flow in parallel micro channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mi; Wang, Shuangfeng; Zhou, You

    2016-08-01

    The present work experimentally investigated the phase splitting characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow passing through a horizontal-oriented micro-channel device with three parallel micro-channels. The hydraulic diameters of the header and the branch channels were 0.6 and 0.4 mm, respectively. Five different liquids, including de-ionized water and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution with different concentration were employed. Different from water, the surface tension of SDS solution applied in this work decreased with the increment of mass concentration. Through series of visual experiments, it was found that the added SDS surfactant could obviously facilitate the two-phase flow through the parallel micro channels while SDS solution with low concentration would lead to an inevitable blockage of partial outlet branches. Experimental results revealed that the two phase distribution characteristics depended highly on the inlet flow patterns and the outlet branch numbers. To be specific, at the inlet of slug flow, a large amount of gas preferred flowing into the middle branch channel while the first branch was filled with liquid. However, when the inlet flow pattern was shifted to annular flow, all of the gas passed through the second and the last branches, with a little proportion of liquid flowing into the first channel. By comparison with the experimental results obtained from a microchannel device with five parallel micro-T channels, uneven distribution of the two phase can be markedly noticed in our present work.

  3. Numerical Analysis of Turbulent Flows in Channels of Complex Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farbos De Luzan, Charles

    The current study proposes to follow a systematic validated approach to applied fluid mechanics problems in order to evaluate the ability of different computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to be a relevant design tool. This systematic approach involves different operations such as grid sensitivity analyses, turbulence models comparison and appropriate wall treatments, in order to define case-specific optimal parameters for industrial applications. A validation effort is performed on each study, with particle image velocimetry (PIV) experimental results as the validating metric. The first part of the dissertation lays down the principles of validation, and presents the details of a grid sensitivity analysis, as well as a turbulence models benchmark. The models are available in commercial solvers, and in most cases the default values of the equations constants are retained. The validation experimental data is taken with a hot wire, and has served as a reference to validate multiple turbulence models for turbulent flows in channels. In a second part, the study of a coaxial piping system will compare a set of different steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) turbulence models, namely the one equation model Spalart-Almaras, and two-equation-models standard k-epsilon, k-epsilon realizable, k-epsilon RNG, standard k-omega, k-omega SST, and transition SST. The geometry of interest involves a transition from an annulus into a larger one, where highly turbulent phenomena occur, such as recirculation and jet impingement. Based on a set of constraints that are defined in the analysis, a chosen model will be tested on new designs in order to evaluate their performance. The third part of this dissertation will address the steady-state flow patterns in a Viscosity-Sensitive Fluidic Diode (VSFD). This device is used in a fluidics application, and its originality lies in the fact that it does not require a control fluid in order to operate. This section will discuss the

  4. Research on measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution based on an air-water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuan-yuan; Zhou, Xue-jun; Xu, Hua-bin; Cheng, Kang

    2016-11-01

    A measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) method with an air-water channel is researched. In this method, the underwater vehicle and satellite are the legitimate parties, and the third party is at the airwater interface in order to simplify the unilateral quantum channel to water or air. Considering the condition that both unilateral transmission distance and transmission loss coefficient are unequal, a perfect model of the asymmetric channel is built. The influence of asymmetric channel on system loss tolerance and secure transmission distance is analyzed. The simulation results show that with the increase of the channel's asymmetric degree, the system loss tolerance will descend, one transmission distance will be reduced while the other will be increased. When the asymmetric coefficient of channel is between 0.068 and 0.171, MDI-QKD can satisfy the demand of QKD with an air-water channel, namely the underwater transmission distance and atmospheric transmission distance are not less than 60 m and 12 km, respectively.

  5. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  6. Characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental program to study the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling flows to obtain detailed and accurate data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport modeling for combustor flows is discussed. The work was also motivated by the need to investigate and quantify the influence of confinement and swirl on the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets. The flow facility was constructed in a simple way which allows easy interchange of different swirlers and the freedom to vary the jet Reynolds number. The velocity measurements were taken with a one color, one component DISA Model 55L laser-Doppler anemometer employing the forward scatter mode. Standard statistical methods are used to evaluate the various moments of the signals to give the flow characteristics. The present work was directed at the understanding of the velocity field. Therefore, only velocity and turbulence data of the axial and circumferential components are reported for inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows.

  7. The effect of floodplain grass on the flow characteristics of meandering compound channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Shan, Yuqi; Liu, Xingnian; Yang, Kejun; Liao, Huasheng

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted in a large-scale meandering compound channel to investigate the effect of floodplain grass on the main flow field in the channel. Three-dimensional velocity fields, turbulences, and Reynolds shear stresses were measured along half a meander. The experiments revealed that flexible artificial grass planted on a floodplain can significantly reduce the conveyance capability of the entire channel. Two parallel stage-discharge curves increased with increasing flow depth. The additional resistance of the floodplain grass increased the streamwise velocity and conveyance in the main channel along a meander. An analysis of the generation mechanism of secondary flows in the main channel indicated that the secondary current consisted of an enhanced original secondary cell that was strengthened by the centrifugal force and a component of the upstream floodplain flow. The relative dominance of these two components in the secondary flows was primarily determined by the angle between the floodplain flow and the main channel ridge, and also the floodplain roughness. At the same flow depth, the secondary flow in cases with grass on the floodplain was generally stronger than that in the case of a smooth meander bend, although it was weaker near the middle cross-over section. Floodplain grass enhanced the intensity of the lateral turbulence above the bankfull level and significantly modified the turbulence structure, although it had a negligible effect on the vertical turbulence except at the bend entrance. Floodplain grass also affected the Reynolds shear stresses in the main channel, generating stronger lateral shear stresses at a low flow depth. In contrast, at a high flow depth, the distribution of the interface shear stresses changed entirely while its magnitude remained the same. When the floodplains were grassed, the vertical shear stress that was induced by secondary flows was greater at the apexes but reduced at the cross-over sections

  8. Fuel cell stack with passive air supply

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-01-17

    A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

  9. Single channel layer, single sheath-flow inlet microfluidic flow cytometer with three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shiang-Chi; Yen, Pei-Wen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2012-09-07

    Flow cytometry is a technique capable of optically characterizing biological particles in a high-throughput manner. In flow cytometry, three dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing is critical for accurate and consistent measurements. Due to the advantages of microfluidic techniques, a number of microfluidic flow cytometers with 3D hydrodynamic focusing have been developed in recent decades. However, the existing devices consist of multiple layers of microfluidic channels and tedious fluidic interconnections. As a result, these devices often require complicated fabrication and professional operation. Consequently, the development of a robust and reliable microfluidic flow cytometer for practical biological applications is desired. This paper develops a microfluidic device with a single channel layer and single sheath-flow inlet capable of achieving 3D hydrodynamic focusing for flow cytometry. The sheath-flow stream is introduced perpendicular to the microfluidic channel to encircle the sample flow. In this paper, the flow fields are simulated using a computational fluidic dynamic (CFD) software, and the results show that the 3D hydrodynamic focusing can be successfully formed in the designed microfluidic device under proper flow conditions. The developed device is further characterized experimentally. First, confocal microscopy is exploited to investigate the flow fields. The resultant Z-stack confocal images show the cross-sectional view of 3D hydrodynamic with flow conditions that agree with the simulated ones. Furthermore, the flow cytometric detections of fluorescence beads are performed using the developed device with various flow rate combinations. The measurement results demonstrate that the device can achieve great detection performances, which are comparable to the conventional flow cytometer. In addition, the enumeration of fluorescence-labelled cells is also performed to show its practicality for biological applications. Consequently, the microfluidic

  10. Air-cooled, hydrogen-air fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelekhin, Alexander B. (Inventor); Bushnell, Calvin L. (Inventor); Pien, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An air-cooled, hydrogen-air solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell with a membrane electrode assembly operatively associated with a fluid flow plate having at least one plate cooling channel extending through the plate and at least one air distribution hole extending from a surface of the cathode flow field into the plate cooling channel.

  11. High-frame rate imaging of two-phase flow in a thin rectangular channel using fast neutrons.

    PubMed

    Zboray, R; Mor, I; Dangendorf, V; Stark, M; Tittelmeier, K; Cortesi, M; Adams, R

    2014-08-01

    We have demonstrated the feasibility of performing high-frame-rate, fast neutron radiography of air-water two-phase flows in a thin channel with rectangular cross section. The experiments have been carried out at the accelerator facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. A polychromatic, high-intensity fast neutron beam with average energy of 6 MeV was produced by 11.5 MeV deuterons hitting a thick Be target. Image sequences down to 10 ms exposure times were obtained using a fast-neutron imaging detector developed in the context of fast-neutron resonance imaging. Different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. Two phase flow parameters like the volumetric gas fraction, bubble size and mean bubble velocities have been measured. The first results are promising, improvements for future experiments are also discussed.

  12. Parametric Studies of Flow Separation using Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Boundary Layer separation causes the airfoil to stall and therefore imposes dramatic performance degradation on the airfoil. In recent years, flow separation control has been one of the active research areas in the field of aerodynamics due to its promising performance improvements on the lifting device. These active flow separation control techniques include steady and unsteady air injection as well as suction on the airfoil surface etc. This paper will be focusing on the steady and unsteady air injection on the airfoil. Although wind tunnel experiments revealed that the performance improvements on the airfoil using injection techniques, the details of how the key variables such as air injection slot geometry and air injection angle etc impact the effectiveness of flow separation control via air injection has not been studied. A parametric study of both steady and unsteady air injection active flow control will be the main objective for this summer. For steady injection, the key variables include the slot geometry, orientation, spacing, air injection velocity as well as the injection angle. For unsteady injection, the injection frequency will also be investigated. Key metrics such as lift coefficient, drag coefficient, total pressure loss and total injection mass will be used to measure the effectiveness of the control technique. A design of experiments using the Box-Behnken Design is set up in order to determine how each of the variables affects each of the key metrics. Design of experiment is used so that the number of experimental runs will be at minimum and still be able to predict which variables are the key contributors to the responses. The experiments will then be conducted in the 1ft by 1ft wind tunnel according to the design of experiment settings. The data obtained from the experiments will be imported into JMP, statistical software, to generate sets of response surface equations which represent the statistical empirical model for each of the metrics as

  13. Continuous-flow biodiesel production using slit-channel reactors.

    PubMed

    Kalu, Egwu Eric; Chen, Ken S; Gedris, Tom

    2011-03-01

    Slit-channel reactors are reactors whose active surface areas are orders of magnitude higher than those of micro-reactors but have low fabrication costs relative to micro-reactors. We successfully produced biodiesel with different degrees of conversion using homogeneous catalyst in the slit-channel reactor. The reactor performance shows that percent conversion of soybean oil to biodiesel increases with channel depth, as expected, due to more efficient mixing. Shallow slit-channels require short average residence times for complete product conversion. Present results show that the slit-channel reactor provides an improved performance over traditional batch reactors using homogeneous sodium alkoxide catalyst. It is aimed to couple the reactors with solid catalysts in converting soybean oil to biodiesel and implementation method is suggested. The cost advantages resulting from the ease of fabrication of slit-channel reactors over micro-reactors and how these factors relate to the oil conversion efficiency to biodiesel are briefly noted and discussed.

  14. Noise control of subsonic cavity flows using plasma actuated receptive channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Gupta, Arnob; Roy, Subrata

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a passive receptive rectangular channel at the trailing edge of an open rectangular cavity to reduce the acoustic tones generated due to coherent shear layer impingement. The channel is numerically tested at Mach 0.3 using an unsteady three-dimensional large eddy simulation. Results show reduction in pressure fluctuations in the cavity due to which sound pressure levels are suppressed. Two linear dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators are placed inside the channel to enhance the flow through it. Specifically, acoustic suppression of 7 dB was obtained for Mach 0.3 flow with the plasma actuated channel. Also, the drag coefficient for the cavity reduced by over three folds for the channel and over eight folds for the plasma actuated channel. Such a channel can be useful in noise and drag reduction for various applications, including weapons bay, landing gear and branched piping systems.

  15. Flow over a Modern Ram-Air Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Johari, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    The flow field on the central section of a modern ram-air parachute canopy was examined numerically using a finite-volume flow solver coupled with the one equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Ram-air parachutes are used for guided airdrop applications, and the canopy resembles a wing with an open leading edge for inflation. The canopy surfaces were assumed to be impermeable and rigid. The flow field consisted of a vortex inside the leading edge opening which effectively closed off the canopy and diverted the flow around the leading edge. The flow experienced a rather bluff leading edge in contrast to the smooth leading of an airfoil, leading to a separation bubble on the lower lip of the canopy. The flow inside the canopy was stagnant beyond the halfway point. The section lift coefficient increased linearly with the angle of attack up to 8.5 and the lift curve slope was about 8% smaller than the baseline airfoil. The leading edge opening had a major effect on the drag prior to stall; the drag is at least twice the baseline airfoil drag. The minimum drag of the section occurs over the angle of attack range of 3 -- 7 .

  16. Improved Determination of Surface and Atmospheric Temperatures Using Only Shortwave AIRS Channels: The AIRS Version 6 Retrieval Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Blaisdell, John; Iredell, Lena

    2010-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002 together with ASMU-A and HSB to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmosphere sounding system (Pagano et al 2003). The theoretical approach used to analyze AIRS/AMSU/HSB data in the presence of clouds in the AIRS Science Team Version 3 at-launch algorithm, and that used in the Version 4 post-launch algorithm, have been published previously. Significant theoretical and practical improvements have been made in the analysis of AIRS/AMSU data since the Version 4 algorithm. Most of these have already been incorporated in the AIRS Science Team Version 5 algorithm (Susskind et al 2010), now being used operationally at the Goddard DISC. The AIRS Version 5 retrieval algorithm contains three significant improvements over Version 4. Improved physics in Version 5 allowed for use of AIRS clear column radiances (R(sub i)) in the entire 4.3 micron CO2 absorption band in the retrieval of temperature profiles T(p) during both day and night. Tropospheric sounding 15 micron CO2 observations were used primarily in the generation of clear column radiances (R(sub i)) for all channels. This new approach allowed for the generation of accurate Quality Controlled values of R(sub i) and T(p) under more stressing cloud conditions. Secondly, Version 5 contained a new methodology to provide accurate case-by-case error estimates for retrieved geophysical parameters and for channel-by-channel clear column radiances. Thresholds of these error estimates are used in a new approach for Quality Control. Finally, Version 5 contained for the first time an approach to provide AIRS soundings in partially cloudy conditions that does not require use of any microwave data. This new AIRS Only sounding methodology was developed as a backup to AIRS Version 5 should the AMSU-A instrument fail. Susskind et al 2010 shows that Version 5 AIRS Only sounding are only slightly degraded from the AIRS/AMSU soundings, even at large fractional cloud

  17. Modeling of unsteady flow of viscous fluid in the channel of complex geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marfin, E. A.; Abdrashitov, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The article concerns an issue of exploring the mechanism of wave influence on the process of filtration. To describe a filtration flow, the porous medium is represented as a capillary, the radius of which varies sinusoidally. In this article we are presenting the results of numerical modeling of pulsating liquid flow in a sinusoidally-shaped channel. Numerical research was conducted with the help of the program complex FlowVision. As a result of series of calculations we received fields of velocities and pressure in the axial section of flowing channel. It was found that it is the flow in narrow isthmuses between the pores that contributes to the pressure difference the most. We revealed the signs of steady-state liquid flow in the channel when imposing fluctuations of pressure in the absence of pressure gradient. The conditions of formation of such flow are revealed.

  18. Pressure losses during steam flow and condensation in tubes and channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontiev, A. I.; Milman, O. O.

    2014-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental investigations have revealed the dependence of parameters of the process of steam condensation in tubes and channels on the scheme of heat-exchange fluid flow, including counter, forward, and cross flow systems. The total pressure losses in the case of counter flow are greater than those in the case of forward and cross flow. This dependence is valid for the flow of gases and plasma in channels with significant density variation (e.g., due to heating and cooling). Pressure losses have been evaluated using various computational models, and the results are compared to experimental data.

  19. Effect of air on water capillary flow in silica nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens; Oyarzua, Elton

    2013-11-01

    Capillarity is a classical topic in fluid dynamics. The fundamental relationship between capillarity and surface tension is solidly established. Nevertheless, capillarity is an active research area especially as the miniaturization of devices is reaching the molecular scale. Currently, with the fabrication of microsystems integrated by nanochannels, a thorough understanding of the transport of fluids in nanoconfinement is required for a successful operation of the functional parts of such devices. In this work, Molecular Dynamics simulations are conducted to study the spontaneous imbibition of water in sub 10 nm silica channels. The capillary filling speed is computed in channels subjected to different air pressures. In order to describe the interactions between the species, an effective force field is developed, which is calibrated by reproducing the water contact angle. The results show that the capillary filling speed qualitatively follows the classical Washburn model, however, quantitatively it is lower than expected. Furthermore, it is observed that the deviations increase as air pressure is higher. We attribute the deviations to amounts of air trapped at the silica-water interface which leads to changes in the dynamics contact angle of the water meniscus.

  20. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  1. The dynamics of a channel-fed lava flow on Pico Partido volcano, Lanzarote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Duncan; Harris, Andrew

    2006-09-01

    A short length of channel on Pico Partido volcano, Lanzarote, provides us the opportunity to examine the dynamics of lava flowing in a channel that extends over a sudden break in slope. The 1 2-m-wide, 0.5 2-m-deep channel was built during the 1730 1736 eruptions on Lanzarote and exhibits a sinuous, well-formed channel over a steep (11° slope) 100-m-long proximal section. Over-flow units comprising smooth pahoehoe sheet flow, as well as evidence on the inner channel walls for multiple (at least 11) flow levels, attest to unsteady flow in the channel. In addition, superelevation is apparent at each of the six bends along the proximal channel section. Superelevation results from banking of the lava as it moves around the bend thus causing preferential construction of the outer bank. As a result, the channel profile at each bend is asymmetric with an outer bank that is higher than the inner bank. Analysis of superelevation indicates flow velocities of ~8 m s 1. Our analysis of the superelevation features is based on an inertia-gravity balance, which we show is appropriate, even though the down-channel flow is in laminar flow. We use a viscosity-gravity balance model, together with the velocities calculated from superelevation, to obtain viscosities in the range 25 60 Pa s (assuming that the lava behaved as a Newtonian liquid). Estimated volume fluxes are in the range 7 12 m3 s 1. An apparent down-flow increase in derived volume flux may have resulted from variable supply or bulking up of the flow due to vesiculation. Where the channel moves over a sharp break in slope and onto slopes of ~6°, the channel becomes less well defined and widens considerably. At the break of slope, an elongate ridge extends across the channel. We speculate that this ridge was formed as a result of a reduction in velocity immediately below the break of slope to allow deposition of entrained material or accretion of lava to the channel bed as a result of a change in flow regime or depth.

  2. Reformulation and energy flow of the Cowling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, R.; Amm, O.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ieda, A.; Vanhamäki, H.

    2011-02-01

    The question to which extent the divergence of the Hall current can be connected to the Pedersen current or to the closure current in the magnetosphere through field-aligned currents (FACs), that is, the Cowling channel process in the polar region, has long been debated but not fully understood. The present study reformulates the Cowling channel by introducing a two-layer model consisting of Hall and Pedersen conductivity layers with channel boundaries not only in the direction perpendicular to the channel but also in the direction along it. This new model enables us to better and more physically understand the connection between the Hall current, Pedersen current, and FAC. In particular, the finiteness of the channel along its direction enables us to understand that the primary nonzero electric field along the channel and FACs at the channel boundaries that faced each other in the channel direction carries the necessary energy for the Hall current to set up the secondary electric field from the magnetosphere. A case for a possible connection between the Pedersen and Hall currents is shown based on a polar current system derived from the Kamide-Richmond-Matsushita method. A more comprehensive analysis based on data is presented in the companion paper.

  3. Flow regime classification in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, T; De Vuyst, F; Yamaguchi, H

    2008-05-21

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  4. Flow regime classification in air magnetic fluid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, T.; DeVuyst, F.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2008-05-01

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  5. HPIV based volumetric 3D flow description in the roughness sublayer of a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Microscopic HPIV is utilized to resolve the 3D flow in the roughness sublayer of a boundary layer over a rough wall at Reτ=3400, consisting of pyramidal elements with height of k=0.45mm and 3.3mm wavelength. Typically, ~7000 particles are tracked in a 3.2 ×2.1 ×1.8mm3 volume, whose wall-normal extent is -0.2 < y / k < 4.67, y=0 being the roughness peak. These measurements are facilitated by matching the refractive index of the fluid with that of the acrylic rough wall. Results show that the sublayer is flooded by complex coherent structures scaled between 1-2 k. They are mostly aligned with roughness grooves, but some wrap around the pyramids, and stretch to a streamwise orientation by a relatively fast channeling flow that develops between the pyramid ridgelines. Occasionally, structures eject away from the roughness sublayer at a steep angle to the mean flow. Using the 300 realizations processed so far, the spatial variations in mean velocity and Reynolds stresses are compared to 2D PIV results, and trends generally (but not always) agree. In particular, there is a rapid increase in all Reynolds stress components close y=0. Conditional sampling is used to extract statistically significant structures. Sponsored by ONR (grant No. 000140-91-10-0-7).

  6. An Experimental Investigation of Skin Friction on Smooth Surfaces Supporting Air Bearing Channels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF SKIN FRICTION ON SMOOTH SURFACES SUPPORTING AIR BEARING CHANNELS ETUDE EXPERIMENTALE DU FROTTEMENT PELLICULAIRE SUR DES SURFACES...LISSES PORTEUSES DE CANAUX ANTI- FROTTEMENT by/par M. Khalid National Aeronautical Establishment AERONAUTICAL NOTE OTTAWA NAE-AN-39 JULY 1986 NRC NO...installant sur la surface des canaux qui agissent comme des valiers d’air. Les mesures ont &t prises A l’aide d’une balance de mesure du frottement

  7. Measurement of velocity of air flow in the sinus maxillaris.

    PubMed

    Müsebeck, K; Rosenberg, H

    1979-03-01

    Anemometry with the hot wire and hot film technique previously described, enables the rhinologist to record slow and rapidly changing air flow in the maxillary sinus. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are considered. Anemometry together with manometry may be designated sinumetry and used as a diagnostic procedure following sinuscopy in chronic maxillary sinus disease. The value of the function from velocity of time allows the estimation of flow-volume in the sinus. Furthermore, the method is useful to evaluate the optimal therapy to restore ventilation in the case of an obstructed ostium demonstrated before and after surgical opening in the inferior meatus.

  8. Character of energy flow in air shower core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, K.; Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Energy per charged particle near the core of air showers was measured by 9 energy flow detectors, which were the combination of Cerenkov counters and scintillators. Energy per particle of each detector was normalized to energy at 2m from the core. The following results were obtained as to the energy flow: (1) integral frequency distribution of mean energy per particle (averaged over 9 detectors) is composed of two groups separated distinctly; and (2) showers contained in one group show an anisotropy of arrival direction.

  9. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gavin J.; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a ‘streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality. PMID:24019053

  10. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gavin J; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a 'streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality.

  11. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  12. Interrelationships of petiole air canal architecture, water depth and convective air flow in Nymphaea odorata (Nymphaeaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study--Nymphaea odorata grows in water up to 2 m deep, producing fewer, larger leaves in deeper water. This species has a convective flow system that moves gases from younger leaves through submerged parts to older leaves, aerating submerged parts. Petiole air canals are in the conv...

  13. Development of an air flow thermal balance calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An air flow calorimeter, based on the idea of balancing an unknown rate of heat evolution with a known rate of heat evolution, was developed. Under restricted conditions, the prototype system is capable of measuring thermal wattages from 10 milliwatts to 1 watt, with an error no greater than 1 percent. Data were obtained which reveal system weaknesses and point to modifications which would effect significant improvements.

  14. Multiscale modeling of mechanosensing channels on vesicles and cell membranes in 3D constricted flows and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan-Nan; Liu, Allen; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the gating of mechanosensing channels (Mscls) on vesicles and cell membranes under different flow conditions using a multiscale approach. At the cell level (microns), the membrane tension is calculated using a 3D two-component whole-cell membrane model based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), including the cortex cytoskeleton and its interactions with the lipid bilayer. At the Mscl level (nanometers), we predict the relation between channel gating and the membrane tension obtained from a cell-level model using a semi-analytical model based on the bilayer hydrophobic mismatch energy. We systematically study the gating of Mscls of vesicles and cell membranes in constricted channel flows and shear flows, and explore the dependence of the gating on flow rate, cell shape and size. The results provide guidance for future experiments in inducing Mscl opening for various purposes such as drug delivery.

  15. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  16. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  19. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  20. Numerical characterization of the hydrodynamics and thermal behavior of air flow in flexible air distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehdaghi, Samad; Moujaes, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Flexible duct air distribution systems are used in a large percentage of residential and small commercial buildings in the United States . Very few empirical or predictive data are available though to help provide the HVAC design engineer with reliable information . Moreover, because of the ducts flexibility, the shapes of these ducts offer a different set of operating fluid flow and thermal conditions from traditional smooth metal ducts. Hence, both the flow field and heat transfer through this kind of ducts are much more complex and merit to be analyzed from a numerical predictive approach. The aim of this research paper is to compute some of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the air flow inside these ducts over a range of Re numbers commonly used in the flow conditions of these air distribution systems. The information resulting from this CFD simulation, where a κ-ɛ turbulent model is used to predict the flow conditions, provide pressure drop and average convective heat transfer coefficients that exist in these ducts and was compared to previously found data. Circulation zones in the depressions of these ducts are found to exist which are suspected of influencing the pressured drop and heat transfer coefficients as compared to smooth ducts. The results show that fully developed conditions exist much earlier with regard to the inlet for both hydrodynamic and thermal entrance regions than what would be expected in smooth ducts under the same turbulent conditions.

  1. Reducing Electroosmotic Flow Enables DNA Separations in Ultrathin Channels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    systems with on-column detection. B. Schematic diagram of EOF in traditional CE systems . ...23 Figure 2-2: Schematic diagram of EOF in CE systems ...of the CE/ultrathin channel system for characterization studies. B. Schematic diagram of the CE/ultrathin channel system for separation studies 49...Development of an Integrated DNA Separation System ; Hietpas, P. B., Ed.; The Pennsylvannia State University: University Park, PA, 1997, pp 1-168. 19

  2. A NON-OSCILLATORY SCHEME FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In modeling shocks in open channel flows, the traditional finite difference schemes become inefficient and warrant special numerical treatment for smooth computations. This paper provides a general introduction to the non-oscillatory high-resolution methodology, coupled with the ...

  3. Fluid undercutting in the successive channel flow of two gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, R. W.; Jenkins, R. V.

    1973-01-01

    A fluid piston technique wherein one gas displaces another gas from a horizontal channel was investigated experimentally in a laboratory simulation of the operating concept of a Mach number 9, true-energy wind tunnel. Tests were conducted over a Froude number range from 0.0015 to 0.543 at driver-to-driven gas density ratios from 0.637 to 11.0 to find the effect of fluid undercutting (or overcutting) on test duration. Other variables studied, either experimentally or analytically, include channel cross-sectional shape, channel inlet design, channel length-to-diameter ratio, Reynolds number, pretest pressurization, and channel inclination angle. Results from shadowgraph movies and pressure measurements provide a correlation of actual-to-ideal test durations for a wide range of Froude numbers and gas density ratios and indicate that the application of the fluid piston technique to the wind-tunnel concept is feasible. However, severe fluid undercutting (or overcutting) in horizontal channels occurs at lower Froude numbers and at density ratios significantly different from unity.

  4. TRPV4, TRPC1, and TRPP2 assemble to form a flow-sensitive heteromeric channel

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Ma, Xin; Shen, Bing; Huang, Yu; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Yao, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, a superfamily of ion channels, can be divided into 7 subfamilies, including TRPV, TRPC, TRPP, and 4 others. Functional TRP channels are tetrameric complexes consisting of 4 pore-forming subunits. The purpose of this study was to explore the heteromerization of TRP subunits crossing different TRP subfamilies. Two-step coimmunoprecipitation (co-IP) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) were used to determine the interaction of the different TRP subunits. Patch-clamp and cytosolic Ca2+ measurements were used to determine the functional role of the ion channels in flow conditions. The analysis demonstrated the formation of a heteromeric TRPV4-C1-P2 complex in primary cultured rat mesenteric artery endothelial cells (MAECs) and HEK293 cells that were cotransfected with TRPV4, TRPC1, and TRPP2. In functional experiments, pore-dead mutants for each of these 3 TRP isoforms nearly abolished the flow-induced cation currents and Ca2+ increase, suggesting that all 3 TRPs contribute to the ion permeation pore of the channels. We identified the first heteromeric TRP channels composed of subunits from 3 different TRP subfamilies. Functionally, this heteromeric TRPV4-C1-P2 channel mediates the flow-induced Ca2+ increase in native vascular endothelial cells.—Du, J., Ma, X., Shen, B., Huang, Y., Birnbaumer, L., Yao, X. TRPV4, TRPC1, and TRPP2 assemble to form a flow-sensitive heteromeric channel. PMID:25114176

  5. Avalanching granular flows down curved and twisted channels: Theoretical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.; Wang, Yongqi; Sheng, Li-Tsung; Hsiau, Shu-San; Hutter, Kolumban; Katzenbach, Rolf

    2008-07-01

    Depth evolution and final deposits play a crucial role in the description of the dynamics of granular avalanches. This paper presents new and important results on the geometric deformation and measurements of avalanche depositions in laboratory granular flows and their comparisons with theoretical predictions through some benchmark problems for flows down curved and twisted channels merging into a horizontal plane. XY-table and analoglaser sensor are applied to measure geometries of deposited masses in the fanlike open transition and runout zones for different granular materials, different channel lengths, and different channel mouths in the runout zone. The model equations proposed by Pudasaini and Hutter ["Rapid shear flows of dry granular masses down curved and twisted channels," J. Fluid Mech. 495, 193 (2003)] are used for theoretical prediction. We show that geometric parameters such as curvature, twist and local details of the channel play a crucial role in the description of avalanching debris and their deposits in the standstill. Asymmetric depositions and surface contours about the central line of the channel could not be produced and predicted by any other classical theories and available experiments in the literature as done in this paper. Such a role played by the geometrical parameters of the channel over physical parameters for the flow of granular materials down a general channel was not investigated before. It is demonstrated that the numerical simulations of the model equations and experimental observations are generally in good agreement.

  6. Three-dimensional boundary layers and secondary flows in cascade channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackeschmidt, M.; Hilbrich, H.-D.; Krueger, N.

    Using the present analytical method for the calculation of three-dimensional boundary layers and secondary flows in a straight cascade channel, the influence of various phenomena on the spatial flow field of cascade channels is systematically investigated and the potential fields of the phenomena are computed exactly. The mathematical model distinguished between disturbed and undisturbed primary flow fields; collateral, bilateral, and multilateral boundary layers; and secondary flow fields with and without friction. More accurate details have been obtained for side wall streamlines and the formation of corner vortices.

  7. A chaotic system of two-phase flow in a small, horizontal, rectangular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1995-07-01

    Various measurement tools that are used in chaos theory were applied to analyze two-phase pressure signals with the objective of identifying and interpreting flow pattern transitions for two-phase flows in a small, horizontal rectangular channel. These measurement tools included power spectral density function, autocorrelation function, pseudo-phase-plane trajectory, Lyapunov exponents, and fractal dimensions. It was demonstrated that the randomlike pressure fluctuations characteristic of two-phase flow in small rectangular channels are chaotic. As such, they are governed by a high-order deterministic system. The correlation dimension is potentially a new approach for identifying certain two-phase flow patterns and transitions.

  8. Temperature and Pressure Measurements and Visualization of He II Cavitation Flow through Venturi Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Murakami, M.; Harada, K.

    2004-06-23

    He II cavitation flow through a Venturi channel was experimentally investigated through temperature and pressure measurements and optical visualization. So far some distinctive features of cavitation between He II and He I flows were clarified. Then, detailed measurements were added for further investigation, such as the measurements of the temperature drop distribution throughout the flow channel and the void fraction. Further considerations were given on the cavitation inception with emphasis on the superheating of liquid helium, and the effect of the flow separation on cavitation.

  9. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  10. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  14. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.603 Procedures for air flow tests of...) Air flow instrument complete with accessories to measure the fineness and maturity, in combination,...

  15. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  16. Impact of channel incision on the hydraulics of flood flows: Examples from Polish Carpathian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Zawiejska, Joanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur

    2016-11-01

    Channel deepening may result from channel incision or river metamorphosis changing a wide and shallow channel to a narrow and deep one. As only the first type of channel change leads to increased flow capacity of the channel, a lowering of water stage associated with a given discharge rather than a lowering of river bed should be used to identify channel incision. A lowering of minimum annual stage at gauging stations is typically used to assess the relative importance of channel incision along a river or within a particular region. Rivers of the Polish Carpathians incised by 0.5-3.8 m over the twentieth century, with the amount of incision being greater in their lower and middle courses than in the upper ones. Variability in the hydraulic importance of channel incision with increasing river size is analysed by comparing changes in the frequency of valley floor inundation at gauging stations located along the seventh-order Dunajec River. Despite a lower absolute amount of channel incision in the upper river course, here incision has increased channel conveyance and reduced the frequency of valley floor inundation considerably more than in the lower course. Hydraulic effects of channel incision depend also on lateral stability of an incising river. Low-energy rivers from the eastern part of the Polish Carpathians remained laterally stable during channel incision. This has resulted in substantial lowering of stages for low flood discharges and markedly smaller one for high-magnitude floods, whereas velocity of the flows conveyed over the highly elevated floodplains has decreased considerably. In high-energy rivers from the western part of the Polish Carpathians, alternation of incision and lateral channel migration has led to the formation of incised meander belts, with substantially lowered stages for all flood discharges and increased velocity of the flows conveyed over the newly-formed, low-lying floodplains.

  17. Flow structure and channel morphodynamics of meander bend chute cutoffs: A case study of the Wabash River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, Jessica A.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Best, James L.; Johnson, Kevin K.

    2013-12-01

    paper documents the three-dimensional structure of flow and bed morphology of two developing chute cutoffs on a single meander bend on the lower Wabash River, USA, and relates the flow structure to patterns of morphologic change in the evolving cutoff channels. The upstream end of the cutoff channels is characterized by: (1) a zone of flow velocity reduction/stagnation and bar development in the main channel across from the cutoff entrance, (2) flow separation and bar development along the inner (left) bank of the cutoff channel immediately downstream from the cutoff entrance, and (3) helical motion and outward advection of flow momentum entering the cutoff channel, leading to erosion of the outer (right) bank of the cutoff channel. At the downstream end of the cutoff channels, the major hydrodynamic and morphologic features are: (1) flow stagnation along the bank of the main channel immediately upstream of the cutoff channel mouth, (2) convergence of flows from the cutoff and main channels, (3) helical motion of flow from the cutoff, (4) a zone of reduced velocity along the bank of the main channel immediately downstream from the cutoff channel mouth, and (5) development of a prominent bar complex that penetrates into the main channel and extends from the stagnation zone upstream to downstream of the cutoff mouth. These results provide the basis for a conceptual model of chute-cutoff dynamics in which the upstream and downstream ends of a cutoff channel are treated as a bifurcation and confluence, respectively.

  18. An analysis of pressure driven cross-flow through a long slot connecting two parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Cross-flow between two parallel channels that were connected by a long narrow slot has been measured. The data was presented primarily in terms of transverse resistance coefficients. This data has been analyzed with momentum balances applied to both the axial and transverse components of the slot flow. The importance of wall friction to the slot flow and the necessity of calculating the axial component of the slot flow is demonstrated.

  19. Flow over a Ram-Air Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslambolchi, Ali; Johari, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    The flow field over a full-scale, ram-air personnel parachute canopy was investigated numerically using a finite-volume flow solver coupled with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Ram-air parachute canopies resemble wings with arc-anhedral, surface protuberances, and an open leading edge for inflation. The rectangular planform canopy had an aspect ratio of 2.2 and was assumed to be rigid and impermeable. The chord-based Reynolds number was 3.2 million. Results indicate that the oncoming flow barely penetrates the canopy opening, and creates a large separation bubble below the lower lip of canopy. A thick boundary layer exists over the entire lower surface of the canopy. The flow over the upper surface of the canopy remains attached for an extended fraction of the chord. Lift increases linearly with angle of attack up to about 12 degrees. To assess the capability of lifting-line theory in predicting the forces on the canopy, the lift and drag data from a two-dimensional simulation of the canopy profile were extended using finite-wing expressions and compared with the forces from the present simulations. The finite-wing predicted lift and drag trends compare poorly against the full-span simulation, and the maximum lift-to-drag ratio is over-predicted by 36%. Sponsored by the US Army NRDEC.

  20. Information flow in interaction networks II: channels, path lengths, and potentials.

    PubMed

    Stojmirović, Aleksandar; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2012-04-01

    In our previous publication, a framework for information flow in interaction networks based on random walks with damping was formulated with two fundamental modes: emitting and absorbing. While many other network analysis methods based on random walks or equivalent notions have been developed before and after our earlier work, one can show that they can all be mapped to one of the two modes. In addition to these two fundamental modes, a major strength of our earlier formalism was its accommodation of context-specific directed information flow that yielded plausible and meaningful biological interpretation of protein functions and pathways. However, the directed flow from origins to destinations was induced via a potential function that was heuristic. Here, with a theoretically sound approach called the channel mode, we extend our earlier work for directed information flow. This is achieved by constructing a potential function facilitating a purely probabilistic interpretation of the channel mode. For each network node, the channel mode combines the solutions of emitting and absorbing modes in the same context, producing what we call a channel tensor. The entries of the channel tensor at each node can be interpreted as the amount of flow passing through that node from an origin to a destination. Similarly to our earlier model, the channel mode encompasses damping as a free parameter that controls the locality of information flow. Through examples involving the yeast pheromone response pathway, we illustrate the versatility and stability of our new framework.

  1. Flow Structure and Channel Change in Chute Cutoffs On Meandering Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, J. A.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J. L.; Johnson, K. K.

    2011-12-01

    Freely meandering rivers typically exhibit complex, continuously evolving patterns of planform geometry involving elongation of the channel path through lateral migration and shorting of this path through bend cutoffs. Despite the importance of cutoffs in shaping the planform geometry of meandering rivers, the fluvial processes operative immediately after initiation of a cutoff are poorly understood. Two recent chute cutoff events on a single bend on the Wabash River, IL-IN, have provided an unprecedented opportunity to document the morphologic evolution and flow structure of chute cutoffs in a large, unregulated, meandering river. Here, we present results of ADCP measurements of three-dimensional flow velocity and bed topography at these cutoffs and describe a conceptual model for the morphodynamics of chute cutoffs prior to oxbow lake formation. Our results indicate that the flow structure at upstream and downstream ends of cutoff channels, prior to plugging of the entrance and exit of the abandoned bend with sediment, is analogous to flow through diffluence - confluence units. The interaction of this flow structure with an erodible bed and banks can cause rapid widening of the upstream end of the cutoff channel and bar development i) in the main channel where velocities are reduced, and ii) in the separation zone of the cutoff channel. Over time, these patterns of deposition and erosion will lead formation of an oxbow lake and complete capture of the flow by the cutoff channel.

  2. Quasi-steady-state air plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse sequence

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Chen, Shi-You; Ma, Jing-Long; Hou, Lei; Liao, Guo-Qian; Wang, Jin-Guang; Han, Yu-Jing; Liu, Xiao-Long; Teng, Hao; Han, Hai-Nian; Li, Yu-Tong; Chen, Li-Ming; Wei, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    A long air plasma channel can be formed by filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses. However, the lifetime of the plasma channel produced by a single femtosecond laser pulse is too short (only a few nanoseconds) for many potential applications based on the conductivity of the plasma channel. Therefore, prolonging the lifetime of the plasma channel is one of the key challenges in the research of femtosecond laser filamentation. In this study, a unique femtosecond laser source was developed to produce a high-quality femtosecond laser pulse sequence with an interval of 2.9 ns and a uniformly distributed single-pulse energy. The metre scale quasi-steady-state plasma channel with a 60–80 ns lifetime was formed by such pulse sequences in air. The simulation study for filamentation of dual femtosecond pulses indicated that the plasma channel left by the previous pulse was weakly affected the filamentation of the next pulse in sequence under our experimental conditions. PMID:26493279

  3. Bubble absorption by an air-filled helically-supported capillary channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshtipour, Negar; Thiessen, David

    2016-11-01

    Gas-liquid phase separation under microgravity conditions where buoyancy is not active represents a challenge for two-phase liquid-continuous space systems. Similar challenges are present in micro-scale electrochemical systems on Earth that generate gas bubbles in geometries where surface tension prevails over gravity. A possible ground-based application would be the removal of carbon dioxide bubbles from large aspect ratio channels in a direct-methanol fuel cell that could otherwise occlude the channel. In this study we use a 3-mm diameter stretched stainless-steel spring coated with a superhydrophobic layer to create a helically-supported capillary channel. Such a channel that is submerged in water and filled with air while vented to the atmosphere was found to absorb a stream of 2.5-mm diameter air bubbles at a rate of at least 36 bubbles/s. An optical detector and high-speed imaging system have been used to study bubble absorption dynamics. A significant finding is that the initial attachment of the bubble to the channel that involves the rupture of a thin film of water happens in less than 1 ms. The rapid rupture of the water film separating the bubble from the channel might be attributed to the roughness of the hydrophobic coating.

  4. An experimental validation of a turbulence model for air flow in a mining chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Wodziak, W.; Jaszczur, M.; Nowak, R.; Szmyd, J. S.

    2014-08-01

    In copper mines, excavation chambers are ventilated by jet fans. A fan is installed at the inlet of the dead-end chamber, which is usually 20-30m long. The effectiveness of ventilation depends on the stream range generated by the fan. The velocity field generated by the supply air stream is fully three-dimensional and the flow is turbulent. Currently, the parameters of 3D air flows are determined using the CFD approach. This paper presents the results of experimental testing and numerical simulations of airflow in a laboratory model of a blind channel, aired by a forced ventilation system. The aim of the investigation is qualitative and quantitative verification of computer modelling data. The analysed layout is a geometrically re-scaled and simplified model of a real object. The geometrical scale of the physical model is 1:10. The model walls are smooth, the channel cross-section is rectangular. Measurements were performed for the average airflow velocity in the inlet duct equal 35.4m/s, which gives a Reynolds number of about 180 000. The components of the velocity vector were measured using the Particle Image Velocimetry approach. The numerical procedures presented in this paper use two turbulence models: the standard k-ɛ model and the Reynolds Stress model. The experimental results have been compared against the results of numerical simulations. In the investigated domain of flow - extending from the air inlet to the blind wall of the chamber - we can distinguish two zones with recirculating flows. The first, reaching a distance of about lm from the inlet is characterized by intense mixing of air. A second vortex is formed into a distance greater than lm from the inlet. Such an image of the velocity field results from both the measurements and calculations. Based on this study, we can conclude that the RSM model provides better predictions than the standard k-ɛ model. Good qualitative agreement is achieved between Reynolds Stress model predictions and measured

  5. Flow Structures and Effects of Spatial Resolution on Turbulence Statistics in Rough Wall Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Joseph; Hong, Jiarong; Schultz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    PIV data obtained in the roughness sublayer of a turbulent channel flow is used for examining effects of spatial resolution on the magnitude, distribution, and trends of Reynolds stresses. Starting with a vector spacing of 63um (9-12 wall units), for roughness consisting of 0.45mm high pyramids at Reτ=3400-5418, spatial filtering of data causes major reduction in the magnitude of Reynolds stresses in the roughness sublayer. Although these reductions extend to well above the log layer, they increase with decreasing distance from the wall, especially for terms involving the wall-normal velocity fluctuation component, but also for the streamwise component. As expected, these effects increase with filter size, and are much higher for 2D filters in comparison to 1D ones. Consequently, trends of Reynolds stresses, and even mean flow profile vary significantly with filter properties. Spatial energy spectra and distributions of 2D swirling strength show the increasing role of small scale eddies on 2^nd order statistics as the wall is approached, which is attenuated by filtering.

  6. Flow-induced oscillations of tandem tethered cylinders in a channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gary; Michael, Tyler; Vlachos, Pavlos; Stremler, Mark

    2014-11-01

    In single degree-of-freedom (DOF) flow-induced oscillation studies of tandem rigid cylinders, the system most often consists of a front fixed cylinder and a trailing cylinder that is constrained to move perpendicular to the flow. We have conducted experiments in a water channel to investigate the behavior of a single DOF system of cylinders in which the trailing cylinder is constrained to move in a circular arc about the leading cylinder. We will discuss the dynamic response of the trailing cylinder for Reynolds numbers ranging from 10,000 to 20,000 and for inter-cylinder spacings from 3D to 5D, where D is the diameter of the cylinders. The experiments show a multi-frequency response that cannot be classified as a simple harmonic oscillator, as is assumed in typical tandem cylinder models. We compare our results with existing work on transversely constrained cylinders to determine the effect of tethering the cylinders. Work made possible by funding from the Virginia Commonwealth Research Commercialization Fund.

  7. A model for simulation of flow in singular and interconnected channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, R.A.; Goldberg, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model is presented for simulating the unsteady flow in singular riverine or estuarine reaches and in networks of reaches composed of interconnected channels. The model is both general and flexible in that it can be used to simulate a wide range of flow conditions for various channel configurations. The channel geometry of the network to be modeled should be sufficiently simple so as to lend itself to characterization in one spatial dimension. The flow must be substantially homogenous in density, and hydrostatic pressure must prevail everywhere in the network channels. The slope of each channel bottom ought to be mild and reasonably constant over its length so that the flow remains subcritical. The model accommodates tributary inflows and diversions and includes the effects of wind shear on the water surface as a forcing function in the flow equations. Water-surface elevations and flow discharges are computed at channel junctions, as well as at specified intermediate locations within the network channels. The one-dimensional branch-network flow model uses a four-point, implicit, finite-difference approximation of the unsteady-flow equations. The flow equations are linearized over a time step, and branch transformations are formulated that describe the relationship between the unknowns at the end points of the channels. The resultant matrix of branch-transformation equations and required boundary-condition equations is solved by Gaussian elimination using maximum pivot strategy. Five example applications of the flow model are illustrated. The applications cover such diverse conditions as a singular upland river reach in which unsteady flow results from hydropower regulations, coastal rivers composed of sequentially connected reaches subject to unsteady tide-driven flow, and a multiply connected network of channels whose flow is principally governed by wind tides and seiches in adjoining lakes. The report includes a listing of the FORTRAN

  8. Cold air drainage flows subsidize montane valley ecosystem productivity.

    PubMed

    Novick, Kimberly A; Oishi, A Christopher; Miniat, Chelcy Ford

    2016-12-01

    In mountainous areas, cold air drainage from high to low elevations has pronounced effects on local temperature, which is a critical driver of many ecosystem processes, including carbon uptake and storage. Here, we leverage new approaches for interpreting ecosystem carbon flux observations in complex terrain to quantify the links between macro-climate condition, drainage flows, local microclimate, and ecosystem carbon cycling in a southern Appalachian valley. Data from multiple long-running climate stations and multiple eddy covariance flux towers are combined with simple models for ecosystem carbon fluxes. We show that cold air drainage into the valley suppresses local temperature by several degrees at night and for several hours before and after sunset, leading to reductions in growing season respiration on the order of ~8%. As a result, we estimate that drainage flows increase growing season and annual net carbon uptake in the valley by >10% and >15%, respectively, via effects on microclimate that are not be adequately represented in regional- and global-scale terrestrial ecosystem models. Analyses driven by chamber-based estimates of soil and plant respiration reveal cold air drainage effects on ecosystem respiration are dominated by reductions to the respiration of aboveground biomass. We further show that cold air drainage proceeds more readily when cloud cover and humidity are low, resulting in the greatest enhancements to net carbon uptake in the valley under clear, cloud-free (i.e., drought-like) conditions. This is a counterintuitive result that is neither observed nor predicted outside of the valley, where nocturnal temperature and respiration increase during dry periods. This result should motivate efforts to explore how topographic flows may buffer eco-physiological processes from macroscale climate change.

  9. Characterising flow-vegetation interactions in open channel flows across a range of plant forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marjoribanks, T.; Hardy, R. J.; Lane, S. N.; Parsons, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamic interactions between flow and vegetation within open channels have important implications for channel management. Vegetation canopies can alter the mean and turbulent flow properties, via drag, which in turn can affect conveyance and sediment transport. Therefore, a good understanding of these interactions is key to effective river management. Consequently, much research has been conducted into canopy layer theory. This has predominantly focused on terrestrial (semi-rigid) canopies of a particular morphology, such that a good understanding of canopy layer turbulence structure within these canopies has been developed. This conceptual model of the canopy shear layer hypothesizes that roller vortices form at the canopy top, due to the inflection in the velocity profile. These vortices then develop further into hairpin vortices with associated turbulent quadrant events. However, there has been little investigation of turbulence structure above complex, highly flexible, aquatic macrophyte canopies of the kind often found in lowland rivers. Therefore, there is a need to characterize turbulent flow dynamics in such cases. Here we report on a series of high resolution numerical experiments over a wide range of plant forms. These experiments are undertaken using two biomechanical vegetation models, developed to represent different plant morphologies. The models are implemented within a Large Eddy Simulation framework, enabling investigation of time-dependent vortex generation and evolution at high temporal and spatial resolution. In order to investigate the role of characteristics such as canopy density and flexural rigidity in determining turbulent structure, experiments were conducted across a wide parameter set. The results from the semi-rigid canopies support previous work, showing the development of a canopy shear layer. However, as canopy density increases, the system switches and more closely resembles a boundary layer. For the highly flexible canopies

  10. Laboratory Modeling of Self-Formed Leveed Channels From Sediment-Laden Flows Entering Still Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowland, J. C.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2004-12-01

    Self-formed leveed channels constructed by deposition of suspended sediment from sediment-laden flows entering still water are common features in nature. Such channels drive delta progradation, develop at tidal inlets and occur where mainstem river flows empty into oxbows and blocked valley lakes. Presently there is no theory for the formation of such channels. This lack of theory is partly due to a lack of field or laboratory studies that provide insight about the mechanism controlling these self-formed, propagating channels. The creation of such features in the laboratory, have proved illusive to date. Our ongoing experiments aimed at modeling the formation of floodplain tie channels provide insight into the necessary conditions for levee formation and channel growth. Under conditions of steady water discharge, constant sediment feed rate, unimodal sediment distribution and invariant basin stage we are able to create subaqueous lateral bars (submerged levees) along the margins of a sediment laden jet. Our results highlight the sensitivity of channel formation to issues of scaling and experimental design. In the laboratory, levee formation has only been possible with the use of plastic particles (specific gravity ~1.5); complete bed alluviation and dune formation results from the use of particles with specific gravities of ~ 2.65 across a range grain diameters and shapes. We hypothesize this effect is related to high entrainment thresholds relative to suspension thresholds of small (< 100 mm) natural particles under conditions of reduced turbulence in laboratory scaled flows. Additionally, both the width to depth ratio and the form of the outlet channel introducing the sediment laden flow into the experimental basin exert a strong control on sedimentation pattern and levee growth. Continuing experiments are focused on generating emergent channel levees and a basin ward propagation of the channel by adjusting the form of the feed channel, varying basin stage, and

  11. Interfacial wave behavior in oil-water channel flows: Prospects for a general understanding

    SciTech Connect

    McCready, M.J.; Uphold, D.D.; Gifford, K.A.

    1997-12-31

    Oil-water pressure driven channel flow is examined as a model for general two-layer flows where interfacial disturbances are important. The goal is to develop sufficient understanding of this system so that the utility and limitations of linear and nonlinear theories can be known a priori. Experiments show that sometimes linear stability is useful at predicting the steady or dominant evolving waves. However in other situations there is no agreement between the linearly fastest growing wave and the spectral peak. An interesting preliminary result is that the bifurcation to interfacial waves is supercritical for all conditions that were studied for an oil-water channel flow, gas-liquid channel flow and two-liquid Couette flow. However, three different mechanisms are dominant for each of these three situations.

  12. Flow through an Array of Superhydrophopic Pillars: The Role of the Air-Water Interface Shape on Drag Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Rothstein, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    In this study, measurements of the pressure drop and the velocity fields associated with the flow of water through a regular array of superhydrophobic pillars were systematically performed to investigate the role of the air-water interface shape on drag reduction. A microfluidic channel was created with circular and superhydrophobic apple-core-shaped pillars bridging across the entire channel. The apple-core-shaped pillars were designed to trap an air pocket along the side of the pillars. The shape of the interface was systematically modified from concave to convex by changing the static pressure within the microchannel. For superhydrophobic pillars having a circular cross section, D /D0 = 1.0, a drag reduction of 7% and a slip velocity of 20% the average channel velocity along the air-water interface were measured. At large static pressures, the interface was driven into the pillars resulting in a decrease in the effective size of the pillars, an increase in the effective spacing between pillars and a pressure drop reduction of as much as 18% when the interface was compressed to D /D0 = 0.8. At low static pressures, the pressure drop increased significantly even as the slip velocity increased as the expanding air-water interface constricted flow through the array of pillars. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant CBET-1334962.

  13. Environmental flows can reduce the encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into river channels: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kimberly A; Webb, J Angus; de Little, Siobhan C; Stewardson, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Encroachment of riparian vegetation into regulated river channels exerts control over fluvial processes, channel morphology, and aquatic ecology. Reducing encroachment of terrestrial vegetation is an oft-cited objective of environmental flow recommendations, but there has been no systematic assessment of the evidence for and against the widely-accepted cause-and-effect mechanisms involved. We systematically reviewed the literature to test whether environmental flows can reduce the encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into river channels. We quantified the level of support for five explicit cause-effect hypotheses drawn from a conceptual model of the effects of flow on vegetation. We found that greater inundation, variously expressed as changes in the area, depth, duration, frequency, seasonality, and volume of surface water, generally reduces riparian vegetation abundance in channels, but most studies did not investigate the specific mechanisms causing these changes. Those that did show that increased inundation results in increased mortality, but also increased germination. The evidence was insufficient to determine whether increased inundation decreases reproduction. Our results contribute to hydro-ecological understanding by using the published literature to test for general cause-effect relationships between flow regime and terrestrial vegetation encroachment. Reviews of this nature provide robust support for flow management, and are more defensible than expert judgement-based approaches. Overall, we predict that restoration of more natural flow regimes will reduce encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into regulated river channels, partly through increased mortality. Conversely, infrequent deliveries of environmental flows may actually increase germination and subsequent encroachment.

  14. Environmental Flows Can Reduce the Encroachment of Terrestrial Vegetation into River Channels: A Systematic Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kimberly A.; Webb, J. Angus; de Little, Siobhan C.; Stewardson, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Encroachment of riparian vegetation into regulated river channels exerts control over fluvial processes, channel morphology, and aquatic ecology. Reducing encroachment of terrestrial vegetation is an oft-cited objective of environmental flow recommendations, but there has been no systematic assessment of the evidence for and against the widely-accepted cause-and-effect mechanisms involved. We systematically reviewed the literature to test whether environmental flows can reduce the encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into river channels. We quantified the level of support for five explicit cause-effect hypotheses drawn from a conceptual model of the effects of flow on vegetation. We found that greater inundation, variously expressed as changes in the area, depth, duration, frequency, seasonality, and volume of surface water, generally reduces riparian vegetation abundance in channels, but most studies did not investigate the specific mechanisms causing these changes. Those that did show that increased inundation results in increased mortality, but also increased germination. The evidence was insufficient to determine whether increased inundation decreases reproduction. Our results contribute to hydro-ecological understanding by using the published literature to test for general cause-effect relationships between flow regime and terrestrial vegetation encroachment. Reviews of this nature provide robust support for flow management, and are more defensible than expert judgement-based approaches. Overall, we predict that restoration of more natural flow regimes will reduce encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into regulated river channels, partly through increased mortality. Conversely, infrequent deliveries of environmental flows may actually increase germination and subsequent encroachment.

  15. Asymptotic Modeling of Flows in Micro-Channel by Using Macroscopic Balance Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatignol, Renée; Croizet, Cédric

    2011-05-01

    The introduction of a small parameter related to a micro-channel geometry and the application of the Principle of Least Degeneracy to the dimensionless Navier-Stokes equations produce models for the study of micro-channel flows with small Mach number and small or moderate Knudsen number. The first approximation of the asymptotic solution is calculated for a steady gas flow inside a micro-channel with a temperature gradient along the walls. In addition, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to analyze the same problem and some comparisons are presented. Analytical asymptotic solutions and DSMC numerical simulations found to be in very good agreement.

  16. Computation of Turbulent Recirculating Flow in Channels, and for Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Byong Hoon

    1992-01-01

    Fully elliptic forms of the transport equations have been solved numerically for two flow configurations. The first is turbulent flow in a channel with transverse rectangular ribs, and the second is impingement cooling of a plane surface. Both flows are relevant to proposed designs for active cooling of hypersonic vehicles using supercritical hydrogen as the coolant. Flow downstream of an abrupt pipe expansion and of a backward-facing step were also solved with various near-wall turbulence models as benchmark problems. A simple form of periodicity boundary condition was used for the channel flow with transverse rectangular ribs. The effects of various parameters on heat transfer in channel flow with transverse ribs and in impingement cooling were investigated using the Yap modified Jones and Launder low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model. For the channel flow, predictions were in adequate agreement with experiment for constant property flow, with the results for friction superior to those for heat transfer. For impingement cooling, the agreement with experiment was generally good, but the results suggest that improved modelling of the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy is required in order to obtain improved heat transfer prediction, especially near the stagnation point. The k-epsilon turbulence model was used to predict the mean flow and heat transfer for constant and variable property flows. The effect of variable properties for channel flow was investigated using the same turbulence model, but comparison with experiment yielded no clear conclusions. Also, the wall function method was modified for use in the variable properties flow with a non-adiabatic surface, and an empirical model is suggested to correctly account for the behavior of the viscous sublayer with heating.

  17. Experimental Investigation and Flow Process Computer Simulation of the Single Mini Channel Condenser for Vapor Compression Refrigeration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabilona, L. L.; Villanueva, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    This study is a computer simulation of the temperature profiles and experimental investigation of three 100 mm x 50 mm x 18 mm single mini channel condensers with hydraulic diameters of 3 mm, 2 mm, and 1mm. The mini channels which were made of copper were designed, fabricated and tested. Each unit was connected in a vapor compression cycle with R-134a as the refrigerant. The average refrigerant mass flow rates were varied from 1.296 - 69.471 g/s, and the average inlet and outlet condenser pressure variations were 102.5 - 121.8 kPa and 101.74 -121.23 kPa, respectively. Each condenser was placed inside a mini wind tunnel system where forced draft air was introduced to initiate convective heat transfer. Each condenser was tested and data were gathered every five minute interval for one hour using a Lab View Software. Computer simulations on the flow process were conducted using Solid Works software. The experimental results presented the inlet and outlet condenser pressures, and pressure drops. The experimental heat transfer coefficients were calculated at different mass fluxes during condensation. The values ranged from 3900 to 5200 W/m2-°K for the 3 mm, 2600 to 9000 W/m2-°K for the 2 mm, and 13 to 98 W/m2-°K for the 1 mm. The heat transfer coefficients calculated from experiments were then compared with the computed values using the correlations developed by Dittus-Boelter and Lee-Son. The results showed increasing deviation as the diameter decreased. The discrepancies could be attributed to the appropriateness of the Dittus-Boelter and Lee-Son correlations in small diameter channels, complexities in the flow process which involved two phase flow heat transfer in very small tubes, and the difficulties in attaining very accurate measurements in small channels.

  18. Effective slip for flow in a rotating channel bounded by stick-slip walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chiu-On

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to look into how system rotation may modify the role played by boundary slip in controlling flow through a rotating channel bounded by stick-slip walls. A semianalytical model is developed for pressure-driven flow in a slit channel that rotates about an axis perpendicular to its walls, which are superhydrophobic surfaces patterned with periodic alternating no-shear and no-slip stripes. The cases where the flow is driven by a pressure gradient parallel or normal to the stripes are considered. The effects of the no-shear area fraction on the velocities and effective slip lengths for the primary and secondary flows are investigated as functions of the rotation rate and the channel height. It is mathematically proved that the secondary flow rate is exactly the same in the two cases, irrespective of whether the primary flow is parallel or normal to the wall stripes. For any rotation speed, there is an optimal value of the no-shear area fraction at which the primary flow rate is maximum. This is a consequence of two competing effects: the no-shear part of the wall may serve to reduce the wall resistance, thereby enhancing the flow especially at low rotation, but it also weakens the formation of the near-wall Ekman layer, which is responsible for pumping the flow especially at high rotation. Wall slip in a rotating environment is to affect flow in the Ekman layer, but not flow in the geostrophic core.

  19. Effective slip for flow in a rotating channel bounded by stick-slip walls.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chiu-On

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to look into how system rotation may modify the role played by boundary slip in controlling flow through a rotating channel bounded by stick-slip walls. A semianalytical model is developed for pressure-driven flow in a slit channel that rotates about an axis perpendicular to its walls, which are superhydrophobic surfaces patterned with periodic alternating no-shear and no-slip stripes. The cases where the flow is driven by a pressure gradient parallel or normal to the stripes are considered. The effects of the no-shear area fraction on the velocities and effective slip lengths for the primary and secondary flows are investigated as functions of the rotation rate and the channel height. It is mathematically proved that the secondary flow rate is exactly the same in the two cases, irrespective of whether the primary flow is parallel or normal to the wall stripes. For any rotation speed, there is an optimal value of the no-shear area fraction at which the primary flow rate is maximum. This is a consequence of two competing effects: the no-shear part of the wall may serve to reduce the wall resistance, thereby enhancing the flow especially at low rotation, but it also weakens the formation of the near-wall Ekman layer, which is responsible for pumping the flow especially at high rotation. Wall slip in a rotating environment is to affect flow in the Ekman layer, but not flow in the geostrophic core.

  20. Two-phase flow instability and dryout in parallel channels in natural circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Hughes, E.D.

    1993-06-01

    The unique feature of parallel channel flows is that the pressure drop or driving head for the flow is maintained constant across any given channel by the flow in all the others, or by having a large downcomer or bypass in a natural circulation loop. This boundary condition is common in all heat exchangers, reactor cores and boilers, it is well known that the two-phase flow in parallel channels can exhibit both so-called static and dynamic instability. This leads to the question of the separability of the flow and pressure drop boundary conditions in the study of stability and dryout. For the areas of practical interest, the flow can be considered as incompressible. The dynamic instability is characterized by density (kinematic) or continuity waves, and the static instability by inertial (pressure drop) or manometric escalations. The static has been considered to be the zero-frequency or lowest mode of the dynamic case. We briefly review the status of the existing literature on both parallel channel static and dynamic instability, and the latest developments in theory and experiment. The difference between the two derivations lies in the retention of the time-dependent terms in the conservation equations. The effects and impact of design options are also discussed. Since dryout in parallel systems follows instability, it has been traditional to determine the dryout power for a parallel channel by testing a single channel with a given (inlet) flow boundary condition without particular regard for the pressure drop. Thus all modern dryout correlations are based on constant or fixed flow tests, a so-called hard inlet, and subchannel and multiple bundle effects are corrected for separately. We review the thinking that lead to this approach, and suggest that for all multiple channel and natural circulation systems close attention should be paid to the actual (untested) pressure drop conditions. A conceptual formulation is suggested as a basis for discussion.

  1. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-02-01

    A research program to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly, is discussed. Freon 11 is the working fluid involved. The specific objectives are: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls, (2) examine the effect channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel, and (3) develop an improved data reduction analysis.

  2. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    A research program to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly, is discussed. Freon 11 is the working fluid involved. The specific objectives are: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls, (2) examine the effect channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel, and (3) develop an improved data reduction analysis.

  3. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Smith, Alvin

    1990-02-01

    The use of flow boiling for thermal energy transport is intended to provide an alternative for accommodating higher heat fluxes in commercial space systems. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls, spiral fins, or both spiral fins and a twisted tape; (2) examine the effects of channel diameter and subcooling; and (3) develop an improved reduction analysis and/or suggest possible heat transfer correlation of the present data. Freon-11 is the working fluid. Two-dimensional (circumferential and axial) wall temperature distributions were measured for coolant channels with the above noted internal geometries. The flow regimes which are being studied are: (1) single phase; (2) subcooled flow boiling; and (3) stratified flow boiling. The inside diameter of all test sections is near 1.0 cm. Cicumferentially averaged heat transfer coefficients at several axial locations were obtained for selected coolant channels for a mass velocity of 210 kg/sq m s, an exit pressure of 0.19 MPa (absolute), and an inlet subcooling of 20.8 C. Overall (averaged over the entire channel) heat transfer coefficients were compared for the above channel geometries. This comparison showed that the channel with large pitch spiral fins had higher heat transfer coefficients at all power levels.

  4. VDAC channels mediate and gate the flow of ATP: implications for the regulation of mitochondrial function.

    PubMed Central

    Rostovtseva, T; Colombini, M

    1997-01-01

    The mitochondrial channel, VDAC, forms large (3 nm in diameter) aqueous pores through membranes. We measured ATP flow (using the luciferin/luciferase method) through these channels after reconstitution into planar phospholipid membranes. In the open state of VDAC, as many as 2 x 10(6) ATP molecules can flow through one channel per second. The half-maximum rate occurs at approximately 75 mM ATP. The permeability of a single channel for ATP is 1.1 x 10(-14) cm3/s (about 1 cm/s after correcting for cross-sectional area), which is 100 times less than the permeability for chloride and 10 times less than that for succinate. Channel closure results in a 50% reduction in conductance, showing that monovalent ions are still quite permeable, yet ATP flux is almost totally blocked. This is consistent with an electrostatic barrier that results in inversion of the selectivity of the channel and could be an example of how large channels selectively control the flow of charged metabolites. Thus VDAC is ideally suited to controlling the flow of ATP between the cytosol and the mitochondrial spaces. Images FIGURE 9 PMID:9129800

  5. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.; Smith, Alvin

    1990-01-01

    The use of flow boiling for thermal energy transport is intended to provide an alternative for accommodating higher heat fluxes in commercial space systems. The objectives are to: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls, spiral fins, or both spiral fins and a twisted tape; (2) examine the effects of channel diameter and subcooling; and (3) develop an improved reduction analysis and/or suggest possible heat transfer correlation of the present data. Freon-11 is the working fluid. Two-dimensional (circumferential and axial) wall temperature distributions were measured for coolant channels with the above noted internal geometries. The flow regimes which are being studied are: (1) single phase; (2) subcooled flow boiling; and (3) stratified flow boiling. The inside diameter of all test sections is near 1.0 cm. Cicumferentially averaged heat transfer coefficients at several axial locations were obtained for selected coolant channels for a mass velocity of 210 kg/sq m s, an exit pressure of 0.19 MPa (absolute), and an inlet subcooling of 20.8 C. Overall (averaged over the entire channel) heat transfer coefficients were compared for the above channel geometries. This comparison showed that the channel with large pitch spiral fins had higher heat transfer coefficients at all power levels.

  6. Geologic Controls on Channel Morphology and Low-Flow Habitat; Rattlesnake Creek, Santa Barbara, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, G.; Keller, E.

    2006-12-01

    Channel morphology and baseflow are limiting factors in sustaining low-flow habitat for the spawning and rearing of endangered southern steelhead trout in southern California. To aid the recovery of steelhead trout, it is imperative to determine how pools are formed and maintained in steep mountain streams, and what hydrogeologic factors control baseflow. Rattlesnake Creek, a steep (6 to 31%) boulder-bedrock channel in Santa Barbara, California, was investigated to determine if geologic and hydrogeologic properties, specifically rock strength and fracture density, control channel morphology and low-flow habitat. Analysis of rock strength, fracture density, and channel morphology using a single-factor analysis of variance, Kolmorgorov-Smirnov test and t-test suggest that rock strength and fracture density of the underlying lithology (bed and banks) does not significantly affect the channel morphology at the 0.05 level of significance. However, this study does show that boulder large roughness elements (LREs) armor the channel, controlling channel gradient and the location, abundance and type of pools. Step pools are the dominant pool type, found in reaches up to 18% where cascades might be expected, and steps are composed of resistant sandstone boulder LREs. Although fracture density does not influence the morphology of the channel, baseflow for low-flow habitat is predominantly supplied through fractures in the coldwater sandstone.

  7. Groundwater flow into underground openings in fractured crystalline rocks: an interpretation based on long channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, John H.; Woodman, Nicholas D.; Barker, John A.

    2017-03-01

    Rethinking an old tracer experiment in fractured crystalline rock suggests a concept of groundwater flow in sparse networks of long channels that is supported by results from an innovative lattice network model. The model, HyperConv, can vary the mean length of `strings' of connected bonds, and the gaps between them, using two independent probability functions. It is found that networks of long channels are able to percolate at lower values of (bond) density than networks of short channels. A general relationship between mean channel length, mean gap length and probability of percolation has been developed which incorporates the well-established result for `classical' lattice network models as a special case. Using parameters appropriate to a 4-m diameter drift located 360 m below surface at Stripa Mine Underground Research Laboratory in Sweden, HyperConv is able to reproduce values of apparent positive skin, as observed in the so-called Macropermeability Experiment, but only when mean channel length exceeds 10 m. This implies that such channel systems must cross many fracture intersections without bifurcating. A general relationship in terms of flow dimension is suggested. Some initial investigations using HyperConv show that the commonly observed feature, `compartmentalization', only occurs when channel density is just above the percolation threshold. Such compartments have been observed at Kamaishi Experimental Mine (Japan) implying a sparse flow network. It is suggested that compartments and skin are observable in the field, indicate sparse channel systems, and could form part of site characterization for deep nuclear waste repositories.

  8. Groundwater flow into underground openings in fractured crystalline rocks: an interpretation based on long channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, John H.; Woodman, Nicholas D.; Barker, John A.

    2016-12-01

    Rethinking an old tracer experiment in fractured crystalline rock suggests a concept of groundwater flow in sparse networks of long channels that is supported by results from an innovative lattice network model. The model, HyperConv, can vary the mean length of `strings' of connected bonds, and the gaps between them, using two independent probability functions. It is found that networks of long channels are able to percolate at lower values of (bond) density than networks of short channels. A general relationship between mean channel length, mean gap length and probability of percolation has been developed which incorporates the well-established result for `classical' lattice network models as a special case. Using parameters appropriate to a 4-m diameter drift located 360 m below surface at Stripa Mine Underground Research Laboratory in Sweden, HyperConv is able to reproduce values of apparent positive skin, as observed in the so-called Macropermeability Experiment, but only when mean channel length exceeds 10 m. This implies that such channel systems must cross many fracture intersections without bifurcating. A general relationship in terms of flow dimension is suggested. Some initial investigations using HyperConv show that the commonly observed feature, `compartmentalization', only occurs when channel density is just above the percolation threshold. Such compartments have been observed at Kamaishi Experimental Mine (Japan) implying a sparse flow network. It is suggested that compartments and skin are observable in the field, indicate sparse channel systems, and could form part of site characterization for deep nuclear waste repositories.

  9. Darcy Flow in a Wavy Channel Filled with a Porous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Donald D; Ogretim, Egemen; Bromhal, Grant S

    2013-05-17

    Flow in channels bounded by wavy or corrugated walls is of interest in both technological and geological contexts. This paper presents an analytical solution for the steady Darcy flow of an incompressible fluid through a homogeneous, isotropic porous medium filling a channel bounded by symmetric wavy walls. This packed channel may represent an idealized packed fracture, a situation which is of interest as a potential pathway for the leakage of carbon dioxide from a geological sequestration site. The channel walls change from parallel planes, to small amplitude sine waves, to large amplitude nonsinusoidal waves as certain parameters are increased. The direction of gravity is arbitrary. A plot of piezometric head against distance in the direction of mean flow changes from a straight line for parallel planes to a series of steeply sloping sections in the reaches of small aperture alternating with nearly constant sections in the large aperture bulges. Expressions are given for the stream function, specific discharge, piezometric head, and pressure.

  10. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    1991-01-01

    Future space exploration and commercialization will require more efficient heat rejection systems. For the required heat transfer rates, such systems must use advanced heat transfer techniques. Forced two phase flow boiling heat transfer with enhancements falls in this category. However, moderate to high quality two phase systems tend to require higher pressure losses. This report is divided into two major parts: (1) Multidimensional wall temperature measurement and heat transfer enhancement for top heated horizontal channels with flow boiling; and (2) Improved analytical heat transfer data reduction for a single side heated coolant channel. Part 1 summarizes over forty experiments which involve both single phase convection and flow boiling in a horizontal channel heated externally from the top side. Part 2 contains parametric dimensionless curves with parameters such as the coolant channel radius ratio, the Biot number, and the circumferential coordinate.

  11. A phenomenological continuum model for force-driven nano-channel liquid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbanian, Jafar; Celebi, Alper T.; Beskok, Ali

    2016-11-01

    A phenomenological continuum model is developed using systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of force-driven liquid argon flows confined in gold nano-channels at a fixed thermodynamic state. Well known density layering near the walls leads to the definition of an effective channel height and a density deficit parameter. While the former defines the slip-plane, the latter parameter relates channel averaged density with the desired thermodynamic state value. Definitions of these new parameters require a single MD simulation performed for a specific liquid-solid pair at the desired thermodynamic state and used for calibration of model parameters. Combined with our observations of constant slip-length and kinematic viscosity, the model accurately predicts the velocity distribution and volumetric and mass flow rates for force-driven liquid flows in different height nano-channels. Model is verified for liquid argon flow at distinct thermodynamic states and using various argon-gold interaction strengths. Further verification is performed for water flow in silica and gold nano-channels, exhibiting slip lengths of 1.2 nm and 15.5 nm, respectively. Excellent agreements between the model and the MD simulations are reported for channel heights as small as 3 nm for various liquid-solid pairs.

  12. Subcritical transition to turbulence in plane channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orszag, S. A.; Patera, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    A linear three dimensional mechanism for the transition of plane Poiseuille flows to turbulence is presented which provides good agreement with experimental observations. The mechanism is based on the evolution of states within a band of quasi-equilibria which slowly approach the stable upper branch solutions for the evolution of flow energy but which are strongly unstable to infinitesimal three-dimensional disturbances. Numerical simulation has shown that if two-dimensional flow persists long enough for the three-dimensional perturbations to attain finite amplitude, the resulting three dimensional flow quickly develops a turbulent character with nonperiodic behavior, and thus transition can be predicted from knowledge of the initial two- and three-dimensional energies and time scales. The mechanism predicts transition to turbulence at Reynolds numbers greater than 1000, as observed in experiments, and implies higher threshold three-dimensional energies in plane Couette flow.

  13. Turbulent combustion flow through variable cross section channel

    SciTech Connect

    Rogov, B.V.; Sokolova, I.A.

    1999-07-01

    The object of this study is to develop a new evolutionary numerical method for solving direct task of Laval nozzle, which provides non-iterative calculations of chemical reacting turbulent flows with detailed kinetic chemistry. The numerical scheme of fourth order along the normal coordinate and second order along the streamwise one is derived for calculation of difference-differential equations of the second order and the first order. Marching method provides the possibility of computing field flow in subsonic section of nozzle and near an expansion. Critical mass consumption is calculated with controlled accuracy. After critical cross section of nozzle a combined marching method with global iterations over axial pressure (only) makes it possible to overcome ill posedness of mixed supersonic flow and calculate the whole flow field near and after critical cross section. Numerical results are demonstrated on turbulent burning hydrogen-oxygen flow through Laval nozzle with curvature of wall K{sub w} = 0.5.

  14. 3D Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Buoyant Flow and Heat Transport in a Curved Open Channel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional buoyancy-extended version of kappa-epsilon turbulence model was developed for simulating the turbulent flow and heat transport in a curved open channel. The density- induced buoyant force was included in the model, and the influence of temperature stratification on flow field was...

  15. Flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable shallow microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Cognet, Vincent; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-11-01

    Laminar flow in devices fabricated from PDMS causes deformation of the passage geometry, which affects the flow rate-pressure drop relation. Having an accurate flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable microchannels is of importance given that the flow rate for a given pressure drop can be as much as 500% of the flow rate predicted by Poiseuille's law for a rigid channel. proposed a successful model of the latter phenomenon by heuristically coupling linear elasticity with the lubrication approximation for Stokes flow. However, their model contains a fitting parameter that must be found for each channel shape by performing an experiment. We present a perturbative derivation of the flow rate-pressure drop relation in a shallow deformable microchannel using Kirchoff-Love theory of isotropic quasi-static plate bending and Stokes' equations under a ``double lubrication'' approximation (i.e., the ratio of the channel's height to its width and of the channel's width to its length are both assumed small). Our result contains no free parameters and confirms Gervais et al.'s observation that the flow rate is a quartic polynomial of the pressure drop. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1132835.

  16. Pressure drop of two-phase dry-plug flow in round mini-channels: Effect of moving contact line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong

    2010-01-15

    In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of the two-phase dry-plug flow (dry wall condition at the gas portions) in round mini-channels was investigated. The air-water mixtures were flowed through the round mini-channels made of polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. In the dry-plug flow regime, the pressure drop measured became larger either by increasing the liquid superficial velocity or by decreasing the gas superficial velocity due to the increase of the number of the moving contact lines in the test section. In such a case, the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. Therefore, a pressure drop model of dry-plug flow was proposed through modification of the dynamic contact angle analysis taking account of the energy dissipation by the moving contact lines, which represents the experimental data within the mean deviation of 4%. (author)

  17. Additional research on instabilities in atmospheric flow systems associated with clear air turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical and experimental fluid mechanics studies were conducted to investigate instabilities in atmospheric flow systems associated with clear air turbulence. The experimental portion of the program was conducted using an open water channel which allows investigation of flows having wide ranges of shear and density stratification. The program was primarily directed toward studies of the stability of straight, stratified shear flows with particular emphasis on the effects of velocity profile on stability; on studies of three-dimensional effects on the breakdown region in shear layers; on the the interaction of shear flows with long-wave length internal waves; and on the stability of shear flows consisting of adjacent stable layers. The results of these studies were used to evaluate methods used in analyses of CAT encounters in the atmosphere involving wave-induced shear layer instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholta type. A computer program was developed for predicting shear-layer instability and CAT induced by mountain waves. This technique predicts specific altitudes and locations where CAT would be expected.

  18. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  19. Flow-activated chloride channels in vascular endothelium. Shear stress sensitivity, desensitization dynamics, and physiological implications.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Mamta; Shen, Yue; Thirkill, Twanda L; Douglas, Gordon C; Barakat, Abdul I

    2006-12-01

    Although activation of outward rectifying Cl(-) channels is one of the fastest responses of endothelial cells (ECs) to shear stress, little is known about these channels. In this study, we used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to characterize the flow-activated Cl(-) current in bovine aortic ECs (BAECs). Application of shear stress induced rapid development of a Cl(-) current that was effectively blocked by the Cl(-) channel antagonist 5-nitro-2-(3-phenopropylamino)benzoic acid (100 microM). The current initiated at a shear stress as low as 0.3 dyne/cm(2), attained its peak within minutes of flow onset, and saturated above 3.5 dynes/cm(2) approximately 2.5-3.5-fold increase over pre-flow levels). The Cl(-) current desensitized slowly in response to sustained flow, and step increases in shear stress elicited increased current only if the shear stress levels were below the 3.5 dynes/cm(2) saturation level. Oscillatory flow with a physiological oscillation frequency of 1 Hz, as occurs in disturbed flow zones prone to atherosclerosis, failed to elicit the Cl(-) current, whereas lower oscillation frequencies led to partial recovery of the current. Nonreversing pulsatile flow, generally considered protective of atherosclerosis, was as effective in eliciting the current as steady flow. Measurements using fluids of different viscosities indicated that the Cl(-) current is responsive to shear stress rather than shear rate. Blocking the flow-activated Cl(-) current abolished flow-induced Akt phosphorylation in BAECs, whereas blocking flow-sensitive K(+) currents had no effect, suggesting that flow-activated Cl(-) channels play an important role in regulating EC flow signaling.

  20. Forces driving fast flow channels, dipolarizations, and turbulence in the magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Alaoui, Mostafa; Richard, Robert L.; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Walker, Raymond J.

    2016-11-01

    Fast flow channels are a major contributor to earthward transport in the magnetotail. Fast flow channels originate at reconnection sites in the magnetotail and terminate with dipolarizations, earthward moving regions of enhanced magnetic field. We have used a global magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetotail dynamics during a substorm on 7 February 2009 to investigate the stresses in the plasma sheet. In particular, we present an analysis of forces in and around flow channels and dipolarizations. Earthward of the dipolarization magnetic and thermal pressure forces are nearly in equilibrium. Tailward of the dipolarization the pattern of stresses is complex, but several general features are evident. In the earthward flow channel the magnetic tension force dominates. In the dipolarization a tailward magnetic force is partially balanced by the earthward pressure force. The stresses in azimuth (y) are variable. In some places they cause the flow stream to meander, while in others they cause the stream to become wider or narrower. A major consequence of fast earthward flow channels is that they drive large-scale vortices that initiate turbulence.

  1. An air traffic flow management method based on mixed genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ying

    2009-12-01

    With the air traffic congest problem becoming more and more severe, the study of air traffic flow management is more and more important. According to the character of air traffic flow management, the author analyzed the heuristic method and genetic algorithms, later put this two method together and give a new method of air traffic flow management-mixture genetic algorithms, It has global convergence, the simulation result demonstrates that the presented algorithm is effective.

  2. Air flow paths and porosity/permeability change in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin

    2007-04-02

    This study develops methods to estimate the change in soil characteristics and associated air flow paths in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging. These objectives were achieved by performing combined in situ air sparging and tracer testing, and comparing the breakthrough curves obtained from the tracer gas with those obtained by a numerical simulation model that incorporates a predicted change in porosity that is proportional to the air saturation. The results reveal that revising the porosity and permeability according to the distribution of gas saturation is helpful in breakthrough curve fitting, however, these changes are unable to account for the effects of preferential air flow paths, especially in the zone closest to the points of air injection. It is not known the extent to which these preferential air flow paths were already present versus created, increased, or reduced as a result of the air sparging experiment. The transport of particles from around the sparging well could account for the overall increase in porosity and permeability observed in the study. Collection of soil particles in a monitoring well within 2m of the sparging well provided further evidence of the transport of particles. Transport of particles from near the sparging well also appeared to decrease the radius of influence (ROI). Methods for predicting the effects of pressurized air injection and water flow on the creation or modification of preferential air flow paths are still needed to provide a full description of the change in soil conditions that accompany air sparging.

  3. Effects of an emergent vegetation patch on channel reach bathymetry and stability during repeated unsteady flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Kevin A.; Crowe Curran, Joanna

    2016-11-01

    While research into the interaction between in-channel vegetation, flow, and bed sediment has increased in recent years, there is still a need to understand how unsteady flows affect these processes, particularly in terms of channel bed adjustments. In this study, flume experiments tested two flood hydrograph sizes run over sand/gravel and sand/silt beds to evaluate reach scale impacts of a midchannel vegetation patch of variable stem density on channel bathymetry and stability. Alternating flood hydrographs with periods of low, steady flow created flow sequences reflective of an extended unsteady flow regime, thereby simulating time scales consisting of multiple flood events. Digital elevation models provided detailed measurements of channel change following each flood event to enable analysis over each unsteady flow sequence. The vegetation patch created characteristic channel bathymetries dependent on sediment mixture and patch density that in all cases resulted in a more variable bed structure than channels without a patch. Reach scale stability, quantified based on net volumetric bed change, only occurred with a sparse patch in the low flood sequence, corresponding with little variation in surface composition and structure. In most other cases, scour measured at the patch prevented stability at the reach scale, especially in the finer substrate. Overall, findings show that a channel may only adjust to a stable bathymetry upon addition of a midchannel vegetation patch within a limited range of flow regimes and patch stem densities, and that for the experimental conditions tested here, in-stream patches generally did not enhance reach scale bed stability.

  4. Flow characteristics on the blade channel vortex in the Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P. C.; Wang, Z. N.; Luo, X. Q.; Wang, Y. L.; Zuo, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the long-term hydraulic development of Francis turbine, the blade channel vortex phenomenon was investigated systematically from hydraulic design, experimental and numerical computation in this paper. The blade channel vortex difference between the high water head and low water head turbine was also analyzed. Meanwhile, the relationship between the blade channel vortex and the operating stability of hydraulic turbine was also investigated. The results show that the phenomenon of blade channel vortex is an intrinsic property for Francis turbine under small flow rate condition, the turning-point of the blade channel vortex inception curve appears at low unit speed region, and the variation trend of the blade channel vortex inception curve is closely related to the blade inlet edge profile. In addition to, the vortex of the high water head turbine can generally be excluded from the stable operation region, while which is more different for the one of the low water head turbine.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of chemical fouling in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hanbyeol; Choi, Haecheon

    2016-11-01

    In heat exchanger industries, the fouling deposition on solid surfaces causes serious problems such as impaired heat transfer and increased pressure drop. Thus, the prediction and mitigation of fouling deposits has been an important issue. In the present study, we conduct direct numerical simulation of a fully developed channel flow. We assume that fluid flows as a slurry flow and the apparent viscosity is calculated using Thomas' equation. We also assume that a second order reaction with single soluble reactant occurs and a highly viscous product is accumulated at high-temperature wall. Two passive scalar equations are solved along with the Navier-Stokes equations to obtain the mass fraction of the reactant and the temperature in the channel. The reactant flows into the channel at the inlet, and the highly viscous product is stuck on the wall and forms a fouling layer.

  6. Preconditioning Method Applied to Near-Critical Carbon-Dioxide Flows in Micro-Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Toratani, Masayuki; Sasao, Yasuhiro

    A numerical method for simulating near-critical carbon-dioxide flows in a micro-channel is presented. This method is based on the preconditioning method applied to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The Peng-Robinson equation of state is introduced to evaluate the properties of near-critical fluids. As numerical examples, Near-critical carbon-dioxide flows in a square cavity and in a micro-channel are calculated and the calculated results are compared with the experimental data and the theoretical results. Finally, we demonstrate that the compressibility dominates the near-critical carbon-dioxide flows in a micro-channel even if the flow is very slow and the Reynolds number is very low.

  7. Statistical Characterization of River and Channel Network Formation in Intermittently Flowing Vortex Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, C. J.; Reichhardt, C.; Nori, F.

    1997-03-01

    Vortices moving in dirty superconductors can form intricate flow patterns, resembling fluid rivers, as they interact with the pinning landscape (F. Nori, Science 271), 1373 (1996).. Weaker pinning produces relatively straight vortex channels, while stronger pinning results in the formation of one or more winding channels that carry all flow. This corresponds to a crossover from elastic flow to plastic flow as the pinning strength is increased. For several pinning parameters, we find the fractal dimension of the channels that form, the vortex trail density, the distance travelled by vortices as they pass through the sample, the branching ratio, the sinuosity, and the size distribution of the rivers, and we compare our rivers with physical rivers that follow Horton's laws.

  8. Comparing two methods of simulating mirco-scale viscous flows in a porous channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hui; Han, Jie; Jin, Yan; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2007-11-01

    Water flows in natural soil porous media are important to colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants and other phenomena with groundwater as the carrier. The 3D micro-scale flow is complicated due to the complex geometry. The transport and deposition of colloids in such flows are affected by several physical and chemical forces involved. In this talk, we first compare two methods of simulating viscous flows in both 2D and 3D channels filled with glass-bead particles. The first method is Physalis developed by Prosperetti's group, at Johns Hopkins, based on solving the Navier-Stokes equation using a combination of numerical solution and local analytical Stokes flow representation. The second method is a meso-scale approach by solving a lattice Boltzmann equation. Specific implementation issues will be discussed. The two methods yield almost identical flows. Preliminary simulation results as well as parallel experimental results on colloid deposition in the porous channel will also be presented.

  9. Unsteady Turbulent Flows in Channels with Parallel or Diverging Walls

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    2.5 sec to infinity,although the largest period studied was 132 sec.The time period was repeatable within 0.1%. The flow loop provided very stable and...Turbulent Flow in a Pipe" PCH PhyslcoChemical Hydrodynamics, 10.N" 5/6, 585 40 HOUDEVILLE R., JULLIEN J.E., COUSTEIX J., 1984 "Mesure du Frottement Paridtal

  10. Flow visualization study in high aspect ratio cooling channels for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Giuliani, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The structural integrity of high pressure liquid propellant rocket engine thrust chambers is typically maintained through regenerative cooling. The coolant flows through passages formed either by constructing the chamber liner from tubes or by milling channels in a solid liner. Recently, Carlile and Quentmeyer showed life extending advantages (by lowering hot gas wall temperatures) of milling channels with larger height to width aspect ratios (AR is greater than 4) than the traditional, approximately square cross section, passages. Further, the total coolant pressure drop in the thrust chamber could also be reduced, resulting in lower turbomachinery power requirements. High aspect ratio cooling channels could offer many benefits to designers developing new high performance engines, such as the European Vulcain engine (which uses an aspect ratio up to 9). With platelet manufacturing technology, channel aspect ratios up to 15 could be formed offering potentially greater benefits. Some issues still exist with the high aspect ratio coolant channels. In a coolant passage of circular or square cross section, strong secondary vortices develop as the fluid passes through the curved throat region. These vortices mix the fluid and bring lower temperature coolant to the hot wall. Typically, the circulation enhances the heat transfer at the hot gas wall by about 40 percent over a straight channel. The effect that increasing channel aspect ratio has on the curvature heat transfer enhancement has not been sufficiently studied. If the increase in aspect ratio degrades the secondary flow, the fluid mixing will be reduced. Analysis has shown that reduced coolant mixing will result in significantly higher wall temperatures, due to thermal stratification in the coolant, thus decreasing the benefits of the high aspect ratio geometry. A better understanding of the fundamental flow phenomena in high aspect ratio channels with curvature is needed to fully evaluate the benefits of this

  11. Ozone concentrations in air flowing into New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksic, Nenad; Kent, John; Walcek, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Ozone (O3) concentrations measured at Pinnacle State Park (PSPNY), very close to the southern border of New York State, are used to estimate concentrations in air flowing into New York. On 20% of the ozone season (April-September) afternoons from 2004 to 2015, mid-afternoon 500-m back trajectories calculated from PSPNY cross New York border from the south and spend less than three hours in New York State, in this area of negligible local pollution emissions. One-hour (2p.m.-3p.m.) O3 concentrations during these inflowing conditions were 46 ± 13 ppb, and ranged from a minimum of 15 ppb to a maximum of 84 ppb. On average during 2004-2015, each year experienced 11.8 days with inflowing 1-hr O3 concentrations exceeding 50 ppb, 4.3 days with O3 > 60 ppb, and 1.5 days had O3 > 70 ppb. During the same period, 8-hr average concentrations (10a.m. to 6p.m.) exceeded 50 ppb on 10.0 days per season, while 3.9 days exceeded 60 ppb, and 70 ppb was exceeded 1.2 days per season. Two afternoons of minimal in-state emission influences with high ozone concentrations were analyzed in more detail. Synoptic and back trajectory analysis, including comparison with upwind ozone concentrations, indicated that the two periods were characterized as photo-chemically aged air containing high inflowing O3 concentrations most likely heavily influenced by pollution emissions from states upwind of New York including Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Ohio. These results suggest that New York state-level attempts to comply with National Ambient Air Quality Standards by regulating in-state O3 precursor NOx and organic emissions would be very difficult, since air frequently enters New York State very close to or in excess of Federal Air Quality Standards.

  12. Unstable flow of worm-like micelles in rectangular microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salipante, Paul; Hudson, Steven

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a jetting instability of shear banding worm-like micelle (WLM) solutions in microfluidic channels with rectangular cross-sections. The flow is tracked using both 3-D and 2-D particle tracking methods in channels of different aspect ratio, size, and wall materials. We observe that the instability forms in high aspect ratio channels within an intermediate range of volumetric flows. The location of the high velocity jet in the channel appears to be sensitive to stress localizations induced by channel defects and wall roughness. A lower concentration WLM solution, with a monotonic stress curve, does not show the banding instability but displays non-negligible velocity gradients across the channel width. The transient development of the instability at the entrance of the microfluidic channel is observed in various geometries. The experimental measurements are compared to finite volume simulations using the Johnson-Segalman viscoelastic model. The simulations show a qualitatively similar behavior to our experimental observations and indicate that normal stresses in the cross stream directions lead to the development of the jetting flow.

  13. A Self-Replication Model for Long Channelized Lava Flows on the Mars Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented for channelized lava flows emplaced by a self-replicating, levee-building process over long distances on the plains of Mars. Such flows may exhibit morphologic evidence of stagnation, overspills, and upstream breakouts. However, these processes do not inhibit the formation and persistence of a prominent central channel that can often be traced for more than 100 km. The two central assumptions of the self-replication model are (1) the flow advances at the average upstream velocity of the molten core and (2) the fraction of the lava that travels faster than the average upstream velocity forms stationary margins in the advancing distal zone to preserve the self-replication process. For an exemplary 300 km long flow north of Pavonis Mons, the model indicates that 8 m of crust must have formed during emplacement, as determined from the channel and levee dimensions. When combined with independent thermal dynamic estimates for the crustal growth rate, relatively narrow constraints are obtained for the flow rate (2250 m3 s 1), emplacement duration (600 d), and the lava viscosity of the molten interior (106 Pa s). Minor, transient overspills and breakouts increase the emplacement time by only a factor of 2. The primary difference between the prodigious channelized Martian flows and their smaller terrestrial counterparts is that high volumetric flow rates must have persisted for many hundreds of days on Mars, in contrast to a few hours or days on Earth.

  14. Visualization of Secondary Flow Development in High Aspect Ratio Channels with Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Giuliani, James E.

    1994-01-01

    The results of an experimental project to visually examine the secondary flow structure that develops in curved, high aspect-ratio rectangular channels are presented. The results provide insight into the fluid dynamics within high aspect ratio channels. A water flow test rig constructed out of plexiglass, with an adjustable aspect ratio, was used for these experiments. Results were obtained for a channel geometry with a hydraulic diameter of 10.6 mm (0.417 in.), an aspect ratio of 5.0, and a hydraulic radius to curvature radius ratio of 0.0417. Flow conditions were varied to achieve Reynolds numbers up to 5,100. A new particle imaging velocimetry technique was developed which could resolve velocity information from particles entering and leaving the field of view. Time averaged secondary flow velocity vectors, obtained using this velocimetry technique, are presented for 30 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees into a 180 degrees bend and at a Reynolds number of 5,100. The secondary flow results suggest the coexistence of both the classical curvature induced vortex pair flow structure and the eddies seen in straight turbulent channel flow.

  15. Effects of roughness on density-weighted particle statistics in turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-31

    The distribution of inertial particles in turbulent flows is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the coherent turbulent structures which develop in the carrier flow field. In wall-bounded flows, these turbulent structures, which control the turbulent regeneration cycles, are strongly affected by the roughness of the wall, nevertheless its effects on the particle transport in two-phase turbulent flows has been still poorly investigated. The issue is discussed here by addressing DNS combined with LPT to obtain statistics of velocity and preferential accumulation of a dilute dispersion of heavy particles in a turbulent channel flow, bounded by irregular two-dimensional rough surfaces, in the one-way coupling regime.

  16. Simulations of Direct Current Glow Discharges in Supersonic Air Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, there have been a significant number of computational and experimental studies investigating the application of plasma discharges as actuators for high speed flow control. The relative importance of the actuation mechanisms: volumetric heating and electrostatic forcing can be established by developing self-consistent models of the plasma and bulk supersonic flow. To simulate the plasma discharge in a supersonic air stream, a fluid model of the glow discharge is coupled with a compressible Navier-Stokes solver in a self-consistent manner. Source terms for the momentum and energy equations are calculated from the plasma model and input into the Navier-Stokes solver. In turn, the pressure, gas temperature and velocity fields from the Navier-Stokes solution are fed back into the plasma model. The results include plasma species number density contour maps in the absence and presence of Mach 3 supersonic flow, and the corresponding effect of the glow discharge on gas dynamic properties such as the gas pressure and temperature. We also examine the effect of increasing the discharge voltage on the structure of the discharge and its corresponding effect on the supersonic flow.

  17. Numerical simulation of air flow in a model of lungs with mouth cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcner, Jakub; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The air flow in a realistic geometry of human lung is simulated with computational flow dynamics approach as stationary inspiration. Geometry used for the simulation includes oral cavity, larynx, trachea and bronchial tree up to the seventh generation of branching. Unsteady RANS approach was used for the air flow simulation. Velocities corresponding to 15, 30 and 60 litres/min of flow rate were set as boundary conditions at the inlet to the model. These flow rates are frequently used as a representation of typical human activities. Character of air flow in the model for these different flow rates is discussed with respect to future investigation of particle deposition.

  18. Secrets of the code: do vascular endothelial cells use ion channels to decipher complex flow signals?

    PubMed

    Barakat, Abdul I; Lieu, Deborah K; Gojova, Andrea

    2006-02-01

    The ability of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) to respond to changes in blood flow is essential for both vasoregulation and arterial wall remodelling, while abnormalities in endothelial responsiveness to flow play an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. Endothelial flow responses also have important implications for the field of vascular tissue engineering. In response to changes in fluid dynamic shear stress, ECs exhibit humoral, metabolic, and structural responses. Significantly, ECs respond differently to different types of shear stress. For instance, steady shear stress elicits a profile of responses that differs drastically from oscillatory shear stress. Although our understanding of flow-induced signaling has advanced greatly over the past two decades, how ECs sense shear forces remains to be established. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which ECs discriminate among different flow waveforms are unknown. Activation of flow-sensitive ion channels is one of the most rapid known responses to flow in ECs. In this paper, we argue in favor of an important role for ion channels in shear stress sensing in ECs and propose that these channels may endow ECs with the ability to resolve components of a complex flow signal and hence distinguish among different types of flow.

  19. Thermal analysis and two-directional air flow thermal management for lithium-ion battery pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kuahai; Yang, Xi; Cheng, Yongzhou; Li, Changhao

    2014-12-01

    Thermal management is a routine but crucial strategy to ensure thermal stability and long-term durability of the lithium-ion batteries. An air-flow-integrated thermal management system is designed in the present study to dissipate heat generation and uniformize the distribution of temperature in the lithium-ion batteries. The system contains of two types of air ducts with independent intake channels and fans. One is to cool the batteries through the regular channel, and the other minimizes the heat accumulations in the middle pack of batteries through jet cooling. A three-dimensional anisotropic heat transfer model is developed to describe the thermal behavior of the lithium-ion batteries with the integration of heat generation theory, and validated through both simulations and experiments. Moreover, the simulations and experiments show that the maximum temperature can be decreased to 33.1 °C through the new thermal management system in comparison with 42.3 °C through the traditional ones, and temperature uniformity of the lithium-ion battery packs is enhanced, significantly.

  20. Hydrodynamic Coupling in Microbially Mediated Fracture Mineralization: Formation of Self-Organized Groundwater Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunn, R. J.; El Mountassir, G.; MacLachlan, E.; Moir, H.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence of fossilized microorganisms embedded within mineral veins and mineral-filled fractures has been observed in a wide range of geological environments. Microorganisms can act as sites for mineral nucleation and also contribute to mineral precipitation by inducing local geochemical changes. In this study, we explore fundamental controls on microbially induced mineralization in rock fractures. Specifically, we systematically investigate the influence of hydrodynamics (velocity, flow rate, aperture) on microbially mediated calcite precipitation. We use a case study of microbially induced calcite precipitation as a model biomineralization system to investigate potential feedback mechanisms between the temporally varying patterns of mineral precipitation within a fracture and the resulting variations in the local velocity field. Fractures are represented as a series of precision-etched parallel channels between a pair of sealed Perspex plates. Multiple channels are designed to maintain a constant flow rate, whilst independently adjusting channel aperture and width to explore the effects of aperture and fluid velocity on biomineral precipitation. Our experimental results demonstrate that a feedback mechanism exists between the gradual reduction in fracture aperture due to precipitation, and its effect on the local fluid velocity. This feedback results in mineral fill distributions that focus flow into a small number of self-organizing channels that remain open, ultimately controlling the final aperture profile that governs flow within the fracture. This feedback mechanism exists because precipitation on the fracture walls (as opposed to in solution) requires the bacteria to be transported to the fracture surface. Bacteria settle out of a quiescent solution at a velocity that is dependent on individual floc size and density. This settling velocity competes with the bed shear velocity, inhibiting deposition via entrainment. As precipitation progresses, the flow

  1. A Rotary Flow Channel for Shear Stress Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed shear sensor calibrator consists of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangential to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau(sub omega) = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. With numerical values of mu = 31 (mu)Pa s (neon at room temperature), r = 0.5 m, omega = 754 /s (7200 rpm), and h = 50.8 m, a shear stress of tau(sub omega) = 231 Pa can be generated. An analysis based on one-dimensional flow, with the flow velocity having only an angular component as a function of the axial and radial coordinates, yields corrections to the above simple formula for the curvature of the wheel, flatness of the sensor, and finite width of the wheel. It is assumed that the sensor mount contains a trough (sidewalls) to render a velocity release boundary condition at the edges of the rim. The Taylor number under maximum flow conditions is found to be 62.3, sufficiently low to obviate flow instability. The fact that the parameters entering into the evaluation of the shear stress can be measured to high accuracy with well-defined uncertainties makes the proposed calibrator suitable for a physical standard for shear stress calibration.

  2. Comparison of the AIRS, IASI, and CrIS 900 cm-1 channel for Dome Concordia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, H. H.; Elliott, Denis; Manning, Evan

    2016-09-01

    We compare AIRS, IASI-A and CrIS under the cold conditions encountered in the daily overpasses of Dome Concordia, located on a high plateau in Antarctica, between May 2012 and March 2016. The mean brightness temperature at DomeC for the 900 cm-1 atmospheric window channel is 218K, but it varies seasonally from 185K to 255K. Averaged over all simultaneous overpass data AIRS is 26+/-13 mK warmer than IASI-A, AIRS is 116+/-7 mK colder than CrIS. This is excellent agreement and consistent with SNO analysis in the literature. However, we find that differences for both AIRS/IASI-A and AIRS/CrIS are temperature dependent. AIRS is 120 mK colder at 200K, but 150 mK warmer at 230K than IASI-A. AIRS is 120 mK colder at 200K, 50mK colder at 230K than CrIS. Differences and scene temperature sensitivity of this magnitude have also been reported by other investigators. A scene temperature dependence bias can create a sampling bias which need to be taken into account when comparing data from current instruments, and even more so when analyzing data from vintage instruments with respect to climate change.

  3. Phonatory air flow characteristics of adductor spasmodic dysphonia and muscle tension dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Higgins, M B; Chait, D H; Schulte, L

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if phonatory air flow characteristics differed among women with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), and normal phonation. Phonatory air flow signals were gathered during [pa] syllable repetitions. Mean phonatory air flow, coefficients of variation, and the presence of large air flow perturbations (75 ml/s or more) were examined for the three groups of speakers. There was no significant difference in mean phonatory air flow across groups, and very large intersubject variation in mean phonatory air flow occurred for both the AdSD and MTD groups. Coefficients of variation were similar for the groups of women with MTD and normal phonation but were significantly larger for the group with AdSD. Air flow perturbations were common with AdSD and rare with MTD. Relatively large coefficients of variation and air flow perturbations of at least 75 ml/s did occur for some women with normal voices who were 70 years of age or older. It appears that intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow may aid in the differentiation of AdSD and MTD when used in conjunction with other elements of a thorough voice evaluation. However, the potential contribution of aging to increased intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow must be considered when interpreting findings.

  4. Improved Determination of Surface and Atmospheric Temperatures Using Only Shortwave AIRS Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind,Joel

    2009-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. AIRS is a grating spectrometer with a number of linear arrays of detectors with each detector sensitive to outgoing radiation in a characteristic frequency v(sub i) with a spectral band pass delta v(sub i) of roughly v(sub i) /1200. AIRS contains 2378 spectral channels covering portions of the spectral region 650 cm(exp -1) (15.38 gm) - 2665 cm(exp -1)' (3.752 micrometers). These spectral regions contain significant absorption features from two CO2 absorption bands, the 15 micrometer (longwave) CO2 band, and the 4.3 micrometer (shortwave) CO, absorption band. There are also two atmospheric window regions, the 12 micrometerm - 8 micrometer (longwave) window, and the 4.17 micrometer - 3.75 micrometer (shortwave) window. Historically, determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures from satellite observations was performed using primarily observations in the longwave window and CO2 absorption regions. One reason for this was concerns about the effects, during the day, of reflected sunlight and non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (non-LTE) on the observed radiances in the shortwave portion of the spectrum. According to cloud clearing theory, more accurate soundings of both surface skin and atmospheric temperatures can be obtained under partial cloud cover conditions if one uses the longwave channels to determine cloud cleared radiances R(sub i) for all channels, and uses R(sub i) only from shortwave channels in the determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures. This procedure is now being used by the AIRS Science Team in preparation for the AIRS Version 6 Retrieval Algorithm. This paper describes how the effects on the radiances of solar radiation reflected by clouds and the Earth's surface, and also of non-LTE, are accounted for in the analysis of the data. Results are presented for both

  5. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  6. Air-structure coupling features analysis of mining contra-rotating axial flow fan cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q. G.; Sun, W.; Li, F.; Zhang, Y. J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction between contra-rotating axial flow fan blade and working gas has been studied by means of establishing air-structure coupling control equation and combining Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational solid mechanics (CSM). Based on the single flow channel model, the Finite Volume Method was used to make the field discrete. Additionally, the SIMPLE algorithm, the Standard k-ε model and the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian dynamic grids technology were utilized to get the airflow motion by solving the discrete governing equations. At the same time, the Finite Element Method was used to make the field discrete to solve dynamic response characteristics of blade. Based on weak coupling method, data exchange from the fluid solver and the solid solver was processed on the coupling interface. Then interpolation was used to obtain the coupling characteristics. The results showed that the blade's maximum amplitude was on the tip of the last-stage blade and aerodynamic force signal could reflect the blade working conditions to some extent. By analyzing the flow regime in contra-rotating axial flow fan, it could be found that the vortex core region was mainly in the blade surface, the hub and the blade clearance. In those regions, the turbulence intensity was very high. The last-stage blade's operating life is shorter than that of the pre-stage blade due to the fatigue fracture occurs much more easily on the last-stage blade which bears more stress.

  7. Electron inertia effect on incompressible plasma flow in a planar channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrikov, M. B.; Taiurskii, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    > In this paper, we consider a one-fluid model of electromagnetic hydrodynamics (EMHD) of quasi-neutral plasma, with ion and electron inertia fully taken into account. The EMHD and the MHD models are compared with regard to solving the classical problem of steady flow of incompressible plasma in a planar channel. In the MHD theory, the solution is given by the Hartmann flow, whereas in the EMHD model, the diagram of the longitudinal velocity is shown to be significantly different from the Hartmann profile: in particular, near-wall flows and a counterflow appear, while the flow velocity may significantly deviate from the direction of the antigradient pressure causing plasma to flow (the so-called hydrodynamic `Hall effect'). This study shows that the EMHD and the MHD planar channel theories are practically the same for liquid metal plasma and are very different for gas plasma.

  8. Entrainment at a sediment concentration interface in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Jorge; Shringarpure, Mrugesh; Cantero, Mariano; Balachandar, S.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we address the role of turbulence on entrainment at a sediment concentration interface. This process can be conceived as the entrainment of sediment-free fluid into the bottom sediment-laden flow, or alternatively, as the entrainment of sediment into the top sediment-free flow. We have performed direct numerical simulations for fixed Reynolds and Schmidt numbers while varying the values of Richardson number and particle settling velocity. The analysis performed shows that the ability of the flow to pick up a given sediment size decreases with the distance from the bottom, and thus only fine enough sediment particles are entrained across the sediment concentration interface. For these cases, the concentration profiles evolve to a final steady state in good agreement with the well-known Rouse profile. The approach towards the Rouse profile happens through a transient self-similar state. Detailed analysis of the three dimensional structure of the sediment concentration interface shows the mechanisms by which sediment particles are lifted up by tongues of sediment-laden fluid with positive correlation between vertical velocity and sediment concentration. Finally, the mixing ability of the flow is addressed by monitoring the center of mass of the sediment-laden layer. With the support of ExxonMobil, NSF, ANPCyT, CONICET.

  9. The Extent of Channelized Basal Water Flow Under the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, J.; Johnson, J. V.; Harper, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial ice flows due to a combination of deformation and basal sliding, with sliding accounting for most of the fastest ice flow. Basal sliding is controlled by the transport of water at the glacier's bed, which can be accomplished through both high pressure, low discharge, distributed flow, or low pressure, high discharge, channelized flow. Higher pressures are generally associated with more complete decoupling of a glacier from its bed and faster flow. As the intensity of summer melt in Greenland has increased, our poor understanding of the drainage network's discharge capacity and its coupling to sliding has generated fundamental questions, such as: will larger fluxes of liquid water promote or inhibit basal sliding? To investigate this question we have implemented a model of distributed and channelized flow developed by Werder et. al 2013. The sensitivity of the modeled channel network to basal and surface geometry, melt rate, boundary conditions, and other parameters is examined in a sequence of experiments using synthetic geometries. Expanding on these experiments, we run the model with realistic surface and bedrock data from Issunguata Sermia in Western Central Greenland. These experiments benefit from a wealth of in-situ data, including observations of basal water pressure. Our results suggest that the development of large channels is limited to the margins of the ice sheet, and that higher pressures continue to prevail in the interior.

  10. Quantifying downstream impacts of impoundment on flow regime and channel planform, lower Trinity River, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Slattery, Michael C.; Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2005-07-01

    As human population worldwide has grown, so has interest in harnessing and manipulating the flow of water for the benefit of humans. The Trinity River of eastern Texas is one such watershed greatly impacted by engineering and urbanization. Draining the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, just under 30 reservoirs are in operation in the basin, regulating flow while containing public supplies, supporting recreation, and providing flood control. Lake Livingston is the lowest, as well as largest, reservoir in the basin, a mere 95 km above the Trinity's outlet near Galveston Bay. This study seeks to describe and quantify channel activity and flow regime, identifying effects of the 1968 closure of Livingston dam. Using historic daily and peak discharge data from USGS gauging stations, flow duration curves are constructed, identifying pre- and post-dam flow conditions. A digital historic photo archive was also constructed using six sets of aerial photographs spanning from 1938 to 1995, and three measures of channel activity applied using a GIS. Results show no changes in high flow conditions following impoundment, while low flows are elevated. However, the entire post-dam period is characterized by significantly higher rainfall, which may be obscuring the full impact of flow regulation. Channel activity rates do not indicate a more stabilized planform following dam closure; rather they suggest that the Trinity River is adjusting itself to the stress of Livingston dam in a slow, gradual process that may not be apparent in a modern time scale.

  11. Equilibria and Travelling wave solutions for Couette and channel flows with longitudinal grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadarevu, Sabarish; Sharma, Ati; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2016-11-01

    Several classes of exact solutions for canonical flows have been computed by earlier researchers. These solutions are known to inform the flow of turbulence in state-space. We extend two classes of exact solutions, equilibria and travelling wave solutions, from flat-walled Couette and channel flows to grooved geometries with groove-amplitudes as high as 20% of channel half-height. These solutions provide insight into the mechanics of how a wavy wall could influence turbulent flow. Plotting scalars such as the average shear stress at the wall and the bulk velocity (for channel flows) allows us to identify branches of solutions that could have greater contributions to turbulence, and reconcile the curious phenomenon of drag reduction observed in some riblet-mounted boundary layer flows. Earlier researchers have proposed using modified boundary conditions (imposed on flat surfaces) as a substitute to imposing the traditional no-slip and impermeability conditions on a rough wall. We compare solutions for grooved flows to those for flat-walled flows with modified boundary conditions to evaluate the validity of such simplification to non-laminar solutions.

  12. Regular patterns in the information flow of local dephasing channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldi, Filippo

    2017-02-01

    Consider local dephasing processes of a qubit that interacts with a structured reservoir of frequency modes or a thermal bath, with Ohmic-like spectral density (SD). It is known that non-Markovian evolution appears uniquely above a temperature-dependent critical value of the Ohmicity parameter and non-Markovianity can be induced by properly engineering the external environment. In the same scenario, we find regular patterns in the flow of quantum information: Alternate directions appear in correspondence with periodic intervals of the Ohmicity parameter α0. The information flows back into the system over long times at zero temperature for 2 +4 n <α0<4 +4 n , where n =0 ,1 ,2 ,..., and at nonvanishing temperatures for 3 +4 n <α0<5 +4 n . Under special conditions, backflow of information appears also for nonvanishing, even natural values of the Ohmicity parameter, at zero temperature, and for odd natural values at nonvanishing temperatures. Otherwise, the long-time information flows into the environment. In the transition from vanishing to arbitrary nonvanishing temperature, the long-time backflow of information is stable for 3 +4 n <α0<4 +4 n , while it is reversed for 2 +4 n <α0<3 +4 n and 4 +4 n <α0<5 +4 n . The patterns in the information flow are not altered if the low-frequency Ohmic-like profiles of the SDs are perturbed with additional factors that consist in arbitrary powers of logarithmic forms. Consequently, the flow of information can be controlled, directed, and reversed over long times by engineering a wide variety of reservoirs that includes and continuously departs from the Ohmic-like structure at low frequencies. Non-Markovianity and recoherence appear according to the same rules along with the backflow of information.

  13. On the extension of LES methods from incompressible to compressible turbulent flows with application to turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, J. B.; Báez Vidal, A.; Lehmkuhl, O.; Pérez Segarra, C. D.; Oliva, A.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the present work is to validate the compressible Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) models implemented in the in house parallel unstructured CFD code TermoFluids. Our research team has implemented and tested several LES models over the past years for the incompressible regimen. In order to be able to solve complex turbulent compressible flows, the models are revisited and modified if necessary. In addition, the performance of the implemented hybrid advection scheme is an issue of interest for the numerical simulation of turbulent compressible flows. The models are tested in the well known turbulent channel flow problem at different compressible regimens.

  14. Navier-Stokes computations of laminar compressible and incompressible vortex flows in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmeier, U.; Mitra, N. K.; Fiebig, M.

    To investigate the structure of compressible and incompressible vortices behind a small delta wing in a channel at low Reynolds and Mach numbers, computer programs have been developed to solve complete three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and energy equations. Results show qualitatively similar vortex formation, flattening of the vortex core, and movement of the core away from the channel center and towards the bottom wall for both incompressible and compressible flows.

  15. An evolutionary outlook of air traffic flow management techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistan, Trevor; Gardi, Alessandro; Sabatini, Roberto; Ramasamy, Subramanian; Batuwangala, Eranga

    2017-01-01

    In recent years Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) has become pertinent even in regions without sustained overload conditions caused by dense traffic operations. Increasing traffic volumes in the face of constrained resources has created peak congestion at specific locations and times in many areas of the world. Increased environmental awareness and economic drivers have combined to create a resurgent interest in ATFM as evidenced by a spate of recent ATFM conferences and workshops mediated by official bodies such as ICAO, IATA, CANSO the FAA and Eurocontrol. Significant ATFM acquisitions in the last 5 years include South Africa, Australia and India. Singapore, Thailand and Korea are all expected to procure ATFM systems within a year while China is expected to develop a bespoke system. Asia-Pacific nations are particularly pro-active given the traffic growth projections for the region (by 2050 half of all air traffic will be to, from or within the Asia-Pacific region). National authorities now have access to recently published international standards to guide the development of national and regional operational concepts for ATFM, geared to Communications, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management and Avionics (CNS+A) evolutions. This paper critically reviews the field to determine which ATFM research and development efforts hold the best promise for practical technological implementations, offering clear benefits both in terms of enhanced safety and efficiency in times of growing air traffic. An evolutionary approach is adopted starting from an ontology of current ATFM techniques and proceeding to identify the technological and regulatory evolutions required in the future CNS+A context, as the aviation industry moves forward with a clearer understanding of emerging operational needs, the geo-political realities of regional collaboration and the impending needs of global harmonisation.

  16. Large woody debris and flow resistance in step-pool channels, Cascade Range, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Janet H.; Wohl, Ellen E.

    2003-01-01

    Total flow resistance, measured as Darcy-Weisbach f, in 20 step-pool channels with large woody debris (LWD) in Washington, ranged from 5 to 380 during summer low flows. Step risers in the study streams consist of either (1) large and relatively immobile woody debris, bedrock, or roots that form fixed, or “forced,” steps, or (2) smaller and relatively mobile wood or clasts, or a mixture of both, arranged across the channel by the stream. Flow resistance in step-pool channels may be partitioned into grain, form, and spill resistance. Grain resistance is calculated as a function of particle size, and form resistance is calculated as large woody debris drag. Combined, grain and form resistance account for less than 10% of the total flow resistance. We initially assumed that the substantial remaining portion is spill resistance attributable to steps. However, measured step characteristics could not explain between-reach variations in flow resistance. This suggests that other factors may be significant; the coefficient of variation of the hydraulic radius explained 43% of the variation in friction factors between streams, for example. Large woody debris generates form resistance on step treads and spill resistance at step risers. Because the form resistance of step-pool channels is relatively minor compared to spill resistance and because wood in steps accentuates spill resistance by increasing step height, we suggest that wood in step risers influences channel hydraulics more than wood elsewhere in the channel. Hence, the distribution and function, not just abundance, of large woody debris is critical in steep, step-pool channels.

  17. Extended plasma channels created by UV laser in air and their application to control electric discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V. D. Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    Results are presented from a series of experimental and theoretical studies on creating weakly ionized extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by 248-nm UV laser radiation and their application to control long high-voltage discharges. The main mechanisms of air ionization by UV laser pulses with durations from 100 fs to 25 ns and intensities in the ranges of 3×10{sup 11}–1.5×10{sup 13} and 3×10{sup 6}–3×10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}, respectively, which are below the threshold for optical gas breakdown, as well as the main relaxation processes in plasma with a density of 10{sup 9}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, are considered. It is shown that plasma channels in air can be efficiently created by amplitude-modulated UV pulses consisting of a train of subpicosecond pulses producing primary photoelectrons and a long UV pulse suppressing electron attachment and sustaining the density of free electrons in plasma. Different modes of the generation and amplification of trains of subterawatt subpicosecond pulses and amplitude-modulated UV pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were implemented on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid Ti:sapphire-KrF laser facility. The filamentation of such UV laser beams during their propagation in air over distances of up to 100 m and the parameters of the corresponding plasma channels were studied experimentally and theoretically. Laser initiation of high-voltage electric discharges and control of their trajectories by means of amplitude-modulated UV pulses, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of breakdowns in air gaps with length of up to 80 cm, were studied.

  18. Fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in constricted channel flows and their effect on the onset of separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip

    1992-07-01

    The development of fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in high Reynolds number flow in a symmetrically constricted channel is investigated. Attention is restricted to the case of 'strongly' constricted channels considered by Smith and Daniels (1981) for which the scaled constriction height is asymptotically large. Such flows are known to develop a Goldstein singularity and subsequently become separated at some downstream station past the point of maximum channel constriction. It is shown that these flows can support fully nonlinear Goertler vortices, of the form elucidated by Hall and Lakin (1988), for constrictions which have an appreciable region of local concave curvature upstream of the position at which separation occurs. The effect on the onset of separation due to the nonlinear Goertler modes is discussed. A brief discussion of other possible nonlinear states which may also have a dramatic effect in delaying (or promoting) separation is given.

  19. Splitter imperfections in annular split-flow thin separation channels: effect on nonspecific crossover.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Stephen; Moore, Lee R; Chalmers, Jeffrey J; Zborowski, Maciej

    2003-03-15

    The separation performance of split-flow thin (SPLITT) separation channels generally falls short of ideal behavior. There are many possible contributing factors to the loss of separation resolution, and these are discussed in the text. The possibility that small imperfections in the splitters play a significant role is examined in this study. Computational fluid dynamics is used to determine the flow pattern within an annular SPLITT channel having small imperfections in the inlet splitter. These results are used to calculate the nonspecific crossover of particles from the inner annular inlet to the outer annular outlet under various flow rate regimes. Nonspecific crossover, obtained through convective transport alone, and not the result of field-induced transport, is often used as a check of channel behavior. The results of a typical experimental determination of nonspecific crossover are included for comparison. It is concluded that geometrical imperfections can indeed play a significant role in the loss of resolution observed for these systems.

  20. THE PATTERN OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH DURING SPEECH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, H.; AND OTHERS

    SINCE THE 19TH CENTURY, KYMOGRAPHIC RECORDING OF TOTAL AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH HAS BEEN USED TO DIAGNOSE THE VARYING DURATIONS AND DEGREES OF CONSTRICTIONS OF THE VOCAL TRACT DURING SPEECH. THE PRESENT PROJECT ATTEMPTS TO INTRODUCE A SECOND DIMENSION TO RECORDINGS OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH--NAMELY, CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA OF FLOW--ON THE…

  1. An analysis of steady/unsteady electroosmotic flows through charged cylindrical nano-channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, A. K.

    2013-11-01

    The steady/unsteady electroosmotic flow in an infinitely extended cylindrical channel with diameters ranging from 10 to 100 nm has been investigated. A mixture of (NaCl + H2O) is considered for the numerical calculation of the mass, potential, velocity, and mixing efficiency. Results are obtained for the channel diameters are small, equal, or greater than the electric double layer (EDL) both for steady and unsteady cases. In the present discussion, a symmetrical distribution of mole fractions is considered at the wall interface. Hence, the velocity and potential are symmetrical in nature toward the centerline of the channel, and also identical in nature at maximum and minimum time levels (i.e., at π/2 and 3 π/2 for a periodic function) in the transient case. In case of steady flows, the velocity and potential satisfy the chemical equilibrium condition at the centerline. It is observed that the electric double layer reaches a local equilibrium in the presence of electroosmosis when the channel length is long compared to the characteristic hydraulic diameter and the flow is essentially one-dimensional, which depends only on channel diameter. Comparisons of NP (Nernst Plank) model with PB (Poisson-Boltzmann) model are achieved out for different published results at larger channel diameters.

  2. Computational modeling of flow and combustion in a couette channel simulating microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ghaleb

    Theoretically a Couette flow in a narrow channel can be utilized to simulate microgravity conditions experienced by a surface flame due to the linear velocity profile. Hence, the Couette channel is a potential apparatus for the study of flame spread in an environment that recreated microgravity flow conditions. Simulated microgravity conditions were achieved by limiting the vertical extent over and under the flame to suppress buoyancy. This numerical study was done for a 2-D channel using Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS). This thesis is divided into two sections; the first is the study of Couette flow with a non-reacting cold flow in a finite length channel, a subject with surprisingly little past research, despite the ubiquity of "infinite" Couette channels in text books. The channel was placed in a room to allow for a better representation of a realistic channel and allow the flow and pressure field to develop without forcing them at the inlet and outlet. The plate's velocities, channel's gap and the channel's length were varied and the results of the u-velocity profile, w-velocity profile and pressure were investigated. The entrance length relationship with Reynolds number for a finite Couette Channel was determined for the first time - as far as the author knows - in order to ensure the flame occurs in a fully developed flow. In contrast to an infinite channel, the u-velocity was found to be nonlinear due to an adverse pressure differential created along the channel attributed to the pull force along the entrance of the channel created by the top plate a well as the pressure differential created by the flow exiting the channel. The linearity constant was derived for the one moving plate case. The domain consisted of a rectangular region with the top plate moving and the bottom plate fixed except for a few cases in which the bottom plate also moved and were compared with only one moving plate. The second section describes the combustion of a thin cellulose sample

  3. Theory for nanoparticle retention time in the helical channel of quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-05-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a separation and characterization technique for magnetic nanoparticles such as those used for cell labeling and for targeted drug therapy. A helical separation channel is used to efficiently exploit the quadrupole magnetic field. The fluid and sample components therefore have angular and longitudinal components to their motion in the thin annular space occupied by the helical channel. The retention ratio is defined as the ratio of the times for non-retained and a retained material to pass through the channel. Equations are derived for the respective angular and longitudinal components to retention ratio.

  4. Tree-ring records of variation in flow and channel geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merigliano, M.F.; Friedman, J. M.; Scott, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    We review the use of tree rings to date flood disturbance, channel change, and sediment deposition, with an emphasis on rivers in semi-arid landscapes in the western United States. As watershed area decreases and aridity increases, large floods have a more pronounced and sustained effect on channel width and location, resulting in forest area-age distributions that are farther from a steady-state exponential relation. Furthermore, forests along three major snowmelt rivers in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA, have smaller than expected areas of young trees, suggesting that high flows and channel migration have decreased since the late 1800s.

  5. Air-Flow Navigated Crystal Growth for TIPS Pentacene-Based Organic Thin-Film Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Chen, Jihua; Sun, Zhenzhong; Szulczewski, Greg; Li, Dawen

    2012-01-01

    6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS pentacene) is a promising active channel material of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) due to its solubility, stability, and high mobility. However, the growth of TIPS pentacene crystals is intrinsically anisotropic and thus leads to significant variation in the performance of OTFTs. In this paper, air flow is utilized to effectively reduce the TIPS pentacene crystal anisotropy and enhance performance consistency in OTFTs, and the resulted films are examined with optical microscopy, grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, and thin-film transistor measurements. Under air-flow navigation (AFN), TIPS pentacene drop-cast from toluene solution has been observed to form thin films with improved crystal orientation and increased areal coverage on substrates, which subsequently lead to a four-fold increase of average hole mobility and one order of magnitude enhancement in performance consistency defined by the ratio of average mobility to the standard deviation of the field-effect mobilities.

  6. Build up An Operational Flood Simulation from Existing 1D Channel Flow Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Che-Hao; Hsu, Chih-Tsung; Wu, Shiang-Jen; Lien, Ho-Cheng; Shen, Jhih-Cyuan; Chung, Ming-Ko

    2016-04-01

    Several 2D flood simulations will be developed for urban area in recent years in Taiwan. Original ideas focus on the static flood maps produced by the 2D flood simulation with respect to design events, which could be useful no matter for planning or disaster awareness. However, an extra bonus is expected to see if we can reuse the 2D flood simulation framework for operational use or not. Such a project goal inspire us to setup a standard operation procedure before any progress from existing 1D channel flow works. 3 key issues are taken into account in the SOP: 1. High Resolution Terrain: A 1m resolution digital terrain model (DTM) is considered as a reference. The Channels and structures should be setup in 1D channel flow works if we can identify under such high resolution. One should examine the existing 1D channel flow works consistent with the DTM or not. 2. Meteo Stations Referenced: Real time precipitation would be send to referenced location in RR models during an operational forecast. Existing 1D channels flow works are usually specifically for design events which are not necessarily equipped with such references. 3. Time Consuming: A full scale 2D flood simulation needs a lot of computation resources. A solution should be derived within practical time limits. Under the above consideration, some impacts and procedures will be analyzed and developed to setup the SOP for further model modification.

  7. The Evolution of Finite Amplitude Wavetrains in Plane Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, R. E.; Hall, P.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a viscous incompressible fluid flow driven between two parallel plates by a constant pressure gradient. The flow is at a finite Reynolds number, with an 0(l) disturbance in the form of a traveling wave. A phase equation approach is used to discuss the evolution of slowly varying fully nonlinear two dimensional wavetrains. We consider uniform wavetrains in detail, showing that the development of a wavenumber perturbation is governed by Burgers equation in most cases. The wavenumber perturbation theory, constructed using the phase equation approach for a uniform wavetrain, is shown to be distinct from an amplitude perturbation expansion about the periodic flow. In fact we show that the amplitude equation contains only linear terms and is simply the heat equation. We review, briefly, the well known dynamics of Burgers equation, which imply that both shock structures and finite time singularities of the wavenumber perturbation can occur with respect to the slow scales. Numerical computations have been performed to identify areas of the (wavenumber, Reynolds number, energy) neutral surface for which each of these possibilities can occur. We note that the evolution equations will breakdown under certain circumstances, in particular for a weakly nonlinear secondary flow. Finally we extend the theory to three dimensions and discuss the limit of a weak spanwise dependence for uniform wavetrains, showing that two functions are required to describe the evolution. These unknowns are a phase and a pressure function which satisfy a pair of linearly coupled partial differential equations. The results obtained from applying the same analysis to the fully three dimensional problem are included as an appendix.

  8. The effects of stream bank vegetation on the flow characteristics and turbulent flow field of the main channel.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, M.; Yagci, O.; McGann, N. J.; Turker, U.

    2014-12-01

    Over the last two decades, the role of vegetation in the environmental and ecological restoration of surface water bodies has received much attention. Numerous studies have investigated the effects of vegetation on flow velocity at various locations ranging from the floodplain, river-bank and main channel. There is a general agreement amongst such studies, that the presence of vegetation may cause a decrease in flow velocity locally, followed by increased flows laterally, in non-vegetated regions. This experimental study attempts to present the findings of an elaborate set of flow measurements that aim at quantifying changes to the flow field at the main channel, at the bank inside the vegetated region and at their interface, for increasing vegetation density. To this goal an inclined section is constructed with acrylic panels sloping at, in a 1.8m wide re-circulating flume, to simulate the stream-bank. The main-channel bed comprises of coarse sand of 1.5mm nominal diameter, while 6mm diameter acrylic rods are used to simulate the vegetated river-bank. Ten velocity and turbulent intensity profiles are developed across the test cross-section, for each vegetation density, via acoustic Doppler velocimetry along a fine measurement grid. The experiments are run under uniform flow and stable bed conditions, for a range of six different vegetation densities changed by adding more vegetation elements in a staggered arrangement along the stream-bank. These detailed observations are further analyzed, with emphasis on the effects on the main channel. Measurements near the bed with implications for sediment transport are further discussed.

  9. New sensor for measurement of low air flow velocity. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Hashemian, M.; Riggsbee, E.T.

    1995-08-01

    The project described here is the Phase I feasibility study of a two-phase program to integrate existing technologies to provide a system for determining air flow velocity and direction in radiation work areas. Basically, a low air flow sensor referred to as a thermocouple flow sensor has been developed. The sensor uses a thermocouple as its sensing element. The response time of the thermocouple is measured using an existing in-situ method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) test. The response time results are then converted to a flow signal using a response time-versus-flow correlation. The Phase I effort has shown that a strong correlation exists between the response time of small diameter thermocouples and the ambient flow rate. As such, it has been demonstrated that thermocouple flow sensors can be used successfully to measure low air flow rates that can not be measured with conventional flow sensors. While the thermocouple flow sensor developed in this project was very successful in determining air flow velocity, determining air flow direction was beyond the scope of the Phase I project. Nevertheless, work was performed during Phase I to determine how the new flow sensor can be used to determine the direction, as well as the velocity, of ambient air movements. Basically, it is necessary to use either multiple flow sensors or move a single sensor in the monitoring area and make flow measurements at various locations sweeping the area from top to bottom and from left to right. The results can then be used with empirical or physical models, or in terms of directional vectors to estimate air flow patterns. The measurements can be made continuously or periodically to update the flow patterns as they change when people and objects are moved in the monitoring area. The potential for using multiple thermocouple flow sensors for determining air flow patterns will be examined in Phase II.

  10. On the impact of entrapped air in infiltration under ponding conditions: Part a: Preferential air flow path effects on infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbord, N.; Mizrahi, G.; Furman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Entrapped air effects on infiltration under ponding conditions could be important for massive infiltration of managed aquifer recharge or soil aquifer treatment. Earlier studies found that under ponding conditions air could reduce infiltration by 70-90%. Most studies have dealt with entrapped air effects when soil surface topography is flat. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of: (1) irregular surface topography on preferential air flow path development; (2) preferential air flow path on infiltration; and (3) hydraulic head on infiltration when air is trapped. Column experiments were used to investigate these particular effects. A 140 cm deep and 30 cm wide column packed with silica sand was used under two boundary conditions: in the first, air can only escape vertically upward through the soil surface; in the second, air is free to escape. The surface was flooded with 13 liters of water, with ponding depth decreasing with time. Two soil surface conditions were tested: flat surface and irregular. It was found that in irregular surfaces, stable air flow through preferential paths was developed in the high altitude zones. Flat surface topography caused unstable air flow through random paths. Comparison between irregular and flat surface topography showed that the entrapped air pressure was lower and the infiltration rate was about 40% higher in the irregular surface topography than in the flat surface topography. No difference of infiltration rate between flat and irregular surface topography was observed when air was free to escape along the infiltration path. It was also found that at the first stage of infiltration, higher hydraulic heads caused higher entrapped air pressures and lower infiltration rates. In contrast, higher hydraulic head results in higher infiltration rate, when air was free to escape. Our results suggest that during ponding conditions: (1) preferential air flow paths develop at high surface zones of irregular topography

  11. LES - IB analysis of a flow in channel with an adverse pressure gradient.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Księżyk, M.; Tyliszczak, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents results of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a flow in a channel with an adverse pressure gradient. The applied computational code (SAILOR) is based on a high-order compact finite difference scheme on half-staggered meshes and is combined with an Immersed Boundary (IB) method. The IB method is implemented using the direct forcing approach in a simplified stepwise variant. The results are verified using the experimental data and the general agreement is good. The observed discrepancies are small close to the inlet section and increase along the channel length where strong flow separation occurs.

  12. The Influence of Electrode and Channel Configurations on Flow Battery Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Darling, RM; Perry, ML

    2014-05-21

    Flow batteries with flow-through porous electrodes are compared to cells with porous electrodes adjacent to either parallel or interdigitated channels. Resistances and pressure drops are measured for different configurations to augment the electrochemical data. Cell tests are done with an electrolyte containing VO2+ and VO2+ in sulfuric acid that is circulated through both anode and cathode from a single reservoir. Performance is found to depend sensitively on the combination of electrode and flow field. Theoretical explanations for this dependence are provided. Scale-up of flow through and interdigitated designs to large active areas is also discussed. (C) 2014 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Flow pattern changes influenced by variation of viscosities of a heterogeneous gas-liquid mixture flow in a vertical channel

    SciTech Connect

    Keska, Jerry K.; Hincapie, Juan; Jones, Richard

    2011-02-15

    In the steady-state flow of a heterogeneous mixture such as an air-liquid mixture, the velocity and void fraction are space- and time-dependent parameters. These parameters are the most fundamental in the analysis and description of a multiphase flow. The determination of flow patterns in an objective way is extremely critical, since this is directly related to sudden changes in spatial and temporal changes of the random like characteristic of concentration. Flow patterns can be described by concentration signals in time, amplitude, and frequency domains. Despite the vital importance and countless attempts to solve or incorporate the flow pattern phenomena into multiphase models, it has still been a very challenging topic in the scientific community since the 1940's and has not yet reached a satisfactory solution. This paper reports the experimental results of the impact of fluid viscosity on flow patterns for two-phase flow. Two-phase flow was created in laboratory equipment using air and liquid as phase medium. The liquid properties were changed by using variable concentrations of glycerol in water mixture which generated a wide-range of dynamic viscosities ranging from 1 to 1060 MPa s. The in situ spatial concentration vs. liquid viscosity and airflow velocity of two-phase flow in a vertical ID=50.8 mm pipe were measured using two concomitant computer-aided measurement systems. After acquiring data, the in situ special concentration signals were analyzed in time (spatial concentration and RMS of spatial concentration vs. time), amplitude (PDF and CPDF), and frequency (PSD and CPSD) domains that documented broad flow pattern changes caused by the fluid viscosity and air velocity changes. (author)

  14. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture, or its equivalent. (2) A suitable supply of compressed air filtered to remove... specimen. The weight of the test specimen shall be that weight prescribed for the air flow instrument...

  15. Role of slip on the Yih-Marangoni instability in an interface dominated channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Geetanjali; Usha, R.

    2015-11-01

    A linear stability analysis of Poiseuille flow of two immiscible fluids of different viscosities and densities in a slippery channel, in the presence of an insoluble surfactant at the interface is examined, within the framework of Orr-Sommerfeld system. The equations governing the flow system are solved numerically by a Chebyshev collocation method for a wide range of dimensionless parameters describing the flow system. The effects of slip on the neutral stability boundaries for the interface modes in the presence/absence of an insoluble surfactant at the interface are examined for different thickness ratios of the two layers. Slip conditions at the wall show a promise for control of the Yih-Marangoni instability of the corresponding flow system in a rigid channel. The influence of the parameters on the critical Reynolds number for the shear mode is assessed. The interaction between the two modes under the influence of different parameters displays interesting scenarios such as coalescence of modes. The study reveals that it is possible to control instabilities in interface dominated rigid channel flows by designing the walls of the channel as hydrophobic/rough/porous or undulated surfaces as these can be modeled as one with slip at the substrates.

  16. Effects of viscosity in a partially ionized channel flow with thermionic emission

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2009-01-15

    The flow of the partially ionized gas inside thermionic hollow cathodes spans a diverse range of theoretical disciplines in plasma physics and fluid mechanics. Understanding and predicting the evolution of such flows has many practical implications because hollow cathodes are critical components of electric propulsion systems used onboard scientific and commercial spacecraft presently in space or in the mission planning stages. As space missions become more demanding of the propulsion system in terms of throughput, understanding and predicting failure mechanisms of the system becomes imperative. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of the partially ionized gas generated by a thermionic hollow cathode have been performed to quantify the effects of viscosity inside the cylindrical channel of the device. A comparison of the inviscid and fully viscous flow fields shows that viscosity has a significant impact on the atomic species and a lesser effect on the ions. The internal pressure is determined to be more than 40% higher compared to the inviscid solution and the Reynolds number for the flow of atoms is found to be less than 20 inside the channel. Although the Mach number is computed to be <0.1 for approximately 95% of the channel, the solution for the velocity flow field begins to deviate from the Poiseuille (parabolic) solution at about 50% of the channel due mainly to collisional drag with ions.

  17. Taylor-Aris dispersion in time-dependent laminar channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedel, Søren; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-11-01

    The effective axial diffusion of solute concentrations advected in channel flows is known as Taylor-Aris dispersion [1,2]. Due to the no-slip condition, particles near the walls are displaced less than those close to the channel center axis, leading to concentration gradient perpendicular to the axis and an enhanced axial diffusivity. In many applications the velocity field is unsteady, but concentration dispersion in such time-dependent flows is largely unexplored, except for transient dispersion of an initial concentration profile in a steady flow [3], and dispersion in a velocity field with one harmonically oscillating component superimposed on a steady component [4]. We present a mathematical theory for Taylor-Aris dispersion in a straight channel with an arbitrary time- dependent flow, based on Fourier expansion of the velocity field, valid for all times and all values of the P'eclet number. The theory is applied to different time-dependent flows in channels of different cross sections, and we discuss the new phenomena arising by adding an increasing number of higher harmonics. [1] Taylor, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 219, 186 (1953)[2] Aris, Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A 235, 67 (1956)[3] Barton, J. Fluid Mech. 126, 205 (1983)[4] Mukherjee and Mazumder, Acta Mech. 74, 107 (1988)

  18. Channeling of Branched Flow in Weakly Scattering Anisotropic Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Henri; Metzger, Jakob J.; Schultheis, Erik; Fleischmann, Ragnar

    2017-01-01

    When waves propagate through weakly scattering but correlated, disordered environments they are randomly focused into pronounced branchlike structures, a phenomenon referred to as branched flow, which has been studied in a wide range of isotropic random media. In many natural environments, however, the fluctuations of the random medium typically show pronounced anisotropies. A prominent example is the focusing of tsunami waves by the anisotropic structure of the ocean floor topography. We study the influence of anisotropy on such natural focusing events and find a strong and nonintuitive dependence on the propagation angle which we explain by semiclassical theory.

  19. Contribution of voltage-dependent K+ channels to metabolic control of coronary blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Zachary C.; Dick, Gregory M.; Moberly, Steven P.; Kohr, Meredith C.; Sturek, Michael; Tune, Johnathan D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that KV channels contribute to metabolic control of coronary blood flow and that decreases in KV channel function and/or expression significantly attenuate myocardial oxygen supply-demand balance in the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Experiments were conducted in conscious, chronically instrumented Ossabaw swine fed either a normal maintenance diet or an excess calorie atherogenic diet that produces the clinical phenotype of early MetS. Data were obtained under resting conditions and during graded treadmill exercise before and after inhibition of KV channels with 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 0.3 mg/kg, i.v.). In lean-control swine, 4-AP reduced coronary blood flow ~15% at rest and ~20% during exercise. Inhibition of KV channels also increased aortic pressure (P < 0.01) while reducing coronary venous Po2 (P < 0.01) at a given level of myocardial oxygen consumption (MVo2). Administration of 4-AP had no effect on coronary blood flow, aortic pressure, or coronary venous Po2 in swine with MetS. The lack of response to 4-AP in MetS swine was associated with a ~20% reduction in coronary KV current (P < 0.01) and decreased expression of KV1.5 channels in coronary arteries (P < 0.01). Together, these data demonstrate that KV channels play an important role in balancing myocardial oxygen delivery with metabolism at rest and during exercise-induced increases in MVo2. Our findings also indicate that decreases in KV channel current and expression contribute to impaired control of coronary blood flow in the MetS. PMID:21771599

  20. The influence of underlying topography on lava channel networks and flow behavior (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietterich, H. R.; Cashman, K. V.; Rust, A.

    2013-12-01

    New high resolution mapping of historical lava flows in Hawai';i reveals complex topographically controlled channel networks. Network morphologies range from distributary systems dominated by branching around local obstacles, to tributary systems constricted by topographic confinement. Because channel networks govern the distribution of lava within the flow, they can dramatically alter the effective volumetric flux, which affects both flow length and advance rate. The influence of flow bifurcations is evidenced by (1) channelized flows from Pu';u ';O';o episodes 1-20 at Kilauea Volcano, where flow front velocities decreased by approximately half each time a flow split, and (2) the length of confined flows, such as the Mauna Loa 1859 flow, which traveled twice as far as the distributary Mauna Loa 1984 flow, despite similar effusion rates and durations. To study the underlying controls on flow bifurcations, we have undertaken a series of analogue experiments with golden syrup (a Newtonian fluid) to better understand the physics of obstacle interaction and its influence on flow behavior and morphology. Controlling the effusion rate and surface slope, we extrude flows onto a surface with a cylindrical or V-shaped obstacle of variable angle. When the flow is sufficiently fast, a stationary wave forms upslope of the obstacle; if the stationary wave is sufficiently high, the flow can overtop, rather than split around, the obstacle. The stationary wave height increases with flow velocity and with the effective obstacle width. Evidence for stationary waves in Hawaiian lava flows comes from both photographs of active flows and waveforms frozen into solidified flows. We have also performed a preliminary set of similar experiments with molten basalt to identify the effect of cooling and investigate flow merging. In these experiments, a stationary wave develops upslope of the obstacle, which allows the surface to cool and thicken. After splitting, the syrup experiments show

  1. Relief, nocturnal cold-air flow and air quality in Kigali, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    , this result is not reassuringly, because all measured residential districts in Kigali exceeded the recommendations of the WHO, too. This suggests that the inhabitants of Kigali are exposed to enormous levels of PM10 during most of their time outdoors. So PM10 levels are increasing in areas with high rates of traffic due to the exhaust of the vehicles and the stirring up of dust from the ground, but also in fact of burning wood for cooking etc. within the residential districts. Hazardous measuring trips could be detected for nighttime measurements. Because of high temperatures, high solar radiation and a non-typical missing cloud cover the urban surface could heat up extremely, which produced a cold-air flow from the ridges and the slopes down to the "Marais" at night. This cold-air flow takes away the suspended particulate matters, which tends to accumulate within the "Marais" on the bottom of the hills, the places where most residential neighborhoods could be found and agricultural fields were used. The distinctive relief caused an accumulation within small valleys. Unfortunately, these are the favourite places of living and agriculture and this tends to high indoor-air pollution.

  2. Water droplet evaporation and dynamics in a mini-channel under action of the gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isachenko, E. A.; Orlik, E. V.; Bykovskaya, E. F.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup was developed to study the vaporization and dynamics of liquid droplets, blown by the gas flow in a mini-channel. The shadow method was the main method of measurement; a drop was also observed from the top. A series of experiments was carried out with single water drops with volumes varying from 60 to 150 gl in the channel of 6 mm height on the polished stainless steel substrate. The experiments have resulted in the dependences of evaporation rate in the temperature range of the substrate surface from 25 to 70°C and Reynolds numbers of the gas flow from 0 to 2500. The advancing and receding contact angles were measured depending on the Re number of the gas flow. The gas flow rate at which the droplet motion over the substrate starts was determined depending on the surface temperature at different drop volumes.

  3. Measurements of Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in Channel Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian J.; Skor, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Under microgravity conditions, the shear lift force acting on bubbles, droplets or solid particles in multiphase flows becomes important because under normal gravity, this hydrodynamic force is masked by buoyancy. This force plays an important role in furnishing the detachment process of bubbles in a setting where a bubble suspension is needed in microgravity. In this work, measurements of the shear lift force acting on a bubble in channel flow are performed. The shear lift force is deduced from the bubble kinematics using scaling and then compared with predictions from models in literature that address different asymptotic and numerical solutions. Basic trajectory calculations are then performed and the results are compared with experimental data of position of the bubble in the channel. A direct comparison of the lateral velocity of the bubbles is also made with the lateral velocity prediction from investigators, whose work addressed the shear lift on a sphere in different two-dimensional shear flows including Poiseuille flow.

  4. Flow reversal of fully developed double diffusive mixed convection in a vertical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makhatar, Nur Asiah Mohd; Saleh, Habibis; Hashim, Ishak

    2015-10-01

    The mixed convection flow within a vertical channel having internal heat generation at a rate proportional to a power of the temperature difference is considered. The analysis is concerning the studies of occurrence of flow reversal and the effects of three dimensionless parameters, identified as the internal heat parameter (G), a mixed convection parameter (λ) and the exponent (p) in the local heating term on the fully developed double diffusive mixed convection flow in a vertical channel. The governing equations are solved numerically via MAPLE. It was found that flow reversal occurs with larger values of internal heat parameter and mixed convection parameter, but smaller values of local-heating exponent. They also show that, unlike the internal heat parameter and the local-heating exponent, the mixed convection parameter do not give any significant effect on the temperature.

  5. Direct numerical simulation of interfacial wave generation in turbulent gas-liquid flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Bryce; Hendrickson, Kelli; Liu, Yuming; Subramani, Hariprasad

    2014-11-01

    For gas-liquid flows through pipes and channels, a flow regime (referred to as slug flow) may occur when waves form at the interface of a stratified flow and grow until they bridge the pipe diameter trapping large elongated gas bubbles within the liquid. Slug formation is often accompanied by strong nonlinear wave-wave interactions, wave breaking, and gas entrainment. This work numerically investigates the fully nonlinear interfacial evolution of a two-phase density/viscosity stratified flow through a horizontal channel. A Navier-Stokes flow solver coupled with a conservative volume-of-fluid algorithm is use to carry out high resolution three-dimensional simulations of a turbulent gas flowing over laminar (or turbulent) liquid layers. The analysis of such flows over a range of gas and liquid Reynolds numbers permits the characterization of the interfacial stresses and turbulent flow statistics allowing for the development of physics-based models that approximate the coupled interfacial-turbulent interactions and supplement the heuristic models built into existing industrial slug simulators.

  6. A restricted nonlinear-dynamics model for turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Durán, Adrián; Jiménez, Javier; Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.; Nikolaidis, Marios A.; Constantinou, Navid C.

    2014-11-01

    The dynamics of the formation of very-large scale structure in turbulent plane Poiseuille flow is studied by restricting the nonlinearity in the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations to interactions between the streamwise-averaged flow and perturbations. Using comparisons with DNS, we show that this restricted nonlinear dynamics (RNL) supports essentially realistic turbulence at Reτ = 900 , despite the naturally occurring severe reduction in the set of streamwise wavenumbers supporting the turbulence. Using statistical diagnostics we verify that there are similar self-sustaining processes (SSP) underlying turbulence in the RNL and in the NS dynamics, separate manifestations of which operate in the buffer and outer layers. In the buffer layer, the SSP supports the familiar roll-streak mechanism of wall-bounded turbulence, while the outer-layer streaks in the RNL are probably the streamwise elongated structures referred to as VLSI. It is argued that the formation of the roll-streak structure is a universal mechanism that can be fruitfully studied in the minimal dynamics of RNL. Funded by Multiflow project of the ERC, Navid Constantinou acknowledges the support of the Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation. Brian Farrell was supported by NSF AGS-1246929.

  7. Some Effects of Air Flow on the Penetration and Distribution of Oil Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Beardsley, E G

    1929-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effects of air flow on the characteristics of fuel sprays from fuel injection valves. Curves and photographs are presented showing the airflow throughout the chamber and the effects of the air flow on the fuel spray characteristics. It was found that the moving air had little effect on the spray penetration except with the 0.006 inch orifice. The moving air did, however, affect the oil particles on the outside of the spray cone. After spray cut-off, the air flow rapidly distributed the atomized fuel throughout the spray chamber.

  8. Imaging based optofluidic air flow meter with polymer interferometers defined by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Song, Wuzhou; Psaltis, Demetri

    2010-08-02

    We present an optofluidic chip with integrated polymer interferometers for measuring both the microfluidic air pressure and flow rate. The chip contains a microfluidic circuit and optical cavities on a polymer which was defined by soft lithography. The pressure can be read out by imaging the interference patterns of the cavities. The air flow rate was then calculated from the differential pressure across a microfluidic Venturi circuit. Air flow rate measurement in the range of 0-2mg/second was demonstrated. This device provides a simple and versatile way for in situ measuring the microscale air pressure and flow on chip.

  9. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  10. Mechanistic understanding of monosaccharide-air flow battery electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Daniel M.; Tsang, Tsz Ho; Chetty, Leticia; Aloi, Sekotilani; Liaw, Bor Yann

    Recently, an inexpensive monosaccharide-air flow battery configuration has been demonstrated to utilize a strong base and a mediator redox dye to harness electrical power from the partial oxidation of glucose. Here the mechanistic understanding of glucose oxidation in this unique glucose-air power source is further explored by acid-base titration experiments, 13C NMR, and comparison of results from chemically different redox mediators (indigo carmine vs. methyl viologen) and sugars (fructose vs. glucose) via studies using electrochemical techniques. Titration results indicate that gluconic acid is the main product of the cell reaction, as supported by evidence in the 13C NMR spectra. Using indigo carmine as the mediator dye and fructose as the energy source, an abiotic cell configuration generates a power density of 1.66 mW cm -2, which is greater than that produced from glucose under similar conditions (ca. 1.28 mW cm -2). A faster transition from fructose into the ene-diol intermediate than from glucose likely contributed to this difference in power density.

  11. Laser prepulse induced plasma channel formation in air and relativistic self focusing of an intense short pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashok; Dahiya, Deepak; Sharma, A. K.

    2011-02-15

    An analytical formalism is developed and particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to study plasma channel formation in air by a two pulse technique and subsequent relativistic self focusing of the third intense laser through it. The first prepulse causes tunnel ionization of air. The second pulse heats the plasma electrons and establishes a prolonged channel. The third pulse focuses under the combined effect of density nonuniformity of the channel and relativistic mass nonlinearity. A channel with 20% density variation over the spot size of the third pulse is seen to strongly influence relativistic self focusing at normalized laser amplitude {approx}0.4-1. In deeper plasma channels, self focusing is less sensitive to laser amplitude variation. These results are reproduced in particle-in-cell simulations. The present treatment is valid for millimeter range plasma channels.

  12. Ignition of hydrogen/air mixing layer in turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H.; Law, C.K.

    1998-03-01

    Autoignition of a scalar hydrogen/air mixing layer in homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation. An initial counterflow of unmixed nitrogen-diluted hydrogen and heated air is perturbed by two-dimensional homogeneous turbulence. The temperature of the heated air stream is chosen to be 1,100 K which is substantially higher than the crossover temperature at which the rates of the chain branching and termination reactions become equal. Three different turbulence intensities are tested in order to assess the effect of the characteristic flow time on the ignition delay. For each condition, a simulation without heat release is also performed. The ignition delay determined with and without heat release is shown to be almost identical up to the point of ignition for all of the turbulence intensities tested, and the predicted ignition delays agree well within a consistent error band. It is also observed that the ignition kernel always occurs where hydrogen is focused, and the peak concentration of HO{sub 2} is aligned well with the scalar dissipation rate. The dependence of the ignition delay on turbulence intensity is found to be nonmonotonic. For weak to moderate turbulence the ignition is facilitated by turbulence via enhanced mixing, while for stronger turbulence, whose timescale is substantially smaller than the ignition delay, the ignition is retarded due to excessive scalar dissipation, and hence diffusive loss, at the ignition location. However, for the wide range of initial turbulence fields studied, the variation in ignition delay due to the corresponding variation in turbulence intensity appears to be quite small.

  13. Wakes from submerged obstacles in an open channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Geoffrey B.; Marmorino, George; Dong, Charles; Miller, W. D.; Mied, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Wakes from several submerged obstacles are examined via airborne remote sensing. The primary focus will be bathymetric features in the tidal Potomac river south of Washington, DC, but others may be included as well. In the Potomac the water depth is nominally 10 m with an obstacle height of 8 m, or 80% of the depth. Infrared imagery of the water surface reveals thermal structure suitable both for interpretation of the coherent structures and for estimating surface currents. A novel image processing technique is used to generate two independent scenes with a known time offset from a single overpass from the infrared imagery, suitable for velocity estimation. Color imagery of the suspended sediment also shows suitable texture. Both the `mountain wave' regime and a traditional turbulent wake are observed, depending on flow conditions. Results are validated with in-situ ADCP transects. A computational model is used to further interpret the results.

  14. Debris-flow runout predictions based on the average channel slope (ACS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prochaska, A.B.; Santi, P.M.; Higgins, J.D.; Cannon, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Prediction of the runout distance of a debris flow is an important element in the delineation of potentially hazardous areas on alluvial fans and for the siting of mitigation structures. Existing runout estimation methods rely on input parameters that are often difficult to estimate, including volume, velocity, and frictional factors. In order to provide a simple method for preliminary estimates of debris-flow runout distances, we developed a model that provides runout predictions based on the average channel slope (ACS model) for non-volcanic debris flows that emanate from confined channels and deposit on well-defined alluvial fans. This model was developed from 20 debris-flow events in the western United States and British Columbia. Based on a runout estimation method developed for snow avalanches, this model predicts debris-flow runout as an angle of reach from a fixed point in the drainage channel to the end of the runout zone. The best fixed point was found to be the mid-point elevation of the drainage channel, measured from the apex of the alluvial fan to the top of the drainage basin. Predicted runout lengths were more consistent than those obtained from existing angle-of-reach estimation methods. Results of the model compared well with those of laboratory flume tests performed using the same range of channel slopes. The robustness of this model was tested by applying it to three debris-flow events not used in its development: predicted runout ranged from 82 to 131% of the actual runout for these three events. Prediction interval multipliers were also developed so that the user may calculate predicted runout within specified confidence limits. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Isothermal mass flow measurements in microfabricated rectangular channels over a very wide Knudsen range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, John M.; Moorman, Matthew W.; Brown, Jason R.; Hochrein, James M.; Thornberg, Steven M.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Gallis, Michael A.; Torczynski, John R.; Khraishi, Tariq; Manginell, Ronald P.

    2014-05-01

    Measurement and modeling of gas flows in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) scale channels are relevant to the fundamentals of rarefied gas dynamics (RGD) and the practical design of MEMS-based flow systems and micropumps. We describe techniques for building robust, leak-free, rectangular microchannels which are relevant to micro- and nanofluidic devices, while the channels themselves are useful for fundamental RGD studies. For the first time, we report the isothermal steady flow of helium (He) gas through these channels from the continuum to the free-molecular regime in the unprecedented Knudsen range of 0.03-1000. On the high end, our value is 20-fold larger than values previously reported by Ewart et al (2007 J. Fluid Mech. 584 337-56). We accomplished this through a dual-tank accumulation technique which enabled the monitoring of very low flow rates, below 10-14 kg s-1. The devices were prebaked under vacuum for 24 h at 100 °C in order to reduce outgassing and attain high Kn. We devised fabrication methods for controlled-depth micro-gap channels using silicon for both channel ceiling and floor, thereby allowing direct comparisons to models which utilize this simplifying assumption. We evaluated the results against a closed-form expression that accurately reproduces the continuum, slip, transition, and free-molecular regimes developed partly by using the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. The observed data were in good agreement with the expression. For Kn > ˜100, we observed minor deviations between modeled and experimental flow values. Our fabrication processes and experimental data are useful to fundamental RGD studies and future MEMS microflow devices with respect to extremely low-flow measurements, model validation, and predicting optimal designs.

  16. Onset of Stationary Flows of a Cohesive Granular Material in a Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ryck, A.; Louisnard, O.

    The handling of bulk materials and powders in process engineering remains an important issue. To obtain reliable gravitational flows, starting and remaining stationary, the hoppers and transport channels must be designed at a scale appropriate for the friction and cohesive properties of the granular material. To describe such dense flows (the interaction with the surrounding ambient fluid is negligible compared to the weight of the particles and interparticles forces), they can be modelled by continuum mechanics, associated with a constitutive equation taking into account the friction behaviour (Mohr-Coulomb or Druger-Prager plasticity criterion). We use here the rheology proposed by Jop et al. (Nature 441: 727-730, 2006) which combines this with an associated flow rule (co-linearity of the stress and strain tensors) (Jenike, Powder Technol. 50: 229-236, 1987) and a viscous dependency of the coefficient of friction on the strain (Da Cruz et al., Phys. Rev. E 72: 021309, 2005).Using the method of characteristics to describe the flow structure (de Ryck, Granular Matter 10: 361-367, 2008), we deduce the minimal slope to obtain a stationary flow of cohesive granular materials on a finite width channel, whose lateral walls are rough or smooth. We also obtain the depth of the flow (maximal at the centre of the channel). In the case of weak cohesive materials, these results are formulated with simple analytical expressions.

  17. Measurements of particle orientation in simple shear and channel flows of polypropylene/clay nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykes, Laura

    2005-03-01

    We report studies of flow-induced orientation in dispersions of organically modified montmorillonite clay in polypropylene. The nanocomposite samples were prepared using two methods. Melt blending in a twin-screw extruder led to intercalated samples in which the layered structure of the clay remains intact. An additional step of solid-state shear pulverization leads to samples with a higher degree of exfoliation of individual clay sheets. In situ x-ray scattering was used to probe particle orientation in steady shear using an annular cone and plate shear cell which provides information about particle orientation in the flow-gradient plane. The more highly exfoliated pulverized sample shows significantly lower orientation than the intercalated melt-blended sample. Both samples were also studied in extrusion-fed channel flows. In slit-channel geometries, the dominant shear rate direction is parallel to the x-ray beam, allowing information about orientation in the flow- vorticity plane to be obtained. In fact, little scattering was observed in these configurations, confirming the tendency of clay particles to `lie down' in the shear flow. Superposition of extension via contractions or expansions in slit-channel flows did not reorient particles sufficiently to bring them `into view' in these geometries.

  18. Electrohydrodynamic peristaltic flow of a dielectric Oldroydian viscoelastic fluid in a flexible channel with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, M. F.; Haroun, M. H.; Mostapha, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the effects of a vertical a.c. electric field and heat transfer on a peristaltic flow of an incompressible dielectric viscoelastic fluid in a symmetric flexible channel. The mathematical modeling includes interactions among the electric field, flow field, and temperature. The perturbation solution of the modeled problem is derived by considering a small wave number. The influence of pertinent parameters is demonstrated and discussed. The numerical results show that the possibility of flow reversal increases near the lower bound of the channel and decreases near the upper bound of the channel as the electrical Rayleigh number, the Reynolds number, and the Weissenberg number increase, whereas the opposite effect is observed as the temperature parameter and the Weissenberg number increase. It is observed that the size of the trapped bolus decreases at the upper bound of the channel and increases at the lower bound of the channel with increasing electrical Rayleigh number, whereas the opposite effect is observed as the temperature parameter increases. The results also show that the trapped bolus in the case of an Oldroydian fluid is smaller than that for a Newtonian fluid.

  19. Electro-osmotically driven MHD flow and heat transfer in micro-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shit, G. C.; Mondal, A.; Sinha, A.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented for electro-osmotic flow (EOF) of blood in a hydrophobic micro-channel with externally applied magnetic field. The lumen of micro-channels is assumed to be porous medium in addition to the consideration of permeability of the channel walls. The effects of slip velocity and thermal-slip are taken into consideration. The governing equations in the electrical double layer (EDL) together with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation and the body force exerted by the applied potential are furthermore considered. The flow is governed by the non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluid model. These equations along with the thermal energy equation are approximated by assuming that the channel height is much greater than the thickness of electrical double layer consisting the stern and diffusive layers. The problem is solved analytically and the computed results have presented graphically for various values of the dimensionless parameters. The results presented here have significant impact on the therapeutic treatment in hyperthermia as well as in controlling blood flow and heat transfer in micro-channels.

  20. Enhancement of heat transfer by clamped flags in a Poiseuille channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Bok; Park, Sung Goon; Kim, Boyoung; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2016-11-01

    A pair of flexible flags clamped vertically in a heated channel was numerically modeled to study an enhancement of heat transfer by the clamped flags in a Poiseuille channel flow. The penalty immersed boundary method was adopted to analyze the fluid-structure-thermal interaction between the surrounding fluid and the clamped flags. The dynamics of the clamped flags was categorized into three distinctive modes: a flapping mode, a fully deflected mode, and an irregular mode. The distinctive modes that depended on the relationship between the hydrodynamic force and the restoring force displayed different movement patterns. The flapping mode provided superior thermal performance to the other modes. Vortices generated from the flapping flags swept out the thermal boundary layer and entrained the fluid near channel walls into the channel core flow while passing through the wake periodically. Compared to rigid flags, the flapping flags significantly improved the thermal efficiency. In addition, the effects of channel height and Reynolds number on the thermal efficiency were explored to obtain an optimal parameter set, which presented the highest thermal performance in present study. The flexible flags regarding the optimal parameter set showed an increase of up to 230% in net heat flux, compared to the baseline flow. Dynamic modes decomposition (DMD) method was adopted to examine the correlation between the vorticity and temperature fields.