Science.gov

Sample records for air flow channels

  1. The evolution of hairpin vortices in subcritical air channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svizher, A.; Cohen, J.

    2001-11-01

    Experimental investigation of artificially generated hairpin vortical structures in air channel flow has been performed. The basic plane Poiseuille flow at a range of Reynolds numbers from 1000 to 2000, based on half channel height and centreline velocity, has been disturbed by injecting smoke through a streamwise slot located at the bottom channel wall. Employing hot-wire anemometry and PIV measurements, the characteristics of these hairpin structures and the parameters that govern their generation and evolution have been studied. In order to carefully examine the topology and dynamics of these coherent structures, the instantaneous three-dimensional velocity (and vorticity) distribution over the entire sample volume is required. To accomplish this task Holographic PIV system has been built. The optical setup consists of two mutually perpendicular hybrid HPIV systems for simultaneous recording of two holograms. By combining these holograms, all three coordinates indicating the particle position may be achieved at the same level of accuracy. Switching the reference beam between the Laser pulses (by electrooptic Pockels cell), enables one to reconstruct separately the double exposed holograms for future cross-correlation analysis. Preliminary results obtained in this experimental setup are promising.

  2. Thermal performance evaluation of MSFC hot air collectors with various flow channel depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The test procedures used and the results obtained during the evaluation test program on the MSFC air collector with flow channel depth of 3 in., 2 in., and 1 in., under simulated conditions are presented. The MSFC hot air collector consists of a single glass cover with a nonselective coating absorber plate and uses air as the heat transfer medium. The absorber panel consists of a thin flat sheet of aluminum.

  3. Simulation of 3-D Nonequilibrium Seeded Air Flow in the NASA-Ames MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D nonequilibrium seeded air flow in the NASA-Ames experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed us ing a 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime: The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. The algorithm has been extended in the present study to account for nonequilibrium seeded air flows. The electrical conductivity of the flow is determined using the program of Park. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the seeded flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  4. Role of mixed boundaries on flow in open capillary channels with curved air-water interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenjuan; Wang, Lian-Ping; Or, Dani; Lazouskaya, Volha; Jin, Yan

    2012-09-01

    Flow in unsaturated porous media or in engineered microfluidic systems is dominated by capillary and viscous forces. Consequently, flow regimes may differ markedly from conventional flows, reflecting strong interfacial influences on small bodies of flowing liquids. In this work, we visualized liquid transport patterns in open capillary channels with a range of opening sizes from 0.6 to 5.0 mm using laser scanning confocal microscopy combined with fluorescent latex particles (1.0 μm) as tracers at a mean velocity of ∼0.50 mm s(-1). The observed velocity profiles indicate limited mobility at the air-water interface. The application of the Stokes equation with mixed boundary conditions (i.e., no slip on the channel walls and partial slip or shear stress at the air-water interface) clearly illustrates the increasing importance of interfacial shear stress with decreasing channel size. Interfacial shear stress emerges from the velocity gradient from the adjoining no-slip walls to the center where flow is trapped in a region in which capillary forces dominate. In addition, the increased contribution of capillary forces (relative to viscous forces) to flow on the microscale leads to increased interfacial curvature, which, together with interfacial shear stress, affects the velocity distribution and flow pattern (e.g., reverse flow in the contact line region). We found that partial slip, rather than the commonly used stress-free condition, provided a more accurate description of the boundary condition at the confined air-water interface, reflecting the key role that surface/interface effects play in controlling flow behavior on the nanoscale and microscale.

  5. Numerical investigation of interfacial mass transport resistance and two-phase flow in PEM fuel cell air channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koz, Mustafa

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are efficient and environmentally friendly electrochemical engines. The performance of a PEMFC is adversely affected by oxygen (O2) concentration loss from the air flow channel to the cathode catalyst layer (CL). Oxygen transport resistance at the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and air channel interface is a non-negligible component of the O2 concentration loss. Simplified PEMFC performance models in the available literature incorporate the O2 resistance at the GDL-channel interface as an input parameter. However, this parameter has been taken as a constant so far in the available literature and does not reflect variable PEMFC operating conditions and the effect of two-phase flow in the channels. This study numerically calculates the O2 transport resistance at the GDL-air channel interface and expresses this resistance through the non-dimensional Sherwood number (Sh). Local Sh is investigated in an air channel with multiple droplets and films inside. These water features are represented as solid obstructions and only air flow is simulated. Local variations of Sh in the flow direction are obtained as a function of superficial air velocity, water feature size, and uniform spacing between water features. These variations are expressed with mathematical expressions for the PEMFC performance models to utilize and save computational resources. The resulting mathematical correlations for Sh can be utilized in PEMFC performance models. These models can predict cell performance more accurately with the help of the results of this work. Moreover, PEMFC performance models do not need to use a look-up table since the results were expressed through correlations. Performance models can be kept simplified although their predictions will become more realistic. Since two-phase flow in channels is experienced mostly at lower temperatures, performance optimization at low temperatures can be done easier.

  6. The effect of different inlet conditions of air in a rectangular channel on convection heat transfer: Turbulence flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtbas, Irfan

    2008-10-15

    Theoretical and empirical correlations for duct flow are given for hydrodynamically and thermally developed flow in most of previous studies. However, this is commonly not a realistic inlet configuration for heat exchanger, in which coolant flow generally turns through a serpentine shaped passage before entering heat sinks. Accordingly, an experimental investigation was carried out to determine average heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated rectangular channel with 45 and 90 turned flow, and with wall mounted a baffle. The channel was heated through bottom side with the baffle. In present work, a detailed study was conducted for three different height of entry channel (named as the ratio of the height of entry channel to the height of test section (anti H{sub c}=h{sub c}/H)) by varying Reynolds number (Re{sub Dh}). Another variable parameter was the ratio of the baffle height to the channel height (anti H{sub b}=h{sub b}/H). Only one baffle was attached on the bottom (heating) surface. The experimental procedure was validated by comparing the data for the straight channel with no baffle. Reynolds number (Re{sub Dh}) was varied from 2800 to 30,000, so the flow was considered as only turbulent regime. All experiments were conduced with air accordingly; Prandtl number (Pr) was approximately fixed at 0.71. The results showed that average Nusselt number for {theta}=45 and {theta}=90 were 9% and 30% higher, respectively, than that of the straight channel without baffle. Likewise, the pressure drop increased up to 4.4 to 5.3 times compare to the straight channel. (author)

  7. 3-Dimensional numerical study of cooling performance of a heat sink with air-water flow through mini-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Sambit; Majumder, Abhik; Bhaumik, Swapan

    2016-07-01

    The present microelectronics market demands devices with high power dissipation capabilities having enhanced cooling per unit area. The drive for miniaturizing the devices to even micro level dimensions is shooting up the applied heat flux on such devices, resulting in complexity in heat transfer and cooling management. In this paper, a method of CPU processor cooling is introduced where active and passive cooling techniques are incorporated simultaneously. A heat sink consisting of fins is designed, where water flows internally through the mini-channel fins and air flows externally. Three dimensional numerical simulations are performed for large set of Reynolds number in laminar region using finite volume method for both developing flows. The dimensions of mini-channel fins are varied for several aspect ratios such as 1, 1.33, 2 and 4. Constant temperature (T) boundary condition is applied at heat sink base. Channel fluid temperature, pressure drop are analyzed to obtain best cooling option in the present study. It has been observed that as the aspect ratio of the channel decreases Nusselt number decreases while pressure drop increases. However, Nusselt number increases with increase in Reynolds number.

  8. Investigation of the temperature field in a turbulent air flow in the channels with structured packing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perepelitsa, B. V.

    2007-12-01

    Temperature distribution and intensity of temperature pulsations in the airflow in a complex heat exchanger of “Frenkel packing” type were studied experimentally. Measurements were carried out at the airflow between two corrugated plates with triangular embossing, directed at 90° relative to each other. The temperature in the flow was measured by a special thermocouple probe. The hot junction of the thermocouple did not exceed 10 μm. The effect of contact points and Reynolds number on static characteristics of temperature in a turbulent airflow is analysed. The main attention is paid to temperature distribution in an elementary cell. According to the studies, there is a considerable difference between temperature distributions in the flow at the back and front sides of the channel.

  9. Experimental investigation of water droplet-air flow interaction in a non-reacting PEM fuel cell channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Angelo; Montello, Aaron D.; Guezennec, Yann G.; Pianese, Cesare

    It has been well documented that water production in PEM fuel cells occurs in discrete locations, resulting in the formation and growth of discrete droplets on the gas diffusion layer (GDL) surface within the gas flow channels (GFCs). This research uses a simulated fuel cell GFC with three transparent walls in conjunction with a high speed fluorescence photometry system to capture videos of dynamically deforming droplets. Such videos clearly show that the droplets undergo oscillatory deformation patterns. Although many authors have previously investigated the air flow induced droplet detachment, none of them have studied these oscillatory modes. The novelty of this work is to process and analyze the recorded videos to gather information on the droplets induced oscillation. Plots are formulated to indicate the dominant horizontal and vertical deformation frequency components over the range of sizes of droplets from formation to detachment. The system is also used to characterize droplet detachment size at a variety of channel air velocities. A simplified model to explain the droplet oscillation mechanism is provided as well.

  10. Experimental assessment of spanwise-oscillating dielectric electroactive surfaces for turbulent drag reduction in an air channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatti, Davide; Güttler, Andreas; Frohnapfel, Bettina; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-05-01

    In the present work, wall oscillations for turbulent skin friction drag reduction are realized in an air turbulent duct flow by means of spanwise-oscillating active surfaces based on dielectric electroactive polymers. The actuator system produces spanwise wall velocity oscillations of 820 mm/s semi-amplitude at its resonance frequency of 65 Hz while consuming an active power of a few 100 mW. The actuators achieved a maximum integral drag reduction of 2.4 %. The maximum net power saving, budget of the power benefit and cost of the control, was measured for the first time with wall oscillations. Though negative, the net power saving is order of magnitudes higher than what has been estimated in previous studies. Two new direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow show that the finite size of the actuator only partially explains the lower values of integral drag reduction typically achieved in laboratory experiments compared to numerical simulations.

  11. An Experimental Investigation of the Flow of Air in a Flat Broadening Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vedernikoff, A. N.

    1944-01-01

    The wide use of diffusers, in various fields of technology, has resulted in several experimental projects to study the action and design of diffusers. Most of the projects dealt with steam (steam turbine nozzles). But diffusers have other applications - that is, ventilators, smoke ducts, air coolers, refrigeration, drying, and so forth. At present there is another application for diffusers in wind-tunnel design. Because of higher requirements and increased power of such installations more attention must be paid to the correctness of work and the decrease in losses due to every section of the tunnel. A diffuser, being one of the component parts of a tunnel , can in the event of faulty construction introduce considerable losses. Therefore, in the design of the new CAHI wind tunnel, it was suggested that an experimental study of diffusers be made, with a view to applying the results to wind tunnels. The experiments conducted by K. K. Baulin in the laboratories of CAHI upon models of diffusers of different cross sections, lengths, and angles of divergence, were a valuable source of experimental data. They were of no help, however, in reaching any conclusion regarding the optimum shape because of the complexity and diversity of the factors which all appeared simultaneously, thereby precluding the.study of the effects of any one factor separately. On the suggestion of the director of the CAHI,Prof. B. N. Ureff, it was decided to experiment on a two-dimensional diffuser model and determine the effect, of the angle of divergence. The author is acquainted with two experimental projects of like nature: the first was conducted with water, the other with air. The first of these works, although containing a wealth of experimental data, does not indicate the nature of flow or its relation to the angle of divergence. The second work is limited to four angles - that is, 12 deg, 24 deg, 45 deg, 90 deg. The study of this diffuser did not supply any information about the effect of

  12. Buoyancy effects in steeply inclined air-water bubbly shear flow in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanaullah, K.; Arshad, M.; Khan, A.; Chughtai, I. R.

    2015-07-01

    We report measurements of two-dimensional ( B/ D = 5) fully turbulent and developed duct flows (overall length/depth, L/ D = 60; D-based Reynolds number Re > 104) for inclinations to 30° from vertical at low voidages (< 5 % sectional average) representative of disperse regime using tap water bubbles (4-6 mm) and smaller bubbles (2 mm) stabilised in ionic solution. Pitot and static probe instrumentation, primitive but validated, provided adequate (10 % local value) discrimination of main aspects of the mean velocity and voidage profiles at representative streamwise station i.e L/ D = 40. Our results can be divided into three categories of behaviour. For vertical flow (0°) the evidence is inconclusive as to whether bubbles are preferentially trapped within the wall-layer as found in some, may be most earlier experimental works. Thus, the 4-mm bubbles showed indication of voidage retention but the 2-mm bubbles did not. For nearly vertical flow (5°) there was pronounced profiling of voidage especially with 4-mm bubbles but the transverse transport was not suppressed sufficiently to induce any obvious layering. In this context, we also refer to similarities with previous work on one-phase vertical and nearly vertical mixed convection flows displaying buoyancy inhibited mean shear turbulence. However, with inclined flow (10+ degrees) a distinctively layered pattern was invariably manifested in which voidage confinement increased with increasing inclination. In this paper we address flow behavior at near vertical conditions. Eulerian, mixed and VOF models were used to compute voidage and mean velocity profiles.

  13. Turbulent supersonic channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechner, Richard; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Friedrich, Rainer

    2001-01-01

    The effects of compressibility are studied in low Reynolds number turbulent supersonic channel flow via a direct numerical simulation. A pressure-velocity-entropy formulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations which is cast in a characteristic, non-conservative form and allows one to specify exact wall boundary conditions, consistent with the field equations, is integrated using a fifth-order compact upwind scheme for the Euler part, a fourth-order Padé scheme for the viscous terms and a third-order low-storage Runge-Kutta time integration method. Coleman et al fully developed supersonic channel flow at M?=?1.5 and Re?=?3000 is used to test the method. The nature of fluctuating variables is investigated in detail for the wall layer and the core region based on scatter plots. Fluctuations conditioned on sweeps and ejections in the wall layer are especially instructive, showing that positive temperature, entropy and total temperature fluctuations are mainly due to sweep events in this specific situation of wall cooling. The effect of compressibility on the turbulence structure is in many respects similar to that found in homogeneous shear turbulence and in mixing layers. The normal components of the Reynolds stress anisotropy tensor are increased due to compressibility, while the shear stress component is slightly reduced. Characteristic of the Reynolds stress transport is a suppression of the production of the longitudinal and the shear stress component, a suppression of all velocity-pressure-gradient correlations and most of the dissipation rates. Comparison with incompressible channel flow data reveals that compressibility effects manifest themselves in the wall layer only.

  14. Air flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Smoke Flow Visualization shows the flow of air around a model airfoil at 100 feet per second. Photograph and caption published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page xi), by James Schultz.

  15. FAITH Water Channel Flow Visualization

    NASA Video Gallery

    Water channel flow visualization experiments are performed on a three dimensional model of a small hill. This experiment was part of a series of measurements of the complex fluid flow around the hi...

  16. An innovative hybrid 3D analytic-numerical model for air breathing parallel channel counter-flow PEM fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tavčar, Gregor; Katrašnik, Tomaž

    2014-01-01

    The parallel straight channel PEM fuel cell model presented in this paper extends the innovative hybrid 3D analytic-numerical (HAN) approach previously published by the authors with capabilities to address ternary diffusion systems and counter-flow configurations. The model's core principle is modelling species transport by obtaining a 2D analytic solution for species concentration distribution in the plane perpendicular to the cannel gas-flow and coupling consecutive 2D solutions by means of a 1D numerical pipe-flow model. Electrochemical and other nonlinear phenomena are coupled to the species transport by a routine that uses derivative approximation with prediction-iteration. The latter is also the core of the counter-flow computation algorithm. A HAN model of a laboratory test fuel cell is presented and evaluated against a professional 3D CFD simulation tool showing very good agreement between results of the presented model and those of the CFD simulation. Furthermore, high accuracy results are achieved at moderate computational times, which is owed to the semi-analytic nature and to the efficient computational coupling of electrochemical kinetics and species transport.

  17. An innovative hybrid 3D analytic-numerical model for air breathing parallel channel counter-flow PEM fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tavčar, Gregor; Katrašnik, Tomaž

    2014-01-01

    The parallel straight channel PEM fuel cell model presented in this paper extends the innovative hybrid 3D analytic-numerical (HAN) approach previously published by the authors with capabilities to address ternary diffusion systems and counter-flow configurations. The model's core principle is modelling species transport by obtaining a 2D analytic solution for species concentration distribution in the plane perpendicular to the cannel gas-flow and coupling consecutive 2D solutions by means of a 1D numerical pipe-flow model. Electrochemical and other nonlinear phenomena are coupled to the species transport by a routine that uses derivative approximation with prediction-iteration. The latter is also the core of the counter-flow computation algorithm. A HAN model of a laboratory test fuel cell is presented and evaluated against a professional 3D CFD simulation tool showing very good agreement between results of the presented model and those of the CFD simulation. Furthermore, high accuracy results are achieved at moderate computational times, which is owed to the semi-analytic nature and to the efficient computational coupling of electrochemical kinetics and species transport. PMID:25125112

  18. Air Entraining Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2001-11-01

    Air entraining flows are frequently encountered in Nature (e.g. breaking waves, waterfalls, rain over water bodies) and in technological applications (gas-liquid chemical reactors, water treatment, aquaculture, and others). Superficially, one may distinguish between transient events, such as a breaking wave, and steady situations, e.g. a falling jet. However, when viscosity is not important, the process of air entrainment turns out to be the consequence of local transient events even in steady flows. For example, surface disturbances convected by a nominally steady jet impact the receiving liquid, create a deep depression, which collapses entraining an air pocket. (In practice this basic mechanism is complicated by the presence of waves, vortical flows, and other factors.) This talk will describe several examples of air-entraining flows illustrating the fluid mechanic principles involved with high-speed movies and numerical computations.

  19. Time-resolved fast-neutron radiography of air-water two-phase flows in a rectangular channel by an improved detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Zboray, Robert; Dangendorf, Volker; Bromberger, Benjamin; Tittelmeier, Kai; Mor, Ilan

    2015-07-15

    In a previous work, we have demonstrated the feasibility of high-frame-rate, fast-neutron radiography of generic air-water two-phase flows in a 1.5 cm thick, rectangular flow channel. The experiments have been carried out at the high-intensity, white-beam facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany, using an multi-frame, time-resolved detector developed for fast neutron resonance radiography. The results were however not fully optimal and therefore we have decided to modify the detector and optimize it for the given application, which is described in the present work. Furthermore, we managed to improve the image post-processing methodology and the noise suppression. Using the tailored detector and the improved post-processing, significant increase in the image quality and an order of magnitude lower exposure times, down to 3.33 ms, have been achieved with minimized motion artifacts. Similar to the previous study, different two-phase flow regimes such as bubbly slug and churn flows have been examined. The enhanced imaging quality enables an improved prediction of two-phase flow parameters like the instantaneous volumetric gas fraction, bubble size, and bubble velocities. Instantaneous velocity fields around the gas enclosures can also be more robustly predicted using optical flow methods as previously.

  20. Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, Jeffrey Allan

    2000-08-08

    A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

  1. Terminal Air Flow Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) will be the basis for air traffic planning and control in the terminal area. The system accepts arriving traffic within an extended terminal area and optimizes the flow based on current traffic and airport conditions. The operational use of CTAS will be presented together with results from current operations.

  2. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    DOEpatents

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  3. Thermotechnical performance of an air-cooled tuyere with air cooling channels in series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuansheng; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Tao; Duan, Guangbin

    2016-03-01

    To reduce the cooling air consumption for an air-cooled tuyere, an air-cooled tuyere with air cooling channels in series is developed based on several hypotheses, i.e., a transparent medium in the blast furnace, among others, and the related mathematical models are introduced and developed. Referring to the data from a BF site, the thermotechnical computation for the air-cooled tuyere was performed, and the results show that when the temperature of the inlet cooling air increases, the temperatures for the outlet cooling air, the outer surface of the tuyere, the walls of the air cooling channels and the center channel as well as the heat going into the center channel increase, but the heat absorbed by the cooling air flowing through the air cooling channels decreases. When the cooling air flow rate under the standard state increases, the physical parameters mentioned above change in an opposite directions. Compared to a water-cooled tuyere, the energy savings for an air-cooled tuyere are more than 0.23 kg/min standard coal.

  4. Precipitation patterns during channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamtveit, B.; Hawkins, C.; Benning, L. G.; Meier, D.; Hammer, O.; Angheluta, L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation during channelized fluid flow is widespread in a wide variety of geological systems. It is also a common and costly phenomenon in many industrial processes that involve fluid flow in pipelines. It is often referred to as scale formation and encountered in a large number of industries, including paper production, chemical manufacturing, cement operations, food processing, as well as non-renewable (i.e. oil and gas) and renewable (i.e. geothermal) energy production. We have studied the incipient stages of growth of amorphous silica on steel plates emplaced into the central areas of the ca. 1 meter in diameter sized pipelines used at the hydrothermal power plant at Hellisheidi, Iceland (with a capacity of ca 300 MW electricity and 100 MW hot water). Silica precipitation takes place over a period of ca. 2 months at approximately 120°C and a flow rate around 1 m/s. The growth produces asymmetric ca. 1mm high dendritic structures ';leaning' towards the incoming fluid flow. A novel phase-field model combined with the lattice Boltzmann method is introduced to study how the growth morphologies vary under different hydrodynamic conditions, including non-laminar systems with turbulent mixing. The model accurately predicts the observed morphologies and is directly relevant for understanding the more general problem of precipitation influenced by turbulent mixing during flow in channels with rough walls and even for porous flow. Reference: Hawkins, C., Angheluta, L., Hammer, Ø., and Jamtveit, B., Precipitation dendrites in channel flow. Europhysics Letters, 102, 54001

  5. Liquid infused surfaces in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Matthew; Stone, Howard; Smits, Alexander; Jacobi, Ian; Samaha, Mohamed; Wexler, Jason; Shang, Jessica; Rosenberg, Brian; Hellström, Leo; Fan, Yuyang; Wang, Karen; Lee, Kevin; Hultmark, Marcus

    2014-11-01

    A turbulent channel flow facility is used to measure the drag reduction capabilities and dynamic behavior of liquid-infused micro-patterned surfaces. Liquid infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust alternative to traditional air-cushion-based superhydrophobic surfaces. The mobile liquid lubricant creates a surface slip with the outer turbulent shear flow as well as an energetic sink to dampen turbulent fluctuations. Micro-manufactured surfaces can be mounted flush in the channel and exposed to turbulent flows. Two configurations are possible, both capable of producing laminar and turbulent flows. The first configuration allows detailed investigation of the infused liquid layer and the other allows well resolved pressure gradient measurements. Both of the configurations have high aspect ratios 15-45:1. Drag reduction for a variety of liquid-infused surface architectures is quantified by measuring pressure drop in the channel. Flow in the oil film is simultaneously visualized using fluorescent dye. Supported under ONR Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (program manager Ki-Han Kim).

  6. Wood stove air flow regulating

    SciTech Connect

    Brefka, P.E.

    1983-10-04

    A wood stove has primary and secondary air regulator doors at the bottom and top, respectively, of the stove door each rotating about the axis of a tightening knob in the center of the door opposite a baffle plate that defines with the door inside an air channel open at the top and bottom.

  7. Annular fuel and air co-flow premixer

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Melton, Patrick Benedict; York, William David

    2013-10-15

    Disclosed is a premixer for a combustor including an annular outer shell and an annular inner shell. The inner shell defines an inner flow channel inside of the inner shell and is located to define an outer flow channel between the outer shell and the inner shell. A fuel discharge annulus is located between the outer flow channel and the inner flow channel and is configured to inject a fuel flow into a mixing area in a direction substantially parallel to an outer airflow through the outer flow channel and an inner flow through the inner flow channel. Further disclosed are a combustor including a plurality of premixers and a method of premixing air and fuel in a combustor.

  8. Two-Phase Annular Flow in Helical Coil Flow Channels in a Reduced Gravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, Edward G.; Lin, Chin S.

    1996-01-01

    A brief review of both single- and two-phase flow studies in curved and coiled flow geometries is first presented. Some of the complexities of two-phase liquid-vapor flow in curved and coiled geometries are discussed, and serve as an introduction to the advantages of observing such flows under a low-gravity environment. The studies proposed -- annular two-phase air-water flow in helical coil flow channels are described. Objectives of the studies are summarized.

  9. Fluid flow through the larynx channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. A.; Pereira, J. C.; Thomas, D. W.

    1988-03-01

    The classic two-mass model of the larynx channel is extended by including the false vocal folds and the laryngeal ventricle. Several glottis profiles are postulated to exist which are the result of the forces applied to the mucus membrane due to intraglottal pressure variation. These profiles constrain the air flow which allows the formation of one or two "venae contractae". The location of these influences the pressure in the glottis and layrngeal ventricle and also gives rise to additional viscous losses as well as losses due to flow enlargement. Sampled waveforms are calculated from the model for volume velocity, glottal area, Reynolds number and fluid forces over the vocal folds for various profiles. Results show that the computed waveforms agree with physiological data [1,2] and that it is not necessary to use any empirical constants to match the simulation results. Also, the onset of phonation is shown to be possible either with abduction or adduction of the vocal folds.

  10. Turbulent flow across a natural compound channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, P. A.; Cao, Zhixian; Holland, M. J.; Ervine, D. A.; Babaeyan-Koopaei, K.

    2002-12-01

    The measurements and primary analysis of turbulent flow across a compound channel (River Severn, England) are presented. The velocity was measured using a three-dimensional acoustic Doppler velocimeter in combination with a directional current meter. The statistical flow structure is examined against existing analytical formulations derived for single channel flows based on laboratory studies. The existence of a vertically two-layer structure around the interface between the main channel and the floodplain is demonstrated, indicating (1) a vertical shear-dominated flow zone near the bed; and (2) away from the bed a transverse shear-dominated flow zone with enhanced turbulent mixing. The temporal spectra clearly reveal the occurrence of anisotropic turbulence both in the main channel and over the floodplain. The present findings necessitate the resolution of both transverse and vertical structures for advanced modeling of compound channel flows. The measured data can be used to assess the performance of mathematical river models.

  11. Air conditioning system and component therefore distributing air flow from opposite directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.; Bauer, H. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The air conditioning system comprises a plurality of separate air conditioning units coupled to a common supply duct such that air may be introduced into the supply duct in two opposite flow directions. A plurality of outlets such as registers or auxiliary or branch ducts communicate with the supply duct and valve means are disposed in the supply duct at at least some of the outlets for automatically channelling a controllable amount of air from the supply duct to the associated outlet regardless of the direction of air flow within the supply duct. The valve means comprises an automatic air volume control apparatus for distribution within the air supply duct into which air may be introduced from two opposite directions. The apparatus incorporates a freely swinging movable vane in the supply duct to automatically channel into the associated outlet only the deflected air flow which has the higher relative pressure.

  12. Experimental and computational investigation of flow in catalytic monolith channels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G.C.; Bardon, M.F.; Witton, J.J. Cranfield Inst. of Technology )

    1992-01-01

    Monolith optimization is necessary for maximum efficiency during catalytic combustion. This paper describes a study undertaken to investigate the flow in catalytic monolith channels. A super-scale model of a single passage in a ceramic catalyst monolith was constructed and studied using pure air as the working fluid. Combustion of a representative natural gas mixture at the catalyst surface was simulated by electrical heating of the channel walls. The flow-field was probed with hot wire anemometers and fine wire thermocouples to obtain velocity and temperature data. Concurrently, the PHOENICS CFD package was used to model the flow. Results confirmed the presence of secondary flows and illustrated the effects of channel shape. The results are discussed as to their relevance to the design of a monolithic combustor for gas turbine applications. 15 refs.

  13. Simulation of the Turbulent air Flow Over a Circular Cavity with a Variable Opening Angle in an U-Shaped Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Usachov, A. E.; Zhukova, Yu. V.; Vysotskaya, A. A.; Malyshkin, D. A.

    2015-07-01

    A numerical investigation of the influence of the opening angle of a circular cavity in an U-shaped channel and the Reynolds number of a fluid fl ow in this channel on the local characteristics and turbulence of this fl ow has been performed based on the solution of the Reynolds equations, closed by the old and new Menter shear-stress transfer models and two variants of this model accounting for the curvature of streamlines, with the use of multiblock computational technologies realized in the VP2/3 package. The results of calculations were compared with each other and with experimental data of I. Castro and R. Savelsberg. This comparison has shown that the best agreement between the numerical predictions and experiments is obtained in the case where calculations are performed within the framework of the Leshtsiner-Rody-Isaev approach with correction for the eddy viscosity of the fluid fl ow. It was established that with increase in the Reynolds number and in the opening angle of the cavity the circulation flow in the near-wall layer of the vortex trapped in the cavity intensifies at a practically constant vorticity in the core of the vortex.

  14. Visualization of the air flow behind the automotive benchmark vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech, Ondrej; Jedelsky, Jan; Caletka, Petr; Jicha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Passenger comfort in cars depends on appropriate function of the cabin HVAC system. A great attention is therefore paid to the effective function of automotive vents and proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. The article deals with the visualization of air flow from the automotive benchmark vent. The visualization was made for two different shapes of the inlet channel connected to the benchmark vent. The smoke visualization with the laser knife was used. The influence of the shape of the inlet channel to the airflow direction, its enlargement and position of air flow axis were investigated.

  15. Bulk flow scaling for turbulent channel and pipe flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-08-01

    We report a theory deriving bulk flow scaling for canonical wall-bounded flows. The theory accounts for the symmetries of boundary geometry (flat plate channel vs. circular pipe) by a variational calculation for a large-scale energy length, which characterizes its bulk flow scaling by a simple exponent, i.e., m = 4 for the channel and 5 for the pipe. The predicted mean velocity shows excellent agreement with several dozen sets of quality empirical data for a wide range of the Reynolds number (Re), with a universal bulk flow constant κ≈0.45 . Predictions for dissipation and turbulent transport in the bulk flow are also given, awaiting data verification.

  16. Choked Flows in Open Capillary Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendhal, U.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study the forced liquid flow through an open capillary channel is investigated experimentally under reduced gravity conditions (microgravity). The channel consists of two parallel plates and has two free liquid surfaces at the sides. Depending on the applied volume flux, the liquid pressure decreases in the flow direction due to flow losses. To achieve a stationary flow the difference between the liquid pressure and the ambient pressure has to be balanced by the capillary pressure of the free surface. Since the free surface can only withstand a certain difference pressure, the flow rate in the channel is limited. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the surfaces collapse at the end of the capillary channel. The aim of this investigation is to understand the mechanism of the flow rate limitation. Our thesis is, that the limitation occurs due to choking, which is known from compressible gas flows and open channel flow under normal gravity. The theory of choked flow predicts a limiting velocity corresponding to a characteristic signal velocity of the flow. Once that this critical velocity is reached the mass flow is maximal and cannot be increased further. For the open capillary channel flow we except a limiting velocity defined by the speed of longitudinal (capillary) waves. The investigations were performed in the Bremen drop tower and on board the sounding rocket TEXUS-37. For the prediction of the critical velocity an one-dimensional theoretical model taking into account the entrance pressure loss and the frictional pressure loss in the channel is developed. The experiment evaluation yields the critical velocity in the channel and the surface contour in good accuracy with the theoretical prediction. We show that the gained differential equation is of the same structure like the equations of similar compressible gas flows. The key parameter is the ratio of the liquid velocity and the characteristic wave speed which can be taken as a Weber number

  17. Flow rate limitation in open capillary channel flows.

    PubMed

    Haake, Dennis; Rosendahl, Uwe; Ohlhoff, Antje; Dreyer, Michael E

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports the experimental and theoretical investigations of forced liquid flows through open capillary channels under reduced gravity conditions. An open capillary channel is a structure that establishes a liquid flow path at low Bond numbers, when the capillary pressure caused by the surface tension force dominates in comparison to the hydrostatic pressure induced by gravitational or residual accelerations. In case of steady flow through the channel, the capillary pressure of the free surface balances the pressure difference between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. Because of convective and viscous momentum transport, the pressure along the flow path decreases and causes the free surface to bend inward. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the free surface collapses and gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. This critical flow rate depends on the geometry of the channel and the properties of the liquid. In this paper we present a comparison of the theoretical and experimental critical flow rates and surface profiles for convective dominated flows. For the prediction of the critical flow rate a one-dimensional theoretical model taking into account the entrance pressure loss and the frictional pressure loss in the channel is developed.

  18. Rarefied gas flow through nanoscale tungsten channels.

    PubMed

    Ozhgibesov, M S; Leu, T S; Cheng, C H

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate argon flow behaviors through the channels with three types of boundary conditions. Current work deals with numerical simulations of rarefied gas flow through nano-channels using the Molecular Dynamics method. Taking into account that this method is very time consuming, we implemented all the simulations using CUDA capable graphic cards. We found that the well-known and relatively simple Maxwell model of boundary conditions is able to reproduce gas flow through a tungsten channel with irregularities and roughness, while it results in a significant error in the case of a smooth metal surface. We further found that the flow rate through a relatively short channel correlates nonlinearly with the channel's length. This finding is in contrast with the results available in extant literature. Our results are important for both numerical and theoretical analyses of rarefied gas flow in micro- and nano-systems where the choice of boundary conditions significantly influences flow. PMID:23528809

  19. Automatic air flow control in air conditioning ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Device is designed which automatically selects air flow coming from either of two directions and which can be adjusted to desired air volume on either side. Device uses one movable and two fixed scoops which control air flow and air volume.

  20. Numerical investigation of turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moin, P.; Kim, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fully developed turbulent channel flow was simulated numerically at Reynolds number 13800, based on centerline velocity and channel halt width. The large-scale flow field was obtained by directly integrating the filtered, three dimensional, time dependent, Navier-Stokes equations. The small-scale field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model. The calculations were carried out on the ILLIAC IV computer with up to 516,096 grid points. The computed flow field was used to study the statistical properties of the flow as well as its time dependent features. The agreement of the computed mean velocity profile, turbulence statistics, and detailed flow structures with experimental data is good. The resolvable portion of the statistical correlations appearing in the Reynolds stress equations are calculated. Particular attention is given to the examination of the flow structure in the vicinity of the wall.

  1. Investigation of supersonic chemically reacting and radiating channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mani, Mortaza; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    The 2-D time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are used to investigate supersonic flows undergoing finite rate chemical reaction and radiation interaction for a hydrogen-air system. The explicit multistage finite volume technique of Jameson is used to advance the governing equations in time until convergence is achieved. The chemistry source term in the species equation is treated implicitly to alleviate the stiffness associated with fast reactions. The multidimensional radiative transfer equations for a nongray model are provided for a general configuration and then reduced for a planar geometry. Both pseudo-gray and nongray models are used to represent the absorption-emission characteristics of the participating species. The supersonic inviscid and viscous, nonreacting flows are solved by employing the finite volume technique of Jameson and the unsplit finite difference scheme of MacCormack. The specified problem considered is of the flow in a channel with a 10 deg compression-expansion ramp. The calculated results are compared with those of an upwind scheme. The problem of chemically reacting and radiating flows are solved for the flow of premixed hydrogen-air through a channel with parallel boundaries, and a channel with a compression corner. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the radiative interaction can have a significant influence on the entire flow field.

  2. Morphodynamics of debris flow-dominated channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebl, Johannes

    2013-04-01

    The mountain environment is mainly shaped by mass movements and glacial, debris flow and fluvial erosion. Therefore the landform ensemble of torrential catchments includes features of several thousand years. Many of them contribute as debris sources to the development of debris flow activity. But the torrential channel is not formed by different types of slope failures only, channel erosion itself plays a dominant role in the development of debris flows. Today LIDAR data allow us to identify different types of debris sources and subsequent channel features. In combination with the lithological setting this information helps us to understand the general morphodynamics of mountain channels. A deeper insight into the development of mountain channels lacks of consistent data sets. Different approaches try to estimate erosional rates of torrents during design events. These methods are mainly based on field survey and on the experience of the person doing this job. To decrease the uncertainty of these data, the collected data have to be checked against already existing data of documented former events. The development of the erosional processes in torrents is directly linked with the dominating morphodynamic process, leading to essential estimates of debris flow hydrographes.

  3. Critical Velocity in Open Capillary Channel Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosendahl, Uwe; Dreyer, Michael E.; Rath, Hans J.; Motil, Brian; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate forced liquid flows through open capillary channels with free surfaces experimentally. The experiments were performed under low gravity conditions in the Bremen Drop Tower and on board the sounding rocket TEXUS-37. Open capillary channels (vanes) are used in surface tension tanks to transport the propellant and to provide a flow path for the bubble-free liquid supply to the thrusters. Since the free surfaces can only withstand a certain pressure differential between the liquid and ambient, the flow rate in the channel is limited. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the surfaces collapse and gas is ingested into the outlet. Since experimental and theoretical data of this flow rate limitation is lacking, the safety factors for the application of vanes in surface tension tanks must be unnecessary high. The aim of the investigation is to determine the maximum liquid flow rate and the corresponding critical flow velocity. The characteristic nondimensional parameters, OHNESORGE number, and gap ratio, cover a wide range of usual vanes. For the theoretical approach a one-dimensional momentum balance was set up. The numerical solution yields the maximum volume flux and the position of the free surface in good agreement with the experiments.

  4. Granular flow over inclined channels with constrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak; Weinhart, Thomas; Thornton, Anthony; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Study of granular flows down inclined channels is essential in understanding the dynamics of natural grain flows like landslides and snow avalanches. As a stepping stone, dry granular flow over an inclined channel with a localised constriction is investigated using both continuum methods and particle simulations. Initially, depth-averaged equations of motion (Savage & Hutter 1989) containing an unknown friction law are considered. The shallow-layer model for granular flows is closed with a friction law obtained from particle simulations of steady flows (Weinhart et al. 2012) undertaken in the open source package Mercury DPM (Mercury 2010). The closed two-dimensional (2D) shallow-layer model is then width-averaged to obtain a novel one-dimensional (1D) model which is an extension of the one for water flows through contraction (Akers & Bokhove 2008). Different flow states are predicted by this novel one-dimensional theory. Flow regimes with distinct flow states are determined as a function of upstream channel Froude number, F, and channel width ratio, Bc. The latter being the ratio of the channel exit width and upstream channel width. Existence of multiple steady states is predicted in a certain regime of F - Bc parameter plane which is in agreement with experiments previously undertaken by (Akers & Bokhove 2008) and for granular flows (Vreman et al. 2007). Furthermore, the 1D model is verified by solving the 2D shallow granular equations using an open source discontinuous Galerkin finite element package hpGEM (Pesch et al. 2007). For supercritical flows i.e. F > 1 the 1D asymptotics holds although the two-dimensional oblique granular jumps largely vary across the converging channel. This computationally efficient closed 1D model is validated by comparing it to the computationally more expensiveaa three-dimensional particle simulations. Finally, we aim to present a quasi-steady particle simulation of inclined flow through two rectangular blocks separated by a gap

  5. Channel Flow of Wormlike Micellar Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromer, Michael; Cook, Pam; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-11-01

    We examine the inhomogeneous response of the VCM model (Vasquez, Cook, McKinley 2006) in steady pressure-driven channel flow. The VCM model, a microstructural network model, was developed to describe concentrated solutions of wormlike micelles. The model comprises of a set of coupled partial differential equations, which incorporate breakage and reforming of two micellar species (a long species `A' and a shorter species `B') in addition to reptative and Rousian stress-relaxation mechanisms. We examine pressure-driven flow in microfluidic devices with rectangular cross-sections as well as with hyperbolic converging/diverging walls. The velocity profile predicted by the VCM model in Poiseuille flow deviates from the parabolic profile expected for a constant viscosity fluid and exhibits strong shear bands near channel walls. This shear-banding is analogous to that seen in circular Taylor-Couette flow and in good qualitative agreement with experimental observations in microfluidic channels. The hyperbolic planar contraction is of special interest due to the dominant contribution of extensional flow along the centerline and the proposed use of such flows as microfluidic extensional rheometers. The model predictions are compared with birefringence measurements of the evolution in the local microstructural orientation of CTAB and CPyCl-based micellar solutions.

  6. Viscous flow through a rotating square channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kheshgi, H. S.; Scriven, L. E.

    1985-10-01

    Fully developed flow of an incompressible Newtonian fluid driven by a pressure gradient through a square channel that rotates about an axis perpendicular to the channel roof is analyzed here with the aid of the penalty/Galerkin/finite element method. Coriolis force throws fast-moving fluid in the channel core in the direction of the cross product of the mean fluid velocity with the channel's angular velocity. Two vortex cells form when convective inertial force is weak. Asymptotic limits of rectilinear flow and geostrophic plug flow are approached when viscous force or Coriolis force dominates, respectively. A flow structure with an ageostrophic, virtually inviscid core is uncovered when Coriolis and convective inertial forces are both strong. This ageostrophic two-vortex structure becomes unstable when the strength of convective inertial force increases past a critical value. The two-vortex family of solutions metamorphoses into a family of four-vortex solutions at an imperfect bifurcation composed of a pair of turning points.

  7. 78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. PIPING CHANNEL FOR FUEL LOADING, FUEL TOPPING, COMPRESSED AIR, GASEOUS NITROGEN, AND HELIUM - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. Blade manipulators in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasudevan, B.; Prabhu, A.; Narasimha, R.

    1992-01-01

    We report here the results of a series of careful experiments in turbulent channel flow, using various configurations of blade manipulators suggested as optimal in earlier boundary layer studies. The mass flow in the channel could be held constant to better than 0.1%, and the uncertainties in pressure loss measurements were less than 0.1 mm of water; it was therefore possible to make accurate estimates of the global effects of blade manipulation of a kind that are difficult in boundary layer flows. The flow was fully developed at the station where the blades were mounted, and always relaxed to the same state sufficiently far downstream. It is found that, for a given mass flow, the pressure drop to any station downstream is always higher in the manipulated than in the unmanipulated flow, demonstrating that none of the blade manipulators tried reduces net duct losses. However the net increase in duct losses is less than the drag of the blade even in laminar flow, showing that there is a net reduction in the total skin friction drag experienced by the duct, but this relief is only about 20% of the manipulator drag at most.

  9. Measurements of gravity driven granular channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facto, Kevin

    This dissertation presents experiments that studied two gravity driven granular channel flows. The first experiment used magnetic resonance imaging to measure the density and displacement distributions of poppy seeds flowing in a rough walled channel. Time-averaged measurements of normalized velocity and density showed little flow speed dependence. Instantaneous measurements, however, showed marked velocity dependence in the displacement distributions. There was evidence of aperiodic starting and stopping at lower flow speeds and the onset of density waves on a continuous flow at higher speeds. The second experiment measured forces in all three spatial directions at the boundary of a flow of steel balls. The relationship between the normal and the tangential forces were examined statistically and compared to the Coulomb friction model. For both large and small forces, the tangential and normal forces are unrelated, as there appears to be a strong tendency for the tangential force to maintain a value that will bear the weight the weight of the particles in flow.

  10. Elastic turbulence in a curvilinear channel flow.

    PubMed

    Jun, Yonggun; Steinberg, Victor

    2011-11-01

    We report detailed quantitative studies of elastic turbulence in a curvilinear channel flow in a dilute polymer solution of high molecular weight polyacrylamide in a high viscosity water-sugar solvent. Detailed studies of the average and rms velocity and velocity gradients profiles reveal the emergence of a boundary layer associated with the nonuniform distribution of the elastic stresses across the channel. The characteristic boundary width is independent of the Weissenberg number Wi and proportional to the channel width, which is consistent with the findings our early investigations of the boundary layer in elastic turbulence in different flow geometries. The nonuniform distribution of the elastic stresses across the channel and appearance of the characteristic spatial scales of the order of the boundary layer width of both velocity and velocity gradient in the correlation functions of the velocity and velocity gradient fields in a bulk flow may suggest that excessive elastic stresses, concentrated in the boundary layer, are ejected into the bulk flow similar to jets observed in passive scalar mixing in elastic turbulence observed recently. Finally, the experimental results show that one of the main predictions of the theory of elastic turbulence, namely, the saturation of the normalized rms velocity gradient in the bulk flow of elastic turbulence contradicts the experimental observations both qualitatively and quantitatively in spite of the fact that the theory explains well the observed sharp power-law decay of the velocity power spectrum. The experimental findings call for further development of theory of elastic turbulence in a bounded container, similar to what was done for a passive scalar problem.

  11. Flow pattern and pressure drop of vertical upward gas-liquid flow in sinusoidal wavy channels

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2006-06-15

    Flow patterns and pressure drop of upward liquid single-phase flow and air-water two-phase flow in sinusoidal wavy channels are experimentally studied. The test section is formed by a sinusoidal wavy wall of 1.00 m length with a wave length of 67.20mm, an amplitude of 5.76mm. Different phase shifts between the side walls of the wavy channel of 0{sup o}, 90{sup o} and 180{sup o} are investigated. The flow phenomena, which are bubbly flow, slug flow, churn flow, and dispersed bubbly flow are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. When the phase shifts are increased, the onset of the transition from the bubbly flow to the churn flow shifts to a higher value of superficial air velocity, and the regions of the slug flow and the churn flow are smaller. In other words, the regions of the bubbly flow and the dispersed bubbly flow are larger as the phase shift increases. The slug flow pattern is only found in the test sections with phase shifts of 0{sup o} and 90{sup o}. Recirculating gas bubbles are always found in the troughs of the corrugations. The recirculating is higher when the phase shifts are larger. The relationship between the two-phase multipliers calculated from the measured pressure drops, and the Martinelli parameter is compared with the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation. The correlation in the case of turbulent-turbulent condition is shown to fit the data very well for the phase shift of 0{sup o} but shows greater deviation when the phase shifts are higher. (author)

  12. Sound radiation in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Morfey, Christopher L.; Sandham, Neil D.

    2003-01-01

    Lighthill’s acoustic analogy is formulated for turbulent channel flow with pressure as the acoustic variable, and integrated over the channel width to produce a two-dimensional inhomogeneous wave equation. The equivalent sources consist of a dipole distribution related to the sum of the viscous shear stresses on the two walls, together with monopole and quadrupole distributions related to the unsteady turbulent dissipation and Reynolds stresses respectively. Using a rigid-boundary Green function, an expression is found for the power spectrum of the far-field pressure radiated per unit channel area. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent plane Poiseuille and Couette flow have been performed in large computational domains in order to obtain good resolution of the low-wavenumber source behaviour. Analysis of the DNS databases for all sound radiation sources shows that their wavenumber frequency spectra have non-zero limits at low wavenumber. The sound power per unit channel area radiated by the dipole distribution is proportional to Mach number squared, while the monopole and quadrupole contributions are proportional to the fourth power of Mach number. Below a particular Mach number determined by the frequency and radiation direction, the dipole radiation due to the wall shear stress dominates the far field. The quadrupole takes over at Mach numbers above about 0.1, while the monopole is always the smallest term. The resultant acoustic field at any point in the channel consists of a statistically diffuse assembly of plane waves, with spectrum limited by damping to a value that is independent of Mach number in the low-M limit.

  13. TVD schemes for open channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delis, A. I.; Skeels, C. P.

    1998-04-01

    The Saint Venant equations for modelling flow in open channels are solved in this paper, using a variety of total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes. The performance of second- and third-order-accurate TVD schemes is investigated for the computation of free-surface flows, in predicting dam-breaks and extreme flow conditions created by the river bed topography. Convergence of the schemes is quantified by comparing error norms between subsequent iterations. Automatically calculated time steps and entropy corrections allow high CFL numbers and smooth transition between different conditions. In order to compare different approaches with TVD schemes, the most accurate of each type was chosen. All four schemes chosen proved acceptably accurate. However, there are important differences between the schemes in the occurrence of clipping, overshooting and oscillating behaviour and in the highest CFL numbers allowed by a scheme. These variations in behaviour stem from the different orders and inherent properties of the four schemes.

  14. Connecting exact coherent states to turbulent dynamics in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Sung; Graham, Michael D.

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of nonlinear traveling wave solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations or exact coherent states has greatly advanced the understanding of the nature of turbulent shear flows. These solutions are unstable saddle points in state space, while the time evolution of a turbulent flow is a dynamical trajectory wandering around them. In this regard, it is of interest to investigate how closely the turbulent trajectories approach these invariant states. Here, we present connections between turbulent trajectories and one intriguing solution family in channel flow. A state space visualization of turbulent trajectories is presented in a three-dimensional space. The lifetime of the trajectories is well represented by closeness to two distinct solutions resembling in many ways the active and hibernating phases of minimal channel turbulence (Xi & Graham PRL 2010). The connections are then examined by comparing mean profiles and flow structures. More importantly, the connections are confirmed by calculating the L2 distance between the trajectories and the traveling waves. Lastly, paths of an intermittent bursting phenomenon are identified in state space and the relationship between bursting paths and the traveling waves or hibernating turbulence is further discussed. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research through grant FA9550-15-1-0062 (Flow Interactions and Control Program).

  15. Dynamics of spheroid particles in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenbin; Alexeev, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The effect of inertia on the dynamics of rigid spheroid microparticles in a pressure-driven channel flow is studied using a hybrid lattice Boltzmann and lattice spring method. We find distinctive behaviors of particles depending on the particle shape, initial orientation, and ratio of particle size to the channel size. Two possible stable modes of motion are found for prolate spheroids. Particles either tumble in a shear plane or spin with the axis parallel to the vortex direction. We present a phase diagram showing the transition between these two modes. Cross-stream migration and equilibrium trajectories of particles are also investigated and found to depend on the particle shape and mode of motion. The simulations results are compared with experimental data showing favorable agreement. Our results will be useful for separating biological and synthetic particles by size and shape.

  16. Flow of foam through a convergent channel.

    PubMed

    Dollet, Benjamin; Bocher, Claire

    2015-11-01

    We study experimentally the flow of a foam confined as a bubble monolayer between two plates through a convergent channel. We quantify the velocity, the distribution and orientation of plastic events, and the elastic stress, using image analysis. We use two different soap solutions: a sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, with a negligible wall friction between the bubbles and the confining plates, and a mixture containing a fatty acid, giving a large wall friction. We show that for SDS solutions, the velocity profile obeys a self-similar form which results from the superposition of plastic events, and the elastic deformation is uniform. For the other solution, the velocity field differs and the elastic deformation increases towards the exit of the channel. We discuss and quantify the role of wall friction on the velocity profile, the elastic deformation, and the rate of plastic events. PMID:26607260

  17. Mass conservation: 1-D open channel flow equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLong, Lewis L.

    1989-01-01

    Unsteady flow simulation in natural rivers is often complicated by meandering channels of compound section. Hydraulic properties and the length of the wetted channel may vary significantly as a meandering river inundates its adjacent floodplain. The one-dimensional, unsteady, open-channel flow equations can be extended to simulate floods in channels of compound section. It will be shown that equations derived from the addition of differential equations individually describing flow in main and overbank channels do not in general conserve mass when overbank and main channels are of different lengths.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Surface and Volumetric Cooling using Optimal T- and Y-shaped Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaraju, Srinivas

    2015-11-01

    The T- and Y-shaped flow channels can be optimized for reduced pressure drop and pumping power. The results of the optimization are in the form of geometric parameters such as length and diameter ratios of the stem and branch sections. While these flow channels are optimized for minimum pressure drop, they can also be used for surface and volumetric cooling applications such as heat exchangers, air conditioning and electronics cooling. In this paper, we studied the heat transfer characteristics of multiple T- and Y-shaped flow channel configurations using numerical simulations. All configurations are subjected to same pumping power and heat generation constraints and their heat transfer performance is studied.

  19. Optimum design of bipolar plates for separate air flow cooling system of PEM fuel cells stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    The paper discusses about thermal management of PEM fuel cells. The objective is to define criteria and guidelines for the design of the air flow cooling system of fuel cells stacks for different combination of power density, bipolar plates material, air flow rate, operating temperature It is shown that the optimization of the geometry of the channel permits interesting margins for maintaining the use of separate air flow cooling systems for high power density PEM fuel cells.

  20. A clean air continuous flow propulsion facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, R. H.; Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a contaminant-free, high enthalpy, continuous flow facility designed to obtain detailed code validation measurements of high speed combustion. The facility encompasses uncontaminated air temperature control to within 5 K, fuel temperature control to 2 K, a ceramic flow straightener, drying of inlet air, and steady state continuous operation. The air heating method provides potential for independent control of contaminant level by injection, mixing, and heating upstream. Particular attention is given to extension of current capability of 1250 K total air temperature, which simulates Scramjet enthalpy at Mach 5.

  1. Inception of supraglacial channelization under turbulent flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantelli, E.; Camporeale, C.; Ridolfi, L.

    2013-12-01

    Glacier surfaces exhibit an amazing variety of meltwater-induced morphologies, ranging from small scale ripples and dunes on the bed of supraglacial channels to meandering patterns, till to large scale drainage networks. Even though the structure and geometry of these morphologies play a key role in the glacier melting processes, the physical-based modeling of such spatial patterns have attracted less attention than englacial and subglacial channels. In order to partially fill this gap, our work concerns the large scale channelization occurring on the ice slopes and focuses on the role of turbulence on the wavelength selection processes during the channelization inception. In a recent study[1], two of us showed that the morphological instability induced by a laminar film flowing over an ice bed is characterized by transversal length scales of order of centimeters. Being these scales much smaller than the spacing observed in the channelization of supraglacial drainage networks (that are of order of meters) and considering that the water films flowing on glaciers can exhibit Reynolds numbers larger than 104, we investigated the role of turbulence in the inception of channelization. The flow-field is modeled by means of two-dimensional shallow water equations, where Reynolds stresses are also considered. In the depth-averaged heat balance equation an incoming heat flux from air is assumed and forced convection heat exchange with the wall is taken into account, in addition to convection and diffusion in the liquid. The temperature profile in the ice is finally coupled to the liquid through Stefan equation. We then perform a linear stability analysis and, under the assumption of small Stefan number, we solve the differential eigenvalue problem analytically. As main outcome of such an analysis, the morphological instability of the ice-water interface is detected and investigated in a wide range of the independent parameters: longitudinal and transversal wavenumbers

  2. Lattice Boltzmann method and channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stensholt, Sigvat; Mongstad Hope, Sigmund

    2016-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann methods are presented at an introductory level with a focus on fairly simple simulations that can be used to test and illustrate the model’s capabilities. Two scenarios are presented. The first is a simple laminar flow in a straight channel driven by a pressure gradient (Poiseuille flow). The second is a more complex, including a wedge where Moffatt vortices may be induced if the wedge is deep enough. Simulations of the Poiseuille flow scenario accurately capture the theoretical velocity profile. The experiment shows the location of the fluid-wall boundary and the effects viscosity has on the velocity and convergence time. The numerical capabilities of the lattice Boltzmann model are tested further by simulating the more complex Moffatt vortex scenario. The method reproduces with high accuracy the theoretical predction that Moffat vortices will not form in a wedge if the vertex angle exceeds 146°. Practical issues limitations of the lattice Boltzmann method are discussed. In particular the accuracy of the bounce-back boundary condition is first order dependent on the grid resolution.

  3. Guiding supersonic projectiles using optically generated air density channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Luke A.; Sprangle, Phillip

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using optically generated channels of reduced air density to provide trajectory correction (guiding) for a supersonic projectile. It is shown that the projectile experiences a force perpendicular to its direction of motion as one side of the projectile passes through a channel of reduced air density. A single channel of reduced air density can be generated by the energy deposited from filamentation of an intense laser pulse. We propose changing the laser pulse energy from shot-to-shot to build longer effective channels. Current femtosecond laser systems with multi-millijoule pulses could provide trajectory correction of several meters on 5 km trajectories for sub-kilogram projectiles traveling at Mach 3.

  4. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels.

  5. Shark skin inspired low-drag microstructured surfaces in closed channel flow.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Gregory D; Bhushan, Bharat

    2013-03-01

    Living nature is the inspiration for many innovations and continues to serve as an invaluable resource to solve technical challenges. Skin from fast swimming sharks intrigue researchers since its low-drag riblet structure is applicable to many engineering applications. In this study, riblet-lined closed channel (rectangular duct) internal flow was examined since its effect is less understood than with open channel external flow. With one experimental setup and two fluids, this study examines various dimensional aspects of microstructured riblets. Experimental parameters include riblet geometry, fluid velocity (laminar and turbulent flow), fluid viscosity, riblet combinations, channel size, wettability, and scalability. For direct comparison, the sample flow channel was fabricated to accommodate multiple samples with water and air in various flow conditions, where drag is characterized by measuring pressure drop. Results are discussed and conceptual models are shown suggesting the interaction between vortices and the riblet surfaces.

  6. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels. PMID:23956695

  7. Analysis of Laminar Incompressible Flow on Semiporous Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L

    1956-01-01

    Perturbation solutions for laminar incompressible flow in semiporous and fully porous channels are compared. The perturbation parameter measures the amount of suction or blowing at the porous wall. The velocity profile and the wall friction parameter are more affected by suction or blowing for the semiporous channel than for the fully porous channel. For blowing through the wall, the pressure decreases in channel direction for both channels; with sufficiently high suction rates, the analysis showed that the pressure rises in flow direction for the fully porous channel.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic channel flows with weak transverse magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Rothmayer, A P

    2014-07-28

    Magnetohydrodynamic flow of an incompressible fluid through a plane channel with slowly varying walls and a magnetic field applied transverse to the channel is investigated in the high Reynolds number limit. It is found that the magnetic field can first influence the hydrodynamic flow when the Hartmann number reaches a sufficiently large value. The magnetic field is found to suppress the steady and unsteady viscous flow near the channel walls unless the wall shapes become large.

  9. Phase segregation in multiphase turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, Federico; Soldati, Alfredo

    2014-11-01

    The phase segregation of a rapidly quenched mixture (namely spinodal decomposition) is numerically investigated. A phase field approach is considered. Direct numerical simulation of the coupled Navier-Stokes and Cahn-Hilliard equations is performed with spectral accuracy and focus has been put on domain growth scaling laws, in a wide range of regimes. The numerical method has been first validated against well known results of literature, then spinodal decomposition in a turbulent bounded flow (channel flow) has been considered. As for homogeneous isotropic case, turbulent fluctuations suppress the segregation process when surface tension at the interfaces is relatively low (namely low Weber number regimes). For these regimes, segregated domains size reaches a statistically steady state due to mixing and break-up phenomena. In contrast with homogenous and isotropic turbulence, the presence of mean shear, leads to a typical domain size that show a wall-distance dependence. Finally, preliminary results on the effects to the drag forces at the wall, due to phase segregation, have been discussed. Regione FVG, program PAR-FSC.

  10. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Goglia, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow is reported. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time-evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction-blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  11. Transition to turbulence in plane channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-01-01

    Results obtained from a numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow are described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32x51x32 grid. Results are presented for no-slip boundary conditions at the solid walls as well as for periodic suction blowing to simulate active control of transition by mass transfer. Solutions indicate that the method is capable of simulating the complex character of vorticity dynamics during the various stages of transition and final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a lambda-shape vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the main elements of transition. Calculations involving periodic suction-blowing indicate that interference with a wave of suitable phase and amplitude reduces the disturbance growth rates.

  12. Compressible Flow Tables for Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcher, Marie A.

    1947-01-01

    This paper contains a tabulation of functions of the Mach number which are frequently used in high-speed aerodynamics. The tables extend from M = 0 to M = 10.0 in increments of 0.01 and are based on the assumption that air is a perfect gas having a specific heat ratio of 1.400.

  13. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-03-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disc on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  14. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  15. Contribution of the AIRS Shortwave Sounding Channels to Retrieval Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Kouvaris, Louis

    2006-01-01

    AIRS contains 2376 high spectral resolution channels between 650/cm and 2665/cm, including channels in both the 15 micron (near 667/cm) and 4.2 micron (near 2400/cm) COP sounding bands. Use of temperature sounding channels in the 15 micron CO2 band has considerable heritage in infra-red remote sensing. Channels in the 4.2 micron CO2 band have potential advantages for temperature sounding purposes because they are essentially insensitive to absorption by water vapor and ozone, and also have considerably sharper lower tropospheric temperature sounding weighting functions than do the 15 micron temperature sounding channels. Potential drawbacks with regard to use of 4.2 micron channels arise from effects on the observed radiances of solar radiation reflected by the surface and clouds, as well as effects of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium on shortwave observations during the day. These are of no practical consequences, however, when properly accounted for. We show results of experiments performed utilizing different spectral regions of AIRS, conducted with the AIRS Science Team candidate Version 5 algorithm. Experiments were performed using temperature sounding channels within the entire AIRS spectral coverage, within only the spectral region 650/cm to 1614 /cm; and within only the spectral region 1000/cm-2665/cm. These show the relative importance of utilizing only 15 micron temperature sounding channels, only the 4.2 micron temperature sounding channels, and both, with regards to sounding accuracy. The spectral region 2380/cm to 2400/cm is shown to contribute significantly to improve sounding accuracy in the lower troposphere, both day and night.

  16. Characteristics of coal mine ventilation air flows.

    PubMed

    Su, Shi; Chen, Hongwei; Teakle, Philip; Xue, Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a greenhouse gas but also a wasted energy resource if not utilised. Underground coal mining is by far the most important source of fugitive methane emissions, and approximately 70% of all coal mining related methane is emitted to the atmosphere through mine ventilation air. Therefore, research and development on mine methane mitigation and utilisation now focuses on methane emitted from underground coal mines, in particular ventilation air methane (VAM) capture and utilisation. To date, most work has focused on the oxidation of very low concentration methane. These processes may be classified based on their combustion kinetic mechanisms into thermal oxidation and catalytic oxidation. VAM mitigation/utilisation technologies are generally divided into two basic categories: ancillary uses and principal uses. However, it is possible that the characteristics of ventilation air flows, for example the variations in methane concentration and the presence of certain compounds, which have not been reported so far, could make some potential VAM mitigation and utilisation technologies unfeasible if they cannot cope with the characteristics of mine site ventilation air flows. Therefore, it is important to understand the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows. Moreover, dust, hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide, and other possible compounds emitted through mine ventilation air into the atmosphere are also pollutants. Therefore, this paper presents mine-site experimental results on the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows, including methane concentration and its variations, dust loadings, particle size, mineral matter of the dust, and other compounds in the ventilation air flows. The paper also discusses possible correlations between ventilation air characteristics and underground mining activities.

  17. Air flow in snake ventilation.

    PubMed

    Clark, B D; Gans, C; Rosenberg, H I

    1978-02-01

    Ventilation in resting, unrestrained Boa constrictor, Python regius and Thanmophis s. sirtalis was monitored using various combinations of a closed Kopfkappe (head chamber), intratracheal pressure catheters, strain gauges around the trunk, and a flow meter connected to one of the nostrils. Records of intratracheal pressure with and without closing the Kopfkappe show that the latter device induces artifacts in the normal ventilatory pattern. Flow meter readings from quiescent snakes indicate that ventilation is biphasic (outflow-inflow-pause) rather than triphasic (outflow-inflow-outflow-pause), while simultaneous pressure and strain gauge records are variably tri- or quadriphasic.

  18. Air flow through poppet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G W; Nutting, E M

    1920-01-01

    Report discusses the comparative continuous flow characteristics of single and double poppet valves. The experimental data presented affords a direct comparison of valves, single and in pairs of different sizes, tested in a cylinder designed in accordance with current practice in aviation engines.

  19. Migration of Air Flow in Non-Fixed Saturated Porous Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Fritz, S.; Kinzelbach, W.

    2008-12-01

    Two phase flow in porous media is of importance in a number of processes relevant in environmental engineering. The study of gas movement following injection into liquid saturated porous media is an active area of exploration for theoretical and practical reasons, e.g., in air-sparging, oil recovery, and bio-filter. A set of two-dimensional laboratory visualization experiments reveals a previously unrecognized gas-flow instability in a liquid-saturated porous medium packed by its own weight. The medium is made of crushed fused silica glass and saturated with a glycerine-water solution for refractive-index-matching. The interaction of the air flow injected at the bottom and the matrix (porous medium) structure leads to mobilization of the matrix and an instability, which causes the air channel to migrate. The instability of air-channel migration differs significantly from the gas-flow instability in a fixed matrix described in previous research. The migration of the air channel appears as a sequence of former channels collapsing and new channels opening. This process is characterized by the reorganization of the matrix, and the switching between channelized flow and pulsating slug flow. The channel migration comes to a stop after some time, leaving one thin and stable channel. The process is studied by calculating the cumulated lateral movement distance of channel and the lateral width of the area affected by the migration. A dimensionless number is defined to describe the migration. It is observed to be a function of grain size, height of bed, and air flow rate.

  20. Flow visualization in a low-density plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, R. L.; Hayes, J. R.; Estevadeordal, J.; Crafton, J. W.; Fonov, S. D.; Gogineni, S.

    2010-04-01

    A schlieren system and surface-stress-sensitive film system were developed for a plasma channel which posed unique challenges for flow visualization because of the combination of low air density and the presence of plasma discharges. Temperature-sensitive paint and direct-current discharge were also applied to flow visualization. Three pulsed schlieren light sources were evaluated. A light-emitting diode (LED), a xenon NanopulserTM and laser breakdown, were tested on identical flowfields. The LED provided excellent illumination, with pulses ranging from μs to continuous. The NanopulserTM provided excellent, short-duration images, although illumination varied from shot-to-shot. Laser-breakdown provided short-duration, incoherent illumination that was constant from pulse-to-pulse. The surface-stress-sensitive film was applied to surface flow visualization. A low-modulus elastomer doped with a luminescent dye was used to visualize the surface shear stress and pressure field in laminar shock boundary layer interactions. Intensity distributions from the dye were imaged to interrogate the surface pressure gradients. Displacement of surface markers provided shear information. Results showed the presence of Görtler vortices in the reattaching shear flow. Görtler vortices were also evident in temperature-sensitive paint images and in the plasma discharge glow. These vortices were evident in the intensity images from the elastomer, which could be related to the surface pressure gradient, but were not readily evident in surface shear measurements.

  1. Miniature electrooptical air flow sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershner, D. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A sensor for measuring flow direction and airspeed that is suitable, because of its small size, for rapid instrumentation of research airplanes is described. A propeller driven sphere rotating at a speed proportional to airspeed presents a reflective target to an electro-optical system such that the duty cycle of the resulting electrical output is proportional to yaw angle and the frequency is proportional to airspeed.

  2. Gating of a mechanosensitive channel due to cellular flows.

    PubMed

    Pak, On Shun; Young, Y-N; Marple, Gary R; Veerapaneni, Shravan; Stone, Howard A

    2015-08-11

    A multiscale continuum model is constructed for a mechanosensitive (MS) channel gated by tension in a lipid bilayer membrane under stresses due to fluid flows. We illustrate that for typical physiological conditions vesicle hydrodynamics driven by a fluid flow may render the membrane tension sufficiently large to gate a MS channel open. In particular, we focus on the dynamic opening/closing of a MS channel in a vesicle membrane under a planar shear flow and a pressure-driven flow across a constriction channel. Our modeling and numerical simulation results quantify the critical flow strength or flow channel geometry for intracellular transport through a MS channel. In particular, we determine the percentage of MS channels that are open or closed as a function of the relevant measure of flow strength. The modeling and simulation results imply that for fluid flows that are physiologically relevant and realizable in microfluidic configurations stress-induced intracellular transport across the lipid membrane can be achieved by the gating of reconstituted MS channels, which can be useful for designing drug delivery in medical therapy and understanding complicated mechanotransduction.

  3. Communication Channels and Information Flow among Ethnics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffres, Leo W.; Hur, K. Kyoon

    The questionnaire responses of 768 people from a variety of ethnic groups were analyzed to determine what communication channels were used to link ethnics to their native countries and to provide news of the ethnic community. The relationships between channel preferences and demographics, ethnicity, and communication channel patterns were also…

  4. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  5. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  6. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  7. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  8. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  9. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  10. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  11. Characterization and Control of Separated Entrance Flow in a Branched Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, C. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Glezer, A.

    2015-11-01

    The evolution of the flow downstream of the inlet of a rectangular channel that is branched along the entire span of the side wall of a primary channel of the same height is investigated experimentally in an air facility. Of particular interest is the formation and scaling of a separated flow domain downstream of the entrance plane into the secondary channel and its interaction with the flow surfaces at speeds up to M = 0 . 4 . The separation is actively controlled using a spanwise array of fluidic actuators on the primary channel's surface upstream of the inlet plane of the secondary duct. The effects of the actuation on the evolution of the separation and attachment of the vorticity layer between upstream surface of the primary duct and the surface of the secondary duct downstream of the branched inlet in the presence of a strong confined adverse pressure gradient are investigated using particle image velocimetry coupled with detailed static surface pressure distributions. The effects of the controlled separation within the secondary channel on the global flow within the primary duct and on flow split between primary and secondary channels are assessed, and it is demonstrated that actuation can effect significant changes in the flow fractions between the channels. Copyright 2015 Boeing. All rights reserved.

  12. Capillary-Driven Flow in Liquid Filaments Connecting Orthogonal Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    Capillary phenomena plays an important role in the management of product water in PEM fuel cells because of the length scales associated with the porous layers and the gas flow channels. The distribution of liquid water within the network of gas flow channels can be dramatically altered by capillary flow. We experimentally demonstrate the rapid movement of significant volumes of liquid via capillarity through thin liquid films which connect orthogonal channels. The microfluidic experiments discussed provide a good benchmark against which the proper modeling of capillarity by computational models may be tested. The effect of surface wettability, as expressed through the contact angle, on capillary flow will also be discussed.

  13. Flow, Sediment Transport, and Erosion in Steep Mountain Channels: an Alpine Symphony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, J. W.; Beer, A. R.; Heimann, F.; Rickenmann, D.; Schneider, J. M.; von Boetticher, A.; Turowski, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Steep headwater channels comprise a large fraction of the total channel length in mountainous regions. They control the transport of water, solutes, and sediments to larger rivers downstream, and regulate the erosional development of many mountain landscapes. Flow and transport processes in these steep channels contrast with those in their lower-gradient counterparts. Steep streams have complex bed morphology, with large roughness relative to the flow depth, and the flow is likewise complex, often comprising a variable mixture of air and water. Here we present several examples from Switzerland highlighting recent research into hydraulics, sediment transport, and bedrock erosion in steep Alpine channels. The Riedbach presents a striking natural experiment, in which the channel gradient steepens from roughly 3% to more than 40% in less than 1km, while the discharge, flow width, and sediment transport rates remain roughly constant. Measurements at the Riedbach illustrate the self-adjustment of flow velocity and bed roughness in steep mountain channels. Data from the Erlenbach, an intensively instrumented stream in the Alpine foothills, illustrate how the bed configuration of such streams regulates the relationship between flow and sediment transport. Field studies at the Gornera illustrate how flow patterns control the spatial distribution of bedrock erosion in this glacier-fed stream in the shadow of the Matterhorn. We present an overview of these studies and discuss their implications.

  14. 47 CFR 22.805 - Channels for general aviation air-ground service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Channels for general aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service General Aviation Air-Ground Stations § 22.805 Channels for general aviation air-ground service. The following channels are...

  15. 47 CFR 22.805 - Channels for general aviation air-ground service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Channels for general aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service General Aviation Air-Ground Stations § 22.805 Channels for general aviation air-ground service. The following channels are...

  16. 47 CFR 22.805 - Channels for general aviation air-ground service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Channels for general aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service General Aviation Air-Ground Stations § 22.805 Channels for general aviation air-ground service. The following channels are...

  17. 47 CFR 22.805 - Channels for general aviation air-ground service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channels for general aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service General Aviation Air-Ground Stations § 22.805 Channels for general aviation air-ground service. The following channels are...

  18. Lessons Learned from AIRS: Improved Determination of Surface and Atmospheric Temperatures Using Only Shortwave AIRS Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of shortwave channels available to the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) to improve the determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures. The AIRS instrument is compared with the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on-board the MetOp-A satellite. The objectives of the AIRS/AMSU were to (1) provide real time observations to improve numerical weather prediction via data assimilation, (2) Provide observations to measure and explain interannual variability and trends and (3) Use of AIRS product error estimates allows for QC optimized for each application. Successive versions in the AIRS retrieval methodology have shown significant improvement.

  19. Flow characteristics and heat transfer in wavy walled channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Zachary; Shah, Tapan; Monts, Vontravis; Warey, Alok; Balestrino, Sandro; Alexeev, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Using lattice Boltzmann simulations, we investigated the effects of wavy channel geometry on the flow and heat transfer within a parallel plate heat exchanger. We observed three distinct flow regimes that include steady flow with and without recirculation and unsteady time-periodic flow. We determined the critical Reynolds numbers at which the flow transitions between different flow regimes. To validate our computational results, we compared the simulated flow structures with the structures observed in a flowing soap film. Furthermore, we examine the effects of the wavy channel geometry on the heat transfer. We find that the unsteady flow regime drastically enhances the rate of heat transfer and show that heat exchangers with wavy walls outperform currently used heat exchangers with similar volume and power characteristics. Results from our study point to a simple and efficient method for increasing performance in compact heat exchangers.

  20. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  1. MRI channel flows in vertically stratified models of accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latter, Henrik N.; Fromang, Sebastien; Gressel, Oliver

    2010-08-01

    Simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in `unstratified' shearing boxes exhibit powerful coherent flows, whereby the fluid vertically splits into countermoving planar jets or `channels'. Channel flows correspond to certain axisymmetric linear MRI modes, and their preponderance follows from the remarkable fact that they are approximate non-linear solutions of the MHD equations in the limit of weak magnetic fields. We show in this paper, analytically and with one-dimensional numerical simulations, that this property is also shared by certain axisymmetric MRI modes in vertically stratified shearing boxes. These channel flows rapidly capture significant amounts of magnetic and kinetic energy, and thus are vulnerable to secondary shear instabilities. We examine these parasites in the vertically stratified context, and estimate the maximum amplitudes that channels attain before they are destroyed. These estimates suggest that a dominant channel flow will usually drive the disc's magnetic field to thermal strengths. The prominence of these flows and their destruction place enormous demands on simulations, but channels in their initial stages also offer a useful check on numerical codes. These benchmarks are especially valuable given the increasing interest in the saturation of the stratified MRI. Lastly, we speculate on the potential connection between `run-away' channel flows and outburst behaviour in protostellar and dwarf nova discs.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Seonghyeon; Je, Jongdoo; Choi, Haecheon

    2002-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are to suggest a proper boundary condition at the interface between a permeable block and turbulent channel flow and to investigate the characteristics of turbulent channel flow with permeable walls. The boundary condition suggested is an extended version of that applied to laminar channel flow by Beavers & Joseph (1967) and describes the behaviour of slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the permeable block and turbulent channel flow. With the proposed boundary condition, direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow that is bounded by the permeable wall are performed and significant skin-friction reductions at the permeable wall are obtained with modification of overall flow structures. The viscous sublayer thickness is decreased and the near-wall vortical structures are significantly weakened by the permeable wall. The permeable wall also reduces the turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stress, and pressure and vorticity fluctuations throughout the channel except very near the wall. The increase of some turbulence quantities there is due to the slip-velocity fluctuations at the wall. The boundary condition proposed for the permeable wall is validated by comparing solutions with those obtained from a separate direct numerical simulation using both the Brinkman equation for the interior of a permeable block and the Navier Stokes equation for the main channel bounded by a permeable block.

  3. Production and study of megawatt air-nitrogen plasmatron with divergent channel of an output electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakaev, E. H.; Chinnov, V. F.; Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Sargsyan, M. A.; Konovalov, P. V.

    2015-11-01

    Megawatt generator of high-enthalpy air plasma jet (H ≥ 30 kJ/g) is constructed. Plasmatron belongs to the class of plasma torches with thermionic cathode, tangential swirl flow and divergent channel of an output electrode-anode. Plasma torch ensures the formation of the slightly divergent (2α = 12°) air plasma jet with the diameter D = 50 mm. The current-voltage characteristics of the plasma torch has virtually unchanged voltage relative to its current with enhanced (compared with arcs in cylindrical channels) stable combustion zone. Preliminary analysis of the obtained air plasma spectra shows that at a current of 1500 A near-axis zone of the plasma jet is characterized by a temperature of up to 15000 K, and the peripheral radiating area has a temperature of 8000-9000 K.

  4. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical..., you may use an intake-air flow meter signal that does not give the actual value of raw exhaust, as... requirements. We recommend that you use an intake-air flow meter that meets the specifications in Table 1...

  5. Effect of asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation channel geometry on separation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ji Yeon; Kim, Ki Hun; Lee, Ju Yong; Williams, P Stephen; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2010-06-11

    The separation efficiencies of three different asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) channel designs were evaluated using polystyrene latex standards. Channel breadth was held constant for one channel (rectangular profile), and was reduced either linearly (trapezoidal profile) or exponentially (exponential profile) along the length for the other two. The effective void volumes of the three channel types were designed to be equivalent. Theoretically, under certain flow conditions, the mean channel flow velocity of the exponential channel could be arranged to remain constant along the channel length, thereby improving separation in AF4. Particle separation obtained with the exponential channel was compared with particle separation obtained with the trapezoidal and rectangular channels. We demonstrated that at a certain flow rate condition (outflow/inflow rate=0.2), the exponential channel design indeed provided better performance with respect to the separation of polystyrene nanoparticles in terms of reducing band broadening. While the trapezoidal channel exhibited a little poorer performance than the exponential, the strongly decreasing mean flow velocity in the rectangular channel resulted in serious band broadening, a delay in retention time, and even failure of larger particles to elute. PMID:20439106

  6. Channel morphology and flow structure of an abandoned channel under varying stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigan, Katie H.; Gerken, Joseph E.

    2016-07-01

    Abandoned channels are those channels left behind as meandering rivers migrate over their floodplains and remain among the most enigmatic features of the riverscape, especially related to their hydraulics and geomorphology. Abandoned channels are being considered and implemented as restoration and rehabilitation strategies for large rivers but we do not yet have a sound understanding of their hydromorphodynamics. The overall objectives of this work were to assess the bed morphology and flow structure of a large, dynamically connected abandoned channel (e.g., the channel is inundated during annual or decadal floods through bank overflow) under varying stages. Here we document the hydromorphodynamics of an abandoned channel during 3.4, 9.2, and 37.9 return interval discharges using an acoustic Doppler current profiler. Flow separation was observed along the channel entrance during the lowest flow surveying campaign but was not seen during the higher flow campaign. Width to depth ratio and channel width at the exit both progressively decreased from the first surveying campaign, despite the final campaign having the highest measured discharge. Large zones of flow stagnation and recirculation were observed, with depth-averaged velocity vectors not aligning in one direction, in the abandoned channel where water from the entrance was meeting water coming up from the exit during moderate discharges. The abandoned channel has been maintained for at least 25 years due to its low diversion angle and it being perched above the Kansas River. Results of this study provide insights of how flow hydraulics and physical characteristics of abandoned channel change under varying stages.

  7. Two-phase flow instabilities in a vertical annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Babelli, I.; Nair, S.; Ishii, M.

    1995-09-01

    An experimental test facility was built to study two-phase flow instabilities in vertical annular channel with emphasis on downward flow under low pressure and low flow conditions. The specific geometry of the test section is similar to the fuel-target sub-channel of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Mark 22 fuel assembly. Critical Heat Flux (CHF) was observed following flow excursion and flow reversal in the test section. Density wave instability was not recorded in this series of experimental runs. The results of this experimental study show that flow excursion is the dominant instability mode under low flow, low pressure, and down flow conditions. The onset of instability data are plotted on the subcooling-Zuber (phase change) numbers stability plane.

  8. Erosional processes in channelized water flows on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, V. R.

    1979-01-01

    A hypothesis is investigated according to which the Martian outflow channels were formed by high-velocity flows of water or dynamically similar liquid. It is suggested that the outflow channels are largely the result of several interacting erosional mechanisms, including fluvial processes involving ice covers, macroturbulence, streamlining, and cavitation.

  9. 6. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OUTLET CHANNEL FLOWING INTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF DAM 83, SHOWING OUTLET CHANNEL FLOWING INTO POND A WITH DIVERSION GATES LONG EAST (LEFT) SIDE OF OUTLET CHANNEL, LOOKING SOUTH FROM DOWNSTREAM FACE OF THE DAM - Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuge, Dam 83, Souris River Basin, Foxholm, Surrey (England), ND

  10. Evaporation from flowing channels ( mass-transfer formulas).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Sturm, T.W.

    1984-01-01

    Stability-dependent and Dalton-type mass transfer formulas are determined from experimental evaporation data in ambient and heated channels and are shown to have similar performance in prediction of evaporation. The formulas developed are compared with those proposed by other investigators for lakes and flowing channels. -from ASCE Publications Information

  11. Supercritical transition in plane channel flow with spatially periodic perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, Michael F.; Tagg, Randall P.; Swinney, Harry L.; Fischer, Paul F.; Patera, Anthony T.

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations have been conducted for plane channel flow with a streamwise-periodic array of cylinders. The primary transition in this open flow occurs as a convective rather than absolute instability and leads to traveling-wave packets, which advect out of the system. The ordered secondary state is characteristic of closed flows, in contrast with other open flows where the primary transition often leads directly to turbulence.

  12. Flow resistance in open channels with fixed movable bed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simoes, Francisco J.

    2010-01-01

    In spite of an increasingly large body of research by many investigators, accurate quantitative prediction of open channel flow resistance remains a challenge. In general, the relations between the elements influencing resistance (turbulence, boundary roughness, and channel shape features, such as discrete obstacles, bars, channel curvature, recirculation areas, secondary circulation, etc.) and mean flow variables are complex and poorly understood. This has resulted in numerous approaches to compute friction using many and diverse variables and equally diverse prescriptions for their use. In this paper, a new resistance law for surface (grain) resistance, the resistance due to the flow viscous effects on the channel boundary roughness elements, is presented for the cases of flow in the transition (5 < Re* <70) and fully rough (Re* ≥ 70) turbulent flow regimes, where Re* is the Reynolds number based on shear velocity and sediment particle mean diameter. It is shown that the new law is sensitive to bed movement without requiring previous knowledge of sediment transport conditions. Comparisons between computation and measurements, as well as comparisons with other well-known existing roughness predictors, are presented to demonstrate its accuracy and range of application. It is shown that the method accurately predicts total friction losses in channels and natural rivers with plane beds, regardless of sediment transport conditions. This work is useful to hydraulic engineers involved with the derivation of depth-discharge relations in open channel flow and with the estimation of sediment transport rates for the case of bedload transport.

  13. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  14. Flow reversal and thermal limit in a heated rectangular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.Y.; Tichler, P.R.; Yang, B.W.; OuYang, W.Y.; McAssey, E.

    1994-07-01

    The thermal limit in a vertical rectangular channel was determined in a series of experiments whereby the internal coolant underwent a change in flow direction from forced downflow to upward natural circulation. The tests were designed to simulate the flow reversal transient in the High Flux Beam Reactor. A number of parameters were varied in the flow reversal experiments to examine their effects on the thermal limit. Among the parameters varied were the rate of flow coastdown, inlet subcooling, water level in the upper plenum, bypass ratio (ratio of initial flow through the heated section to initial flow through the bypass orifice), and single- verses double-sided heating.

  15. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  16. ABSORBING BOUNDARY TECHNIQUE FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An absorbing boundary condition is formulated and applied to the one-dimensional open channel flow equations in conjunction with an explicit MacCormack scheme. The physical flow domain has been truncated by introducing an artificial pseudo-boundary. By using an appropriate bounda...

  17. Flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction of two-phase gas-liquid flow in an inclined narrow annular channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wongwises, Somchai; Pipathattakul, Manop

    2006-03-01

    Two-phase flow pattern, pressure drop and void fraction in horizontal and inclined upward air-water two-phase flow in a mini-gap annular channel are experimentally studied. A concentric annular test section at the length of 880mm with an outer diameter of 12.5mm and inner diameter of 8mm is used in the experiments. The flow phenomena, which are plug flow, slug flow, annular flow, annular/slug flow, bubbly/plug flow, bubbly/slug-plug flow, churn flow, dispersed bubbly flow and slug/bubbly flow, are observed and recorded by high-speed camera. A slug flow pattern is found only in the horizontal channel while slug/bubbly flow patterns are observed only in inclined channels. When the inclination angle is increased, the onset of transition from the plug flow region to the slug flow region (for the horizontal channel) and from the plug flow region to slug/bubbly flow region (for inclined channels) shift to a lower value of superficial air velocity. Small shifts are found for the transition line between the dispersed bubbly flow and the bubbly/plug flow, the bubbly/plug flow and the bubbly/slug-plug flow, and the bubbly/plug flow and the plug flow. The rest of the transition lines shift to a higher value of superficial air velocity. Considering the effect of flow pattern on the pressure drop in the horizontal tube at low liquid velocity, the occurrence of slug flow stops the rise of pressure drop for a short while, before rising again after the air velocity has increased. However, the pressure does not rise abruptly in the tubes with {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o} when the slug/bubbly flow occurs. At low gas and liquid velocity, the pressure drop increases, when the inclination angles changes from horizontal to 30{sup o} and 60{sup o}. Void fraction increases with increasing gas velocity and decreases with increasing liquid velocity. After increasing the inclination angle from horizontal to {theta}=30{sup o} and 60{sup o}, the void fraction appears to be similar, with a

  18. Propagation and deposition of stony debris flows at channel confluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stancanelli, L. M.; Lanzoni, S.; Foti, E.

    2015-07-01

    The fluid dynamics of stony debris flows generated in two small tributaries adjacent to each other and flowing into a main receiving channel was analyzed experimentally at a laboratory scale. The analysis on the propagation along the tributaries and deposition in the main channel provide information about sediment-water mobility, dangerous damming, and potential hazard. Debris flows were generated by releasing a preset water discharge over an erodible layer of saturated gravels material. As a consequence, the debris flow sediment concentration varied accordingly to the entrainment rate which, in turn, was strongly controlled by the tributary slope. The data collected by acoustic level sensors, pore fluid pressure transducers, and a load cell were used to characterize the evolution of bulk density and solid concentration of the sediment-water mixture. These two parameters were relevant to assess the stony debris flow mobility which contributes to determine the shape of sediment deposits in the main channel. The detailed bed topography surveys carried out in the main channel at the end of each experiment provided information on the morphology of these deposits and on the interplay of adjacent confluences. The influences of confluence angle, tributary slopes, and triggering conditions have been investigated, for a total of 18 different configurations. Within the investigated range of parameters, the slope angle was the parameter that mainly influences the stony debris flow mobility while, for adjacent confluences, the degree of obstruction within the receiving channel was strongly influenced by the triggering scenario.

  19. Piecewise uniform conduction-like flow channels and method therefor

    DOEpatents

    Cummings, Eric B.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.

    2006-02-28

    A low-dispersion methodology for designing microfabricated conduction channels for on-chip electrokinetic-based systems is presented. The technique relies on trigonometric relations that apply for ideal electrokinetic flows, allowing faceted channels to be designed on chips using common drafting software and a hand calculator. Flows are rotated and stretched along the abrupt interface between adjacent regions with differing permeability. Regions bounded by interfaces form flow "prisms" that can be combined with other designed prisms to obtain a wide range of turning angles and expansion ratios while minimizing dispersion. Designs are demonstrated using two-dimensional numerical solutions of the Laplace equation.

  20. Single phase channel flow forced convection heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Hartnett, J.P.

    1999-04-01

    A review of the current knowledge of single phase forced convection channel flow of liquids (Pr > 5) is presented. Two basic channel geometries are considered, the circular tube and the rectangular duct. Both laminar flow and turbulent flow are covered. The review begins with a brief overview of the heat transfer behavior of Newtonian fluids followed by a more detailed presentation of the behavior of purely viscous and viscoelastic Non-Newtonian fluids. Recent developments dealing with aqueous solutions of high molecular weight polymers and aqueous solutions of surfactants are discussed. The review concludes by citing a number of challenging research opportunities.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flows in Expanding Channels

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobieff, Peter; Putkaradze, Vakhtang

    2008-10-24

    We present an experimental realization of the classical Jeffery-Hamel flows inside a wedge-shaped channel. We compare the measured velocity fields with the predictions of Jeffery-Hamel theory. A detailed experimental study of bifurcation diagrams for the solutions reveals the absolute stability of the pure outflow solution and an interesting hysteretic structure for bifurcations. We also observe a multiple vortex flow regime predicted earlier numerically and analytically. Experimental studies of the stability of the flow to perturbations at the channel exit are also conducted.

  2. A survey of air flow models for multizone structures

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

    1991-03-01

    Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of air... longwall and continuous miner sections. The quantity of air across each face at a work place shall be...

  4. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  5. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  6. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  7. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  8. Vortex structures in turbulent channel flow behind an orifice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Soichiro; Iwamoto, Kaoru; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a channel flow with an orifice has been performed for Reτ0=10 - 600, where uτ0 is the friction velocity calculated from the mean pressure gradient, δ the channel half width and ν the kinematic viscosity. In the wake region, the mean flow becomes asymmetric by the Coanda effect. The degree of asymmetry increases with increasing the Reynolds number for the laminar flow at Reτ0< 50. The degree decreases abruptly at Reτ0=50, where the transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow take places. Large-scale spanwise vortices generated at the orifice edges. They become deformed and break up into disordered small-scale structures in shear layer. The small-scale vortices are convected towards the channel center. The large-scale vortices have an important effect upon the reattachment locations and streamwise vortices near the wall in the wake region.

  9. Flows and mixing in channels with misaligned superhydrophobic walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkaya, Tatiana V.; Asmolov, Evgeny S.; Zhou, Jiajia; Schmid, Friederike; Vinogradova, Olga I.

    2015-03-01

    Aligned superhydrophobic surfaces with the same texture orientation reduce drag in the channel and generate secondary flows transverse to the direction of the applied pressure gradient. Here we show that a transverse shear can be easily generated by using superhydrophobic channels with misaligned textured surfaces. We propose a general theoretical approach to quantify this transverse flow by introducing the concept of an effective shear tensor. To illustrate its use, we present approximate theoretical solutions and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations for striped superhydrophobic channels. Our results demonstrate that the transverse shear leads to complex flow patterns, which provide a new mechanism of a passive vertical mixing at the scale of a texture period. Depending on the value of Reynolds number two different scenarios occur. At relatively low Reynolds number the flow represents a transverse shear superimposed with two corotating vortices. For larger Reynolds number these vortices become isolated, by suppressing fluid transport in the transverse direction.

  10. Flows and mixing in channels with misaligned superhydrophobic walls.

    PubMed

    Nizkaya, Tatiana V; Asmolov, Evgeny S; Zhou, Jiajia; Schmid, Friederike; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2015-03-01

    Aligned superhydrophobic surfaces with the same texture orientation reduce drag in the channel and generate secondary flows transverse to the direction of the applied pressure gradient. Here we show that a transverse shear can be easily generated by using superhydrophobic channels with misaligned textured surfaces. We propose a general theoretical approach to quantify this transverse flow by introducing the concept of an effective shear tensor. To illustrate its use, we present approximate theoretical solutions and Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations for striped superhydrophobic channels. Our results demonstrate that the transverse shear leads to complex flow patterns, which provide a new mechanism of a passive vertical mixing at the scale of a texture period. Depending on the value of Reynolds number two different scenarios occur. At relatively low Reynolds number the flow represents a transverse shear superimposed with two corotating vortices. For larger Reynolds number these vortices become isolated, by suppressing fluid transport in the transverse direction.

  11. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of orthogonally rotating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Hiroshi

    1991-12-01

    Numerical analysis was conducted to predict the centripetal buoyant effect on flow and heat transfer characteristics in a channel rotating about a perpendicular axis. The conditions were assumed to be laminar, fully developed, and uniform heat flux. Calculation were conducted both for radially outward flow from the rotating axis and radially inward flow. The calculated results indicated that for radially outward flow buoyancy decreases the suction side friction and heat transfer while increasing pressure side friction and heat transfer. This trends were reversed for radially inward flow.

  12. Viscous flow calculations in turbomachinery channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, F.; Michelassi, V.

    1993-02-01

    An implicit procedure based on the artificial compressibility formulation is presented for the numerical solution of the two-dimensional incompressible steady Navier-Stokes equations in the presence of large separated regions. Turbulence effects are accounted for by the Chien low Reynolds number form of the K - \\varepsilon turbulence model and the Baldwin-Lomax algebraic expression for turbulent viscosity. The governing equations are written in conservative form and irnplicitly solved in fully coupled form using the approximate factorization technique. Preliminary tests were carried out in a laminar flow regime to check the accuracy and stability of the method in two-dimensional and cylindrical axisymmetric flow configurations. After testing in laminar and turbulent flow regimes and comparing the two turbulence models, the code was successfully applied to an actual gas turbine diffuser at low Mach numbers.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of Stable Channel Flow at Large Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwstadt, F. T. M.

    2005-08-01

    We consider a model for the stable atmospheric boundary at large stability, i.e. near the limit where turbulence is no longer able to survive. The model is a plane horizontally homogeneous channel flow, which is driven by a constant pressure gradient and which has a no-slip wall at the bottom and a free-slip wall at the top. At the lower wall a constant negative temperature flux is imposed. First, we consider a direct numerical simulation of the same channel flow. The simulation is computed with the neutral channel flow as initial condition and computed as a function of time for various values of the stability parameter h/L, where h is the channel height and L is related to the Obukhov length. We find that a turbulent solution is only possible for h/L < 1.25 and for larger values turbulence decays. Next, we consider a theoretical model for this channel flow based on a simple gradient transfer closure. The resulting equations allow an exact solution for the case of a stationary flow. The velocity profile for this solution is almost linear as a function of height in most of the channel. In the limit of infinite Reynolds number, the temperature profile has a logarithmic singularity at the upper wall of the channel. For the cases where a turbulent flow is maintained in the numerical simulation, we find that the velocity and temperature profiles are in good agreement with the results of the theoretical model when the effects of the surface layer on the exchange coefficients are taken into account.

  14. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  15. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  16. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  17. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  18. 47 CFR 22.857 - Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground... CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Air-Ground Radiotelephone Service Commercial Aviation Air-Ground Systems § 22.857 Channel plan for commercial aviation air-ground systems. The 849-851 MHz and 894-896...

  19. Stability limits of unsteady open capillary channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grah, Aleksander; Haake, Dennis; Rosendahl, Uwe; Klatte, J.?Rg; Dreyer, Michael E.

    This paper is concerned with steady and unsteady flow rate limitations in open capillary channels under low-gravity conditions. Capillary channels are widely used in Space technology for liquid transportation and positioning, e.g. in fuel tanks and life support systems. The channel observed in this work consists of two parallel plates bounded by free liquid surfaces along the open sides. The capillary forces of the free surfaces prevent leaking of the liquid and gas ingestion into the flow.In the case of steady stable flow the capillary pressure balances the differential pressure between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. Increasing the flow rate in small steps causes a decrease of the liquid pressure. A maximum steady flow rate is achieved when the flow rate exceeds a certain limit leading to a collapse of the free surfaces due to the choking effect. In the case of unsteady flow additional dynamic effects take place due to flow rate transition and liquid acceleration. The maximum flow rate is smaller than in the case of steady flow. On the other hand, the choking effect does not necessarily cause surface collapse and stable temporarily choked flow is possible under certain circumstances.To determine the limiting volumetric flow rate and stable flow dynamic properties, a new stability theory for both steady and unsteady flow is introduced. Subcritical and supercritical (choked) flow regimes are defined. Stability criteria are formulated for each flow type. The steady (subcritical) criterion corresponds to the speed index defined by the limiting longitudinal small-amplitude wave speed, similar to the Mach number. The unsteady (supercritical) criterion for choked flow is defined by a new characteristic number, the dynamic index. It is based on pressure balances and reaches unity at the stability limit.The unsteady model based on the Bernoulli equation and the mass balance equation is solved numerically for perfectly wetting incompressible

  20. Air sparging effectiveness: laboratory characterization of air-channel mass transfer zone for VOC volatilization.

    PubMed

    Braida, W J; Ong, S K

    2001-10-12

    Air sparging in conjunction with soil vapor extraction is one of many technologies currently being applied for the remediation of groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Mass transfer at the air-water interface during air sparging is affected by various soil and VOC properties. In this study with a single air-channel apparatus, mass transfer of VOCs was shown to occur within a thin layer of saturated porous media next to the air channel. In this zone, the VOCs were found to rapidly deplete during air sparging resulting in a steep concentration gradient while the VOC concentration outside the zone remained fairly constant. The sizes of the mass transfer zone were found to range from 17 to 41 mm or 70d(50) and 215d(50) (d(50)=mean particle size) for low organic carbon content media (<0.01% OC). The size of the mass transfer zone was found to be proportional to the square root of the aqueous diffusivity of the VOC, and was affected by the mean particle size, and the uniformity coefficient. Effects of the volatility of the VOCs as represented by the Henry's law constants and the airflow rates on the mass transfer zone were found to be negligible but VOC mass transfer from air-water interface to bulk air phase seems to play a role. A general correlation for predicting the size of the mass transfer zone was developed. The model was developed using data from nine different VOCs and verified by two other VOCs. The existence of the mass transfer zone provides an explanation for the tailing effect of the air phase concentration under prolonged air sparging and the rebound in the VOC air phase concentration after the sparging system is turned off.

  1. A Numerical simulation of transition in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G.; Biringen, S.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 7500 is described. Three dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two and three dimensional finite amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 by 33 by 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and which are characteristic of various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streak-like formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), implementation of subgrid-scale terms are necessary to obtain proper turbulent statistics.

  2. A universal transition to turbulence in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sano, Masaki; Tamai, Keiichi

    2016-03-01

    Transition from laminar to turbulent flow drastically changes the mixing, transport, and drag properties of fluids, yet when and how turbulence emerges is elusive even for simple flow within pipes and rectangular channels. Unlike the onset of temporal disorder, which is identified as the universal route to chaos in confined flows, characterization of the onset of spatiotemporal disorder has been an outstanding challenge because turbulent domains irregularly decay or spread as they propagate downstream. Here, through extensive experimental investigation of channel flow, we identify a distinctive transition with critical behaviour. Turbulent domains continuously injected from an inlet ultimately decayed, or in contrast, spread depending on flow rates. Near a transition point, critical behaviour was observed. We investigate both spatial and temporal dynamics of turbulent clusters, measuring four critical exponents, a universal scaling function and a scaling relation, all in agreement with the (2 + 1)-dimensional directed percolation universality class.

  3. Generation of Martian chaos and channels by debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nummedal, D.; Prior, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    A debris flow mechanism is proposed to account for the formation of chaos and the large channels debouching into Crysae Planitia from the adjacent southern uplands of Mars. Based on considerations of the juxtaposition of individual channel environments, the morphological assemblages within each environment and flow dynamics, it is suggested that the debris flows were triggered by the large-scale failure of subsurface sediments, possibly initiated by a seismic event. During the initial, slow-moving phase of the flow, the debris would have formed gently sinuous channels with multiple side-wall slumps, grooves and ridges, and elongate erosional remnants. The flow would have gained mobility as the debris moved downslope, producing travel distances greatly in excess of those characteristic of terrestrial examples, and eroded, streamlined remnants at the distal reaches of the channel. Finally, due to internal and boundary friction, the flow would have been slowed down once it entered the Chryse plains, resulting in a thin debris blanket with no depositional relief.

  4. Dean flow-coupled inertial focusing in curved channels.

    PubMed

    Ramachandraiah, Harisha; Ardabili, Sahar; Faridi, Asim M; Gantelius, Jesper; Kowalewski, Jacob M; Mårtensson, Gustaf; Russom, Aman

    2014-05-01

    Passive particle focusing based on inertial microfluidics was recently introduced as a high-throughput alternative to active focusing methods that require an external force field to manipulate particles. In inertial microfluidics, dominant inertial forces cause particles to move across streamlines and occupy equilibrium positions along the faces of walls in flows through straight micro channels. In this study, we systematically analyzed the addition of secondary Dean forces by introducing curvature and show how randomly distributed particles entering a simple u-shaped curved channel are focused to a fixed lateral position exiting the curvature. We found the lateral particle focusing position to be fixed and largely independent of radius of curvature and whether particles entering the curvature are pre-focused (at equilibrium) or randomly distributed. Unlike focusing in straight channels, where focusing typically is limited to channel cross-sections in the range of particle size to create single focusing point, we report here particle focusing in a large cross-section area (channel aspect ratio 1:10). Furthermore, we describe a simple u-shaped curved channel, with single inlet and four outlets, for filtration applications. We demonstrate continuous focusing and filtration of 10 μm particles (with >90% filtration efficiency) from a suspension mixture at throughputs several orders of magnitude higher than flow through straight channels (volume flow rate of 4.25 ml/min). Finally, as an example of high throughput cell processing application, white blood cells were continuously processed with a filtration efficiency of 78% with maintained high viability. We expect the study will aid in the fundamental understanding of flow through curved channels and open the door for the development of a whole set of bio-analytical applications.

  5. Dynamics of premixed hydrogen/air flames in mesoscale channels

    SciTech Connect

    Pizza, Gianmarco; Frouzakis, Christos E.; Boulouchos, Konstantinos; Mantzaras, John; Tomboulides, Ananias G.

    2008-10-15

    Direct numerical simulation with detailed chemistry and transport is used to study the stabilization and dynamics of lean ({phi}=0.5) premixed hydrogen/air atmospheric pressure flames in mesoscale planar channels. Channel heights of h=2, 4, and 7 mm, and inflow velocities in the range 0.3{<=}U{sub IN}{<=}1100cm/ s are investigated. Six different burning modes are identified: mild combustion, ignition/extinction, closed steady symmetric flames, open steady symmetric flames, oscillating and, finally, asymmetric flames. Chaotic behavior of cellular flame structures is observed for certain values of U{sub IN}. Stability maps delineating the regions of the different flame types are finally constructed. (author)

  6. Decentralized and Tactical Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odoni, Amedeo R.; Bertsimas, Dimitris

    1997-01-01

    This project dealt with the following topics: 1. Review and description of the existing air traffic flow management system (ATFM) and identification of aspects with potential for improvement. 2. Identification and review of existing models and simulations dealing with all system segments (enroute, terminal area, ground) 3. Formulation of concepts for overall decentralization of the ATFM system, ranging from moderate decentralization to full decentralization 4. Specification of the modifications to the ATFM system required to accommodate each of the alternative concepts. 5. Identification of issues that need to be addressed with regard to: determination of the way the ATFM system would be operating; types of flow management strategies that would be used; and estimation of the effectiveness of ATFM with regard to reducing delay and re-routing costs. 6. Concept evaluation through identification of criteria and methodologies for accommodating the interests of stakeholders and of approaches to optimization of operational procedures for all segments of the ATFM system.

  7. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  8. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in inclined channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-08-01

    Linear stability of the stratified gas-liquid and liquid-liquid plane-parallel flows in the inclined channels is studied with respect to all wavenumber perturbations. The main objective is to predict the parameter regions in which the stable stratified configuration in inclined channels exists. Up to three distinct base states with different holdups exist in the inclined flows, so that the stability analysis has to be carried out for each branch separately. Special attention is paid to the multiple solution regions to reveal the feasibility of the non-unique stable stratified configurations in inclined channels. The stability boundaries of each branch of the steady state solutions are presented on the flow pattern map and are accompanied by the critical wavenumbers and the spatial profiles of the most unstable perturbations. Instabilities of different nature are visualized by the streamlines of the neutrally stable perturbed flows, consisting of the critical perturbation superimposed on the base flow. The present analysis confirms the existence of two stable stratified flow configurations in a region of low flow rates in the countercurrent liquid-liquid flows. These configurations become unstable with respect to the shear mode of instability. It was revealed that in slightly upward inclined flows the lower and middle solutions for the holdup are stable in the part of the triple solution region, while the upper solution is always unstable. In the case of downward flows, in the triple solution region, none of the solutions are stable with respect to the short-wave perturbations. These flows are stable only in the single solution region at low flow rates of the heavy phase, and the long-wave perturbations are the most unstable ones.

  9. Dry microfoams: formation and flow in a confined channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, J.-P.; Marmottant, P.; Graner, F.

    2006-05-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the agglomeration of microbubbles into a 2D microfoam and its flow in a rectangular microchannel. Using a flow-focusing method, we produce the foam in situ on a microfluidic chip for a large range of liquid fractions, down to a few percent in liquid. We can monitor the transition from separated bubbles to the desired microfoam, in which bubbles are closely packed and separated by thin films. We find that bubble formation frequency is limited by the liquid flow rate, whatever the gas pressure. The formation frequency creates a modulation of the foam flow, rapidly damped along the channel. The average foam flow rate depends non-linearly on the applied gas pressure, displaying a threshold pressure due to capillarity. Strong discontinuities in the flow rate appear when the number of bubbles in the channel width changes, reflecting the discrete nature of the foam topology. We also produce an ultra flat foam, reducing the channel height from 250 μm to 8 μm, resulting in a height to diameter ratio of 0.02; we notice a marked change in bubble shape during the flow.

  10. Ultraviolet disinfection: similitude in Taylor-Couette and channel flow.

    PubMed

    Forney, L J; Goodridge, C F; Pierson, J A

    2003-11-01

    The inactivation data for Escherichia coli are recorded for the three reactor geometries of Taylor-Couette flow and flow between either concentric cylinders or a square channel. All of the data are shown to be correlated with the assumption of plug flow. In particular, the effects of nonuniform radiation levels are accounted for by integration across the fluid channel as done previously. However, a new correction factor is introduced that is shown to be inversely proportional to the laminar, velocity boundary thickness to account for the effects of a concentration boundary layer of surviving pathogen. It has also been demonstrated that the common problems of nonuniform radiation levels and concentration boundary layer effects in UV reactors are largely eliminated with the use of Taylor-Couette flow. Moreover, the repetitive exposure of fluid parcels to a small number of lamps in the rotating Taylor-Couette flow decreases maintainance requirements compared to the hydrodynamic equivalent of cross-flow over a tube bank or lamp array. Over a 3-log reduction in the inactivation of E. coli was demonstrated compared to a conventional channel with the same radiation dosage. Moreover, greater than a 2-log reduction was evident compared to flow through concentric cylinders.

  11. Effect of Surface Energy Pulses on Supersonic Flow in a Channel of Variable Cross Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamuraev, V. P.; Kalinina, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of a surface pulse-periodic supply of energy on the formation of shock-wave structures in a plane channel of variable cross section has been studied. Energy is supplied to the constant cross-section units of the channel with the flow Mach number M = 2. The time-average supplied power corresponds to the combustion of hydrogen with the excess-air coefficient from 1 to 10. The problem is solved within the framework of the Euler equations. A dimensionless approach is used to analyze the effect of sources. The applicability of the analytical relations obtained is confirmed by numerical solution of two-dimensional Euler equations.

  12. Yield Hardening of Electrorheological Fluids in Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helal, Ahmed; Qian, Bian; McKinley, Gareth H.; Hosoi, A. E.

    2016-06-01

    Electrorheological fluids offer potential for developing rapidly actuated hydraulic devices where shear forces or pressure-driven flow are present. In this study, the Bingham yield stress of electrorheological fluids with different particle volume fractions is investigated experimentally in wall-driven and pressure-driven flow modes using measurements in a parallel-plate rheometer and a microfluidic channel, respectively. A modified Krieger-Dougherty model can be used to describe the effects of the particle volume fraction on the yield stress and is in good agreement with the viscometric data. However, significant yield hardening in pressure-driven channel flow is observed and attributed to an increase and eventual saturation of the particle volume fraction in the channel. A phenomenological physical model linking the densification and consequent microstructure to the ratio of the particle aggregation time scale compared to the convective time scale is presented and used to predict the enhancement in yield stress in channel flow, enabling us to reconcile discrepancies in the literature between wall-driven and pressure-driven flows.

  13. Open-channel integrating-type flow meter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koopman, K.C.

    1971-01-01

    A relatively inexpensive meter for measuring cumulative flow in open channels with a rated control,. called a "totalizer", was developed. It translates the nonlinear function of gage height to flow by use of a cam and a float. A variable resistance element in an electronic circuit is controlled by the float so that the electron flow in the circuit corresponds to the flow of water. The flow of electricity causes electroplating of an electrode with silver. The amount of silver deposited is proportionate to the flow of water. The total flow of water is determined by removing the silver from the electrode at a fixed rate with ·an electronic device and recording the time for removal with a counter. The circuit is designed so that the ,resultant reading on the counter is in acre-feet of water.

  14. Turbulent channel without boundaries: the periodic Kolmogorov flow.

    PubMed

    Musacchio, S; Boffetta, G

    2014-02-01

    The Kolmogorov flow provides an ideal instance of a virtual channel flow: It has no boundaries, but it possesses well defined mean flow in each half wavelength. We exploit this remarkable feature for the purpose of investigating the interplay between the mean flow and the turbulent drag of the bulk flow. By means of a set of direct numerical simulations at increasing Reynolds number, we show the dependence of the bulk turbulent drag on the amplitude of the mean flow. Further, we present a detailed analysis of the scale-by-scale energy balance, which describes how kinetic energy is redistributed among different regions of the flow while being transported toward small dissipative scales. Our results allow us to obtain an accurate prediction for the spatial energy transport at large scales.

  15. Dynamic Flow Management Problems in Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Sarah Stock

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, over six hundred thousand licensed pilots flew nearly thirty-five million flights into over eighteen thousand U.S. airports, logging more than 519 billion passenger miles. Since demand for air travel has increased by more than 50% in the last decade while capacity has stagnated, congestion is a problem of undeniable practical significance. In this thesis, we will develop optimization techniques that reduce the impact of congestion on the national airspace. We start by determining the optimal release times for flights into the airspace and the optimal speed adjustment while airborne taking into account the capacitated airspace. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Problem (TFMP). We address the complexity, showing that it is NP-hard. We build an integer programming formulation that is quite strong as some of the proposed inequalities are facet defining for the convex hull of solutions. For practical problems, the solutions of the LP relaxation of the TFMP are very often integral. In essence, we reduce the problem to efficiently solving large scale linear programming problems. Thus, the computation times are reasonably small for large scale, practical problems involving thousands of flights. Next, we address the problem of determining how to reroute aircraft in the airspace system when faced with dynamically changing weather conditions. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Rerouting Problem (TFMRP) We present an integrated mathematical programming approach for the TFMRP, which utilizes several methodologies, in order to minimize delay costs. In order to address the high dimensionality, we present an aggregate model, in which we formulate the TFMRP as a multicommodity, integer, dynamic network flow problem with certain side constraints. Using Lagrangian relaxation, we generate aggregate flows that are decomposed into a collection of flight paths using a randomized rounding heuristic. This collection of paths is used in a packing integer

  16. Counter-current flow limited CHF in thin rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, L.Y.

    1990-01-01

    An analytical expression for counter-current-flow-limitation (CCFL) was used to predict critical heat flux (CHF) for downward flow in thin vertical rectangular channels which are prototypes of coolant channels in test and research nuclear reactors. Top flooding is the mechanism for counter-current flow limited CHF. The CCFL correlation also was used to determine the circulation and flooding-limited CHF. Good agreements were observed between the period the model predictions and data on the CHF for downflow. The minimum CHF for downflow is lower than the flooding-limited CHF and it is predicted to occur at a liquid flow rate higher than that at the flooding limit. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Flow structure in submarine meandering channels, a continuous discussion on secondary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abad, J. D.; Parker, G.; Sequeiros, O.; Spinewine, B.; Garcia, M. H.; Pirmez, C.

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the flow structure in deep-sea turbidity currents is important for the formation of submarine meandering channels. Similarly to the case of subaerial channels, several types of secondary flows include turbulence-, curvature- and bed morphodynamic-driven flow structures that modulate sediment transport and channel bed morphodynamics. This study focuses on [1] a review of long-time research effort (Abad et al., 2011) that tackles the description of the secondary flow associated with a subaqueous bottom current (saline) in a high-curvature meandering channel and [2] ongoing numerical simulations of similar settings as the experiments to describe the entire flow structure. In the case of subaerial channels, the classical Rozovskiian paradigm is often invoked which indicates that the near-bottom secondary flow in a bend is directed inward. It has recently been suggested based on experimental and theoretical considerations, however, that this pattern is reversed (near-bottom secondary flow is directed outward) in the case of submarine meandering channels. Experimental results presented here, on the other hand, indicate near-bottom secondary flows that have the same direction as observed in a river (normal secondary flow). The implication is an apparent contradiction between experimental results. This study combines theory, experiments, reconstructions of field flows and ongoing simulations to resolve this apparent contradiction based on the flow densimetric Froude number. Three ranges of densimetric Froude number are found, such that a) in an upper regime, secondary flow is reversed, b) in a middle regime, it is normal and c) in a lower regime, it is reversed. These results are applied to field scale channel-forming turbidity currents in the Amazon submarine canyon-fan system (Amazon Channel) and the Monterey canyon and a saline underflow in the Black Sea flowing from the Bosphorus. Our analysis indicates that secondary flow should be normal

  18. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement specifications. 91.416 Section 91.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow...

  19. Surface-directed boundary flow in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tom T; Taylor, David G; Lim, Kwan Seop; Sedlak, Miroslav; Bashir, Rashid; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R

    2006-07-01

    Channel geometry combined with surface chemistry enables a stable liquid boundary flow to be attained along the surfaces of a 12 microm diameter hydrophilic glass fiber in a closed semi-elliptical channel. Surface free energies and triangular corners formed by PDMS/glass fiber or OTS/glass fiber surfaces are shown to be responsible for the experimentally observed wetting phenomena and formation of liquid boundary layers that are 20-50 microm wide and 12 microm high. Viewing this stream through a 20 microm slit results in a virtual optical window with a 5 pL liquid volume suitable for cell counting and pathogen detection. The geometry that leads to the boundary layer is a closed channel that forms triangular corners where glass fiber and the OTS coated glass slide or PDMS touch. The contact angles and surfaces direct positioning of the fluid next to the fiber. Preferential wetting of corner regions initiates the boundary flow, while the elliptical cross-section of the channel stabilizes the microfluidic flow. The Young-Laplace equation, solved using fluid dynamic simulation software, shows contact angles that exceed 105 degrees will direct the aqueous fluid to a boundary layer next to a hydrophilic fiber with a contact angle of 5 degrees. We believe this is the first time that an explanation has been offered for the case of a boundary layer formation in a closed channel directed by a triangular geometry with two hydrophobic wetting edges adjacent to a hydrophilic surface. PMID:16800710

  20. Flow model for open-channel reach or network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Formulation of a one-dimensional model for simulating unsteady flow in a single open-channel reach or in a network of interconnected channels is presented. The model is both general and flexible in that it can be used to simulate a wide range of flow conditions for various channel configurations. It is based on a four-point (box), implicit, finite-difference approximation of the governing nonlinear flow equations with user-definable weighting coefficients to permit varying the solution scheme from box-centered to fully forward. Unique transformation equations are formulated that permit correlation of the unknowns at the extremities of the channels, thereby reducing coefficient matrix and execution time requirements. Discharges and water-surface elevations computed at intermediate locations within a channel are determined following solution of the transformation equations. The matrix of transformation and boundary-condition equations is solved by Gauss elimination using maximum pivot strategy. Two diverse applications of the model are presented to illustrate its broad utility. (USGS)

  1. Basic hydraulic principles of open-channel flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jobson, Harvey E.; Froehlich, David C.

    1988-01-01

    The three basic principles of open-channel-flow analysis--the conservation of mass, energy, and momentum--are derived, explained, and applied to solve problems of open-channel flow. These principles are introduced at a level that can be comprehended by a person with an understanding of the principles of physics and mechanics equivalent to that presented in the first college level course of the subject. The reader is assumed to have a working knowledge of algebra and plane geometry as well as some knowledge of calculus. Once the principles have been derived, a number of example applications are presented that illustrate the computation of flow through culverts and bridges, and over structures, such as dams and weirs. Because resistance to flow is a major obstacle to the successful application of the energy principle to open-channel flow, procedures are outlined for the rational selection of flow resistance coefficients. The principle of specific energy is shown to be useful in the prediction of water-surface profiles both in the qualitative and quantitative sense. (USGS)

  2. Rotation of Nonspherical Particles in Turbulent Channel Flow.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihao; Challabotla, Niranjan Reddy; Andersson, Helge I; Variano, Evan A

    2015-12-11

    The effects of particle inertia, particle shape, and fluid shear on particle rotation are examined using direct numerical simulation of turbulent channel flow. Particles at the channel center (nearly isotropic turbulence) and near the wall (highly sheared flow) show different rotation patterns and surprisingly different effects of particle inertia. Oblate particles at the center tend to rotate orthogonally to their symmetry axes, whereas prolate particles rotate around their symmetry axes. This trend is weakened by increasing inertia so that highly inertial oblate spheroids rotate nearly isotropically about their principle axes at the channel center. Near the walls, inertia does not move the rotation of spheroids towards isotropy but, rather, reverses the trend, causing oblate spheroids to rotate strongly about their symmetry axes and prolate spheroids to rotate normal to their symmetry axes. The observed phenomena are mostly ascribed to preferential orientations of the spheroids.

  3. Investigation of Turbulent Flow in a Two-Dimensional Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, John

    1951-01-01

    A detailed exploration of the field of mean and fluctuating quantities in a two-dimensional turbulent channel flow is presented. The measurements were repeated at three Reynolds numbers, 12,300, 30,800, and 61,600, based on the half width of the channel and the maximum mean velocity. A channel of 5-inch width and 12:1 aspect ratio was used for the investigation. Mean-speed and axial-fluctuation measurements were made well within the laminar sublayer. The semitheoretical predictions concerning the extent of the laminar sublayer were confirmed. The distribution of the velocity fluctuations in the direction of mean flow u' shows that the influence of the viscosity extends farther from the wall than indicated by the mean velocity profile, the region of influence being approximately four times as wide.

  4. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... background correction as described in § 1065.667. (2) In the following cases, you may use an intake-air flow...-specific fuel consumption and fuel consumed. (b) Component requirements. We recommend that you use...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... as described in § 1065.667. (2) In the following cases, you may use an intake-air flow meter signal...-specific fuel consumption and fuel consumed. (b) Component requirements. We recommend that you use...

  6. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... background correction as described in § 1065.667. (2) In the following cases, you may use an intake-air flow...-specific fuel consumption and fuel consumed. (b) Component requirements. We recommend that you use...

  7. Stabililty and laminarisation of turbulent rotating channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, S.; Grundestam, O.; Johansson, A. V.

    The influence of moderate rotation rate on turbulent channel flow is that the turbulence is suppressed on the stable side and augmented on the unstable side because of the Coriolis force. With increasing rotation rate the turbulent region becomes restricted to a decreasing zone near the unstable wall. For the rotation number, Ro > 3 (normalized by bulk velocity and channel height) inviscid linear theory yields a stable laminar flow [1] and a recent DNS study [2] indicates that the turbulent flow laminarizes for Ro below 3. The critical Ro has been identified by a standard text-book linear stability analysis of rotating laminar channel flow including the viscous effects. The Reynolds number, Re = 10800 based on the bulk velocity and channel half height, is the same as in the recent DNS [2]. The most unstable mode consists of tilted slightly oblique streamwise vortices with a critical rotation number of Ro c = 2.805 and streamwise and spanwise wave numbers of α = 2.7 and β = 19 respectivelly. Steady streamwise roll-cells are slightly more stable.

  8. Morphology of Cryogenic Flows and Channels on Dwarf Planet Ceres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, Katrin; Jaumann, Ralf; Otto, Katharina A.; von der Gathen, Isabel; Matz, Klaus-Dieter; Buczkowski, Debra L.; Williams, David A.; Pieters, Carle M.; Preusker, Frank; Roatsch, Thomas; Stephan, Katrin; Wagner, Roland J.; Russell, Christopher T.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2016-04-01

    Cereś surface is affected by numerous impact craters and some of them show features such as channels or multiple flow events forming a smooth, less cratered surface, indicating possible post-impact resurfacing [1,2]. Flow features occur on several craters on Ceres such as Haulani, Ikapati, Occator, Jarimba and Kondos in combination with smooth crater floors [3,4], appearing as extended plains, ponded material, lobate flow fronts and in the case of Haulani lobate flows originating from the crest of the central ridge [3] partly overwhelming the mass wasting deposits from the rim. Haulanís crater flanks are also affected by multiple flow events radiating out from the crater and partly forming breakages. Flows occur as fine-grained lobes with well-defined margins and as smooth undifferentiated streaky flows covering the adjacent surface. Thus, adjacent craters are covered by flow material. Occator also exhibits multiple flows but in contrast to Haulani, the flows originating from the center overwhelm the mass wasting deposits from the rim [4]. The flows have a "bluish" signature in the FC color filters ratio. Channels occur at relatively fresh craters. They also show the "bluish" signature like the flows and plains. Only few channels occur at older "reddish" craters. They are relatively fresh incised into flow features or crater ejecta. Most are small, narrow and have lobated lobes with predominant distinctive flow margins. The widths vary between a few tens of meters to about 3 km. The channels are found on crater flanks as well as on the crater floors. The occurrence of flow features indicates viscous material on the surface. Those features could be formed by impact melt. However, impact melt is produced during the impact, assuming similar material properties as the ejecta it is expected to have nearly the same age as the impact itself, but the flows and plains are almost free of craters, thus, they seem to be much younger than the impact itself. In addition, the

  9. Development of Channeled Flow in Partially Molten Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashima, S.; Kumagai, I.; Kurita, K.

    2002-12-01

    There exist two contrasting models as to the style of melt migration in the partially molten medium; homogeneous permeable flow on grain scale and heterogeneous localized one (channeled flow on larger scale than the grain scale). It is considered that the style evolves from the homogeneous flow to the heterogeneous one as the degree of melting increases, but the physics responsible for this flow organization is not yet clarified. Several models as to this process and the melt segregation are proposed based on numerical simulation, though the experimental verification is not given yet. Here we present simple experimental results on the flow organization. We utilized highly deformable transparent gel as the solid phase. Due to this high deformability the matrix composed of the gel is easy to vary its internal structure. We have conducted the following experiments; the gel (about 5mm in diameter) is mingled with methyl-cellulose solution (MS) with almost same density as the gel, 1.01g/cm3, packed in a rectangular parallelepiped case (2.4cm*18cm*14.4cm), and a compaction state is realized by covering with wire netting at the upper boundary. Gel fraction of this mixture system is controlled by changing the ratio of the gel to MS (about 100% to 60%). Glycerol solution (GS) with density of 1.2g/cm3 is poured at the upper boundary. This is a kind of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and the dense GS flows downward through the mixture. The flow pattern of the GS is analyzed. A series of these procedures is carried out at various gel fractions (from about 100% to 60%), and how the flow style varies with the gel fraction is investigated. At median fraction of the gel about 80% to 70% the evolution from homogeneous permeable flow to heterogeneous localized flow was observed. At higher gel fraction, liquid phase flows as homogeneous permeable flow. Fragility of the solid frame is a most important factor for flow organization. The structure of the partially molten medium can be easily

  10. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: bench-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating.

  11. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: bench-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating. PMID:25462638

  12. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: Bench-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating.

  13. A reciprocal theorem for boundary-driven channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelin, Sébastien; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    In a variety of physical situations, a bulk viscous flow is induced by a distribution of surface velocities, for example, in diffusiophoresis (as a result of chemical gradients) and above carpets of cilia (as a result of biological activity). When such boundary-driven flows are used to pump fluids, the primary quantity of interest is the induced flow rate. In this letter, we propose a method, based on the reciprocal theorem of Stokes flows, to compute the net flow rate for arbitrary flow distribution and periodic pump geometry using solely stress information from a dual Poiseuille-like problem. After deriving the general result, we apply it to straight channels of triangular, elliptic, and rectangular geometries and quantify the relationship between bulk motion and surface forcing.

  14. Turbulent flow and heat transfer in rotating channels and tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitiakov, V. Y.; Petropavlovskii, R. R.; Ris, V. V.; Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnov, S. A.

    This document is a reduction of the author's experimental results on turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer in rotating channels whose axes are parallel to the plane of rotation. Substantial dissimilarities of longitudinal velocity field profile and pulsational characteristics are caused by effects of stabilization and destabilization and secondary flow production. Local heat transfer coefficients vary over the perimeter of the tube section connecting detected flow peculiarities. It is shown that the increase in rotational intensity caused an increase in the relative dissimilarity of the local heat transfer coefficients and increased their mean value.

  15. Power formula for open-channel flow resistance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Cheng-lung

    1988-01-01

    This paper evaluates various power formulas for flow resistance in open channels. Unlike the logarithmic resistance equation that can be theoretically derived either from Prandtl's mixing-length hypothesis or von Karman's similarity hypothesis, the power formula has long had an appearance of empiricism. Nevertheless, the simplicity in the form of the power formula has made it popular among the many possible forms of flow resistance formulas. This paper reexamines the concept and rationale of the power formulation, thereby addressing some critical issues in the modeling of flow resistance.

  16. Statistics of polymer extensions in turbulent channel flow.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Faranggis; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Perlekar, Prasad; Brandt, Luca

    2012-11-01

    We present direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow with passive Lagrangian polymers. To understand the polymer behavior we investigate the behavior of infinitesimal line elements and calculate the probability distribution function (PDF) of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and from them the corresponding Cramer's function for the channel flow. We study the statistics of polymer elongation for both the Oldroyd-B model (for Weissenberg number Wi<1) and the FENE model. We use the location of the minima of the Cramer's function to define the Weissenberg number precisely such that we observe coil-stretch transition at Wi ≈1. We find agreement with earlier analytical predictions for PDF of polymer extensions made by Balkovsky, Fouxon, and Lebedev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4765 (2000)] for linear polymers (Oldroyd-B model) with Wi <1 and by Chertkov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4761 (2000)] for nonlinear FENE-P model of polymers. For Wi >1 (FENE model) the polymer are significantly more stretched near the wall than at the center of the channel where the flow is closer to homogenous isotropic turbulence. Furthermore near the wall the polymers show a strong tendency to orient along the streamwise direction of the flow, but near the center line the statistics of orientation of the polymers is consistent with analogous results obtained recently in homogeneous and isotropic flows.

  17. Structure parameters in rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knightly, George H.; Sather, D.

    1986-01-01

    It is well-known that a number of steady state problems in fluid mechanics involving systems of nonlinear partial differential equations can be reduced to the problem of solving a single operator equation of the form: v + lambda Av + lambda B(v) = 0, v is the summation of H, lambda is the summation of one-dimensional Euclid space, where H is an appropriate (real or complex) Hilbert space. Here lambda is a typical load parameter, e.g., the Reynolds number, A is a linear operator, and B is a quadratic operator generated by a bilinear form. In this setting many bifurcation and stability results for problems were obtained. A rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow was studied, and it showed that, in general, the superposition of a Poiseuille flow on a rotating Couette channel flow is destabilizing.

  18. Structure parameters in rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knightly, George H.; Sather, D.

    It is well-known that a number of steady state problems in fluid mechanics involving systems of nonlinear partial differential equations can be reduced to the problem of solving a single operator equation of the form: v + lambda Av + lambda B(v) = 0, v is the summation of H, lambda is the summation of one-dimensional Euclid space, where H is an appropriate (real or complex) Hilbert space. Here lambda is a typical load parameter, e.g., the Reynolds number, A is a linear operator, and B is a quadratic operator generated by a bilinear form. In this setting many bifurcation and stability results for problems were obtained. A rotating Couette-Poiseuille channel flow was studied, and it showed that, in general, the superposition of a Poiseuille flow on a rotating Couette channel flow is destabilizing.

  19. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired. PMID:24483559

  20. Capillary channel flow experiments aboard the International Space Station.

    PubMed

    Conrath, M; Canfield, P J; Bronowicki, P M; Dreyer, M E; Weislogel, M M; Grah, A

    2013-12-01

    In the near-weightless environment of orbiting spacecraft capillary forces dominate interfacial flow phenomena over unearthly large length scales. In current experiments aboard the International Space Station, partially open channels are being investigated to determine critical flow rate-limiting conditions above which the free surface collapses ingesting bubbles. Without the natural passive phase separating qualities of buoyancy, such ingested bubbles can in turn wreak havoc on the fluid transport systems of spacecraft. The flow channels under investigation represent geometric families of conduits with applications to liquid propellant acquisition, thermal fluids circulation, and water processing for life support. Present and near future experiments focus on transient phenomena and conduit asymmetries allowing capillary forces to replace the role of gravity to perform passive phase separations. Terrestrial applications are noted where enhanced transport via direct liquid-gas contact is desired.

  1. Movement of a finite body in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Frank T.; Johnson, Edward R.

    2016-07-01

    A body of finite size is moving freely inside, and interacting with, a channel flow. The description of this unsteady interaction for a comparatively dense thin body moving slowly relative to flow at medium-to-high Reynolds number shows that an inviscid core problem with vorticity determines much, but not all, of the dominant response. It is found that the lift induced on a body of length comparable to the channel width leads to differences in flow direction upstream and downstream on the body scale which are smoothed out axially over a longer viscous length scale; the latter directly affects the change in flow directions. The change is such that in any symmetric incident flow the ratio of slopes is found to be cos ⁡(π / 7 ), i.e. approximately 0.900969, independently of Reynolds number, wall shear stresses and velocity profile. The two axial scales determine the evolution of the body and the flow, always yielding instability. This unusual evolution and linear or nonlinear instability mechanism arise outside the conventional range of flow instability and are influenced substantially by the lateral positioning, length and axial velocity of the body.

  2. The pulsating laminar flow in a rectangular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valueva, E. P.; Purdin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    The finite difference method is used to solve the task of the developed pulsating laminar flow in a rectangular channel. The optimum of the difference scheme parameters was determined. Data on the amplitude and phase of the longitudinal velocity oscillations, the hydraulic and friction drag coefficients, the shear stress on the wall have been obtained. Using the dimensionless value of the frequency pulsations two characteristic regimes — the quasisteady-state regime and the high-frequency regime have been identified. In the quasi-steady-state regime, the values of all hydrodynamic quantities at each instant of time correspond to the velocity value averaged over the cross section at a given moment of time. It is shown that in the high-frequency regime, the dependences on the dimensionless oscillation frequency of oscillating components of hydrodynamic quantities are identical for rectilinear channels with a different cross-sectional form (round pipe, flat and a rectangular channels). The effect of the aspect ratio of the rectangular channel sides channel on the pulsating flow dynamics has been analyzed.

  3. Predicting equilibrium states with Reynolds stress closures in channel flow and homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abid, R.; Speziale, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent channel flow and homogeneous shear flow have served as basic building block flows for the testing and calibration of Reynolds stress models. A direct theoretical connection is made between homogeneous shear flow in equilibrium and the log-layer of fully-developed turbulent channel flow. It is shown that if a second-order closure model is calibrated to yield good equilibrium values for homogeneous shear flow it will also yield good results for the log-layer of channel flow provided that the Rotta coefficient is not too far removed from one. Most of the commonly used second-order closure models introduce an ad hoc wall reflection term in order to mask deficient predictions for the log-layer of channel flow that arise either from an inaccurate calibration of homogeneous shear flow or from the use of a Rotta coefficient that is too large. Illustrative model calculations are presented to demonstrate this point which has important implications for turbulence modeling.

  4. Overland flow erosion inferred from Martian channel network geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seybold, Hansjörg; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    The controversy about the origin of Mars' channel networks is almost as old as their discovery 150 years ago. Over the last few decades, new Mars probes have revealed more detailed structures in Martian The controversy about the origin of Mars' channel networks is almost as old as their discovery 150 years ago. Over the last few decades, new Mars probes have revealed more detailed structures in Martian drainage networks, and new studies suggest that Mars once had large volumes of surface water. But how this water flowed, and how it could have carved the channels, remains unclear. Simple scaling arguments show that networks formed by similar mechanisms should have similar branching angles on Earth and Mars, suggesting that Earth analogues can be informative here. A recent analysis of high-resolution data for the continental United States shows that climate leaves a characteristic imprint in the branching geometry of stream networks. Networks growing in humid regions have an average branching angle of α = 2π/5 = 72° [1], which is characteristic of network growth by groundwater sapping [2]. Networks in arid regions, where overland flow erosion is more dominant, show much smaller branching angles. Here we show that the channel networks on Mars have branching angles that resemble those created by surficial flows on Earth. This result implies that the growth of Martian channel networks was dominated by near-surface flow, and suggests that deeper infiltration was inhibited, potentially by permafrost or by impermeable weathered soils. [1] Climate's Watermark in the Geometry of River Networks, Seybold et al.; under review [2] Ramification of stream networks, Devauchelle et al.; PNAS (2012)

  5. Proper horizontal photospheric flows in a filament channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Roudier, T.; Mein, N.; Mein, P.; Malherbe, J. M.; Chandra, R.

    2014-04-01

    Context. An extended filament in the central part of the active region NOAA 11106 crossed the central meridian on Sept. 17, 2010 in the southern hemisphere. It has been observed in Hα with the THEMIS telescope in the Canary Islands and in 304 Å with the EUV imager (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). Counterstreaming along the Hα threads and bright moving blobs (jets) along the 304 Å filament channel were observed during 10 h before the filament erupted at 17:03 UT. Aims: The aim of the paper is to understand the coupling between magnetic field and convection in filament channels and relate the horizontal photospheric motions to the activity of the filament. Methods: An analysis of the proper photospheric motions using SDO/HMI continuum images with the new version of the coherent structure tracking (CST) algorithm developed to track granules, as well as the large scale photospheric flows, was performed for three hours. Using corks, we derived the passive scalar points and produced a map of the cork distribution in the filament channel. Averaging the velocity vectors in the southern hemisphere in each latitude in steps of 3.5 arcsec, we defined a profile of the differential rotation. Results: Supergranules are clearly identified in the filament channel. Diverging flows inside the supergranules are similar in and out of the filament channel. Converging flows corresponding to the accumulation of corks are identified well around the Hα filament feet and at the edges of the EUV filament channel. At these convergence points, the horizontal photospheric velocity may reach 1 km s-1, but with a mean velocity of 0.35 km s-1. In some locations, horizontal flows crossing the channel are detected, indicating eventually large scale vorticity. Conclusions: The coupling between convection and magnetic field in the photosphere is relatively strong. The filament experienced the convection motions through its anchorage points with the photosphere, which are

  6. Field GPR Monitoring of Flow Channeling in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoflias, G. P.; Baker, M.; Becker, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    Fractures control the flow of fluids in rocks with important implications for groundwater resources, contaminant transport, geothermal resources, sequestration of carbon dioxide, and the development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources. However, fractured rocks exhibit heterogeneous hydraulic properties that are difficult to characterize using conventional hydraulic testing methods. Flow channeling caused by fracture aperture variability is known to result in preferential pathways of rapid contaminant transport in aquifers and poor sweep efficiency in geothermal reservoirs. Time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) experiments were conducted at the Altona Flat Rock fractured sandstone field site using surface reflection to monitor saline tracer flow through a water-saturated subhorizontal bedrock fracture at a depth of 7.6 m below surface. Three-dimensional (3-D) GPR grids were acquired, each covering approximately a 100 m2 area at a 0.25 m x 0.5 m trace spacing. Radar data were acquired at 50 MHz and 100 MHz frequencies using broadside and cross-polarized dipole antenna pairs oriented parallel and orthogonal to the survey grid lines. Dipole flow hydraulic tests established by re-circulation of saline traced formation water between injection and pumping boreholes were used to set-up controlled flow of variable salinity tracers and variable direction hydraulic gradients. Natural gradient saline tracer tests were also monitored using GPR. Comparison of GPR reflection amplitudes between background clean water (9.3 mS/m) and traced water of 200 mS/m, 400 mS/m and 700 mS/m fluid electrical conductivity under East-West oriented dipole flow showed overall reflection strength increase with increasing fluid electrical conductivity. Amplitude differencing between each of the saline tracer tests and background reveals 1 m to 1.5 m wide flow channels trending across the survey area and the flow dipole field. North-South oriented dipole tests result in channeled flow

  7. Femtosecond laser flow tagging in non-air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibin; Calvert, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    The Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) [Michael, J. B. et al., Applied optics, 50(26), 2011] method is studied in nitrogen-containing gaseous flows. The underlying mechanism behind the FLEET process is the dissociation of molecular nitrogen into atomic nitrogen, which produces long-lived florescence as the nitrogen atoms recombine. Spectra and images of the resulting tagged line provide insight into the effects of different atmospheric gases on the FLEET process. The ionization cross-section, conductivity and energy states of the gaseous particles are each brought into consideration. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility for long-lived flow tagging on the order of hundreds of microseconds in non-air environments. Of particular interest are the enhancement of the FLEET signal with the addition of argon gas, and the non-monotonic quenching effect of oxygen on the length, duration and intensity of the resulting signal and spectra. FLEET is characterized in number of different atmospheric gases, including that simulating Mar's atmospheric composition.

  8. Computational heat transfer analysis for oscillatory channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Kannapareddy, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    An accurate finite-difference scheme has been utilized to investigate oscillatory, laminar and incompressible flow between two-parallel-plates and in circular tubes. The two-parallel-plates simulate the regenerator of a free-piston Stirling engine (foil type regenerator) and the channel wall was included in the analysis (conjugate heat transfer problem). The circular tubes simulate the cooler and heater of the engine with an isothermal wall. The study conducted covered a wide range for the maximum Reynolds number (from 75 to 60,000), Valensi number (from 2.5 to 700), and relative amplitude of fluid displacement (0.714 and 1.34). The computational results indicate a complex nature of the heat flux distribution with time and axial location in the channel. At the channel mid-plane we observed two thermal cycles (out of phase with the flow) per each flow cycle. At this axial location the wall heat flux mean value, amplitude and phase shift with the flow are dependent upon the maximum Reynolds number, Valensi number and relative amplitude of fluid displacement. At other axial locations, the wall heat flux distribution is more complex.

  9. Linear Stability Analysis of a Channel Flow with Porous Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Nils

    2005-11-01

    This study is motivated by the extensive use of wall-transpiration in numerical studies related to inhibition and control of wall-turbulence. In general, wall-transpiration has been implemented by providing the wall-normal velocity and imposing a no-slip condition on the wall-tangential velocity. Physically, however, the pores cannot be infinitesimally small and, consequently, it is important to address how the presence of the pores affects the slip velocity at the wall and the stability of the boundary layer. Moreover, our work is motivated by the existence of only few studies on the linear stability of channels with porous walls. Our study considers a parallel-plate channel with porous walls such that a longitudinal pressure gradient induces a laminar flow in both the open channel region and the porous walls. Simplified counterparts to the Orr-Sommerfeld and Squire equations are derived for the porous regions that are valid for small permeablities. The linear stability analysis takes account of the coupling between the three disturbance fields through boundary conditions recently derived by Ochoa-Tapia and Whitaker (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, Vol. 38, 1995, pp 2635-2646). The resulting Orr-Sommerfeld spectrum and eigenfunctions reduce to those for Poiseuille flow as the permeability of the walls tends to zero, but are altered for greater values. We discuss symmetrical flows where parameters at both porous walls are identical as well as skewed flows where parameters at the two walls differ.

  10. Statistics of polymer extensions in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, F.; Mitra, D.; Perlekar, P.; Brandt, L.

    2010-11-01

    We carry out direct numerical simulations of three dimensional channel flow with passive polymer additives. We also calculate, for the first time, the PDF of finite-time Lyapunov exponents and from them the corresponding Cramer's function for the channel flow. We study the statistics of polymer elongation for both the Oldroyd-B model (for Wi less than 1) and the FENE model. We use the location of the minima of the Cramer's function to define the Weissenberg number precisely such that we observe coil-stretch transition at Wi approximately 1. For the Oldroyd-B model we find that the PDF of polymer extensions shows power-law behavior irrespective of the wall-normal coordinate of the polymer molecule, but the range of scaling does depend on the wall-normal coordinate. The exponent of this power-law matches with the earlier theoretical results within error bars. In addition we also find the dependence of the PDF of polymer extension on the wall-normal coordinate, v.i.z, the polymer are more stretched near the wall than at the center of the flow. We further study the orientation of the polymers with respect the channel geometry. Our results show that the polymers close to the wall have a very high probability of being oriented along the stream-wise direction of the flow.

  11. Final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper involves a numerical simulation of the final stages of transition to turbulence in plane channel flow at a Reynolds number of 1500. Three-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are numerically integrated to obtain the time evolution of two- and three-dimensional finite-amplitude disturbances. Computations are performed on the CYBER-203 vector processor for a 32 x 51 x 32 grid. Solutions indicate the existence of structures similar to those observed in the laboratory and characteristics of the various stages of transition that lead to final breakdown. In particular, evidence points to the formation of a upside-down-V-shaped vortex and the subsequent system of horseshoe vortices inclined to the main flow direction as the primary elements of transition. Details of the resulting flow field after breakdown indicate the evolution of streaklike formations found in turbulent flows. Although the flow field does approach a steady state (turbulent channel flow), the introduction of subgrid-scale terms seems necessary to obtain fully developed turbulence statistics.

  12. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  13. Rivulet Flow In Vertical Parallel-Wall Channel

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. Mc Creery; P. Meakin

    2006-04-01

    In comparison with studies of rivulet flow over external surfaces, rivulet flow confined by two surfaces has received almost no attention. Fully-developed rivulet flow in vertical parallel-wall channels was characterized, both experimentally and analytically for flows intermediate between a lower flow limit of drop flow and an upper limit where the rivulets meander. Although this regime is the most simple rivulet flow regime, it does not appear to have been previously investigated in detail. Experiments were performed that measured rivulet widths for aperture spacing ranging from 0.152 mm to 0.914 mm. The results were compared with a simple steadystate analytical model for laminar flow. The model divides the rivulet cross-section into an inner region, which is dominated by viscous and gravitational forces and where essentially all flow is assumed to occur, and an outer region, dominated by capillary forces, where the geometry is determined by the contact angle between the fluid and the wall. Calculations using the model provided excellent agreement with data for inner rivulet widths and good agreement with measurements of outer rivulet widths.

  14. Numerical simulation of effective efficiency of a discrete multi V-pattern rib solar air channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Saini, R. P.; Saini, J. S.

    2016-10-01

    The use of artificial roughness in the form of repeated ribs has been found to be an efficient method of improving the heat transfer to fluid flowing in the channel. In this study, performance of solar air channel as a function of discrete multi V-pattern rib shapes has been investigated. The e/D was varied from 0.022 to 0.043, Gd/Lv was varied from 0.24 to 0.80, g/e was varied from 0.5 to 1.5, α was varied from 30° to 75°, P/e was varied from 6.0 to 12.0 and W/w was varied from 1.0 to 10.0. A methodology has been developed for the prediction of effective efficiency. Based on the values of effective efficiency, an optimization has been carried out to determine the set of data of roughness shapes parameters that correspond to better effective efficiency for given values of operating parameters of the air channel. Design plots have been represent to depict the data of individual roughness shapes parameters that characterize the optimum condition as a function of performance parameter and intensity of radiation. It was observed that the maximum values of effective efficiency for e/D of 0.043, Gd/Lv of 0.69, g/e of 1.0, α of 60°, P/e of 8.0 and W/w of 6.0. Discrete multi v-rib shape has been found to be better thermohydraulic performance (effective efficiency) as comparison to other rib shapes solar air channels.

  15. TVD scheme for computing open channel wave flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buntina, M. V.; Ostapenko, V. V.

    2008-12-01

    For the shallow water equations in the first approximation (Saint-Venant equations), a TVD scheme is developed for shock-capturing computations of open channel flows with discontinuous waves. The scheme is based on a special nondivergence approximation of the total momentum equation that does not involve integrals related to the cross-section pressure force and the channel wall reaction. In standard divergence difference schemes, most of the CPU time is spent on the computation of these integrals. Test computations demonstrate that the discontinuity relations reproduced by the scheme are accurate enough for actual discontinuous wave propagation to be numerically simulated. All the qualitatively distinct solutions for a dam collapsing in a trapezoidal channel with a contraction in the tailwater area are constructed as an example.

  16. Numerical study of a novel micro-diaphragm flow channel with piezoelectric device for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, H. K.; Huang, S. H.; Chen, B. R.; Cheng, L. W.

    Previous studies have shown that the amplitude of the vibration of a piezoelectric (PZT) device produces an oscillating flow that changes the chamber volume along with a curvature variation of the diaphragm. In this study, an actuating micro-diaphragm with piezoelectric effects is utilized as an air-flow channel in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) systems, called PZT-PEMFC. This newly designed gas pump, with a piezoelectric actuation structure, can feed air into the system of an air-breathing PEMFC. When the actuator moves outward to increase the cathode channel volume, the air is sucked into the chamber; moving inward decreases the channel's volume and thereby compresses air into the catalyst layer and enhancing the chemical reaction. The air-standard PZT-PEMFC cycle is proposed to describe an air-breathing PZT-PEMFC. A novel design for PZT-PEMFCs has been proposed and a three-dimensional, transitional model has been successfully built to account for its major phenomena and performance. Moreover, at high frequencies, PZT actuation leads to a more stable current output, more drained water, higher sucked air, higher hydrogen consumption, and also overcomes concentration losses.

  17. A simple analytical model of coupled single flow channel over porous electrode in vanadium redox flow battery with serpentine flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xinyou; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2015-08-01

    A simple analytical model of a layered system comprised of a single passage of a serpentine flow channel and a parallel underlying porous electrode (or porous layer) is proposed. This analytical model is derived from Navier-Stokes motion in the flow channel and Darcy-Brinkman model in the porous layer. The continuities of flow velocity and normal stress are applied at the interface between the flow channel and the porous layer. The effects of the inlet volumetric flow rate, thickness of the flow channel and thickness of a typical carbon fiber paper porous layer on the volumetric flow rate within this porous layer are studied. The maximum current density based on the electrolyte volumetric flow rate is predicted, and found to be consistent with reported numerical simulation. It is found that, for a mean inlet flow velocity of 33.3 cm s-1, the analytical maximum current density is estimated to be 377 mA cm-2, which compares favorably with experimental result reported by others of ∼400 mA cm-2.

  18. Coherent vorticity extraction in turbulent channel flow using anisotropic wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Sakurai, Teluo; Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Morishita, Koji; Ishihara, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    We examine the role of coherent vorticity in a turbulent channel flow. DNS data computed at friction-velocity based Reynolds number 320 is analyzed. The vorticity is decomposed using three-dimensional anisotropic orthogonal wavelets. Thresholding of the wavelet coefficients allows to extract the coherent vorticity, corresponding to few strong wavelet coefficients. It retains the vortex tubes of the turbulent flow. Turbulent statistics, e.g., energy, enstrophy and energy spectra, are close to those of the total flow. The nonlinear energy budgets are also found to be well preserved. The remaining incoherent part, represented by the large majority of the weak coefficients, corresponds to a structureless, i.e., a noise-like background flow.

  19. Doppler-Based Flow Rate Sensing in Microfluidic Channels

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Liron; Bakal, Avraham; Tzur, Mor; Veinguer, Maya; Mazurski, Noa; Cohen, Nadav; Levy, Uriel

    2014-01-01

    We design, fabricate and experimentally demonstrate a novel generic method to detect flow rates and precise changes of flow velocity in microfluidic devices. Using our method we can measure flow rates of ∼2 mm/s with a resolution of 0.08 mm/s. The operation principle is based on the Doppler shifting of light diffracted from a self-generated periodic array of bubbles within the channel and using self-heterodyne detection to analyze the diffracted light. As such, the device is appealing for variety of “lab on chip” bio-applications where a simple and accurate speed measurement is needed, e.g., for flow-cytometry and cell sorting. PMID:25211195

  20. Longitudinal dispersion in open channel flow with suspended canopies.

    PubMed

    Huai, Wenxin; Li, Chengguang

    2016-01-01

    Suspended canopies can cause flow disturbances such as reducing velocities within the canopy, and increasing flow beneath the canopy. Flow modifications by canopies dramatically affect the fate and transport of sediment, nutrients, contaminants, dissolved oxygen, and fauna in aquatic systems. A three-zone model is presented here to predict the longitudinal dispersion coefficient by simplifying Chikwendu's N-zone model. To validate the model, both flow field and tracer experiments were conducted using a straight rectangular Plexiglas flume, with rigid circular rods as the modeled suspended canopies. The result shows that velocities increased above the flume bed and maximized at a point between the canopies and flume bed. Above that point, streamwise velocities decreased into and within the canopies. Reynolds shear stresses were largest at the canopy interface and smallest (zero) at the velocity maximum point. Good agreement between the modeled results and experimental data shows that the model can effectively predict the longitudinal dispersion coefficient in open channels with suspended canopies.

  1. An improved near-wall treatment for turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Gharbi, Najla; Absi, Rafik; Benzaoui, Ahmed; Bennacer, Rachid

    2011-01-01

    The success of predictions of wall-bounded turbulent flows requires an accurate description of the flow in the near-wall region. This article presents a comparative study between different near-wall treatments and presents an improved method. The study is applied to fully developed plane channel flow (i.e. the flow between two infinitely large plates). Simulations were performed using Fluent. Near-wall treatments available in Fluent were tested: standard wall functions, non-equilibrium wall function and enhanced wall treatment. A user defined function (UDF), based on an analytical profile for the turbulent kinetic energy (Absi, R., 2008. Analytical solutions for the modeled k-equation. ASME Journal of Applied Mechanics, 75 (4), 044501), is developed and implemented. Predicted turbulent kinetic energy profiles are presented and validated by DNS data.

  2. Nonlinear dispersion of a pollutant ejected into a channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.; Vajravelu, Kuppalapalle

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we study the nonlinear coupled boundary value problem arising from the nonlinear dispersion of a pollutant ejected by an external source into a channel flow. We obtain exact solutions for the steady flow for some special cases and an implicit exact solution for the unsteady flow. Additionally, we obtain analytical solutions for the transient flow. From the obtained solutions, we are able to deduce the qualitative influence of the model parameters on the solutions. Furthermore, we are able to give both exact and analytical expressions for the skin friction and wall mass transfer rate as functions of the model parameters. The model considered can be useful for understanding the polluting situations of an improper discharge incident and evaluating the effects of decontaminating measures for the water bodies.

  3. Buckling-induced jamming in channel flow of particle rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chin-Chang; Dennin, Michael

    2013-03-01

    We report on observations of the flow of plastic particles floating on the surface of water in a rectangular channel. The system is driven by moving one wall of the channel at a constant velocity. The opposite side of the channel is open, and the particles are pushed into a region free of material. During the flow, video of the particle motions is captured, and the average force on the pushing wall is measured. We have studied particle shapes that are both circular disks and rectangular bars. We find that when the rectangular bars form a layer at the side walls of the channel (whether or not the central region is filled with disks or additional rectangular bars), the system exhibits sudden increases and decreases in the average force on the driving wall. This behavior is consistent with the existence of jamming in the system. We report on the shape and velocity dependence of these force fluctuations, and the evidence that buckling of the rectangular blocks at the wall is responsible for generating the jamming dynamics.

  4. Ion channel networks in the control of cerebral blood flow.

    PubMed

    Longden, Thomas A; Hill-Eubanks, David C; Nelson, Mark T

    2016-03-01

    One hundred and twenty five years ago, Roy and Sherrington made the seminal observation that neuronal stimulation evokes an increase in cerebral blood flow.(1) Since this discovery, researchers have attempted to uncover how the cells of the neurovascular unit-neurons, astrocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells, vascular endothelial cells and pericytes-coordinate their activity to control this phenomenon. Recent work has revealed that ionic fluxes through a diverse array of ion channel species allow the cells of the neurovascular unit to engage in multicellular signaling processes that dictate local hemodynamics.In this review we center our discussion on two major themes: (1) the roles of ion channels in the dynamic modulation of parenchymal arteriole smooth muscle membrane potential, which is central to the control of arteriolar diameter and therefore must be harnessed to permit changes in downstream cerebral blood flow, and (2) the striking similarities in the ion channel complements employed in astrocytic endfeet and endothelial cells, enabling dual control of smooth muscle from either side of the blood-brain barrier. We conclude with a discussion of the emerging roles of pericyte and capillary endothelial cell ion channels in neurovascular coupling, which will provide fertile ground for future breakthroughs in the field. PMID:26661232

  5. Distribution of incompressible flow within interdigitated channels and porous electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kee, Robert J.; Zhu, Huayang

    2015-12-01

    This paper develops a general model with which to evaluate flow uniformity and pressure drop within interdigitated-channel structures, especially in the context of redox flow batteries. The governing equations are cast in dimensionless variables, leading to a set of characteristic dimensionless parameter groups. The systems of governing equations are solved computationally, with the results presented graphically. Because the results are general, the underlying model itself is not needed to apply the quantitative design guidelines. However, the paper presents and discusses all the information required to recreate the model as needed.

  6. Application of large eddy interaction model to channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. K.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure utilizing an expansion of proper orthogonal functions (or modes) to predict a fully developed flow in channel is derived. To examine numerical and conceptual difficulties, preliminary computations are performed with assigned mean velocity, and turbulence is expressed with only the first mode. The nonlinear interactions of the components of the first mode are treated specifically, with the influence of higher modes neglected; this treatment required adjustment of the skewness and effective Reynolds number to assure energy equilibrium of the first mode. Computational results show that the first mode possesses the structural character similar to that of the entire flow.

  7. River flow mass exponents with fractal channel networks and rainfall

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Over, T.M.

    2001-01-01

    An important problem in hydrologic science is understanding how river flow is influenced by rainfall properties and drainage basin characteristics. In this paper we consider one approach, the use of mass exponents, in examining the relation of river flow to rainfall and the channel network, which provides the primary conduit for transport of water to the outlet in a large basin. Mass exponents, which characterize the power-law behavior of moments as a function of scale, are ideally suited for defining scaling behavior of processes that exhibit a high degree of variability or intermittency. The main result in this paper is an expression relating the mass exponent of flow resulting from an instantaneous burst of rainfall to the mass exponents of spatial rainfall and that of the network width function. Spatial rainfall is modeled as a random multiplicative cascade and the channel network as a recursive replacement tree; these fractal models reproduce certain types of self-similar behavior seen in actual rainfall and networks. It is shown that under these modeling assumptions the scaling behavior of flow mirrors that of rainfall if rainfall is highly variable in space, and on the other hand flow mirrors the structure of the network if rainfall is not so highly variable. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Experimental study on heat transfer and flow resistance in improved latticework cooling channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongwu; Wang, Kai; Zhu, Jianqin; Pan, Wenyan

    2013-06-01

    Characteristics of heat transfer and flow resistance of the latticework (vortex) cooling channel with ribs truncated at their two ends were theoretically and experimentally studied compared with regular and smooth channels of the same configuration. The results showed: the heat transfer efficiency of the latticework channel with two slots was better than those of regular and smooth channels of the same configuration, its flow resistance situation in the slotted channel becomes quite complex; The flow resistances of 2 mm- and 4 mm-slotted channels were obviously lower than that of the regular channel, but they are still much higher than that of the smooth channel; Compared with the regular channel, the total heat transfer efficiencies of the slotted channels were pretty improved, among them the 4-mm slotted channel has the biggest enhancement. From the experimental results, it is obvious that the latticework channel with proper slots has a great prospect in the design of the inner cooling channels of turbine blades.

  9. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  10. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  13. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimetric (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single CW laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640 x 480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  14. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  15. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This photograph illustrates a standard passenger van modified at the Dryden Flight Research Center to investigate the aerodynamics of trucks. The resulting vehicle--re-fashioned with sheet metal--resembled a motor home, with rounded vertical corners on the vehicle's front and rear sections. For subsequent tests, researchers installed a 'boat tail' structure, shown in the photograph. During a decade spanning the 1970s and 1980s, Dryden researchers conducted tests to determine the extent to which adjustments in the shape of trucks reduced aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the tests, the vehicle's sides were fitted with tufts, or strings, that showed air flow. The investigators concluded that rounding the vertical corners front and rear reduced drag by 40 percent, yet decreased the vehicle's internal volume by only 1.3 percent. Rounding both the vertical and horizontal corners cut drag by 54 percent, resulting in a three percent loss of internal volume. A second group of tests added a faired underbody and a boat tail, the latter feature resulting in drag reduction of about 15 percent.

  16. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air...

  17. Rain and channel flow supplements to subsurface water beneath hyper-arid ephemeral stream channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampf, Stephanie K.; Faulconer, Joshua; Shaw, Jeremy R.; Sutfin, Nicholas A.; Cooper, David J.

    2016-05-01

    In hyper-arid regions, ephemeral stream channels are important sources of subsurface recharge and water supply for riparian vegetation, but few studies have documented the subsurface water content dynamics of these systems. This study examines ephemeral channels in the hyper-arid western Sonoran Desert, USA to determine how frequently water recharges the alluvial fill and identify variables that affect the depth and persistence of recharge. Precipitation, stream stage, and subsurface water content measurements were collected over a three-year study at six channels with varying contributing areas and thicknesses of alluvial fill. All channels contain coarse alluvium composed primarily of sands and gravels, and some locations also have localized layers of fine sediment at 2-3 m depth. Rain alone contributed 300-400 mm of water input to these channels over three years, but water content responses were only detected for 36% of the rain events at 10 cm depth, indicating that much of the rain water was either quickly evaporated or taken up by plants. Pulses of water from rain events were detected only in the top meter of alluvium. The sites each experienced ⩽5 brief flow events, which caused transient saturation that usually lasted only a few hours longer than flow. These events were the only apparent source of water to depths >1 m, and water from flow events quickly percolated past the deepest measurement depths (0.5-3 m). Sustained saturation in the shallow subsurface only developed where there was a near-surface layer of finer consolidated sediments that impeded deep percolation.

  18. Direction of scalar transport in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Chiranth; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2011-11-01

    The concept of reverse diffusion, introduced by Corrsin to describe the motion of particles as they move towards a location in the flow field, is fundamental to the understanding of mixing. In this work, direct numerical simulations in conjunction with the tracking of scalar markers are utilized in infinitely long channels to study the principal direction of transport of heat (or mass) for both forwards and backwards single particle dispersion. The viscous sub-layer, the transition region (between the viscous sub-layer and the logarithmic region), and the logarithmic region of a Poiseuille flow and a plane Couette flow channel are studied. Fluctuating velocities of scalar markers captured in these regions are used to obtain the full autocorrelation coefficient tensor forwards and backwards with time. The highest eigenvalue of the velocity correlation coefficient tensor quantifies the highest amount of turbulent heat transport, while the corresponding eigenvector points to the main direction of transport. Different Prandtl number, Pr, fluids are simulated for the two types of flow. It is found that the highest eigenvalues are higher in the case of backwards dispersion compared to the case of forwards dispersion for any Pr, in both flow cases. The principal direction for backwards and forwards dispersion is different than for forwards dispersion, for all Pr, and in all flow regions for both flows. Fluids with lower Pr behave different than the higher Pr fluids because of increased molecular diffusion effects. The current study also establishes an interesting analogy of turbulent dispersion to optics defining the turbulent dispersive ratio, a parameter that can be used to identify the differences in the direction of turbulent heat transport between forwards and backwards dispersion. A spectral analysis of the auto-correlation coefficient for both forwards and backwards dispersion shows a universal behavior with slope of -1 at intermediate frequencies.

  19. Deposition patterns and dispersion in reactive channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angheluta, L.; Hawkins, C.; Jamtveit, B.

    2015-12-01

    Flow of natural fluids is often associated with dispersion of dissolved chemical species and their surface deposition either by precipitation kinetics or aggregation. For most industrial or practical flows, this wall deposition has a detrimental effect that hiders transport by clogging or alters the fluid container; therefore it is important to gain a better understanding of transport in reactive flows and the range of deposition patterns developed. This talk has two main aims. Firstly, it is to present a combined theoretical and numerical approach to explore the diverse yet generic wall morphologies that develop in channel flows either due to precipitation kinetics or aggregation of spherical particles. These deposition patterns range from dendrites to needles and fan-like structures growing against the mean flow direction, and depend strongly on flow perturbations and dispersion properties. The second goal is to revisit classical Taylor's theory of dispersion in turbulent pipe flows and to show that, in fully developed turbulence, it predicts a nontrivial connection between longitudinal dispersion and the turbulent energy spectrum that we can also test and observe in numerical simulations.

  20. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of curved turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, R. D.; Moin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Low Reynolds number, mildly curved, turbulent channel flow has been simulated numerically without subgrid scale models. A new spectral numerical method developed for this problem was used, and the computations were performed with 2 million degrees of freedom. A variety of statistical and structural information has been extracted from the computed flow fields. These include mean velocity, turbulence stresses, velocity skewness, and flatness factors, space time correlations and spectra, all the terms in the Reynolds stress balance equations, and contour and vector plots of instantaneous velocity fields. The effects of curvature on this flow were determined by comparing the concave and convex sides of the channel. The observed effects are consistent with experimental observations for mild curvature. The most significant difference in the turbulence statistics between the concave and convex sides was in the Reynolds shear stress. This was accompanied by significant differences in the terms of the Reynolds shear stress balance equations. In addition, it was found that stationary Taylor-Gortler vortices were present and that they had a significant effect on the flow by contributing to the mean Reynolds shear stress, and by affecting the underlying turbulence.

  2. Strongly coupled turbulent gas-particle flows in vertical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Capecelatro, Jesse; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) simulations of strongly coupled (high mass loading) gas-particle flows in vertical channels are performed with the purpose of exploring the fundamental physics of fully developed, wall-bounded multiphase turbulence. An adaptive spatial filter is developed that accurately decomposes the total granular energy of the particles into correlated and uncorrelated components at each location in the wall-normal direction of the flow. In this manner, Reynolds- and phase-averaged (PA) two-phase turbulence statistics up to second order are reported for both phases and for three values of the PA mean fluid velocity. As expected due to the high mass loading, in all cases the turbulence production due to mean drag dominates production due to mean shear. A multiphase LRR-IP Reynolds-stress turbulence model is developed to predict the turbulent flow statistics as a function of the wall-normal distance. Using a correlation for the vertical drift velocity developed from the EL data, the turbulence model predictions agree satisfactorily with all of one-point EL statistics for the vertical channel flows, as well as for the homogeneous cluster-induced turbulence (CIT) statistics reported previously. Funded by U.S. National Science Foundation (CBET-1437865).

  3. Particle dispersion in a stably stratified channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquero, C.; Armenio, V.

    2003-04-01

    The motion of particles in a stably stratified channel flow is relevant in geophysic and environmental applications. In the present research this problem has been studied numerically using a mixed Lagrangian-Eulerian technique (Lagrangian motion of an ensemble of particles in an Eulerian field) by means of large eddy simulation. A stratified channel flows can be decomposed into a buoyancy affected region, with a strong turbulent activity, close to the walls, and into a buoyancy dominated region, where turbulence is strongly inhibited, in the center of the channel. For strong stratifications, counter gradient heat fluxes steepen the density gradient moving hot fluid up and cold fluid down. The stratification in the central region of the channel becomes extremely stable. However, the vertical turbulent energy, defined as the difference between the total vertical kinetic energy and its temporal average, is very strong. Particle statistics have shown that this can be related to the presence of high frequency internal waves, that do not contribute to dispersion because of their highly coherent behavior. Vertical stratification is shown to reduce or increase the decorrelation time for vertical motion, depending on the Richardson number. When stratification is increased there are two competing effects: Structures have a smaller vertical scale (acting to reduce the decorrelation time) and vertical velocities are smaller (acting to increase the decorrelation time, since particles stay for a longer time into a given structure in the flow). It has been shown that for low stratification the first mechanism dominates, while for large stratification the second effect is more important. The research is in progress and results for both fluid and inertial particles will be presented at the conference.

  4. Textural and rheological evolution of basalt flowing down a lava channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Bénédicte; Harris, Andrew; Gurioli, Lucia; Médard, Etienne; Sehlke, Alexander; Whittington, Alan

    2014-06-01

    The Muliwai a Pele lava channel was emplaced during the final stage of Mauna Ulu's 1969-1974 eruption (Kilauea, Hawaii). The event was fountain-fed and lasted for around 50 h, during which time a channelized flow system developed, in which a 6-km channel fed a zone of dispersed flow that extended a further 2.6 km. The channel was surrounded by initial rubble levees of 'a'a, capped by overflow units of limited extent. We sampled the uppermost overflow unit every 250 m down the entire channel length, collecting, and analyzing 27 air-quenched samples. Bulk chemistry, density and textural analyses were carried out on the sample interior, and glass chemistry and microlite crystallization analyses were completed on the quenched crust. Thermal and rheological parameters (cooling, crystallization rate, viscosity, and yield strength) were also calculated. Results show that all parameters experience a change around 4.5 km from the vent. At this point, there is a lava surface transition from pahoehoe to 'a'a. Lava density, microlite content, viscosity, and yield strength all increase down channel, but vesicle content and lava temperature decrease. Cooling rates were 6.7 °C/km, with crystallization rates increasing from 0.03 Фc/km proximally, to 0.14 Фc/km distally. Modeling of the channel was carried out using the FLOWGO thermo-rheological model and allowed fits for temperature, microlite content, and channel width when run using a three-phase viscosity model based on a temperature-dependent viscosity relation derived for this lava. The down flow velocity profile suggests an initial velocity of 27 m/s, declining to 1 m/s at the end of the channel. Down-channel, lava underwent cooling that induced crystallization, causing both the lava viscosity and yield strength to increase. Moreover, lava underwent degassing and a subsequent vesicularity decrease. This aided in increasing viscosity, with the subsequent increase in shearing promoting a transition to 'a'a.

  5. On the Analysis of Flows in Vibrating Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Sahab; Mohammadi, Alireza; Floryan, Jerzy Maciej

    2015-11-01

    Pressure losses in channels with vibrating walls have been analyzed. Surface vibrations were assumed to have the form of travelling waves. The waves can have arbitrary profiles. The spectrally accurate immersed boundary conditions (IBC) method based on the Fourier expansions in the flow direction and the Chebyshev expansions in the transverse direction has been developed. The results show dependence of the pressure losses on the phase speed of the waves, with the waves propagating in the downstream direction reducing the pressure gradient required to maintain a fixed flow rate. A drag increase is observed when the waves propagate with a phase speed similar to the flow velocity. Analytical solution demonstrates that the drag changes result from the nonlinear interactions and vary proportionally to A2 for small enough A, where A stands for the wave amplitude. This work has been carried out with support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada.

  6. Pressure-driven flow in a channel with porous walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qianlong; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2010-11-01

    The finite-Reynolds-number three-dimensional flow in a channel bounded by one and two parallel porous walls is studied numerically. The porous medium is modelled by spheres in a simple cubic arrangement. The results for the slip velocity at the surface of the porous layers are compared with the phenomenological Beavers-Joseph model. It is found that the value of the slip coefficient is different for pressure-driven and shear-driven flow. A modification of the relation is suggested to deal with this feature. Furthermore, detailed results on the flow structure and the hydrodynamic forces and couple acting on the sphere layer bounding the porous medium are reported and their dependence on the Reynolds number illustrated. It is shown that, at finite Reynolds numbers, a lift force acts on the spheres, which may be expected to contribute to the the mobilization of bottom sediments.

  7. Large eddy simulation of turbulent channel flow: ILLIAC 4 calculation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Moin, P.

    1979-01-01

    The three-dimensional time dependent equations of motion were numerically integrated for fully-developed turbulent channel flow. A large scale flow field was obtained directly from the solution of these equations, and small scale field motions were simulated through an eddy viscosity model. The calculations were carried out on the ILLIAC 4 computer. The computed flow patterns show that the wall layer consists of coherent structures of low speed and high speed streaks alternating in the spanwise direction. These structures were absent in the regions away from the wall. Hot spots, small localized regions of very large turbulent shear stress, were frequently observed. The profiles of the pressure velocity-gradient correlations show a significant transfer of energy from the normal to the spanwise component of turbulent kinetic energy in the immediate neighborhood of the wall ('the splatting effect').

  8. Sensitivity analysis of vegetation-induced flow steering in channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bywater-Reyes, S.; Wilcox, A. C.; Lightbody, A.; Stella, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Morphodynamic feedbacks result in alternating bars within channels, and the resulting convective accelerations dictate the cross-stream force balance of channels and in turn influence morphology. Pioneer woody riparian trees recruit on river bars and may steer flow and alter this force balance. This study uses two-dimensional hydraulic modeling to test the sensitivity of the flow field to riparian vegetation at the reach scale. We use two test systems with different width-to-depth ratios, substrate sizes, and vegetation structure: the gravel-bed Bitterroot River, MT and the sand-bed Santa Maria River, AZ. We model vegetation explicitly as a drag force by spatially specifying vegetation density, height, and drag coefficient, across varying hydraulic (e.g., discharge, eddy viscosity) conditions and compare velocity vectors between runs. We test variations in vegetation configurations, including the present-day configuration of vegetation in our field systems (extracted from LiDAR), removal of vegetation (e.g., from floods or management actions), and expansion of vegetation. Preliminary model runs suggest that the sensitivity of convective accelerations to vegetation reflects a balance between the extent and density of vegetation inundated and other sources of channel roughness. This research quantifies how vegetation alters hydraulics at the reach scale, a fundamental step to understanding vegetation-morphodynamic interactions.

  9. Turbulent flow statistics of vegetative channel with seepage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Thokchom Bebina; Kumar, Bimlesh

    2015-12-01

    The present study is carried out for studying the impact of submerged, flexible vegetation in a channel where downward seepage occurs. Laboratory experiments on artificial vegetation of two different heights, 8 cm and 6 cm, were conducted for no-seepage, 10% seepage and 15% seepage cases. Vegetation height is an important parameter in influencing the flow characteristics in a vegetated channel, where velocity is reduced near the top of the vegetation. Results show that velocity measured at upstream vegetation section is always higher than the downstream section even with the application of downward seepage. The maximum value of Reynolds stress occurs near the top of the vegetation. When the flow enters the vegetation section, the local effect of the presence of vegetation on sediment transport is more at the upstream vegetation section and then decreases which is shown by higher Reynolds stress at the upstream as compared to downstream vegetation section highlighting the importance of vegetation in providing as an erosion control. The maximum Reynolds stress at no seepage is increased by a percentage of 17% for 10% seepage and average of 30.5% for 15% seepage. The turbulence intensities at no seepage are increased by an average value of 15% for 10% seepage and 25% for 15% seepage. The reduction of Reynolds stress and turbulent intensities along the longitudinal direction implies the importance of using vegetation as a river restoration measure providing considerable stability to channels. Third order moments highlight that downward seepage increases the streamwise flux and decreases the upward flux.

  10. Numerical simulation of flow in a horizontal channel with multiple cross-flow inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pranab N.; Smith, Chuck; Metcalfe, Ralph W.

    2014-11-01

    Flow in a horizontal channel with multiple cross-flow inlets was studied numerically. Based on Reynolds and Mach number analysis of data obtained from a horizontal natural gas well having 31 completion stages, measured at two different times in the production cycle, it was determined that an incompressible flow model may be applied to study a large fraction of the wellbore. Using five cross-flow inlets, the existence of three basic flow regimes - trickle flow, partially blocked flow and fully blocked flow - were identified with respect to the blocking of upstream inlets by the downstream ones. The existence of these flow regimes is consistent with field data. A lumped-parameter model for pressure drop was used to simulate large axial distances between two inlets. A pressure boundary condition was employed at each inlet to simulate a linearly depleting reservoir. This was used to study the dynamic interaction between the inlets in the channel. The characteristic time scales related to the transient depletion were identified and analyzed. The transition of flow regimes is consistent with the trends observed from field data and gives an insight into the behavior of horizontal wells. Supported in part by Apache Corp., Houston.

  11. Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang; Lim, Hyug

    2010-11-15

    Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

  12. Relationship between surface velocity divergence and gas transfer in open-channel flows with submerged simulated vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjou, M.; Okamoto, T.; Nezu, I.

    2016-05-01

    Velocity and gas concentration measurements were carried out to reveal gas transfer phenomena in open-channel turbulent flows with flat bottom and submerged vegetation bottom conditions. A large-scale coherent vortex appears near the vegetation top due to shear instability, and the submerged vegetation was found to promote gas transfer beneath the air- water interface. Furthermore, we revealed a great dependency of gas transfer on vegetation density. The present measurement results propose a new surface divergence model with wide generality, connecting reasonably the gas transfer velocity and the surface divergence intensity in open-channel flows, irrespective of bottom roughness conditions.

  13. Two-dimensional calculations of a continuous optical discharge in atmospheric air flow (optical plasma generator)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raizer, Iu. P.; Silant'ev, A. Iu.; Surzhikov, S. T.

    1987-06-01

    Two-dimensional gasdynamic processes in a continuous optical discharge in subsonic flow of atmospheric air are simulated numerically with allowance for distortions of the light channel due to laser beam refraction in the generated plasma, radiative energy losses, and radiant heat transfer. It is found that instabilities and vortex structures are formed in the hot jet behind the energy release region; flow in this region is nonstationary but periodic. These effects are not observed in the main part of the discharge, which is quite stable. Depending on flow velocity, diffraction in the plasma may lead to both defocusing and focusing of the beam.

  14. A Flow-Channel Analysis for the Mars Hopper

    SciTech Connect

    W. Spencer Cooley

    2013-02-01

    The Mars Hopper is an exploratory vehicle designed to fly on Mars using carbon dioxide from the Martian atmosphere as a rocket propellant. The propellent gasses are thermally heated while traversing a radioisotope ther- mal rocket (RTR) engine’s core. This core is comprised of a radioisotope surrounded by a heat capacitive material interspersed with tubes for the propellant to travel through. These tubes, or flow channels, can be manu- factured in various cross-sectional shapes such as a special four-point star or the traditional circle. Analytical heat transfer and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) anal- yses were performed using flow channels with either a circle or a star cross- sectional shape. The nominal total inlet pressure was specified at 2,805,000 Pa; and the outlet pressure was set to 2,785,000 Pa. The CO2 inlet tem- perature was 300 K; and the channel wall was 1200 K. The steady-state CFD simulations computed the smooth-walled star shape’s outlet temper- ature to be 959 K on the finest mesh. The smooth-walled circle’s outlet temperature was 902 K. A circle with a surface roughness specification at 0.01 mm gave 946 K and at 0.1 mm yielded 989 K. The The effects of a slightly varied inlet pressure were also examined. The analytical calculations were based on the mass flow rates computed in the CFD simulations and provided significantly higher outlet temperature results while displaying the same comparison trends. Research relating to the flow channel heat transfer studies was also done. Mathematical methods to geometrically match the cross-sectional areas of the circle and star, along with a square and equilateral triangle, were derived. A Wolfram Mathematica 8 module was programmed to analyze CFD results using Richardson Extrapolation and calculate the grid convergence index (GCI). A Mathematica notebook, also composed, computes and graphs the bulk mean temperature along a flow channel’s length while the user dynam- ically provides the input

  15. Computed Turbulent Free Shear Flow Of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    Standard k-epsilon model of turbulence yields fairly accurate results. Symposium paper discusses numerical simulation of turbulent free shear flow of nonreacting compressible fluid. Ability to compute such flows essential to advances in design.

  16. Stability of a Soft Plate in Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanida, Yoshimichi

    The present paper gives a computational method for the flutter analysis of a soft plate placed in two-dimensional subsonic channel flow, remarking the palatal flutter in snoring. The computations were carried out first for the prelimanary case of a hard plate oscillating in windtunnel and then for the case of a soft plate oscillating with standing- or travelling-wave mode, simulating the palatal oscillation. The results obtained for a hard plate are in good agreement with those for the windtunnel wall effects, showing the validity of the present method. The results for a soft plate show that the palatal flutter can be caused by the oscillation of travelling-wave mode, and that the flutter is slightly promoted by the channel walls but slightly suppressed by the hard plate attached fore the soft plate. The effect of mechanical damping is also discussed.

  17. Microscopic origin of channeled flow in lamellar titanium aluminide.

    PubMed

    Katzarov, Ivaylo H; Paxton, Anthony T

    2010-06-01

    We employ a quantum mechanical bond order potential in an atomistic simulation of channeled flow. We show that the original hypothesis that this is achieved by a cooperative deployment of slip and twinning is correct, first because a twin is able to "protect" a 60° ordinary dislocation from becoming sessile, and second because the two processes are found to be activated by Peierls stresses of similar magnitude. In addition we show an explicit demonstration of the lateral growth of a twin, again at a similar level of stress. Thus these simultaneous processes are shown to be capable of channeling deformation into the observed state of plane strain in so-called "A"-oriented mechanical testing of titanium aluminide superalloy. PMID:20867180

  18. Study on airflow characteristics in the semi-closed irregular narrow flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuzhen; Hu, Xiaodong; Zhu, Linhang; Hu, Xudong; Jin, Yingzi

    2016-04-01

    The air-jet loom is widely used in the textile industry. The interaction mechanism of airflow and yarn is not clear in such a narrow flow channel, the gas consumption is relatively large, the yarn motion is unstable and the weft insertion is often interrupted during the operation. In order to study the characteristics of the semi-closed flow field in profiled dents, the momentum conservation equation is modified and the model parameters and boundary conditions are set. Compared with the different r, the ratio of profiled dent's thickness and gap, the results show that the smaller the r is, the smaller the velocity fluctuations of the airflow is. When the angle of profiled dents α is close to zero, the diffusion of the airflow will be less. The experiment is also conducted to verify the result of the simulation with a high-speed camera and pressure sensor in profiled dents. The airflow characteristics in the semi-closed irregular narrow flow channel in the paper would provide the theoretical basis for optimizing the weft insertion process of the air-jet loom.

  19. Physical modeling of air flow during air sparging remediation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liming; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yan; Meegoda, Jay N; Gao, Shengyan

    2010-05-15

    Air sparging (AS) is one of the most efficient techniques for remediating saturated soils and groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds. A series of physical modeling tests for different sizes of porous media under varied injection pressure were conducted to investigate the effect of particle size and air injection pressure on size and shape of the zone of influence (ZOI). The test results show that ZOI can be expressed by two components: the horizontal expansion due to pneumatic fracture or preferential intrusion around the injection point and the angle of ZOI which is the angle between the vertical line and the boundary of ZOI. There exists a limited angle of ZOI for each type of porous media. The measured minimum and maximum air injection pressures in 1g tests are compared with corresponding theoretical values, and it is found that the measured minimum injection pressure is slightly lower than the theoretical value, while the measured maximum injection pressure is much higher than the theoretical maximum injection pressure. Centrifugal test results confirmed nonapplicability of theoretical maximum injection pressure to air sparging design. All of the above provide valuable information for design and theoretical modeling of air sparging for groundwater remediation.

  20. Simulating unsteady flow and sediment transport in vegetated channel network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yang; Duan, Jennifer G.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional model for simulating flood routing and sediment transport over mobile alluvium in a vegetated channel network. The modified St. Venant equations together with the governing equations for suspended sediment and bed load transport were solved simultaneously to obtain flow properties and sediment transport rate. The Godunov-type finite volume method is employed to discretize the governing equations. Then, the Exner equation was solved for bed elevation change. Since sediment transport is non-equilibrium when bed is degrading or aggrading, a recovery coefficient for suspended sediment and an adaptation length for bed load transport were used to quantify the differences between equilibrium and non-equilibrium sediment transport rate. The influence of vegetation on floodplain and main channel was accounted for by adjusting resistance terms in the momentum equations for flow field. A procedure to separate the grain resistance from the total resistance was proposed and implemented to calculate sediment transport rate. The model was tested by a flume experiment case and an unprecedented flood event occurred in the Santa Cruz River, Tucson, Arizona, in July 2006. Simulated results of flow discharge and bed elevation changes showed satisfactory agreements with the measurements. The impacts of vegetation density on sediment transport and significance of non-equilibrium sediment transport model were discussed.

  1. Flow discharge prediction in compound channels using linear genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azamathulla, H. Md.; Zahiri, A.

    2012-08-01

    SummaryFlow discharge determination in rivers is one of the key elements in mathematical modelling in the design of river engineering projects. Because of the inundation of floodplains and sudden changes in river geometry, flow resistance equations are not applicable for compound channels. Therefore, many approaches have been developed for modification of flow discharge computations. Most of these methods have satisfactory results only in laboratory flumes. Due to the ability to model complex phenomena, the artificial intelligence methods have recently been employed for wide applications in various fields of water engineering. Linear genetic programming (LGP), a branch of artificial intelligence methods, is able to optimise the model structure and its components and to derive an explicit equation based on the variables of the phenomena. In this paper, a precise dimensionless equation has been derived for prediction of flood discharge using LGP. The proposed model was developed using published data compiled for stage-discharge data sets for 394 laboratories, and field of 30 compound channels. The results indicate that the LGP model has a better performance than the existing models.

  2. Investigation on Online Multiphase Flow Meter in oilfield Based on Open Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, L. Y.; Wang, W. C.; Li, Y. X.; Zhang, J.; Dong, S. P.

    2010-03-01

    Flow metering of multiphase pipeline is an urgently problem needed to be solved in oilfield producing in China. Based on the principle of multiphase oil and gas flow in the open channel, four liquid metering models(Falling Model I, Falling Model II, Open Channel Model and Element Resistance Model) and one gas model were obtained to calculate the gas and liquid flow rate, in which the water cut was measured by the differential pressure. And then a new type of multiphase meter system was developed based on these models and neural networks were developed to improve the estimating results of gas and liquid flow rate with the new metering system. At last a lot of experiments of multiphase metering were finished in lab and field. According to the experiments, the results of the metering system show that the liquid flow rate error was no more than 10%, and gas flow rate error was no more than 15%, which can meet the demand of the field flow rate measurement. Furthermore the relationship between liquid and gas flow rate and characteristic signals was found out through the experiments so as to deepening the study on multiphase flow metering technology.

  3. Instability of a cantilevered flexible plate in viscous channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, T. S.; Lucey, A. D.

    2005-10-01

    The stability of a flexible cantilevered plate in viscous channel flow is studied as a representation of the dynamics of the human upper airway. The focus is on instability mechanisms of the soft palate (flexible plate) that cause airway blockage during sleep. We solve the Navier Stokes equations for flow with Reynolds numbers up to 1500 fully coupled with the dynamics of the plate motion solved using finite-differences. The study is 2-D and based upon linearized plate mechanics. When both upper and lower airways are open, the plate is found to lose its stability through a flutter mechanism and a critical Reynolds number exists. When one airway is closed, the plate principally loses its stability through a divergence mechanism and a critical flow speed exists. However, below the divergence-onset flow speed, flutter can exist for low levels of structural damping in the flexible plate. Our results serve to extend understanding of flow-induced instability of cantilevered flexible plates and will ultimately improve the diagnosis and treatment of upper-airway disorders.

  4. Stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmak, I.; Gelfgat, A.; Vitoshkin, H.; Ullmann, A.; Brauner, N.

    2016-04-01

    Linear stability of stratified two-phase flows in horizontal channels to arbitrary wavenumber disturbances is studied. The problem is reduced to Orr-Sommerfeld equations for the stream function disturbances, defined in each sublayer and coupled via boundary conditions that account also for possible interface deformation and capillary forces. Applying the Chebyshev collocation method, the equations and interface boundary conditions are reduced to the generalized eigenvalue problems solved by standard means of numerical linear algebra for the entire spectrum of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors. Some additional conclusions concerning the instability nature are derived from the most unstable perturbation patterns. The results are summarized in the form of stability maps showing the operational conditions at which a stratified-smooth flow pattern is stable. It is found that for gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems, the stratified flow with a smooth interface is stable only in confined zone of relatively low flow rates, which is in agreement with experiments, but is not predicted by long-wave analysis. Depending on the flow conditions, the critical perturbations can originate mainly at the interface (so-called "interfacial modes of instability") or in the bulk of one of the phases (i.e., "shear modes"). The present analysis revealed that there is no definite correlation between the type of instability and the perturbation wavelength.

  5. Parallel, open-channel lateral flow (immuno) assay substrate based on capillary-channeled polymer films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lynn X; Jiang, Liuwei; Willett, Daniel R; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    Presented here is a novel implementation of polypropylene capillary-channeled polymer (C-CP) films, functionalized for bioaffinity separations and implemented as a platform for lateral flow (immuno) assays. The parallel ∼80 μm × 80 μm channels pass test solutions down the 30 mm film length via spontaneous wicking action, setting up the possibility for immobilizing different capture agents in the respective channels. The base-film modification process is divided into two steps: ultraviolet light treatment to improve hydrophillicity of the polypropylene substrate and the physical adsorption of a functionalized lipid tethered ligand (LTL) as a selective capture agent. The entire modification procedure is performed under ambient conditions in an aqueous solution without extreme pH conditions. In this demonstration, physical adsorption of a biotinylated-LTL onto the UV-treated PP surface selectively captures Texas Red-labeled streptavidin (SAv-TR) in the presence of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), which passes without retention in less than 5 s. In addition to the fluorescence imaging of the protein solutes, matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used to confirm the formation of the LTL-SAv conjugates on the channel surface as well as to demonstrate an alternative means of probing the capture step. The present effort sets the groundwork for further development of C-CP films as a parallel, multi-analyte LFA platform; a format that to-date has not been described.

  6. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  7. Flow and Diffusion in Channel-Guided Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Zorn, Matthias; Klingner, Christoph; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Frey, Erwin; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2014-01-01

    Collective migration of mechanically coupled cell layers is a notable feature of wound healing, embryonic development, and cancer progression. In confluent epithelial sheets, the dynamics have been found to be highly heterogeneous, exhibiting spontaneous formation of swirls, long-range correlations, and glass-like dynamic arrest as a function of cell density. In contrast, the flow-like properties of one-sided cell-sheet expansion in confining geometries are not well understood. Here, we studied the short- and long-term flow of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as they moved through microchannels. Using single-cell tracking and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we found that a defined averaged stationary cell current emerged that exhibited a velocity gradient in the direction of migration and a plug-flow-like profile across the advancing sheet. The observed flow velocity can be decomposed into a constant term of directed cell migration and a diffusion-like contribution that increases with density gradient. The diffusive component is consistent with the cell-density profile and front propagation speed predicted by the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. To connect diffusion-mediated transport to underlying cellular motility, we studied single-cell trajectories and occurrence of vorticity. We discovered that the directed large-scale cell flow altered fluctuations in cellular motion at short length scales: vorticity maps showed a reduced frequency of swirl formation in channel flow compared with resting sheets of equal cell density. Furthermore, under flow, single-cell trajectories showed persistent long-range, random-walk behavior superimposed on drift, whereas cells in resting tissue did not show significant displacements with respect to neighboring cells. Our work thus suggests that active cell migration manifests itself in an underlying, spatially uniform drift as well as in randomized bursts of short-range correlated motion that lead to a diffusion-mediated transport

  8. Fluid flow over arbitrary bottom topography in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Srikumar

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, two-dimensional free surface potential flow over an arbitrary bottom in a channel is considered to analyze the behavior of the free surface profile using linear theory. It is assumed that the fluid is inviscid, incompressible and flow is irrotational. Perturbation analysis in conjunction with Fourier transform technique is employed to determine the first order corrections of some important physical quantities such as free surface profile, velocity potential, etc. From the practical point of view, one arbitrary bottom topography is considered to determine the free surface profile since the free surface profile depends on the bottom topography. It is found that the free surface profile is oscillatory in nature, representing a wave propagating downstream and no wave upstream.

  9. Principles of transverse flow fractionation of microparticles in superhydrophobic channels.

    PubMed

    Asmolov, Evgeny S; Dubov, Alexander L; Nizkaya, Tatiana V; Kuehne, Alexander J C; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2015-07-01

    We propose a concept of fractionation of micron-sized particles in a microfluidic device with a bottom wall decorated by superhydrophobic stripes. The stripes are oriented at an angle α to the direction of a driving force, G, which generally includes an applied pressure gradient and gravity. Separation relies on the initial sedimentation of particles under gravity in the main forward flow, and their subsequent lateral deflection near a superhydrophobic wall due to generation of a secondary flow transverse to G. We provide some theoretical arguments allowing us to quantify the transverse displacement of particles in the microfluidic channel, and confirm the validity of theoretical predictions in test experiments with monodisperse fractions of microparticles. Our results can guide the design of superhydrophobic microfluidic devices for efficient sorting of microparticles with a relatively small difference in size and density. PMID:26016651

  10. Conservation-form equations of unsteady open-channel flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lai, C.; Baltzer, R.A.; Schaffranek, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    The unsteady open-channel flow equations are typically expressed in a variety of forms due to the imposition of differing assumptions, use of varied dependent variables, and inclusion of different source/sink terms. Questions often arise as to whether a particular equation set is expressed in a form consistent with the conservation-law definition. The concept of conservation form is developed to clarify the meaning mathematically. Six sets of unsteady-flow equations typically used in engineering practice are presented and their conservation properties are identified and discussed. Results of the theoretical development and analysis of the equations are substantiated in a set of numerical experiments conducted using alternate equation forms. Findings of these analytical and numerical efforts demonstrate that the choice of dependent variable is the fundamental factor determining the nature of the conservation properties of any particular equation form.

  11. Large eddy interactions in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    The dynamic processes of large eddies in a turbulent channel flow have been examined by utilizing an orthogonal expansion of the velocity fluctuation, known in the literature as the Proper Orthogonal Decomposition Theorem. The mathematical form of these functions is unknown in contrast to the Fourier analysis. Attention is focused on the nonlinear, turbulence-turbulence interaction process in the dynamical equation for large eddies (the first term in the expansion). The nonlinear interactions of the components of the first mode are treated exactly, but influences of higher modes are modeled. This requires adjustment of both the skewness and the effective Reynolds number so that the energy equilibrium of the large eddies is ensured when the mean velocity distribution is assumed known for experiments. Computational results show that the first mode contributes significantly to turbulent intensities and possesses a structural and statistical character similar to that of the entire flow.

  12. Droplet detachment by air flow for microstructured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hao, Pengfei; Lv, Cunjing; Yao, Zhaohui

    2013-04-30

    Quantitative correlation between critical air velocity and roughness of microstructured surface has still not been established systematically until the present; the dynamics of water droplet detachment by air flow from micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces is investigated by combining experiments and simulation comparisons. Experimental evidence demonstrates that the onset of water droplet detachment from horizontal micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces under air flow always starts with detachment of the rear contact lines of the droplets from the pillar tops, which exhibits a similar dynamic mechanism for water droplet motion under a gravity field. On the basis of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, an explicit analytical model is proposed for investigating the detaching mechanism, in which the critical air velocity can be fully determined by several intrinsic parameters: water-solid interface area fraction, droplet volume, and Young's contact angle. This model gives predictions of the critical detachment velocity of air flow that agree well with the experimental measurements.

  13. Interaction of a turbulent channel flow with a compliant tensegrity fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Haoxiang; Bewley, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    A non-trivial influence of the compliant surface on the statistics of near-wall turbulence has been found by direct numerical simulations of a channel flow at Re_τ=150 passing over a ``tensegrity fabric'' surface. Inspired from nature, this compliant surface model is special truss system having tensile members distinguished from the compressive members, as we have presented at previous APS meetings. Validated by a variety of flows, a pseudospectral/finite-difference flow solver with a 3D coordinate transformation is coupled with a C++ code calculating the dynamics of the tensegrity fabric to simulate the flow/structure interaction. Simulation results show that, when the structure has high stiffness and damping, the flow acts as if the interface were a solid flat wall. When the structure's stiffness and damping are reduced, it may resonate under the excitation of the flow disturbances. The resonating flow/structure interface forms a streamwise wave reminiscent of air-water interface but traveling at a much faster phase speed, a few times of the viscous velocity u_τ. Although the wave's amplitude is small, y_w^+≈ 2, it changes the near-wall turbulence significantly. Drag on the compliant surface is increased by about 17% where form drag accounts for only one third of the drag increase due to the small wall deformation. Various domain sizes have been tried in order to make sure that the structure's vibration mode is correct.

  14. Numerical experiments of variable property turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashish; Peeters, Jurriaan; Boersma, Bendiks; Pecnik, Rene

    2014-11-01

    We perform numerical experiments of turbulent channel flows with varying density and viscosity to investigate the validity of semi-local scaling as proposed by Huang, Coleman and Bradshaw (1995, J. Fluid Mech). Direct numerical simulations of the low Mach number approximation of the Navier-Stokes equations are used, whereby the fluid is internally heated and the temperature at the walls is set to constant. A pseudo-spectral discretization in the periodic directions and a 6th order compact finite difference in wall normal direction is used. The friction Reynolds number based on half channel height and wall friction velocity is Reτ = 395 . Different relations for density and viscosity as a function of temperature are studied. A variable property case has been identified with turbulent statistics that are quasi-similar to constant property turbulence. This case corresponds to the condition when the semi-local scaling is equal to the classical scaling. For cases wherein the semi-local scaling differs from classical scaling in the channel core, we show that the near-wall turbulence deviates towards a state of increased/decreased anisotropy as compared to constant property turbulence. The above results show not only the validity but also the usefulness of the semi-local scaling.

  15. Ignition of hydrocarbon-air supersonic flow by volumetric ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfeld, Marat A.; Pozdnyakov, George A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper describes the results of the electron-beam initiation of the combustion in the mixtures of hydrogen, natural gas or kerosene vapors with air. Electron beam characteristics were studied in closed volume with immobile gas. The researches included definition of an integrated current of an electronic beam, distribution of a current density and an estimation of average energy of electrons. Possibility of fuel mixtures ignition by means of this approach in the combustor at high velocity at the entrance was demonstrated. Experiments were carried out at Mach numbers of 4 and 5. Process of ignition and combustion under electron beam action was researched. It was revealed that ignition of mixture occurs after completion of electron gun operation. Data obtained have confirmed effectiveness of electron beam application for ignition of hydrogen and natural gas. The numerical simulation of the combustion of mixture in channel was carried out by means of ANSYS CFD 12.0 instrumentation on the basis of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equation using SST/k-ω turbulence model. For combustion modeling, a detailed kinetic scheme with 38 reactions of 8 species was implemented taking into account finite rate chemistry. Computations have shown that the developed model allow to predict ignition of a mixture and flame propagation even at low flow temperatures.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics for modeling the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Guillén, I.; Xamán, J.; Álvarez, G.; Arce, J.; Hernández-Pérez, I.; Gijón-Rivera, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the modeling of the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney (SC-DC) and its comparison with a single air-channel solar chimney (SC-C). Prediction of the mass flow and the thermal behavior of the SC-DC were obtained under three different climates of Mexico during one summer day. The climates correspond to: tropical savannah (Mérida), arid desert (Hermosillo) and temperate with warm summer (Mexico City). A code based on the Finite Volume Method was developed and a k-ω turbulence model has been used to model air turbulence in the solar chimney (SC). The code was validated against experimental data. The results indicate that during the day the SC-DC extracts about 50% more mass flow than the SC-C. When the SC-DC is located in Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, the air-changes extracted along the day were 60, 63 and 52, respectively. The air temperature at the outlet of the chimney increased up to 33%, 38% and 61% with respect to the temperature it has at the inlet for Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, respectively.

  17. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor. PMID:26343789

  18. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor.

  19. Effect of air flow on tubular solar still efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An experimental work was reported to estimate the increase in distillate yield for a compound parabolic concentrator-concentric tubular solar still (CPC-CTSS). The CPC dramatically increases the heating of the saline water. A novel idea was proposed to study the characteristic features of CPC for desalination to produce a large quantity of distillate yield. A rectangular basin of dimension 2 m × 0.025 m × 0.02 m was fabricated of copper and was placed at the focus of the CPC. This basin is covered by two cylindrical glass tubes of length 2 m with two different diameters of 0.02 m and 0.03 m. The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. Findings The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. Conclusions On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. PMID:23587020

  20. Longitudinal dispersion in open channel flow with suspended canopies.

    PubMed

    Huai, Wenxin; Li, Chengguang

    2016-01-01

    Suspended canopies can cause flow disturbances such as reducing velocities within the canopy, and increasing flow beneath the canopy. Flow modifications by canopies dramatically affect the fate and transport of sediment, nutrients, contaminants, dissolved oxygen, and fauna in aquatic systems. A three-zone model is presented here to predict the longitudinal dispersion coefficient by simplifying Chikwendu's N-zone model. To validate the model, both flow field and tracer experiments were conducted using a straight rectangular Plexiglas flume, with rigid circular rods as the modeled suspended canopies. The result shows that velocities increased above the flume bed and maximized at a point between the canopies and flume bed. Above that point, streamwise velocities decreased into and within the canopies. Reynolds shear stresses were largest at the canopy interface and smallest (zero) at the velocity maximum point. Good agreement between the modeled results and experimental data shows that the model can effectively predict the longitudinal dispersion coefficient in open channels with suspended canopies. PMID:27508377

  1. Compressible Turbulent Channel Flows: DNS Results and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, P. G.; Coleman, G. N.; Bradshaw, P.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The present paper addresses some topical issues in modeling compressible turbulent shear flows. The work is based on direct numerical simulation of two supersonic fully developed channel flows between very cold isothermal walls. Detailed decomposition and analysis of terms appearing in the momentum and energy equations are presented. The simulation results are used to provide insights into differences between conventional time-and Favre-averaging of the mean-flow and turbulent quantities. Study of the turbulence energy budget for the two cases shows that the compressibility effects due to turbulent density and pressure fluctuations are insignificant. In particular, the dilatational dissipation and the mean product of the pressure and dilatation fluctuations are very small, contrary to the results of simulations for sheared homogeneous compressible turbulence and to recent proposals for models for general compressible turbulent flows. This provides a possible explanation of why the Van Driest density-weighted transformation is so successful in correlating compressible boundary layer data. Finally, it is found that the DNS data do not support the strong Reynolds analogy. A more general representation of the analogy is analysed and shown to match the DNS data very well.

  2. Minimum detectable air velocity by thermal flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Issa, Safir; Lang, Walter

    2013-08-19

    Miniaturized thermal flow sensors have opened the doors for a large variety of new applications due to their small size, high sensitivity and low power consumption. Theoretically, very small detection limits of air velocity of some micrometers per second are achievable. However, the superimposed free convection is the main obstacle which prevents reaching these expected limits. Furthermore, experimental investigations are an additional challenge since it is difficult to generate very low flows. In this paper, we introduce a physical method, capable of generating very low flow values in the mixed convection region. Additionally, we present the sensor characteristic curves at the zero flow case and in the mixed convection region. Results show that the estimated minimum detectable air velocity by the presented method is 0.8 mm/s. The equivalent air velocity to the noise level of the sensor at the zero flow case is about 0.13 mm/s.

  3. Minimum Detectable Air Velocity by Thermal Flow Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Safir; Lang, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Miniaturized thermal flow sensors have opened the doors for a large variety of new applications due to their small size, high sensitivity and low power consumption. Theoretically, very small detection limits of air velocity of some micrometers per second are achievable. However, the superimposed free convection is the main obstacle which prevents reaching these expected limits. Furthermore, experimental investigations are an additional challenge since it is difficult to generate very low flows. In this paper, we introduce a physical method, capable of generating very low flow values in the mixed convection region. Additionally, we present the sensor characteristic curves at the zero flow case and in the mixed convection region. Results show that the estimated minimum detectable air velocity by the presented method is 0.8 mm/s. The equivalent air velocity to the noise level of the sensor at the zero flow case is about 0.13 mm/s. PMID:23966190

  4. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement specifications. 90.416 Section 90.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures §...

  5. Ramification of Channel Networks Incised by Groundwater Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, R. S.; Seybold, H. F.; Petroff, A. P.; Devauchelle, O.; Rothman, D.

    2011-12-01

    The geometry of channel networks has been a source of fascination since at least Leonardo da Vinci's time. Yet a comprehensive understanding of ramification---the mechanism of branching by which a stream network acquires its geometric complexity---remains elusive. To investigate the mechanisms of ramification and network growth, we consider channel growth driven by groundwater flow as a model system, analogous to a medical scientist's laboratory rat. We test our theoretical predictions through analysis of a particularly compelling example found on the Florida Panhandle north of Bristol. As our ultimate goal is to understand ramification and growth dynamics of the entire network, we build a computational model based on the following growth hypothesis: Channels grow in the direction that captures the maximum water flux. When there are two such directions, tips bifurcate. The direction of growth can be determined from the expansion of the ground water field around each tip, where each coefficient in this expansion has a physical interpretation. The first coefficient in the expansion determines the ground water discharge, leading to a straight growth of the channel. The second term describes the asymmetry in the water field leading to a bending of the stream in the direction of maximal water flux. The ratio between the first and the third coefficient determines a critical distance rc over which the tip feels inhomogeneities in the ground water table. This initiates then the splitting of the tip. In order to test our growth hypothesis and to determine rc, we grow the Florida network backward. At each time step we calculate the solution of the ground water field and determine the appropriate expansion coefficients around each tip. Comparing this simulation result to the predicted values provides us with a stringent measure for rc and the significance of our growth hypothesis.

  6. Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

    2012-07-08

    A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

  7. Localized reconnection in the magnetotail driven by lobe flow channels: Global MHD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.

    2016-02-01

    Recent ionospheric measurements suggest polar cap flow channels often trigger nightside auroral brightening. However, measurements were limited to the ionosphere, and it was not understood if such flow channels can exist in the lobe and can trigger magnetotail reconnection in a localized cross-tail extent. We examined if localized flow channels can form self-consistently in a global MHD regime, and if so, how such flow channels originate and relate to localized magnetotail reconnection. We show that lobe convection became nonuniform with azimuthally narrow flow channels (enhanced dawn-dusk electric fields) of ~3 RE cross-tail width. The flow channels propagated from the dayside toward the plasma sheet as an interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) discontinuity swept tailward. The plasma sheet around the lobe flow channels became thinner with a similar cross-tail extent and then localized reconnection occurred. These results suggest that localized flow channels can propagate tailward across the lobe and drive localized magnetotail reconnection, that the cross-tail width of reconnection and resulting plasma sheet flow channels and dipolarization fronts are related to the width of inflow from the lobe, and that IMF discontinuities drive lobe flow channels.

  8. Computational and experimental study of spin coater air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoguang; Liang, Faqiu; Haji-Sheikh, A.; Ghariban, N.

    1998-06-01

    An extensive 2- and 3-D analysis of air flow in a POLARISTM 2200 Microlithography Cluster spin coater was conducted using FLUENTTM Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. To supplement this analysis, direct measurement of air flow velocity was also performed using a DantecTM Hot Wire Anemometer. Velocity measurements were made along two major planes across the entire flow field in the spin coater at various operating conditions. It was found that the flow velocity at the spin coater inlet is much lower than previously assumed and quite nonuniform. Based on this observation, a pressure boundary condition rather than a velocity boundary condition was used for subsequent CFD analysis. A comparison between calculated results and experimental data shows that the 3D model accurately predicts the air flow field in the spin coater. An added advantage of this approach is that the CFD model can be easily generated from the mechanical design database and used to analyze the effect of design changes. The modeled and measured results show that the flow pattern in the spin bowl is affected by interactions between the spinning wafer, exhaust flow, and the gap between the spin head and surrounding baffle. Different operating conditions such as spin speed, inlet pressure, and exhaust pressure were found to generate substantially different flow patterns. It was also found that backflow of air could be generated under certain conditions.

  9. Flow distribution and maximum current density studies in redox flow batteries with a single passage of the serpentine flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xinyou; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2014-12-01

    Flow batteries show promise for very large-scale stationary energy storage such as needed for the grid and renewable energy implementation. In recent years, researchers and developers of redox flow batteries (RFBs) have found that electrode and flow field designs of PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) technology can increase the power density and consequently push down the cost of flow battery stacks. In this paper we present a macroscopic model of a typical PEMFC-like RFB electrode-flow field design. The model is a layered system comprised of a single passage of a serpentine flow channel and a parallel underlying porous electrode (or porous layer). The effects of the inlet volumetric flow rate, permeability of the porous layer, thickness of the porous layer and thickness of the flow channel on the flow penetration into the porous layer are investigated. The maximum current density corresponding to stoichiometry is estimated to be 377 mA cm-2 and 724 mA cm-2, which compares favorably with experiments of ∼400 mA cm-2 and ∼750 mA cm-2, for a single layer and three layers of the carbon fiber paper, respectively.

  10. The effect of passive mixing on pressure drop and oxygen mass fraction using opposing channel flow field design in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anant Bir

    This study investigates a flow field with opposing channel design. Previous studies on flow field designs have been focused on improving fuel utilization which often leads to increased pressure drop. This increased pressure drop is typical because standard designs employ either a single flow channel to clear blockages or dead end condition to force the flow through the gas diffusion layer. The disadvantage with these designs is the increased resistance to the flow which requires higher pressure, which becomes a parasitic loss that lowers the system efficiency. For this study the focus was to reduce the pressure drop by providing a less resistive path to the flow. To achieve a less resistive path, the inlet channel was split into two opposing channels. These channels are then recombined only to be split again for the next leg. Therefore, the split channel design should reduce the pressure drop which reduces the parasitic load and ultimately contributes to higher system efficiency. In addition the recombining of the streams at each leg should induce mixing. Having opposing channels should also increase cross flow under the lands to reduce mass transfer loses. The cathode side of the fuel cell is especially sensitive to the mass transport losses since air (oxygen mixed with nitrogen) is used for supplying oxygen unlike the anode side which uses pure hydrogen. To test the hypothesis of having benefits from an opposing channel design, both an experimental and analytical approach was taken. For the experiment, a serpentine flow field and opposing channel flow field plates were compared over several flow rates with compressed air. To test the hypothesis of increased mass transfer, the two flow fields were modeled using a CFD software package, COMSOL. It was found that the opposing channel configuration for high flow rate with multiple entry and exit conditions exhibited significant improvement over the single serpentine channel. Pressure drop was ⅓ less than the

  11. Bedrock erosion by sliding wear in channelized granular flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C. Y.; Stark, C. P.; Capart, H.; Smith, B.; Maia, H. T.; Li, L.; Reitz, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Boundary forces generated by debris flows can be powerful enough to erode bedrock and cause considerable damage to infrastructure during runout. Bedrock wear can be separated into impact and sliding wear processes. Here we focus on sliding wear. We have conducted experiments with a 40-cm-diameter grainflow-generating rotating drum designed to simulate dry channelized debris flows. To generate sliding erosion, we placed a 20-cm-diameter bedrock plate axially on the back wall of the drum. The rotating drum was half filled with 2.3-mm-diameter grains, which formed a thin grain-avalanching layer with peak flow speed and depth close to the drum axis. The whole experimental apparatus was placed on a 100g-ton geotechnical centrifuge and, in order to scale up the stress level, spun to a range of effective gravity levels. Rates and patterns of erosion of the bedrock plate were mapped after each experiment using 3d micro-photogrammetry. High-speed video and particle tracking were employed to measure granular flow dynamics. The resulting data for granular velocities and flow geometry were used to estimate impulse exchanges and forces on the bedrock plate. To address some of the complexities of granular flow under variable gravity levels, we developed a continuum model framed around a GDR MiDi rheology. This model allowed us to scale up boundary forcing while maintaining the same granular flow regime, and helped us to understand important aspects of the flow dynamics including e.g. fluxes of momentum and kinetic energy. In order to understand the detailed processes of boundary forcing, we performed numerical simulations with a new contact dynamics model. This model confirmed key aspects of our continuum model and provided information on second-order behavior such as fluctuations in the forces acting on the wall. By combining these measurements and theoretical analyses, we have developed and calibrated a constitutive model for sliding wear that is a threshold function of

  12. The air-liquid flow in a microfluidic airway tree.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Baudoin, Michael; Manneville, Paul; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidic techniques are employed to investigate air-liquid flows in the lung. A network of microchannels with five generations is made and used as a simplified model of a section of the pulmonary airway tree. Liquid plugs are injected into the network and pushed by a flow of air; they divide at every bifurcation until they reach the exits of the network. A resistance, associated with the presence of one plug in a given generation, is defined to establish a linear relation between the driving pressure and the total flow rate in the network. Based on this resistance, good predictions are obtained for the flow of two successive plugs in different generations. The total flow rate of a two-plug flow is found to depend not only on the driving pressure and lengths of the plugs, but also the initial distance between them. Furthermore, long range interactions between daughters of a dividing plug are observed and discussed, particularly when the plugs are flowing through the bifurcations. These interactions lead to different flow patterns for different forcing conditions: the flow develops symmetrically when subjected to constant pressure or high flow rate forcing, while a low flow rate driving yields an asymmetric flow.

  13. The initial-value problem for viscous channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Jackson, T. L.; Lasseigne, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    Plane viscous channel flows are perturbed and the ensuing initial-value problems are investigated in detail. Unlike traditional methods where traveling wave normal modes are assumed for solution, this works offers a means whereby completely arbitrary initial input can be specified without having to resort to eigenfunction expansions. The full temporal behavior, including both early time transients and the long time asymptotics, can be determined for any initial disturbance. Effects of three-dimensionality can be assessed. The bases for the analysis are: (a) linearization of the governing equations; (b) Fourier decomposition in the spanwise and streamwise directions of the flow; and (c) direct numerical integration of the resulting partial differential equations. All of the stability data that are known for such flows can be reproduced. Also, the optimal initial condition can be determined in a straight forward manner and such optimal conditions clearly reflect transient growth data that is easily determined by a rational choice of a basis for the initial conditions. Although there can be significant transient growth for subcritical values of the Reynolds number using this approach it does not appear possible that arbitrary initial conditions will lead to the exceptionally large transient amplitudes that have been determined by optimization of normal modes. The approach is general and can be applied to other classes of problems where only a finite discrete spectrum exists, such as the boundary layer for example.

  14. Low power, constant-flow air pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, M.D.; Albert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A rugged, yet small and lightweight constant-flow air pump system has been designed. Flow control is achieved using a novel approach which is three times more power efficient than previous designs. The resultant savings in battery size and weight makes these pumps ideal for sampling air on balloon platforms. The pump package includes meteorological sensors and an onboard computer that stores time and sensor data and turns the constant-flow pump circuit on/off. Some applications of these systems are also presented in this report.

  15. Numerical Study on a Detailed Air Flows in an Urban Area Using a CFD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, detailed air flows in an urban area were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. For this model buildings used as the surface boundary in the model were constructed using Los Angeles Region Imagery Acquisition Consortium 2 Geographic Information System (LARIAC2 GIS) data. Three target areas centered at the cross roads of Broadway & 7th St., Olive & 12th St., and Wilshire blvd. & Carondelet, Los Angeles, California were considered. The size of each numerical domain is 400 m, 400 m, and 200 m in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions, respectively. The grid sizes in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions are 2 m, 2 m, and 2 m, respectively. Based on the inflow wind data provided by California Air Resources Board, detailed flow characteristics were investigated for each target area. Descending air flow were developed at the leeward area of tall building and ascending air current were occurred on the windward area of tall building. Vertically rotating vortices were formed in spaces between buildings, so-called, street canyons and horizontally rotating vortices appeared near cross roads. When flows came into narrow street canyon from wide street canyon, channeling effects appeared and flow speed increased for satisfying mass continuity.

  16. Design and Implementation of Automatic Air Flow Rate Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, A.; Saputra, C.; Munir, M. M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    Venturimeter is an apparatus that can be used to measure the air flow rate. In this experiment we designed a venturimeter which equipped with a valve that is used to control the air flow rate. The difference of pressure between the cross sections was measured with the differential pressure sensor GA 100-015WD which can calculate the difference of pressures from 0 to 3737.33 Pa. A 42M048C Z36 stepper motor was used to control the valve. The precision of this motor rotation is about 0.15 °. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed to monitor and set the value of flow rate then an 8-bit microcontroller was used to process the control system In this experiment- the venturimeter has been examined to get the optimal parameter of controller. The results show that the controller can set the stable output air flow rate.

  17. Analysis of flood-flow frequency, flow duration, and channel-forming flow for the James River in South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, R.D.

    1988-01-01

    The James River, which originates in North Dakota and joins the Missouri River near Yankton, South Dakota, is about 747 miles long, with about 474 river miles located in South Dakota. The James River basin includes 21,116 sq mi, with 14,428 sq mi located in South Dakota. Bankfull capacity of the James River in South Dakota ranges from a minimum of about 200 cu ft/sec near the mouth. Discharges that produce bankfull conditions on much of the river in South Dakota occur on an average of once in about 2 years. The 10-year flood flows, which range from 1,620 cu ft/sec (at the gage near Stratford) to 8,870 cu ft/sec (at the gage near Scotland), cause major flooding on most of the river in South Dakota. The river also has potential for extending periods of low or zero flow, especially in the northern portion within South Dakota. Generally, low flows occur from late summer until spring snowmelt. The James River at Columbia had zero flow for 623 consecutive days from July 13, 1958, through March 26, 1960. The channel pattern (channel alignment) has changed little since 1922. This channel stability indicates that channel formation is approaching a state of equilibrium. It does not appear that velocities in the river are sufficient to carry the sediment being delivered by the tributaries. (Author 's abstract)

  18. Effect of an entrained air bubble on the acoustics of an ink channel.

    PubMed

    Jeurissen, Roger; de Jong, Jos; Reinten, Hans; van den Berg, Marc; Wijshoff, Herman; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2008-05-01

    Piezo-driven inkjet systems are very sensitive to air entrapment. The entrapped air bubbles grow by rectified diffusion in the ink channel and finally result in nozzle failure. Experimental results on the dynamics of fully grown air bubbles are presented. It is found that the bubble counteracts the pressure buildup necessary for the droplet formation. The channel acoustics and the air bubble dynamics are modeled. For good agreement with the experimental data it is crucial to include the confined geometry into the model: The air bubble acts back on the acoustic field in the channel and thus on its own dynamics. This two-way coupling limits further bubble growth and thus determines the saturation size of the bubble.

  19. Large eddy simulation study of spanwise spacing effects on secondary flows in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliakbarimiyanmahaleh, Mohammad; Anderson, William

    2015-11-01

    The structure of turbulent flow over a complex topography composed of streamwise-aligned rows of cones with varying spanwise spacing, s is studied with large-eddy simulation (LES). Similar to the experimental study of Vanderwel and Ganapathisubramani, 2015: J. Fluid Mech., we investigate the relationship between secondary flow and s, for 0 . 25 <= s / δ <= 5 . For cases with s / δ > 2 , domain-scale rollers freely exist. These had previously been called ``turbulent secondary flows'' (Willingham et al., 2014: Phys. Fluids; Barros and Christensen, 2014: J. Fluid Mech.; Anderson et al., 2015: J. Fluid Mech.), but closer inspection of the statistics indicates these are a turbulent tertiary flow: they only remain ``anchored'' to the conical roughness elements for s / δ > 2 . For s / δ < 2 , turbulent tertiary flows are prevented from occupying the domain by virtue of proximity to adjacent, counter-rotating tertiary flows. Turbulent secondary flows are associated with the conical roughness elements. These turbulent secondary flows emanate from individual conical topographic elements and set the roughness sublayer depth. The turbulent secondary flows remain intact for large and small spacing. For s / δ < 1 , a mean tertiary flow is not present. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Sci. Research, Young Inv. Program (PM: Dr. R. Ponnoppan and Ms. E. Montomery) under Grant # FA9550-14-1-0394. Computational resources were provided by the Texas Adv. Comp. Center at the Univ. of Texas.

  20. Flow structure due to dimple depressions on a channel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligrani, P. M.; Harrison, J. L.; Mahmmod, G. I.; Hill, M. L.

    2001-11-01

    Instantaneous, dynamic and time-averaged characteristics of the vortex structures which are shed from the dimples placed on one wall of a channel are described. The dimpled test surface contains 13 staggered rows of dimples in the streamwise direction, where each dimple has a print diameter of 5.08 cm, and a ratio of depth to print diameter of 0.2. Considered are Reynolds numbers (based on channel height) ReH from 600 to 11 000, and ratios of channel height to dimple print diameter H/D of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.00. For all three H/D, a primary vortex pair is periodically shed from the central portion of each dimple, including a large upwash region. This shedding occurs periodically and continuously, and is followed by inflow advection into the dimple cavity. The frequency of these events appears to scale on time-averaged bulk velocity and dimple print diameter, which gives nondimensional frequencies of 2.2-3.0 for all three H/D values considered. As H/D decreases, (i) the strength of the primary vortex pair increases, and (ii) two additional secondary vortex pairs (which form near the spanwise edges of each dimple) become significantly stronger, larger in cross section, and more apparent in flow visualization images and in surveys of time-averaged, streamwise vorticity. The locations of these primary and secondary vortex pairs near the dimpled surface coincide closely with locations where normalized Reynolds normal stress is augmented. This evidences an important connection between the vortices, Reynolds normal stress, and mixing. The large-scale unsteadiness associated with this mixing is then more pronounced, and encompasses larger portions of the vortex structure (and thus extends over larger volumes) as H/D increases from 0.25 to 1.0.

  1. Modeling of Gas-Liquid Flow Through An Interconnected Channel Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane.H

    2009-01-01

    The motion of a less viscous, non-wetting gas into a liquid-saturated porous medium is known as drainage. Drainage is an important process in environmental applications, such as enhanced oil recovery and geologic CO2 sequestration. Understanding what conditions will increase the volume of gas that can saturate an initially water-saturated porous medium is of importance for predictions of the total CO2 volume that can be sequestered in known geologic formations. To further the understanding of how drainage flow properties are related to different injection flow-rates, a porous medium consisting of interconnected channels and pores was manufactured to perform bench-top experiments of drainage. Additionally, a finite-volume model of this interconnected channel matrix was constructed. Numerical simulations of constant-rate injection into the model porous medium are first shown to compare favorably to the bench-top experiments. The fluid and injection properties of the drainage process were then varied to evaluate the flow conditions which would maximize the volume of gas trapped within the porous medium. In particular, CO2 displacing brine within the porous medium was modeled, with representative subsurface temperatures and fluid properties. It was shown with these fluid conditions a higher final saturation of the invading less-viscous CO2 was obtained, as compared to air into water experiments at similar injection rates.

  2. Concentration distributions of arbitrary shaped particles in microfluidic channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibaba, Arvind; Shaqfeh, Eric; Darve, Eric

    2009-11-01

    We are interested in the study of the transient and steady state concentration distribution of orientable Brownian particles across channels at low Reynolds numbers. This is important in understanding margination of blood ``particles'' including platelets as well as new drug delivery and cancer nanotechnology particles which are involved in hemostasis as well as delivering drugs to the vascular endothelial cells. Although our formulation is general, the particles we consider are rigid Brownian ``surfboards'' which have been found to be effective in drug delivery since they are resistant to leukocyte attack [1]. The Stokes flow in the channel around the particles, driven by a mean pressure gradient, is computed using the Boundary Element method within the single layer formulation. The particle motion is calculated using rigid body dynamics with a contribution due to Brownian motion that satisfies the Fluctuation-Dissipation theorem. Finite concentrations are considered, and all hydrodynamic interactions are included. The concentration distribution is computed and interpreted as a balance between the concentration dependent variation in the non-equilibrium particle osmotic pressure and the cross stream particle normal stresses. [4pt] [1] J. A. Champion, S. Mitragotri, ``Role of target geometry in phagocytosis'', PNAS 103, 4930-4934, (2006)

  3. Cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel: effects of wind on snow bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savijärvi, Hannu

    2015-08-01

    Wintertime cold air outbreaks along a non-frozen sea channel or a long lake can become destructive if the related bands of heavy snowfall hit onto land. The forcing for such bands is studied with a 2D numerical model set across an east-west sea channel at 60oN (`Gulf of Finland'), varying the basic geostrophic wind V g. Without any V g opposite coastal land breezes emerge with convergence. This results in a quasi-steady rising motion w max ~ 7.5 cm/s at 600 m in the middle of the gulf, which can force a snow band. During weak V g, the rising motion is reduced but least so for winds from 60o to 80o (~ENE), when modest alongshore bands could exist near the downstream (Estonian) coast. During V g of 4-6 m/s from any direction, the land breezes and rising motions are reduced more effectively, so snow bands are not expected during moderate basic flow. In contrast, during a strong V g of 20-25 m/s from 110o to 120o (~ESE) the land breeze perturbations are intense with w max up to 15-18 cm/s. The induced alongshore bands of heavy snowfall are located in these cases at the sea but quite close to the downstream (Finnish) coast. They can suddenly make a landfall if the basic wind turns clockwise.

  4. Spool Valve for Switching Air Flows Between Two Beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. Clark

    2005-01-01

    U.S. Patent 6,142,151 describes a dual-bed ventilation system for a space suit, with emphasis on a multiport spool valve that switches air flows between two chemical beds that adsorb carbon dioxide and water vapor. The valve is used to alternately make the air flow through one bed while exposing the other bed to the outer-space environment to regenerate that bed through vacuum desorption of CO2 and H2O. Oxygen flowing from a supply tank is routed through a pair of periodically switched solenoid valves to drive the spool valve in a reciprocating motion. The spool valve equalizes the pressures of air in the beds and the volumes of air flowing into and out of the beds during the alternations between the adsorption and desorption phases, in such a manner that the volume of air that must be vented to outer space is half of what it would be in the absence of pressure equalization. Oxygen that has been used to actuate the spool valve in its reciprocating motion is released into the ventilation loop to replenish air lost to vacuum during the previous desorption phase of the operating cycle.

  5. Reducing minimum air flow at low boiler loads

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, B.L.; Lange, H.B.; Brown, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    One aspect of boiler operation that impairs performance at low loads is the practice of maintaining the flow of air to the boiler at or above 25% of the full-load air flow even though the boiler load may be reduced well below 25%. This is done in accordance with National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 8502, a guideline which boiler insurers generally require. The intent of the minimum air flow rate guideline is to reduce the likelihood of a boiler explosion being caused by an unexpected accumulation of unburned fuel in the boiler, by maintaining a minimum purge rate through the boiler. Operation at high excess air reduces boiler efficiency, increases NO{sub x} emissions and, in some cases, negatively impacts flame stability. Under a contract with EPRI, Carnot is currently engaged in a program aimed at more fully establishing the economics of and technical basis for safe reduced air flow operation at low boiler loads and developing guidelines for its implementation on any boiler. In Phase 1 of this program, discussions were initiated with the NFPA, and detailed boiler combustion and heat-transfer analyses were combined with cost models to quantify the benefits and costs of reduced air flow operation on a wide variety of boilers. The cost/benefit analysis investigated gas- and/or oil-fired boilers including tangential, wall and opposed-fired designs. Phase 2 of the program is to consist of a series of demonstrations of reduced air flow operation on working utility boilers. These demonstrations are to cover gas, oil and coal fuels and the major boiler design types.

  6. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  7. Partial flow compensation by transverse bypass configuration in multi-channel cryogenic compact heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jeheon; Hwang, Gyuwan; Baek, Seungwhan; Jeong, Sangkwon; Rowe, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    High-performance multi-channel heat exchangers are vulnerable to small defects such as ill-manufacture or contamination in flow channels. Even slight flow mal-distribution may result in drastic reduction of their thermal performance. In order to accommodate such performance reduction in multi-channel heat exchangers, transverse bypass structure among the channels of hot stream or cold stream is proposed. Since transverse bypass structure enables voluntary flow re-distribution among the channels, detrimental effect of flow defects can be partially reduced and flow mal-distribution can be locally relieved. The lower the flow resistance of transverse bypass is, the more substantial the flow re-distribution is and the larger its effect can be. Quantitative analysis and experimental verification on the effect of transverse bypass is carried out, and the results are presented in this paper.

  8. Kelvin-Helmholtz Unstable Magnetotail Flow Channels: Deceleration and Radiation of MHD Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkakin, H.; Mann, I. R.; Rankin, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) of magnetotail flow channels associated with burstybulk flows (BBFs) is investigated. MHD oscillations of the channel in both kink and sausage modes areinvestigated for KHI, and both the primary and secondary KHIs are found that drive MHD waves. Theseinstabilities are likely to be important for flow channel braking where the KHI removes energy from the flow.At flow speeds above the peak growth rate, the MHD modes excited by KHI develop from surface modesinto propagating modes leading to the radiation of MHD waves from the flow channel. The coupling ofBBF-driven shear flow instabilities to MHD waves presented here represents a new paradigm to explain BBFexcitation of tail flapping. Our model can also explain, for the first time, the generation mechanism for theobservations of waves propagating toward both flanks and emitted from BBF channels in the magnetotail.

  9. Cross-flow versus counterflow air-stripping towers

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.C.; Marinas, B.J.

    1997-07-01

    Mass-transfer and pressure-drop packing performance correlations are used together with tower design equations and detailed cost models to compare the effectiveness of cross-flow and counterflow air stripping towers over a wide range of contaminant volatility. Cross-flow towers are shown to offer a significant economic advantage over counterflow towers when stripping low volatility organic contaminants primarily due to savings in energy costs. These savings increase as contaminant volatility decreases and as water flow rate increases. A further advantage of the cross-flow configuration is that it extends the feasible operating range for air stripping as cross-flow towers can accommodate higher air-to-water flow ratios than conventional counterflow towers. Finally it is shown that the optimized least-cost design for both counterflow and cross-flow towers varies with Henry`s law constant, water flow rate, and percent removal, but that the optimum is virtually insensitive to other cost and operating variables. This greatly simplifies the tower design procedure.

  10. Cooling channels design analysis with chaotic laminar trajectory for closed cathode air-cooled PEM fuel cells using non-reacting numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, W. Mohamed W. A.

    2015-09-01

    The thermal management of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells contributes directly to the overall power output of the system. For a closed cathode PEM fuel cell design, the use of air as a cooling agent is a non-conventional method due to the large heat load involved, but it offers a great advantage for minimizing the system size. Geometrical aspects of the cooling channels have been identified as the basic parameter for improved cooling performance. Numerical investigation using STAR-CCM computational fluid dynamics platform was applied for non-reacting cooling effectiveness study of various channel geometries for fuel cell application. The aspect ratio of channels and the flow trajectory are the parametric variations. A single cooling plate domain was selected with an applied heat flux of 2400 W/m2 while the cooling air are simulated at Reynolds number of 400 that corresponds to normal air flow velocities using standard 6W fans. Three channel designs of similar number of channels (20 channels) are presented here to analyze the effects of having chaotic laminar flow trajectory compared to the usual straight path trajectory. The total heat transfer between the cooling channel walls and coolant were translated into temperature distribution, maximum temperature gradient, average plate temperature and overall cooling effectiveness analyses. The numerical analysis shows that the chaotic flow promotes a 5% to 10% improvement in cooling effectiveness, depending on the single-axis or multi-axis flow paths applied. Plate temperature uniformity is also more realizable using the chaotic flow designs.

  11. Channel Geometry and Flood Flows: Quantifying over-bank flow dynamics during high-flow events in North Carolina's floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovette, J. P.; Duncan, J. M.; Vimal, S.; Band, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    Natural riparian areas play numerous roles in the maintenance and improvement of stream water quality. Both restoration of riparian areas and improvement of hydrologic connectivity to the stream are often key goals of river restoration projects. These management actions are designed to improve nutrient removal by slowing and treating overland flow delivered from uplands and by storing, treating, and slowly releasing streamwater from overbank inundation during flood events. A major question is how effective this storage of overbank flow is at treating streamwater based on the cumulative time stream discharge at a downstream location has spent in shallower, slower overbank flow. The North Carolina Floodplain Mapping Program maintains a detailed statewide Flood Risk Information System (FRIS) using HEC-RAS modeling, lidar, and detailed surveyed river cross-sections. FRIS provides extensive information regarding channel geometry on approximately 39,000 stream reaches (a slightly coarser spatial resolution than the NHD+v2 dataset) with tens of cross-sections for each reach. We use this FRIS data to calculate volume and discharge from floodplain riparian areas separately from in-channel flow during overbank events. Preliminary results suggest that a small percentage of total annual discharge interacts with the full floodplain extent along a stream reach due to the infrequency of overbank flow events. However, with the significantly different physical characteristics of the riparian area when compared to the channel itself, this overbank flow can provide unique services to water quality. Our project aims to use this information in conjunction with data from the USGS SPARROW program to target non-point source hotspots of Nitrogen and Phosphorus addition and removal. By better understanding the flow dynamics within riparian areas during high flow events, riparian restoration projects can be carried out with improved efficacy.

  12. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent channel flow at one bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, for bulk Mach numbers Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs). The IBCs are formulated in the time domain following Fung and Ju (2004) and coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. The impedance model adopted is a three-parameter Helmholtz oscillator with resonant frequency tuned to the outer layer eddies. The IBC's resistance, R, has been varied in the range, R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00. Tuned IBCs result in a noticeable drag increase for sufficiently high Mb and/or low R, exceeding 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01, and thus represents a promising passive control technique for delaying boundary layer separation and/or enhancing wall heat transfer. Alterations to the turbulent flow structure are confined to the first 15% of the boundary layer thickness where the classical buffer-layer coherent vortical structures are replaced by an array of Kelvin-Helmholtz-like rollers. The non-zero asymptotic value of the Reynolds shear stress gradient at the wall results in the disappearance of the viscous sublayer and very early departure of the mean velocity profiles from the law of the wall.

  13. Numerical investigation of transition critical Reynolds number of channel flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongming

    2015-11-01

    Two critical Reynolds numbers are mentioned in investigation of laminar-turbulent transition. One is instability critical Reynolds number from linear stability theory (LST). The other is transition critical Reynolds number at which transition occurs in reality, which is significantly lower than the former in general. The determination of transition critical Reynolds number is of important practical significance in some engineering problems. Theoretical method has not been proposed for its determination, so it has to depend on experiments. However, for some flows with important practical significance, such as hypersonic boundary layer, transition critical Reynolds number cannot be determined by experiments in current situation. In this paper, transition critical Reynolds number of incompressible channel flow is determined by direct numerical simulations (DNS). It is found as Re =1114, which agrees with experimental data. In subsequent paper, transition critical Reynolds number of boundary layer will be investigation by the similar method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11202147, 11332007, 11172203, and 91216111) and the Specialized Research Fund (New Teacher Class) for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (No. 20120032120007).

  14. Coalescence and breakup of large droplets in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarbolo, Luca; Bianco, Federico; Soldati, Alfredo

    2015-07-01

    Coalescence and breakup of large deformable droplets dispersed in a wall-bounded turbulent flow are investigated. Droplets much larger than the Kolmogorov length scale and characterized by a broad range of surface tension values are considered. The turbulent field is a channel flow computed with pseudo-spectral direct numerical simulations, while phase interactions are described with a phase field model. Within this physically consistent framework, the motion of the interfaces, the capillary effects, and the complex topological changes experienced by the droplets are simulated in detail. An oil-water emulsion is mimicked: the fluids are considered of same density and viscosity for a range of plausible values of surface tension, resulting in a simplified system that sets a benchmark for further analysis. In the present conditions, the Weber number (We), that is, the ratio between inertia and surface tension, is a primary factor for determining the droplets coalescence rate and the occurrence of breakups. Depending on the value of We, two different regimes are observed: when We is smaller than a threshold value (We < 1 in our simulations), coalescence dominates until droplet-droplet interactions are prevented by geometric separation; when We is larger than the threshold value (We > 1), a permanent dynamic equilibrium between coalescence and breakup events is established.

  15. Flow and transport in channels with submerged vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nepf, Heidi; Ghisalberti, Marco

    2008-09-01

    This paper reviews recent work on flow and transport in channels with submerged vegetation, including discussions of turbulence structure, mean velocity profiles, and dispersion. For submerged canopies of sufficient density, the dominant characteristic of the flow is the generation of a shear-layer at the top of the canopy. The shear-layer generates coherent vortices by Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. These vortices control the vertical exchange of mass and momentum, influencing both the mean velocity profile, as well as the turbulent diffusivity. For flexible canopies, the passage of the KH vortices generates a progressive wave along the canopy interface, termed monami. The KH vortices formed at the top of the canopy penetrate a distance δ e into the canopy. This penetration scale segregates the canopy into an upper layer of rapid transport and a lower layer of slow transport. Flushing of the upper canopy is enhanced by the energetic shear-scale vortices. In the lower layer turbulence is limited to length-scales set by the stem geometry, and the resulting transport is significantly slower than that of the upper layer.

  16. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of isothermal-wall compressible turbulent channel flow with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) for the wall-normal velocity component and no-slip conditions for the tangential velocity components. Three bulk Mach numbers, Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with a fixed bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, have been investigated. For each Mb, nine different combinations of IBC settings were tested, in addition to a reference case with impermeable walls, resulting in a total of 30 simulations. The adopted numerical coupling strategy allows for a spatially and temporally consistent imposition of physically realizable IBCs in a fully explicit compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The IBCs are formulated in the time domain according to Fung and Ju ["Time-domain impedance boundary conditions for computational acoustics and aeroacoustics," Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 18(6), 503-511 (2004)]. The impedance adopted is a three-parameter damped Helmholtz oscillator with resonant angular frequency, ωr, tuned to the characteristic time scale of the large energy-containing eddies. The tuning condition, which reads ωr = 2πMb (normalized with the speed of sound and channel half-width), reduces the IBCs' free parameters to two: the damping ratio, ζ, and the resistance, R, which have been varied independently with values, ζ = 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00, for each Mb. The application of the tuned IBCs results in a drag increase up to 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01. It is shown that for tuned IBCs, the resistance, R, acts as the inverse of the wall-permeability and that varying the damping ratio, ζ, has a secondary effect on the flow response. Typical buffer-layer turbulent structures are completely suppressed by the application of tuned IBCs. A new resonance buffer layer is established characterized by large spanwise-coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers, with a well-defined streamwise wavelength λx, traveling downstream with

  17. Velocity Vector Field Visualization of Flow in Liquid Acquisition Device Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Chao, David F.; Hall, Nancy R.; Zhang, Nengli

    2012-01-01

    A capillary flow liquid acquisition device (LAD) for cryogenic propellants has been developed and tested in NASA Glenn Research Center to meet the requirements of transferring cryogenic liquid propellants from storage tanks to an engine in reduced gravity environments. The prototypical mesh screen channel LAD was fabricated with a mesh screen, covering a rectangular flow channel with a cylindrical outlet tube, and was tested with liquid oxygen (LOX). In order to better understand the performance in various gravity environments and orientations at different liquid submersion depths of the screen channel LAD, a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of LOX flow through the LAD screen channel was undertaken. The resulting velocity vector field visualization for the flow in the channel has been used to reveal the gravity effects on the flow in the screen channel.

  18. Air-segmented amplitude-modulated multiplexed flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Inui, Koji; Uemura, Takeshi; Ogusu, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Masaki; Tanaka, Hideji

    2011-01-01

    Air-segmentation is applied to amplitude-modulated multiplexed flow analysis, which we proposed recently. Sample solutions, the flow rates of which are varied periodically, are merged with reagent and/or diluent solution. The merged stream is segmented by air-bubbles and, downstream, its absorbance is measured after deaeration. The analytes in the samples are quantified from the amplitudes of the respective wave components in the absorbance. The proposed method is applied to the determinations of a food dye, phosphate ions and nitrite ions. The air-segmentation is effective for limiting amplitude damping through the axial dispersion, resulting in an improvement in sensitivity. This effect is more pronounced at shorter control periods and longer flow path lengths.

  19. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  20. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.

  1. Numerical simulations of non-homogeneous viscoelastic turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housiadas, Kostas; Beris, Antony

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the polymer mixing in turbulent channel flow is studied through numerical simulations, using a spectral technique. In particular, we simulate injection of polymeric material through a slit very close to the wall and parallel to it in pre-established Newtonian turbulent flow. The governing equations consist of the mass conservation, the modified Navier-Stokes equation (in order to take into account the polymer extra-stress), the evolution equation for the conformation tensor and an advection-diffusion equation for the polymer concentration. The injection process is simulated by dividing the computational domain in three different regions: (a) the entrance region where the polymer is introduced (b) the developing region where the polymer is allowed to convect freely interacting/modifying the turbulent flow and (c) the recovering region where we use a reacting sink to force the removal of the polymer from the solvent in order to re-establish the inlet conditions. A fully spectral method is used in order to solve the set of governing equations similar to that developed for homogenous viscoelastic turbulent DNS (Housiadas & Beris, Phys. Fluids, 15, (2003)). Although a significantly improved numerical algorithm has been successfully used before (Housiadas & Beris, to appear in J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. (2004)) a further improved version of that algorithm is presented in this work. The new algorithm has enabled us to extend the simulations for much wider range of viscoelasticity parameter values as well as for many viscoelastic models like the FENE-P, Giesekus, Oldroyd-B and the modified Giesekus/FENE-P model. Results for illustrative sets of parameter values are going to be presented.

  2. Correlations of Surface Deformation and 3D Flow Field in a Compliant Wall Turbulent Channel Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jin; Zhang, Cao; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on the correlations between surface deformation and flow features, including velocity, vorticity and pressure, in a turbulent channel flow over a flat, compliant Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) wall. The channel centerline velocity is 2.5 m/s, and the friction Reynolds number is 2.3x103. Analysis is based on simultaneous measurements of the time resolved 3D velocity and surface deformation using tomographic PIV and Mach-Zehnder Interferometry. The volumetric pressure distribution is calculated plane by plane by spatially integrating the material acceleration using virtual boundary, omni-directional method. Conditional sampling based on local high/low pressure and deformation events reveals the primary flow structures causing the deformation. High pressure peaks appear at the interface between sweep and ejection, whereas the negative deformations peaks (dent) appear upstream, under the sweeps. The persistent phase lag between flow and deformations are presumably caused by internal damping within the PDMS. Some of the low pressure peaks and strong ejections are located under the head of hairpin vortices, and accordingly, are associated with positive deformation (bump). Others bumps and dents are correlated with some spanwise offset large inclined quasi-streamwise vortices that are not necessarily associated with hairpins. Sponsored by ONR.

  3. Two-dimensional calculations of a continuous optical discharge in atmospheric-air flow (optical plasmatron)

    SciTech Connect

    Raizer, Yu.P.; Silant'ev, A.Yu.; Surzhikov, S.T.

    1987-11-01

    A two-dimensional gas-dynamic process in a continuous optical discharge, burning in subsonic atmospheric-air flow, is modeled numerically. The distortion of the light channel owing to refraction of the laser beam in the plasma created by it, the radiative energy losses, and radiant heat transfer were taken into account. It was found that in a hot jet instabilities and eddy structures appear behind the region of energy liberation. These effects do not affect the main part of the discharge, where the state is completely stable. The calculations showed that for an optical plasmatron in the free atmosphere the incoming flow primarily flows around the highly heated region, and penetrates into it only slightly. Depending on the velocity of the flow the refraction in the plasma can lead to both defocusing and additional focusing of the beam. The results agree qualitatively with available experimental data.

  4. Enhanced flow in smooth single-file channel.

    PubMed

    Roy Majumder, Shashwati; Choudhury, Niharendu; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2007-08-01

    We investigate the flux of particles in a smooth single-file channel where particles cannot cross each other as well as in wider channels of varying cross section where particles execute normal diffusion. All the channels are connected to an infinite reservoir at one end and the flux of particles is measured at the other open end. We perform random walk Monte Carlo simulation using lattice model. The flux decreases monotonically as the channel cross section is increased from single-file channel to wider channel and finally reaches a constant value for a sufficiently wide channel. The observation of enhanced flux in single-file channel as compared to a wider channel can be tested for efficient separation of particles through smooth nanochannels.

  5. Comparisons of the hydraulics of water flows in Martian outflow channels with flows of similar scale on earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, P. D.

    1979-01-01

    The hydraulics of channelized water flows on Mars and the resulting sediment transport rates are calculated, and similar computations are performed for such terrestrial analogs as the Mississippi River and the catastrophic Lake Missoula floods that formed the Channeled Scabland in eastern Washington State. The morphologies of deep-sea channels formed by catastrophic turbidity currents are compared with the Martian channels, many similarities are pointed out, and the hydraulics of the various flows are compared. The results indicate that the velocities, discharges, bottom shear stresses, and sediment-transport capacity of water flows along the Martian channels would be comparable to those of the oceanic turbidity currents and the Lake Missoula floods. It is suggested that the submarine canyons from which turbidity currents originate are the terrestrial counterparts to the chaotic-terrain areas or craters that serve as sources for many of the Martian channels.

  6. Effect of droplet interaction on droplet-laden turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuerten, J. G. M.; Vreman, A. W.

    2015-05-01

    We present results of direct numerical simulation of heat transfer and droplet concentration in turbulent flow of a mixture of dry air, water vapor, and water droplets in a differentially heated channel. In particular, we study the effects of droplet collisions by comparing results of simulations with and without droplet collision model for several overall droplet volume fractions. The results show that droplet collisions have a large influence on droplet concentration. Maximum local concentrations, which occur close to the walls of the channel, are reduced by almost an order of magnitude for the case with the highest overall volume fraction. In addition, the positive skewness of the local volume fraction is reduced by a factor of two near the walls. These findings show the importance of including four-way coupling, even in cases where the overall droplet volume fraction is only on the order of 10-4 and the Stokes number in wall units is only about 10. In spite of this large effect of droplet collisions on droplet concentration, the effect on the overall heat transfer between the walls of the channel is not more than approximately 17%. That the effect on the overall heat transfer is relatively small can be explained by the lower heat exchange area between droplets and gas in the near-wall areas, which results in a higher temperature difference between droplets and surrounding gas.

  7. Influence of air flow rate and backwashing on the hydraulic behaviour of a submerged filter.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Becerra, Yazmin Lucero; González-Martínez, Simón

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate backwashing effects on the apparent porosity of the filter media and on the hydraulic behaviour of a pilot scale submerged filter, prior to biofilm colonization, under different hydraulic retention times, and different air flow rates. Tracer curves were analysed with two mathematical models for ideal and non-ideal flow (axial dispersion and Wolf and Resnick models). The filter media was lava stones sieved to 4.5 mm. Backwashing causes attrition of media particles, decreasing the void volume of the filter media and, consequently, the tracer flow is more uniform. The eroded media presented lower dead volumes (79% for the filter with aeration and 8% for the filter without aeration) compared with the new media (83% for the filter with aeration and 22% for the filter without aeration). The flow patterns of eroded and new media were different because the more regular shape of the particles decreases the void volume of the filter media. The dead volume is attributed, in the case of the filter with aeration, to the turbulence caused by the air bubbles that generate preferential channelling of the bulk liquid along the filter media, creating large zones of stagnant liquid and, for the filter without aeration, to the channels formed due to the irregular shaped media.

  8. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  9. Distribution of air-water mixtures in parallel vertical channels as an effect of the header geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Marchitto, Annalisa; Fossa, Marco; Guglielmini, Giovanni

    2009-07-15

    Uneven phase distribution in heat exchangers is a cause of severe reductions in thermal performances of refrigeration equipment. To date, no general design rules are available to avoid phase separation in manifolds with several outlet channels, and even predicting the phase and mass distribution in parallel channels is a demanding task. In the present paper, measurements of two-phase air-water distributions are reported with reference to a horizontal header supplying 16 vertical upward channels. The effects of the operating conditions, the header geometry and the inlet port nozzle were investigated in the ranges of liquid and gas superficial velocities of 0.2-1.2 and 1.5-16.5 m/s, respectively. Among the fitting devices used, the insertion of a co-axial, multi-hole distributor inside the header confirmed the possibility of greatly improving the liquid and gas flow distribution by the proper selection of position, diameter and number of the flow openings between the supplying distributor and the system of parallel channels connected to the header. (author)

  10. An experimental and analytical study of flow through a supersonic open channel with contoured floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saheli, F. P.; Dunn, B.; Marrs, K.; Kumar, A.; Peery, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel experiment was performed to study the characteristics of supersonic airflow (M(infinity) = 2.5-3.86) through an open channel with a contoured floor. The measured static pressures along the centerline of the channel floor exhibited an unexpected rise at the end of the channel. Complex three-dimensional interactions of compression and expansion waves within the channel coupled with external flow perturbations caused by model/tunnel wall interference were the suspected sources of this flow behavior. Three-dimensional inviscid flow analysis procedures were used to investigate and explain this phenomenon. The results of the computations and the experiment are presented and discussed.

  11. Heat transfer, pressure drop, and mass flow rate in pin fin channels with long and short trailing edge ejection holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Han, J. C.; Batten, T.

    1988-06-01

    The turbulent heat transfer and friction characteristics in the pin fin channels with small trailing edge ejection holes found in internally-cooled turbine airfoils have been experimentally investigated. It is found that the overall heat transfer increases when the length of the trailing edge ejection holes is increased and when the trailing edge ejection holes are configured such that much of the cooling air is forced to flow further downstream in the radial flow direction prior to exiting. The increase in the overall heat transfer is shown to be accompanied by an increase in the overall pressure drop.

  12. Transitions and Pressure Drop Characteristics of Flow in Channels with Periodically Grooved Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Takahiro; Uehara, Haruo

    Transitions of flow in periodically grooved channels and pressure drop characteristics are numerically investigated by assuming two-dimensional and fully developed flow fields. It is confirmed that a self-sustained oscillatory flow occurs at a critical Reynolds number from the steady-state flow as a result of Hopf bifurcation due to instability. The critical Reynolds numbers are obtained for various channel geometries. The ratio of the pressure drop of the grooved channel to that of the parallel-plate channel is also investigated. It is shown that the ratio is less than unity for the expanded channel geometries for the subcritical Reynolds numbers, whereas it increases above unity for the supercritical values. On the other hand, it always increases above unity for the contracted channel geometries.

  13. Transport of self-propelling bacteria in micro-channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costanzo, A.; Di Leonardo, R.; Ruocco, G.; Angelani, L.

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the collective motion of self-propelling organisms in confined geometries, such as that of narrow channels, is of great theoretical and practical importance. By means of numerical simulations we study the motion of model bacteria in 2D channels under different flow conditions: fluid at rest, steady and unsteady flow. We find aggregation of bacteria near channel walls and, in the presence of external flow, also upstream swimming, which turns out to be a very robust result. Detailed analysis of bacterial velocity and orientation fields allows us to quantify the phenomenon by varying cell density, channel width and fluid velocity. The tumbling mechanism turns out to have strong influence on velocity profiles and particle flow, resulting in a net upstream flow in the case of non-tumbling organisms. Finally we demonstrate that upstream flow can be enhanced by a suitable choice of an unsteady flow pattern.

  14. A weakly nonlinear theory for wave-vortex interactions in curved channel flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Zang, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    A weakly nonlinear theory is developed to study the interaction of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves and Dean vortices in curved channel flow. The predictions obtained from the theory agree well with results obtained from direct numerical simulations of curved channel flow, especially for low amplitude disturbances. Some discrepancies in the results of a previous theory with direct numerical simulations are resolved.

  15. Simulations of quasi-static foam flow through a diverging-converging channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Simon; Davies, I. Tudur

    2016-08-01

    Numerical simulations of foam flow in narrow channels are described. The fields of velocity, strain, and stress are predicted for the slow flow of a dry two-dimensional foam through a diverging-converging channel. Two different bubble area dispersities are simulated, and the effects of crystallisation in the monodisperse case described.

  16. Flow activates an endothelial potassium channel to release an endogenous nitrovasodilator.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, J P; Rossitch, E; Andon, N A; Loscalzo, J; Dzau, V J

    1991-01-01

    Flow-mediated vasodilation is endothelium dependent. We hypothesized that flow activates a potassium channel on the endothelium, and that activation of this channel leads to the release of the endogenous nitrovasodilator, nitric oxide. To test this hypothesis, rabbit iliac arteries were perfused at varying flow rates, at a constant pressure of 60 mm Hg. Increments in flow induced proportional increases in vessel diameter, which were abolished by L,N-mono-methylarginine (the antagonist of nitric-oxide synthesis). Barium chloride, depolarizing solutions of potassium, verapamil, calcium-free medium, and antagonists of the KCa channel (charybdotoxin, iberiotoxin) also blocked flow-mediated vasodilation. Conversely, responses to other agonists of endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilation were unaffected by charybdotoxin or iberiotoxin. To confirm that flow activated a specific potassium channel to induce the release of nitric oxide, endothelial cells cultured on micro-carrier beads were added to a flow chamber containing a vascular ring without endothelium. Flow-stimulated endothelial cells released a diffusible vasodilator; the degree of vasorelaxation was dependent upon the flow rate. Relaxation was abrogated by barium, tetraethylammonium ion, or charybdotoxin, but was not affected by apamin, glybenclamide, tetrodotoxin, or ouabain. The data suggest that transmission of a hyperpolarizing current from endothelium to the vascular smooth muscle is not necessary for flow-mediated vasodilation. Flow activates a potassium channel (possibly the KCa channel) on the endothelial cell membrane that leads to the release of nitric oxide. Images PMID:1719029

  17. Evolutionary Concepts for Decentralized Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Milton; Kolitz, Stephan; Milner, Joseph; Odoni, Amedeo

    1997-01-01

    Alternative concepts for modifying the policies and procedures under which the air traffic flow management system operates are described, and an approach to the evaluation of those concepts is discussed. Here, air traffic flow management includes all activities related to the management of the flow of aircraft and related system resources from 'block to block.' The alternative concepts represent stages in the evolution from the current system, in which air traffic management decision making is largely centralized within the FAA, to a more decentralized approach wherein the airlines and other airspace users collaborate in air traffic management decision making with the FAA. The emphasis in the discussion is on a viable medium-term partially decentralized scenario representing a phase of this evolution that is consistent with the decision-making approaches embodied in proposed Free Flight concepts for air traffic management. System-level metrics for analyzing and evaluating the various alternatives are defined, and a simulation testbed developed to generate values for those metrics is described. The fundamental issue of modeling airline behavior in decentralized environments is also raised, and an example of such a model, which deals with the preservation of flight bank integrity in hub airports, is presented.

  18. Behavior of Heavy Particles in Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Lee, Changhoon

    2010-11-01

    The motion of heavy particles in turbulent channel flow was investigated by using direct numerical simulation. We assumed that Stokes drag, Saffman lift and Magnus lift act on the motion of heavy spherical particles in turbulence. In this study, Stokes number is defined as the particle response time normalized by the wall units. The range of the Stokes number is 0.1˜50 and the diameter of a particle is 0.06˜0.3 in wall unit. Collision of particles with the wall is modelled by an elastic collision. Relevant velocity and acceleration statistics of heavy particles for the given range of Stokes number were investigated to interpret the particle accumulation near the wall. Particle accumulation at the wall is maximized when the Stokes number is around 15. And we found that Saffman lift force has a great effect on particle acceleration in the wall-normal direction near the wall. Detailed statistics including probability density function and autocorrelation of particle velocity and acceleration will be presented in the meeting.

  19. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs.

  20. Litter ammonia losses amplified by higher air flow rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT Broiler litter utilization has largely been associated with land application as fertilizer. Reducing ammonia (NH3) released from litter enhances its fertilizer value and negates detrimental impacts to the environment. A laboratory study was conducted to quantify the effect of air flow var...

  1. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal...

  2. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, R.F.

    1987-11-24

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs. 4 figs.

  3. Morphological impacts of flow events of varying magnitude on ephemeral channels in a semiarid region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooke, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Flows in ephemeral channels in semiarid areas are only occasional, and channel changes are episodic; but the flash floods can be devastating and have major geomorphological impacts. Data on morphological impacts of flows in semiarid areas are needed to increase understanding of the dynamics and variability of geomorphic responses in such channels. For this purpose nine reaches of river channel in three catchments in SE Spain - the Nogalte, Torrealvilla, and Salada - have been sites for measurement of flows and their effects over the period 1997-2012. The sites encompass a range of channel size, channel morphology, substrate, vegetation, and position within the catchments. A major difference is between schist and marl bedrock areas. Peak flow stage has been recorded and topography surveyed at frequent intervals and after major flow events. Over the 16-year period, an average of 0.5 flow events per year has been recorded at the schist sites, and an average of one per year at the marl sites; but occurrence has been highly variable from year to year. Threshold daily rainfall for channel flow is mostly 15-20 mm, but higher rainfalls do not always produce flow. One to two major floods have occurred in each of the catchments in the period, including the extreme flood event of September 2012 in the Nogalte catchment. Measured morphological changes have occurred between 2 and 10 times at the monitored sites. The same size flow can have differing effects depending on the state of the system. Low flow can mobilise sediment without producing much morphological change. The long-term trajectory of the reaches and the sediment substrate has a major influence on response to events. Channel change is governed by threshold values of hydraulic conditions. The measurements provide an indication of the scale of maximum erosion and deposition that occurs within the channels and on the floodplains over a range of flow magnitudes and the flow impacts that need to be considered in

  4. Characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental program to study the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling flows to obtain detailed and accurate data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport modeling for combustor flows is discussed. The work was also motivated by the need to investigate and quantify the influence of confinement and swirl on the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets. The flow facility was constructed in a simple way which allows easy interchange of different swirlers and the freedom to vary the jet Reynolds number. The velocity measurements were taken with a one color, one component DISA Model 55L laser-Doppler anemometer employing the forward scatter mode. Standard statistical methods are used to evaluate the various moments of the signals to give the flow characteristics. The present work was directed at the understanding of the velocity field. Therefore, only velocity and turbulence data of the axial and circumferential components are reported for inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows.

  5. A stagnation pressure probe for droplet-laden air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.; Leonardo, M.; Ehresman, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is often of interest in a droplet-laden gas flow to obtain the stagnation pressure of both the gas phase and the mixture. A flow-decelerating probe (TPF), with separate, purged ports for the gas phase and the mixture and with a bleed for accumulating liquid at the closed end, has been developed. Measurements obtained utilizing the TPF in a nearly isothermal air-water droplet mixture flow in a smooth circular pipe under various conditions of flow velocity, pressure, liquid concentration and droplet size are presented and compared with data obtained under identical conditions with a conventional, gas phase stagnation pressure probe (CSP). The data obtained with the CSP and TPF probes are analyzed to determine the applicability of the two probes in relation to the multi-phase characteristics of the flow and the geometry of the probe.

  6. Transverse glow discharges in supersonic air and methane flows

    SciTech Connect

    Denisova, N. V.; Postnikov, B. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2006-03-15

    Transverse glow discharges in supersonic air and methane flows are studied both experimentally and theoretically. The experiments show that a diffuse volume discharge filling the whole cross section of the flow can easily be initiated in air, whereas a diffuse discharge in a methane flow shows a tendency to transition into a constricted mode. The electron transport coefficients (mobility and drift velocity) and the kinetic coefficients (such as collisional excitation rates of the vibrational levels of a methane molecule, as well as dissociation and ionization rates) are calculated by numerically solving the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function. The calculated coefficients are used to estimate the parameters of the plasma and the electric field in the positive column of a discharge in methane.

  7. Measurement of the Shear Lift Force on a Bubble in a Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Motil, Brian; Skor, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Two-phase flow systems play vital roles in the design of some current and anticipated space applications of two-phase systems which include: thermal management systems, transfer line flow in cryogenic storage, space nuclear power facilities, design and operation of thermal bus, life support systems, propulsion systems, In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), and space processes for pharmaceutical applications. The design of two-phase flow systems for space applications requires a clear knowledge of the behaviors of the dispersed phase (bubble), its interaction with the continuous phase (liquid) and its effect on heat and mass transfer processes, The need to understand the bubble generation process arises from the fact that for all space applications, the size and distribution of bubbles are extremely crucial for heat and mass transfer control. One important force in two-phase flow systems is the lift force on a bubble or particle in a liquid shear flow. The shear lift is usually overwhelmed by buoyancy in normal gravity, but it becomes an important force in reduced gravity. Since the liquid flow is usually sheared because of the confining wall, the trajectories of bubbles and particles injected into the liquid flow are affected by the shear lift in reduced gravity. A series of experiments are performed to investigate the lift force on a bubble in a liquid shear flow and its effect on the detachment of a bubble from a wall under low gravity conditions. Experiments are executed in a Poiseuille flow in a channel. An air-water system is used in these experiments that are performed in the 2.2 second drop tower. A bubble is injected into the shear flow from a small injector and the shear lift is measured while the bubble is held stationary relative to the fluid. The trajectory of the bubble prior, during and after its detachment from the injector is investigated. The measured shear lift force is calculated from the trajectory of the bubble at the detachment point. These

  8. Study of flow channel geometry using current distribution measurement in a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobato, Justo; Cañizares, Pablo; Rodrigo, Manuel A.; Pinar, F. Javier; Úbeda, Diego

    To improve fuel cell design and performance, research studies supported by a wide variety of physical and electrochemical methods have to be carried out. Among the different techniques, current distribution measurement owns the desired feature that can be performed during operation, revealing information about internal phenomena when the fuel cell is working. Moreover, short durability is one of the main problems that is hindering fuel cell wide implementation and it is known to be related to current density heterogeneities over the electrode surface. A good flow channel geometry design can favor a uniform current density profile, hence hypothetically extending fuel cell life. With this, it was thought that a study on the influence of flow channel geometry on the performance of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell using current distribution measurement should be a very solid work to optimize flow field design. Results demonstrate that the 4 step serpentine and pin-type geometries distribute the reactants more effectively, obtaining a relatively flat current density map at higher current densities than parallel or interdigitated ones and yielding maximum powers up to 25% higher when using oxygen as comburent. If air is the oxidant chosen, interdigitated flow channels perform almost as well as serpentine or pin-type due to that the flow conditions are very important for this geometry.

  9. Factors affecting measurement of channel thickness in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) has been considered to be a useful tool for simultaneous separation and characterization of polydisperse macromolecules or colloidal nanoparticles. AF4 analysis requires the knowledge of the channel thickness (w), which is usually measured by injecting a standard with known diffusion coefficient (D) or hydrodynamic diameter (dh). An accurate w determination is a challenge due to its uncertainties arising from the membrane's compressibility, which may vary with experimental condition. In the present study, influence of factors including the size and type of the standard on the measurement of w was systematically investigated. The results revealed that steric effect and the particles-membrane interaction by van der Waals or electrostatic force may result in an error in w measurement. PMID:25817708

  10. Factors affecting measurement of channel thickness in asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Dou, Haiyang; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) has been considered to be a useful tool for simultaneous separation and characterization of polydisperse macromolecules or colloidal nanoparticles. AF4 analysis requires the knowledge of the channel thickness (w), which is usually measured by injecting a standard with known diffusion coefficient (D) or hydrodynamic diameter (dh). An accurate w determination is a challenge due to its uncertainties arising from the membrane's compressibility, which may vary with experimental condition. In the present study, influence of factors including the size and type of the standard on the measurement of w was systematically investigated. The results revealed that steric effect and the particles-membrane interaction by van der Waals or electrostatic force may result in an error in w measurement.

  11. Numerical determination of heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics for converging-diverging flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghri, M.; Asako, Y.

    1984-12-01

    A finite difference scheme was utilized to predict periodic fully developed heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics in a converging-diverging flow channel. The basis of the method is an algebraic non-orthogonal coordinate transformation which maps the complex fluid domain onto a rectangle. This transformation avoids the task of numerically generating boundary-fitted coordinates. Its adaptation to a periodic example problem of converging-diverging flow channel is illustrated. Representative results were carried out for laminar flow, Prandtl number of 0.7, in the Reynolds number range from 90 to 1635, for various taper angles of converging-diverging flow channel, and for three ratios of maximum-minimum height of the flow channel. Moderate enhancement in the Nusselt number results occurred, at higher values of Reynolds number for most cases, when compared with the corresponding values for a straight duct.

  12. Flow-induced channel formation in the cytoplasm of motile cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Robert D.; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Wright, Grady B.

    2011-07-01

    A model is presented to explain the development of flow channels within the cytoplasm of the plasmodium of the giant amoeba Physarum polycephalum. The formation of channels is related to the development of a self-organizing tubular network in large cells. Experiments indicate that the flow of cytoplasm is involved in the development and organization of these networks, and the mathematical model proposed here is motivated by recent experiments involving the observation of development of flow channel in small cells. A model of pressure-driven flow through a polymer network is presented in which the rate of flow increases the rate of depolymerization. Numerical solutions and asymptotic analysis of the model in one spatial dimension show that under very general assumptions this model predicts the formation of channels in response to flow.

  13. Parametric Studies of Flow Separation using Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Boundary Layer separation causes the airfoil to stall and therefore imposes dramatic performance degradation on the airfoil. In recent years, flow separation control has been one of the active research areas in the field of aerodynamics due to its promising performance improvements on the lifting device. These active flow separation control techniques include steady and unsteady air injection as well as suction on the airfoil surface etc. This paper will be focusing on the steady and unsteady air injection on the airfoil. Although wind tunnel experiments revealed that the performance improvements on the airfoil using injection techniques, the details of how the key variables such as air injection slot geometry and air injection angle etc impact the effectiveness of flow separation control via air injection has not been studied. A parametric study of both steady and unsteady air injection active flow control will be the main objective for this summer. For steady injection, the key variables include the slot geometry, orientation, spacing, air injection velocity as well as the injection angle. For unsteady injection, the injection frequency will also be investigated. Key metrics such as lift coefficient, drag coefficient, total pressure loss and total injection mass will be used to measure the effectiveness of the control technique. A design of experiments using the Box-Behnken Design is set up in order to determine how each of the variables affects each of the key metrics. Design of experiment is used so that the number of experimental runs will be at minimum and still be able to predict which variables are the key contributors to the responses. The experiments will then be conducted in the 1ft by 1ft wind tunnel according to the design of experiment settings. The data obtained from the experiments will be imported into JMP, statistical software, to generate sets of response surface equations which represent the statistical empirical model for each of the metrics as

  14. Development of bipolar plates with different flow channel configurations for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boddu, Rajesh; Marupakula, Uday Kumar; Summers, Benjamin; Majumdar, Pradip

    Bipolar plates include separate gas flow channels for anode and cathode electrodes of a fuel cell. These gases flow channels supply reactant gasses as well as remove products from the cathode side of the fuel cell. Fluid flow, heat and mass transport processes in these channels have significant effect on fuel cell performance, particularly to the mass transport losses. The design of the bipolar plates should minimize plate thickness for low volume and mass. Additionally, contact faces should provide a high degree of surface uniformity for low thermal and electrical contact resistances. Finally, the flow fields should provide for efficient heat and mass transport processes with reduced pressure drops. In this study, bipolar plates with different serpentine flow channel configurations are analyzed using computational fluid dynamics modeling. Flow characteristics including variation of pressure in the flow channel across the bipolar plate are presented. Pressure drop characteristics for different flow channel designs are compared. Results show that with increased number of parallel channels and smaller sizes, a more effective contact surface area along with decreased pressured drop can be achieved. Correlations of such entrance region coefficients will be useful for the PEM fuel cell simulation model to evaluate the affects of the bipolar plate design on mass transfer loss and hence on the total current and power density of the fuel cell.

  15. Phase distribution of nitrogen-water two-phase flow in parallel micro channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mi; Wang, Shuangfeng; Zhou, You

    2016-08-01

    The present work experimentally investigated the phase splitting characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow passing through a horizontal-oriented micro-channel device with three parallel micro-channels. The hydraulic diameters of the header and the branch channels were 0.6 and 0.4 mm, respectively. Five different liquids, including de-ionized water and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution with different concentration were employed. Different from water, the surface tension of SDS solution applied in this work decreased with the increment of mass concentration. Through series of visual experiments, it was found that the added SDS surfactant could obviously facilitate the two-phase flow through the parallel micro channels while SDS solution with low concentration would lead to an inevitable blockage of partial outlet branches. Experimental results revealed that the two phase distribution characteristics depended highly on the inlet flow patterns and the outlet branch numbers. To be specific, at the inlet of slug flow, a large amount of gas preferred flowing into the middle branch channel while the first branch was filled with liquid. However, when the inlet flow pattern was shifted to annular flow, all of the gas passed through the second and the last branches, with a little proportion of liquid flowing into the first channel. By comparison with the experimental results obtained from a microchannel device with five parallel micro-T channels, uneven distribution of the two phase can be markedly noticed in our present work.

  16. Experimental visualization of temperature fields and study of heat transfer enhancement in oscillatory flow in a grooved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, C.; Kang, E.

    An experimental study was conducted of incompressible, moderate Reynolds number flow of air over heated rectangular blocks in a two-dimensional, horizontal channel. Holographic interferometry combined with high-speed cinematography was used to visualize the unsteady temperature fields in self- sustained oscillatory flow. Experiments were conducted in the laminar, transitional and turbulent flow regimes for Reynolds numbers in the range from Re=520 to Re=6600. Interferometric measurements were obtained in the thermally and fluiddynamically periodically fully developed flow region on the ninth heated block. Flow oscillations were first observed between Re=1054 and Re=1318. The period of oscillations, wavelength and propagation speed of the Tollmien-Schlichting waves in the main channel were measured at two characteristic flow velocities, Re=1580 and Re=2370. For these Reynolds numbers it was observed that two to three waves span one geometric periodicity length. At Re=1580 the dominant oscillation frequency was found to be around 26Hz and at Re=2370 the frequency distribution formed a band around 125Hz. Results regarding heat transfer and pressure drop are presented as a function of the Reynolds number, in terms of the block-average Nusselt number and the local Nusselt number as well as the friction factor. Measurements of the local Nusselt number together with visual observations indicate that the lateral mixing caused by flow instabilities is most pronounced along the upstream vertical wall of the heated block in the groove region, and it is accompanied by high heat transfer coefficients. At Reynolds numbers beyond the onset of oscillations the heat transfer in the grooved channel exceeds the performance of the reference geometry, the asymmetrically heated parallel plate channel.

  17. The impact of mass flow and masking on the pressure drop of air filter in heavy-duty diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoseeinzadeh, Sepideh; Gorji-Bandpy, Mofid

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculation approach to predict and evaluate the impact of the mass-flow inlet on the pressure drop of turbocharger`s air filtfer in heavy-duty diesel engine. The numerical computations were carried out using a commercial CFD program whereas the inlet area of the air filter consisted of several holes connected to a channel. After entering through the channel, the air passes among the holes and enters the air filter. The effect of masking holes and hydraulic diameter is studied and investigated on pressure drop. The results indicate that pressure drop increase with decreasing of hydraulic diameter and masking of the holes has considerable affect on the pressure drop.

  18. Flow over a Modern Ram-Air Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Johari, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    The flow field on the central section of a modern ram-air parachute canopy was examined numerically using a finite-volume flow solver coupled with the one equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Ram-air parachutes are used for guided airdrop applications, and the canopy resembles a wing with an open leading edge for inflation. The canopy surfaces were assumed to be impermeable and rigid. The flow field consisted of a vortex inside the leading edge opening which effectively closed off the canopy and diverted the flow around the leading edge. The flow experienced a rather bluff leading edge in contrast to the smooth leading of an airfoil, leading to a separation bubble on the lower lip of the canopy. The flow inside the canopy was stagnant beyond the halfway point. The section lift coefficient increased linearly with the angle of attack up to 8.5 and the lift curve slope was about 8% smaller than the baseline airfoil. The leading edge opening had a major effect on the drag prior to stall; the drag is at least twice the baseline airfoil drag. The minimum drag of the section occurs over the angle of attack range of 3 -- 7 .

  19. Enhanced laser-induced plasma channels in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanlei, Zuo; Xiaofeng, Wei; Kainan, Zhou; Xiaoming, Zeng; Jingqin, Su; Zhihong, Jiao; Na, Xie; Zhaohui, Wu

    2016-03-01

    Plasma is a significant medium in high-energy density physics since it can hardly be damaged. For some applications such as plasma based backward Raman amplification (BRA), uniform high-density and large-scale plasma channels are required. In the previous experiment, the plasma transverse diameter and density are 50-200 μm and 1-2 × 1019 cm-3, here we enhance them to 0.8 mm and 8 × 1019 cm-3, respectively. Moreover, the gradient plasma is investigated in our experiment. A proper plasma gradient can be obtained with suitable pulse energy and delay. The experimental results are useful for plasma physics and nonlinear optics. Project supported by the Development Foundation of the Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2012A0401019 and 2013A0401019).

  20. Properties of a constricted-tube air-flow levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, J. E.; Stephens, W. K.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of a constricted-tube gas flow levitator first developed by Berge et al. (1981) have been investigated experimentally in order to predict its behavior in a gravity-free environment and at elevated temperatures. The levitator consists of a constricted (quartz) tube fed at one end by a source of heated air or gas. A spherical sample is positioned by the air stream on the downstream side of the constriction, where it can be melted and resolidified without touching the tube. It is shown experimentally that the kinematic viscosity is the important fluid parameter for operation in thermal equilibrium at high temperatures. If air is heated from room temperature to 1200 C, the kinematic viscosity increases by a factor of 14. To maintain a given value of the Reynolds number, the flow rate would have to be increased by the same factor for a specific geometry of tube and sample. Thus, to maintain stable equilibrium, the flow rate should be increased as the air or other gas is heated. The other stability problem discussed is associated with changes in the shape of a cylindrical sample as it melts.

  1. Coherent structures near the wall in a turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, J.; Hussain, F.; Schoppa, W.; Kim, J.

    1997-02-01

    Coherent structures (CS) near the wall (i.e. y+ [less-than-or-eq, slant] 60) in a numerically simulated turbulent channel flow are educed using a conditional sampling scheme which extracts the entire extent of dominant vortical structures. Such structures are detected from the instantaneous flow field using our newly developed vortex definition (Jeong & Hussain 1995) a region of negative [lambda]2, the second largest eigenvalue of the tensor SikSkj + [Omega]ik[Omega]kj which accurately captures the structure details (unlike velocity-, vorticity- or pressure-based eduction). Extensive testing has shown that [lambda]2 correctly captures vortical structures, even in the presence of the strong shear occurring near the wall of a boundary layer. We have shown that the dominant near-wall educed (i.e. ensemble averaged after proper alignment) CS are highly elongated quasi-streamwise vortices; the CS are inclined 9° in the vertical (x, y)-plane and tilted ±4° in the horizontal (x, z)-plane. The vortices of alternating sign overlap in x as a staggered array; there is no indication near the wall of hairpin vortices, not only in the educed data but also in instantaneous fields. Our model of the CS array reproduces nearly all experimentally observed events reported in the literature, such as VITA, Reynolds stress distribution, wall pressure variation, elongated low-speed streaks, spanwise shear, etc. In particular, a phase difference (in space) between streamwise and normal velocity fluctuations created by CS advection causes Q4 (‘sweep’) events to dominate Q2 (‘ejection’) and also creates counter-gradient Reynolds stresses (such as Q1 and Q3 events) above and below the CS. We also show that these effects are adequately modelled by half of a Batchelor's dipole embedded in (and decoupled from) a background shear U(y). The CS tilting (in the (x, z)-plane) is found to be responsible for sustaining CS through redistribution of streamwise turbulent kinetic energy to

  2. Noise control of subsonic cavity flows using plasma actuated receptive channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Gupta, Arnob; Roy, Subrata

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a passive receptive rectangular channel at the trailing edge of an open rectangular cavity to reduce the acoustic tones generated due to coherent shear layer impingement. The channel is numerically tested at Mach 0.3 using an unsteady three-dimensional large eddy simulation. Results show reduction in pressure fluctuations in the cavity due to which sound pressure levels are suppressed. Two linear dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators are placed inside the channel to enhance the flow through it. Specifically, acoustic suppression of 7 dB was obtained for Mach 0.3 flow with the plasma actuated channel. Also, the drag coefficient for the cavity reduced by over three folds for the channel and over eight folds for the plasma actuated channel. Such a channel can be useful in noise and drag reduction for various applications, including weapons bay, landing gear and branched piping systems.

  3. Effects of pulsation on separated flow and heat transfer in enlarged channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Kai, Tomonori; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2011-03-01

    Numerical results of three-dimensional separated flow and heat transfer in an enlarged rectangular channel are presented in this paper. The expansion ratio and aspect ratio of the channel are 2.0 and 16.0, respectively. Reynolds number of the flow is 200 and it is over the critical Reynolds number. Over the critical Reynolds number, the flow in the symmetric channel becomes asymmetric and deflects to one side of the walls. Effects of the pulsating fluctuation at the inlet upon the flow in the channel are investigated. It is clarified that the inlet flow with a pulsating fluctuation of Strouhal number 0.05 and 0.10 strongly affects on the flow in the channel, and heat transfer on the walls is enhanced, especially on the wall surface covered with long separation bubble. On the other hand, the pulsation of St = 0.0125 oscillates the shear layer more weakly than that of St = 0.05, 0.10 and the enhancement of heat transfer is smaller, though some vortices are shed from the vicinity of the side wall near the reattachment region. The oscillation of the main flow calms down gradually as the Strouhal number of the pulsation increases over 0.10. The influence of pulsation of St = 0.20 on the flow is restricted in the near downstream of the step, and heat transfer on the walls is almost similar to that of the steady flow in the channel.

  4. Does the choice of the forcing term affect flow statistics in DNS of turbulent channel flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quadrio, Maurizio; Frohnapfel, Bettina; Hasegawa, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    We seek possible statistical consequences of the way a forcing term is added to the Navier--Stokes equations in the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of incompressible channel flow. Simulations driven by constant flow rate, constant pressure gradient and constant power input are used to build large databases, and in particular to store the complete temporal trace of the wall-shear stress for later analysis. As these approaches correspond to different dynamical systems, it can in principle be envisaged that these differences are reflect by certain statistics of the turbulent flow field. The instantaneous realizations of the flow in the various simulations are obviously different, but, as expected, the usual one-point, one-time statistics do not show any appreciable difference. However, the PDF for the fluctuations of the streamwise component of wall friction reveals that the simulation with constant flow rate presents lower probabilities for extreme events of large positive friction. The low probability value of such events explains their negligible contribution to the commonly computed statistics; however, the very existence of a difference in the PDF demonstrates that the forcing term is not entirely uninfluential. Other statistics for wall-based quantities (the two components of friction and pressure) are examined; in particular spatio-temporal autocorrelations show small differences at large temporal separations, where unfortunately the residual statistical uncertainty is still of the same order of the observed difference. Hence we suggest that the specific choice of the forcing term does not produce important statistical consequences, unless one is interested in the strongest events of high wall friction, that are underestimated by a simulation run at constant flow rate.

  5. Air-cooled, hydrogen-air fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelekhin, Alexander B. (Inventor); Bushnell, Calvin L. (Inventor); Pien, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An air-cooled, hydrogen-air solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell with a membrane electrode assembly operatively associated with a fluid flow plate having at least one plate cooling channel extending through the plate and at least one air distribution hole extending from a surface of the cathode flow field into the plate cooling channel.

  6. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  7. Flow measurement of a two-phase fluid around a cylinder in a channel using particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, Y.A.; Martinez, R.S.; Philip, O.G.; Schmidl, W.D.

    1994-12-31

    The particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow measurement technique was used to study two-phase flow over cylindrical rods inserted in a channel. For the two-phase flow study, a mixture of water and small air bubbles was used. The water flow rate was 378 cm{sup 3}/s and the airflow rate was {approximately}30 cm{sup 3}/s. The water was seeded with fluorescent particle tracers in order to record the position of the particles and the air bubbles independently. Then the data were analyzed to obtain the velocity fields for both experiments. One of the major concerns with steam generator operation is the tube vibration caused by turbulent flow buffeting. The vibration can cause wear on the tube joints that may eventually lead to ruptures and leaks. This repair procedure can be very costly. To help avoid this problem, experimental data are needed to test the empirical correlations that predict the behavior of the turbulent flow around the cylinders. The PIV flow measurement technique can be used to acquire that experimental data.

  8. Fuel cell stack with passive air supply

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-01-17

    A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

  9. Surface treatment of flow channels in microfluidic devices fabricated by stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kanako; Tsuchiya, Masaki; Sugiyama, Hitomi; Katakura, Toru; Hayakawa, Masatoshi; Kanai, Toshimitsu

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic device with three-dimensional flow channels was fabricated by stereolithography, and hydrophilic surface treatment of the flow channel was performed by coating the wall of the channel with a silica layer. After the treatment, the device produced monodisperse oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions. The silica layer on the channel surface was then coated with a fluorinated silane coupling agent to make it hydrophobic, thus enabling the treated device to produce monodisperse inverted water-in-oil (W/O) emulsions.

  10. Heat/mass transfer and flow characteristics of pin fin cooling channels in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Saxena, A.

    Experiments studied the local heat/mass transfer distributions and pressure drops in pin fin channels that modeled internal cooling passages in gas turbine blades. Heat/mass transfer distributions were determined for a straight flow through a pin fin channel (H/D = 1.0, X/D = S/D = 2.5) and a flow through the pin fin channel with trailing edge flow ejection. The overall friction factor and local pressure drop results were obtained for various configurations and lengths of the trailing edge ejection holes. The results show that, when there is trailing edge flow ejection, the main flow stream turns toward the trailing edge ejection holes. The wake regions downstream of the pins and the regions affected by secondary flow shift toward the ejection holes. The local channel wall heat/mass transfer is generally high immediately upstream of a pin, in the wake region downstream of a pin, and in the regions affected by secondary flow. In the case with trailing edge flow ejection, the heat/mass transfer generally decreases in the radial direction as a result of the reducing radial mass flow rate. The overall friction is higher when the trailing edge ejection holes are longer and when they are configured such that more flow is forced further downstream in the pin fin channel before exiting through the ejection holes.

  11. The dynamics of a channel-fed lava flow on Pico Partido volcano, Lanzarote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodcock, Duncan; Harris, Andrew

    2006-09-01

    A short length of channel on Pico Partido volcano, Lanzarote, provides us the opportunity to examine the dynamics of lava flowing in a channel that extends over a sudden break in slope. The 1 2-m-wide, 0.5 2-m-deep channel was built during the 1730 1736 eruptions on Lanzarote and exhibits a sinuous, well-formed channel over a steep (11° slope) 100-m-long proximal section. Over-flow units comprising smooth pahoehoe sheet flow, as well as evidence on the inner channel walls for multiple (at least 11) flow levels, attest to unsteady flow in the channel. In addition, superelevation is apparent at each of the six bends along the proximal channel section. Superelevation results from banking of the lava as it moves around the bend thus causing preferential construction of the outer bank. As a result, the channel profile at each bend is asymmetric with an outer bank that is higher than the inner bank. Analysis of superelevation indicates flow velocities of ~8 m s 1. Our analysis of the superelevation features is based on an inertia-gravity balance, which we show is appropriate, even though the down-channel flow is in laminar flow. We use a viscosity-gravity balance model, together with the velocities calculated from superelevation, to obtain viscosities in the range 25 60 Pa s (assuming that the lava behaved as a Newtonian liquid). Estimated volume fluxes are in the range 7 12 m3 s 1. An apparent down-flow increase in derived volume flux may have resulted from variable supply or bulking up of the flow due to vesiculation. Where the channel moves over a sharp break in slope and onto slopes of ~6°, the channel becomes less well defined and widens considerably. At the break of slope, an elongate ridge extends across the channel. We speculate that this ridge was formed as a result of a reduction in velocity immediately below the break of slope to allow deposition of entrained material or accretion of lava to the channel bed as a result of a change in flow regime or depth.

  12. Interrelationships of petiole air canal architecture, water depth and convective air flow in Nymphaea odorata (Nymphaeaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study--Nymphaea odorata grows in water up to 2 m deep, producing fewer, larger leaves in deeper water. This species has a convective flow system that moves gases from younger leaves through submerged parts to older leaves, aerating submerged parts. Petiole air canals are in the conv...

  13. Character of energy flow in air shower core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, K.; Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Energy per charged particle near the core of air showers was measured by 9 energy flow detectors, which were the combination of Cerenkov counters and scintillators. Energy per particle of each detector was normalized to energy at 2m from the core. The following results were obtained as to the energy flow: (1) integral frequency distribution of mean energy per particle (averaged over 9 detectors) is composed of two groups separated distinctly; and (2) showers contained in one group show an anisotropy of arrival direction.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW PRESSURE, AIR ATOMIZED OIL BURNER WITH HIGH ATOMIZER AIR FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    BUTCHER,T.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5--8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or FAB has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a torroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the tiring rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% 0{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

  15. Effect of flow pulsation on mass transport in a cathode channel of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hun Sik; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Seo Young; Hyun, Jae Min

    2012-09-01

    An experimental and theoretical study on the cathode flow pulsation in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is performed. A 10-cell PEM fuel cell stack with open-air cathode channels is employed to investigate the effects of the cathode flow pulsation on the overall performance. The polarization and corresponding power curves obtained show that both the limiting current density and the maximum power density are substantially enhanced when the pulsating component is added to the cathode mainstream flow. The flow pulsation at Re = 77 provides the maximum increment of 40% and 35.5% in the limiting current density and in the maximum power density, respectively. The enhancement of the overall performance is more pronounced at low Reynolds numbers. Also, the theoretical mass transport analysis in the pulsating cathode flow channel is carried out to verify the present experimental results. The momentum and species conservation equations are analytically solved, and the effective time-averaged dispersion coefficient is defined to account for the enhanced mass transport by the flow pulsation. Comprehensive analytical solutions show that the effect of the relevant parameters is in well accordance with the experimental results.

  16. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  17. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gavin J; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a 'streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality.

  18. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gavin J.; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a ‘streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality. PMID:24019053

  19. Methods of Visually Determining the Air Flow Around Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, Melvin N; Johnson, Ernest

    1932-01-01

    This report describes methods used by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to study visually the air flow around airplanes. The use of streamers, oil and exhaust gas streaks, lampblack and kerosene, powdered materials, and kerosene smoke is briefly described. The generation and distribution of smoke from candles and from titanium tetrachloride are described in greater detail because they appear most advantageous for general application. Examples are included showing results of the various methods.

  20. Electron concentration distribution in a glow discharge in air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedzianov, R. B.; Gaisin, F. M.; Sabitov, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    Electron concentration distributions in a glow discharge in longitudinal and vortex air flows are determined from the attenuation of the electromagnetic wave passing through the plasma using microwave probes. An analysis of the distribution curves obtained indicates that electron concentration decreases in the direction of the anode. This can be explained by charge diffusion toward the chamber walls and electron recombination and sticking within the discharge.

  1. Development of an air flow thermal balance calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An air flow calorimeter, based on the idea of balancing an unknown rate of heat evolution with a known rate of heat evolution, was developed. Under restricted conditions, the prototype system is capable of measuring thermal wattages from 10 milliwatts to 1 watt, with an error no greater than 1 percent. Data were obtained which reveal system weaknesses and point to modifications which would effect significant improvements.

  2. Numerical characterization of the hydrodynamics and thermal behavior of air flow in flexible air distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehdaghi, Samad; Moujaes, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Flexible duct air distribution systems are used in a large percentage of residential and small commercial buildings in the United States . Very few empirical or predictive data are available though to help provide the HVAC design engineer with reliable information . Moreover, because of the ducts flexibility, the shapes of these ducts offer a different set of operating fluid flow and thermal conditions from traditional smooth metal ducts. Hence, both the flow field and heat transfer through this kind of ducts are much more complex and merit to be analyzed from a numerical predictive approach. The aim of this research paper is to compute some of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the air flow inside these ducts over a range of Re numbers commonly used in the flow conditions of these air distribution systems. The information resulting from this CFD simulation, where a κ-ɛ turbulent model is used to predict the flow conditions, provide pressure drop and average convective heat transfer coefficients that exist in these ducts and was compared to previously found data. Circulation zones in the depressions of these ducts are found to exist which are suspected of influencing the pressured drop and heat transfer coefficients as compared to smooth ducts. The results show that fully developed conditions exist much earlier with regard to the inlet for both hydrodynamic and thermal entrance regions than what would be expected in smooth ducts under the same turbulent conditions.

  3. Flow structure and channel morphology at a natural confluent meander bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, James D.; Rhoads, Bruce L.

    2012-08-01

    Previous experimental, field, and modeling studies of confluence dynamics have focused mainly on junctions formed by straight channels. In contrast, natural rivers often meander and tributaries can enter meandering rivers on the outside of bends to form a junction planform known as a confluent meander bend. In this study, field measurements of three-dimensional velocity components and bed topography at a confluent meander bend reveal a complex hydrodynamic environment that responds to changes in momentum-flux ratio, while channel morphology remains relatively stable. Flow from the tributary deflects high-velocity flow and helical motion in the curving main river toward the inside of the bend, inducing bed scour and inhibiting point-bar development. The high junction angle forces the tributary flow to abruptly realign to the orientation of the downstream channel, initiating a counter-rotating helical cell over the outer portion of the bend. Two surface-convergent helical cells persist through the downstream channel, where the combined flows accelerate as the channel cross-sectional area is constricted by a bar along the downstream junction corner, precluding flow separation. Long-term stability of its planform suggests that this confluent meander bend represents a quasi-stable channel configuration. Overall, patterns of flow and channel morphology are quite different from typical patterns in most meander bends, but are generally consistent with a conceptual model of confluent meander bends derived from previous laboratory experiments and numerical modeling.

  4. On the impact of entrapped air in infiltration under ponding conditions. Part a: Preferential air flow path effects on infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, Guy; Weisbrod, Noam; Furman, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Entrapped air effects on infiltration under ponding conditions could be important for massive infiltration of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) or soil aquifer treatment (SAT) of treated wastewater. Earlier studies found that under ponding conditions, air is being entrapped and compressed until it reaches a pressure which will enable the air to escape (unstable air flow). They also found that entrapped air could reduce infiltration by 70-90%. Most studies have dealt with entrapped air effects when soil surface topography is flat. The objective of this study is to investigate, under ponding conditions, the effects of: (1) irregular surface topography on preferential air flow path development (stable air flow); (2) preferential air flow path on infiltration; and (3) hydraulic head on infiltration when air is trapped. Column experiments were used to investigate these particular effects. A 140 cm deep and 30 cm wide column packed with silica sand was used under two boundary conditions: in the first, air can only escape vertically upward through the soil surface; in the second, air is free to escape through 20 ports installed along the column perimeter. The surface was flooded with 13 liters of water, with ponding depth decreasing with time. Two soil surface conditions were tested: flat surface and irregular surface (high and low surface zones). Additionally, Helle-show experiments were conducted in order to obtain a visual observation of preferential air flow path development. The measurements were carried out using a tension meter, air pressure transducers, TDR and video cameras. It was found that in irregular surfaces, stable air flow through preferential paths was developed in the high altitude zones. Flat surface topography caused unstable air flow through random paths. Comparison between irregular and flat surface topography showed that the entrapped air pressure was lower and the infiltration rate was about 40% higher in the irregular surface topography than in the

  5. Expiratory flow limitation in compressed air divers and oxygen divers.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, K; Friege, L; Reuter, M; Haber, J; Mutzbauer, T; Neubauer, B

    1998-10-01

    Divers are exposed to dense gases under hyperbaric and hyperoxic conditions and, therefore, may be at risk of developing respiratory disease. Long-term effects on respiratory function have been found in commercial divers who perform deep dives. This study was conducted to detect possible lung function changes in scuba divers who dive in shallow water using compressed air or oxygen as a breathing gas. A cross-sectional sample of 180 healthy male divers (152 air divers and 28 oxygen divers) and 34 healthy male controls underwent a diving medical examination including body plethysmography, diffusion capacity measurement and a cold-air isocapnic hyperventilation test (CAIH). Air divers and oxygen divers had a lower mid-expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity (MEF25) than controls (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). Oxygen divers also had a decreased mid-expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity (MEF50) (p<0.05). Divers' groups and controls did not differ with respect to age, smoking or medical history. The prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness to CAIH was 1.4% (n=3 divers). MEF25 and MEF50 were inversely related to years of diving (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). The pattern of lung function changes obtained in scuba divers is consistent with small airways dysfunction and the association between diving exposure and lung function changes may indicate long-term effects on respiratory function.

  6. Quasi-steady-state air plasma channel produced by a femtosecond laser pulse sequence

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Chen, Shi-You; Ma, Jing-Long; Hou, Lei; Liao, Guo-Qian; Wang, Jin-Guang; Han, Yu-Jing; Liu, Xiao-Long; Teng, Hao; Han, Hai-Nian; Li, Yu-Tong; Chen, Li-Ming; Wei, Zhi-Yi; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    A long air plasma channel can be formed by filamentation of intense femtosecond laser pulses. However, the lifetime of the plasma channel produced by a single femtosecond laser pulse is too short (only a few nanoseconds) for many potential applications based on the conductivity of the plasma channel. Therefore, prolonging the lifetime of the plasma channel is one of the key challenges in the research of femtosecond laser filamentation. In this study, a unique femtosecond laser source was developed to produce a high-quality femtosecond laser pulse sequence with an interval of 2.9 ns and a uniformly distributed single-pulse energy. The metre scale quasi-steady-state plasma channel with a 60–80 ns lifetime was formed by such pulse sequences in air. The simulation study for filamentation of dual femtosecond pulses indicated that the plasma channel left by the previous pulse was weakly affected the filamentation of the next pulse in sequence under our experimental conditions. PMID:26493279

  7. Monitoring debris flow induced channel morphodynamics with terrestrial laser scanning, Chalk Cliffs, CO (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasklewicz, T. A.; Staley, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Debris flows are important geomorphic agents in alpine drainages. They have been linked with channel initiation in headwater streams, connectivity of organic material and sediment through drainage basins, and as hazards to human development in and adjacent to steep watersheds. Debris flows also significantly alter channel morphometry at a variety of spatial scales. Of particular interest are topographic changes associated with multiple surge fronts within a debris flow as well as between several debris flows. An unnamed tributary stream to Chalk Creek, CO has over the last decade experienced one to four debris flow events annually. Four field sampling campaigns were conducted in the summer and fall of 2009. A Leica ScanStation 2, in conjunction with a robust local control network, were used to capture channel morphodynamics along five stream reaches prior to the debris flow season and after three debris flows. Point cloud data from the scanner permit the generation of two centimeter planimetric resolution digital terrain models (DTM). DTM-of-difference analyses and measures of slope, roughness, sediment transport volumes and channel dimensions were employed to detect spatial and temporal morphometric changes. The first debris flow occurred on unsaturated bed material and resulted in aggradation along 3 of the 5 reaches. One reach, a bedrock step, remained relatively unchanged, while the final reach saw significant erosion along boulder steps in the channel and an associated mass failure adjacent to the stream bank through this section. The second debris flow resulted in net aggradation along all of the reaches. The third and largest debris flow took place on saturated bed materials. The flow produced net erosion along all reaches. Significant channel changes were associated with the headward erosion of debris flow snouts and bank failures associated with undercutting of angle-of-repose slopes during debris flow erosion. Analysis of the potential relationships

  8. Using falling soap film to visualize flow in a wavy channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monts, Vontravis; Edokpolo, Osazuwa; Mills, Zachary; Alexeev, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The disturbances created by the walls of a sinusoidal shaped channel lead to the development of unsteady, time periodic flow. This periodic flow is the result of vortex shedding occurring along the crests of the channel walls. We used a falling soap film to investigate the influence of the channel geometry on the flow. In falling soap films, variations in the thickness of the film correspond to streamlines in the flow. These thickness variations are made visible by reflecting monochromatic light off the film. This allows for soap films to be an accurate, but inexpensive method of visualizing two dimensional flows. In our experiments we used a gravity driven soap film flowing through a wavy channel of several periods and used a high speed camera to record the resulting flow. The collected footage was then analyzed to collect data on the flow. From this data we were able to characterize the dependence of the size of the vortices and their shedding frequency on the amplitude and period of the sinusoidal channel walls as well as the Reynolds number of the flow.

  9. Proceedings of the Advanced Seminar on one-dimensional, open-channel Flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    If several limiting assumptions are valid, flow in a waterbody can be represented by one-dimensional equations of unsteady open-channel flow. The equations can be expressed in a number of forms of varying complexity, depending upon the choice of dependent variables used in their formulation and on possible additional limiting assumptions which allow various terms to be excluded. The assumptions are related to the physical characteristics of water and water flow, characteristics of the flow channel, and the effects of boundary friction and turbulence. With the assumptions, unsteady open-channel flow can be described by two dependent variables, either flow discharge and water surface elevation or flow velocity and cross-sectional area. These variables are expressed as a function of distance and time at a given cross section. The equations are derived from the principles of conservation of mass and momentum. Additional variables may be included to account for wind effects , the Coriolis effect, overbank storage, and other influences. Equations are formulated for unsteady gradually varied flow, steady gradually varied flow, steady uniform flow (the Manning equation), and other variations. More rudimentary continuity-based equations, such as the kinematic wave equation and storage-routing equations, are inherently more empirical and considerable caution must be exercised in their use. Models employing the full dynamic equations for simulating unsteady open-channel flow should be used whenever possible. (See also W90-10652) (Tappert-PTT)

  10. The dominant role of surface conduction in electro-osmotic flows through periodically varying narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludar, Lotan; Yariv, Ehud

    2015-11-01

    As surface conduction has no effect on electro-osmosis in uniform channel flows, where the tangential Debye-layer currents are longitudinally uniform, it may appear as it would only result in a small modifying correction in lubrication analyses of slowly varying channels. This misconception is refuted here by analyzing flows through periodic channels of slowly varying but otherwise arbitrary geometry. Assuming that the channel width is still large compared with the Debye thickness we employ the simplest thin-double-layer model which incorporates surface conduction. We find that surface conduction affects the leading-order flow and the consequent net volumetric flux, introducing a nonlinear dependence upon the zeta potential. Remarkably, as the channel becomes more and more narrow, the scaled flux approaches a limit which is independent of the Dukhin number yet different from that calculated for zero Dukhin number.

  11. Flow Structure and Channel Morphology at a Confluent-Meander Bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. D.; Rhoads, B. L.

    2009-12-01

    Flow structure and channel morphology in meander bends have been well documented. Channel curvature subjects flow through a bend to centrifugal acceleration, inducing a counterbalancing pressure-gradient force that initiates secondary circulation. Transverse variations in boundary shear stress and bedload transport parallel cross-stream movement of high velocity flow and determine spatial patterns of erosion along the outer bank and deposition along the inner bank. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of confluent-meander bends, a junction planform that develops when a tributary joins a meandering river along the outer bank of a bend, suggest that flow and channel morphology in such bends deviate from typical patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine three-dimensional (3-D) flow structure and channel morphology at a natural confluent-meander bend. Field data were collected in southeastern Illinois where Big Muddy Creek joins the Little Wabash River near a local maximum of curvature along an elongated meander loop. Measurements of 3-D velocity components were obtained with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) for two flow events with differing momentum ratios. Channel bathymetry was also resolved from the four-beam depths of the ADCP. Analysis of velocity data reveals a distinct shear layer flanked by dual helical cells within the bend immediately downstream of the confluence. Flow from the tributary confines flow from the main channel along the inner part of the channel cross section, displacing the thalweg inward, limiting the downstream extent of the point bar, protecting the outer bank from erosion and enabling bar-building along this bank. Overall, this pattern of flow and channel morphology is quite different from typical patterns in meander bends, but is consistent with a conceptual model derived from laboratory experiments and numerical modeling.

  12. Fluid undercutting in the successive channel flow of two gases.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, R. W.; Jenkins, R. V.

    1973-01-01

    A fluid piston technique wherein one gas displaces another gas from a horizontal channel was investigated experimentally in a laboratory simulation of the operating concept of a Mach number 9, true-energy wind tunnel. Tests were conducted over a Froude number range from 0.0015 to 0.543 at driver-to-driven gas density ratios from 0.637 to 11.0 to find the effect of fluid undercutting (or overcutting) on test duration. Other variables studied, either experimentally or analytically, include channel cross-sectional shape, channel inlet design, channel length-to-diameter ratio, Reynolds number, pretest pressurization, and channel inclination angle. Results from shadowgraph movies and pressure measurements provide a correlation of actual-to-ideal test durations for a wide range of Froude numbers and gas density ratios and indicate that the application of the fluid piston technique to the wind-tunnel concept is feasible. However, severe fluid undercutting (or overcutting) in horizontal channels occurs at lower Froude numbers and at density ratios significantly different from unity.

  13. Multiscale modeling of mechanosensing channels on vesicles and cell membranes in 3D constricted flows and shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pak, On Shun; Young, Yuan-Nan; Liu, Allen; Stone, Howard

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the gating of mechanosensing channels (Mscls) on vesicles and cell membranes under different flow conditions using a multiscale approach. At the cell level (microns), the membrane tension is calculated using a 3D two-component whole-cell membrane model based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), including the cortex cytoskeleton and its interactions with the lipid bilayer. At the Mscl level (nanometers), we predict the relation between channel gating and the membrane tension obtained from a cell-level model using a semi-analytical model based on the bilayer hydrophobic mismatch energy. We systematically study the gating of Mscls of vesicles and cell membranes in constricted channel flows and shear flows, and explore the dependence of the gating on flow rate, cell shape and size. The results provide guidance for future experiments in inducing Mscl opening for various purposes such as drug delivery.

  14. Flow over a Ram-Air Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslambolchi, Ali; Johari, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    The flow field over a full-scale, ram-air personnel parachute canopy was investigated numerically using a finite-volume flow solver coupled with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Ram-air parachute canopies resemble wings with arc-anhedral, surface protuberances, and an open leading edge for inflation. The rectangular planform canopy had an aspect ratio of 2.2 and was assumed to be rigid and impermeable. The chord-based Reynolds number was 3.2 million. Results indicate that the oncoming flow barely penetrates the canopy opening, and creates a large separation bubble below the lower lip of canopy. A thick boundary layer exists over the entire lower surface of the canopy. The flow over the upper surface of the canopy remains attached for an extended fraction of the chord. Lift increases linearly with angle of attack up to about 12 degrees. To assess the capability of lifting-line theory in predicting the forces on the canopy, the lift and drag data from a two-dimensional simulation of the canopy profile were extended using finite-wing expressions and compared with the forces from the present simulations. The finite-wing predicted lift and drag trends compare poorly against the full-span simulation, and the maximum lift-to-drag ratio is over-predicted by 36%. Sponsored by the US Army NRDEC.

  15. Thermistor based, low velocity isothermal, air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrita, Admésio A. C. M.; Mendes, Ricardo; Quintela, Divo A.

    2016-03-01

    The semiconductor thermistor technology is applied as a flow sensor to measure low isothermal air velocities (<2 ms-1). The sensor is subjected to heating and cooling cycles controlled by a multifunctional timer. In the heating stage, the alternating current of a main AC power supply source guarantees a uniform thermistor temperature distribution. The conditioning circuit assures an adequate increase of the sensors temperature and avoids the thermal disturbance of the flow. The power supply interruption reduces the consumption from the source and extends the sensors life time. In the cooling stage, the resistance variation of the flow sensor is recorded by the measuring chain. The resistive sensor parameters proposed vary significantly and feature a high sensitivity to the flow velocity. With the aid of a computer, the data transfer, storage and analysis provides a great advantage over the traditional local anemometer readings. The data acquisition chain has a good repeatability and low standard uncertainties. The proposed method measures isothermal air mean velocities from 0.1 ms-1 to 2 ms-1 with a standard uncertainty error less than 4%.

  16. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  17. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  18. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  19. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  20. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  1. Control works in debris-flow channels: influence on morphology and sediment transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, L.

    2012-04-01

    Extensive torrent control works, such as grade-control dams, debris basins, deflecting walls, etc. have been implemented in the European Alps since the last decades of 19th century. These structural measures, aimed at stabilizing channels and to control sediment transport, are also widespread in Japan and are increasingly present in other mountain regions. As debris flows are one of the most destructive processes in steep mountain channels, hydraulic works are often intended to attenuate debris-flow hazard. Multi-temporal aerial photos and historic records permit evaluating the long term effects of torrent control works on the morphological settings of the channels and the delivery of sediment. The experience arising from over one century of torrent control works in debris-flow channels of the Alps permits also to improve the management of steep headwater catchments. A basic issue in the management of debris-flow channels is the recognition of success versus failure of engineering control works. Successful debris-flow control works provide benchmarks for further implementations, whereas the failure in reducing debris-flow hazard may lead to refinements in planning and design of control works or to the choice of preferring non-structural measures for coping with debris flows. Data from historical archives on debris-flow occurrence and on the performance of control works are the basic sources of information for these analyses. Moreover, when dealing with hydraulic structures for debris-flow control, it should be reminded that the artificial morphology resulting from the construction of check dams provides only a temporary stability to the channel and adjacent banks. This stresses the importance of evaluating the state of conservation and the effectiveness of control works and implies the need for their careful and continuous maintenance. Inventories of hydraulic structures, coupled with detailed data on catchment and channel topography, sediment sources and supply

  2. A NON-OSCILLATORY SCHEME FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOWS. (R825200)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In modeling shocks in open channel flows, the traditional finite difference schemes become inefficient and warrant special numerical treatment for smooth computations. This paper provides a general introduction to the non-oscillatory high-resolution methodology, coupled with the ...

  3. Dynamics of compressible air flow in ducts with heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhadi, M.

    1986-12-01

    An investigation into the effect of heat addition on subsonic flow of an air stream in a constant-area duct preceded by a convergent nozzle is carried out. A nozzle flow apparatus with a heat exchanger encasing the constant-area duct has been built for this purpose. Hot water is provided from an electric boiler where the flow rate and the in-flow hot water temperature could be controlled. It is confirmed experimentally, as predicted analytically, that heat transfer to the gas decreases its local static pressure along the duct axis, and that this decrease is associated with an increase in Mach number toward M = 1 at the exit (thermal choking). In the case of subsonic flow, the additional entropy generated by the heat interaction exceeding the amount that produces thermal choking can only be accommodated by moving to a new Rayleigh line, at a decreased flow rate which lowers the inlet Mach number. The good correlation between the experimental results and the analytical derivations illustrates that the experimental arrangement has potential for further experiments and investigations.

  4. Burnout and distribution of liquid between the flow core and wall films in narrow slot channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltenko, E. A.; Shpakovskii, A. A.

    2010-03-01

    Previous works on studying distribution of liquid between the flow core and wall films in narrow slot channels are briefly reviewed. Interrelation between mass transfer processes and burnout is shown. A procedure for calculating burnout on convex and concave heat-transfer surfaces in narrow slot channels is presented.

  5. Study on Fins' Effect of Boiling Flow in Millimeter Channel Heat Exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi

    2005-11-01

    Recently, a lot of researches about compact heat exchangers with mini-channels have been carried out with the hope of obtaining a high-efficiency heat transfer, due to the higher ratio of surface area than existing heat exchangers. However, there are many uncertain phenomena in fields such as boiling flow in mini-channels. Thus, in order to understand the boiling flow in mini-channels to design high-efficiency heat exchangers, this work focused on the visualization measurement of boiling flow in a millimeter channel. A transparent acrylic channel (heat exchanger form), high-speed camera (2000 fps at 1024 x 1024 pixels), and halogen lamp (backup light) were used as the visualization system. The channel's depth is 2 mm, width is 30 mm, and length is 400 mm. In preparation for commercial use, two types of channels were experimented on: a fins type and a normal slit type (without fins). The fins are circular cylindrical obstacles (diameter is 5 mm) to promote heat transfer, set in a triangular array (distance between each center point is 10 mm). Especially in this work, boiling flow and heat transfer promotion in the millimeter channel heat exchanger with fins was evaluated using a high-speed camera.

  6. Sediment budgets and channel scouring of two alpine debris-flow torrents (SE France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theule, J. I.; Liébault, F.; Loye, A.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Laigle, D.

    2011-12-01

    Steep mountain catchments typically experience sediment pulses from hillslopes which are stored in headwater channels and flushed out by debris-flows. Event-based sediment budget monitoring in two active debris-flow torrents in the French Alps (Manival and Réal) during a two-year period gave insights about catchment-scale sediment routing during rainfall forcings of moderate intensity. This study allowed for further investigation on channel scour relationships with gradient. The monitoring was based on intensive topographic resurveys of low- and high-order channels using different techniques (cross-section surveys with total station and high-resolution channel surveys with terrestrial and airborne laser scanning). For the Manival Torrent, sediment outputs from the main channel were obtained by a sediment trap. Two debris-flows were observed in the Manival and three in the Réal, as well as several bedload transport flow events. Sediment budget reconstitution of the five debris-flows revealed that most of the debris-flow volumes were supplied by channel scouring (always more than 92%). Bedload transport during autumn contributed to the sediment recharge of high-order channels by the deposition of large gravel wedges. This process is recognized as being fundamental for debris-flow occurrence during the subsequent spring and summer. A time shift of scour-and-fill sequences was observed between low- and high-order channels, revealing the discontinuous sediment transfer in the catchment during common flow events. A conceptual model of sediment routing for different event magnitude was proposed. Significant channel scouring by debris-flows took place in alluvial reaches. Throughout the torrent channel, the upstream channel gradient (from a local reach) is identified to play a role in debris-flow scour. Maximum scours normally occur between slopes ranging from 0.18 to 0.20 (depending on sediment availability at the time of occurrence). It is found that above this

  7. Impact of channel incision on the hydraulics of flood flows: Examples from Polish Carpathian rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyżga, Bartłomiej; Zawiejska, Joanna; Radecki-Pawlik, Artur

    2016-11-01

    Channel deepening may result from channel incision or river metamorphosis changing a wide and shallow channel to a narrow and deep one. As only the first type of channel change leads to increased flow capacity of the channel, a lowering of water stage associated with a given discharge rather than a lowering of river bed should be used to identify channel incision. A lowering of minimum annual stage at gauging stations is typically used to assess the relative importance of channel incision along a river or within a particular region. Rivers of the Polish Carpathians incised by 0.5-3.8 m over the twentieth century, with the amount of incision being greater in their lower and middle courses than in the upper ones. Variability in the hydraulic importance of channel incision with increasing river size is analysed by comparing changes in the frequency of valley floor inundation at gauging stations located along the seventh-order Dunajec River. Despite a lower absolute amount of channel incision in the upper river course, here incision has increased channel conveyance and reduced the frequency of valley floor inundation considerably more than in the lower course. Hydraulic effects of channel incision depend also on lateral stability of an incising river. Low-energy rivers from the eastern part of the Polish Carpathians remained laterally stable during channel incision. This has resulted in substantial lowering of stages for low flood discharges and markedly smaller one for high-magnitude floods, whereas velocity of the flows conveyed over the highly elevated floodplains has decreased considerably. In high-energy rivers from the western part of the Polish Carpathians, alternation of incision and lateral channel migration has led to the formation of incised meander belts, with substantially lowered stages for all flood discharges and increased velocity of the flows conveyed over the newly-formed, low-lying floodplains.

  8. Temperature and Pressure Measurements and Visualization of He II Cavitation Flow through Venturi Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ishii, T.; Murakami, M.; Harada, K.

    2004-06-23

    He II cavitation flow through a Venturi channel was experimentally investigated through temperature and pressure measurements and optical visualization. So far some distinctive features of cavitation between He II and He I flows were clarified. Then, detailed measurements were added for further investigation, such as the measurements of the temperature drop distribution throughout the flow channel and the void fraction. Further considerations were given on the cavitation inception with emphasis on the superheating of liquid helium, and the effect of the flow separation on cavitation.

  9. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.603 Procedures for air flow tests of...) Air flow instrument complete with accessories to measure the fineness and maturity, in combination,...

  10. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  11. SIMPLIFIED MODELING OF AIR FLOW DYNAMICS IN SSD RADON MITIGATION SYSTEMS FOR RESIDENCES WITH GRAVEL BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an attempt to better understand the dynamics of subslab air flow, the report suggests that subslab air flow induced by a central suction point be treated as radial air flow through a porous bed contained between two impermeable disks. (NOTE: Many subslab depressurization syste...

  12. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  13. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  14. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  15. An analysis of pressure driven cross-flow through a long slot connecting two parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1992-12-31

    Cross-flow between two parallel channels that were connected by a long narrow slot has been measured. The data was presented primarily in terms of transverse resistance coefficients. This data has been analyzed with momentum balances applied to both the axial and transverse components of the slot flow. The importance of wall friction to the slot flow and the necessity of calculating the axial component of the slot flow is demonstrated.

  16. Flow structure and channel morphodynamics of meander bend chute cutoffs: A case study of the Wabash River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, Jessica A.; Rhoads, Bruce L.; Best, James L.; Johnson, Kevin K.

    2013-12-01

    paper documents the three-dimensional structure of flow and bed morphology of two developing chute cutoffs on a single meander bend on the lower Wabash River, USA, and relates the flow structure to patterns of morphologic change in the evolving cutoff channels. The upstream end of the cutoff channels is characterized by: (1) a zone of flow velocity reduction/stagnation and bar development in the main channel across from the cutoff entrance, (2) flow separation and bar development along the inner (left) bank of the cutoff channel immediately downstream from the cutoff entrance, and (3) helical motion and outward advection of flow momentum entering the cutoff channel, leading to erosion of the outer (right) bank of the cutoff channel. At the downstream end of the cutoff channels, the major hydrodynamic and morphologic features are: (1) flow stagnation along the bank of the main channel immediately upstream of the cutoff channel mouth, (2) convergence of flows from the cutoff and main channels, (3) helical motion of flow from the cutoff, (4) a zone of reduced velocity along the bank of the main channel immediately downstream from the cutoff channel mouth, and (5) development of a prominent bar complex that penetrates into the main channel and extends from the stagnation zone upstream to downstream of the cutoff mouth. These results provide the basis for a conceptual model of chute-cutoff dynamics in which the upstream and downstream ends of a cutoff channel are treated as a bifurcation and confluence, respectively.

  17. Field Investigation of Flow Structure and Channel Morphology at Confluent-Meander Bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. D.; Rhoads, B. L.

    2007-12-01

    The movement of water and sediment through drainage networks is inevitably influenced by the convergence of streams and rivers at channel confluences. These focal components of fluvial systems produce a complex hydrodynamic environment, where rapid changes in flow structure and sediment transport occur to accommodate the merging of separate channel flows. The inherent geometric and hydraulic change at confluences also initiates the development of distinct geomorphic features, reflected in the bedform and shape of the channel. An underlying assumption of previous experimental and theoretical models of confluence dynamics has been that converging streams have straight channels with angular configurations. This generalized conceptualization was necessary to establish confluence planform as symmetrical or asymmetrical and to describe subsequent flow structure and geomorphic features at confluences. However, natural channels, particularly those of meandering rivers, curve and bend. This property and observation of channel curvature at natural junctions have led to the hypothesis that natural stream and river confluences tend to occur on the concave outer bank of meander bends. The resulting confluence planform, referred to as a confluent-meander bend, was observed over a century ago but has received little scientific attention. This paper examines preliminary data on three-dimensional flow structure and channel morphology at two natural confluent-meander bends of varying size and with differing tributary entrance locations. The large river confluence of the Vermilion River and Wabash River in west central Indiana and the comparatively small junction of the Little Wabash River and Big Muddy Creek in southeastern Illinois are the location of study sites for field investigation. Measurements of time-averaged three-dimensional velocity components were obtained at these confluences with an acoustic Doppler current profiler for flow events with differing momentum ratios. Bed

  18. Flow Structure and Channel Change in Chute Cutoffs On Meandering Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinger, J. A.; Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J. L.; Johnson, K. K.

    2011-12-01

    Freely meandering rivers typically exhibit complex, continuously evolving patterns of planform geometry involving elongation of the channel path through lateral migration and shorting of this path through bend cutoffs. Despite the importance of cutoffs in shaping the planform geometry of meandering rivers, the fluvial processes operative immediately after initiation of a cutoff are poorly understood. Two recent chute cutoff events on a single bend on the Wabash River, IL-IN, have provided an unprecedented opportunity to document the morphologic evolution and flow structure of chute cutoffs in a large, unregulated, meandering river. Here, we present results of ADCP measurements of three-dimensional flow velocity and bed topography at these cutoffs and describe a conceptual model for the morphodynamics of chute cutoffs prior to oxbow lake formation. Our results indicate that the flow structure at upstream and downstream ends of cutoff channels, prior to plugging of the entrance and exit of the abandoned bend with sediment, is analogous to flow through diffluence - confluence units. The interaction of this flow structure with an erodible bed and banks can cause rapid widening of the upstream end of the cutoff channel and bar development i) in the main channel where velocities are reduced, and ii) in the separation zone of the cutoff channel. Over time, these patterns of deposition and erosion will lead formation of an oxbow lake and complete capture of the flow by the cutoff channel.

  19. Channel initiation by surface and subsurface flows in a steep catchment of the Akaishi Mountains, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaizumi, Fumitoshi; Hattanji, Tsuyoshi; Hayakawa, Yuichi S.

    2010-02-01

    Channel initiation, which is a key factor in the evolution of mountain landforms, is caused by a combination of various hydrogeomorphic processes. We modeled the channel initiation in steep mountains on the basis of the physical mechanism for sediment transport by surface and subsurface flows. Field investigations and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analysis in the Higashi-gouchi catchment of central Japan showed that our model can well explain the area-slope relationship in steep and highly incised subcatchments, in which surface flow and shallow underground water would be the dominant flow components. In contrast, the area-slope relationship is not clear in gentler subcatchments, in which the contribution of deeper flow components (i.e., deep underground water) on the entire runoff is not negligible. Thus, the contribution of each runoff component to the total runoff is an important factor affecting the location of the channel head. Most channel heads in the deeply incised subcatchments in the Higashi-gouchi catchment have been formed by surface and subsurface flows, although many landslides have also occurred around the channel heads. Compared with the dominant flow components, activity of sediment supply from hillslopes might be a minor factor in determining the area-slope relationship for locating the channel head.

  20. Flow and Heat Transfer Analysis in a Deformable Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar, S.; Abbas, Z.; Mushtaq, M.; Hayat, T.

    2016-07-01

    An analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in a semi-infinite rectangular channel with porous and uniformly expanding or contracting walls is presented to improve the existing analytical results and to provide a comparison with the exact numerical solutions. The analytical solution is obtained with the use of the homotopy analysis method (HAM) which provides a uniformly valid solution for a wide range of parameters and has a better accuracy. In addition, the heat transfer analysis is presented for the case where the channel walls are kept at a constant temperature. The analytical solution is obtained with the use of three different techniques, and a numerical solution is obtained by the shooting method. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of all these methods is presented. Heat transfer analysis in a deformable channel has been carried out for the first time.

  1. A model for simulation of flow in singular and interconnected channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, R.A.; Goldberg, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model is presented for simulating the unsteady flow in singular riverine or estuarine reaches and in networks of reaches composed of interconnected channels. The model is both general and flexible in that it can be used to simulate a wide range of flow conditions for various channel configurations. The channel geometry of the network to be modeled should be sufficiently simple so as to lend itself to characterization in one spatial dimension. The flow must be substantially homogenous in density, and hydrostatic pressure must prevail everywhere in the network channels. The slope of each channel bottom ought to be mild and reasonably constant over its length so that the flow remains subcritical. The model accommodates tributary inflows and diversions and includes the effects of wind shear on the water surface as a forcing function in the flow equations. Water-surface elevations and flow discharges are computed at channel junctions, as well as at specified intermediate locations within the network channels. The one-dimensional branch-network flow model uses a four-point, implicit, finite-difference approximation of the unsteady-flow equations. The flow equations are linearized over a time step, and branch transformations are formulated that describe the relationship between the unknowns at the end points of the channels. The resultant matrix of branch-transformation equations and required boundary-condition equations is solved by Gaussian elimination using maximum pivot strategy. Five example applications of the flow model are illustrated. The applications cover such diverse conditions as a singular upland river reach in which unsteady flow results from hydropower regulations, coastal rivers composed of sequentially connected reaches subject to unsteady tide-driven flow, and a multiply connected network of channels whose flow is principally governed by wind tides and seiches in adjoining lakes. The report includes a listing of the FORTRAN

  2. Fine-grained linings of leveed channels facilitate runout of granular flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokelaar, B. P.; Graham, R. L.; Gray, J. M. N. T.; Vallance, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Catastrophic dense granular flows, such as occur in rock avalanches, debris flows and pyroclastic flows, move as fully shearing mixtures that have approximately 60 vol.% solids and tend to segregate to form coarse-grained fronts and leveed channels. Levees restrict spreading of unconfined flows and form as coarse particles that become concentrated in the top of the flow are transported to the front and then advect to the sides in the flow head. Channels from which most material has drained away down slope are commonly lined with fine-grained deposit, widely thought to remain from the tail of the waning flow. We show how segregation in experimental dense flows of carborundum or sand (300-425 μm) mixed with spherical fine ballotini (150-250 μm), on rough slopes of 27-29°, produces fine-grained channel linings that are deposited with the levees, into which they grade laterally. Maximum runout distance is attained with mixtures containing 30-40% sand, just sufficient to segregate and form levees that are adequately robust to restrict the spreading attributable to the low-friction fines. Resin impregnation and serial sectioning of deliberately arrested experimental flows shows how fines-lined levees form from the flow head; the flows create their own stable ‘conduit’ entirely from the front, which in a geophysical context can play an important mechanistic role in facilitating runout. The flow self-organization ensures that low-friction fines at the base of the segregated channel flow shear over fine-grained substrate in the channel, thus reducing frictional energy losses. We propose that in pyroclastic flows and debris flows, which have considerable mobility attributable to pore-fluid pressures, such fine-grained flow-contact zones form similarly and not only reduce frictional energy losses but also reduce flow-substrate permeability so as to enhance pore-fluid pressure retention. Thus the granular flow self-organization that produces fine-grained channel linings

  3. Interfacial wave behavior in oil-water channel flows: Prospects for a general understanding

    SciTech Connect

    McCready, M.J.; Uphold, D.D.; Gifford, K.A.

    1997-12-31

    Oil-water pressure driven channel flow is examined as a model for general two-layer flows where interfacial disturbances are important. The goal is to develop sufficient understanding of this system so that the utility and limitations of linear and nonlinear theories can be known a priori. Experiments show that sometimes linear stability is useful at predicting the steady or dominant evolving waves. However in other situations there is no agreement between the linearly fastest growing wave and the spectral peak. An interesting preliminary result is that the bifurcation to interfacial waves is supercritical for all conditions that were studied for an oil-water channel flow, gas-liquid channel flow and two-liquid Couette flow. However, three different mechanisms are dominant for each of these three situations.

  4. Arsenic removal from flowing irrigation water in bangladesh: impacts of channel properties.

    PubMed

    Lineberger, Ethan M; Badruzzaman, A Borhan M; Ali, M Ashraf; Polizzotto, Matthew L

    2013-11-01

    Across Bangladesh, dry-season irrigation with arsenic-contaminated well water is loading arsenic onto rice paddies, leading to increased arsenic concentrations in plants, diminished crop yields, and increased human health risks. As irrigation water flows through conveyance channels between wells and rice fields, arsenic concentrations change over space and time, indicating that channels may provide a location for removing arsenic from solution. However, few studies have systematically evaluated the processes controlling arsenic concentrations in irrigation channels, limiting the ability to manipulate these systems and enhance arsenic removal from solution. The central goal of this study was to quantify how channel design affected removal of dissolved arsenic from flowing irrigation water. Field experiments were conducted in Bangladesh using a chemically constant source of arsenic-contaminated irrigation water and an array of constructed channels with varying geometries. The resulting hydraulic conditions affected the quantity of arsenic removed from solution within the channels by promoting known hydrogeochemical processes. Channels three times the width of control channels removed ∼3 times the mass of arsenic over 32 min of flowing conditions, whereas negligible arsenic removal was observed in tarp-lined channels, which prevented soil-water contact. Arsenic removal from solution was ∼7 times higher in a winding, 200-m-long channel than in the straight, 45-m-long control channels. Arsenic concentrations were governed by oxidative iron-arsenic coprecipitation within the water column, sorption to soils, and phosphate competition. Collectively, these results suggest that better design and management of irrigation channels may play a part in arsenic mitigation strategies for rice fields in Southern Asia. PMID:25602413

  5. Numerical study of heat transfer enhancement in a channel flow using an oscillating vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.-J.

    2002-04-01

    A numerical simulation is performed to study the unsteady flow and heat transfer in a channel with an oscillating bar, which is called an oscillating vortex generator. The behavior of the oscillating bar and flow is coupled, and the variation of the flow and thermal fields is classified as a moving boundary problem. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian kinematic description method is adopted to describe the flow and thermal fields, and a Galerkin finite element formulation with moving meshes is applied to solve the governing equations. The effects of Reynolds number, maximum oscillating speed, oscillating amplitude, and oscillating frequency of the bar on the flow and heat transfer are examined in details. The results show that the unsteady flow of transverse vortices is actively and largely formed behind the bar as the bar oscillates in the channel. The transverse vortices transport the low-temperature and high-speed core flow toward the heated regions of the channel. Also, the high-temperature wall flow is carried away from the heated regions of the channel to mix with the low-temperature core flow by transverse vortices. Based upon the fixed heat transfer area, the efficiency index is greater than 1.0 for almost all cases.

  6. Unidirectionally migrating deep-water channels: Architectural styles and flow processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, C.; Steel, R. J.; Wang, Y.; Xu, Q.

    2014-12-01

    3D seismic data are used to investigate flow processes and sedimentation in deep-water slope channels of an alternate type characterized by short and straight channel courses, a lack of levees, and absence of any coeval fans. The study allows a picture of unusual flow processes in submarine channels. The studied channels can be divided into two discrete segments: (1) Upper segments are characterized by low aspect ratio(W/T), little lateral offset (Lm), and low migration/aggradation ratios (Lm/Va). These upper segment channels build vertically-stacked channel-complex sets (CCSs), each of which is characterized by a facies transition from fine-grained sands in the lower part overlain by debris flow deposits and then shale drapes. Energetic sediment density flows triggered by fluid escape and/or strong wave action were well able to bypass sediment and to mask relatively weak bottom currents, yielding deep-water channels characterized by little lateral offset and dominantly aggradational stacking patterns. (2) Lower segments are characterized by higher W/T, wide lateral offset (Lm), and high Lm/Va. They consist of laterally-migrated CCSs, each of which consists of fine-grained reworked sands in the lower part overlain by debris flow deposits and, finally, shale drapes. Bottom currents restricted within the channels would have induced a tilt of the interface between turbidity currents and the overriding bottom currents (Wedderburn number > 1). This would have deflected turbidity currents downward and back toward the gentle channel bank, thus causing channel migration (the steep bank) by ~2° to 15°, and yielding a helical flow circulation composed of a high-velocity zone along the steep bank and a low-velocity zone along the gentle bank. This bottom current-induced helical flow circulation promoted deposition on the gentle bank, but it favored erosion on the steep banke, yielding deep-water channels exhibiting wide lateral offset and dominantly laterally

  7. The hydraulic geometry of narrow and deep channels; evidence for flow optimisation and controlled peatland growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanson, Rachel A.; Nanson, Gerald C.; Huang, He Qing

    2010-04-01

    At-a-station and bankfull hydraulic geometry analyses of peatland channels at Barrington Tops, New South Wales, Australia, reveal adjustments in self-forming channels in the absence of sediment load. Using Rhodes ternary diagram, comparisons are made with hydraulic geometry data from self-forming channels carrying bedload in alluvial settings elsewhere. Despite constraints on channel depths caused at some locations by the restricted thickness of peat, most stations have cohesive, near-vertical, well-vegetated banks, and width/depth (w/d) ratios of ∼ 2 that are optimal for sediment-free flow. Because banks are strong, resist erosion and can stand nearly vertical, and depth is sometimes constrained, adjustments to discharge are accommodated largely by changes in velocity. These findings are consistent with the model of maximum flow efficiency and the overarching least action principle in open channels. The bankfull depth of freely adjusting laterally active channels in clastic alluvium is well known to be related to the thickness of floodplain alluvium and a similar condition appears to apply to these swamps that grow in situ and are formed almost entirely of organic matter. The thickness of peat in these swamps rarely exceeds that required to form a bankfull channel of optimum w/d ratio for the transport of sediment-free water. Swamp vegetation is highly dependent on proximity to the water table. To maintain a swamp-channel and associated floodplain system, the channels must flow with sufficient water much of the time; they not only offer an efficient morphology for flow but do so in a way that enables bankfull conditions to occur many times a year. They also prevent the swamp from growing above a level linked to the depth of the channel. Once the channel attains the most efficient cross section, further growth of the swamp vertically is restricted by enhanced flow velocities and limited flow depths. This means that the volume of peat in such swamps is determined

  8. Environmental Flows Can Reduce the Encroachment of Terrestrial Vegetation into River Channels: A Systematic Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kimberly A.; Webb, J. Angus; de Little, Siobhan C.; Stewardson, Michael J.

    2013-11-01

    Encroachment of riparian vegetation into regulated river channels exerts control over fluvial processes, channel morphology, and aquatic ecology. Reducing encroachment of terrestrial vegetation is an oft-cited objective of environmental flow recommendations, but there has been no systematic assessment of the evidence for and against the widely-accepted cause-and-effect mechanisms involved. We systematically reviewed the literature to test whether environmental flows can reduce the encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into river channels. We quantified the level of support for five explicit cause-effect hypotheses drawn from a conceptual model of the effects of flow on vegetation. We found that greater inundation, variously expressed as changes in the area, depth, duration, frequency, seasonality, and volume of surface water, generally reduces riparian vegetation abundance in channels, but most studies did not investigate the specific mechanisms causing these changes. Those that did show that increased inundation results in increased mortality, but also increased germination. The evidence was insufficient to determine whether increased inundation decreases reproduction. Our results contribute to hydro-ecological understanding by using the published literature to test for general cause-effect relationships between flow regime and terrestrial vegetation encroachment. Reviews of this nature provide robust support for flow management, and are more defensible than expert judgement-based approaches. Overall, we predict that restoration of more natural flow regimes will reduce encroachment of terrestrial vegetation into regulated river channels, partly through increased mortality. Conversely, infrequent deliveries of environmental flows may actually increase germination and subsequent encroachment.

  9. Heat and mass transfer for turbulent flow of chemically reacting gas in eccentric annular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Besedina, T.V.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Udot, A.V.; Yakushev, A.P.

    1988-02-01

    Because of the possibility of using dissociating gases as coolants and working bodies of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to develop computational algorithms for calculating heat and mass transfer processes under conditions of nonequilibrium flow of chemically reacting gases not only in axisymmetric channels, but also in channels with a complex transverse cross section (including also in eccentric annular channels). An algorithm is proposed for calculating the velocity, temperature, and concentration fields under conditions of cooling of a cylindrical heat-releasing rod, placed off-center in a circular casing pipe, by a longitudinal flow of chemically reacting gas (N/sub 2/O/sub 4/).

  10. Computation of Turbulent Recirculating Flow in Channels, and for Impingement Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Byong Hoon

    1992-01-01

    Fully elliptic forms of the transport equations have been solved numerically for two flow configurations. The first is turbulent flow in a channel with transverse rectangular ribs, and the second is impingement cooling of a plane surface. Both flows are relevant to proposed designs for active cooling of hypersonic vehicles using supercritical hydrogen as the coolant. Flow downstream of an abrupt pipe expansion and of a backward-facing step were also solved with various near-wall turbulence models as benchmark problems. A simple form of periodicity boundary condition was used for the channel flow with transverse rectangular ribs. The effects of various parameters on heat transfer in channel flow with transverse ribs and in impingement cooling were investigated using the Yap modified Jones and Launder low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model. For the channel flow, predictions were in adequate agreement with experiment for constant property flow, with the results for friction superior to those for heat transfer. For impingement cooling, the agreement with experiment was generally good, but the results suggest that improved modelling of the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy is required in order to obtain improved heat transfer prediction, especially near the stagnation point. The k-epsilon turbulence model was used to predict the mean flow and heat transfer for constant and variable property flows. The effect of variable properties for channel flow was investigated using the same turbulence model, but comparison with experiment yielded no clear conclusions. Also, the wall function method was modified for use in the variable properties flow with a non-adiabatic surface, and an empirical model is suggested to correctly account for the behavior of the viscous sublayer with heating.

  11. Computation of turbulent recirculating flow in channels, and for impingement cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, B.H.

    1992-01-01

    Fully elliptic forms of the transport equations have been solved numerically for two flow configurations. The first is turbulent flow in a channel with transverse rectangular ribs, and the second is impingement cooling of a plane surface. Both flows are relevant to proposed designs for active cooling of hypersonic vehicles using supercritical hydrogen as the coolant. Flow downstream of an abrupt pipe expansion and of a backward-facing step were also solved with various near-wall turbulence models as benchmark problems. A simple form of periodicity boundary condition was used for the channel flow with transverse rectangular ribs. The effects of various parameters on heat transfer in channel flow with transverse ribs and in impingement cooling were investigated using the Yap modified Jones and Launder low Reynolds number k-[epsilon] turbulence model. For the channel flow, predictions were in adequate agreement with experiment for constant property flow, with the results for friction superior to those for heat transfer. For impingement cooling, the agreement with experiment was generally good, but the results suggest that improvement modelling of the dissipation rate of turbulence kinetic energy is required in order to obtain improved heat transfer prediction, especially near the stagnation point. The k-[epsilon] turbulence model was used to predict the mean flow and heat transfer for constant and variable property flows. The effect of variable properties for channel flow was investigated using the same turbulence model, but comparison with experiment yielded no clear conclusions. Also, the wall function method was modified for use in the variable properties flow with a non-adiabatic surface, and an empirical model is suggested to correctly account for the behavior of the viscous sublayer with heating. The wall thermal boundary condition was found to have a significant effect on local heat transfer coefficients in the neighborhood of boundary layer separation.

  12. Chryse Basin channels: low-gradients and ponded flows.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1983-01-01

    Gradients on the floors of the Martian outflow channels that are derived from radar-elevation profiles across Lunae Planum and Chryse Basin have much lower values than those obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey's topographic map. Whereas the gradients of Maja and Ares Valles are similar to those of the catastrophic flood channels in the Scablands of Washington State, the gradients of Simud and Tiu Valles are essentially level, and the movement of fluids to the N poses problems. It is proposed that ponding may have formed lakes in depressions associated with the Valles Marineris grabens, ancient craters in the chaotic terrain area, and possibly even the regional low where most chaotic terrains occur. It is envisaged that lakes eventually overflowed, forming the present channels. When dams broke, floods were released catastrophically, with a final gigantic flood from the Valles Marineris system of troughs, which would have had sufficient head to move fluids across nearly level gradients through the Simud and Tiu channels. -P.Br.

  13. Seepage from channeled flows as influenced by PAM and sediment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage from water streams into unlined channels determines the proportion of water distributed to adjacent soil for plant use or soil or groundwater recharge, or conveyed to downstream reaches. We conducted a laboratory study to determine how sediment type (none, clay, silt), sediment concentratio...

  14. Sediment and polyacrylamide effects on seepage losses from channeled flows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage from water streams into unlined channels determines the proportion of water distributed to adjacent soil for plant use or soil or groundwater recharge, or conveyed to downstream reaches. We conducted a laboratory study to determine how inflow amendment and related factors, sediment type (no...

  15. Flow Structure and Channel Change in a Chute Cutoff along a Large Meandering River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, B. L.; Best, J.; Johnson, K.; Engel, F. L.

    2009-12-01

    Meander cutoffs, which develop when flow cuts across the narrow neck of a bend, are common features along actively migrating meandering rivers. Despite the importance of cutoffs in the dynamics of river meandering and floodplain sedimentation, few, if any, studies have documented in detail the fluvial processes involved in the development of a meander cutoff. This paper examines the morphodynamics of a chute cutoff along the Wabash River, Illinois-Indiana, immediately following initiation of the cutoff. The original cutoff channel formed across the neck of Mackey Bend, a meander loop immediately upstream of the confluence with the Ohio River, during a major flood in June 2008. The formation of the cutoff channel likely involved migration of a headcut from the downstream side to the upstream side of the meander neck along the path of a floodplain slough. A key focus of the investigation has been to document flow structure at the upstream and downstream ends of the cutoff channel so that patterns of flow can be related to morphological change. Three separate measurement campaigns using an acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP) and single-beam echosounder were conducted between January and May 2009 to determine 3D flow structure and bed morphology during events with different discharges and flow stages. In addition, channel dimensions were surveyed using a dGPS system in September 2008 and in August 2009. Results indicate that the cutoff channel has widened dramatically over a one-year period, increasing its width by as much as 100 percent. Curvature of flow into the entrance of the cutoff channel from the Wabash River generates strong helical motion that advects momentum toward the outer bank, resulting in high velocities near the bank toe and ongoing bank retreat through slab failures. This flow pattern, accentuated by dramatic widening of the cutoff channel, has resulted in deposition along the inner bank and development of a large bar platform at this location

  16. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D., Sr.

    1989-01-01

    A research program to study the effect of enhancement devices on flow boiling heat transfer in coolant channels, which are heated either from the top side or uniformly, is discussed. Freon 11 is the working fluid involved. The specific objectives are: (1) examine the variations in both the mean and local (axial and circumferential) heat transfer coefficients for a circular coolant channel with either smooth walls or with both a twisted tape and spiral finned walls, (2) examine the effect channel diameter (and the length-to-diameter aspect ratio) variations for the smooth wall channel, and (3) develop an improved data reduction analysis.

  17. A three-dimensional dynamical model for channeled lava flow with nonlinear rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippucci, Marilena; Tallarico, Andrea; Dragoni, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Recent laboratory studies on the rheology of lava samples from different volcanic areas have highlighted that the apparent viscosity depends on a power of the strain rate. Several authors agree in attributing this dependence to the crystal content of the sample and to temperature. Starting from these results, in this paper we studied the effect of a power law rheology on a gravity-driven lava flow. The equation of motion is nonlinear in the diffusion term, and an analytical solution does not seem to be possible. The finite-volume method has been applied to solve numerically the equation governing the fully developed laminar flow of a power law non-Newtonian fluid in an inclined rectangular channel. The convergence, the stability, and the order of approximation were tested for the Newtonian rheology case, comparing the numerical solution with the available analytical solution. Results indicate that the assumption on the rheology, whether linear or nonlinear, strongly affects the velocity and/or the thickness of the lava channel both for channels with fixed geometry and for channels with constant flow rate. Results on channels with fixed geometry are confirmed by some simulations for real lava channels. Finally, the study of the Reynolds number indicates that gravity-driven lava channel flows are always in laminar regime, except for strongly nonlinear pseudoplastic fluids with low fluid consistency and at high slopes.

  18. Two-phase flow instability and dryout in parallel channels in natural circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, R.B.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Hughes, E.D.

    1993-06-01

    The unique feature of parallel channel flows is that the pressure drop or driving head for the flow is maintained constant across any given channel by the flow in all the others, or by having a large downcomer or bypass in a natural circulation loop. This boundary condition is common in all heat exchangers, reactor cores and boilers, it is well known that the two-phase flow in parallel channels can exhibit both so-called static and dynamic instability. This leads to the question of the separability of the flow and pressure drop boundary conditions in the study of stability and dryout. For the areas of practical interest, the flow can be considered as incompressible. The dynamic instability is characterized by density (kinematic) or continuity waves, and the static instability by inertial (pressure drop) or manometric escalations. The static has been considered to be the zero-frequency or lowest mode of the dynamic case. We briefly review the status of the existing literature on both parallel channel static and dynamic instability, and the latest developments in theory and experiment. The difference between the two derivations lies in the retention of the time-dependent terms in the conservation equations. The effects and impact of design options are also discussed. Since dryout in parallel systems follows instability, it has been traditional to determine the dryout power for a parallel channel by testing a single channel with a given (inlet) flow boundary condition without particular regard for the pressure drop. Thus all modern dryout correlations are based on constant or fixed flow tests, a so-called hard inlet, and subchannel and multiple bundle effects are corrected for separately. We review the thinking that lead to this approach, and suggest that for all multiple channel and natural circulation systems close attention should be paid to the actual (untested) pressure drop conditions. A conceptual formulation is suggested as a basis for discussion.

  19. Channeling at the base of the lithosphere during the lateral flow of plume material beneath flow line hot spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, Norman H.

    2008-08-01

    Chains of volcanic edifices lie along flow lines between plume-fed hot spots and the thin lithosphere at ridge axes. Discovery and Euterpe/Musicians Seamounts are two examples. An attractive hypothesis is that buoyant plume material flows along the base of the lithosphere perpendicular to isochrons. The plume material may conceivably flow in a broad front or flow within channels convectively eroded into the base to the lithosphere. A necessary but not sufficient condition for convective channeling is that the expected stagnant-lid heat flow for the maximum temperature of the plume material is comparable to the half-space surface heat flow of the oceanic lithosphere. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional numerical calculations confirm this inference. A second criterion for significant convective erosion is that it needs to occur before the plume material thins by lateral spreading. Scaling relationships indicate spreading and convection are closely related. Mathematically, the Nusselt number (ratio of convective to conductive heat flow in the plume material) scales with the flux (volume per time per length of flow front) of the plume material. A blob of unconfined plume material thus spreads before the lithosphere thins much and evolves to a slowly spreading and slowly convecting warm region in equilibrium with conduction into the base of the overlying lithosphere. Three-dimensional calculations illustrate this long-lasting (and hence observable) state of plume material away from its plume source. A different flow domain occurs around a stationary hot plume that continuously supplies hot material. The plume convectively erodes the overlying lithosphere, trapping the plume material near its orifice. The region of lithosphere underlain by plume material grows toward the ridge axis and laterally by convective thinning of the lithosphere at its edges. The hottest plume material channels along flow lines. Geologically, the regions of lithosphere underlain by either warm

  20. Geologic Controls on Channel Morphology and Low-Flow Habitat; Rattlesnake Creek, Santa Barbara, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bean, G.; Keller, E.

    2006-12-01

    Channel morphology and baseflow are limiting factors in sustaining low-flow habitat for the spawning and rearing of endangered southern steelhead trout in southern California. To aid the recovery of steelhead trout, it is imperative to determine how pools are formed and maintained in steep mountain streams, and what hydrogeologic factors control baseflow. Rattlesnake Creek, a steep (6 to 31%) boulder-bedrock channel in Santa Barbara, California, was investigated to determine if geologic and hydrogeologic properties, specifically rock strength and fracture density, control channel morphology and low-flow habitat. Analysis of rock strength, fracture density, and channel morphology using a single-factor analysis of variance, Kolmorgorov-Smirnov test and t-test suggest that rock strength and fracture density of the underlying lithology (bed and banks) does not significantly affect the channel morphology at the 0.05 level of significance. However, this study does show that boulder large roughness elements (LREs) armor the channel, controlling channel gradient and the location, abundance and type of pools. Step pools are the dominant pool type, found in reaches up to 18% where cascades might be expected, and steps are composed of resistant sandstone boulder LREs. Although fracture density does not influence the morphology of the channel, baseflow for low-flow habitat is predominantly supplied through fractures in the coldwater sandstone.

  1. Non-equilibrium Flows of Reacting Air Components in Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevich, S. S.; Sinitsyn, K. A.; Nagnibeda, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the investigation of non-equilibrium flows of reacting air mixtures in nozzles. State-to-state approach based on the solution of the equations for vibrational level populations of molecules and atomic concentrations coupled to the gas dynamics equations is used. For the 5-component air mixture (N2, O2, NO, N, O) non-equilibrium distributions and gasdynamical parameters are calculated for different conditions in a nozzle throat. The influence of various kinetic processes on distributions and gas dynamics parameters is studied. The paper presents the comparison of the results with ones obtained for binary mixtures of molecules and atoms and various models of elementary processes.

  2. Flow regimes in a single dimple on the channel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, G. V.; Terekhov, V. I.; Khalatov, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The boundaries of the domains of existence of flow regimes past single dimples made as spherical segments on a flat plate are determined with the use of available experimental results. Regimes of a diffuser-confuser flow, a horseshoe vortex, and a tornado-like vortex in the dimple are considered. Neither a horseshoe vortex nor a tornado-like vortex is observed in dimples with the relative depth smaller than 0.1. Transformations from the diffuser-confuser flow regime to the horseshoe vortex regime and from the horseshoe vortex flow to the tornado-like vortex flow are found to depend not only on the Reynolds number, but also on the relative depth of the spherical segment. Dependences for determining the boundaries of the regime existence domains are proposed, and parameters at which the experimental results can be generalized are given.

  3. Turbulent combustion flow through variable cross section channel

    SciTech Connect

    Rogov, B.V.; Sokolova, I.A.

    1999-07-01

    The object of this study is to develop a new evolutionary numerical method for solving direct task of Laval nozzle, which provides non-iterative calculations of chemical reacting turbulent flows with detailed kinetic chemistry. The numerical scheme of fourth order along the normal coordinate and second order along the streamwise one is derived for calculation of difference-differential equations of the second order and the first order. Marching method provides the possibility of computing field flow in subsonic section of nozzle and near an expansion. Critical mass consumption is calculated with controlled accuracy. After critical cross section of nozzle a combined marching method with global iterations over axial pressure (only) makes it possible to overcome ill posedness of mixed supersonic flow and calculate the whole flow field near and after critical cross section. Numerical results are demonstrated on turbulent burning hydrogen-oxygen flow through Laval nozzle with curvature of wall K{sub w} = 0.5.

  4. Oscillating flow and separation of species in rectangular channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacioglu, A.; Narayanan, R.

    2016-07-01

    The mass transfer and separation of species in a tube using oscillatory flows are strongly affected by the fluid flow profiles in the tube. It has been well established that oscillatory motion in a one-dimensional flow configuration leads to a single tuning dimensionless frequency, where optimum separation may be effected. In this work, the effect on species separation by two-dimensional laminar flow arising in a rectangular cross section is studied and a surprising result is that a second tuning frequency may occur at lower dimensionless oscillation frequencies. The physics reveals that this new optimum disappears when the aspect ratio is either very large or close to unity. These observations are related to the flow profiles at different aspect ratios.

  5. Deformation of an Elastic beam due to Viscous Flow in an Embedded Channel Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matia, Yoav; Gat, Amir

    2015-11-01

    Elastic deformation due to embedded fluidic networks is currently studied in the context of soft-actuators and soft-robotic applications. In this work, we analyze the time dependent interaction between elastic deformation of a slender beam and viscous flow within a long serpentine channel, embedded in the elastic structure. The channel is positioned asymmetrically with regard to the midplane of the elastic beam, and thus pressure within the channel creates a local moment deforming the beam. We focus on creeping flows and small deformations of the elastic beam and obtain, in leading order, a convection-diffusion equation governing the pressure-field within the serpentine channel. The beam time-dependent deformation is then obtained as a function of the pressure-field and the geometry of the embedded network. This relation enables the design of complex time-dependent deformation patterns of beams with embedded channel networks. Our theoretical results were illustrated and verified by numerical computations.

  6. Experimental Investigation and Flow Process Computer Simulation of the Single Mini Channel Condenser for Vapor Compression Refrigeration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pabilona, L. L.; Villanueva, E. P.

    2015-09-01

    This study is a computer simulation of the temperature profiles and experimental investigation of three 100 mm x 50 mm x 18 mm single mini channel condensers with hydraulic diameters of 3 mm, 2 mm, and 1mm. The mini channels which were made of copper were designed, fabricated and tested. Each unit was connected in a vapor compression cycle with R-134a as the refrigerant. The average refrigerant mass flow rates were varied from 1.296 - 69.471 g/s, and the average inlet and outlet condenser pressure variations were 102.5 - 121.8 kPa and 101.74 -121.23 kPa, respectively. Each condenser was placed inside a mini wind tunnel system where forced draft air was introduced to initiate convective heat transfer. Each condenser was tested and data were gathered every five minute interval for one hour using a Lab View Software. Computer simulations on the flow process were conducted using Solid Works software. The experimental results presented the inlet and outlet condenser pressures, and pressure drops. The experimental heat transfer coefficients were calculated at different mass fluxes during condensation. The values ranged from 3900 to 5200 W/m2-°K for the 3 mm, 2600 to 9000 W/m2-°K for the 2 mm, and 13 to 98 W/m2-°K for the 1 mm. The heat transfer coefficients calculated from experiments were then compared with the computed values using the correlations developed by Dittus-Boelter and Lee-Son. The results showed increasing deviation as the diameter decreased. The discrepancies could be attributed to the appropriateness of the Dittus-Boelter and Lee-Son correlations in small diameter channels, complexities in the flow process which involved two phase flow heat transfer in very small tubes, and the difficulties in attaining very accurate measurements in small channels.

  7. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    1991-01-01

    Future space exploration and commercialization will require more efficient heat rejection systems. For the required heat transfer rates, such systems must use advanced heat transfer techniques. Forced two phase flow boiling heat transfer with enhancements falls in this category. However, moderate to high quality two phase systems tend to require higher pressure losses. This report is divided into two major parts: (1) Multidimensional wall temperature measurement and heat transfer enhancement for top heated horizontal channels with flow boiling; and (2) Improved analytical heat transfer data reduction for a single side heated coolant channel. Part 1 summarizes over forty experiments which involve both single phase convection and flow boiling in a horizontal channel heated externally from the top side. Part 2 contains parametric dimensionless curves with parameters such as the coolant channel radius ratio, the Biot number, and the circumferential coordinate.

  8. Darcy Flow in a Wavy Channel Filled with a Porous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Donald D; Ogretim, Egemen; Bromhal, Grant S

    2013-05-17

    Flow in channels bounded by wavy or corrugated walls is of interest in both technological and geological contexts. This paper presents an analytical solution for the steady Darcy flow of an incompressible fluid through a homogeneous, isotropic porous medium filling a channel bounded by symmetric wavy walls. This packed channel may represent an idealized packed fracture, a situation which is of interest as a potential pathway for the leakage of carbon dioxide from a geological sequestration site. The channel walls change from parallel planes, to small amplitude sine waves, to large amplitude nonsinusoidal waves as certain parameters are increased. The direction of gravity is arbitrary. A plot of piezometric head against distance in the direction of mean flow changes from a straight line for parallel planes to a series of steeply sloping sections in the reaches of small aperture alternating with nearly constant sections in the large aperture bulges. Expressions are given for the stream function, specific discharge, piezometric head, and pressure.

  9. Experimental investigation of turbulent natural convection flow in a converging channel

    SciTech Connect

    Ayinde, T.F.

    2008-05-15

    This paper reports the results of fluid flow measurements for natural convection in a converging plates channel using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The channel walls were symmetrically subjected to uniform temperature conditions. Velocity characteristics were obtained for two inclination angles, {theta} = 15 and 45 , and two heating conditions corresponding to Ra{sub L} = 2.7 x 10{sup 8} and 4.4 x 10{sup 8}, where Ra{sub L} is the Raleigh number based on the length of the channel wall. Results are presented as vector plots as well as profiles of mean velocities and turbulence quantities. They show that the main flow is aligned with the orientation of the channel walls, due to the effect of buoyancy force, which is no longer exclusively in the vertical direction. They also reveal the presence of reverse flow, which leads to the formation of two symmetric vortices in the core. (author)

  10. Formation of plasma channels in air under filamentation of focused ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of plasma channels in air under filamentation of focused ultrashort laser pulses was experimentally and theoretically studied together with theoreticians of the Moscow State University and the Institute of Atmospheric Optics. The influence of various characteristics of ultrashort laser pulses on these plasma channels is discussed. Plasma channels formed under filamentation of focused laser beams with a wavefront distorted by spherical aberration (introduced by adaptive optics) and by astigmatism, with cross-section spatially formed by various diaphragms and with different UV and IR wavelengths, were experimentally and numerically studied. The influence of plasma channels created by a filament of a focused UV or IR femtosecond laser pulse (λ = 248 nm or 740 nm) on characteristics of other plasma channels formed by a femtosecond pulse at the same wavelength following the first one with varied nanosecond time delay was also experimentally studied. An application of plasma channels formed due to the filamentation of focused UV ultrashort laser pulses including a train of such pulses and a combination of ultrashort and long (~100 ns) laser pulses for triggering and guiding long (~1 m) electric discharges is discussed.

  11. Additional research on instabilities in atmospheric flow systems associated with clear air turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeffler, R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical and experimental fluid mechanics studies were conducted to investigate instabilities in atmospheric flow systems associated with clear air turbulence. The experimental portion of the program was conducted using an open water channel which allows investigation of flows having wide ranges of shear and density stratification. The program was primarily directed toward studies of the stability of straight, stratified shear flows with particular emphasis on the effects of velocity profile on stability; on studies of three-dimensional effects on the breakdown region in shear layers; on the the interaction of shear flows with long-wave length internal waves; and on the stability of shear flows consisting of adjacent stable layers. The results of these studies were used to evaluate methods used in analyses of CAT encounters in the atmosphere involving wave-induced shear layer instabilities of the Kelvin-Helmholta type. A computer program was developed for predicting shear-layer instability and CAT induced by mountain waves. This technique predicts specific altitudes and locations where CAT would be expected.

  12. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dilution system, you may use a laminar flow element, an ultrasonic flow meter, a subsonic venturi, a... § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow meter to determine instantaneous diluted exhaust flow rates or total diluted exhaust flow over a...

  13. Air flow paths and porosity/permeability change in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin

    2007-04-01

    This study develops methods to estimate the change in soil characteristics and associated air flow paths in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging. These objectives were achieved by performing combined in situ air sparging and tracer testing, and comparing the breakthrough curves obtained from the tracer gas with those obtained by a numerical simulation model that incorporates a predicted change in porosity that is proportional to the air saturation. The results reveal that revising the porosity and permeability according to the distribution of gas saturation is helpful in breakthrough curve fitting, however, these changes are unable to account for the effects of preferential air flow paths, especially in the zone closest to the points of air injection. It is not known the extent to which these preferential air flow paths were already present versus created, increased, or reduced as a result of the air sparging experiment. The transport of particles from around the sparging well could account for the overall increase in porosity and permeability observed in the study. Collection of soil particles in a monitoring well within 2m of the sparging well provided further evidence of the transport of particles. Transport of particles from near the sparging well also appeared to decrease the radius of influence (ROI). Methods for predicting the effects of pressurized air injection and water flow on the creation or modification of preferential air flow paths are still needed to provide a full description of the change in soil conditions that accompany air sparging.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of sharkskin denticles in turbulent channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, A.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2016-03-01

    The hydrodynamic function of sharkskin has been under investigation for the past 30 years. Current literature conflicts on whether sharkskin is able to reduce skin friction similar to riblets. To contribute insights toward reconciling these conflicting views, direct numerical simulations are carried out to obtain detailed flow fields around realistic denticles. A sharp interface immersed boundary method is employed to simulate two arrangements of actual sharkskin denticles (from Isurus oxyrinchus) in a turbulent boundary layer at Reτ ≈ 180. For comparison, turbulent flow over drag-reducing scalloped riblets is also simulated with similar flow conditions and with the same numerical method. Although the denticles resemble riblets, both sharkskin arrangements increase total drag by 44%-50%, while the riblets reduce drag by 5%. Analysis of the simulated flow fields shows that the turbulent flow around denticles is highly three-dimensional and separated, with 25% of the total drag being form drag. The complex three-dimensional shape of the denticles gives rise to a mean flow dominated by strong secondary flows in sharp contrast with the mean flow generated by riblets, which is largely two-dimensional. The so resulting three-dimensionality of sharkskin flows leads to an increase in the magnitude of the turbulent statistics near the denticles, which further contributes to increasing the total drag. The simulations also show that, at least for the simulated arrangements, sharkskin, in sharp contrast with drag-reducing riblets, is unable to isolate high shear stress near denticle ridges causing a significant portion of the denticle surface to be exposed to high mean shear.

  15. 3D Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Buoyant Flow and Heat Transport in a Curved Open Channel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-dimensional buoyancy-extended version of kappa-epsilon turbulence model was developed for simulating the turbulent flow and heat transport in a curved open channel. The density- induced buoyant force was included in the model, and the influence of temperature stratification on flow field was...

  16. Flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable shallow microfluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Cognet, Vincent; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-11-01

    Laminar flow in devices fabricated from PDMS causes deformation of the passage geometry, which affects the flow rate-pressure drop relation. Having an accurate flow rate-pressure drop relation for deformable microchannels is of importance given that the flow rate for a given pressure drop can be as much as 500% of the flow rate predicted by Poiseuille's law for a rigid channel. proposed a successful model of the latter phenomenon by heuristically coupling linear elasticity with the lubrication approximation for Stokes flow. However, their model contains a fitting parameter that must be found for each channel shape by performing an experiment. We present a perturbative derivation of the flow rate-pressure drop relation in a shallow deformable microchannel using Kirchoff-Love theory of isotropic quasi-static plate bending and Stokes' equations under a ``double lubrication'' approximation (i.e., the ratio of the channel's height to its width and of the channel's width to its length are both assumed small). Our result contains no free parameters and confirms Gervais et al.'s observation that the flow rate is a quartic polynomial of the pressure drop. ICC was supported by NSF Grant DMS-1104047 and the U.S. DOE through the LANL/LDRD Program; HAS was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1132835.

  17. Computation of turbulent channel flow using Large-Eddy Interaction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, S. K.; Payne, F. R.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the paper is to investigate the nature and values of closure parameters appearing in the proposed Large-Eddy Interaction Model for prediction of turbulent flow field. Effects of two closure parameters on predicted Reynolds stresses and other turbulence structural quantities are examined for channel flows at two Reynolds numbers.

  18. Surface-slip equations for multicomponent, nonequilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Scott, Carl D.; Moss, James N.; Goglia, Gene

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low-Reynolds-number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. These are obtained from closed-form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent air flow, includes the finite-rate surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities have been obtained in a form which can readily be employed in flow-field computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures. Expression is also provided for the finite-rate species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in absence of slip.

  19. Air-Flow Simulation in Realistic Models of the Trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, T; Schwartz, P; Trebotich, D

    2004-12-09

    In this article we present preliminary results from a new technique for flow simulation in realistic anatomical airways. The airways are extracted by means of Level-Sets methods that accurately model the complex and varying surfaces of anatomical objects. The surfaces obtained are defined at the sub-pixel level where they intersect the Cartesian grid of the image domain. It is therefore straightforward to construct embedded boundary representations of these objects on the same grid, for which recent work has enabled discretization of the Navier- Stokes equations for incompressible fluids. While most classical techniques require construction of a structured mesh that approximates the surface in order to extrapolate a 3D finite-element gridding of the whole volume, our method directly simulates the air-flow inside the extracted surface without losing any complicated details and without building additional grids.

  20. A critical review of two-phase flow in gas flow channels of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ryan; Zhang, Lifeng; Ding, Yulong; Blanco, Mauricio; Bi, Xiaotao; Wilkinson, David P.

    Water management in PEM fuel cells has received extensive attention due to its key role in fuel cell performance. The unavoidable water, from humidified gas streams and electrochemical reaction, leads to gas-liquid two-phase flow in the flow channels of fuel cells. The presence of two-phase flow increases the complexity in water management in PEM fuel cells, which remains a challenging hurdle in the commercialization of this technology. Unique water emergence from the gas diffusion layer, which is different from conventional gas-liquid two-phase flow where water is introduced from the inlet together with the gas, leads to different gas-liquid flow behaviors, including pressure drop, flow pattern, and liquid holdup along flow field channels. These parameters are critical in flow field design and fuel cell operation and therefore two-phase flow has received increasing attention in recent years. This review emphasizes gas-liquid two-phase flow in minichannels or microchannels related to PEM fuel cell applications. In situ and ex situ experimental setups have been utilized to visualize and quantify two-phase flow phenomena in terms of flow regime maps, flow maldistribution, and pressure drop measurements. Work should continue to make the results more relevant for operating PEM fuel cells. Numerical simulations have progressed greatly, but conditions relevant to the length scales and time scales experienced by an operating fuel cell have not been realized. Several mitigation strategies exist to deal with two-phase flow, but often at the expense of overall cell performance due to parasitic power losses. Thus, experimentation and simulation must continue to progress in order to develop a full understanding of two-phase flow phenomena so that meaningful mitigation strategies can be implemented.

  1. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  2. Residence time of water film and slug flow features in fuel cell gas channels and their effect on instantaneous area coverage ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzini-Gutierrez, Daniel; Kandlikar, Satish G.; Hernandez-Guerrero, Abel; Elizalde-Blancas, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Water in the gas channels of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell is modeled as slugs and film, and removal mechanisms for these flow patterns are numerically investigated. The removal of excess liquid water is simulated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) through the volume of fluid (VOF) model. The computational domain consists of a gas flow channel appropriate for commercial stacks for automotive applications. The effects of superficial air velocity, channel surface wettability, and channel cross-section geometry are investigated through quantitative comparison of two-phase pressure drop, area coverage ratio (ACR) over the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and liquid removal time. Top wall film flow was identified as a desirable feature since it did not cover the GDL and facilitated transport of oxygen to the reaction sites while removing the water. A range of hydrophilic channel walls in combination with a hydrophobic GDL is proposed to promote this behavior while reducing the fluctuations in two-phase pressure drop for different contact angles. Additional enhancements to liquid water removal were associated with the channel cross-section geometry. An alternative trapezoidal shape is suggested for improved top wall film flow while improving the manufacturability of the bipolar plates for mass production.

  3. Nonmodal instability of a stratified plane-channel suspension flow with fine particles.

    PubMed

    Boronin, Sergei A; Osiptsov, Alexander N

    2016-03-01

    We consider the nonmodal instability and transient growth of small disturbances in a plane-channel suspension flow with a nonuniform concentration profile of fine noncolloidal particles accumulated in two localized layers, symmetric about the channel axis. A single-velocity model of an effective Newtonian fluid with a finite particle volume fraction is employed. It is established that fine particles distributed nonuniformly in the main flow significantly modify the growth rate of the first mode in a wide range of governing parameters. The most pronounced destabilizing effect is produced by the particles localized in the vicinity of the walls. A parametric study of the so-called optimal disturbances showed that they are streaks elongated in the flow direction, similar to the optimal disturbances in the flow devoid of particles. The transverse wave number of the optimal disturbances depends strongly on the location of the particle layers. Even when the particle mass concentration (averaged over the channel cross section) is small (of the order of a percent) and the particles are localized in the middle between the walls and the channel axis, the energy of the optimal disturbances is by several orders of magnitude larger than in dusty-gas and pure-fluid flows. When the particle layers are located in the vicinity of the walls or the channel axis, the nonmodal instability mechanism is less pronounced, as compared to the flow devoid of particles. PMID:27078447

  4. Examination of event magnitude, contributing drainage basin area, channel gradient, and rainfall influences on channel yield rates of post-fire debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gartner, J. E.; Cannon, S. H.; Santi, P.

    2011-12-01

    Development of methods for estimating volumes of post-fire debris-flow material along drainage networks requires a better understanding of the factors that control channel erosion and deposition within recently-burned drainage basins. The amount of material eroded and deposited by debris flows at locations along a channel can be quantified using the channel yield rate; the change in debris-flow volume per unit length of channel caused by passage of a debris flow. Here, we use channel yield rates measured in basins recently burned the 2009 Station fire in the San Gabriel Mountains of southern California to examine relationships between these rates and event magnitude, contributing drainage basin area, channel gradient, and rainfall characteristics. Following the Station fire and prior to any significant rainstorms, two to nine cross section surveys were established along the entire lengths of the main channels of three steep, rugged drainage basins. Surveys of the channel cross sections were made both before and after two distinct debris-flow triggering storms. These data were used to calculate post-fire debris-flow channel yield rates at 40 locations. Tipping-bucket rain gages installed near the surveyed channels provide rainfall amounts and intensities. Measurements of the amount of material removed from debris-retention basins located at the drainage basin outlets provide information on debris-flow volumes deposited at drainage basin outlets. High-resolution LiDAR data (1 meter) provide accurate elevation data for defining contributing drainage basin areas and channel gradients. The measured channel yield rates varied from 1 to 19 m3/m, with a mean of 4 m3/m and standard deviation of 5 m3/m. The greatest yield rates coincide with locations immediately downstream of field-mapped bedrock steps or channel junctions. The coincidence with bedrock steps suggests that in-channel "fire-hose" entrainment is a major contributor to debris-flow volume. High channel yield

  5. Flow characteristics on the blade channel vortex in the Francis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P. C.; Wang, Z. N.; Luo, X. Q.; Wang, Y. L.; Zuo, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Depending on the long-term hydraulic development of Francis turbine, the blade channel vortex phenomenon was investigated systematically from hydraulic design, experimental and numerical computation in this paper. The blade channel vortex difference between the high water head and low water head turbine was also analyzed. Meanwhile, the relationship between the blade channel vortex and the operating stability of hydraulic turbine was also investigated. The results show that the phenomenon of blade channel vortex is an intrinsic property for Francis turbine under small flow rate condition, the turning-point of the blade channel vortex inception curve appears at low unit speed region, and the variation trend of the blade channel vortex inception curve is closely related to the blade inlet edge profile. In addition to, the vortex of the high water head turbine can generally be excluded from the stable operation region, while which is more different for the one of the low water head turbine.

  6. Gelled propellant flow: Boundary layer theory for power-law fluids in a converging planar channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraynik, Andrew M.; Geller, A. S.; Glick, J. H.

    1989-10-01

    A boundary layer theory for the flow of power-law fluids in a converging planar channel has been developed. This theory suggests a Reynolds number for such flows, and following numerical integration, a boundary layer thickness. This boundary layer thickness has been used in the generation of a finite element mesh for the finite element code FIDAP. FIDAP was then used to simulate the flow of power-law fluids through a converging channel. Comparison of the analytic and finite element results shows the two to be in very good agreement in regions where entrance and exit effects (not considered in the boundary layer theory) can be neglected.

  7. Patterning electrohydrodynamic flows with conductive obstacles in microfluidic channels.

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, Tyrone F.; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Barrett, Louis C.; Cummings, Eric B.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Harnett, Cindy K.; Skulan, Andrew J.

    2005-03-01

    Flow patterns with both recirculating and unidirectional characteristics are useful for controlled mixing and pumping within microfluidic devices. We have developed a fabrication process that converts injection-molded polymer chips into devices that demonstrate induced-charge electroosmosis (ICEO) effects (1,2) in AC fields. Polymeric insulating posts are coated with metal to produce a nonuniform zeta potential under an applied electric field. Induced flows are analyzed by particle image velocimetry. Stable, recirculating flow patterns are discussed, along with their potential to produce well-characterized and reversible streamlines for on-chip mixing in chemical separation and synthesis devices. Asymmetric conductive features can bias the flow direction, generating unidirectional pumping in an AC field. This pumping approach will be discussed in comparison with DC electrokinetic pumps we have studied.

  8. Two-dimensional and axisymmetric bifurcated channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A.

    1981-10-01

    Flow characteristics within the turbofan engine passageway for arbitrary geometries over a range of Reynolds numbers (1350 to 750,000) are determined by constructing a numerical model capable of handling irregularly shaped flow regions with laminar or turbulent flow. This is accomplished by using a vorticity-stream function formulation of the governing equations for two-dimensional and axisymmetrical flows with a two-equation eddy viscosity model for turbulence closure. A body-fitted coordinate system (Chu, 1971; Amsden and Hirt, 1973; Thompson et al., 1974) is used to treat the arbitrary geomtry. All equations are solved using finite-difference techniques (Goldman, 1980). Conclusions are presented, including: first-order terms must be separately upwind differenced to form stable solutions, regardless of whether the term is a true velocity term of a geometrically generated term created by the transformation.

  9. Ozone concentrations in air flowing into New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksic, Nenad; Kent, John; Walcek, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Ozone (O3) concentrations measured at Pinnacle State Park (PSPNY), very close to the southern border of New York State, are used to estimate concentrations in air flowing into New York. On 20% of the ozone season (April-September) afternoons from 2004 to 2015, mid-afternoon 500-m back trajectories calculated from PSPNY cross New York border from the south and spend less than three hours in New York State, in this area of negligible local pollution emissions. One-hour (2p.m.-3p.m.) O3 concentrations during these inflowing conditions were 46 ± 13 ppb, and ranged from a minimum of 15 ppb to a maximum of 84 ppb. On average during 2004-2015, each year experienced 11.8 days with inflowing 1-hr O3 concentrations exceeding 50 ppb, 4.3 days with O3 > 60 ppb, and 1.5 days had O3 > 70 ppb. During the same period, 8-hr average concentrations (10a.m. to 6p.m.) exceeded 50 ppb on 10.0 days per season, while 3.9 days exceeded 60 ppb, and 70 ppb was exceeded 1.2 days per season. Two afternoons of minimal in-state emission influences with high ozone concentrations were analyzed in more detail. Synoptic and back trajectory analysis, including comparison with upwind ozone concentrations, indicated that the two periods were characterized as photo-chemically aged air containing high inflowing O3 concentrations most likely heavily influenced by pollution emissions from states upwind of New York including Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Ohio. These results suggest that New York state-level attempts to comply with National Ambient Air Quality Standards by regulating in-state O3 precursor NOx and organic emissions would be very difficult, since air frequently enters New York State very close to or in excess of Federal Air Quality Standards.

  10. Improved Determination of Surface and Atmospheric Temperatures Using Only Shortwave AIRS Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind,Joel

    2009-01-01

    AIRS was launched on EOS Aqua on May 4, 2002, together with AMSU-A and HSB, to form a next generation polar orbiting infrared and microwave atmospheric sounding system. AIRS is a grating spectrometer with a number of linear arrays of detectors with each detector sensitive to outgoing radiation in a characteristic frequency v(sub i) with a spectral band pass delta v(sub i) of roughly v(sub i) /1200. AIRS contains 2378 spectral channels covering portions of the spectral region 650 cm(exp -1) (15.38 gm) - 2665 cm(exp -1)' (3.752 micrometers). These spectral regions contain significant absorption features from two CO2 absorption bands, the 15 micrometer (longwave) CO2 band, and the 4.3 micrometer (shortwave) CO, absorption band. There are also two atmospheric window regions, the 12 micrometerm - 8 micrometer (longwave) window, and the 4.17 micrometer - 3.75 micrometer (shortwave) window. Historically, determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures from satellite observations was performed using primarily observations in the longwave window and CO2 absorption regions. One reason for this was concerns about the effects, during the day, of reflected sunlight and non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (non-LTE) on the observed radiances in the shortwave portion of the spectrum. According to cloud clearing theory, more accurate soundings of both surface skin and atmospheric temperatures can be obtained under partial cloud cover conditions if one uses the longwave channels to determine cloud cleared radiances R(sub i) for all channels, and uses R(sub i) only from shortwave channels in the determination of surface and atmospheric temperatures. This procedure is now being used by the AIRS Science Team in preparation for the AIRS Version 6 Retrieval Algorithm. This paper describes how the effects on the radiances of solar radiation reflected by clouds and the Earth's surface, and also of non-LTE, are accounted for in the analysis of the data. Results are presented for both

  11. Intraoral air pressure and oral air flow under different bleed and bite-block conditions.

    PubMed

    Putnam, A H; Shelton, R L; Kastner, C U

    1986-03-01

    Intraoral pressures and oral flows were measured as normal talkers produced /p lambda/ and /si/ under experimental conditions that perturbed the usual aeromechanical production characteristics of the consonants. A translabial pressure-release device was used to bleed off intraoral pressure during /p/. Bite-blocks were used to open the anterior bite artificially during /s/. For /p/, intraoral pressure decreased and translabial air leakage increased as bleed orifice area increased. For /s/, flow increased as the area of sibilant constriction increased, but differential pressure across the /s/ oral constriction did not vary systematically with changes in its area. Flow on postconsonantal vowels /lambda/ and /i/ did not vary systematically across experimental conditions. The data imply that maintenance of perturbed intraoral pressure was more effective when compensatory options included opportunity for increased respiratory drive and structural adjustments at the place of consonant articulation rather than increased respiratory drive alone.

  12. Comparing two methods of simulating mirco-scale viscous flows in a porous channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hui; Han, Jie; Jin, Yan; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2007-11-01

    Water flows in natural soil porous media are important to colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants and other phenomena with groundwater as the carrier. The 3D micro-scale flow is complicated due to the complex geometry. The transport and deposition of colloids in such flows are affected by several physical and chemical forces involved. In this talk, we first compare two methods of simulating viscous flows in both 2D and 3D channels filled with glass-bead particles. The first method is Physalis developed by Prosperetti's group, at Johns Hopkins, based on solving the Navier-Stokes equation using a combination of numerical solution and local analytical Stokes flow representation. The second method is a meso-scale approach by solving a lattice Boltzmann equation. Specific implementation issues will be discussed. The two methods yield almost identical flows. Preliminary simulation results as well as parallel experimental results on colloid deposition in the porous channel will also be presented.

  13. Influence of Visitors' Flows on Indoor Air Quality of Museum Premises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovgaliuk, Volodymyr; Lysak, Pavlo

    2012-06-01

    The article considers the influence of visitors' flows on indoor air quality of museum premises and work of ventilation and air conditioning systems. The article provides the analysis of the heat input from visitors, the results of mathematical simulation of visitors flow influence on indoor air quality. Several advice options are provided on application of variable air volume systems for provision of constant indoor air quality.

  14. Flow visualization study in high aspect ratio cooling channels for rocket engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Giuliani, James E.

    1993-11-01

    The structural integrity of high pressure liquid propellant rocket engine thrust chambers is typically maintained through regenerative cooling. The coolant flows through passages formed either by constructing the chamber liner from tubes or by milling channels in a solid liner. Recently, Carlile and Quentmeyer showed life extending advantages (by lowering hot gas wall temperatures) of milling channels with larger height to width aspect ratios (AR is greater than 4) than the traditional, approximately square cross section, passages. Further, the total coolant pressure drop in the thrust chamber could also be reduced, resulting in lower turbomachinery power requirements. High aspect ratio cooling channels could offer many benefits to designers developing new high performance engines, such as the European Vulcain engine (which uses an aspect ratio up to 9). With platelet manufacturing technology, channel aspect ratios up to 15 could be formed offering potentially greater benefits. Some issues still exist with the high aspect ratio coolant channels. In a coolant passage of circular or square cross section, strong secondary vortices develop as the fluid passes through the curved throat region. These vortices mix the fluid and bring lower temperature coolant to the hot wall. Typically, the circulation enhances the heat transfer at the hot gas wall by about 40 percent over a straight channel. The effect that increasing channel aspect ratio has on the curvature heat transfer enhancement has not been sufficiently studied. If the increase in aspect ratio degrades the secondary flow, the fluid mixing will be reduced. Analysis has shown that reduced coolant mixing will result in significantly higher wall temperatures, due to thermal stratification in the coolant, thus decreasing the benefits of the high aspect ratio geometry. A better understanding of the fundamental flow phenomena in high aspect ratio channels with curvature is needed to fully evaluate the benefits of this

  15. Flow visualization study in high aspect ratio cooling channels for rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Giuliani, James E.

    1993-01-01

    The structural integrity of high pressure liquid propellant rocket engine thrust chambers is typically maintained through regenerative cooling. The coolant flows through passages formed either by constructing the chamber liner from tubes or by milling channels in a solid liner. Recently, Carlile and Quentmeyer showed life extending advantages (by lowering hot gas wall temperatures) of milling channels with larger height to width aspect ratios (AR is greater than 4) than the traditional, approximately square cross section, passages. Further, the total coolant pressure drop in the thrust chamber could also be reduced, resulting in lower turbomachinery power requirements. High aspect ratio cooling channels could offer many benefits to designers developing new high performance engines, such as the European Vulcain engine (which uses an aspect ratio up to 9). With platelet manufacturing technology, channel aspect ratios up to 15 could be formed offering potentially greater benefits. Some issues still exist with the high aspect ratio coolant channels. In a coolant passage of circular or square cross section, strong secondary vortices develop as the fluid passes through the curved throat region. These vortices mix the fluid and bring lower temperature coolant to the hot wall. Typically, the circulation enhances the heat transfer at the hot gas wall by about 40 percent over a straight channel. The effect that increasing channel aspect ratio has on the curvature heat transfer enhancement has not been sufficiently studied. If the increase in aspect ratio degrades the secondary flow, the fluid mixing will be reduced. Analysis has shown that reduced coolant mixing will result in significantly higher wall temperatures, due to thermal stratification in the coolant, thus decreasing the benefits of the high aspect ratio geometry. A better understanding of the fundamental flow phenomena in high aspect ratio channels with curvature is needed to fully evaluate the benefits of this

  16. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 2; Sub-Scale Air Flow Simulation of Port Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y. P.; Ramandran, N.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    The injection-flow issuing from a porous medium in the cold-flow simulation of internal port flows in solid rocket motors is characterized by a spatial instability termed pseudoturbulence that produces a rather non-uniform (lumpy) injection-velocity profile. The objective of this study is to investigate the interaction between the injection- and the developing axial-flows. The findings show that this interaction generally weakens the lumpy injection profile and affects the subsequent development of the axial flow. The injection profile is found to depend on the material characteristics, and the ensuing pseudoturbulence is a function of the injection velocity, the axial position and the distance from the porous wall. The flow transition (from laminar to turbulent) of the axial-flow is accelerated in flows emerging from smaller pores primarily due to the higher pseudoturbulence produced by the smaller pores in comparison to that associated with larger pores. In flows with rather uniform injection-flow profiles (weak or no pseudoturbulence), the axial and transverse velocity components in the porous duct are found to satisfy the sine/cosine analytical solutions derived from inviscid assumptions. The transition results from the present study are compared with previous results from surveyed literature, and detailed flow development measurements are presented in terms of the blowing fraction, and characterizing Reynolds numbers.

  17. Comparison of deliverable and exhaustible pressurized air flow rates in laboratory gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate the maximum credible flow rates of pressurized air into Plutonium Process Support Laboratories gloveboxes. Classical equations for compressible fluids were used to estimate the flow rates. The calculated maxima were compared to another`s estimates of glovebox exhaust flow rates and corresponding glovebox internal pressures. No credible pressurized air flow rate will pressurize a glovebox beyond normal operating limits. Unrestricted use of the pressurized air supply is recommended.

  18. Dynamics of flow behind backward-facing step in a narrow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uruba, V.

    2013-04-01

    The results and their analysis from experiments obtained by TR-PIV are presented on the model of backward-facing step in a narrow channel. The recirculation zone is studied in details. Mean structures are evaluated from fluctuating velocity fields. Then dynamics of the flow is characterized with help of POD (BOD) technique. Substantial differences in high energy dynamical structures behaviour within the back-flow region and further downstream behind the flow reattachment have been found.

  19. Radiation mechanism for the aerodynamic sound of gears - An explanation for the radiation process by air flow observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houjoh, Haruo

    1992-12-01

    One specific feature of the aerodynamic sound produced at the face end region is that the radiation becomes equally weak by filling root spaces as by shortening the center distance. However, one can easily expect that such actions make the air flow faster, and consequently make the sound louder. This paper attempts to reveal the reason for such a feature. First, air flow induced by the pumping action of the gear pair was analyzed regarding a series of root spaces as volume varying cavities which have channels to adjacent cavities as well as the exit/inlet at the face ends. The numerical analysis was verified by the hot wire anemometer measurement. Next, from the obtained flow response, the sound source was estimated to be a combination of symmetrically distributed simple sources. Taking the effect of either the center distance or root filling into consideration, it is shown that the simplified model can explain such a feature rationally.

  20. Extended plasma channels created by UV laser in air and their application to control electric discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    Results are presented from a series of experimental and theoretical studies on creating weakly ionized extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by 248-nm UV laser radiation and their application to control long high-voltage discharges. The main mechanisms of air ionization by UV laser pulses with durations from 100 fs to 25 ns and intensities in the ranges of 3×1011-1.5×1013 and 3×106-3×1011 W/cm2, respectively, which are below the threshold for optical gas breakdown, as well as the main relaxation processes in plasma with a density of 109-1017 cm-3, are considered. It is shown that plasma channels in air can be efficiently created by amplitude-modulated UV pulses consisting of a train of subpicosecond pulses producing primary photoelectrons and a long UV pulse suppressing electron attachment and sustaining the density of free electrons in plasma. Different modes of the generation and amplification of trains of subterawatt subpicosecond pulses and amplitude-modulated UV pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were implemented on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid Ti:sapphire-KrF laser facility. The filamentation of such UV laser beams during their propagation in air over distances of up to 100 m and the parameters of the corresponding plasma channels were studied experimentally and theoretically. Laser initiation of high-voltage electric discharges and control of their trajectories by means of amplitude-modulated UV pulses, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of breakdowns in air gaps with length of up to 80 cm, were studied.

  1. Extended plasma channels created by UV laser in air and their application to control electric discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V. D. Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    Results are presented from a series of experimental and theoretical studies on creating weakly ionized extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by 248-nm UV laser radiation and their application to control long high-voltage discharges. The main mechanisms of air ionization by UV laser pulses with durations from 100 fs to 25 ns and intensities in the ranges of 3×10{sup 11}–1.5×10{sup 13} and 3×10{sup 6}–3×10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}, respectively, which are below the threshold for optical gas breakdown, as well as the main relaxation processes in plasma with a density of 10{sup 9}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, are considered. It is shown that plasma channels in air can be efficiently created by amplitude-modulated UV pulses consisting of a train of subpicosecond pulses producing primary photoelectrons and a long UV pulse suppressing electron attachment and sustaining the density of free electrons in plasma. Different modes of the generation and amplification of trains of subterawatt subpicosecond pulses and amplitude-modulated UV pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were implemented on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid Ti:sapphire-KrF laser facility. The filamentation of such UV laser beams during their propagation in air over distances of up to 100 m and the parameters of the corresponding plasma channels were studied experimentally and theoretically. Laser initiation of high-voltage electric discharges and control of their trajectories by means of amplitude-modulated UV pulses, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of breakdowns in air gaps with length of up to 80 cm, were studied.

  2. Channel flow and trichloroethylene treatment in a partly iron-filled fracture: experimental and model results.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zuansi; Merly, Corrine; Thomson, Neil R; Wilson, Ryan D; Lerner, David N

    2007-08-15

    Technical developments have now made it possible to emplace granular zero-valent iron (Fe(0)) in fractured media to create a Fe(0) fracture reactive barrier (Fe(0) FRB) for the treatment of contaminated groundwater. To evaluate this concept, we conducted a laboratory experiment in which trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated water was flushed through a single uniform fracture created between two sandstone blocks. This fracture was partly filled with what was intended to be a uniform thickness of iron. Partial treatment of TCE by iron demonstrated that the concept of a Fe(0) FRB is practical, but was less than anticipated for an iron layer of uniform thickness. When the experiment was disassembled, evidence of discrete channelised flow was noted and attributed to imperfect placement of the iron. To evaluate the effect of the channel flow, an explicit Channel Model was developed that simplifies this complex flow regime into a conceptualised set of uniform and parallel channels. The mathematical representation of this conceptualisation directly accounts for (i) flow channels and immobile fluid arising from the non-uniform iron placement, (ii) mass transfer from the open fracture to iron and immobile fluid regions, and (iii) degradation in the iron regions. A favourable comparison between laboratory data and the results from the developed mathematical model suggests that the model is capable of representing TCE degradation in fractures with non-uniform iron placement. In order to apply this Channel Model concept to a Fe(0) FRB system, a simplified, or implicit, Lumped Channel Model was developed where the physical and chemical processes in the iron layer and immobile fluid regions are captured by a first-order lumped rate parameter. The performance of this Lumped Channel Model was compared to laboratory data, and benchmarked against the Channel Model. The advantages of the Lumped Channel Model are that the degradation of TCE in the system is represented by a first

  3. Flow distribution and pressure drop in parallel-channel configurations of planar fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maharudrayya, S.; Jayanti, S.; Deshpande, A. P.

    Parallel-channel configurations for gas-distributor plates of planar fuel cells reduce the pressure drop, but give rise to the problem of severe flow maldistribution wherein some of the channels may be starved of the reactants. This study presents an analysis of the flow distribution through parallel-channel configurations. One-dimensional models based on mass and momentum balance equations in the inlet and exhaust gas headers are developed for Z- and U-type parallel-channel configurations. The resulting coupled ordinary differential equations are solved analytically to obtain closed-form solutions for the flow distribution in the individual channels and for the pressure drop over the entire distributor plate. The models have been validated by comparing the results with those obtained from three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Application of the models to typical fuel-cell distributor plates shows that severe maldistribution of flow may arise in certain cases and that this can be avoided by careful choice of the dimensions of the headers and the channels.

  4. A Self-Replication Model for Long Channelized Lava Flows on the Mars Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.

    2008-01-01

    A model is presented for channelized lava flows emplaced by a self-replicating, levee-building process over long distances on the plains of Mars. Such flows may exhibit morphologic evidence of stagnation, overspills, and upstream breakouts. However, these processes do not inhibit the formation and persistence of a prominent central channel that can often be traced for more than 100 km. The two central assumptions of the self-replication model are (1) the flow advances at the average upstream velocity of the molten core and (2) the fraction of the lava that travels faster than the average upstream velocity forms stationary margins in the advancing distal zone to preserve the self-replication process. For an exemplary 300 km long flow north of Pavonis Mons, the model indicates that 8 m of crust must have formed during emplacement, as determined from the channel and levee dimensions. When combined with independent thermal dynamic estimates for the crustal growth rate, relatively narrow constraints are obtained for the flow rate (2250 m3 s 1), emplacement duration (600 d), and the lava viscosity of the molten interior (106 Pa s). Minor, transient overspills and breakouts increase the emplacement time by only a factor of 2. The primary difference between the prodigious channelized Martian flows and their smaller terrestrial counterparts is that high volumetric flow rates must have persisted for many hundreds of days on Mars, in contrast to a few hours or days on Earth.

  5. Visualization of Secondary Flow Development in High Aspect Ratio Channels with Curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Michael L.; Giuliani, James E.

    1994-01-01

    The results of an experimental project to visually examine the secondary flow structure that develops in curved, high aspect-ratio rectangular channels are presented. The results provide insight into the fluid dynamics within high aspect ratio channels. A water flow test rig constructed out of plexiglass, with an adjustable aspect ratio, was used for these experiments. Results were obtained for a channel geometry with a hydraulic diameter of 10.6 mm (0.417 in.), an aspect ratio of 5.0, and a hydraulic radius to curvature radius ratio of 0.0417. Flow conditions were varied to achieve Reynolds numbers up to 5,100. A new particle imaging velocimetry technique was developed which could resolve velocity information from particles entering and leaving the field of view. Time averaged secondary flow velocity vectors, obtained using this velocimetry technique, are presented for 30 degrees, 60 degrees, and 90 degrees into a 180 degrees bend and at a Reynolds number of 5,100. The secondary flow results suggest the coexistence of both the classical curvature induced vortex pair flow structure and the eddies seen in straight turbulent channel flow.

  6. Self-adjustment of stream bed roughness and flow velocity in a steep mountain channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Johannes M.; Rickenmann, Dieter; Turowski, Jens M.; Kirchner, James W.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how channel bed morphology affects flow conditions (and vice versa) is important for a wide range of fluvial processes and practical applications. We investigated interactions between bed roughness and flow velocity in a steep, glacier-fed mountain stream (Riedbach, Ct. Valais, Switzerland) with almost flume-like boundary conditions. Bed gradient increases along the 1 km study reach by roughly 1 order of magnitude (S = 3-41%), with a corresponding increase in streambed roughness, while flow discharge and width remain approximately constant due to the glacial runoff regime. Streambed roughness was characterized by semivariograms and standard deviations of point clouds derived from terrestrial laser scanning. Reach-averaged flow velocity was derived from dye tracer breakthrough curves measured by 10 fluorometers installed along the channel. Commonly used flow resistance approaches (Darcy-Weisbach equation and dimensionless hydraulic geometry) were used to relate the measured bulk velocity to bed characteristics. As a roughness measure, D84 yielded comparable results to more laborious measures derived from point clouds. Flow resistance behavior across this large range of steep slopes agreed with patterns established in previous studies for both lower-gradient and steep reaches, regardless of which roughness measures were used. We linked empirical critical shear stress approaches to the variable power equation for flow resistance to investigate the change of bed roughness with channel slope. The predicted increase in D84 with increasing channel slope was in good agreement with field observations.

  7. A Rotary Flow Channel for Shear Stress Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed shear sensor calibrator consists of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangential to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau(sub omega) = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. With numerical values of mu = 31 (mu)Pa s (neon at room temperature), r = 0.5 m, omega = 754 /s (7200 rpm), and h = 50.8 m, a shear stress of tau(sub omega) = 231 Pa can be generated. An analysis based on one-dimensional flow, with the flow velocity having only an angular component as a function of the axial and radial coordinates, yields corrections to the above simple formula for the curvature of the wheel, flatness of the sensor, and finite width of the wheel. It is assumed that the sensor mount contains a trough (sidewalls) to render a velocity release boundary condition at the edges of the rim. The Taylor number under maximum flow conditions is found to be 62.3, sufficiently low to obviate flow instability. The fact that the parameters entering into the evaluation of the shear stress can be measured to high accuracy with well-defined uncertainties makes the proposed calibrator suitable for a physical standard for shear stress calibration.

  8. Effects of roughness on density-weighted particle statistics in turbulent channel flows

    SciTech Connect

    Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-31

    The distribution of inertial particles in turbulent flows is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the coherent turbulent structures which develop in the carrier flow field. In wall-bounded flows, these turbulent structures, which control the turbulent regeneration cycles, are strongly affected by the roughness of the wall, nevertheless its effects on the particle transport in two-phase turbulent flows has been still poorly investigated. The issue is discussed here by addressing DNS combined with LPT to obtain statistics of velocity and preferential accumulation of a dilute dispersion of heavy particles in a turbulent channel flow, bounded by irregular two-dimensional rough surfaces, in the one-way coupling regime.

  9. Effects of roughness on density-weighted particle statistics in turbulent channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milici, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of inertial particles in turbulent flows is strongly influenced by the characteristics of the coherent turbulent structures which develop in the carrier flow field. In wall-bounded flows, these turbulent structures, which control the turbulent regeneration cycles, are strongly affected by the roughness of the wall, nevertheless its effects on the particle transport in two-phase turbulent flows has been still poorly investigated. The issue is discussed here by addressing DNS combined with LPT to obtain statistics of velocity and preferential accumulation of a dilute dispersion of heavy particles in a turbulent channel flow, bounded by irregular two-dimensional rough surfaces, in the one-way coupling regime.

  10. Numerical simulation of air flow in a model of lungs with mouth cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcner, Jakub; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The air flow in a realistic geometry of human lung is simulated with computational flow dynamics approach as stationary inspiration. Geometry used for the simulation includes oral cavity, larynx, trachea and bronchial tree up to the seventh generation of branching. Unsteady RANS approach was used for the air flow simulation. Velocities corresponding to 15, 30 and 60 litres/min of flow rate were set as boundary conditions at the inlet to the model. These flow rates are frequently used as a representation of typical human activities. Character of air flow in the model for these different flow rates is discussed with respect to future investigation of particle deposition.

  11. Thermal effects on bacterial bioaerosols in continuous air flow.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Hee; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-08-01

    Exposure to bacterial bioaerosols can have adverse effects on health, such as infectious diseases, acute toxic effects, and allergies. The search for ways of preventing and curing the harmful effects of bacterial bioaerosols has created a strong demand for the study and development of an efficient method of controlling bioaerosols. We investigated the thermal effects on bacterial bioaerosols of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by using a thermal electric heating system in continuous air flow. The bacterial bioaerosols were exposed to a surrounding temperature that ranged from 20 degrees C to 700 degrees C for about 0.3 s. Both E. coli and B. subtilis vegetative cells were rendered more than 99.9% inactive at 160 degrees C and 350 degrees C of wall temperature of the quartz tube, respectively. Although the data on bacterial injury showed that the bacteria tended to sustain greater damage as the surrounding temperature increased, Gram-negative E. coli was highly sensitive to structural injury but Gram-positive B. subtilis was slightly more sensitive to metabolic injury. In addition, the inactivation of E. coli endotoxins was found to range from 9.2% (at 200 degrees C) to 82.0% (at 700 degrees C). However, the particle size distribution and morphology of both bacterial bioaerosols were maintained, despite exposure to a surrounding temperature of 700 degrees C. Our results show that thermal heating in a continuous air flow can be used with short exposure time to control bacterial bioaerosols by rendering the bacteria and endotoxins to a large extent inactive. This result could also be useful for developing more effective thermal treatment strategies for use in air purification or sterilization systems to control bioaerosols.

  12. Empirical Formulation of Flow Characteristics in Trapezoidal Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2016-09-01

    Empirical relations for hydraulic jump characteristics, viz. sequent depth ratio (Y2/Y1), efficiency of jump (E2/E1) and relative length of jump (Lj/Y1) in trapezoidal channel with/without appurtenances are developed by introducing dimensionless Reynolds number, and neglecting the frictional effect for approach Froude number (varied between 2 and 10 under different conditions). Developed empirical models were also validated and compared with acquired experimental data as well as with literature data. Close fitness of the empirical models with appurtenances under varying dimensions, positions of baffle blocks provides accurate prediction of same for higher value of Froude number.

  13. Empirical Formulation of Flow Characteristics in Trapezoidal Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, S.; Singh, R. P.

    2016-05-01

    Empirical relations for hydraulic jump characteristics, viz. sequent depth ratio (Y2/Y1), efficiency of jump (E2/E1) and relative length of jump (Lj/Y1) in trapezoidal channel with/without appurtenances are developed by introducing dimensionless Reynolds number, and neglecting the frictional effect for approach Froude number (varied between 2 and 10 under different conditions). Developed empirical models were also validated and compared with acquired experimental data as well as with literature data. Close fitness of the empirical models with appurtenances under varying dimensions, positions of baffle blocks provides accurate prediction of same for higher value of Froude number.

  14. Hydrodynamic Coupling in Microbially Mediated Fracture Mineralization: Formation of Self-Organized Groundwater Flow Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunn, R. J.; El Mountassir, G.; MacLachlan, E.; Moir, H.

    2013-12-01

    Evidence of fossilized microorganisms embedded within mineral veins and mineral-filled fractures has been observed in a wide range of geological environments. Microorganisms can act as sites for mineral nucleation and also contribute to mineral precipitation by inducing local geochemical changes. In this study, we explore fundamental controls on microbially induced mineralization in rock fractures. Specifically, we systematically investigate the influence of hydrodynamics (velocity, flow rate, aperture) on microbially mediated calcite precipitation. We use a case study of microbially induced calcite precipitation as a model biomineralization system to investigate potential feedback mechanisms between the temporally varying patterns of mineral precipitation within a fracture and the resulting variations in the local velocity field. Fractures are represented as a series of precision-etched parallel channels between a pair of sealed Perspex plates. Multiple channels are designed to maintain a constant flow rate, whilst independently adjusting channel aperture and width to explore the effects of aperture and fluid velocity on biomineral precipitation. Our experimental results demonstrate that a feedback mechanism exists between the gradual reduction in fracture aperture due to precipitation, and its effect on the local fluid velocity. This feedback results in mineral fill distributions that focus flow into a small number of self-organizing channels that remain open, ultimately controlling the final aperture profile that governs flow within the fracture. This feedback mechanism exists because precipitation on the fracture walls (as opposed to in solution) requires the bacteria to be transported to the fracture surface. Bacteria settle out of a quiescent solution at a velocity that is dependent on individual floc size and density. This settling velocity competes with the bed shear velocity, inhibiting deposition via entrainment. As precipitation progresses, the flow

  15. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  16. Coulometric detection of components in liquid plugs by microfabricated flow channel and electrode structures.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Fumihiro; Laghzali, Hind; Fukuda, Junji; Suzuki, Hiroaki

    2010-10-15

    Coulometry has been demonstrated to be effective for determining the analyte in a liquid plug on the nanoliter-scale confined in a flow channel. A plug prepared in a rhombus structure of an auxiliary flow channel was placed on a thin-film three-electrode system, and hydrogen peroxide was detected as a model analyte. Under a fixed potential, the current decayed rapidly, particularly in shallow flow channels, thus making reproducible amperometric detection difficult. On the other hand, the increasing charge during coulometry facilitated the measurements. A constricted flow channel structure with an array of platinum strips for the working electrode was effective at efficiently consuming the analyte to improve the sensitivity and lower the detection limit. Compared to the case of a single short working electrode with the same area, a 4-fold increase in sensitivity was observed for the best combination of flow channel height and interstrip distance. With an increase in the generated current while maintaining the background at a low level, the detection limit was lowered from 1.3 μM to 410 nM using working electrodes with the same area. Furthermore, the processing of solutions containing L-glutamate or L-glutamate oxidase and the detection of L-glutamate were demonstrated.

  17. Large eddy simulation of subsonic and supersonic channel flow at moderate Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenormand, E.; Sagaut, P.; Phuoc, L. Ta

    2000-02-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) of compressible periodic channel flow is performed using a fourth-order finite difference scheme for a Reynolds number based on bulk density, bulk velocity and channel half-width equal to 3000. Two configurations are studied: a subsonic case (M0=0.5) that corresponds to the experiments of Niederschulte et al. [Measurements of turbulent flow in a channel at low Reynolds numbers, Exp. Fluids, 9, 222-230 (1990)] and a supersonic case (M0=1.5) that corresponds to the direct numerical simulation (DNS) results by Coleman et al. [A numerical study of turbulent supersonic isothermal-wall channel flow, J. Fluid Mech., 305, 159-183 (1995); Compressible turbulent channel flows: DNS results and modeling, J. Fluid Mech., 305, 185-218 (1995)]. In order to determine the influence of the discretization, two cases are computed using two different meshes, a coarse one and a fine one. Two subgrid-scale models are tested: the first one is an extension to compressible flows of the Smagorinsky model, while the second one is a model based both on large and small scales of turbulence, a hybrid Bardina-selective mixed scale model. Various statistical comparisons are made with experimental and DNS data at similar Reynolds numbers, including higher-order statistics. Copyright

  18. Contribution of voltage-dependent K+ and Ca2+ channels to coronary pressure-flow autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Berwick, Zachary C; Moberly, Steven P; Kohr, Meredith C; Morrical, Ethan B; Kurian, Michelle M; Dick, Gregory M; Tune, Johnathan D

    2012-05-01

    The mechanisms responsible for coronary pressure-flow autoregulation, a critical physiologic phenomenon that maintains coronary blood flow relatively constant in the presence of changes in perfusion pressure, remain poorly understood. This investigation tested the hypothesis that voltage-sensitive K(+) (K(V)) and Ca(2+) (Ca(V)1.2) channels play a critical role in coronary pressure-flow autoregulation in vivo. Experiments were performed in open-chest, anesthetized Ossabaw swine during step changes in coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) from 40 to 140 mmHg before and during inhibition of K(V) channels with 4-aminopyridine (4AP, 0.3 mM, ic) or Ca(V)1.2 channels with diltiazem (10 μg/min, ic). 4AP significantly decreased vasodilatory responses to H(2)O(2) (0.3-10 μM, ic) and coronary flow at CPPs = 60-140 mmHg. This decrease in coronary flow was associated with diminished ventricular contractile function (dP/dT) and myocardial oxygen consumption. However, the overall sensitivity to changes in CPP from 60 to 100 mmHg (i.e. autoregulatory gain; Gc) was unaltered by 4-AP administration (Gc = 0.46 ± 0.11 control vs. 0.46 ± 0.06 4-AP). In contrast, inhibition of Ca(V)1.2 channels progressively increased coronary blood flow at CPPs > 80 mmHg and substantially diminished coronary Gc to -0.20 ± 0.11 (P < 0.01), with no effect on contractile function or oxygen consumption. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that (1) K(V) channels tonically contribute to the control of microvascular resistance over a wide range of CPPs, but do not contribute to coronary responses to changes in pressure; (2) progressive activation of Ca(V)1.2 channels with increases in CPP represents a critical mechanism of coronary pressure-flow autoregulation.

  19. 42 CFR 84.148 - Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.148 Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements. (a) Respirators tested under this section shall be approved only...

  20. MHD mixed convection flow through a diverging channel with heated circular obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Md. S.; Shaha, J.; Khan, M. A. H.; Nasrin, R.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical study of steady MHD mixed convection heat transfer and fluid flow through a diverging channel with heated circular obstacle is carried out in this paper. The circular obstacle placed at the centre of the channel is hot with temperature Th. The top and bottom walls are non-adiabatic. The basic nonlinear governing partial differential equations are transformed into dimensionless ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. These equations have been solved numerically for different values of the governing parameters, namely Reynolds number (Re), Hartmann number (Ha), Richardson number (Ri) and Prandtl number (Pr) using finite element method. The streamlines, isotherms, average Nusselt number and average temperature of the fluid for various relevant dimensionless parameters are displayed graphically. The study revealed that the flow and thermal fields in the diverging channel depend significantly on the heated body. In addition, it is observed that the magnetic field acts to increase the rate of heat transfer within the channel.

  1. Nature and characteristics of the flows that carved the Simud and Tiu outflow channels, Mars

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, J.A.P.; Tanaka, K.L.; Miyamoto, H.; Sasaki, S.

    2006-01-01

    Geomorphic and topographic relations of higher and lower levels of dissection within the Simud and Tiu Valles outflow channels on Mars reveal new insights into their formational histories. We find that the water floods that carved the higher channel floors were primarily sourced from Hydaspis Chaos. The floods apparently branched into distributaries downstream that promoted rapid freezing and sublimation of water and limited discharge into the lowlands. In contrast, we suggest that the lower outflow channels were carved by debris flows from Hydraotes Chaos. Surges within individual debris flows possessed variable volatile contents and led to the deposition of smooth deposits marked by low relief longitudinal ridges. Lower outflow channel discharges resulted in widespread deposition within the Simud/Tiu Valles as well as within the northern plains of Mars. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. The Extent of Channelized Basal Water Flow Under the Greenland Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Downs, J.; Johnson, J. V.; Harper, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial ice flows due to a combination of deformation and basal sliding, with sliding accounting for most of the fastest ice flow. Basal sliding is controlled by the transport of water at the glacier's bed, which can be accomplished through both high pressure, low discharge, distributed flow, or low pressure, high discharge, channelized flow. Higher pressures are generally associated with more complete decoupling of a glacier from its bed and faster flow. As the intensity of summer melt in Greenland has increased, our poor understanding of the drainage network's discharge capacity and its coupling to sliding has generated fundamental questions, such as: will larger fluxes of liquid water promote or inhibit basal sliding? To investigate this question we have implemented a model of distributed and channelized flow developed by Werder et. al 2013. The sensitivity of the modeled channel network to basal and surface geometry, melt rate, boundary conditions, and other parameters is examined in a sequence of experiments using synthetic geometries. Expanding on these experiments, we run the model with realistic surface and bedrock data from Issunguata Sermia in Western Central Greenland. These experiments benefit from a wealth of in-situ data, including observations of basal water pressure. Our results suggest that the development of large channels is limited to the margins of the ice sheet, and that higher pressures continue to prevail in the interior.

  3. Property of reciprocity for stratified laminar flows in channels with arbitrarily shaped cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geshev, P. I.

    2015-05-01

    A stratified laminar flow of several fluids in a channels with an arbitrarily shaped cross section is considered. It is assumed that the hydrostatic problem of finding free boundaries between different fluids is solved and domains of motion of individual fluids are known. Under the assumption that the medium motion arises under the action of an applied pressure gradient and volume gravity forces (or forces of inertia), the property of reciprocity between the applied forces F j and the flows of different components Q i , which is manifested as symmetry of the matrix of the flow rate coefficients L ij ( Q i = L ij F j ), is proved in the general form. General symmetric solutions of the problem for a plane channel and a circular tube are presented. Formulas for the coefficient of increasing of the fluid flow rate owing to the presence of a near-wall layer of the gas are derived. It is shown that the flow rate of water in a partly filled channel may exceed the flow rate in a completely filled channel by more than an order of magnitude.

  4. Quantifying downstream impacts of impoundment on flow regime and channel planform, lower Trinity River, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellmeyer, Jessica L.; Slattery, Michael C.; Phillips, Jonathan D.

    2005-07-01

    As human population worldwide has grown, so has interest in harnessing and manipulating the flow of water for the benefit of humans. The Trinity River of eastern Texas is one such watershed greatly impacted by engineering and urbanization. Draining the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, just under 30 reservoirs are in operation in the basin, regulating flow while containing public supplies, supporting recreation, and providing flood control. Lake Livingston is the lowest, as well as largest, reservoir in the basin, a mere 95 km above the Trinity's outlet near Galveston Bay. This study seeks to describe and quantify channel activity and flow regime, identifying effects of the 1968 closure of Livingston dam. Using historic daily and peak discharge data from USGS gauging stations, flow duration curves are constructed, identifying pre- and post-dam flow conditions. A digital historic photo archive was also constructed using six sets of aerial photographs spanning from 1938 to 1995, and three measures of channel activity applied using a GIS. Results show no changes in high flow conditions following impoundment, while low flows are elevated. However, the entire post-dam period is characterized by significantly higher rainfall, which may be obscuring the full impact of flow regulation. Channel activity rates do not indicate a more stabilized planform following dam closure; rather they suggest that the Trinity River is adjusting itself to the stress of Livingston dam in a slow, gradual process that may not be apparent in a modern time scale.

  5. Stability analysis for capillary channel flow: 1d and 3d computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grah, Aleksander; Klatte, Jörg; Dreyer, Michael E.

    The subject of the presentation are numerical studies on capillary channel flow, based on results of the sounding rocket TEXUS experiments. The flow through a capillary channel is established by a gear pump at the outlet. The channel, consists of two parallel glass plates with a width of 25 mm, a gap of 10 mm and a length of 12 mm. The meniscus of a compensation tube maintains a constant system pressure. Steady and dynamic pressure effects in the system force the surfaces to bend inwards. A maximum flow rate is achieved when the free surface collapses and gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. This critical flow rate depends on the channel geometry, the flow regime and the liquid properties. The aim of the experiments is the determination of the free surface shape and to find the maximum flow rate. In order to study the unsteady liquid loop behavior, a dimensionless one-dimensional model and a corresponding three-dimensional model were developed. The one-dimensional model is based on the unsteady Bernoulli equation, the unsteady continuity equation and geometrical conditions for the surface curvature and the flow cross-section. The experimental and evaluated contour data show good agreement for a sequence of transient flow rate perturbations. In the case of steady flow at maximum flow rate, when the "choking" effect occurs, the surfaces collapse and cause gas ingestion into the channel. This effect is related to the Speed Index. At the critical flow rate the Speed Index reaches the value 1, in analogy to the Mach Number. Unsteady choking does not necessarily cause surface collapse. We show, that temporarily Speed Index values exceeding One may be achieved for a perfectly stable supercritical dynamic flow. As a supercritical criterion for the dynamic free surface stability we define a Dynamic Index considering the local capillary pressure and the convective pressure, which is a function of the local velocity. The Dynamic Index is below One for stable flow while D = 1

  6. Analytical solution to the equations for parallel-flow four-channel heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, L.

    2000-04-01

    Assuming that the thermophysical parameters of the fluids are independent on temperature, the stationary temperature field in a parallel-flow multi-channel heat exchanger can be described by a set of linear differential equations of the first order with constant coefficients. A compact analytical solution to this set is presented for the case of four-channel exchangers and simple eigenvalues of the coefficient matrix of the set.

  7. Numerical study of the unsteady flow and heat transfer in channels with periodically mounted square bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia, A.; Martin, J. S.; Gormaz, R.

    Numerical investigations of unsteady laminar flow and heat transfer in a channel of height H with periodically mounted square bars of height d = 0.2H arranged side by side to the approaching flow have been conducted for different transverse separation distances of the bars. Five cases with transverse separation distance of 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2d for a Reynolds number of 300 in a channel with a periodicity length of 2H were studied. The unsteady Navier-Stokes equations and the energy equation have been solved by a finite volume code with staggered grids combined with the SIMPLEC algorithm and a fine grid resolution. Due to the arrangement of bars detached from the channel walls the flow is unsteady with vortex shedding from the bars. The amplitude and mean values of the drag coefficients, skin friction coefficients, friction factor and Nusselt numbers have a strong dependence of the transverse separation distance of the bars.

  8. Fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in constricted channel flows and their effect on the onset of separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The development of fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in high Reynolds number flow in a symmetrically constricted channel is investigated. Attention is restricted to the case of 'strongly' constricted channels considered by Smith and Daniels (1981) for which the scaled constriction height is asymptotically large. Such flows are known to develop a Goldstein singularity and subsequently become separated at some downstream station past the point of maximum channel constriction. It is shown that these flows can support fully nonlinear Goertler vortices, of the form elucidated by Hall and Lakin (1988), for constrictions which have an appreciable region of local concave curvature upstream of the position at which separation occurs. The effect on the onset of separation due to the nonlinear Goertler modes is discussed. A brief discussion of other possible nonlinear states which may also have a dramatic effect in delaying (or promoting) separation is given.

  9. Fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in constricted channel flows and their effect on the onset of separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denier, James P.; Hall, Philip

    1992-07-01

    The development of fully nonlinear Goertler vortices in high Reynolds number flow in a symmetrically constricted channel is investigated. Attention is restricted to the case of 'strongly' constricted channels considered by Smith and Daniels (1981) for which the scaled constriction height is asymptotically large. Such flows are known to develop a Goldstein singularity and subsequently become separated at some downstream station past the point of maximum channel constriction. It is shown that these flows can support fully nonlinear Goertler vortices, of the form elucidated by Hall and Lakin (1988), for constrictions which have an appreciable region of local concave curvature upstream of the position at which separation occurs. The effect on the onset of separation due to the nonlinear Goertler modes is discussed. A brief discussion of other possible nonlinear states which may also have a dramatic effect in delaying (or promoting) separation is given.

  10. Unsteady transonic flow control around an airfoil in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, Md. Abdul; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, Mohammad; Mitsutake, Yuichi; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Yu, Shen

    2016-04-01

    Transonic internal flow around an airfoil is associated with self-excited unsteady shock wave oscillation. This unsteady phenomenon generates buffet, high speed impulsive noise, non-synchronous vibration, high cycle fatigue failure and so on. Present study investigates the effectiveness of perforated cavity to control this unsteady flow field. The cavity has been incorporated on the airfoil surface. The degree of perforation of the cavity is kept constant as 30%. However, the number of openings (perforation) at the cavity upper wall has been varied. Results showed that this passive control reduces the strength of shock wave compared to that of baseline airfoil. As a result, the intensity of shock wave/boundary layer interaction and the root mean square (RMS) of pressure oscillation around the airfoil have been reduced with the control method.

  11. THE PATTERN OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH DURING SPEECH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, H.; AND OTHERS

    SINCE THE 19TH CENTURY, KYMOGRAPHIC RECORDING OF TOTAL AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH HAS BEEN USED TO DIAGNOSE THE VARYING DURATIONS AND DEGREES OF CONSTRICTIONS OF THE VOCAL TRACT DURING SPEECH. THE PRESENT PROJECT ATTEMPTS TO INTRODUCE A SECOND DIMENSION TO RECORDINGS OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH--NAMELY, CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA OF FLOW--ON THE…

  12. The Evolution of Finite Amplitude Wavetrains in Plane Channel Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewitt, R. E.; Hall, P.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a viscous incompressible fluid flow driven between two parallel plates by a constant pressure gradient. The flow is at a finite Reynolds number, with an 0(l) disturbance in the form of a traveling wave. A phase equation approach is used to discuss the evolution of slowly varying fully nonlinear two dimensional wavetrains. We consider uniform wavetrains in detail, showing that the development of a wavenumber perturbation is governed by Burgers equation in most cases. The wavenumber perturbation theory, constructed using the phase equation approach for a uniform wavetrain, is shown to be distinct from an amplitude perturbation expansion about the periodic flow. In fact we show that the amplitude equation contains only linear terms and is simply the heat equation. We review, briefly, the well known dynamics of Burgers equation, which imply that both shock structures and finite time singularities of the wavenumber perturbation can occur with respect to the slow scales. Numerical computations have been performed to identify areas of the (wavenumber, Reynolds number, energy) neutral surface for which each of these possibilities can occur. We note that the evolution equations will breakdown under certain circumstances, in particular for a weakly nonlinear secondary flow. Finally we extend the theory to three dimensions and discuss the limit of a weak spanwise dependence for uniform wavetrains, showing that two functions are required to describe the evolution. These unknowns are a phase and a pressure function which satisfy a pair of linearly coupled partial differential equations. The results obtained from applying the same analysis to the fully three dimensional problem are included as an appendix.

  13. Microscale flow visualization of nucleate boiling in small channels: Mechanisms influencing heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kasza, K.E.; Didascalou, T.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1997-07-01

    This paper describes the use of a new test apparatus employing flow visualization via ultra-high-speed video and microscope optics to study microscale nucleate boiling in a small, rectangular, heated channel. The results presented are for water. Because of confinement effects produced by the channel cross section being of the same nominal size as the individual vapor bubbles nucleating at discrete wall sites, flow regimes and heat transfer mechanisms that occur in small channels are shown to be considerably different than those in large channels. Flow visualization data are presented depicting discrete bubble/bubble and bubble/wall interactions for moderate and high heat flux. Quantitative data are also presented on nucleate bubble growth behavior for a single nucleation site in the form of growth rates, bubble sizes, and frequency of generation in the presence and absence of a thin wall liquid layer. Mechanistic boiling behavior and trends are observed which support the use of this type of research as a powerful means to gain fundamental insights into why, under some conditions, nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficients are considerably larger in small channels than in large channels.

  14. Dissipative-particle dynamics simulations of flow over a stationary sphere in compliant channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Harinath; Abraham, John

    2009-05-01

    Dissipative-particle dynamics (DPD), a particle-based fluid-simulation approach, is employed to simulate isothermal pressure-driven flow across a sphere in compliant cylindrical channels. The sphere is represented by frozen DPD particles, while the surrounding fluid is modeled using simple fluid particles. The channel walls are made up of interconnected finite extensible nonlinear elastic bead-spring chains. The wall particles at the inlet and outlet ends of the channel are frozen so as to hinge the channel. The model is assessed for accuracy by computing the drag coefficient CD in shear flow past a uniform sphere in unbounded flow, and comparing the results with those from correlations in literature. The effect of the aspect ratio λ of the channel, i.e., the ratio of the sphere diameter d to the channel diameter D, on the drag force FD on the sphere is investigated, and it is found that FD decreases as λ decreases toward the values predicted by the correlations as λ approaches zero. The effect of the elasticity of the wall is also studied. It is observed that as the wall becomes more elastic, there is a decrease in FD on the sphere.

  15. On the impact of entrapped air in infiltration under ponding conditions: Part a: Preferential air flow path effects on infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbord, N.; Mizrahi, G.; Furman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Entrapped air effects on infiltration under ponding conditions could be important for massive infiltration of managed aquifer recharge or soil aquifer treatment. Earlier studies found that under ponding conditions air could reduce infiltration by 70-90%. Most studies have dealt with entrapped air effects when soil surface topography is flat. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of: (1) irregular surface topography on preferential air flow path development; (2) preferential air flow path on infiltration; and (3) hydraulic head on infiltration when air is trapped. Column experiments were used to investigate these particular effects. A 140 cm deep and 30 cm wide column packed with silica sand was used under two boundary conditions: in the first, air can only escape vertically upward through the soil surface; in the second, air is free to escape. The surface was flooded with 13 liters of water, with ponding depth decreasing with time. Two soil surface conditions were tested: flat surface and irregular. It was found that in irregular surfaces, stable air flow through preferential paths was developed in the high altitude zones. Flat surface topography caused unstable air flow through random paths. Comparison between irregular and flat surface topography showed that the entrapped air pressure was lower and the infiltration rate was about 40% higher in the irregular surface topography than in the flat surface topography. No difference of infiltration rate between flat and irregular surface topography was observed when air was free to escape along the infiltration path. It was also found that at the first stage of infiltration, higher hydraulic heads caused higher entrapped air pressures and lower infiltration rates. In contrast, higher hydraulic head results in higher infiltration rate, when air was free to escape. Our results suggest that during ponding conditions: (1) preferential air flow paths develop at high surface zones of irregular topography

  16. Air-Flow Navigated Crystal Growth for TIPS Pentacene-Based Organic Thin-Film Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhengran; Chen, Jihua; Sun, Zhenzhong; Szulczewski, Greg; Li, Dawen

    2012-01-01

    6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS pentacene) is a promising active channel material of organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) due to its solubility, stability, and high mobility. However, the growth of TIPS pentacene crystals is intrinsically anisotropic and thus leads to significant variation in the performance of OTFTs. In this paper, air flow is utilized to effectively reduce the TIPS pentacene crystal anisotropy and enhance performance consistency in OTFTs, and the resulted films are examined with optical microscopy, grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction, and thin-film transistor measurements. Under air-flow navigation (AFN), TIPS pentacene drop-cast from toluene solution has been observed to form thin films with improved crystal orientation and increased areal coverage on substrates, which subsequently lead to a four-fold increase of average hole mobility and one order of magnitude enhancement in performance consistency defined by the ratio of average mobility to the standard deviation of the field-effect mobilities.

  17. Theory for nanoparticle retention time in the helical channel of quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. Stephen; Carpino, Francesca; Zborowski, Maciej

    2009-05-01

    Quadrupole magnetic field-flow fractionation (QMgFFF) is a separation and characterization technique for magnetic nanoparticles such as those used for cell labeling and for targeted drug therapy. A helical separation channel is used to efficiently exploit the quadrupole magnetic field. The fluid and sample components therefore have angular and longitudinal components to their motion in the thin annular space occupied by the helical channel. The retention ratio is defined as the ratio of the times for non-retained and a retained material to pass through the channel. Equations are derived for the respective angular and longitudinal components to retention ratio.

  18. Tree-ring records of variation in flow and channel geometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merigliano, M.F.; Friedman, J. M.; Scott, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    We review the use of tree rings to date flood disturbance, channel change, and sediment deposition, with an emphasis on rivers in semi-arid landscapes in the western United States. As watershed area decreases and aridity increases, large floods have a more pronounced and sustained effect on channel width and location, resulting in forest area-age distributions that are farther from a steady-state exponential relation. Furthermore, forests along three major snowmelt rivers in the northern Rocky Mountains, USA, have smaller than expected areas of young trees, suggesting that high flows and channel migration have decreased since the late 1800s.

  19. Elasto-inertial particle focusing under the viscoelastic flow of DNA solution in a square channel.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bookun; Kim, Ju Min

    2016-03-01

    Particle focusing is an essential step in a wide range of applications such as cell counting and sorting. Recently, viscoelastic particle focusing, which exploits the spatially non-uniform viscoelastic properties of a polymer solution under Poiseuille flow, has attracted much attention because the particles are focused along the channel centerline without any external force. Lateral particle migration in polymer solutions in square channels has been studied due to its practical importance in lab-on-a-chip applications. However, there are still many questions about how the rheological properties of the medium alter the equilibrium particle positions and about the flow rate ranges for particle focusing. In this study, we investigated lateral particle migration in a viscoelastic flow of DNA solution in a square microchannel. The elastic property is relevant due to the long relaxation time of a DNA molecule, even when the DNA concentration is extremely low. Further, the shear viscosity of the solution is essentially constant irrespective of shear rate. Our current results demonstrate that the particles migrate toward the channel centerline and the four corners of a square channel in the dilute DNA solution when the inertia is negligible (elasticity-dominant flow). As the flow rate increases, the multiple equilibrium particle positions are reduced to a single file along the channel centerline, due to the elasto-inertial particle focusing mechanism. The current results support that elasto-inertial particle focusing mechanism is a universal phenomenon in a viscoelastic fluid with constant shear viscosity (Boger fluid). Also, the effective flow rate ranges for three-dimensional particle focusing in the DNA solution were significantly higher and wider than those for the previous synthetic polymer solution case, which facilitates high throughput analysis of particulate systems. In addition, we demonstrated that the DNA solution can be applied to focus a wide range of

  20. Creating fast flow channels in paper fluidic devices to control timing of sequential reactions.

    PubMed

    Jahanshahi-Anbuhi, Sana; Chavan, Puneet; Sicard, Clémence; Leung, Vincent; Hossain, S M Zakir; Pelton, Robert; Brennan, John D; Filipe, Carlos D M

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports the development of a method to control the flow rate of fluids within paper-based microfluidic analytical devices. We demonstrate that by simply sandwiching paper channels between two flexible films, it is possible to accelerate the flow of water through paper by over 10-fold. The dynamics of this process are such that the height of the liquid is dependent on time to the power of 1/3. This dependence was validated using three different flexible films (with markedly different contact angles) and three different fluids (water and two silicon oils with different viscosities). These covered channels provide a low-cost method for controlling the flow rate of fluid in paper channels, and can be added following printing of reagents to control fluid flow in selected fluidic channels. Using this method, we redesigned a previously published bidirectional lateral flow pesticide sensor to allow more rapid detection of pesticides while eliminating the need to run the assay in two stages. The sensor is fabricated with sol-gel entrapped reagents (indoxyl acetate in a substrate zone and acetylcholinesterase, AChE, in a sensing zone) present in an uncovered "slow" flow channel, with a second, covered "fast" channel used to transport pesticide samples to the sensing region through a simple paper-flap valve. In this manner, pesticides reach the sensing region first to allow preincubation, followed by delivery of the substrate to generate a colorimetric signal. This format results in a uni-directional device that detects the presence of pesticides two times faster than the original bidirectional sensors.