Science.gov

Sample records for air flow sensors

  1. Miniature electrooptical air flow sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershner, D. D. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A sensor for measuring flow direction and airspeed that is suitable, because of its small size, for rapid instrumentation of research airplanes is described. A propeller driven sphere rotating at a speed proportional to airspeed presents a reflective target to an electro-optical system such that the duty cycle of the resulting electrical output is proportional to yaw angle and the frequency is proportional to airspeed.

  2. Minimum detectable air velocity by thermal flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Issa, Safir; Lang, Walter

    2013-08-19

    Miniaturized thermal flow sensors have opened the doors for a large variety of new applications due to their small size, high sensitivity and low power consumption. Theoretically, very small detection limits of air velocity of some micrometers per second are achievable. However, the superimposed free convection is the main obstacle which prevents reaching these expected limits. Furthermore, experimental investigations are an additional challenge since it is difficult to generate very low flows. In this paper, we introduce a physical method, capable of generating very low flow values in the mixed convection region. Additionally, we present the sensor characteristic curves at the zero flow case and in the mixed convection region. Results show that the estimated minimum detectable air velocity by the presented method is 0.8 mm/s. The equivalent air velocity to the noise level of the sensor at the zero flow case is about 0.13 mm/s.

  3. Minimum Detectable Air Velocity by Thermal Flow Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Safir; Lang, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Miniaturized thermal flow sensors have opened the doors for a large variety of new applications due to their small size, high sensitivity and low power consumption. Theoretically, very small detection limits of air velocity of some micrometers per second are achievable. However, the superimposed free convection is the main obstacle which prevents reaching these expected limits. Furthermore, experimental investigations are an additional challenge since it is difficult to generate very low flows. In this paper, we introduce a physical method, capable of generating very low flow values in the mixed convection region. Additionally, we present the sensor characteristic curves at the zero flow case and in the mixed convection region. Results show that the estimated minimum detectable air velocity by the presented method is 0.8 mm/s. The equivalent air velocity to the noise level of the sensor at the zero flow case is about 0.13 mm/s. PMID:23966190

  4. Thermistor based, low velocity isothermal, air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrita, Admésio A. C. M.; Mendes, Ricardo; Quintela, Divo A.

    2016-03-01

    The semiconductor thermistor technology is applied as a flow sensor to measure low isothermal air velocities (<2 ms-1). The sensor is subjected to heating and cooling cycles controlled by a multifunctional timer. In the heating stage, the alternating current of a main AC power supply source guarantees a uniform thermistor temperature distribution. The conditioning circuit assures an adequate increase of the sensors temperature and avoids the thermal disturbance of the flow. The power supply interruption reduces the consumption from the source and extends the sensors life time. In the cooling stage, the resistance variation of the flow sensor is recorded by the measuring chain. The resistive sensor parameters proposed vary significantly and feature a high sensitivity to the flow velocity. With the aid of a computer, the data transfer, storage and analysis provides a great advantage over the traditional local anemometer readings. The data acquisition chain has a good repeatability and low standard uncertainties. The proposed method measures isothermal air mean velocities from 0.1 ms-1 to 2 ms-1 with a standard uncertainty error less than 4%.

  5. Egomotion estimation with optic flow and air velocity sensors.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Adam J; Miller, Mikel M; Quinn, Roger D; Willis, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    We develop a method that allows a flyer to estimate its own motion (egomotion), the wind velocity, ground slope, and flight height using only inputs from onboard optic flow and air velocity sensors. Our artificial algorithm demonstrates how it could be possible for flying insects to determine their absolute egomotion using their available sensors, namely their eyes and wind sensitive hairs and antennae. Although many behaviors can be performed by only knowing the direction of travel, behavioral experiments indicate that odor tracking insects are able to estimate the wind direction and control their absolute egomotion (i.e., groundspeed). The egomotion estimation method that we have developed, which we call the opto-aeronautic algorithm, is tested in a variety of wind and ground slope conditions using a video recorded flight of a moth tracking a pheromone plume. Over all test cases that we examined, the algorithm achieved a mean absolute error in height of 7% or less. Furthermore, our algorithm is suitable for the navigation of aerial vehicles in environments where signals from the Global Positioning System are unavailable.

  6. A miniature electro-optical air flow sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kershner, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Miniature sensors are needed for rapid and uncomplicated installation on light aircraft engaged in stability research programs. One particularly difficult sensor to miniaturize to the required degree has been a flow angle and velocity sensor for measuring the local flow ahead of a wing. However, by using an electrooptical technique it was possible to overcome the encountered difficulties and to design a sensor satisfying the requirements. The developed sensor for measuring angle-of-attack, yaw, and airspeed was shown to be suitable for rapid instrumentation of research aircraft because of its small size. The size reduction was accomplished by a design feature which eliminates the need for slip rings and wiring within the movable components of the sensor.

  7. Bioinspired carbon nanotube fuzzy fiber hair sensor for air-flow detection.

    PubMed

    Maschmann, Matthew R; Ehlert, Gregory J; Dickinson, Benjamin T; Phillips, David M; Ray, Cody W; Reich, Greg W; Baur, Jeffery W

    2014-05-28

    Artificial hair sensors consisting of a piezoresistive carbon-nanotube-coated glass fiber embedded in a microcapillary are assembled and characterized. Individual sensors resemble a hair plug that may be integrated in a wide range of host materials. The sensors demonstrate an air-flow detection threshold of less than 1 m/s with a piezoresistive sensitivity of 1.3% per m/s air-flow change.

  8. An ion-drag air mass-flow sensor for automotive applications

    SciTech Connect

    Malaczynski, G.W.; Schroeder, T. )

    1992-04-01

    An air-flow meter, developed primarily for the measurement of intake air flow into an internal combustion engine, is described. The well-known process of corona ion deflection in a gas flow together with proper electrode geometry and a detection scheme provides the conceptual basis for a humidity-insensitive ionic air-flow sensor. Output characteristics of the sensor, such as response time and range of operation, are discussed and compared with those of a production hot-wore meter for the type that is currently used with electronic fuel injection systems.

  9. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  10. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging air-flow energy to sustainably power temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Shuhua; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator with dimensions of 6.7 cm × 4.5 cm × 2 cm and a weight of 42.3 g that consists of two triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and two electromagnetic generators (EMGs) for scavenging air-flow energy. Under an air-flow speed of about 18 m/s, the hybridized nanogenerator can deliver largest output powers of 3.5 mW for one TENG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 8.8 mW/g and 14.6 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 3 MΩ and 1.8 mW for one EMG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 0.3 mW/g and 0.4 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 2 kΩ, respectively. The hybridized nanogenerator can be utilized to charge a capacitor of 3300 μF to sustainably power four temperature sensors for realizing self-powered temperature sensor networks. Moreover, a wireless temperature sensor driven by a hybridized nanogenerator charged Li-ion battery can work well to send the temperature data to a receiver/computer at a distance of 1.5 m. This work takes a significant step toward air-flow energy harvesting and its potential applications in self-powered wireless sensor networks.

  11. Bio-inspired multi-mode optic flow sensors for micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seokjun; Choi, Jaehyuk; Cho, Jihyun; Yoon, Euisik

    2013-06-01

    Monitoring wide-field surrounding information is essential for vision-based autonomous navigation in micro-air-vehicles (MAV). Our image-cube (iCube) module, which consists of multiple sensors that are facing different angles in 3-D space, can be applied to the wide-field of view optic flows estimation (μ-Compound eyes) and to attitude control (μ- Ocelli) in the Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) platforms. In this paper, we report an analog/digital (A/D) mixed-mode optic-flow sensor, which generates both optic flows and normal images in different modes for μ- Compound eyes and μ-Ocelli applications. The sensor employs a time-stamp based optic flow algorithm which is modified from the conventional EMD (Elementary Motion Detector) algorithm to give an optimum partitioning of hardware blocks in analog and digital domains as well as adequate allocation of pixel-level, column-parallel, and chip-level signal processing. Temporal filtering, which may require huge hardware resources if implemented in digital domain, is remained in a pixel-level analog processing unit. The rest of the blocks, including feature detection and timestamp latching, are implemented using digital circuits in a column-parallel processing unit. Finally, time-stamp information is decoded into velocity from look-up tables, multiplications, and simple subtraction circuits in a chip-level processing unit, thus significantly reducing core digital processing power consumption. In the normal image mode, the sensor generates 8-b digital images using single slope ADCs in the column unit. In the optic flow mode, the sensor estimates 8-b 1-D optic flows from the integrated mixed-mode algorithm core and 2-D optic flows with an external timestamp processing, respectively.

  12. Novel air flow meter for an automobile engine using a Si sensor with porous Si thermal isolation.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, Emmanouel; Sarafis, Panagiotis; Nassiopoulou, Androula G

    2012-01-01

    An air flow meter for measuring the intake air of an automobile engine is presented. It is based on a miniaturized silicon thermal mass flow sensor using a thick porous Si (Po-Si) layer for local thermal isolation from the Si substrate, on which the sensor active elements are integrated. The sensor is mounted on one side of a printed circuit board (PCB), on the other side of which the readout and control electronics of the meter are mounted. The PCB is fixed on a housing containing a semi-cylindrical flow tube, in the middle of which the sensor is situated. An important advantage of the present air flow meter is that it detects with equal sensitivity both forward and reverse flows. Two prototypes were fabricated, a laboratory prototype for flow calibration using mass flow controllers and a final demonstrator with the housing mounted in an automobile engine inlet tube. The final demonstrator was tested in real life conditions in the engine inlet tube of a truck. It shows an almost linear response in a large flow range between –6,500 kg/h and +6,500 kg/h, which is an order of magnitude larger than the ones usually encountered in an automobile engine.

  13. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique.

    PubMed

    Battista, L; Sciuto, S A; Scorza, A

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (18.0 l∕min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (±18.0 l∕min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono

  14. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2013-03-15

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of {+-}3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s ({+-}18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed

  15. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10-4 m3/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10-4 m3/s (±18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono-directional configuration, the

  16. Study of a porous surface microphone sensor in an aerofoil. [air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noiseux, D. U.; Noiseux, N. B.; Kadman, Y.

    1975-01-01

    The porous microphone in an airfoil is described as a directional sensor which rejects flow noise. The airfoil allows the sensor to be rotated in the airflow over a wide range of yaw angles, 0 to 90 degrees, avoiding flow separation over the surface of the sensor and its associated additional flow noise. The microphone is discussed in terms of its acoustic properties, vibration sensitivity, effect of Mach number on the directivity function, and flow noise. Additional information on the acoustic calibration of the microphone, the acceleration sensitivity of the airfoil, stationary source and receiver in a moving gas, acoustic tests in airflow, and flow noise tests of the airfoil porous surface sensor is included.

  17. A novel air flow sensor from printed PEDOT micro-hairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcell, J.; Aydemir, N.; Devaraj, H.; Travas-Sejdic, J.; Williams, D. E.; Aw, K. C.

    2013-11-01

    We report the creation of a low flow rate sensor from PEDOT micro-hairs. The hairs are printed as pipette-defined depositions using a nanopositioning system. The printing technique was developed for fabricating structures in 2D and 3D. Here micro-hairs with diameters of 4.4 μm were repeatedly extruded with constant heights. These hairs were then applied to produce a prototype flow rate sensor, which was shown to detect flows of 3.5 l min-1. Structural analysis was performed to demonstrate that the design can be modified to potentially observe flows as low as 0.5 l min-1. The results are extended to propose a practical digital flow rate sensor.

  18. Air Sensor Guidebook

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Air Sensor Guidebook has been developed by the U.S. EPA to assist those interested in potentially using lower cost air quality sensor technologies for air quality measurements. Its development was in direct response to a request for such a document following a recent scienti...

  19. Fabrication of a polyvinylidene difluoride fiber with a metal core and its application as directional air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yixiang; Liu, Rongrong; Hui, Shen

    2016-09-01

    We fabricated a sensitive air flow detector that mimic the sensing mechanism found at the tail of some insects. [see Y. Yang, A. Klein, H. Bleckmann and C. Liu, Appl. Phys. Lett. 99(2) (2011); J. J. Heys, T. Gedeon, B. C. Knott and Y. Kim, J. Biomech. 41(5), 977 (2008); J. Tao and X. Yu, Smart Mat. Struct. 21(11) (2012)]. Our bionic airflow sensor uses a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) microfiber with a molybdenum core which we produced with the hot extrusion tensile method. The surface of the fiber is partially coated with conductive silver adhesive that serve as surface electrodes. A third electrode, the metal core is used to polarize polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) under the surface electrodes. The cantilever beam structure of the prepared symmetric electrodes of metal core piezoelectric fiber (SMPF) is used as the artificial hair airflow sensor. The surface electrodes are used to measure output voltage. Our theoretical and experimental results show that the SMPF responds fast to air flow changes, the output charge has an exponential correlation with airflow velocity and a cosine relation with the direction of airflow. Our bionic airflow sensor with directional sensing ability can also measure air flow amplitude. [see H. Droogendijk, R. G. P. Sanders and G. J. M. Krijnen, New J. Phys. 15 (2013)]. By using two surface electrodes, our sensing circuit further improves sensitivity.

  20. Aeroacoustic flow sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of standing waves in a pipe with flow was conducted aimed toward the development of a flowmeter based on a measurement of phase difference between two points on the circumference of a pipe separated axially by an integral multiple of half sound wavelength. Effects of nonzero Mach number, variable ratios of upstream and downstream running waves, choice of location of the sensing pressure taps, and the incorrect spacings were examined numerically. Calculations were also made for steam flow where the maximum Mach number is much smaller than in cold air flows. For an industrial application where steam flow velocities are below 50 m/s, a very accurate sensor is shown to be possible. Experimental data were obtained by using an active aeroacoustic source over the range of 50 m/s to zero in an air flow. Experimental phase plots obtained from several coast-down tests have been compared with analytical results. The agreement with theory is excellent when the spacings are near N(lambda)/2 and the sensing locations are near the pressure antinodes. Otherwise, some zero shifts are introduced. Theory predicts that for steam flow much better results can be expected because the maximum Mach number is much smaller. Effects due to the (1-M-squared) factor would be imperceptible for steam flow.

  1. Aeroacoustic flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1991-09-01

    A theoretical analysis of standing waves in a pipe with flow was conducted aimed toward the development of a flowmeter based on a measurement of phase difference between two points on the circumference of a pipe separated axially by an integral multiple of half sound wavelength. Effects of nonzero Mach number, variable ratios of upstream and downstream running waves, choice of location of the sensing pressure taps, and the incorrect spacings were examined numerically. Calculations were also made for steam flow where the maximum Mach number is much smaller than in cold air flows. For an industrial application where steam flow velocities are below 50 m/s, a very accurate sensor is shown to be possible. Experimental data were obtained by using an active aeroacoustic source over the range of 50 m/s to zero in an air flow. Experimental phase plots obtained from several coast-down tests have been compared with analytical results. The agreement with theory is excellent when the spacings are near N(lambda)/2 and the sensing locations are near the pressure antinodes. Otherwise, some zero shifts are introduced. Theory predicts that for steam flow much better results can be expected because the maximum Mach number is much smaller. Effects due to the (1-M-squared) factor would be imperceptible for steam flow.

  2. Air Conditioning Overflow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Technology Transfer Office at Stennis Space Center helped a local inventor develop a prototype of an attachment for central air conditioners and heat pumps that helps monitor water levels to prevent condensation overflow. The sensor will indicate a need for drain line maintenance and prevent possible damage caused by drain pan water spillover. An engineer in the Stennis Space Center prototype Development Laboratory used SSC sensor technology in the development of the sensor.

  3. Water temperature effect on upward air-water flow in a vertical pipe: Local measurements database using four-sensor conductivity probes and LDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monrós-Andreu, G.; Chiva, S.; Martínez-Cuenca, R.; Torró, S.; Juliá, J. E.; Hernández, L.; Mondragón, R.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental work was carried out to study the effects of temperature variation in bubbly, bubbly to slug transition. Experiments were carried out in an upward air-water flow configuration. Four sensor conductivity probes and LDA techniques was used together for the measurement of bubble parameters. The aim of this paper is to provide a bubble parameter experimental database using four-sensor conductivity probes and LDA technique for upward air-water flow at different temperatures and also show transition effect in different temperatures under the boiling point.

  4. Design and fabrication of a metal core PVDF fiber for an air flow sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Yixiang; Liu, Rongrong; Huang, Xiaomei; Hong, Jin; Huang, Huiyu; Hui, Shen

    2015-10-01

    To track prey or avoid predators, many arthropods can detect variations in airflow and pressure gradients using an array of very thin and sensitive filiform hairs. In this study, metal core piezoelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) fibers were prepared to mimic such hair sensors. The flexibility of the fibers was very good, which was helpful for overcoming the typical brittleness of piezoelectric ceramic fibers. At the same time, the diameter of the fibers was very small (down to 50 μm in diameter). In order to mimic the insects’ hairs to the maximum extent, which was expected to greatly improve the sensitivity of such PVDF fiber-based sensors, a feasible process to prepare and extract electrodes on the surface of the fibers had to be developed. Compared with stainless steel filament-core fibers, the molybdenum filament-core PVDF fibers were easy to stretch. The molybdenum filament was then covered by a cylindrical PVDF layer with a diameter of 400 μm. One half of the longitudinal surface of the fibers was spray-coated with a conductive silver adhesive. The metal core was then used as one electrode, and the conductive silver adhesive was used as the other electrode. After polarization, a single metal-core PVDF fiber could be used as an airflow sensor. The surface structure and the sections of the PVDF fiber were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The results of the mechanical stretching tests showed that the metal core greatly enhanced the mechanical properties of the PVDF fibers. X-ray diffraction revealed that the greater the stretching ratio, the higher the α-to-β-phase conversion rate during the preparation of the PVDF fibers. A single metal-core PVDF fiber was used as a bionic airflow sensor, and a mechanical model of this sensor was derived. The airflow sensing capability of the PVDF fiber was experimentally confirmed in a miniature wind tunnel. The results showed that a cantilevered metal-core PVDF fiber is capable of detecting the range

  5. Microparticle Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    2005-01-01

    The microparticle flow sensor (MFS) is a system for identifying and counting microscopic particles entrained in a flowing liquid. The MFS includes a transparent, optoelectronically instrumented laminar-flow chamber (see figure) and a computer for processing instrument-readout data. The MFS could be used to count microparticles (including micro-organisms) in diverse applications -- for example, production of microcapsules, treatment of wastewater, pumping of industrial chemicals, and identification of ownership of liquid products.

  6. Air flow visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Smoke Flow Visualization shows the flow of air around a model airfoil at 100 feet per second. Photograph and caption published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page xi), by James Schultz.

  7. Tunable diode laser absorption sensor for temperature and velocity measurements of O2 in air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philippe, L. C.; Hanson, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A fast and nonintrusive velocity and temperature diagnostic based on oxygen absorption is presented. The system uses a GaAlAs tunable diode laser, ramped and modulated in wavelength at high frequency. Detection is performed at twice the modulating frequency, leading to second harmonic absorption lineshapes. Velocity is inferred from the wavelength shift of the absorption line center due to the Doppler effect. Temperature is determined by comparing experimental and calculated lineshapes. Capabilities of the technique for studies of transient high-speed flows are demonstrated in shock tube experiments. Good agreement is obtained with predicted temperatures and velocities when pressure-induced shifts are accounted for.

  8. Overview of Emerging Air Sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    These slides will be presented at the 2014 National Ambient Air Monitoring Conference in Atlanta, GA during August 11-15, 2014. The goal is to provide an overview of air sensor technology and the audience will be primarily state air monitoring agencies and EPA Regions.

  9. Cryogenic Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justak, John

    2010-01-01

    An acousto-optic cryogenic flow sensor (CFS) determines mass flow of cryogens for spacecraft propellant management. The CFS operates unobtrusively in a high-pressure, high-flowrate cryogenic environment to provide measurements for fluid quality as well as mass flow rate. Experimental hardware uses an optical plane-of-light (POL) to detect the onset of two-phase flow, and the presence of particles in the flow of water. Acousto-optic devices are used in laser equipment for electronic control of the intensity and position of the laser beam. Acousto-optic interaction occurs in all optical media when an acoustic wave and a laser beam are present. When an acoustic wave is launched into the optical medium, it generates a refractive index wave that behaves like a sinusoidal grating. An incident laser beam passing through this grating will diffract the laser beam into several orders. Its angular position is linearly proportional to the acoustic frequency, so that the higher the frequency, the larger the diffracted angle. If the acoustic wave is traveling in a moving fluid, the fluid velocity will affect the frequency of the traveling wave, relative to a stationary sensor. This frequency shift changes the angle of diffraction, hence, fluid velocity can be determined from the diffraction angle. The CFS acoustic Bragg grating data test indicates that it is capable of accurately determining flow from 0 to 10 meters per second. The same sensor can be used in flow velocities exceeding 100 m/s. The POL module has successfully determined the onset of two-phase flow, and can distinguish vapor bubbles from debris.

  10. Shock-swallowing air sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nugent, J.; Sakamoto, G. M.; Webb, L. D.; Couch, L. M.

    1979-01-01

    An air-data probe allows air to flow through it so that supersonic and hypersonic shock waves form behind pressure measuring orifices and tube instead of directly on them. Measured pressures are close to those in free-flowing air and are used to determine mach numbers of flying aircraft.

  11. Air Entraining Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2001-11-01

    Air entraining flows are frequently encountered in Nature (e.g. breaking waves, waterfalls, rain over water bodies) and in technological applications (gas-liquid chemical reactors, water treatment, aquaculture, and others). Superficially, one may distinguish between transient events, such as a breaking wave, and steady situations, e.g. a falling jet. However, when viscosity is not important, the process of air entrainment turns out to be the consequence of local transient events even in steady flows. For example, surface disturbances convected by a nominally steady jet impact the receiving liquid, create a deep depression, which collapses entraining an air pocket. (In practice this basic mechanism is complicated by the presence of waves, vortical flows, and other factors.) This talk will describe several examples of air-entraining flows illustrating the fluid mechanic principles involved with high-speed movies and numerical computations.

  12. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-01

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 °C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min-1, equal to 2.0 V l-1 min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min-1 and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min-1, up to 5.7 V l-1 min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min-1 and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min-1. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min-1 with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l-1 min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min-1 with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l-1 min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min-1, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l-1 min.

  13. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio

    2011-02-15

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 deg. C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min{sup -1}, equal to 2.0 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min{sup -1} and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min{sup -1}, up to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min{sup -1} and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min{sup -1} with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min{sup -1} with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l{sup -1} min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min{sup -1}, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l{sup -1} min.

  14. Terminal Air Flow Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.; Erzberger, Heinz; Edwards, Thomas A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The Center TRACON Automation System (CTAS) will be the basis for air traffic planning and control in the terminal area. The system accepts arriving traffic within an extended terminal area and optimizes the flow based on current traffic and airport conditions. The operational use of CTAS will be presented together with results from current operations.

  15. Highlights from the Air Sensors 2014 Workshop

    EPA Science Inventory

    In June 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hosted its fourth next-generation air monitoring workshop to discuss the current state of the science in air sensor technologies and their applications for environmental monitoring, Air Sensors 2014: A New Frontier. Th...

  16. Liquid Bismuth Propellant Flow Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Stanojev, B. J.; Korman, V.

    2007-01-01

    Quantifying the propellant mass flow rate in liquid bismuth-fed electric propulsion systems has two challenging facets. First, the flow sensors must be capable of providing a resolvable measurement at propellant mass flow rates on the order of 10 mg/see with and uncertainty of less that 5%. The second challenge has to do with the fact that the materials from which the flow sensors are fabricated must be capable of resisting any of the corrosive effects associated with the high-temperature propellant. The measurement itself is necessary in order to properly assess the performance (thrust efficiency, Isp) of thruster systems in the laboratory environment. The hotspot sensor[I] has been designed to provide the bismuth propellant mass flow rate measurement. In the hotspot sensor, a pulse of thermal energy (derived from a current pulse and associated joule heating) is applied near the inlet of the sensor. The flow is "tagged" with a thermal feature that is convected downstream by the flowing liquid metal. Downstream, a temperature measurement is performed to detect a "ripple" in the local temperature associated with the passing "hotspot" in the propellant. By measuring the time between the upstream generation and downstream detection of the thermal feature, the flow speed can be calculated using a "time of flight" analysis. In addition, the system can be calibrated by measuring the accumulated mass exiting the system as a-function of time and correlating this with the time it takes the hotspot to convect through the sensor. The primary advantage of this technique is that it doesn't depend on an absolute measurement of temperature but, instead, relies on the observation of thermal features. This makes the technique insensitive to other externally generated thermal fluctuations. In this paper, we describe experiments performed using the hotspot flow sensor aimed at quantifying the resolution of the sensor technology. Propellant is expelled onto an electronic scale to

  17. Evaluation of air acidity through optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Heras, M; Kromka, K; Faber, J; Karaszkiewicz, P; Villegas, M A

    2005-05-15

    Optical sensors developed from dye-doped coatings obtained through the sol-gel method were designed and produced to evaluate air acidity. Both laboratory calibration and field test measurements in several locales of downtown Cracow, Poland, were undertaken with the aim of assessing the sensors' behavior. As a first approach, SO2 was considered as the main gaseous pollutant with acid properties capable of sensitizing the sensors under humid conditions. A relationship between the SO2 concentration measured by conventional automatic air pollution monitoring stations and the optical response of the sensors was established. To correlate such a relationship with the air acidity, a simple calculation, which also takes into account relative humidity, temperature, and atmospheric pressure, was done. Following this calculation, the sensors' detection threshold for pH was found to be 0.05, approximately. The sensors can be a very useful analytical tool to alert against acid rain risks in preventive conservation of historical materials, among other applications.

  18. Linear air-fuel sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, F.; Miller, C.

    1996-12-14

    The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

  19. Mass flow sensor utilizing a resistance bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Hwang, Danny P. (Inventor); Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A mass flow sensor to be mounted within a duct and measures the mass flow of a fluid stream moving through the duct. The sensor is an elongated thin quartz substrate having a plurality of platinum strips extending in a parallel relationship on the strip, with certain of the strips being resistors connected to an excitation voltage. The resistors form the legs of a Wheatstone bridge. The resistors are spaced a sufficient distance inwardly from the leading and trailing edges of the substrate to lie within the velocity recovery region so that the measured flow is the same as the actual upstream flow. The resistor strips extend at least half-way through the fluid stream to include a substantial part of the velocity profile of the stream. Certain of the resistors detect a change in temperature as the fluid stream moves across the substrate to provide an output signal from the Wheatstone bridge which is representative of the fluid flow. A heater is located in the midst of the resistor array to heat the air as it passes over the array.

  20. Sensor selection for outdoor air quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorsey, K. L.; Herr, John R.; Pisano, A. P.

    2014-06-01

    Gas chemical monitoring for next-generation robotics applications such as fire fighting, explosive gas detection, ubiquitous urban monitoring, and mine safety require high performance, reliable sensors. In this work, we discuss the performance requirements of fixed-location, mobile vehicle, and personal sensor nodes for outdoor air quality sensing. We characterize and compare the performance of a miniature commercial electrochemical and a metal oxide gas sensor and discuss their suitability for environmental monitoring applications. Metal oxide sensors are highly cross-sensitive to factors that affect chemical adsorption (e.g., air speed, pressure) and require careful enclosure design or compensation methods. In contrast, electrochemical sensors are less susceptible to environmental variations, have very low power consumption, and are well matched for mobile air quality monitoring.

  1. Village Green Project and Air Sensor Kits

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a presentation for the OAQPS Teachers Workshop. Will provide a background overview on the Village Green Project and our air sensor kit for outreach, then have the teachers try putting it together.

  2. Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

  3. Low power, constant-flow air pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, M.D.; Albert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A rugged, yet small and lightweight constant-flow air pump system has been designed. Flow control is achieved using a novel approach which is three times more power efficient than previous designs. The resultant savings in battery size and weight makes these pumps ideal for sampling air on balloon platforms. The pump package includes meteorological sensors and an onboard computer that stores time and sensor data and turns the constant-flow pump circuit on/off. Some applications of these systems are also presented in this report.

  4. Evaluation of air acidity through optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Heras, M; Kromka, K; Faber, J; Karaszkiewicz, P; Villegas, M A

    2005-05-15

    Optical sensors developed from dye-doped coatings obtained through the sol-gel method were designed and produced to evaluate air acidity. Both laboratory calibration and field test measurements in several locales of downtown Cracow, Poland, were undertaken with the aim of assessing the sensors' behavior. As a first approach, SO2 was considered as the main gaseous pollutant with acid properties capable of sensitizing the sensors under humid conditions. A relationship between the SO2 concentration measured by conventional automatic air pollution monitoring stations and the optical response of the sensors was established. To correlate such a relationship with the air acidity, a simple calculation, which also takes into account relative humidity, temperature, and atmospheric pressure, was done. Following this calculation, the sensors' detection threshold for pH was found to be 0.05, approximately. The sensors can be a very useful analytical tool to alert against acid rain risks in preventive conservation of historical materials, among other applications. PMID:15952380

  5. A smart indoor air quality sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jin

    2006-03-01

    The indoor air quality (IAQ) has an important impact on public health. Currently, the indoor air pollution, caused by gas, particle, and bio-aerosol pollutants, is considered as the top five environmental risks to public health and has an estimated cost of $2 billion/year due to medical cost and lost productivity. Furthermore, current buildings are especially vulnerable for chemical and biological warfare (CBW) agent contamination because the central air conditioning and ventilation system serve as a nature carrier to spread the released agent from one location to the whole indoor environment within a short time period. To assure the IAQ and safety for either new or existing buildings, real time comprehensive IAQ and CBW measurements are needed. With the development of new sensing technologies, economic and reliable comprehensive IAQ and CBW sensors become promising. However, few studies exist that examine the design and evaluation issues related to IAQ and CBW sensor network. In this paper, relevant research areas including IAQ and CBW sensor development, demand control ventilation, indoor CBW sensor system design, and sensor system design for other areas such as water system protection, fault detection and diagnosis, are reviewed and summarized. Potential research opportunities for IAQ and CBW sensor system design and evaluation are discussed.

  6. Automatic air flow control in air conditioning ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.

    1972-01-01

    Device is designed which automatically selects air flow coming from either of two directions and which can be adjusted to desired air volume on either side. Device uses one movable and two fixed scoops which control air flow and air volume.

  7. Smart sensors enable smart air conditioning control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection. PMID:24961213

  8. Smart sensors enable smart air conditioning control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-06-24

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection.

  9. Smart Sensors Enable Smart Air Conditioning Control

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chin-Chi; Lee, Dasheng

    2014-01-01

    In this study, mobile phones, wearable devices, temperature and human motion detectors are integrated as smart sensors for enabling smart air conditioning control. Smart sensors obtain feedback, especially occupants' information, from mobile phones and wearable devices placed on human body. The information can be used to adjust air conditioners in advance according to humans' intentions, in so-called intention causing control. Experimental results show that the indoor temperature can be controlled accurately with errors of less than ±0.1 °C. Rapid cool down can be achieved within 2 min to the optimized indoor capacity after occupants enter a room. It's also noted that within two-hour operation the total compressor output of the smart air conditioner is 48.4% less than that of the one using On-Off control. The smart air conditioner with wearable devices could detect the human temperature and activity during sleep to determine the sleeping state and adjusting the sleeping function flexibly. The sleeping function optimized by the smart air conditioner with wearable devices could reduce the energy consumption up to 46.9% and keep the human health. The presented smart air conditioner could provide a comfortable environment and achieve the goals of energy conservation and environmental protection. PMID:24961213

  10. New intravascular flow sensor using fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenow, Erik N. D.

    1994-12-01

    A new sensor using fiber optics is suggested for blood flow measurements in small vessels. The sensor principle and a first evaluation on a flow model are presented. The new sensor uses small CO2 gas bubbles as flow markers for optical detection. When the bubbles pass an optical window, light emitted from one fiber is reflected and scattered into another fiber. The sensor has been proven to work in a 3 mm flow model using two 110 micrometers optical fibers and a 100 micrometers steel capillary inserted into a 1 mm guide wire. The evaluation of a sensor archetype shows that the new sensor provides a promising method for intravascular blood flow measurement in small vessels. The linearity for steady state flow is studied in the flow interval 30 - 130 ml/min. comparison with ultrasound Doppler flowmetry was performed for pulsatile flow in the interval 25 - 125 ml/min. with a pulse length between 0.5 and 2 s. The use of intravascular administered CO2 in small volumes is harmless because the gas is rapidly dissolved in whole blood.

  11. Control of Computer Room Air Conditioning using IT Equipment Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Storey, Bill; Patterson, Michael K.

    2009-09-30

    The goal of this demonstration was to show how sensors in IT equipment could be accessed and used to directly control computer room air conditioning. The data provided from the sensors is available on the IT network and the challenge for this project was to connect this information to the computer room air handler's control system. A control strategy was developed to enable separate control of the chilled water flow and the fans in the computer room air handlers. By using these existing sensors in the IT equipment, an additional control system is eliminated (or could be redundant) and optimal cooling can be provided saving significant energy. Using onboard server temperature sensors will yield significant energy reductions in data centers. Intel hosted the demonstration in its Santa Clara, CA data center. Intel collaborated with IBM, HP, Emerson, Wunderlich-Malec Engineers, FieldServer Technologies, and LBNL to install the necessary components and develop the new control scheme. LBNL also validated the results of the demonstration.

  12. Sensor Development for Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahng, Seun K.; Gorton, Susan A.; Mau, Johnney C.; Soto, Hector L.; Hernandez, Corey D.

    2001-01-01

    Presented are the developmental efforts for MEMS sensors for a closed-loop active flow control in a low-speed wind tunnel evaluation. The MEMS sensors are designed in-house and fabricated out of house, and the shear sensors are a thermal type that are collocated with temperature and pressure sensors on a flexible polyimide sheet, which conforms to surfaces of a simple curvature. A total of 6 sensors are located within a 1.5 by 3 mm area as a cluster with each sensor being 300 pm square. The thickness of this sensor cluster is 75 pm. Outputs from the shear sensors have been compared with respect to those of the Preston tube for evaluation of the sensors on a flat plate. Pressure sensors are the absolute type and have recorded pressure measurements within 0.05 percent of the tunnel ESP pressure sensor readings. The sensors and signal conditioning electronics have been tested on both a flat plate and a ramp in Langley s 15-Inch Low-Turbulence Tunnel. The system configuration and control PC is configured with LabView, where calibration constants are stored for desired compensation and correction. The preliminary test results are presented within.

  13. In situ permeable flow sensors at the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration: Phase 1 results

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, S.

    1992-10-01

    The In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor, a new technology which uses a thermal perturbation technique to directly measure the 3-dimensional groundwater flow velocity vector at a point in permeable, unconsolidated geologic formations, has been used to monitor changes in the groundwater flow regime around an experimental air stripping waste remediation activity. While design flaws in the first version of the technology, which were used during the experiment being reported here, precluded measurements of the horizontal component of the flow velocity, measurements of the vertical component of the flow velocity were obtained. Results indicate that significant changes in the vertical flow velocity were induced by the air injection system. One flow sensor, MHM6, measured a vertical flow velocity of 4 m/yr or less when the air injection system was not operating and 25 m/yr when the air injection system was on. This may be caused by air bubbles moving past the probes or may be the result of the establishment of a more widespread flow regime in the groundwater induced by the air injection system. In the latter case, significantly more groundwater would be remediated by the air stripping operation since groundwater would be circulated through the zone of influence of the air injection system. Newly designed flow sensors, already in the ground at Savannah River to monitor Phase II of the project, are capable of measuring horizontal as well as vertical components of flow velocity.

  14. Design and Implementation of Automatic Air Flow Rate Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, A.; Saputra, C.; Munir, M. M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    Venturimeter is an apparatus that can be used to measure the air flow rate. In this experiment we designed a venturimeter which equipped with a valve that is used to control the air flow rate. The difference of pressure between the cross sections was measured with the differential pressure sensor GA 100-015WD which can calculate the difference of pressures from 0 to 3737.33 Pa. A 42M048C Z36 stepper motor was used to control the valve. The precision of this motor rotation is about 0.15 °. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed to monitor and set the value of flow rate then an 8-bit microcontroller was used to process the control system In this experiment- the venturimeter has been examined to get the optimal parameter of controller. The results show that the controller can set the stable output air flow rate.

  15. Demonstration that a new flow sensor can operate in the clinical range for cerebrospinal fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Rahul; Lakshmanan, Shanmugamurthy; Apigo, David; Kanwal, Alokik; Liu, Sheng; Russell, Thomas; Madsen, Joseph R.; Thomas, Gordon A.; Farrow, Reginald C.

    2015-01-01

    A flow sensor has been fabricated and tested that is capable of measuring the slow flow characteristic of the cerebrospinal fluid in the range from less than 4 mL/h to above 100 mL/h. This sensor is suitable for long-term implantation because it uses a wireless external spectrometer to measure passive subcutaneous components. The sensors are pressure-sensitive capacitors, in the range of 5 pF with an air gap at atmospheric pressure. Each capacitor is in series with an inductor to provide a resonant frequency that varies with flow rate. At constant flow, the system is steady with drift <0.3 mL/h over a month. At variable flow rate, V̇, the resonant frequency, f0, which is in the 200–400 MHz range, follows a second order polynomial with respect to V̇. For this sensor system the uncertainty in measuring f0 is 30 kHz which corresponds to a sensitivity in measuring flow of ΔV̇= 0.6 mL/hr. Pressures up to 20 cm H2O relative to ambient pressure were also measured. An implantable twin capacitor system is proposed that can measure flow, which is fully compensated for all hydrostatic pressures. For twin capacitors, other sources of systematic variation within clinical range, such as temperature and ambient pressure, are smaller than our sensitivity and we delineate a calibration method that should maintain clinically useful accuracy over long times. PMID:26543321

  16. Empowering smartphone users with sensor node for air quality measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oletic, Dinko; Bilas, Vedran

    2013-06-01

    We present an architecture of a sensor node developed for use with smartphones for participatory sensing of air quality in urban environments. Our solution features inexpensive metal-oxide semiconductor gas sensors (MOX) for measurement of CO, O3, NO2 and VOC, along with sensors for ambient temperature and humidity. We focus on our design of sensor interface consisting of power-regulated heater temperature control, and the design of resistance sensing circuit. Accuracy of the sensor interface is characterized. Power consumption of the sensor node is analysed. Preliminary data obtained from the CO gas sensors in laboratory conditions and during the outdoor field-test is shown.

  17. A clean air continuous flow propulsion facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, R. H.; Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a contaminant-free, high enthalpy, continuous flow facility designed to obtain detailed code validation measurements of high speed combustion. The facility encompasses uncontaminated air temperature control to within 5 K, fuel temperature control to 2 K, a ceramic flow straightener, drying of inlet air, and steady state continuous operation. The air heating method provides potential for independent control of contaminant level by injection, mixing, and heating upstream. Particular attention is given to extension of current capability of 1250 K total air temperature, which simulates Scramjet enthalpy at Mach 5.

  18. Wood stove air flow regulating

    SciTech Connect

    Brefka, P.E.

    1983-10-04

    A wood stove has primary and secondary air regulator doors at the bottom and top, respectively, of the stove door each rotating about the axis of a tightening knob in the center of the door opposite a baffle plate that defines with the door inside an air channel open at the top and bottom.

  19. A beam-membrane structure micromachined differential pressure flow sensor.

    PubMed

    Chen, P; Zhao, Y L; Tian, B; Li, C; Li, Y Y

    2015-04-01

    A beam-membrane structure micromachined flow sensor is designed, depending on the principle of differential pressure caused by the mass flow, which is directly proportional to the square flow rate. The FSI (fluid structure interaction) characteristics of the differential pressure flow sensor are investigated via numerical analysis and analog simulation. The working mechanism of the flow sensor is analyzed depending on the FSI results. Then, the flow sensor is fabricated and calibrated. The calibration results show that the beam-membrane structure differential pressure flow sensor achieves ideal static characteristics and works well in the practical applications.

  20. A beam-membrane structure micromachined differential pressure flow sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.; Zhao, Y. L.; Tian, B. Li, C.; Li, Y. Y.

    2015-04-15

    A beam-membrane structure micromachined flow sensor is designed, depending on the principle of differential pressure caused by the mass flow, which is directly proportional to the square flow rate. The FSI (fluid structure interaction) characteristics of the differential pressure flow sensor are investigated via numerical analysis and analog simulation. The working mechanism of the flow sensor is analyzed depending on the FSI results. Then, the flow sensor is fabricated and calibrated. The calibration results show that the beam-membrane structure differential pressure flow sensor achieves ideal static characteristics and works well in the practical applications.

  1. MEMS Based Flow Sensors and Their Application on Flow Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yingchen; Chen, Nannan; Engel, Jonathan; Tucker, Craig; Pandya, Saunvit; Liu, Chang

    2006-11-01

    We report characterization and application of recently developed, MEMS based, out-of-plane hot-wire anemometer (HWA) sensor and bio-inspired artificial hair cell (AHC) sensor. Sensitivities of 0.2mm/s for HWA and 0.1mm/s for AHC have been achieved in water flows, comparing with 1mm/s of a conventional HWA. In contrast to its high sensitivity, the AHC sensor can survive 55 bending of its hair, making it very robust. After calibration, both HWA and AHC sensors were employed for dipole field and wake measurements. The dipole field was generated by a vibrating sphere in a large water tank; the measurement results match very well with the analytical model. The wake was created by a circular cylinder in a water channel; the RMS velocity distributions replicate the main features of a typical wake accurately. The two types of sensors were also applied in array format to mimic a fish lateral line for imaging hydrodynamic events. Multi-modal sensors capable of simultaneous measurement of flow velocity, shear stress, pressure and temperature are under development.

  2. High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

    2007-12-31

    This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when

  3. Compressible Flow Tables for Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcher, Marie A.

    1947-01-01

    This paper contains a tabulation of functions of the Mach number which are frequently used in high-speed aerodynamics. The tables extend from M = 0 to M = 10.0 in increments of 0.01 and are based on the assumption that air is a perfect gas having a specific heat ratio of 1.400.

  4. μ-Biomimetic flow-sensors--introducing light-guiding PDMS structures into MEMS.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hendrik; Klein, Adrian; Bleckmann, Horst; Holik, Peter; Schmitz, Sam; Siebke, Georg; Tätzner, Simon; Lacher, Manfred; Steltenkamp, Siegfried

    2015-04-16

    In the area of biomimetics, engineers use inspiration from natural systems to develop technical devices, such as sensors. One example is the lateral line system of fish. It is a mechanoreceptive system consisting of up to several thousand individual sensors called neuromasts, which enable fish to sense prey, predators, or conspecifics. So far, the small size and high sensitivity of the lateral line is unmatched by man-made sensor devices. Here, we describe an artificial lateral line system based on an optical detection principle. We developed artificial canal neuromasts using MEMS technology including thick film techniques. In this work, we describe the MEMS fabrication and characterize a sensor prototype. Our sensor consists of a silicon chip, a housing, and an electronic circuit. We demonstrate the functionality of our μ-biomimetic flow sensor by analyzing its response to constant water flow and flow fluctuations. Furthermore, we discuss the sensor robustness and sensitivity of our sensor and its suitability for industrial and medical applications. In sum, our sensor can be used for many tasks, e.g. for monitoring fluid flow in medical applications, for detecting leakages in tap water systems or for air and gas flow measurements. Finally, our flow sensor can even be used to improve current knowledge about the functional significance of the fish lateral line.

  5. μ-Biomimetic flow-sensors--introducing light-guiding PDMS structures into MEMS.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Hendrik; Klein, Adrian; Bleckmann, Horst; Holik, Peter; Schmitz, Sam; Siebke, Georg; Tätzner, Simon; Lacher, Manfred; Steltenkamp, Siegfried

    2015-06-01

    In the area of biomimetics, engineers use inspiration from natural systems to develop technical devices, such as sensors. One example is the lateral line system of fish. It is a mechanoreceptive system consisting of up to several thousand individual sensors called neuromasts, which enable fish to sense prey, predators, or conspecifics. So far, the small size and high sensitivity of the lateral line is unmatched by man-made sensor devices. Here, we describe an artificial lateral line system based on an optical detection principle. We developed artificial canal neuromasts using MEMS technology including thick film techniques. In this work, we describe the MEMS fabrication and characterize a sensor prototype. Our sensor consists of a silicon chip, a housing, and an electronic circuit. We demonstrate the functionality of our μ-biomimetic flow sensor by analyzing its response to constant water flow and flow fluctuations. Furthermore, we discuss the sensor robustness and sensitivity of our sensor and its suitability for industrial and medical applications. In sum, our sensor can be used for many tasks, e.g. for monitoring fluid flow in medical applications, for detecting leakages in tap water systems or for air and gas flow measurements. Finally, our flow sensor can even be used to improve current knowledge about the functional significance of the fish lateral line. PMID:25879762

  6. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-03-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disc on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  7. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  8. Characteristics of coal mine ventilation air flows.

    PubMed

    Su, Shi; Chen, Hongwei; Teakle, Philip; Xue, Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a greenhouse gas but also a wasted energy resource if not utilised. Underground coal mining is by far the most important source of fugitive methane emissions, and approximately 70% of all coal mining related methane is emitted to the atmosphere through mine ventilation air. Therefore, research and development on mine methane mitigation and utilisation now focuses on methane emitted from underground coal mines, in particular ventilation air methane (VAM) capture and utilisation. To date, most work has focused on the oxidation of very low concentration methane. These processes may be classified based on their combustion kinetic mechanisms into thermal oxidation and catalytic oxidation. VAM mitigation/utilisation technologies are generally divided into two basic categories: ancillary uses and principal uses. However, it is possible that the characteristics of ventilation air flows, for example the variations in methane concentration and the presence of certain compounds, which have not been reported so far, could make some potential VAM mitigation and utilisation technologies unfeasible if they cannot cope with the characteristics of mine site ventilation air flows. Therefore, it is important to understand the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows. Moreover, dust, hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide, and other possible compounds emitted through mine ventilation air into the atmosphere are also pollutants. Therefore, this paper presents mine-site experimental results on the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows, including methane concentration and its variations, dust loadings, particle size, mineral matter of the dust, and other compounds in the ventilation air flows. The paper also discusses possible correlations between ventilation air characteristics and underground mining activities.

  9. Regulatory Considerations of Lower Cost Air Pollution Sensor Data Performance

    EPA Science Inventory

    Low-cost, portable air quality sensors could be the next generation of air monitoring, however, this nascent technology is not without risk. This article looks at how the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses air monitoring data, the procedures followed to ensure and a...

  10. Air flow in snake ventilation.

    PubMed

    Clark, B D; Gans, C; Rosenberg, H I

    1978-02-01

    Ventilation in resting, unrestrained Boa constrictor, Python regius and Thanmophis s. sirtalis was monitored using various combinations of a closed Kopfkappe (head chamber), intratracheal pressure catheters, strain gauges around the trunk, and a flow meter connected to one of the nostrils. Records of intratracheal pressure with and without closing the Kopfkappe show that the latter device induces artifacts in the normal ventilatory pattern. Flow meter readings from quiescent snakes indicate that ventilation is biphasic (outflow-inflow-pause) rather than triphasic (outflow-inflow-outflow-pause), while simultaneous pressure and strain gauge records are variably tri- or quadriphasic.

  11. Air-Microfluidics: Creating Small, Low-cost, Portable Air Quality Sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air-microfluidics shows great promise in dramatically reducing the size, cost, and power requirements of future air quality sensors without compromising their accuracy. Microfabrication provides a suite of relatively new tools for the development of micro electro mechanical syste...

  12. Air flow through poppet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G W; Nutting, E M

    1920-01-01

    Report discusses the comparative continuous flow characteristics of single and double poppet valves. The experimental data presented affords a direct comparison of valves, single and in pairs of different sizes, tested in a cylinder designed in accordance with current practice in aviation engines.

  13. Noncontact Monitoring of Respiration by Dynamic Air-Pressure Sensor.

    PubMed

    Takarada, Tohru; Asada, Tetsunosuke; Sumi, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that a dynamic air-pressure sensor system allows respiratory status to be visually monitored for patients in minimally clothed condition. The dynamic air-pressure sensor measures vital information using changes in air pressure. To utilize this device in the field, we must clarify the influence of clothing conditions on measurement. The present study evaluated use of the dynamic air-pressure sensor system as a respiratory monitor that can reliably detect change in breathing patterns irrespective of clothing. Twelve healthy volunteers reclined on a dental chair positioned horizontally with the sensor pad for measuring air-pressure signals corresponding to respiration placed on the seat back of the dental chair in the central lumbar region. Respiratory measurements were taken under 2 conditions: (a) thinly clothed (subject lying directly on the sensor pad); and (b) thickly clothed (subject lying on the sensor pad covered with a pressure-reducing sheet). Air-pressure signals were recorded and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration were calculated. This information was compared with expiratory tidal volume measured simultaneously by a respirometer connected to the subject via face mask. The dynamic air-pressure sensor was able to receive the signal corresponding to respiration regardless of clothing conditions. A strong correlation was identified between expiratory tidal volume and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration for all subjects under both clothing conditions (0.840-0.988 for the thinly clothed condition and 0.867-0.992 for the thickly clothed condition). These results show that the dynamic air-pressure sensor is useful for monitoring respiratory physiology irrespective of clothing.

  14. Noncontact Monitoring of Respiration by Dynamic Air-Pressure Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Takarada, Tohru; Asada, Tetsunosuke; Sumi, Yoshihisa; Higuchi, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that a dynamic air-pressure sensor system allows respiratory status to be visually monitored for patients in minimally clothed condition. The dynamic air-pressure sensor measures vital information using changes in air pressure. To utilize this device in the field, we must clarify the influence of clothing conditions on measurement. The present study evaluated use of the dynamic air-pressure sensor system as a respiratory monitor that can reliably detect change in breathing patterns irrespective of clothing. Twelve healthy volunteers reclined on a dental chair positioned horizontally with the sensor pad for measuring air-pressure signals corresponding to respiration placed on the seat back of the dental chair in the central lumbar region. Respiratory measurements were taken under 2 conditions: (a) thinly clothed (subject lying directly on the sensor pad); and (b) thickly clothed (subject lying on the sensor pad covered with a pressure-reducing sheet). Air-pressure signals were recorded and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration were calculated. This information was compared with expiratory tidal volume measured simultaneously by a respirometer connected to the subject via face mask. The dynamic air-pressure sensor was able to receive the signal corresponding to respiration regardless of clothing conditions. A strong correlation was identified between expiratory tidal volume and time integration values for air pressure during each expiration for all subjects under both clothing conditions (0.840–0.988 for the thinly clothed condition and 0.867–0.992 for the thickly clothed condition). These results show that the dynamic air-pressure sensor is useful for monitoring respiratory physiology irrespective of clothing. PMID:26398125

  15. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  16. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  17. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  18. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  19. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine operating...

  20. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  1. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  2. Microresonator interference fiber-optic sensor of relative air humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churenkov, A. V.

    2013-08-01

    A novel type of fiber-optic sensor of relative air humidity is developed on the basis of the micromechanical silicon microresonator and silica gel. The output signal of such a sensor in the frequency form has low sensitivity to variations in the laser-source power and to random attenuations in the fiber. In the case of purely optical excitation of oscillations of the resonator, the sensitive element of such a sensor is completely passive because it does not contain any electronic circuits and components. The sensor showed high sensitivity at a relative humidity less than 75%, possibility to operate at temperatures below freezing, and low dependence of readings on air temperature. The dependence of the humidity mass adsorbed by silica gel on the relative air humidity was found to be linear, which simplifies sensor calibration.

  3. Evaluation of a mass flow sensor at a gin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a system to optimize the cotton ginning process, a custom-built mass flow sensor was evaluated at USDA-ARS Cotton Ginning Research Unit at Stoneville, Mississippi. The mass flow sensor was fabricated based on the principle of the sensor patented by Thomasson and Sui. The optical and ele...

  4. Lateral flow immunoassay using magnetoresistive sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taton, Kristin; Johnson, Diane; Guire, Patrick; Lange, Erik; Tondra, Mark

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic particles have been adapted for use as labels in biochemical lateral flow strip tests. Standard gold particle lateral flow assays are generally qualitative; however, with magnetic particles, quantitative results can be obtained by using electronic detection systems with giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensors. As described here, these small integrated sensor chips can detect the presence of magnetic labels in capture spots whose volume is approximately 150 μm×150 μm×150 μm. The range of linear detection is better than two orders of magnitude; the total range is up to four orders of magnitude. The system was demonstrated with both indirect and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for protein detection of rabbit IgG and interferon-γ, respectively, achieving detection of 12 pg/ml protein. Ultimately, the goal is for the detector to be fully integrated into the lateral flow strip backing to form a single consumable item that is interrogated by a handheld electronic reader.

  5. Sap flow sensors: construction, quality control and comparison.

    PubMed

    Davis, Tyler W; Kuo, Chen-Min; Liang, Xu; Yu, Pao-Shan

    2012-01-01

    This work provides a design for two types of sensors, based on the thermal dissipation and heat ratio methods of sap flow calculation, for moderate to large scale deployments for the purpose of monitoring tree transpiration. These designs include a procedure for making these sensors, a quality control method for the final products, and a complete list of components with vendors and pricing information. Both sensor designs were field tested alongside a commercial sap flow sensor to assess their performance and show the importance for quality controlling the sensor outputs. Results show that for roughly 2% of the cost of commercial sensors, self-made sap flow sensors can provide acceptable estimates of the sap flow measurements compared to the commercial sensors.

  6. Data set from gas sensor array under flow modulation.

    PubMed

    Ziyatdinov, Andrey; Fonollosa, Jordi; Fernández, Luis; Gutiérrez-Gálvez, Agustín; Marco, Santiago; Perera, Alexandre

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies in neuroscience suggest that sniffing, namely sampling odors actively, plays an important role in olfactory system, especially in certain scenarios such as novel odorant detection. While the computational advantages of high frequency sampling have not been yet elucidated, here, in order to motivate further investigation in active sampling strategies, we share the data from an artificial olfactory system made of 16 MOX gas sensors under gas flow modulation. The data were acquired on a custom set up featured by an external mechanical ventilator that emulates the biological respiration cycle. 58 samples were recorded in response to a relatively broad set of 12 gas classes, defined from different binary mixtures of acetone and ethanol in air. The acquired time series show two dominant frequency bands: the low-frequency signal corresponds to a conventional response curve of a sensor in response to a gas pulse, and the high-frequency signal has a clear principal harmonic at the respiration frequency. The data are related to the study in [1], and the data analysis results reported there should be considered as a reference point. The data presented here have been deposited to the web site of The University of California at Irvine (UCI) Machine Learning Repository (https://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/datasets/Gas+sensor+array+under+flow+modulation). The code repository for reproducible analysis applied to the data is hosted at the GutHub web site (https://github.com/variani/pulmon). The data and code can be used upon citation of [1].

  7. Plug-in Sensors for Air Pollution Monitoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Manny

    Faristors, a type of plug-in sensors used in analyzing equipment, are described in this technical report presented at the 12th Conference on Methods in Air Pollution and Industrial Hygiene Studies, University of Southern California, April, 1971. Their principles of operation, interchangeability, and versatility for measuring air pollution at…

  8. Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided.

  9. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  10. Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  11. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical..., you may use an intake-air flow meter signal that does not give the actual value of raw exhaust, as... requirements. We recommend that you use an intake-air flow meter that meets the specifications in Table 1...

  13. A Comparative Study of Sound Speed in Air at Room Temperature between a Pressure Sensor and a Sound Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrani, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the comparison of sound speed measurements in air using two types of sensor that are widely employed in physics and engineering education, namely a pressure sensor and a sound sensor. A computer-based laboratory with pressure and sound sensors was used to carry out measurements of air through a 60 ml syringe. The fast Fourier…

  14. Mobile Sensors and Applications for Air Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Executive Summary The public has long been interested in understanding what pollutants are in the air they breathe so they can best protect their environmental health and welfare. The current air quality monitoring network consists of discrete stations with expensive equipment ...

  15. Stratospheric air sampling platform/sensor tradeoffs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arno, R. D.; Page, W.

    1976-01-01

    Results of a study are described in which in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation are considered for accommodation on airborne platforms capable of reaching stratospheric altitudes. The instrumentation measures trace species of importance to present concerns regarding stratospheric pollution and possible ozone depletion. The platforms examined were the U-2, modified U-2, balloon, rocket, F-15 flown in a zoom-climb maneuver, YF-12, and remotely piloted vehicle (RPV). The sensors and performance characteristics of the platforms are described and special problems of sensor-platform integration are discussed. A typical latitudinal sampling mission is utilized to describe platform logistics problems and how the platforms might perform such missions.

  16. Modeling of an air-backed diaphragm in dynamic pressure sensors: Effects of the air cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haijun; Olson, Douglas A.; Yu, Miao

    2014-12-01

    As the key structure of most dynamic pressure sensors, a diaphragm backed by an air cavity plays a critical role in the determination of sensor performance metrics. In this paper, we investigate the influence of air cavity length on the sensitivity and bandwidth. A continuum mechanics model neglecting the air viscous effect is first developed to capture the structural-acoustic coupling between a clamped circular diaphragm and a cylindrical backing air cavity. To facilitate sensor design, close-form approximations are obtained to calculate the static sensitivity and the fundamental natural frequency of the air-backed diaphragm. Parametric studies based on this analytical model show that the air cavity can change both the effective mass and the effective stiffness of the diaphragm. One new finding is that the natural frequency of the air-backed diaphragm behaves differently in three different cavity length ranges. In particular, due to the mass effect of the air cavity being dominant, it is shown for the first time that the natural frequency decreases when the cavity length decreases below a critical value in the short cavity range. Furthermore, a finite element method (FEM) model is developed to validate the continuum mechanics model and to study the damping effect of the air cavity. These results provide important design guidelines for dynamic pressure sensors with air-backed diaphragms.

  17. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  18. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  19. Rapid evolution of air sensor technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Outdoor air pollution measurement approaches have historically been conducted using stationary shelters that require significant space, power, and expertise to operate. The cost and logistical requirements to conduct monitoring have limited the number of locations with continuou...

  20. TAMDAR Sensor Validation in 2003 AIRS II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, Taumi S.; Murray, John J.; Anderson, Mark V.; Mulally, Daniel J.; Jensen, Kristopher R.; Grainger, Cedric A.; Delene, David J.

    2005-01-01

    This study entails an assessment of TAMDAR in situ temperature, relative humidity and winds sensor data from seven flights of the UND Citation II. These data are undergoing rigorous assessment to determine their viability to significantly augment domestic Meteorological Data Communications Reporting System (MDCRS) and the international Aircraft Meteorological Data Reporting (AMDAR) system observational databases to improve the performance of regional and global numerical weather prediction models. NASA Langley Research Center participated in the Second Alliance Icing Research Study from November 17 to December 17, 2003. TAMDAR data taken during this period is compared with validation data from the UND Citation. The data indicate acceptable performance of the TAMDAR sensor when compared to measurements from the UND Citation research instruments.

  1. Artificial hair sensor designs for flow measurement of UAVs with different scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Weihua; Reich, Gregory W.

    2016-04-01

    Artificial hair sensors have been developed in the Air Force Research Laboratory for use in prediction of local flow around airfoils and subsequent use in gust rejection applications. The on-going sensor development is based on a micro-sized unmanned vehicle, resulting in a sensor design that is sensitive in that aircraft's nominal flight condition (speed). However, the active, or operating, region of the artificial hair sensor concept is highly dependent on the geometry and properties of the hair, capillary, and carbon nanotubes that make up the sensor design. This paper aims at expanding the flow measurement concept using artificial hair sensors to UAVs with different dimensions by properly sizing the parameters of the sensors, according to the nominal flight conditions of the UAVs. In this work, the hair, made of glass fiber, will be modeled as a cantilever beam with an elastic foundation, subject to external distributed aerodynamic drag. Hair length, diameter, capillary depth, and carbon nanotube length will be scaled by keeping the maximum strain of the carbon nanotubes constant for different sensors under different working conditions. Numerical studies will demonstrate the feasibility of the scaling methodology by designing artificial hair sensors for UAVs with different dimensions and flight conditions, starting from a baseline sensor design.

  2. A survey of air flow models for multizone structures

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

    1991-03-01

    Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  3. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of air... longwall and continuous miner sections. The quantity of air across each face at a work place shall be...

  4. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  5. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  6. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  7. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  8. Imaging dipole flow sources using an artificial lateral-line system made of biomimetic hair flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Dagamseh, Ahmad; Wiegerink, Remco; Lammerink, Theo; Krijnen, Gijs

    2013-06-01

    In Nature, fish have the ability to localize prey, school, navigate, etc., using the lateral-line organ. Artificial hair flow sensors arranged in a linear array shape (inspired by the lateral-line system (LSS) in fish) have been applied to measure airflow patterns at the sensor positions. Here, we take advantage of both biomimetic artificial hair-based flow sensors arranged as LSS and beamforming techniques to demonstrate dipole-source localization in air. Modelling and measurement results show the artificial lateral-line ability to image the position of dipole sources accurately with estimation error of less than 0.14 times the array length. This opens up possibilities for flow-based, near-field environment mapping that can be beneficial to, for example, biologists and robot guidance applications.

  9. Imaging dipole flow sources using an artificial lateral-line system made of biomimetic hair flow sensors

    PubMed Central

    Dagamseh, Ahmad; Wiegerink, Remco; Lammerink, Theo; Krijnen, Gijs

    2013-01-01

    In Nature, fish have the ability to localize prey, school, navigate, etc., using the lateral-line organ. Artificial hair flow sensors arranged in a linear array shape (inspired by the lateral-line system (LSS) in fish) have been applied to measure airflow patterns at the sensor positions. Here, we take advantage of both biomimetic artificial hair-based flow sensors arranged as LSS and beamforming techniques to demonstrate dipole-source localization in air. Modelling and measurement results show the artificial lateral-line ability to image the position of dipole sources accurately with estimation error of less than 0.14 times the array length. This opens up possibilities for flow-based, near-field environment mapping that can be beneficial to, for example, biologists and robot guidance applications. PMID:23594816

  10. Data set from gas sensor array under flow modulation☆

    PubMed Central

    Ziyatdinov, Andrey; Fonollosa, Jordi; Fernández, Luis; Gutiérrez-Gálvez, Agustín; Marco, Santiago; Perera, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies in neuroscience suggest that sniffing, namely sampling odors actively, plays an important role in olfactory system, especially in certain scenarios such as novel odorant detection. While the computational advantages of high frequency sampling have not been yet elucidated, here, in order to motivate further investigation in active sampling strategies, we share the data from an artificial olfactory system made of 16 MOX gas sensors under gas flow modulation. The data were acquired on a custom set up featured by an external mechanical ventilator that emulates the biological respiration cycle. 58 samples were recorded in response to a relatively broad set of 12 gas classes, defined from different binary mixtures of acetone and ethanol in air. The acquired time series show two dominant frequency bands: the low-frequency signal corresponds to a conventional response curve of a sensor in response to a gas pulse, and the high-frequency signal has a clear principal harmonic at the respiration frequency. The data are related to the study in [1], and the data analysis results reported there should be considered as a reference point. The data presented here have been deposited to the web site of The University of California at Irvine (UCI) Machine Learning Repository (https://archive.ics.uci.edu/ml/datasets/Gas+sensor+array+under+flow+modulation). The code repository for reproducible analysis applied to the data is hosted at the GutHub web site (https://github.com/variani/pulmon). The data and code can be used upon citation of [1]. PMID:26217733

  11. Low-Cost Sensor Units for Measuring Urban Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popoola, O. A.; Mead, M.; Stewart, G.; Hodgson, T.; McLoed, M.; Baldovi, J.; Landshoff, P.; Hayes, M.; Calleja, M.; Jones, R.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of selected key air quality gases (CO, NO & NO2) have been made with a range of miniature low-cost sensors based on electrochemical gas sensing technology incorporating GPS and GPRS for position and communication respectively. Two types of simple to operate sensors units have been designed to be deployed in relatively large numbers. Mobile handheld sensor units designed for operation by members of the public have been deployed on numerous occasions including in Cambridge, London and Valencia. Static sensor units have also been designed for long-term autonomous deployment on existing street furniture. A study was recently completed in which 45 sensor units were deployed in the Cambridge area for a period of 3 months. Results from these studies indicate that air quality varies widely both spatially and temporally. The widely varying concentrations found suggest that the urban environment cannot be fully understood using limited static site (AURN) networks and that a higher resolution, more dispersed network is required to better define air quality in the urban environment. The results also suggest that higher spatial and temporal resolution measurements could improve knowledge of the levels of individual exposure in the urban environment.

  12. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, E.A.; Monroe, S.A.; Springer, A.E.; Blasch, K.W.; Bills, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (<1.0 cm) intermittent and ephemeral flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration.

  13. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Adams, Eric A; Monroe, Stephen A; Springer, Abraham E; Blasch, Kyle W; Bills, Donald J

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (<1.0 cm) intermittent and ephemeral flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration.

  14. Electrical resistance sensors record spring flow timing, Grand Canyon, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Adams, Eric A; Monroe, Stephen A; Springer, Abraham E; Blasch, Kyle W; Bills, Donald J

    2006-01-01

    Springs along the south rim of the Grand Canyon, Arizona, are important ecological and cultural resources in Grand Canyon National Park and are discharge points for regional and local aquifers of the Coconino Plateau. This study evaluated the applicability of electrical resistance (ER) sensors for measuring diffuse, low-stage (<1.0 cm) intermittent and ephemeral flow in the steep, rocky spring-fed tributaries of the south rim. ER sensors were used to conduct a baseline survey of spring flow timing at eight sites in three spring-fed tributaries in Grand Canyon. Sensors were attached to a nearly vertical rock wall at a spring outlet and were installed in alluvial and bedrock channels. Spring flow timing data inferred by the ER sensors were consistent with observations during site visits, with flow events recorded with collocated streamflow gauging stations and with local precipitation gauges. ER sensors were able to distinguish the presence of flow along nearly vertical rock surfaces with flow depths between 0.3 and 1.0 cm. Laboratory experiments confirmed the ability of the sensors to monitor the timing of diffuse flow on impervious surfaces. A comparison of flow patterns along the stream reaches and at springs identified the timing and location of perennial and intermittent flow, and periods of increased evapotranspiration. PMID:16961484

  15. Sensor-based navigation of air duct inspection mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Kyoungchul; Choi, H. J.; Kim, Jae-Seon; Ko, Kuk Won; Cho, Hyungsuck

    2001-02-01

    12 This paper deals with an image sensor system and its position estimation algorithm for autonomous duct cleaning and inspection mobile robots. For the real application, a hierarchical control structure that consists of robot motion controller and image sensor system is designed considering the efficient and autonomous motion behaviors in narrow space such as air ducts. The sensor's system consists of a CCD camera and two laser sources to generate slit beams. The image of the structured lights is used for calculating the geometric parameters of the air ducts which are usually designed with a rectangular section. With the acquired 3D information about the environment, the mobile robot with two differential driving wheels is able to autonomously navigates along the duct path without any human intervention. For real time navigation, the relative position estimation of the robot are performed from 3D image reconstructed by the sensor system. The calibration and image processing methods used for the sensor system are presented with the experimental data. The experimental results show the possibility of the sensor based navigation which is important for effective duct cleaning by small mobile robots.

  16. Structural integrated sensor and actuator systems for active flow control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Christian; Schwerter, Martin; Leester-Schädel, Monika; Wierach, Peter; Dietzel, Andreas; Sinapius, Michael

    2016-04-01

    An adaptive flow separation control system is designed and implemented as an essential part of a novel high-lift device for future aircraft. The system consists of MEMS pressure sensors to determine the flow conditions and adaptive lips to regulate the mass flow and the velocity of a wall near stream over the internally blown Coanda flap. By the oscillating lip the mass flow in the blowing slot changes dynamically, consequently the momentum exchange of the boundary layer over a high lift flap required mass flow can be reduced. These new compact and highly integrated systems provide a real-time monitoring and manipulation of the flow conditions. In this context the integration of pressure sensors into flow sensing airfoils of composite material is investigated. Mechanical and electrical properties of the integrated sensors are investigated under mechanical loads during tensile tests. The sensors contain a reference pressure chamber isolated to the ambient by a deformable membrane with integrated piezoresistors connected as a Wheatstone bridge, which outputs voltage signals depending on the ambient pressure. The composite material in which the sensors are embedded consists of 22 individual layers of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) prepreg. The results of the experiments are used for adapting the design of the sensors and the layout of the laminate to ensure an optimized flux of force in highly loaded structures primarily for future aeronautical applications. It can be shown that the pressure sensor withstands the embedding process into fiber composites with full functional capability and predictable behavior under stress.

  17. Decentralized and Tactical Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odoni, Amedeo R.; Bertsimas, Dimitris

    1997-01-01

    This project dealt with the following topics: 1. Review and description of the existing air traffic flow management system (ATFM) and identification of aspects with potential for improvement. 2. Identification and review of existing models and simulations dealing with all system segments (enroute, terminal area, ground) 3. Formulation of concepts for overall decentralization of the ATFM system, ranging from moderate decentralization to full decentralization 4. Specification of the modifications to the ATFM system required to accommodate each of the alternative concepts. 5. Identification of issues that need to be addressed with regard to: determination of the way the ATFM system would be operating; types of flow management strategies that would be used; and estimation of the effectiveness of ATFM with regard to reducing delay and re-routing costs. 6. Concept evaluation through identification of criteria and methodologies for accommodating the interests of stakeholders and of approaches to optimization of operational procedures for all segments of the ATFM system.

  18. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  19. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensor mapping of a jet-mixing flow field

    SciTech Connect

    Lomperski, Stephen; Gerardi, Craig; Pointer, William David

    2015-03-04

    In this paper, we introduce the use of a Rayleigh backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensor to map the temperature field in air flow for a thermal fatigue application. The experiment involves a pair of air jets at 22 and 70°C discharging from 136 mm hexagonal channels into a 1 × 1 × 1.7 m tank at atmospheric pressure. A 40 m-long, Φ155 µm fiber optic sensor was wound back and forth across the tank midplane to form 16 horizontal measurement sections with a vertical spacing of 51 mm. This configuration generated a 2D temperature map with 2800 data points over a 0.76 × 1.7 m plane. Fiber optic sensor readings were combined with PIV and infrared measurements to relate flow field characteristics to the thermal signature of the tank lid. The paper includes sensor stability data and notes issues encountered using the distributed temperature sensor in a flow field. In conclusion, sensors are sensitive to strain and humidity, and so accuracy relies upon strict control of both.

  20. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensor mapping of a jet-mixing flow field

    DOE PAGES

    Lomperski, Stephen; Gerardi, Craig; Pointer, William David

    2015-03-04

    In this paper, we introduce the use of a Rayleigh backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensor to map the temperature field in air flow for a thermal fatigue application. The experiment involves a pair of air jets at 22 and 70°C discharging from 136 mm hexagonal channels into a 1 × 1 × 1.7 m tank at atmospheric pressure. A 40 m-long, Φ155 µm fiber optic sensor was wound back and forth across the tank midplane to form 16 horizontal measurement sections with a vertical spacing of 51 mm. This configuration generated a 2D temperature map with 2800 data points overmore » a 0.76 × 1.7 m plane. Fiber optic sensor readings were combined with PIV and infrared measurements to relate flow field characteristics to the thermal signature of the tank lid. The paper includes sensor stability data and notes issues encountered using the distributed temperature sensor in a flow field. In conclusion, sensors are sensitive to strain and humidity, and so accuracy relies upon strict control of both.« less

  1. Fiber optic distributed temperature sensor mapping of a jet-mixing flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomperski, S.; Gerardi, C.; Pointer, W. D.

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces the use of a Rayleigh backscatter-based distributed fiber optic sensor to map the temperature field in air flow for a thermal fatigue application. The experiment involves a pair of air jets at 22 and 70 °C discharging from 136 mm hexagonal channels into a 1 × 1 × 1.7 m tank at atmospheric pressure. A 40 m-long, ϕ155 µm fiber optic sensor was wound back and forth across the tank midplane to form 16 horizontal measurement sections with a vertical spacing of 51 mm. This configuration generated a 2D temperature map with 2800 data points over a 0.76 × 1.7 m plane. Fiber optic sensor readings were combined with PIV and infrared measurements to relate flow field characteristics to the thermal signature of the tank lid. The paper includes sensor stability data and notes issues encountered using the distributed temperature sensor in a flow field. Sensors are sensitive to strain and humidity, and so accuracy relies upon strict control of both.

  2. Development of Refrigerant Change Indicator and Dirty Air Filter Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, V.

    2003-06-24

    The most common problems affecting residential and light commercial heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems are slow refrigerant leaks and dirty air filters. Equipment users are usually not aware of a problem until most of the refrigerant has escaped or the air filter is clogged with dirt. While a dirty air filter can be detected with a technology based on the air pressure differential across the filter, such as a ''whistling'' indicator, it is not easy to incorporate this technology into existing HVAC diagnostic equipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is developing a low-cost, nonintrusive refrigerant charge indicator and dirty air filter detection sensor. The sensors, based on temperature measurements, will be inexpensive and easy to incorporate into existing heat pumps and air conditioners. The refrigerant charge indicator is based on the fact that when refrigerant starts to leak, the evaporator coil temperature starts to drop and the level of liquid subcooling drops. When the coil temperature or liquid subcooling drops below a preset reading, a signal, such as a yellow warning light, can be activated to warn the equipment user that the system is undercharged. A further drop of coil temperature or liquid subcooling below another preset reading would trigger a second warning signal, such as a red warning light, to warn the equipment user that the unit now detects a leak and immediate action should be taken. The warning light cannot be turned off until it is re-set by a refrigeration repairman. To detect clogged air filters, two additional temperature sensors can be applied, one each across the evaporator. When the air filter is accumulating buildup, the temperature differential across the evaporator will increase because of the reduced airflow. When the temperature differential reaches a pre-set reading, a signal will be sent to the equipment user that the air filter needs to be changed. A traditional refrigerant charge indicator requires

  3. Recent Electrochemical and Optical Sensors in Flow-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chailapakul, Orawon; Ngamukot, Passapol; Yoosamran, Alongkorn; Siangproh, Weena; Wangfuengkanagul, Nattakarn

    2006-01-01

    Some recent analytical sensors based on electrochemical and optical detection coupled with different flow techniques have been chosen in this overview. A brief description of fundamental concepts and applications of each flow technique, such as flow injection analysis (FIA), sequential injection analysis (SIA), all injection analysis (AIA), batch injection analysis (BIA), multicommutated FIA (MCFIA), multisyringe FIA (MSFIA), and multipumped FIA (MPFIA) were reviewed.

  4. Research on MEMS sensor in hydraulic system flow detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongpeng; Zhang, Yindong; Liu, Dong; Ji, Yulong; Jiang, Jihai; Sun, Yuqing

    2010-12-01

    With the development of mechatronics technology and fault diagnosis theory, people regard flow information much more than before. Cheap, fast and accurate flow sensors are urgently needed by hydraulic industry. So MEMS sensor, which is small, low cost, well performed and easy to integrate, will surely play an important role in this field. Based on the new method of flow measurement which was put forward by our research group, this paper completed the measurement of flow rate in hydraulic system by setting up the mathematical model, using numerical simulation method and doing physical experiment. Based on viscous fluid flow equations we deduced differential pressure-velocity model of this new sensor and did optimization on parameters. Then, we designed and manufactured the throttle and studied the velocity and pressure field inside the sensor by FLUENT. Also in simulation we get the differential pressure-velocity curve .The model machine was simulated too to direct experiment. In the static experiments we calibrated the MEMS sensing element and built some sample sensors. Then in a hydraulic testing system we compared the sensor signal with a turbine meter. It presented good linearity and could meet general hydraulic system use. Based on the CFD curves, we analyzed the error reasons and made some suggestion to improve. In the dynamic test, we confirmed this sensor can realize high frequency flow detection by a 7 piston-pump.

  5. Research on MEMS sensor in hydraulic system flow detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongpeng; Zhang, Yindong; Liu, Dong; Ji, Yulong; Jiang, Jihai; Sun, Yuqing

    2011-05-01

    With the development of mechatronics technology and fault diagnosis theory, people regard flow information much more than before. Cheap, fast and accurate flow sensors are urgently needed by hydraulic industry. So MEMS sensor, which is small, low cost, well performed and easy to integrate, will surely play an important role in this field. Based on the new method of flow measurement which was put forward by our research group, this paper completed the measurement of flow rate in hydraulic system by setting up the mathematical model, using numerical simulation method and doing physical experiment. Based on viscous fluid flow equations we deduced differential pressure-velocity model of this new sensor and did optimization on parameters. Then, we designed and manufactured the throttle and studied the velocity and pressure field inside the sensor by FLUENT. Also in simulation we get the differential pressure-velocity curve .The model machine was simulated too to direct experiment. In the static experiments we calibrated the MEMS sensing element and built some sample sensors. Then in a hydraulic testing system we compared the sensor signal with a turbine meter. It presented good linearity and could meet general hydraulic system use. Based on the CFD curves, we analyzed the error reasons and made some suggestion to improve. In the dynamic test, we confirmed this sensor can realize high frequency flow detection by a 7 piston-pump.

  6. Dynamic Flow Management Problems in Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Sarah Stock

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, over six hundred thousand licensed pilots flew nearly thirty-five million flights into over eighteen thousand U.S. airports, logging more than 519 billion passenger miles. Since demand for air travel has increased by more than 50% in the last decade while capacity has stagnated, congestion is a problem of undeniable practical significance. In this thesis, we will develop optimization techniques that reduce the impact of congestion on the national airspace. We start by determining the optimal release times for flights into the airspace and the optimal speed adjustment while airborne taking into account the capacitated airspace. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Problem (TFMP). We address the complexity, showing that it is NP-hard. We build an integer programming formulation that is quite strong as some of the proposed inequalities are facet defining for the convex hull of solutions. For practical problems, the solutions of the LP relaxation of the TFMP are very often integral. In essence, we reduce the problem to efficiently solving large scale linear programming problems. Thus, the computation times are reasonably small for large scale, practical problems involving thousands of flights. Next, we address the problem of determining how to reroute aircraft in the airspace system when faced with dynamically changing weather conditions. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Rerouting Problem (TFMRP) We present an integrated mathematical programming approach for the TFMRP, which utilizes several methodologies, in order to minimize delay costs. In order to address the high dimensionality, we present an aggregate model, in which we formulate the TFMRP as a multicommodity, integer, dynamic network flow problem with certain side constraints. Using Lagrangian relaxation, we generate aggregate flows that are decomposed into a collection of flight paths using a randomized rounding heuristic. This collection of paths is used in a packing integer

  7. Noise reducing screen devices for in-flow pressure sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Fredric (Inventor); Liu, Sandy (Inventor); Jaeger, Stephen (Inventor); Horne, W. Clifton (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An acoustic sensor assembly is provided for sensing acoustic signals in a moving fluid such as high speed fluid stream. The assembly includes one or more acoustic sensors and a porous, acoustically transparent screen supported between the moving fluid stream and the sensor and having a major surface disposed so as to be tangent to the moving fluid. A layer of reduced velocity fluid separating the sensor from the porous screen. This reduced velocity fluid can comprise substantially still air. A foam filler material attenuates acoustic signals arriving at the assembly from other than a predetermined range of incident angles.

  8. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement specifications. 91.416 Section 91.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow...

  9. Flow Webs: Mechanism and Architecture for the Implementation of Sensor Webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlick, M. M.; Peng, G. S.; Gasster, S. D.; McAtee, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    The sensor web is a distributed, federated infrastructure much like its predecessors, the internet and the world wide web. It will be a federation of many sensor webs, large and small, under many distinct spans of control, that loosely cooperates and share information for many purposes. Realistically, it will grow piecemeal as distinct, individual systems are developed and deployed, some expressly built for a sensor web while many others were created for other purposes. Therefore, the architecture of the sensor web is of fundamental import and architectural strictures that inhibit innovation, experimentation, sharing or scaling may prove fatal. Drawing upon the architectural lessons of the world wide web, we offer a novel system architecture, the flow web, that elevates flows, sequences of messages over a domain of interest and constrained in both time and space, to a position of primacy as a dynamic, real-time, medium of information exchange for computational services. The flow web captures; in a single, uniform architectural style; the conflicting demands of the sensor web including dynamic adaptations to changing conditions, ease of experimentation, rapid recovery from the failures of sensors and models, automated command and control, incremental development and deployment, and integration at multiple levels—in many cases, at different times. Our conception of sensor webs—dynamic amalgamations of sensor webs each constructed within a flow web infrastructure—holds substantial promise for earth science missions in general, and of weather, air quality, and disaster management in particular. Flow webs, are by philosophy, design and implementation a dynamic infrastructure that permits massive adaptation in real-time. Flows may be attached to and detached from services at will, even while information is in transit through the flow. This concept, flow mobility, permits dynamic integration of earth science products and modeling resources in response to real

  10. Air mass flow estimation in turbocharged diesel engines from in-cylinder pressure measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Desantes, J.M.; Galindo, J.; Guardiola, C.; Dolz, V.

    2010-01-15

    Air mass flow determination is needed for the control of current internal combustion engines. Current methods are based on specific sensors (as hot wire anemometers) or indirect estimation through manifold pressure. With the availability of cylinder pressure sensors for engine control, methods based on them can be used for replacing or complementing standard methods. Present paper uses in cylinder pressure increase during the intake stroke for inferring the trapped air mass. The method is validated on two different turbocharged diesel engines and compared with the standard methods. (author)

  11. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... background correction as described in § 1065.667. (2) In the following cases, you may use an intake-air flow...-specific fuel consumption and fuel consumed. (b) Component requirements. We recommend that you use...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... as described in § 1065.667. (2) In the following cases, you may use an intake-air flow meter signal...-specific fuel consumption and fuel consumed. (b) Component requirements. We recommend that you use...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... background correction as described in § 1065.667. (2) In the following cases, you may use an intake-air flow...-specific fuel consumption and fuel consumed. (b) Component requirements. We recommend that you use...

  14. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Hardee, Harry C.; Reynolds, Gerald D.; Steinfort, Terry D.

    1992-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

  15. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

  16. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: bench-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating.

  17. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: bench-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating. PMID:25462638

  18. Changes in air flow patterns using surfactants and thickeners during air sparging: Bench-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juyoung; Kim, Heonki; Annable, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Air injected into an aquifer during air sparging normally flows upward according to the pressure gradients and buoyancy, and the direction of air flow depends on the natural hydrogeologic setting. In this study, a new method for controlling air flow paths in the saturated zone during air sparging processes is presented. Two hydrodynamic parameters, viscosity and surface tension of the aqueous phase in the aquifer, were altered using appropriate water-soluble reagents distributed before initiating air sparging. Increased viscosity retarded the travel velocity of the air front during air sparging by modifying the viscosity ratio. Using a one-dimensional column packed with water-saturated sand, the velocity of air intrusion into the saturated region under a constant pressure gradient was inversely proportional to the viscosity of the aqueous solution. The air flow direction, and thus the air flux distribution was measured using gaseous flux meters placed at the sand surface during air sparging experiments using both two-, and three-dimensional physical models. Air flow was found to be influenced by the presence of an aqueous patch of high viscosity or suppressed surface tension in the aquifer. Air flow was selective through the low-surface tension (46.5 dyn/cm) region, whereas an aqueous patch of high viscosity (2.77 cP) was as an effective air flow barrier. Formation of a low-surface tension region in the target contaminated zone in the aquifer, before the air sparging process is inaugurated, may induce air flow through the target zone maximizing the contaminant removal efficiency of the injected air. In contrast, a region with high viscosity in the air sparging influence zone may minimize air flow through the region prohibiting the region from de-saturating.

  19. Systems and Sensors for Debris-flow Monitoring and Warning

    PubMed Central

    Arattano, Massimo; Marchi, Lorenzo

    2008-01-01

    Debris flows are a type of mass movement that occurs in mountain torrents. They consist of a high concentration of solid material in water that flows as a wave with a steep front. Debris flows can be considered a phenomenon intermediate between landslides and water floods. They are amongst the most hazardous natural processes in mountainous regions and may occur under different climatic conditions. Their destructiveness is due to different factors: their capability of transporting and depositing huge amounts of solid materials, which may also reach large sizes (boulders of several cubic meters are commonly transported by debris flows), their steep fronts, which may reach several meters of height and also their high velocities. The implementation of both structural and non-structural control measures is often required when debris flows endanger routes, urban areas and other infrastructures. Sensor networks for debris-flow monitoring and warning play an important role amongst non-structural measures intended to reduce debris-flow risk. In particular, debris flow warning systems can be subdivided into two main classes: advance warning and event warning systems. These two classes employ different types of sensors. Advance warning systems are based on monitoring causative hydrometeorological processes (typically rainfall) and aim to issue a warning before a possible debris flow is triggered. Event warning systems are based on detecting debris flows when these processes are in progress. They have a much smaller lead time than advance warning ones but are also less prone to false alarms. Advance warning for debris flows employs sensors and techniques typical of meteorology and hydrology, including measuring rainfall by means of rain gauges and weather radar and monitoring water discharge in headwater streams. Event warning systems use different types of sensors, encompassing ultrasonic or radar gauges, ground vibration sensors, videocameras, avalanche pendulums

  20. Optimal flow sensor placement on wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Villez, Kris; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Corominas, Lluís

    2016-09-15

    Obtaining high quality data collected on wastewater treatment plants is gaining increasing attention in the wastewater engineering literature. Typical studies focus on recognition of faulty data with a given set of installed sensors on a wastewater treatment plant. Little attention is however given to how one can install sensors in such a way that fault detection and identification can be improved. In this work, we develop a method to obtain Pareto optimal sensor layouts in terms of cost, observability, and redundancy. Most importantly, the resulting method allows reducing the large set of possibilities to a minimal set of sensor layouts efficiently for any wastewater treatment plant on the basis of structural criteria only, with limited sensor information, and without prior data collection. In addition, the developed optimization scheme is fast. Practically important is that the number of sensors needed for both observability of all flows and redundancy of all flow sensors is only one more compared to the number of sensors needed for observability of all flows in the studied wastewater treatment plant configurations.

  1. Optimal flow sensor placement on wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Villez, Kris; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Corominas, Lluís

    2016-09-15

    Obtaining high quality data collected on wastewater treatment plants is gaining increasing attention in the wastewater engineering literature. Typical studies focus on recognition of faulty data with a given set of installed sensors on a wastewater treatment plant. Little attention is however given to how one can install sensors in such a way that fault detection and identification can be improved. In this work, we develop a method to obtain Pareto optimal sensor layouts in terms of cost, observability, and redundancy. Most importantly, the resulting method allows reducing the large set of possibilities to a minimal set of sensor layouts efficiently for any wastewater treatment plant on the basis of structural criteria only, with limited sensor information, and without prior data collection. In addition, the developed optimization scheme is fast. Practically important is that the number of sensors needed for both observability of all flows and redundancy of all flow sensors is only one more compared to the number of sensors needed for observability of all flows in the studied wastewater treatment plant configurations. PMID:27258618

  2. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  3. Noninvasive measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow using an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Thomas; Yi, Juneyoung L; Kaufman, Bruce A; Krishnamurthy, Satish

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Mechanical failure-which is the primary cause of CSF shunt malfunction-is not readily diagnosed, and the specific reasons for mechanical failure are not easily discerned. Prior attempts to measure CSF flow noninvasively have lacked the ability to either quantitatively or qualitatively obtain data. To address these needs, this preliminary study evaluates an ultrasonic transit time flow sensor in pediatric and adult patients with external ventricular drains (EVDs). One goal was to confirm the stated accuracy of the sensor in a clinical setting. A second goal was to observe the sensor's capability to record real-time continuous CSF flow. The final goal was to observe recordings during instances of flow blockage or lack of flow in order to determine the sensor's ability to identify these changes. METHODS A total of 5 pediatric and 11 adult patients who had received EVDs for the treatment of hydrocephalus were studied in a hospital setting. The primary EVD was connected to a secondary study EVD that contained a fluid-filled pressure transducer and an in-line transit time flow sensor. Comparisons were made between the weight of the drainage bag and the flow measured via the sensor in order to confirm its accuracy. Data from the pressure transducer and the flow sensor were recorded continuously at 100 Hz for a period of 24 hours by a data acquisition system, while the hourly CSF flow into the drip chamber was recorded manually. Changes in the patient's neurological status and their time points were noted. RESULTS The flow sensor demonstrated a proven accuracy of ± 15% or ± 2 ml/hr. The flow sensor allowed real-time continuous flow waveform data recordings. Dynamic analysis of CSF flow waveforms allowed the calculation of the pressure-volume index. Lastly, the sensor was able to diagnose a blocked catheter and distinguish between the blockage and lack of flow. CONCLUSIONS The Transonic flow sensor accurately measures CSF output within ± 15% or ± 2 ml

  4. Diode laser absorption sensors for gas-dynamic and combustion flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in room-temperature, near-IR and visible diode laser sources for tele-communication, high-speed computer networks, and optical data storage applications are enabling a new generation of gas-dynamic and combustion-flow sensors based on laser absorption spectroscopy. In addition to conventional species concentration and density measurements, spectroscopic techniques for temperature, velocity, pressure and mass flux have been demonstrated in laboratory, industrial and technical flows. Combined with fibreoptic distribution networks and ultrasensitive detection strategies, compact and portable sensors are now appearing for a variety of applications. In many cases, the superior spectroscopic quality of the new laser sources compared with earlier cryogenic, mid-IR devices is allowing increased sensitivity of trace species measurements, high-precision spectroscopy of major gas constituents, and stable, autonomous measurement systems. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in this field and suggest likely directions for future research and development. The various laser-source technologies are briefly reviewed as they relate to sensor applications. Basic theory for laser absorption measurements of gas-dynamic properties is reviewed and special detection strategies for the weak near-IR and visible absorption spectra are described. Typical sensor configurations are described and compared for various application scenarios, ranging from laboratory research to automated field and airborne packages. Recent applications of gas-dynamic sensors for air flows and fluxes of trace atmospheric species are presented. Applications of gas-dynamic and combustion sensors to research and development of high-speed flows aeropropulsion engines, and combustion emissions monitoring are presented in detail, along with emerging flow control systems based on these new sensors. Finally, technology in nonlinear frequency conversion, UV laser materials, room

  5. Uncertainty in air quality observations using low-cost sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castell, Nuria; Dauge, Franck R.; Dongol, Rozina; Vogt, Matthias; Schneider, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    Air pollution poses a threat to human health, and the WHO has classified air pollution as the world's largest single environmental health risk. In Europe, the majority of the population lives in areas where air quality levels frequently exceed WHO's ambient air quality guidelines. The emergence of low-cost, user-friendly and very compact air pollution platforms allowing observations at high spatial resolution in near real-time, provides us with new opportunities to simultaneously enhance existing monitoring systems as well as enable citizens to engage in more active environmental monitoring (citizen science). However the data sets generated by low-cost sensors show often questionable data quality. For many sensors, neither their error characteristics nor how their measurement capability holds up over time or through a range of environmental conditions, have been evaluated. We have conducted an exhaustive evaluation of the commercial low-cost platform AQMesh (measuring NO, NO2, CO, O3, PM10 and PM2.5) in laboratory and in real-world conditions in the city of Oslo (Norway). Co-locations in field of 24 platforms were conducted over a 6 month period (April to September 2015) allowing to characterize the temporal variability in the performance. Additionally, the field performance included the characterization on different monitoring urban monitoring sites characteristic of both traffic and background conditions. All the evaluations have been conducted against CEN reference method analyzers maintained according to the Norwegian National Reference Laboratory quality system. The results show clearly that a good performance in laboratory does not imply similar performance in real-world outdoor conditions. Moreover, laboratory calibration is not suitable for subsequent measurements in urban environments. In order to reduce the errors, sensors require on-site field calibration. Even after such field calibration, the platforms show a significant variability in the performance

  6. A Rotary Flow Channel for Shear Stress Sensor Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Scott, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    A proposed shear sensor calibrator consists of a rotating wheel with the sensor mounted tangential to the rim and positioned in close proximity to the rim. The shear stress generated by the flow at the sensor position is simply tau(sub omega) = (mu)r(omega)/h, where mu is the viscosity of the ambient gas, r the wheel radius, omega the angular velocity of the wheel, and h the width of the gap between the wheel rim and the sensor. With numerical values of mu = 31 (mu)Pa s (neon at room temperature), r = 0.5 m, omega = 754 /s (7200 rpm), and h = 50.8 m, a shear stress of tau(sub omega) = 231 Pa can be generated. An analysis based on one-dimensional flow, with the flow velocity having only an angular component as a function of the axial and radial coordinates, yields corrections to the above simple formula for the curvature of the wheel, flatness of the sensor, and finite width of the wheel. It is assumed that the sensor mount contains a trough (sidewalls) to render a velocity release boundary condition at the edges of the rim. The Taylor number under maximum flow conditions is found to be 62.3, sufficiently low to obviate flow instability. The fact that the parameters entering into the evaluation of the shear stress can be measured to high accuracy with well-defined uncertainties makes the proposed calibrator suitable for a physical standard for shear stress calibration.

  7. Development of wireless sensor network for monitoring indoor air pollutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Shaharil Mad; Shakaff, Ali Yeon Md; Saad, Abdul Rahman Mohd; Yusof @ Kamarudin, Azman Muhamad

    2015-05-01

    The air that we breathe with everyday contains variety of contaminants and particles. Some of these contaminants and particles are hazardous to human health. Most of the people don't realize that the content of air they being exposed to whether it was a good or bad air quality. The air quality whether in indoor or outdoor environment can be influenced by physical factors like dust particles, gaseous pollutants (including carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds) and biological like molds and bacteria growth which largely depend on temperature and humidity condition of a room. These kinds of pollutants can affect human health, physical reaction, comfort or work performance. In this study, a wireless sensor network (WSN) monitoring system for monitor air pollutant in indoor environment was developed. The system was divided into three parts: web-based interface program, sensing module and a base station. The measured data was displayed on the web which is can be accessed by the user. The result shows that the overall measured parameters were meet the acceptable limit, requirement and criteria of indoor air pollution inside the building. The research can be used to improve the indoor air quality level in order to create a comfortable working and healthy environment for the occupants inside the building.

  8. Sensor chip and apparatus for tactile and/or flow sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A sensor chip, comprising a flexible, polymer-based substrate, and at least one microfabricated sensor disposed on the substrate and including a conductive element. The at least one sensor comprises at least one of a tactile sensor and a flow sensor. Other embodiments of the present invention include sensors and/or multi-modal sensor nodes.

  9. Sensor chip and apparatus for tactile and/or flow sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chang (Inventor); Chen, Jack (Inventor); Engel, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A sensor chip, comprising a flexible, polymer-based substrate, and at least one microfabricated sensor disposed on the substrate and including a conductive element. The at least one sensor comprises at least one of a tactile sensor and a flow sensor. Other embodiments of the present invention include sensors and/or multi-modal sensor nodes.

  10. CityAir app: Mapping air-quality perception using people as sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castell, Nuria; Fredriksen, Mirjam; Cole-Hunter, Thomas; Robinson, Johanna; Keune, Hans; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Bartonova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Outdoor air pollution is a major environmental health problem affecting all people in developed and developing countries alike. Ambient (outdoor) air pollution in both cities and rural areas was estimated to cause 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012. In modern society, people are expending an increasing amount of time in polluted urban environments, thus increasing their exposure and associated health responses. Some cities provide information about air pollution levels to their citizens using air quality monitoring networks. However, due to their high cost and maintenance, the density of the monitoring networks is very low and not capable to capture the high temporal and spatial variability of air pollution. Thus, the citizen lacks a specific answer to the question of "how the air quality is in our surroundings". In the framework of the EU-funded CITI-SENSE project the innovative concept of People as Sensors is being applied to the field of outdoor air pollution. This is being done in eight European cities, including Barcelona, Belgrade, Edinburgh, Haifa, Ljubljana, Oslo, Ostrava and Vienna. People as Sensors defines a measurement model, in which measurements are not only taken by hardware sensors, but in which also humans can contribute with their individual "measurements" such as their subjective perception of air quality and other personal observations. In order to collect the personal observations a mobile app, CityAir, has been developed. CityAir allows citizens to rate the air quality in their surroundings with colour at their current location: green if air quality is very good, yellow if air quality is good, orange if air quality is poor and red if air quality is very poor. The users have also the possibility of indicating the source of pollution (i.e. traffic, industry, wood burning) and writing a comment. The information is on-line and accessible for other app users, thus contributing to create an air-quality map based on citizens' perception

  11. Femtosecond laser flow tagging in non-air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibin; Calvert, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    The Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) [Michael, J. B. et al., Applied optics, 50(26), 2011] method is studied in nitrogen-containing gaseous flows. The underlying mechanism behind the FLEET process is the dissociation of molecular nitrogen into atomic nitrogen, which produces long-lived florescence as the nitrogen atoms recombine. Spectra and images of the resulting tagged line provide insight into the effects of different atmospheric gases on the FLEET process. The ionization cross-section, conductivity and energy states of the gaseous particles are each brought into consideration. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility for long-lived flow tagging on the order of hundreds of microseconds in non-air environments. Of particular interest are the enhancement of the FLEET signal with the addition of argon gas, and the non-monotonic quenching effect of oxygen on the length, duration and intensity of the resulting signal and spectra. FLEET is characterized in number of different atmospheric gases, including that simulating Mar's atmospheric composition.

  12. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT, HYDROTECHNICS IN SITU FLOW SENSOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluated performance of HydroTechnics, Inc. flow sensors in measuring the three-dimensional flow pattern created by operation of the Wasatch Environmental, Inc. (WEI) ground...

  13. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  14. Touch at a distance sensing: lateral-line inspired MEMS flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Prakash Kottapalli, Ajay Giri; Asadnia, Mohsen; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2014-11-07

    Evolution bestowed the blind cavefish with a resourcefully designed lateral-line of sensors that play an essential role in many important tasks including object detection and avoidance, energy-efficient maneuvering, rheotaxis etc. Biologists identified the two types of vital sensors on the fish bodies called the superficial neuromasts and the canal neuromasts that are responsible for flow sensing and pressure-gradient sensing, respectively. In this work, we present the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of biomimetic polymer artificial superficial neuromast micro-sensor arrays. These biomimetic micro-sensors demonstrated a high sensitivity of 0.9 mV/(m s(-1)) and 0.022 V/(m s(-1)) and threshold velocity detection limits of 0.1 m s(-1) and 0.015 m s(-1) in determining air and water flows respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the biological canal inspired polymer encapsulation on the array of artificial superficial neuromast sensors is capable of filtering steady-state flows that could otherwise significantly mask the relevant oscillatory flow signals of high importance.

  15. Touch at a distance sensing: lateral-line inspired MEMS flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Prakash Kottapalli, Ajay Giri; Asadnia, Mohsen; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Evolution bestowed the blind cavefish with a resourcefully designed lateral-line of sensors that play an essential role in many important tasks including object detection and avoidance, energy-efficient maneuvering, rheotaxis etc. Biologists identified the two types of vital sensors on the fish bodies called the superficial neuromasts and the canal neuromasts that are responsible for flow sensing and pressure-gradient sensing, respectively. In this work, we present the design, fabrication and experimental characterization of biomimetic polymer artificial superficial neuromast micro-sensor arrays. These biomimetic micro-sensors demonstrated a high sensitivity of 0.9 mV/(m s(-1)) and 0.022 V/(m s(-1)) and threshold velocity detection limits of 0.1 m s(-1) and 0.015 m s(-1) in determining air and water flows respectively. Experimental results demonstrate that the biological canal inspired polymer encapsulation on the array of artificial superficial neuromast sensors is capable of filtering steady-state flows that could otherwise significantly mask the relevant oscillatory flow signals of high importance. PMID:25378298

  16. The civil air patrol ARCHER hyperspectral sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Brian; O'Connor, Rory; Kendall, William; Stocker, Alan; Schaff, William; Holasek, Rick; Even, Detlev; Alexa, Drew; Salvador, John; Eismann, Michael; Mack, Robert; Kee, Pat; Harris, Steve; Karch, Barry; Kershenstein, John

    2005-05-01

    The Civil Air Patrol (CAP) is procuring Airborne Real-time Cueing Hyperspectral Enhanced Reconnaissance (ARCHER) systems to increase their search-and-rescue mission capability. These systems are being installed on a fleet of Gippsland GA-8 aircraft, and will position CAP to gain realworld mission experience with the application of hyperspectral sensor and processing technology to search and rescue. The ARCHER system design, data processing, and operational concept leverage several years of investment in hyperspectral technology research and airborne system demonstration programs by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Each ARCHER system consists of a NovaSol-designed, pushbroom, visible/near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral imaging (HSI) sensor, a co-boresighted visible panchromatic high-resolution imaging (HRI) sensor, and a CMIGITS-III GPS/INS unit in an integrated sensor assembly mounted inside the GA-8 cabin. ARCHER incorporates an on-board data processing system developed by Space Computer Corporation (SCC) to perform numerous real-time processing functions including data acquisition and recording, raw data correction, target detection, cueing and chipping, precision image geo-registration, and display and dissemination of image products and target cue information. A ground processing station is provided for post-flight data playback and analysis. This paper describes the requirements and architecture of the ARCHER system, including design, components, software, interfaces, and displays. Key sensor performance characteristics and real-time data processing features are discussed in detail. The use of the system for detecting and geo-locating ground targets in real-time is demonstrated using test data collected in Southern California in the fall of 2004.

  17. Investigation of Countercurrent Helium-Air Flows in Air-ingress Accidents for VHTRs

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard; Oh, Chang

    2013-10-03

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an extensive experimental database for the air- ingress phenomenon for the validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. This research is intended to be a separate-effects experimental study. However, the project team will perform a careful scaling analysis prior to designing a scaled-down test facility in order to closely tie this research with the real application. As a reference design in this study, the team will use the 600 MWth gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) developed by General Atomic. In the test matrix of the experiments, researchers will vary the temperature and pressure of the helium— along with break size, location, shape, and orientation—to simulate deferent scenarios and to identify potential mitigation strategies. Under support of the Department of Energy, a high-temperature helium test facility has been designed and is currently being constructed at Ohio State University, primarily for high- temperature compact heat exchanger testing for the VHTR program. Once the facility is in operation (expected April 2009), this study will utilize high-temperature helium up to 900°C and 3 MPa for loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) depressurization and air-ingress experiments. The project team will first conduct a scaling study and then design an air-ingress test facility. The major parameter to be measured in the experiments is oxygen (or nitrogen) concentration history at various locations following a LOCA scenario. The team will use two measurement techniques: 1) oxygen (or similar type) sensors employed in the flow field, which will introduce some undesirable intrusiveness, disturbing the flow, and 2) a planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging technique, which has no physical intrusiveness to the flow but requires a transparent window or test section that the laser beam can penetrate. The team will construct two test facilities, one for high-temperature helium tests with

  18. Fiber optic sensor technology for air conformal ice detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikiades, Aris A.; Armstrong, David J.; Hare, George G.; Konstantaki, Mary; Crossley, Samuel D.

    2004-03-01

    Ice accretion on flying surfaces affects the aerodynamic performance and handling qualities of aircraft, and may require different pilot corrective action, dependent upon the surface that ice is accreting onto. The current methodology for ice detection usually relies on an indirect method, normally based on ambient air temperature, and liquid water content. When a pre-set threshold level is reached, the ice protection system is activated, whether or not ice is accreting on critical surfaces. This method is not cost effective or efficient for an ice protection system. Air Conformal Ice Detection System (ACIDS) obviates these problems by using a 'direct" method of detection and measurement the presence and thickness of ice. This paper outlines some of the preliminary experimental work done on the optical properties of ice grown in an icing tunnel on the leading edge of an aerofoil leading to the development of a Fibre Optic Direct Ice Detector sensor (DID) with emphasis. The result of this studies have shown that with suitable processing it is possible to use fibre optic sensors to determine the thickness of ice and texture of the ice accreted in the vicinity of the sensor. In the latter part of this paper basic fibre optic architecture is discussed and together with some preliminary results for representative icing runs.

  19. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  20. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  1. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter. 1065.225 Section 1065.225 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225...

  3. Aircraft Aerodynamic Parameter Detection Using Micro Hot-Film Flow Sensor Array and BP Neural Network Identification

    PubMed Central

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Air speed, angle of sideslip and angle of attack are fundamental aerodynamic parameters for controlling most aircraft. For small aircraft for which conventional detecting devices are too bulky and heavy to be utilized, a novel and practical methodology by which the aerodynamic parameters are inferred using a micro hot-film flow sensor array mounted on the surface of the wing is proposed. A back-propagation neural network is used to model the coupling relationship between readings of the sensor array and aerodynamic parameters. Two different sensor arrangements are tested in wind tunnel experiments and dependence of the system performance on the sensor arrangement is analyzed. PMID:23112638

  4. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimetric (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single CW laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640 x 480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  5. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  6. Air flow testing on aerodynamic truck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This photograph illustrates a standard passenger van modified at the Dryden Flight Research Center to investigate the aerodynamics of trucks. The resulting vehicle--re-fashioned with sheet metal--resembled a motor home, with rounded vertical corners on the vehicle's front and rear sections. For subsequent tests, researchers installed a 'boat tail' structure, shown in the photograph. During a decade spanning the 1970s and 1980s, Dryden researchers conducted tests to determine the extent to which adjustments in the shape of trucks reduced aerodynamic drag and improved efficiency. During the tests, the vehicle's sides were fitted with tufts, or strings, that showed air flow. The investigators concluded that rounding the vertical corners front and rear reduced drag by 40 percent, yet decreased the vehicle's internal volume by only 1.3 percent. Rounding both the vertical and horizontal corners cut drag by 54 percent, resulting in a three percent loss of internal volume. A second group of tests added a faired underbody and a boat tail, the latter feature resulting in drag reduction of about 15 percent.

  7. Micro Sensor Node for Air Pollutant Monitoring: Hardware and Software Issues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sukwon; Kim, Nakyoung; Cha, Hojung; Ha, Rhan

    2009-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks equipped with various gas sensors have been actively used for air quality monitoring. Previous studies have typically explored system issues that include middleware or networking performance, but most research has barely considered the details of the hardware and software of the sensor node itself. In this paper, we focus on the design and implementation of a sensor board for air pollutant monitoring applications. Several hardware and software issues are discussed to explore the possibilities of a practical WSN-based air pollution monitoring system. Through extensive experiments and evaluation, we have determined the various characteristics of the gas sensors and their practical implications for air pollutant monitoring systems. PMID:22408489

  8. Smart Sensing Strip Using Monolithically Integrated Flexible Flow Sensor for Noninvasively Monitoring Respiratory Flow.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Zhao, Shuai; Zhu, Rong

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents a smart sensing strip for noninvasively monitoring respiratory flow in real time. The monitoring system comprises a monolithically-integrated flexible hot-film flow sensor adhered on a molded flexible silicone case, where a miniaturized conditioning circuit with a Bluetooth4.0 LE module are packaged, and a personal mobile device that wirelessly acquires respiratory data transmitted from the flow sensor, executes extraction of vital signs, and performs medical diagnosis. The system serves as a wearable device to monitor comprehensive respiratory flow while avoiding use of uncomfortable nasal cannula. The respiratory sensor is a flexible flow sensor monolithically integrating four elements of a Wheatstone bridge on single chip, including a hot-film resistor, a temperature-compensating resistor, and two balancing resistors. The monitor takes merits of small size, light weight, easy operation, and low power consumption. Experiments were conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of monitoring and diagnosing respiratory diseases using the proposed system.

  9. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  10. Air conditioning system and component therefore distributing air flow from opposite directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obler, H. D.; Bauer, H. B. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The air conditioning system comprises a plurality of separate air conditioning units coupled to a common supply duct such that air may be introduced into the supply duct in two opposite flow directions. A plurality of outlets such as registers or auxiliary or branch ducts communicate with the supply duct and valve means are disposed in the supply duct at at least some of the outlets for automatically channelling a controllable amount of air from the supply duct to the associated outlet regardless of the direction of air flow within the supply duct. The valve means comprises an automatic air volume control apparatus for distribution within the air supply duct into which air may be introduced from two opposite directions. The apparatus incorporates a freely swinging movable vane in the supply duct to automatically channel into the associated outlet only the deflected air flow which has the higher relative pressure.

  11. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications. 89.414 Section 89.414 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air...

  12. One dimensional wavefront sensor development for tomographic flow measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.; Pierson, R.; Chen, E.

    1995-08-01

    Optical diagnostics are extremely useful in fluid mechanics because they generally have high inherent bandwidth, and are non-intrusive. However, since optical probe measurements inherently integrate all information along the optical path, it is often difficult to isolate out-of-plane components in 3-dimensional flow events. It is also hard to make independent measurements of internal flow structure. Using an arrangement of one-dimensional wavefront sensors, we have developed a system that uses tomographic reconstruction to make two-dimensional measurements in an arbitrary flow. These measurements provide complete information in a plane normal to the flow. We have applied this system to the subsonic free jet because of the wide range of flow scales available. These measurements rely on the development of a series of one-dimensional wavefront sensors that are used to measure line-integral density variations in the flow of interest. These sensors have been constructed using linear CCD cameras and binary optics lenslet arrays. In designing these arrays, we have considered the coherent coupling between adjacent lenses and have made comparisons between theory and experimental noise measurements. The paper will present examples of the wavefront sensor development, line-integral measurements as a function of various experimental parameters, and sample tomographic reconstructions.

  13. Nanoparticle embedded enzymes for improved lateral flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Özalp, Veli C; Zeydanlı, Uğur S; Lunding, Anita; Kavruk, Murat; Öz, M Tufan; Eyidoğan, Füsun; Olsen, Lars F; Öktem, Hüseyin A

    2013-08-01

    In this study, combining the nanoparticle embedded sensors with lateral flow assays, a novel strategy for ensuring the quality of signalling in lateral flow assays (LFAs) was developed. A LFA for reactive oxygen species (ROS) is reported that is based on horse radish peroxidase (HRP) which is co-entrapped with Texas Red dextran inside porous polyacrylamide nanoparticles. In this system, enzymes are protected in the porous matrix of polyacrylamide which freely allows the diffusion of the analyte. The sensor is rapid and sensitive for quantification of hydrogen peroxide concentrations. A test solution of hydrogen peroxides was quantified with this novel LFA-ROS sensor to obtain a linear range between 1 and 25 μM. Nanoparticle embedding of enzymes is proposed here as a general strategy for developing enzyme-based lateral flow assays, eliminating adverse effects associated with biological samples.

  14. Nanoparticle embedded enzymes for improved lateral flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Özalp, Veli C; Zeydanlı, Uğur S; Lunding, Anita; Kavruk, Murat; Öz, M Tufan; Eyidoğan, Füsun; Olsen, Lars F; Öktem, Hüseyin A

    2013-08-01

    In this study, combining the nanoparticle embedded sensors with lateral flow assays, a novel strategy for ensuring the quality of signalling in lateral flow assays (LFAs) was developed. A LFA for reactive oxygen species (ROS) is reported that is based on horse radish peroxidase (HRP) which is co-entrapped with Texas Red dextran inside porous polyacrylamide nanoparticles. In this system, enzymes are protected in the porous matrix of polyacrylamide which freely allows the diffusion of the analyte. The sensor is rapid and sensitive for quantification of hydrogen peroxide concentrations. A test solution of hydrogen peroxides was quantified with this novel LFA-ROS sensor to obtain a linear range between 1 and 25 μM. Nanoparticle embedding of enzymes is proposed here as a general strategy for developing enzyme-based lateral flow assays, eliminating adverse effects associated with biological samples. PMID:23730687

  15. Flow-cell fibre-optic enzyme sensor for phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Papkovsky, D.B.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Kurochkin, I.N. )

    1993-07-01

    A solid-state fibre-optic luminescent oxygen sensor was used for flow-through measurements. It acts as a transducer in a new flow-cell enzyme sensor arrangement. This arrangement comprises a flow path, sample injector, microcolumn with the immobilized enzyme, oxygen membrane and fibre-optic connector joined together to form an integral unit. Laccase enzyme was used as a recognition system which provided specific oxidation of the substrates with the dissolved oxygen being monitored. The assay procedure was optimized and performance of the new system studied. The sensor was applied to the determination polyphenol content in tea, brandy, etc. (quality control test). The sensitivity to some important phenolic compounds was tested with the view of industrial wastewater control applications. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  17. Contactless impedance sensors and their application to flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Opekar, František; Tůma, Petr; Stulík, Karel

    2013-02-27

    The paper provides a critical discussion of the present state of the theory of high-frequency impedance sensors (now mostly called contactless impedance or conductivity sensors), the principal approaches employed in designing impedance flow-through cells and their operational parameters. In addition to characterization of traditional types of impedance sensors, the article is concerned with the use of less common sensors, such as cells with wire electrodes or planar cells. There is a detailed discussion of the effect of the individual operational parameters (width and shape of the electrodes, detection gap, frequency and amplitude of the input signal) on the response of the detector. The most important problems to be resolved in coupling these devices with flow-through measurements in the liquid phase are also discussed. Examples are given of cell designs for continuous flow and flow-injection analyses and of detection systems for miniaturized liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. New directions for the use of these sensors in molecular biology and chemical reactors and some directions for future development are outlined.

  18. Contactless Impedance Sensors and Their Application to Flow Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Opekar, František; Tůma, Petr; Štulík, Karel

    2013-01-01

    The paper provides a critical discussion of the present state of the theory of high-frequency impedance sensors (now mostly called contactless impedance or conductivity sensors), the principal approaches employed in designing impedance flow-through cells and their operational parameters. In addition to characterization of traditional types of impedance sensors, the article is concerned with the use of less common sensors, such as cells with wire electrodes or planar cells. There is a detailed discussion of the effect of the individual operational parameters (width and shape of the electrodes, detection gap, frequency and amplitude of the input signal) on the response of the detector. The most important problems to be resolved in coupling these devices with flow-through measurements in the liquid phase are also discussed. Examples are given of cell designs for continuous flow and flow-injection analyses and of detection systems for miniaturized liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. New directions for the use of these sensors in molecular biology and chemical reactors and some directions for future development are outlined. PMID:23447011

  19. Laser sheet light flow visualization for evaluating room air flowsfrom Registers

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Claret, Valerie; Smith, Brian

    2006-04-01

    Forced air heating and cooling systems and whole house ventilation systems deliver air to individual rooms in a house via supply registers located on walls ceilings or floors; and occasionally less straightforward locations like toe-kicks below cabinets. Ideally, the air velocity out of the registers combined with the turbulence of the flow, vectoring of air by register vanes and geometry of register placement combine to mix the supply air within the room. A particular issue that has been raised recently is the performance of multiple capacity and air flow HVAC systems. These systems vary the air flow rate through the distribution system depending on the system load, or if operating in a ventilation rather than a space conditioning mode. These systems have been developed to maximize equipment efficiency, however, the high efficiency ratings do not include any room mixing effects. At lower air flow rates, there is the possibility that room air will be poorly mixed, leading to thermal stratification and reduced comfort for occupants. This can lead to increased energy use as the occupants adjust the thermostat settings to compensate and parts of the conditioned space have higher envelope temperature differences than for the well mixed case. In addition, lack of comfort can be a barrier to market acceptance of these higher efficiency systems To investigate the effect on room mixing of reduced air flow rates requires the measurement of mixing of supply air with room air throughout the space to be conditioned. This is a particularly difficult exercise if we want to determine the transient performance of the space conditioning system. Full scale experiments can be done in special test chambers, but the spatial resolution required to fully examine the mixing problem is usually limited by the sheer number of thermal sensors required. Current full-scale laboratory testing is therefore severely limited in its resolution. As an alternative, we used a water-filled scale model

  20. The Citizen Science Toolbox: A One-Stop Resource for Air Sensor Technology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The air sensor technology market is exploding with new sensors in all kinds of forms. Developers are putting sensors in wristbands, headphones, and cell phone add-ons. Small, portable and lower-cost measurement devices using sensors are coming on the market with a wide variety of...

  1. Measurement and control of pressure driven flows in microfluidic devices using an optofluidic flow sensor

    PubMed Central

    Cheri, Mohammad Sadegh; Shahraki, Hamidreza; Sadeghi, Jalal; Moghaddam, Mohammadreza Salehi; Latifi, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Measurement and control of pressure-driven flow (PDF) has a great potential to enhance the performance of chemical and biological experiments in Lab on a Chip technology. In this paper, we present an optofluidic flow sensor for real-time measurement and control of PDF. The optofluidic flow sensor consists of an on-chip micro Venturi and two optical Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometers. Flow rate was measured from the fringe shift of FP interferometers resulted from movement fluid in the on-chip micro Venturi. The experimental results show that the optofluidic flow sensor has a minimum detectable flow change of 5 nl/min that is suitable for real time monitoring and control of fluids in many chemical and biological experiments. A Finite Element Method is used to solve the three dimensional (3D) Navier–Stokes and continuity equations to validate the experimental results. PMID:25584118

  2. Smart catheter flow sensor for real-time continuous regional cerebral blood flow monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyan; Wu, Pei-Ming; Hartings, Jed A.; Wu, Zhizhen; Ahn, Chong H.; LeDoux, David; Shutter, Lori A.; Narayan, Raj K.

    2011-12-01

    We present a smart catheter flow sensor for real-time, continuous, and quantitative measurement of regional cerebral blood flow using in situ temperature and thermal conductivity compensation. The flow sensor operates in a constant-temperature mode and employs a periodic heating and cooling technique. This approach ensures zero drift and provides highly reliable data with microelectromechanical system-based thin film sensors. The developed flow sensor has a sensitivity of 0.973 mV/ml/100 g/min in the range from 0 to 160 ml/100 g/min with a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.9953. It achieves a resolution of 0.25 ml/100 g/min and an accuracy better than 5 ml/100 g/min.

  3. High Accuracy Acoustic Relative Humidity Measurement in Duct Flow with Air

    PubMed Central

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0–12 m/s with an error of ±0.13 m/s, temperature 0–100 °C with an error of ±0.07 °C and relative humidity 0–100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments. PMID:22163610

  4. High accuracy acoustic relative humidity measurement in duct flow with air.

    PubMed

    van Schaik, Wilhelm; Grooten, Mart; Wernaart, Twan; van der Geld, Cees

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic relative humidity sensor for air-steam mixtures in duct flow is designed and tested. Theory, construction, calibration, considerations on dynamic response and results are presented. The measurement device is capable of measuring line averaged values of gas velocity, temperature and relative humidity (RH) instantaneously, by applying two ultrasonic transducers and an array of four temperature sensors. Measurement ranges are: gas velocity of 0-12 m/s with an error of ± 0.13 m/s, temperature 0-100 °C with an error of ± 0.07 °C and relative humidity 0-100% with accuracy better than 2 % RH above 50 °C. Main advantage over conventional humidity sensors is the high sensitivity at high RH at temperatures exceeding 50 °C, with accuracy increasing with increasing temperature. The sensors are non-intrusive and resist highly humid environments.

  5. Computed Turbulent Free Shear Flow Of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viegas, J. R.; Rubesin, M. W.

    1992-01-01

    Standard k-epsilon model of turbulence yields fairly accurate results. Symposium paper discusses numerical simulation of turbulent free shear flow of nonreacting compressible fluid. Ability to compute such flows essential to advances in design.

  6. Physical modeling of air flow during air sparging remediation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liming; Wu, Xiaofeng; Liu, Yan; Meegoda, Jay N; Gao, Shengyan

    2010-05-15

    Air sparging (AS) is one of the most efficient techniques for remediating saturated soils and groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds. A series of physical modeling tests for different sizes of porous media under varied injection pressure were conducted to investigate the effect of particle size and air injection pressure on size and shape of the zone of influence (ZOI). The test results show that ZOI can be expressed by two components: the horizontal expansion due to pneumatic fracture or preferential intrusion around the injection point and the angle of ZOI which is the angle between the vertical line and the boundary of ZOI. There exists a limited angle of ZOI for each type of porous media. The measured minimum and maximum air injection pressures in 1g tests are compared with corresponding theoretical values, and it is found that the measured minimum injection pressure is slightly lower than the theoretical value, while the measured maximum injection pressure is much higher than the theoretical maximum injection pressure. Centrifugal test results confirmed nonapplicability of theoretical maximum injection pressure to air sparging design. All of the above provide valuable information for design and theoretical modeling of air sparging for groundwater remediation.

  7. Sensors for Using Times of Flight to Measure Flow Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gutave; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny; Turso, James

    2006-01-01

    Thin-film sensors for measuring flow velocities in terms of times of flight are undergoing development. These sensors are very small and can be mounted flush with surfaces of airfoils, ducts, and other objects along which one might need to measure flows. Alternatively or in addition, these sensors can be mounted on small struts protruding from such surfaces for acquiring velocity measurements at various distances from the surfaces for the purpose of obtaining boundary-layer flow-velocity profiles. These sensors are related to, but not the same as, hot-wire anemometers. Each sensor includes a thin-film, electrically conductive loop, along which an electric current is made to flow to heat the loop to a temperature above that of the surrounding fluid. Instantaneous voltage fluctuations in segments of the loop are measured by means of electrical taps placed at intervals along the loop. These voltage fluctuations are caused by local fluctuations in electrical resistance that are, in turn, caused by local temperature fluctuations that are, in turn, caused by fluctuations in flow-induced cooling and, hence, in flow velocity. The differential voltage as a function of time, measured at each pair of taps, is subjected to cross-correlation processing with the corresponding quantities measured at other pairs of taps at different locations on the loop. The cross-correlations yield the times taken by elements of fluid to travel between the pairs of taps. Then the component of velocity along the line between any two pairs of taps is calculated simply as the distance between the pairs of taps divided by the travel time. Unlike in the case of hot-wire anemometers, there is no need to obtain calibration data on voltage fluctuations versus velocity fluctuations because, at least in principle, the correlation times are independent of the calibration data.

  8. Performance and Flow Dynamics Studies of Polymeric Optofluidic SERS Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uusitalo, S.; Hiltunen, J.; Karioja, P.; Siitonen, S.; Kontturi, V.; Myllylä, R.; Kinnunen, M.; Meglinski, I.

    2015-09-01

    We present a polymer-based optofluidic surface enhanced Raman scattering chip for biomolecule detection, serving as a disposable sensor choice with cost-effective production. The SERS substrate is fabricated by using industrial roll-to-roll UV-nanoimprinting equipment and integrated with adhesive-based polymeric microfluidics. The functioning of the SERS detection on-chip is confirmed and the effect of the polymer lid on the obtainable Raman spectra is analysed. Rhodamine 6G is used as a model analyte to demonstrate continuous flow measurements on a planar SERS substrate in a microchannel. The relation between the temporal response of the sensors and sample flow dynamics is studied with varied flow velocities, using SERS and fluorescence detection. The response time of the surface-dependent SERS signal is longer than the response time of the fluorescence signal of the bulk flow. This observation revealed the effect of convection on the temporal SERS responses at 25 μl/min to 1000 µl/min flow velocities. The diffusion of analyte molecules from the bulk concentration into the sensing surface induces about a 40-second lag time in the SERS detection. This lag time, and its rising trend with slower flow velocities, has to be taken into account in future trials of the optofluidic SERS sensor, with active analyte binding on the sensing surface.

  9. Numerical analysis of flow about a total temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Lavante, Ernst; Bruns, Russell L., Jr.; Sanetrik, Mark D.; Lam, Tim

    1989-01-01

    The unsteady flowfield about an airfoil-shaped inlet temperature sensor has been investigated using the thin-layer and full Navier-Stokes equations. A finite-volume formulation of the governing equations was used in conjunction with a Runge-Kutta time stepping scheme to analyze the flow about the sensor. Flow characteristics for this configuration were established at Mach numbers of 0.5 and 0.8 for different Reynolds numbers. The results were obtained for configurations of increasing complexity; important physical phenomena such as shock formation, boundary-layer separation, and unsteady wake formation were noted. Based on the computational results, recommendations for further study and refinement of the inlet temperature sensor were made.

  10. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  11. Droplet detachment by air flow for microstructured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hao, Pengfei; Lv, Cunjing; Yao, Zhaohui

    2013-04-30

    Quantitative correlation between critical air velocity and roughness of microstructured surface has still not been established systematically until the present; the dynamics of water droplet detachment by air flow from micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces is investigated by combining experiments and simulation comparisons. Experimental evidence demonstrates that the onset of water droplet detachment from horizontal micropillar-like superhydrophobic surfaces under air flow always starts with detachment of the rear contact lines of the droplets from the pillar tops, which exhibits a similar dynamic mechanism for water droplet motion under a gravity field. On the basis of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, an explicit analytical model is proposed for investigating the detaching mechanism, in which the critical air velocity can be fully determined by several intrinsic parameters: water-solid interface area fraction, droplet volume, and Young's contact angle. This model gives predictions of the critical detachment velocity of air flow that agree well with the experimental measurements.

  12. Terahertz sensor for air pollution monitoring from spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Rui; Guo, Aiyan

    2016-07-01

    Terahertz wave is a radio wave which wavelength between infrared and microwave, substantial is from 0.1-1mm that is 300-3000GHz(0.3-3THz). Compare to microwave and visible/infrared it is advantage of resolution and better penetration in atmosphere respectively, and because of wavelength is similar to scale of micro-particle of air pollution, the absorption coefficient due to the many relevant molecules have a maximum signature in the THz region, such as SO2、CH4、H2S、NH3、CO、O3 etc. of molecules of polluted atmosphere . This paper present a conceptional solution of THz sensor for air pollution sounder which using of large aperture antenna and FSS with 15 channels in 0.183-1.5THz region, each channel with 2MHz by extreme narrow band filter for detecting signature of polluted air. Analysis data show that 2Km spatial resolution at 700km altitude orbit. Sensitive is about 10-12W/Hz1/2 level at cryogenic temp.

  13. Interfacial area and two-phase flow structure development measured by a double-sensor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Waihung; Revankar, S.T.; Ishii, Yoshihiko; Ishii, Mamoru.

    1992-06-01

    In this report, we studied the local phasic characters of dispersed flow regime both at the entrance and at the fully developed regions. Since the dispersed phase is distributed randomly in the medium and enclosed in relatively small interfaces, the phasic measurement becomes difficult to obtain. Local probe must be made with a miniaturized sensor in order to reduce the interface distortion. The double-sensor resistivity probe has been widely used in local void fraction and interface velocity measurements because the are small in comparison with the interfaces. It has been tested and proved to be an accurate local phasic measurement tool. In these experiments, a double-sensor probe was employed to measure the local void fraction and interface velocity in an air-water system. The test section was flow regime can be determined by visualization. Furthermore, local phasic measurements can be verified by photographic studies. We concentrated our study on the bubbly flow regime only. The local measurements were conducted at two axial locations, L/D = 8 and 60, in which the first measurement represents the entrance region where the flow develops, and the second measurement represents the fully developed flow region where the radial profile does not change as the flow moves along the axial direction. Four liquid flow rates were chosen in combination with four different gas injection rates. The superficial liquid velocities were j{sub t} = 1.0, 0.6,0.4, and 0.1 m/s and superficial gas velocities were j{sub g} = 0.0965, 0.0696, 0.0384, and 0.0192 m/s. These combinations put the two-phase flow well in the bubbly flow regime. In this sequence of phenomenological studies, the local void fraction, interface area concentration, sauter mean diameter, bubble velocity and bubble frequency were measured.

  14. Effect of air flow on tubular solar still efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An experimental work was reported to estimate the increase in distillate yield for a compound parabolic concentrator-concentric tubular solar still (CPC-CTSS). The CPC dramatically increases the heating of the saline water. A novel idea was proposed to study the characteristic features of CPC for desalination to produce a large quantity of distillate yield. A rectangular basin of dimension 2 m × 0.025 m × 0.02 m was fabricated of copper and was placed at the focus of the CPC. This basin is covered by two cylindrical glass tubes of length 2 m with two different diameters of 0.02 m and 0.03 m. The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. Findings The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. Conclusions On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. PMID:23587020

  15. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement specifications. 90.416 Section 90.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW 19 KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures §...

  16. The wire-mesh sensor as a two-phase flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaban, H.; Tavoularis, S.

    2015-01-01

    A novel gas and liquid flow rate measurement method is proposed for use in vertical upward and downward gas-liquid pipe flows. This method is based on the analysis of the time history of area-averaged void fraction that is measured using a conductivity wire-mesh sensor (WMS). WMS measurements were collected in vertical upward and downward air-water flows in a pipe with an internal diameter of 32.5 mm at nearly atmospheric pressure. The relative frequencies and the power spectral density of area-averaged void fraction were calculated and used as representative properties. Independent features, extracted from these properties using Principal Component Analysis and Independent Component Analysis, were used as inputs to artificial neural networks, which were trained to give the gas and liquid flow rates as outputs. The present method was shown to be accurate for all four encountered flow regimes and for a wide range of flow conditions. Besides providing accurate predictions for steady flows, the method was also tested successfully in three flows with transient liquid flow rates. The method was augmented by the use of the cross-correlation function of area-averaged void fraction determined from the output of a dual WMS unit as an additional representative property, which was found to improve the accuracy of flow rate prediction.

  17. An Interoperable Architecture for Air Pollution Early Warning System Based on Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadzadegan, F.; Zahmatkesh, H.; Saber, M.; Ghazi khanlou, H. J.

    2013-09-01

    Environmental monitoring systems deal with time-sensitive issues which require quick responses in emergency situations. Handling the sensor observations in near real-time and obtaining valuable information is challenging issues in these systems from a technical and scientific point of view. The ever-increasing population growth in urban areas has caused certain problems in developing countries, which has direct or indirect impact on human life. One of applicable solution for controlling and managing air quality by considering real time and update air quality information gathered by spatially distributed sensors in mega cities, using sensor web technology for developing monitoring and early warning systems. Urban air quality monitoring systems using functionalities of geospatial information system as a platform for analysing, processing, and visualization of data in combination with Sensor Web for supporting decision support systems in disaster management and emergency situations. This system uses Sensor Web Enablement (SWE) framework of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), which offers a standard framework that allows the integration of sensors and sensor data into spatial data infrastructures. SWE framework introduces standards for services to access sensor data and discover events from sensor data streams as well as definition set of standards for the description of sensors and the encoding of measurements. The presented system provides capabilities to collect, transfer, share, process air quality sensor data and disseminate air quality status in real-time. It is possible to overcome interoperability challenges by using standard framework. In a routine scenario, air quality data measured by in-situ sensors are communicated to central station where data is analysed and processed. The extracted air quality status is processed for discovering emergency situations, and if necessary air quality reports are sent to the authorities. This research proposed an

  18. Sensor for Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Chang, Zensheu; Trease, Brian P.; Kerenyi, Kornel; Widholm, Scott E.; Ostlund, Patrick N.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex and lead to low-fidelity results. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear stress, normal stress, and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, most direct-measurement shear sensors are bulky in size or not compatible to fluid flow. A sensor has been developed that consists of a floating plate with folded beam support and an optical grid on the back, combined with a high-resolution optical position probe. The folded beam support makes the floating plate more flexible in the sensing direction within a small footprint, while maintaining high stiffness in the other directions. The floating plate converts the shear force to displacement, and the optical probe detects the plate s position with nanometer resolution by sensing the pattern of the diffraction field of the grid through a glass window. This configuration makes the sensor compatible with liquid flow applications.

  19. Architecture for an integrated real-time air combat and sensor network simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criswell, Evans A.; Rushing, John; Lin, Hong; Graves, Sara

    2007-04-01

    An architecture for an integrated air combat and sensor network simulation is presented. The architecture integrates two components: a parallel real-time sensor fusion and target tracking simulation, and an air combat simulation. By integrating these two simulations, it becomes possible to experiment with scenarios in which one or both sides in a battle have very large numbers of primitive passive sensors, and to assess the likely effects of those sensors on the outcome of the battle. Modern Air Power is a real-time theater-level air combat simulation that is currently being used as a part of the USAF Air and Space Basic Course (ASBC). The simulation includes a variety of scenarios from the Vietnam war to the present day, and also includes several hypothetical future scenarios. Modern Air Power includes a scenario editor, an order of battle editor, and full AI customization features that make it possible to quickly construct scenarios for any conflict of interest. The scenario editor makes it possible to place a wide variety of sensors including both high fidelity sensors such as radars, and primitive passive sensors that provide only very limited information. The parallel real-time sensor network simulation is capable of handling very large numbers of sensors on a computing cluster of modest size. It can fuse information provided by disparate sensors to detect and track targets, and produce target tracks.

  20. Novel Sensors For Measuring Fuel Flow And Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodyer, E. N.

    1989-03-01

    This presentation will discuss a novel sensing method for measuring fuel flow which was developed for the Ford Motor Co by Sira Ltd. The fuel flow sensor uses an optical technique based on detecting light scattered from particles carried in the flowing fuel. Two off axis light sources illuminate the fuel flow region. As particles move with the fuel some light is scattered normal to the fuel flow direction. The scattered light is focused onto a course beam splitter which then directs the light onto two matched detectors. The course beam splitter has 5 linear reflecting grooves per mm each with an included angle of 1351. As a particle that is smaller than the groove width moves across the field of view the effect is to focus scattered light from the particle alternately onto each of the two detectors. Each detector therefore receives optical modulation which is in antiphase to that received by the other detector. The difference of the two detector signals is then used. Also presented will be a new design for an optically based steering wheel position. The sensor is now in full scale production and is manufactured by First Inertia Switch Ltd. An assembly consisting of a number of parallel light guides, each 0.25mm wide, views the light reflected from a black and white striped tape that is stuck to the steering column. The signals from the detectors that are mounted remotely at the end of the light guides are interpreted by a PLA device to give rotational information. The sensor offers a higher resolution than traditional similar sensors while maintaining a low manufacturing cost.

  1. Computational and experimental study of spin coater air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoguang; Liang, Faqiu; Haji-Sheikh, A.; Ghariban, N.

    1998-06-01

    An extensive 2- and 3-D analysis of air flow in a POLARISTM 2200 Microlithography Cluster spin coater was conducted using FLUENTTM Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. To supplement this analysis, direct measurement of air flow velocity was also performed using a DantecTM Hot Wire Anemometer. Velocity measurements were made along two major planes across the entire flow field in the spin coater at various operating conditions. It was found that the flow velocity at the spin coater inlet is much lower than previously assumed and quite nonuniform. Based on this observation, a pressure boundary condition rather than a velocity boundary condition was used for subsequent CFD analysis. A comparison between calculated results and experimental data shows that the 3D model accurately predicts the air flow field in the spin coater. An added advantage of this approach is that the CFD model can be easily generated from the mechanical design database and used to analyze the effect of design changes. The modeled and measured results show that the flow pattern in the spin bowl is affected by interactions between the spinning wafer, exhaust flow, and the gap between the spin head and surrounding baffle. Different operating conditions such as spin speed, inlet pressure, and exhaust pressure were found to generate substantially different flow patterns. It was also found that backflow of air could be generated under certain conditions.

  2. Community Air Sensor Network (CAIRSENSE) Project: Lower Cost, Continuous Ambient Monitoring Methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances in air pollution sensor technology have enabled the development of small and low cost systems to measure outdoor air pollution. The deployment of numerous sensors across a small geographic area would have potential benefits to supplement existing monitoring networks and ...

  3. Measuring PM and related air pollutants using low-cost sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emerging air quality sensors may play a key role in better characterizing levels of air pollution in a variety of settings There are a wide range of low-cost (< $500 US) sensors on the market, but few have been characterized. If accurate, this new generation of inexpensive s...

  4. Measuring PM and related air pollutants using low-cost sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emerging air quality sensors may play a key role in better characterizing levels of air pollution in a variety of settings There are a wide range of low-cost (< $500 US) sensors on the market, but few have been characterized. If accurate, this new generation of inexpensive sens...

  5. Development of a wireless air pollution sensor package for aerial-sampling of emissions

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new sensor system for mobile and aerial emission sampling was developed for open area pollutant sources, such as prescribed forest burns. The sensor system, termed “Kolibri”, consists of multiple low-cost air quality sensors measuring CO2, CO, samplers for particulate matter wi...

  6. The air-liquid flow in a microfluidic airway tree.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Baudoin, Michael; Manneville, Paul; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidic techniques are employed to investigate air-liquid flows in the lung. A network of microchannels with five generations is made and used as a simplified model of a section of the pulmonary airway tree. Liquid plugs are injected into the network and pushed by a flow of air; they divide at every bifurcation until they reach the exits of the network. A resistance, associated with the presence of one plug in a given generation, is defined to establish a linear relation between the driving pressure and the total flow rate in the network. Based on this resistance, good predictions are obtained for the flow of two successive plugs in different generations. The total flow rate of a two-plug flow is found to depend not only on the driving pressure and lengths of the plugs, but also the initial distance between them. Furthermore, long range interactions between daughters of a dividing plug are observed and discussed, particularly when the plugs are flowing through the bifurcations. These interactions lead to different flow patterns for different forcing conditions: the flow develops symmetrically when subjected to constant pressure or high flow rate forcing, while a low flow rate driving yields an asymmetric flow.

  7. Visualization of the air flow behind the automotive benchmark vent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pech, Ondrej; Jedelsky, Jan; Caletka, Petr; Jicha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Passenger comfort in cars depends on appropriate function of the cabin HVAC system. A great attention is therefore paid to the effective function of automotive vents and proper formation of the flow behind the ventilation outlet. The article deals with the visualization of air flow from the automotive benchmark vent. The visualization was made for two different shapes of the inlet channel connected to the benchmark vent. The smoke visualization with the laser knife was used. The influence of the shape of the inlet channel to the airflow direction, its enlargement and position of air flow axis were investigated.

  8. Quantification Method for Electrolytic Sensors in Long-Term Monitoring of Ambient Air Quality

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Nicholas; Piedrahita, Ricardo; Hannigan, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Traditional air quality monitoring relies on point measurements from a small number of high-end devices. The recent growth in low-cost air sensing technology stands to revolutionize the way in which air quality data are collected and utilized. While several technologies have emerged in the field of low-cost monitoring, all suffer from similar challenges in data quality. One technology that shows particular promise is that of electrolytic (also known as amperometric) sensors. These sensors produce an electric current in response to target pollutants. This work addresses the development of practical models for understanding and quantifying the signal response of electrolytic sensors. Such models compensate for confounding effects on the sensor response, such as ambient temperature and humidity, and address other issues that affect the usability of low-cost sensors, such as sensor drift and inter-sensor variability. PMID:26516860

  9. Air Pollution Sensors: Highlights from an EPA Workshop on the Evolution and Revolution in Low-Cost Participatory Air Monitoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article summarizes the findings from the EPA's Apps and Sensors for Air Pollution Workshop that was held March 26-27 of 2012. The workshop brought together researchers, developers, and community-based groups who have been working with sensors and apps in a variety of settin...

  10. Annular fuel and air co-flow premixer

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Melton, Patrick Benedict; York, William David

    2013-10-15

    Disclosed is a premixer for a combustor including an annular outer shell and an annular inner shell. The inner shell defines an inner flow channel inside of the inner shell and is located to define an outer flow channel between the outer shell and the inner shell. A fuel discharge annulus is located between the outer flow channel and the inner flow channel and is configured to inject a fuel flow into a mixing area in a direction substantially parallel to an outer airflow through the outer flow channel and an inner flow through the inner flow channel. Further disclosed are a combustor including a plurality of premixers and a method of premixing air and fuel in a combustor.

  11. Insect-Inspired Optical-Flow Navigation Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Morookian, John M.; Chahl, Javan; Soccol, Dean; Hines, Butler; Zornetzer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Integrated circuits that exploit optical flow to sense motions of computer mice on or near surfaces ( optical mouse chips ) are used as navigation sensors in a class of small flying robots now undergoing development for potential use in such applications as exploration, search, and surveillance. The basic principles of these robots were described briefly in Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Small Flying Robots (NPO-30545), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 1 (January 2005), page 61. To recapitulate from the cited prior article: The concept of optical flow can be defined, loosely, as the use of texture in images as a source of motion cues. The flight-control and navigation systems of these robots are inspired largely by the designs and functions of the vision systems and brains of insects, which have been demonstrated to utilize optical flow (as detected by their eyes and brains) resulting from their own motions in the environment. Optical flow has been shown to be very effective as a means of avoiding obstacles and controlling speeds and altitudes in robotic navigation. Prior systems used in experiments on navigating by means of optical flow have involved the use of panoramic optics, high-resolution image sensors, and programmable imagedata- processing computers.

  12. Development and Application of a Next Generation Air Sensor Network for the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Wong, Ka Chun; Wei, Peng; Ye, Sheng; Huang, Hao; Yang, Fenhuan; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K K; Luk, Connie W Y; Ning, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the development and evaluation of a next generation air monitoring system with both laboratory and field tests. A multi-parameter algorithm was used to correct for the impact of environmental conditions on the electrochemical sensors for carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollutants. The field evaluation in an urban roadside environment in comparison to designated monitors showed good agreement with measurement error within 5% of the pollutant concentrations. Multiple sets of the developed system were then deployed in the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 forming a sensor-based network along the marathon route. Real-time air pollution concentration data were wirelessly transmitted and the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) for the Green Marathon was calculated, which were broadcast to the public on an hourly basis. The route-specific sensor network showed somewhat different pollutant patterns than routine air monitoring, indicating the immediate impact of traffic control during the marathon on the roadside air quality. The study is one of the first applications of a next generation sensor network in international sport events, and it demonstrated the usefulness of the emerging sensor-based air monitoring technology in rapid network deployment to supplement existing air monitoring.

  13. Development and Application of a Next Generation Air Sensor Network for the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 Air Quality Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Wong, Ka Chun; Wei, Peng; Ye, Sheng; Huang, Hao; Yang, Fenhuan; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K K; Luk, Connie W Y; Ning, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the development and evaluation of a next generation air monitoring system with both laboratory and field tests. A multi-parameter algorithm was used to correct for the impact of environmental conditions on the electrochemical sensors for carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollutants. The field evaluation in an urban roadside environment in comparison to designated monitors showed good agreement with measurement error within 5% of the pollutant concentrations. Multiple sets of the developed system were then deployed in the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 forming a sensor-based network along the marathon route. Real-time air pollution concentration data were wirelessly transmitted and the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) for the Green Marathon was calculated, which were broadcast to the public on an hourly basis. The route-specific sensor network showed somewhat different pollutant patterns than routine air monitoring, indicating the immediate impact of traffic control during the marathon on the roadside air quality. The study is one of the first applications of a next generation sensor network in international sport events, and it demonstrated the usefulness of the emerging sensor-based air monitoring technology in rapid network deployment to supplement existing air monitoring. PMID:26861336

  14. Development and Application of a Next Generation Air Sensor Network for the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 Air Quality Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li; Wong, Ka Chun; Wei, Peng; Ye, Sheng; Huang, Hao; Yang, Fenhuan; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K.K.; Luk, Connie W.Y.; Ning, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the development and evaluation of a next generation air monitoring system with both laboratory and field tests. A multi-parameter algorithm was used to correct for the impact of environmental conditions on the electrochemical sensors for carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) pollutants. The field evaluation in an urban roadside environment in comparison to designated monitors showed good agreement with measurement error within 5% of the pollutant concentrations. Multiple sets of the developed system were then deployed in the Hong Kong Marathon 2015 forming a sensor-based network along the marathon route. Real-time air pollution concentration data were wirelessly transmitted and the Air Quality Health Index (AQHI) for the Green Marathon was calculated, which were broadcast to the public on an hourly basis. The route-specific sensor network showed somewhat different pollutant patterns than routine air monitoring, indicating the immediate impact of traffic control during the marathon on the roadside air quality. The study is one of the first applications of a next generation sensor network in international sport events, and it demonstrated the usefulness of the emerging sensor-based air monitoring technology in rapid network deployment to supplement existing air monitoring. PMID:26861336

  15. Spool Valve for Switching Air Flows Between Two Beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. Clark

    2005-01-01

    U.S. Patent 6,142,151 describes a dual-bed ventilation system for a space suit, with emphasis on a multiport spool valve that switches air flows between two chemical beds that adsorb carbon dioxide and water vapor. The valve is used to alternately make the air flow through one bed while exposing the other bed to the outer-space environment to regenerate that bed through vacuum desorption of CO2 and H2O. Oxygen flowing from a supply tank is routed through a pair of periodically switched solenoid valves to drive the spool valve in a reciprocating motion. The spool valve equalizes the pressures of air in the beds and the volumes of air flowing into and out of the beds during the alternations between the adsorption and desorption phases, in such a manner that the volume of air that must be vented to outer space is half of what it would be in the absence of pressure equalization. Oxygen that has been used to actuate the spool valve in its reciprocating motion is released into the ventilation loop to replenish air lost to vacuum during the previous desorption phase of the operating cycle.

  16. Practical strategies for stable operation of HFF-QCM in continuous air flow.

    PubMed

    Wessels, Alexander; Klöckner, Bernhard; Siering, Carsten; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2013-09-09

    Currently there are a few fields of application using quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Because of environmental conditions and insufficient resolution of the microbalance, chemical sensing of volatile organic compounds in an open system was as yet not possible. In this study we present strategies on how to use 195 MHz fundamental quartz resonators for a mobile sensor platform to detect airborne analytes. Commonly the use of devices with a resonant frequency of about 10 MHz is standard. By increasing the frequency to 195 MHz the frequency shift increases by a factor of almost 400. Unfortunately, such kinds of quartz crystals tend to exhibit some challenges to obtain a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. It was possible to reduce the noise in frequency in a continuous air flow of 7.5 m/s to 0.4 Hz [i.e., σ(τ) = 2 × 10-9] by elucidating the major source of noise. The air flow in the vicinity of the quartz was analyzed to reduce turbulences. Furthermore, we found a dependency between the acceleration sensitivity and mechanical stress induced by an internal thermal gradient. By reducing this gradient, we achieved reduction of the sensitivity to acceleration by more than one decade. Hence, the resulting sensor is more robust to environmental conditions such as temperature, acceleration and air flow.

  17. Practical Strategies for Stable Operation of HFF-QCM in Continuous Air Flow

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Alexander; Klöckner, Bernhard; Siering, Carsten; Waldvogel, Siegfried R.

    2013-01-01

    Currently there are a few fields of application using quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Because of environmental conditions and insufficient resolution of the microbalance, chemical sensing of volatile organic compounds in an open system was as yet not possible. In this study we present strategies on how to use 195 MHz fundamental quartz resonators for a mobile sensor platform to detect airborne analytes. Commonly the use of devices with a resonant frequency of about 10 MHz is standard. By increasing the frequency to 195 MHz the frequency shift increases by a factor of almost 400. Unfortunately, such kinds of quartz crystals tend to exhibit some challenges to obtain a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. It was possible to reduce the noise in frequency in a continuous air flow of 7.5 m/s to 0.4 Hz [i.e., σ(τ) = 2 × 10−9] by elucidating the major source of noise. The air flow in the vicinity of the quartz was analyzed to reduce turbulences. Furthermore, we found a dependency between the acceleration sensitivity and mechanical stress induced by an internal thermal gradient. By reducing this gradient, we achieved reduction of the sensitivity to acceleration by more than one decade. Hence, the resulting sensor is more robust to environmental conditions such as temperature, acceleration and air flow. PMID:24021970

  18. Reducing minimum air flow at low boiler loads

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, B.L.; Lange, H.B.; Brown, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    One aspect of boiler operation that impairs performance at low loads is the practice of maintaining the flow of air to the boiler at or above 25% of the full-load air flow even though the boiler load may be reduced well below 25%. This is done in accordance with National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 8502, a guideline which boiler insurers generally require. The intent of the minimum air flow rate guideline is to reduce the likelihood of a boiler explosion being caused by an unexpected accumulation of unburned fuel in the boiler, by maintaining a minimum purge rate through the boiler. Operation at high excess air reduces boiler efficiency, increases NO{sub x} emissions and, in some cases, negatively impacts flame stability. Under a contract with EPRI, Carnot is currently engaged in a program aimed at more fully establishing the economics of and technical basis for safe reduced air flow operation at low boiler loads and developing guidelines for its implementation on any boiler. In Phase 1 of this program, discussions were initiated with the NFPA, and detailed boiler combustion and heat-transfer analyses were combined with cost models to quantify the benefits and costs of reduced air flow operation on a wide variety of boilers. The cost/benefit analysis investigated gas- and/or oil-fired boilers including tangential, wall and opposed-fired designs. Phase 2 of the program is to consist of a series of demonstrations of reduced air flow operation on working utility boilers. These demonstrations are to cover gas, oil and coal fuels and the major boiler design types.

  19. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  20. Cross-flow versus counterflow air-stripping towers

    SciTech Connect

    Little, J.C.; Marinas, B.J.

    1997-07-01

    Mass-transfer and pressure-drop packing performance correlations are used together with tower design equations and detailed cost models to compare the effectiveness of cross-flow and counterflow air stripping towers over a wide range of contaminant volatility. Cross-flow towers are shown to offer a significant economic advantage over counterflow towers when stripping low volatility organic contaminants primarily due to savings in energy costs. These savings increase as contaminant volatility decreases and as water flow rate increases. A further advantage of the cross-flow configuration is that it extends the feasible operating range for air stripping as cross-flow towers can accommodate higher air-to-water flow ratios than conventional counterflow towers. Finally it is shown that the optimized least-cost design for both counterflow and cross-flow towers varies with Henry`s law constant, water flow rate, and percent removal, but that the optimum is virtually insensitive to other cost and operating variables. This greatly simplifies the tower design procedure.

  1. Smart Sensing Strip Using Monolithically Integrated Flexible Flow Sensor for Noninvasively Monitoring Respiratory Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Zhao, Shuai; Zhu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a smart sensing strip for noninvasively monitoring respiratory flow in real time. The monitoring system comprises a monolithically-integrated flexible hot-film flow sensor adhered on a molded flexible silicone case, where a miniaturized conditioning circuit with a Bluetooth4.0 LE module are packaged, and a personal mobile device that wirelessly acquires respiratory data transmitted from the flow sensor, executes extraction of vital signs, and performs medical diagnosis. The system serves as a wearable device to monitor comprehensive respiratory flow while avoiding use of uncomfortable nasal cannula. The respiratory sensor is a flexible flow sensor monolithically integrating four elements of a Wheatstone bridge on single chip, including a hot-film resistor, a temperature-compensating resistor, and two balancing resistors. The monitor takes merits of small size, light weight, easy operation, and low power consumption. Experiments were conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of monitoring and diagnosing respiratory diseases using the proposed system. PMID:26694401

  2. Smart Sensing Strip Using Monolithically Integrated Flexible Flow Sensor for Noninvasively Monitoring Respiratory Flow.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Zhao, Shuai; Zhu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a smart sensing strip for noninvasively monitoring respiratory flow in real time. The monitoring system comprises a monolithically-integrated flexible hot-film flow sensor adhered on a molded flexible silicone case, where a miniaturized conditioning circuit with a Bluetooth4.0 LE module are packaged, and a personal mobile device that wirelessly acquires respiratory data transmitted from the flow sensor, executes extraction of vital signs, and performs medical diagnosis. The system serves as a wearable device to monitor comprehensive respiratory flow while avoiding use of uncomfortable nasal cannula. The respiratory sensor is a flexible flow sensor monolithically integrating four elements of a Wheatstone bridge on single chip, including a hot-film resistor, a temperature-compensating resistor, and two balancing resistors. The monitor takes merits of small size, light weight, easy operation, and low power consumption. Experiments were conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of monitoring and diagnosing respiratory diseases using the proposed system. PMID:26694401

  3. Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-04-28

    A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

  4. Air-segmented amplitude-modulated multiplexed flow analysis.

    PubMed

    Inui, Koji; Uemura, Takeshi; Ogusu, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Masaki; Tanaka, Hideji

    2011-01-01

    Air-segmentation is applied to amplitude-modulated multiplexed flow analysis, which we proposed recently. Sample solutions, the flow rates of which are varied periodically, are merged with reagent and/or diluent solution. The merged stream is segmented by air-bubbles and, downstream, its absorbance is measured after deaeration. The analytes in the samples are quantified from the amplitudes of the respective wave components in the absorbance. The proposed method is applied to the determinations of a food dye, phosphate ions and nitrite ions. The air-segmentation is effective for limiting amplitude damping through the axial dispersion, resulting in an improvement in sensitivity. This effect is more pronounced at shorter control periods and longer flow path lengths.

  5. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  6. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  7. Boundary layer separation and reattachment detection on airfoils by thermal flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Hannes; Dumstorff, Gerrit; Busche, Peter; Westermann, Dieter; Lang, Walter

    2012-10-24

    A sensor concept for detection of boundary layer separation (flow separation, stall) and reattachment on airfoils is introduced in this paper. Boundary layer separation and reattachment are phenomena of fluid mechanics showing characteristics of extinction and even inversion of the flow velocity on an overflowed surface. The flow sensor used in this work is able to measure the flow velocity in terms of direction and quantity at the sensor's position and expected to determine those specific flow conditions. Therefore, an array of thermal flow sensors has been integrated (flush-mounted) on an airfoil and placed in a wind tunnel for measurement. Sensor signals have been recorded at different wind speeds and angles of attack for different positions on the airfoil. The sensors used here are based on the change of temperature distribution on a membrane (calorimetric principle). Thermopiles are used as temperature sensors in this approach offering a baseline free sensor signal, which is favorable for measurements at zero flow. Measurement results show clear separation points (zero flow) and even negative flow values (back flow) for all sensor positions. In addition to standard silicon-based flow sensors, a polymer-based flexible approach has been tested showing similar results.

  8. Boundary Layer Separation and Reattachment Detection on Airfoils by Thermal Flow Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Hannes; Dumstorff, Gerrit; Busche, Peter; Westermann, Dieter; Lang, Walter

    2012-01-01

    A sensor concept for detection of boundary layer separation (flow separation, stall) and reattachment on airfoils is introduced in this paper. Boundary layer separation and reattachment are phenomena of fluid mechanics showing characteristics of extinction and even inversion of the flow velocity on an overflowed surface. The flow sensor used in this work is able to measure the flow velocity in terms of direction and quantity at the sensor's position and expected to determine those specific flow conditions. Therefore, an array of thermal flow sensors has been integrated (flush-mounted) on an airfoil and placed in a wind tunnel for measurement. Sensor signals have been recorded at different wind speeds and angles of attack for different positions on the airfoil. The sensors used here are based on the change of temperature distribution on a membrane (calorimetric principle). Thermopiles are used as temperature sensors in this approach offering a baseline free sensor signal, which is favorable for measurements at zero flow. Measurement results show clear separation points (zero flow) and even negative flow values (back flow) for all sensor positions. In addition to standard silicon-based flow sensors, a polymer-based flexible approach has been tested showing similar results. PMID:23202160

  9. Global Monitoring of Air Pollution Using Spaceborne Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Remer, L. A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The MODIS sensor onboard EOS-Terra satellite provides not only daily global coverage but also high spectral (36 channels from 0.41 to 14 microns wavelength) and spatial (250m, 500m and 1km) resolution measurements. A similar MODIS instrument will be also configured into EOS-Aqua satellite to be launched soon. Using the complementary EOS-Terra and EOS-Aqua sun-synchronous orbits (10:30 AM and 1:30 PM equator-crossing time respectively), it enables us also to study the diurnal changes of the Earth system. It is unprecedented for the derivation of aerosol properties with such high spatial resolution and daily global converge. Aerosol optical depth and other aerosol properties, e.g., Angstrom coefficient over land and particle size over ocean, are derived as standard products at a spatial resolution of 10 x 10 sq km. The high resolution results are found surprisingly useful in detecting aerosols in both urban and rural regions as a result of urban/industrial pollution and biomass burning. For long-lived aerosols, the ability to monitoring the evolution of these aerosol events could help us to establish an system of air quality especially for highly populated areas. Aerosol scenarios with city pollution and biomass burning will be presented. Also presented are the method used in the derivation of aerosol optical properties and preliminary results will be presented, and issue as well as obstacles in validating aerosol optical depth with AERONET ground-based observations.

  10. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  11. Optical Electronic Bragg Reflection Sensor System with Hydrodynamic Flow Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    This project, as described in the following report, involved design and fabrication of fiber optic sensors for the detection and measurement of dynamic fluid density variations. These devices are created using UV (ultraviolet) ablation and generally modified transverse holographic fiber grating techniques. The resulting phase gratings created on or immediately underneath the flat portion of D-shaped optical waveguides are characterized as evanescent field sensing devices. The primary applications include the sensor portion of a real-time localized or distributed measurement system for hydrodynamic flow, fluid density measurements, and phase change phenomena. Several design modifications were implemented in an attempt to accomplish the tasks specified in our original proposal. In addition, we have established key collaborative relationships with numerous people and institutions.

  12. Use of CCD sensors in flow cytometry for nonimaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beisker, Wolfgang

    1997-05-01

    The use of charge coupled devices (CCDs) as non-imaging sensors in flow cytometric systems to replace the classical photomultplier tubes (PMTs) is very advantageous: the quantum efficiency of the CCDs is about 5 to 10 times higher as for PMTs, the charge storage capability of CCDs avoids analogue processing of the fluorescence signals, the dynamic range is up to 18 bits and the fluorescence intensity at different wavelengths can be recorded on the same chip. In this report a full frame CCD imager is used in a thermoelectrically cooled environment. The output signal for the CCD is digitized with a 12-bit ADC and the data are sorted as list-mode data typically used in flow cytometric work. The performance of the system is demonstrated with DNA staining of mammalian cells with acridine-orange, propidium iodide and ethidium bromide. DNA histograms comparable with standard flow cytometry are recorded. From the same data set pulse-widths histograms can be processed and used for doublet discrimination. The high quantum efficiency of the CCD sensors is of special interest for fluorescing dyes in the dark red or near IR wavelength range.

  13. Performance improvement of IPMC flow sensors with a biologically-inspired cupula structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hong; Sharif, Montassar Aidi; Paley, Derek A.; McHenry, Matthew J.; Tan, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) have inherent underwater sensing and actuation properties. They can be used as sensors to collect flow information. Inspired by the hair-cell mediated receptor in the lateral line system of fish, the impact of a flexible, cupula-like structure on the performance of IPMC flow sensors is experimentally explored. The fabrication method to create a silicone-capped IPMC sensor is reported. Experiments are conducted to compare the sensing performance of the IPMC flow sensor before and after the PDMS coating under the periodic flow stimulus generated by a dipole source in still water and the laminar flow stimulus generated in a flow tank. Experimental results show that the performance of IPMC flow sensors is significantly improved under the stimulus of both periodic flow and laminar flow by the proposed silicone-capping.

  14. MEMS flexible thermal flow sensor for measurement of boundary layer separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jui-Ming; Leu, Tzong-Shyng; Miau, Jiun-Jih; Chen, Shih-Jiun

    2016-05-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) thermal flow sensors featured with high spatial resolutions, fast frequency response and minimal interference with fluid flow have been applied widely in boundary-layer studies and aerodynamic flow sensing and control due to the inherent outstanding performances. In this study, MEMS thermal flow sensors were designed and fabricated on a flexible skin using the MEMS technology. The dimension of a single sensing element was 200 μm × 260 μm, which had a resistance of about 200 Ω after annealing. By configuring thermal flow sensors in either a single thermal flow sensor and a thermal tuft sensor, separation points of a two-dimensional (2D) LS(1) 0417 airfoil at various angles of attack could be precisely detected. The experimental results show good agreement with the hot wire sensor and particle traced flow visualization in detecting the separation point on the suction surface of the airfoil.

  15. MEMS flexible thermal flow sensor for measurement of boundary layer separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jui-Ming; Leu, Tzong-Shyng; Miau, Jiun-Jih; Chen, Shih-Jiun

    2016-05-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) thermal flow sensors featured with high spatial resolutions, fast frequency response and minimal interference with fluid flow have been applied widely in boundary-layer studies and aerodynamic flow sensing and control due to the inherent outstanding performances. In this study, MEMS thermal flow sensors were designed and fabricated on a flexible skin using the MEMS technology. The dimension of a single sensing element was 200 μm × 260 μm, which had a resistance of about 200 Ω after annealing. By configuring thermal flow sensors in either a single thermal flow sensor and a thermal tuft sensor, separation points of a two-dimensional (2D) LS(1) 0417 airfoil at various angles of attack could be precisely detected. The experimental results show good agreement with the hot wire sensor and particle traced flow visualization in detecting the separation point on the suction surface of the airfoil.

  16. Evolutionary Concepts for Decentralized Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Milton; Kolitz, Stephan; Milner, Joseph; Odoni, Amedeo

    1997-01-01

    Alternative concepts for modifying the policies and procedures under which the air traffic flow management system operates are described, and an approach to the evaluation of those concepts is discussed. Here, air traffic flow management includes all activities related to the management of the flow of aircraft and related system resources from 'block to block.' The alternative concepts represent stages in the evolution from the current system, in which air traffic management decision making is largely centralized within the FAA, to a more decentralized approach wherein the airlines and other airspace users collaborate in air traffic management decision making with the FAA. The emphasis in the discussion is on a viable medium-term partially decentralized scenario representing a phase of this evolution that is consistent with the decision-making approaches embodied in proposed Free Flight concepts for air traffic management. System-level metrics for analyzing and evaluating the various alternatives are defined, and a simulation testbed developed to generate values for those metrics is described. The fundamental issue of modeling airline behavior in decentralized environments is also raised, and an example of such a model, which deals with the preservation of flight bank integrity in hub airports, is presented.

  17. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs.

  18. Litter ammonia losses amplified by higher air flow rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT Broiler litter utilization has largely been associated with land application as fertilizer. Reducing ammonia (NH3) released from litter enhances its fertilizer value and negates detrimental impacts to the environment. A laboratory study was conducted to quantify the effect of air flow var...

  19. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Safety Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal...

  20. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, R.F.

    1987-11-24

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs. 4 figs.

  1. Flow sensor using a hollow whispering gallery mode microlaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Jonathan M.; Yang, Yong; Chormaic, Síle N.

    2016-03-01

    Flow sensing using the concept of a hot whispering gallery microlaser is presented. Silica microcapillaries or microbubbles, coated with a layer of erbium:ytterbium (Er:Yb) doped phosphate laser glass, result in a hollow, microbottle-shaped laser geometry. The Er:Yb doped glass outer layer is pumped at 980 nm via a tapered optical fiber and whispering gallery mode (WGM) lasing is recorded at 1535 nm. When gas passes through the capillary, the WGMs shift toward shorter wavelengths due to the cooling effect of the fluid flow. In this way, thermal tuning of the lasing modes over 70 GHz can be achieved. The output end of the capillary is connected to a mass flow sensor and the WGM shift rate as a function of flow rate and pump laser power is measured, with the results fitted using hot wire anemometry theory. Flow sensing can also be realized when the cavity is passively probed at 780 nm, with the estimated Q-factor of the WGMs being in excess of 105.

  2. Wind energy harvesting and self-powered flow rate sensor enabled by contact electrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuanjie; Xie, Guangzhong; Xie, Tao; Zhang, Hulin; Ye, Zongbiao; Jing, Qingshen; Tai, Huiling; Du, Xiaosong; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a free-standing-mode based triboelectric nanogenerator (F-TENG) that consists of indium tin oxide (ITO) foils and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin film. By utilizing the wind-induced resonance vibration of a PTFE film between two ITO electrodes, the F-TENG delivers an open-circuit voltage up to 37 V and a short-circuit current of 6.2 μA, which can be used as a sustainable power source to simultaneously and continuously light up tens of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and charge capacitors. Moreover, uniform division of the electrode into several parallel units efficiently suppresses the inner counteracting effect of undulating film and leads to an enhancement of output current by 95%. The F-TENG holds prominent durability and an excellent linear relationship between output current and flow rate, revealing its feasibility as a self-powered sensor for detecting wind speed. This work demonstrates potential applications of the triboelectric generator in gas flow harvesters, self-powered air navigation, self-powered gas sensors and wind vector sensors.

  3. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues. PMID:22163518

  4. Adaptive Preheating Duration Control for Low-Power Ambient Air Quality Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Yoonchul; Atiq, Mahin K.; Kim, Hyung Seok

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic gas sensors used for measuring ambient air quality have features suitable for practical applications such as healthcare and air quality management, but have a major drawback—large power consumption to preheat the sensor for accurate measurements. In this paper; the adaptive preheating duration control (APC) method is proposed to reduce the power consumption of ambient air quality sensor networks. APC reduces the duration of unnecessary preheating, thereby alleviating power consumption. Furthermore, the APC can allow systems to meet user requirements such as accuracy and periodicity factor when detecting the concentration of a target gas. A performance evaluation of the power consumption of gas sensors is conducted with various user requirements and factors that affect the preheating duration of the gas sensor. This shows that the power consumption of the APC is lower than that of continuous power supply methods and constant power supply/cutoff methods. PMID:24658619

  5. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  6. Study of interfacial area transport and sensitivity analysis for air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial area transport equation applicable to the bubbly flow is presented. The model is evaluated against the data acquired by the state-of-the-art miniaturized double-sensor conductivity probe in an adiabatic air-water co-current vertical test loop under atmospheric pressure condition. In general, a good agreement, within the measurement error of plus/minus 10%, is observed for a wide range in the bubbly flow regime. The sensitivity analysis on the individual particle interaction mechanisms demonstrates the active interactions between the bubbles and highlights the mechanisms playing the dominant role in interfacial area transport. The analysis employing the drift flux model is also performed for the data acquired. Under the given flow conditions, the distribution parameter of 1.076 yields the best fit to the data.

  7. The Role of Unmanned Aerial Systems-Sensors in Air Quality Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of unmanned aerial systems (UASs) and miniaturized sensors for a variety of scientific and security purposes has rapidly increased. UASs include aerostats (tethered balloons) and remotely controlled, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) including lighter-than-air vessels, fix...

  8. Do-It-Yourself Air Sensors – Exploring the Atmosphere and Turning on Light Bulbs!?

    EPA Science Inventory

    These are educational slides that will be presented in a webinar to the National Science Teachers Association. Topics covered include general air quality, current EPA research, and EPA's particle sensor kit that is a classroom activity.

  9. Integrated optics ring-resonator chemical sensor for detection of air contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manfreda, A. M.; Homer, M. L.; Ksendzov, A.

    2004-01-01

    We report a silicon nitride-based ring resonator chemical sensor with sensing polymer coating. Its sensitivity to isopropanol in air is at least 50 ppm - well under the permissible exposure level of 400 ppm.

  10. Intregrated optics ring-resonator chemical sensor for detection of air contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ksendzov, Alexander; Homer, Margie L.; Manfreda, Allison M.

    2004-01-01

    We report a silicon nitride-based ring resonator chemical sensor with sensing polymer coating. Its sensitivity to isopropanol in air is at least 50 ppm - well under the permissible exposure level of 400 ppm.

  11. Numerical Laser Energy Deposition on Supersonic Cavity Flow and Sensor Placement Strategies to Control the Flow

    PubMed Central

    Aradag, Selin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the impact of laser energy deposition on pressure oscillations and relative sound pressure levels (SPL) in an open supersonic cavity flow is investigated. Laser energy with a magnitude of 100 mJ is deposited on the flow just above the cavity leading edge and up to 7 dB of reduction is obtained in the SPL values along the cavity back wall. Additionally, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method is applied to the x-velocity data obtained as a result of computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow with laser energy deposition. Laser is numerically modeled using a spherically symmetric temperature distribution. By using the POD results, the effects of laser energy on the flow mechanism are presented. A one-dimensional POD methodology is applied to the surface pressure data to obtain critical locations for the placement of sensors for real time flow control applications. PMID:24363612

  12. Numerical laser energy deposition on supersonic cavity flow and sensor placement strategies to control the flow.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Aradag, Selin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the impact of laser energy deposition on pressure oscillations and relative sound pressure levels (SPL) in an open supersonic cavity flow is investigated. Laser energy with a magnitude of 100 mJ is deposited on the flow just above the cavity leading edge and up to 7 dB of reduction is obtained in the SPL values along the cavity back wall. Additionally, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method is applied to the x-velocity data obtained as a result of computational fluid dynamics simulations of the flow with laser energy deposition. Laser is numerically modeled using a spherically symmetric temperature distribution. By using the POD results, the effects of laser energy on the flow mechanism are presented. A one-dimensional POD methodology is applied to the surface pressure data to obtain critical locations for the placement of sensors for real time flow control applications. PMID:24363612

  13. Characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental program to study the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling flows to obtain detailed and accurate data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport modeling for combustor flows is discussed. The work was also motivated by the need to investigate and quantify the influence of confinement and swirl on the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets. The flow facility was constructed in a simple way which allows easy interchange of different swirlers and the freedom to vary the jet Reynolds number. The velocity measurements were taken with a one color, one component DISA Model 55L laser-Doppler anemometer employing the forward scatter mode. Standard statistical methods are used to evaluate the various moments of the signals to give the flow characteristics. The present work was directed at the understanding of the velocity field. Therefore, only velocity and turbulence data of the axial and circumferential components are reported for inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows.

  14. A stagnation pressure probe for droplet-laden air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.; Leonardo, M.; Ehresman, C. M.

    1985-01-01

    It is often of interest in a droplet-laden gas flow to obtain the stagnation pressure of both the gas phase and the mixture. A flow-decelerating probe (TPF), with separate, purged ports for the gas phase and the mixture and with a bleed for accumulating liquid at the closed end, has been developed. Measurements obtained utilizing the TPF in a nearly isothermal air-water droplet mixture flow in a smooth circular pipe under various conditions of flow velocity, pressure, liquid concentration and droplet size are presented and compared with data obtained under identical conditions with a conventional, gas phase stagnation pressure probe (CSP). The data obtained with the CSP and TPF probes are analyzed to determine the applicability of the two probes in relation to the multi-phase characteristics of the flow and the geometry of the probe.

  15. Transverse glow discharges in supersonic air and methane flows

    SciTech Connect

    Denisova, N. V.; Postnikov, B. V.; Fomin, V. M.

    2006-03-15

    Transverse glow discharges in supersonic air and methane flows are studied both experimentally and theoretically. The experiments show that a diffuse volume discharge filling the whole cross section of the flow can easily be initiated in air, whereas a diffuse discharge in a methane flow shows a tendency to transition into a constricted mode. The electron transport coefficients (mobility and drift velocity) and the kinetic coefficients (such as collisional excitation rates of the vibrational levels of a methane molecule, as well as dissociation and ionization rates) are calculated by numerically solving the Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function. The calculated coefficients are used to estimate the parameters of the plasma and the electric field in the positive column of a discharge in methane.

  16. Parametric Studies of Flow Separation using Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Boundary Layer separation causes the airfoil to stall and therefore imposes dramatic performance degradation on the airfoil. In recent years, flow separation control has been one of the active research areas in the field of aerodynamics due to its promising performance improvements on the lifting device. These active flow separation control techniques include steady and unsteady air injection as well as suction on the airfoil surface etc. This paper will be focusing on the steady and unsteady air injection on the airfoil. Although wind tunnel experiments revealed that the performance improvements on the airfoil using injection techniques, the details of how the key variables such as air injection slot geometry and air injection angle etc impact the effectiveness of flow separation control via air injection has not been studied. A parametric study of both steady and unsteady air injection active flow control will be the main objective for this summer. For steady injection, the key variables include the slot geometry, orientation, spacing, air injection velocity as well as the injection angle. For unsteady injection, the injection frequency will also be investigated. Key metrics such as lift coefficient, drag coefficient, total pressure loss and total injection mass will be used to measure the effectiveness of the control technique. A design of experiments using the Box-Behnken Design is set up in order to determine how each of the variables affects each of the key metrics. Design of experiment is used so that the number of experimental runs will be at minimum and still be able to predict which variables are the key contributors to the responses. The experiments will then be conducted in the 1ft by 1ft wind tunnel according to the design of experiment settings. The data obtained from the experiments will be imported into JMP, statistical software, to generate sets of response surface equations which represent the statistical empirical model for each of the metrics as

  17. A Survey of Wireless Sensor Network Based Air Pollution Monitoring Systems.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wei Ying; Lo, Kin Ming; Mak, Terrence; Leung, Kwong Sak; Leung, Yee; Meng, Mei Ling

    2015-01-01

    The air quality in urban areas is a major concern in modern cities due to significant impacts of air pollution on public health, global environment, and worldwide economy. Recent studies reveal the importance of micro-level pollution information, including human personal exposure and acute exposure to air pollutants. A real-time system with high spatio-temporal resolution is essential because of the limited data availability and non-scalability of conventional air pollution monitoring systems. Currently, researchers focus on the concept of The Next Generation Air Pollution Monitoring System (TNGAPMS) and have achieved significant breakthroughs by utilizing the advance sensing technologies, MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). However, there exist potential problems of these newly proposed systems, namely the lack of 3D data acquisition ability and the flexibility of the sensor network. In this paper, we classify the existing works into three categories as Static Sensor Network (SSN), Community Sensor Network (CSN) and Vehicle Sensor Network (VSN) based on the carriers of the sensors. Comprehensive reviews and comparisons among these three types of sensor networks were also performed. Last but not least, we discuss the limitations of the existing works and conclude the objectives that we want to achieve in future systems. PMID:26703598

  18. A Survey of Wireless Sensor Network Based Air Pollution Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Wei Ying; Lo, Kin Ming; Mak, Terrence; Leung, Kwong Sak; Leung, Yee; Meng, Mei Ling

    2015-01-01

    The air quality in urban areas is a major concern in modern cities due to significant impacts of air pollution on public health, global environment, and worldwide economy. Recent studies reveal the importance of micro-level pollution information, including human personal exposure and acute exposure to air pollutants. A real-time system with high spatio-temporal resolution is essential because of the limited data availability and non-scalability of conventional air pollution monitoring systems. Currently, researchers focus on the concept of The Next Generation Air Pollution Monitoring System (TNGAPMS) and have achieved significant breakthroughs by utilizing the advance sensing technologies, MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). However, there exist potential problems of these newly proposed systems, namely the lack of 3D data acquisition ability and the flexibility of the sensor network. In this paper, we classify the existing works into three categories as Static Sensor Network (SSN), Community Sensor Network (CSN) and Vehicle Sensor Network (VSN) based on the carriers of the sensors. Comprehensive reviews and comparisons among these three types of sensor networks were also performed. Last but not least, we discuss the limitations of the existing works and conclude the objectives that we want to achieve in future systems. PMID:26703598

  19. A Survey of Wireless Sensor Network Based Air Pollution Monitoring Systems.

    PubMed

    Yi, Wei Ying; Lo, Kin Ming; Mak, Terrence; Leung, Kwong Sak; Leung, Yee; Meng, Mei Ling

    2015-12-12

    The air quality in urban areas is a major concern in modern cities due to significant impacts of air pollution on public health, global environment, and worldwide economy. Recent studies reveal the importance of micro-level pollution information, including human personal exposure and acute exposure to air pollutants. A real-time system with high spatio-temporal resolution is essential because of the limited data availability and non-scalability of conventional air pollution monitoring systems. Currently, researchers focus on the concept of The Next Generation Air Pollution Monitoring System (TNGAPMS) and have achieved significant breakthroughs by utilizing the advance sensing technologies, MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) and Wireless Sensor Network (WSN). However, there exist potential problems of these newly proposed systems, namely the lack of 3D data acquisition ability and the flexibility of the sensor network. In this paper, we classify the existing works into three categories as Static Sensor Network (SSN), Community Sensor Network (CSN) and Vehicle Sensor Network (VSN) based on the carriers of the sensors. Comprehensive reviews and comparisons among these three types of sensor networks were also performed. Last but not least, we discuss the limitations of the existing works and conclude the objectives that we want to achieve in future systems.

  20. Low cost sensors for PM and related air pollutants in the US and India

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emerging air quality sensors have a variety of possible applications. If accurate and reliable, they have a number of benefits over conventional monitors. They are low-cost, lightweight, and have low power consumption. Because of their low cost, a dense array of sensors instal...

  1. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  2. Flow over a Modern Ram-Air Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Johari, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    The flow field on the central section of a modern ram-air parachute canopy was examined numerically using a finite-volume flow solver coupled with the one equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Ram-air parachutes are used for guided airdrop applications, and the canopy resembles a wing with an open leading edge for inflation. The canopy surfaces were assumed to be impermeable and rigid. The flow field consisted of a vortex inside the leading edge opening which effectively closed off the canopy and diverted the flow around the leading edge. The flow experienced a rather bluff leading edge in contrast to the smooth leading of an airfoil, leading to a separation bubble on the lower lip of the canopy. The flow inside the canopy was stagnant beyond the halfway point. The section lift coefficient increased linearly with the angle of attack up to 8.5 and the lift curve slope was about 8% smaller than the baseline airfoil. The leading edge opening had a major effect on the drag prior to stall; the drag is at least twice the baseline airfoil drag. The minimum drag of the section occurs over the angle of attack range of 3 -- 7 .

  3. Properties of a constricted-tube air-flow levitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, J. E.; Stephens, W. K.; Ethridge, E. C.

    1982-01-01

    The properties of a constricted-tube gas flow levitator first developed by Berge et al. (1981) have been investigated experimentally in order to predict its behavior in a gravity-free environment and at elevated temperatures. The levitator consists of a constricted (quartz) tube fed at one end by a source of heated air or gas. A spherical sample is positioned by the air stream on the downstream side of the constriction, where it can be melted and resolidified without touching the tube. It is shown experimentally that the kinematic viscosity is the important fluid parameter for operation in thermal equilibrium at high temperatures. If air is heated from room temperature to 1200 C, the kinematic viscosity increases by a factor of 14. To maintain a given value of the Reynolds number, the flow rate would have to be increased by the same factor for a specific geometry of tube and sample. Thus, to maintain stable equilibrium, the flow rate should be increased as the air or other gas is heated. The other stability problem discussed is associated with changes in the shape of a cylindrical sample as it melts.

  4. Sensor for Direct Measurement of the Boundary Shear Stress in Fluid Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Badescu, Mircea; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Sherrit, Stewart; Chang, Zensheu; Chen, Beck; Widholm, Scott; Ostlund, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    The formation of scour patterns at bridge piers is driven by the forces at the boundary of the water flow. In most experimental scour studies, indirect processes have been applied to estimate the shear and normal stress using measured velocity profiles. The estimations are based on theoretical models and associated assumptions. However, the turbulence flow fields and boundary layer in the pier-scour region are very complex. In addition, available turbulence models cannot account accurately for the bed roughness effect. Direct measurement of the boundary shear and normal stress and their fluctuations are attractive alternatives. However, this approach is a challenging one especially for high spatial resolution and high fidelity measurements. The authors designed and fabricated a prototype miniature shear stress sensor including an EDM machined floating plate and a high-resolution laser optical encoder. Tests were performed both in air as well as operation in water with controlled flow. The sensor sensitivity, stability and signal-to-noise level were measured and evaluated. The detailed test results and a discussion of future work will be presented in this paper.

  5. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  6. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor. PMID:26343789

  7. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor.

  8. Mass flow rate measurements in gas-liquid flows by means of a venturi or orifice plate coupled to a void fraction sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Jorge Luiz Goes; Passos, Julio Cesar

    2009-01-15

    Two-phase flow measurements were carried out using a resistive void fraction meter coupled to a venturi or orifice plate. The measurement system used to estimate the liquid and gas mass flow rates was evaluated using an air-water experimental facility. Experiments included upward vertical and horizontal flow, annular, bubbly, churn and slug patterns, void fraction ranging from 2% to 85%, water flow rate up to 4000 kg/h, air flow rate up to 50 kg/h, and quality up to almost 10%. The fractional root mean square (RMS) deviation of the two-phase mass flow rate in upward vertical flow through a venturi plate is 6.8% using the correlation of Chisholm (D. Chisholm, Pressure gradients during the flow of incompressible two-phase mixtures through pipes, venturis and orifice plates, British Chemical Engineering 12 (9) (1967) 454-457). For the orifice plate, the RMS deviation of the vertical flow is 5.5% using the correlation of Zhang et al. (H.J. Zhang, W.T. Yue, Z.Y. Huang, Investigation of oil-air two-phase mass flow rate measurement using venturi and void fraction sensor, Journal of Zhejiang University Science 6A (6) (2005) 601-606). The results show that the flow direction has no significant influence on the meters in relation to the pressure drop in the experimental operation range. Quality and slip ratio analyses were also performed. The results show a mean slip ratio lower than 1.1, when bubbly and slug flow patterns are encountered for mean void fractions lower than 70%. (author)

  9. Evaluating the performance of low cost chemical sensors for air pollution research.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Alastair C; Lee, James D; Edwards, Peter M; Shaw, Marvin D; Evans, Mat J; Moller, Sarah J; Smith, Katie R; Buckley, Jack W; Ellis, Matthew; Gillot, Stefan R; White, Andrew

    2016-07-18

    Low cost pollution sensors have been widely publicized, in principle offering increased information on the distribution of air pollution and a democratization of air quality measurements to amateur users. We report a laboratory study of commonly-used electrochemical sensors and quantify a number of cross-interferences with other atmospheric chemicals, some of which become significant at typical suburban air pollution concentrations. We highlight that artefact signals from co-sampled pollutants such as CO2 can be greater than the electrochemical sensor signal generated by the measurand. We subsequently tested in ambient air, over a period of three weeks, twenty identical commercial sensor packages alongside standard measurements and report on the degree of agreement between references and sensors. We then explore potential experimental approaches to improve sensor performance, enhancing outputs from qualitative to quantitative, focusing on low cost VOC photoionization sensors. Careful signal handling, for example, was seen to improve limits of detection by one order of magnitude. The quantity, magnitude and complexity of analytical interferences that must be characterised to convert a signal into a quantitative observation, with known uncertainties, make standard individual parameter regression inappropriate. We show that one potential solution to this problem is the application of supervised machine learning approaches such as boosted regression trees and Gaussian processes emulation. PMID:27104223

  10. Interrelationships of petiole air canal architecture, water depth and convective air flow in Nymphaea odorata (Nymphaeaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study--Nymphaea odorata grows in water up to 2 m deep, producing fewer, larger leaves in deeper water. This species has a convective flow system that moves gases from younger leaves through submerged parts to older leaves, aerating submerged parts. Petiole air canals are in the conv...

  11. Character of energy flow in air shower core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, K.; Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Energy per charged particle near the core of air showers was measured by 9 energy flow detectors, which were the combination of Cerenkov counters and scintillators. Energy per particle of each detector was normalized to energy at 2m from the core. The following results were obtained as to the energy flow: (1) integral frequency distribution of mean energy per particle (averaged over 9 detectors) is composed of two groups separated distinctly; and (2) showers contained in one group show an anisotropy of arrival direction.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW PRESSURE, AIR ATOMIZED OIL BURNER WITH HIGH ATOMIZER AIR FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    BUTCHER,T.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5--8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or FAB has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a torroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the tiring rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% 0{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

  13. High-sensitivity strain sensor based on in-fiber rectangular air bubble.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shen; Yang, Kaiming; Wang, Yiping; Qu, Junle; Liao, Changrui; He, Jun; Li, Zhengyong; Yin, Guolu; Sun, Bing; Zhou, Jiangtao; Wang, Guanjun; Tang, Jian; Zhao, Jing

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a unique rectangular air bubble by means of splicing two sections of standard single mode fibers together and tapering the splicing joint. Such an air bubble can be used to develop a promising high-sensitivity strain sensor based on Fabry-Perot interference. The sensitivity of the strain sensor with a cavity length of about 61 μm and a wall thickness of about 1 μm was measured to be up to 43.0 pm/με and is the highest strain sensitivity among the in-fiber FPI-based strain sensors with air cavities reported so far. Moreover, our strain sensor has a very low temperature sensitivity of about 2.0 pm/°C. Thus, the temperature-induced strain measurement error is less than 0.046 με/°C. PMID:25557614

  14. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  15. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gavin J; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a 'streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality.

  16. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gavin J.; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a ‘streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality. PMID:24019053

  17. A practical fiber optic air-ratio sensor operating by flame color detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Uchiyama, H.; Yamada, T.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the development of a simple fiber-optic sensor used to detect the air-ratio in a premix type gas boiler, by monitoring and appraising the color of the flame emission, including the effect of radical emissions. Such boilers with a multi-port plate burner show an improved thermal efficiency, with the environmentally friendly effect of a reduction in both NOx and CO in the exhaust gas. The sensor is used to monitor and maintain the air-ratio in order to enable effective feedback control, and a low-cost, durable and small sensor solution is presented. Tests carried out show the potential of the sensor for use outside the laboratory and image processing techniques are used to analyze the spectral features of the emissions seen to confirm the spectral regions of use of the fiber-optic sensor.

  18. Methods of Visually Determining the Air Flow Around Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gough, Melvin N; Johnson, Ernest

    1932-01-01

    This report describes methods used by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to study visually the air flow around airplanes. The use of streamers, oil and exhaust gas streaks, lampblack and kerosene, powdered materials, and kerosene smoke is briefly described. The generation and distribution of smoke from candles and from titanium tetrachloride are described in greater detail because they appear most advantageous for general application. Examples are included showing results of the various methods.

  19. Electron concentration distribution in a glow discharge in air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedzianov, R. B.; Gaisin, F. M.; Sabitov, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    Electron concentration distributions in a glow discharge in longitudinal and vortex air flows are determined from the attenuation of the electromagnetic wave passing through the plasma using microwave probes. An analysis of the distribution curves obtained indicates that electron concentration decreases in the direction of the anode. This can be explained by charge diffusion toward the chamber walls and electron recombination and sticking within the discharge.

  20. Development of an air flow thermal balance calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An air flow calorimeter, based on the idea of balancing an unknown rate of heat evolution with a known rate of heat evolution, was developed. Under restricted conditions, the prototype system is capable of measuring thermal wattages from 10 milliwatts to 1 watt, with an error no greater than 1 percent. Data were obtained which reveal system weaknesses and point to modifications which would effect significant improvements.

  1. Numerical characterization of the hydrodynamics and thermal behavior of air flow in flexible air distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehdaghi, Samad; Moujaes, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Flexible duct air distribution systems are used in a large percentage of residential and small commercial buildings in the United States . Very few empirical or predictive data are available though to help provide the HVAC design engineer with reliable information . Moreover, because of the ducts flexibility, the shapes of these ducts offer a different set of operating fluid flow and thermal conditions from traditional smooth metal ducts. Hence, both the flow field and heat transfer through this kind of ducts are much more complex and merit to be analyzed from a numerical predictive approach. The aim of this research paper is to compute some of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the air flow inside these ducts over a range of Re numbers commonly used in the flow conditions of these air distribution systems. The information resulting from this CFD simulation, where a κ-ɛ turbulent model is used to predict the flow conditions, provide pressure drop and average convective heat transfer coefficients that exist in these ducts and was compared to previously found data. Circulation zones in the depressions of these ducts are found to exist which are suspected of influencing the pressured drop and heat transfer coefficients as compared to smooth ducts. The results show that fully developed conditions exist much earlier with regard to the inlet for both hydrodynamic and thermal entrance regions than what would be expected in smooth ducts under the same turbulent conditions.

  2. On the impact of entrapped air in infiltration under ponding conditions. Part a: Preferential air flow path effects on infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, Guy; Weisbrod, Noam; Furman, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Entrapped air effects on infiltration under ponding conditions could be important for massive infiltration of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) or soil aquifer treatment (SAT) of treated wastewater. Earlier studies found that under ponding conditions, air is being entrapped and compressed until it reaches a pressure which will enable the air to escape (unstable air flow). They also found that entrapped air could reduce infiltration by 70-90%. Most studies have dealt with entrapped air effects when soil surface topography is flat. The objective of this study is to investigate, under ponding conditions, the effects of: (1) irregular surface topography on preferential air flow path development (stable air flow); (2) preferential air flow path on infiltration; and (3) hydraulic head on infiltration when air is trapped. Column experiments were used to investigate these particular effects. A 140 cm deep and 30 cm wide column packed with silica sand was used under two boundary conditions: in the first, air can only escape vertically upward through the soil surface; in the second, air is free to escape through 20 ports installed along the column perimeter. The surface was flooded with 13 liters of water, with ponding depth decreasing with time. Two soil surface conditions were tested: flat surface and irregular surface (high and low surface zones). Additionally, Helle-show experiments were conducted in order to obtain a visual observation of preferential air flow path development. The measurements were carried out using a tension meter, air pressure transducers, TDR and video cameras. It was found that in irregular surfaces, stable air flow through preferential paths was developed in the high altitude zones. Flat surface topography caused unstable air flow through random paths. Comparison between irregular and flat surface topography showed that the entrapped air pressure was lower and the infiltration rate was about 40% higher in the irregular surface topography than in the

  3. Expiratory flow limitation in compressed air divers and oxygen divers.

    PubMed

    Tetzlaff, K; Friege, L; Reuter, M; Haber, J; Mutzbauer, T; Neubauer, B

    1998-10-01

    Divers are exposed to dense gases under hyperbaric and hyperoxic conditions and, therefore, may be at risk of developing respiratory disease. Long-term effects on respiratory function have been found in commercial divers who perform deep dives. This study was conducted to detect possible lung function changes in scuba divers who dive in shallow water using compressed air or oxygen as a breathing gas. A cross-sectional sample of 180 healthy male divers (152 air divers and 28 oxygen divers) and 34 healthy male controls underwent a diving medical examination including body plethysmography, diffusion capacity measurement and a cold-air isocapnic hyperventilation test (CAIH). Air divers and oxygen divers had a lower mid-expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity (MEF25) than controls (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). Oxygen divers also had a decreased mid-expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity (MEF50) (p<0.05). Divers' groups and controls did not differ with respect to age, smoking or medical history. The prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness to CAIH was 1.4% (n=3 divers). MEF25 and MEF50 were inversely related to years of diving (p<0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). The pattern of lung function changes obtained in scuba divers is consistent with small airways dysfunction and the association between diving exposure and lung function changes may indicate long-term effects on respiratory function.

  4. Micromachined lab-on-a-tube sensors for simultaneous brain temperature and cerebral blood flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Wu, Pei-Ming; Hartings, Jed A; Wu, Zhizhen; Cheyuo, Cletus; Wang, Ping; LeDoux, David; Shutter, Lori A; Ramaswamy, Bharat Ram; Ahn, Chong H; Narayan, Raj K

    2012-08-01

    This work describes the development of a micromachined lab-on-a-tube device for simultaneous measurement of brain temperature and regional cerebral blood flow. The device consists of two micromachined gold resistance temperature detectors with a 4-wire configuration. One is used as a temperature sensor and the other as a flow sensor. The temperature sensor operates with AC excitation current of 500 μA and updates its outputs at a rate of 5 Hz. The flow sensor employs a periodic heating and cooling technique under constant-temperature mode and updates its outputs at a rate of 0.1 Hz. The temperature sensor is also used to compensate for temperature changes during the heating period of the flow sensor to improve the accuracy of flow measurements. To prevent thermal and electronic crosstalk between the sensors, the temperature sensor is located outside the "thermal influence" region of the flow sensor and the sensors are separated into two different layers with a thin-film Copper shield. We evaluated the sensors for accuracy, crosstalk and long-term drift in human blood-stained cerebrospinal fluid. These in vitro experiments showed that simultaneous temperature and flow measurements with a single lab-on-a-tube device are accurate and reliable over the course of 5 days. It has a resolution of 0.013 °C and 0.18 ml/100 g/min; and achieves an accuracy of 0.1 °C and 5 ml/100 g/min for temperature and flow sensors respectively. The prototype device and techniques developed here establish a foundation for a multi-sensor lab-on-a-tube, enabling versatile multimodality monitoring applications.

  5. Integrated cantilever-based flow sensors with tunable sensitivity for in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations in microfluidic systems.

    PubMed

    Noeth, Nadine; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2013-12-23

    For devices such as bio-/chemical sensors in microfluidic systems, flow fluctuations result in noise in the sensor output. Here, we demonstrate in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations with a cantilever-like sensor integrated in a microfluidic channel. The cantilevers are fabricated in different materials (SU-8 and SiN) and with different thicknesses. The integration of arrays of holes with different hole size and number of holes allows the modification of device sensitivity, theoretical detection limit and measurement range. For an average flow in the microliter range, the cantilever deflection is directly proportional to the flow rate fluctuations in the microfluidic channel. The SiN cantilevers show a detection limit below 1 nL/min and the thinnest SU-8 cantilevers a detection limit below 5 nL/min. Finally, the sensor is applied for in-line monitoring of flow fluctuations generated by external pumps connected to the microfluidic system.

  6. Used to Calibrate Thermistors on In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors

    1996-12-01

    The software package is comprised of three programs which together are used to calibrate thermistors in an In Situ Permable Flow Sensor. TBATH controls a temperature controlled bath/circulator. The code monitors the temperature of a set of previously calibrated thermistors located in a tank through which the fluid from the bath is circulated. After the temperature has reached and maintained thermal equilibrium for a specified period of time, the bath/circulator is instructed by the programmore » to change the temperature set point to the next specified temperature. An arbitrary number of temperature calibration points can be specified allowing thermistors to be calibrated on a continuous basis without human intervention. CALIB is used to merge two data files that are collected during a temperature calibration run. During calibration of the thermistors on an In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor, the known temperatures in the temperaure controlled tank are recorded in one computer file in one format while the electrical resistance of the thermistors being calibrated is collected in a different file with a different format. This software reads in the two files and writes out a third file with all of the data in it that is required to calculate the calibration coefficients of the thermistors on the probe. POLYFIT is used to calculate the calibration coefficients which permit the temperature of a thermistor to ba calculated from its electrical resistance. During calibration of a thermistor, the electrical resistance of the thermistor is measured at four or more known temperatures and the data sent to this software. The program calculates the coefficients of a fourth order polynomial relating the inverse of the absolute temperature to the natural log of the electrical resistance. Once these coefficients are known, the polynomial can be evaluated with any measured electrical resistance to calculate the equivalent temperature.« less

  7. Flow over a Ram-Air Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslambolchi, Ali; Johari, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    The flow field over a full-scale, ram-air personnel parachute canopy was investigated numerically using a finite-volume flow solver coupled with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Ram-air parachute canopies resemble wings with arc-anhedral, surface protuberances, and an open leading edge for inflation. The rectangular planform canopy had an aspect ratio of 2.2 and was assumed to be rigid and impermeable. The chord-based Reynolds number was 3.2 million. Results indicate that the oncoming flow barely penetrates the canopy opening, and creates a large separation bubble below the lower lip of canopy. A thick boundary layer exists over the entire lower surface of the canopy. The flow over the upper surface of the canopy remains attached for an extended fraction of the chord. Lift increases linearly with angle of attack up to about 12 degrees. To assess the capability of lifting-line theory in predicting the forces on the canopy, the lift and drag data from a two-dimensional simulation of the canopy profile were extended using finite-wing expressions and compared with the forces from the present simulations. The finite-wing predicted lift and drag trends compare poorly against the full-span simulation, and the maximum lift-to-drag ratio is over-predicted by 36%. Sponsored by the US Army NRDEC.

  8. Redesigned Gas Mass Flow Sensors for Space Shuttle Pressure Control System and Fuel Cell System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A program was conducted to determine if a state of the art micro-machined silicon solid state flow sensor could be used to replace the existing space shuttle orbiter flow sensors. The rather aggressive goal was to obtain a new sensor which would also be a multi-gas sensor and operate over a much wider flow range and with a higher degree of accuracy than the existing sensors. Two types of sensors were tested. The first type was a venturi throat design and the second was a bypass design. The accuracy of venturi design was found to be marginally acceptable. The bypass sensor was much better although it still did not fully reach the accuracy goal. Two main problems were identified which would require further work.

  9. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  10. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  11. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  12. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  13. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  14. Dynamics of compressible air flow in ducts with heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulhadi, M.

    1986-12-01

    An investigation into the effect of heat addition on subsonic flow of an air stream in a constant-area duct preceded by a convergent nozzle is carried out. A nozzle flow apparatus with a heat exchanger encasing the constant-area duct has been built for this purpose. Hot water is provided from an electric boiler where the flow rate and the in-flow hot water temperature could be controlled. It is confirmed experimentally, as predicted analytically, that heat transfer to the gas decreases its local static pressure along the duct axis, and that this decrease is associated with an increase in Mach number toward M = 1 at the exit (thermal choking). In the case of subsonic flow, the additional entropy generated by the heat interaction exceeding the amount that produces thermal choking can only be accommodated by moving to a new Rayleigh line, at a decreased flow rate which lowers the inlet Mach number. The good correlation between the experimental results and the analytical derivations illustrates that the experimental arrangement has potential for further experiments and investigations.

  15. Measuring air gap width of permanent magnet linear generators using search coil sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.; Danielsson, O.; Leijon, M.

    2007-01-15

    A concept for a wave power plant is being developed at the Centre for Renewable Electric Energy Conversion at the Angstroem Laboratory at Uppsala University. The concept is based on a permanent magnet linear generator placed on the seabed, directly driven by a surface following buoy. Critical for the survival of the generator is that the air gap between the moving and static parts of the generator is constantly fixed at the designed width to prevent the moving and static parts from connecting during operation. This paper shows the design and evaluation of an inductive sensor for measuring the air gap width during generator operation. In order to survive during years on the seafloor inside the wave power plants, the sensor has deliberately been chosen to be a passive component, as well as robust and compact. A coil etched on a printed circuit board, i.e., a search coil, was the chosen basis for the sensor. The sensor has been tested on an existing test rig of a wave power plant and the results have been compared with finite element simulations.The results show that a search coil magnetic sensor etched on a printed circuit board is a suitable concept for measuring the air gap width. Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated sensor signals show very good agreement. The setup has a sensitivity of {+-}0.4 mm in the range of 4-9.5 mm air gap. The potential for future improvements of the sensitivity is considerable.

  16. Evaluation of an experimental mass-flow sensor of cotton-lint at the gin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As part of a system to optimize the cotton ginning process, a custom built mass-flow sensor was evaluated at USDA-ARS Cotton Ginning Research Unit at Stoneville, Mississippi. The mass-flow sensor was fabricated based on the principle of the senor patented by Thomasson and Sui (2004). The optical a...

  17. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.603 Procedures for air flow tests of...) Air flow instrument complete with accessories to measure the fineness and maturity, in combination,...

  18. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  19. SIMPLIFIED MODELING OF AIR FLOW DYNAMICS IN SSD RADON MITIGATION SYSTEMS FOR RESIDENCES WITH GRAVEL BEDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In an attempt to better understand the dynamics of subslab air flow, the report suggests that subslab air flow induced by a central suction point be treated as radial air flow through a porous bed contained between two impermeable disks. (NOTE: Many subslab depressurization syste...

  20. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  1. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  2. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  3. The Sensing Technology for Air-Conditioning Equipments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaka, Takashi

    Various kinds of sensor are used for control of air-conditioning equipments. In this paper, examples of control system using some kinks of sensor about improvement of amenity are introduced. Humidity control methods using ceramic humidity sonsor, temperature-radiation-air flow control methods using amenity sensor, zone control methods using human detecting sensor and IAQ control methods using gas sensor, are discussed.

  4. Development of a wireless sensor for the measurement of chicken blood flow using the laser Doppler blood flow meter technique.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Kei; Iwasaki, Wataru; Nakamura, Masaki; Higurashi, Eiji; Soh, Tomoki; Itoh, Toshihiro; Okada, Hironao; Maeda, Ryutaro; Sawada, Renshi

    2013-06-01

    Here, we report the development of an integrated laser Doppler blood flow micrometer for chickens. This sensor weighs only 18 g and is one of the smallest-sized blood flow meters, with no wired line, these are features necessary for attaching the sensor to the chicken. The structure of the sensor chip consists of two silicon cavities with a photo diode and a laser diode, which was achieved using the microelectromechanical systems technique, resulting in its small size and significantly low power consumption. In addition, we introduced an intermittent measuring arrangement in the measuring system to reduce power consumption and to enable the sensor to work longer. We were successfully able to measure chicken blood flow for five consecutive days, and discovered that chicken blood flow shows daily fluctuations.

  5. Monitoring Volcanoes by Use of Air-Dropped Sensor Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kedar, Sharon; Rivellini, Tommaso; Webb, Frank; Blaes, Brent; Bracho, Caroline; Lockhart, Andrew; McGee, Ken

    2003-01-01

    Sensor packages that would be dropped from airplanes have been proposed for pre-eruption monitoring of physical conditions on the flanks of awakening volcanoes. The purpose of such monitoring is to gather data that could contribute to understanding and prediction of the evolution of volcanic systems. Each sensor package, denoted a volcano monitoring system (VMS), would include a housing with a parachute attached at its upper end and a crushable foam impact absorber at its lower end (see figure). The housing would contain survivable low-power instrumentation that would include a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, an inclinometer, a seismometer, a barometer, a thermometer, and CO2 and SO2 analyzers. The housing would also contain battery power, control, data-logging, and telecommunication subsystems. The proposal for the development of the VMS calls for the use of commercially available sensor, power, and telecommunication equipment, so that efforts could be focused on integrating all of the equipment into a system that could survive impact and operate thereafter for 30 days, transmitting data on the pre-eruptive state of a target volcano to a monitoring center. In a typical scenario, VMSs would be dropped at strategically chosen locations on the flanks of a volcano once the volcano had been identified as posing a hazard from any of a variety of observations that could include eyewitness reports, scientific observations from positions on the ground, synthetic-aperture-radar scans from aircraft, and/or remote sensing from aboard spacecraft. Once dropped, the VMSs would be operated as a network of in situ sensors that would transmit data to a local monitoring center. This network would provide observations as part of an integrated volcano-hazard assessment strategy that would involve both remote sensing and timely observations from the in situ sensors. A similar strategy that involves the use of portable sensors (but not dropping of sensors from aircraft) is

  6. Respirable particulate monitoring with remote sensors. (Public health ecology: Air pollution)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Severs, R. K.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of monitoring atmospheric aerosols in the respirable range from air or space platforms was studied. Secondary reflectance targets were located in the industrial area and near Galveston Bay. Multichannel remote sensor data were utilized to calculate the aerosol extinction coefficient and thus determine the aerosol size distribution. Houston Texas air sampling network high volume data were utilized to generate computer isopleth maps of suspended particulates and to establish the mass loading of the atmosphere. In addition, a five channel nephelometer and a multistage particulate air sampler were used to collect data. The extinction coefficient determined from remote sensor data proved more representative of wide areal phenomena than that calculated from on site measurements. It was also demonstrated that a significant reduction in the standard deviation of the extinction coefficient could be achieved by reducing the bandwidths used in remote sensor.

  7. Next Generation Air Monitoring (NGAM) VOC Sensor Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of next generation air monitor (NGAM) volatile organic compound (VOC) evaluations performed using both laboratory as well as field scale settings. These evaluations focused on challenging lower cost (<$2500) NGAM technologies to either controlle...

  8. Non-equilibrium Flows of Reacting Air Components in Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazilevich, S. S.; Sinitsyn, K. A.; Nagnibeda, E. A.

    2008-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the investigation of non-equilibrium flows of reacting air mixtures in nozzles. State-to-state approach based on the solution of the equations for vibrational level populations of molecules and atomic concentrations coupled to the gas dynamics equations is used. For the 5-component air mixture (N2, O2, NO, N, O) non-equilibrium distributions and gasdynamical parameters are calculated for different conditions in a nozzle throat. The influence of various kinetic processes on distributions and gas dynamics parameters is studied. The paper presents the comparison of the results with ones obtained for binary mixtures of molecules and atoms and various models of elementary processes.

  9. Fiber optic sensors for measuring angular position and rotational speed. [air breathing engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two optical sensors, a 360 deg rotary encoder and a tachometer, were built for operation with the light source and detectors located remotely from the sensors. The source and detectors were coupled to the passive sensing heads through 3.65 meter fiber optic cables. The rotary encoder and tachometer were subjected to limited environmental testing. They were installed on an air breathing engine during recent altitude tests. Over 100 hours of engine operation were accumulated without any failure of either device.

  10. A μ-biomimetic flow sensor for medical and pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Stepniak, Simon; Bleckmann, Horst; Herzog, Hendrik; Klein, Adrian; Schulze, Elisabeth; Taetzner, Simon; Steltenkamp, Siegfried

    2015-08-01

    Flow sensing is pivotal in many medical and pharmaceutical applications. Most commercial flow sensors are either expensive, complex, or consume a lot of energy, while low cost sensors usually lack sensitivity, robustness, or long-term stability. In addition, the maintenance and sterilization of most commercial flow sensors is difficult to perform. Here, we present a new μ-biomimetic flow sensor based on the fish lateral line. It measures flow velocity and detects the transition between laminar and turbulent flow, thereby fulfilling most requirements for medical and pharmaceutical applications. Additionally, it has a modular setup featuring a screened or passive bypass configuration, enabling it not only to meter flow in medical applications but also under harsh or well-defined environmental conditions, such as found in pharmaceutical applications. The sensor is robust and can be easily cleaned. Individual parts of the sensor can even be replaced or sterilized. In sum, this sensor opens up a whole new field of applications in the area of medical and pharmaceutical related flow monitoring.

  11. A μ-biomimetic flow sensor for medical and pharmaceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Stepniak, Simon; Bleckmann, Horst; Herzog, Hendrik; Klein, Adrian; Schulze, Elisabeth; Taetzner, Simon; Steltenkamp, Siegfried

    2015-08-01

    Flow sensing is pivotal in many medical and pharmaceutical applications. Most commercial flow sensors are either expensive, complex, or consume a lot of energy, while low cost sensors usually lack sensitivity, robustness, or long-term stability. In addition, the maintenance and sterilization of most commercial flow sensors is difficult to perform. Here, we present a new μ-biomimetic flow sensor based on the fish lateral line. It measures flow velocity and detects the transition between laminar and turbulent flow, thereby fulfilling most requirements for medical and pharmaceutical applications. Additionally, it has a modular setup featuring a screened or passive bypass configuration, enabling it not only to meter flow in medical applications but also under harsh or well-defined environmental conditions, such as found in pharmaceutical applications. The sensor is robust and can be easily cleaned. Individual parts of the sensor can even be replaced or sterilized. In sum, this sensor opens up a whole new field of applications in the area of medical and pharmaceutical related flow monitoring. PMID:26737265

  12. Development of Micro Air Reconnaissance Vehicle as a Test Bed for Advanced Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Vranas, Thomas L.; Fox, Robert L.; Kuhn, Theodore R.; Ingham, John; Logan, Michael J.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Guenther, Benjamin F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Micro/Mini Air Reconnaissance Vehicle for advanced sensors and electronics at NASA Langley Research Center over the last year. This vehicle is expected to have a total weight of less than four pounds, a design velocity of 40 mph, an endurance of 15-20 minutes, and a maximum range of 5km. The vehicle has wings that are simple to detach yet retain the correct alignment. The upper fuselage surface has a quick release hatch used to access the interior and also to mount the varying propulsion systems. The sensor suite developed for this vehicle consists of a Pitot-static measurement system for determining air speed, an absolute pressure measurement for determining altitude, magnetic direction measurement, and three orthogonal gyros to determine body angular rates. Swarming GPS-guidance and in-flight maneuvering is discussed, as well as design and installation of some other advance sensors like MEMS microphones, infrared cameras, GPS, humidity sensors, and an ultrasonic sonar sensor. Also low cost, small size, high performance control and navigation system for the Micro Air Vehicle is discussed. At the end, laboratory characterization of different sensors, motors, propellers, and batteries will be discussed.

  13. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... dilution system, you may use a laminar flow element, an ultrasonic flow meter, a subsonic venturi, a... § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow meter to determine instantaneous diluted exhaust flow rates or total diluted exhaust flow over a...

  14. Air flow paths and porosity/permeability change in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin

    2007-04-01

    This study develops methods to estimate the change in soil characteristics and associated air flow paths in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging. These objectives were achieved by performing combined in situ air sparging and tracer testing, and comparing the breakthrough curves obtained from the tracer gas with those obtained by a numerical simulation model that incorporates a predicted change in porosity that is proportional to the air saturation. The results reveal that revising the porosity and permeability according to the distribution of gas saturation is helpful in breakthrough curve fitting, however, these changes are unable to account for the effects of preferential air flow paths, especially in the zone closest to the points of air injection. It is not known the extent to which these preferential air flow paths were already present versus created, increased, or reduced as a result of the air sparging experiment. The transport of particles from around the sparging well could account for the overall increase in porosity and permeability observed in the study. Collection of soil particles in a monitoring well within 2m of the sparging well provided further evidence of the transport of particles. Transport of particles from near the sparging well also appeared to decrease the radius of influence (ROI). Methods for predicting the effects of pressurized air injection and water flow on the creation or modification of preferential air flow paths are still needed to provide a full description of the change in soil conditions that accompany air sparging.

  15. Air-brush multi-walled carbon nanotube capacitive sensor for dimethyl methylphosphonate detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Hongjun; Jiang, Yadong; Du, Xiaosong

    2012-10-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) films were prepared on interdigital electrodes by air-brush technique, and their sensing properties to dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) were studied. The MWNT films were observed by scanning electron microscope. The capacitive response to different concentrations of DMMP vapor was investigated at room temperature. The results showed that the capacitance and loss tangent of the air-brush MWNT sensor both decreased rapidly in varying concentrations ranging from 2.4 to 12 ppm. The sensitivity of capacitance was higher than that of the loss tangent at all the concentrations of DMMP vapors. The sensor exhibited high sensitivity and fast response for DMMP vapor detection.

  16. Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2009-12-31

    This report documents the self-correction algorithms developed in the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls project funded jointly by the Bonneville Power Administration and the Building Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The algorithms address faults for temperature sensors, humidity sensors, and dampers in air-handling units and correction of persistent manual overrides of automated control systems. All faults considered create energy waste when left uncorrected as is frequently the case in actual systems.

  17. Surface-slip equations for multicomponent, nonequilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Scott, Carl D.; Moss, James N.; Goglia, Gene

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low-Reynolds-number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. These are obtained from closed-form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent air flow, includes the finite-rate surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities have been obtained in a form which can readily be employed in flow-field computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures. Expression is also provided for the finite-rate species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in absence of slip.

  18. Air-Flow Simulation in Realistic Models of the Trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Deschamps, T; Schwartz, P; Trebotich, D

    2004-12-09

    In this article we present preliminary results from a new technique for flow simulation in realistic anatomical airways. The airways are extracted by means of Level-Sets methods that accurately model the complex and varying surfaces of anatomical objects. The surfaces obtained are defined at the sub-pixel level where they intersect the Cartesian grid of the image domain. It is therefore straightforward to construct embedded boundary representations of these objects on the same grid, for which recent work has enabled discretization of the Navier- Stokes equations for incompressible fluids. While most classical techniques require construction of a structured mesh that approximates the surface in order to extrapolate a 3D finite-element gridding of the whole volume, our method directly simulates the air-flow inside the extracted surface without losing any complicated details and without building additional grids.

  19. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  20. Flexible Wing Base Micro Aerial Vehicles: Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) for Surveillance and Remote Sensor Delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ifju, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) will be developed for tracking individuals, locating terrorist threats, and delivering remote sensors, for surveillance and chemical/biological agent detection. The tasks are: (1) Develop robust MAV platform capable of carrying sensor payload. (2) Develop fully autonomous capabilities for delivery of sensors to remote and distant locations. The current capabilities and accomplishments are: (1) Operational electric (inaudible) 6-inch MAVs with novel flexible wing, providing superior aerodynamic efficiency and control. (2) Vision-based flight stability and control (from on-board cameras).

  1. Multi radar tracking and multi sensor tracking in air defence systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berle, F. J.

    1983-10-01

    The netting of radars and the integration of other complementary sensors provide advantages with respect to system survivability and achieve a better quality air picture because of the resulting higher data rate. The paper describes an MST concept resulting from an extension of an operational MRT system and presents the results of a computer evaluation of the concept, emphasizing the processing of data from passive sensors and radars operating in passive mode. Three examples of different target density and number indicate the difficulties of processing sensor data in a jamming situation. Several possibilities of improvements are indicated.

  2. Implantable sensor for intraoperative and postoperative monitoring of blood flow: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Rabinovitz, R S; Hartley, C J; Michael, L H; Entman, M L; Hawkins, H K; Sekela, M E; Noon, G P

    1990-08-01

    We have developed an implantable 20 MHz Doppler flow sensor, to monitor blood flow in patients after operation. During surgery the sensor is wrapped around a blood vessel and secured in place with a releasable tie. No tissue puncturing techniques are required. The lead wires, together with a release cable, are exteriorized through the chest wall. Several days after operation, the tie is externally released, and the sensor is pulled out. Twenty-seven sensors were implanted in 24 dogs for up to 16 days. All were extracted successfully with minimal visible behavioral reaction in the awake dogs and caused no thrombosis or vascular damage. The Doppler velocity signals had excellent linear correlations (r = 0.99) with data from electromagnetic flow sensors and timed blood collections. In addition, the sensors were applied to coronary artery bypass grafts in 31 patients for up to 2 days after operation. High-quality signals were obtained, and intraoperatively recorded signals agreed well with simultaneous electromagnetic flow tracings. All sensors were extracted with minimal discomfort to the awake patients and with no complications. Thus, the implantable flow sensor is a safe, reliable, accurate, and simple method for intraoperative and postoperative monitoring of blood flow in vessels 2.5 to 5 mm in diameter. PMID:2199684

  3. Ozone concentrations in air flowing into New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksic, Nenad; Kent, John; Walcek, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Ozone (O3) concentrations measured at Pinnacle State Park (PSPNY), very close to the southern border of New York State, are used to estimate concentrations in air flowing into New York. On 20% of the ozone season (April-September) afternoons from 2004 to 2015, mid-afternoon 500-m back trajectories calculated from PSPNY cross New York border from the south and spend less than three hours in New York State, in this area of negligible local pollution emissions. One-hour (2p.m.-3p.m.) O3 concentrations during these inflowing conditions were 46 ± 13 ppb, and ranged from a minimum of 15 ppb to a maximum of 84 ppb. On average during 2004-2015, each year experienced 11.8 days with inflowing 1-hr O3 concentrations exceeding 50 ppb, 4.3 days with O3 > 60 ppb, and 1.5 days had O3 > 70 ppb. During the same period, 8-hr average concentrations (10a.m. to 6p.m.) exceeded 50 ppb on 10.0 days per season, while 3.9 days exceeded 60 ppb, and 70 ppb was exceeded 1.2 days per season. Two afternoons of minimal in-state emission influences with high ozone concentrations were analyzed in more detail. Synoptic and back trajectory analysis, including comparison with upwind ozone concentrations, indicated that the two periods were characterized as photo-chemically aged air containing high inflowing O3 concentrations most likely heavily influenced by pollution emissions from states upwind of New York including Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Ohio. These results suggest that New York state-level attempts to comply with National Ambient Air Quality Standards by regulating in-state O3 precursor NOx and organic emissions would be very difficult, since air frequently enters New York State very close to or in excess of Federal Air Quality Standards.

  4. Intraoral air pressure and oral air flow under different bleed and bite-block conditions.

    PubMed

    Putnam, A H; Shelton, R L; Kastner, C U

    1986-03-01

    Intraoral pressures and oral flows were measured as normal talkers produced /p lambda/ and /si/ under experimental conditions that perturbed the usual aeromechanical production characteristics of the consonants. A translabial pressure-release device was used to bleed off intraoral pressure during /p/. Bite-blocks were used to open the anterior bite artificially during /s/. For /p/, intraoral pressure decreased and translabial air leakage increased as bleed orifice area increased. For /s/, flow increased as the area of sibilant constriction increased, but differential pressure across the /s/ oral constriction did not vary systematically with changes in its area. Flow on postconsonantal vowels /lambda/ and /i/ did not vary systematically across experimental conditions. The data imply that maintenance of perturbed intraoral pressure was more effective when compensatory options included opportunity for increased respiratory drive and structural adjustments at the place of consonant articulation rather than increased respiratory drive alone.

  5. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, William D.; Naughton, Jonathan; Lindberg, William R.

    2008-09-02

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  6. Development of a Flexible Implantable Sensor for Postoperative Monitoring of Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Cannata, Jonathan M.; Chilipka, Thomas; Yang, Hao-Chung; Han, Sukgu; Ham, Sung W.; Rowe, Vincent L.; Weaver, Fred A.; Shung, K. Kirk; Vilkomerson, David

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a blood flow measurement system using Doppler ultrasound flow sensors fabricated of thin and flexible piezoelectric-polymer films. These flow sensors can be wrapped around a blood vessel and accurately measure flow. The innovation that makes this flow sensor possible is the diffraction-grating transducer. A conventional transducer produces a sound beam perpendicular to its face; therefore, when placed on the wall of a blood vessel, the Doppler shift in the backscattered ultrasound from blood theoretically would be 0. The diffraction-grating transducer produces a beam at a known angle to its face; therefore, backscattered ultrasound from the vessel will contain a Doppler signal. Flow sensors were fabricated by spin coating a poly(vinylidene fluoride–trifluoroethylene) copolymer film onto a flexible substrate with patterned gold electrodes. Custom-designed battery-operated continuous wave Doppler electronics along with a laptop computer completed the system. A prototype flow sensor was evaluated experimentally by measuring blood flow in a flow phantom and the infrarenal aorta of an adult New Zealand White rabbit. The flow phantom experiment demonstrated that the error in average velocity and volume blood flow was less than 6% for 30 measurements taken over a 2.5-hour period. The peak blood velocity through the rabbit infrarenal aorta measured by the flow sensor was 118 cm/s, within 1.7% of the measurement obtained using a duplex ultrasound system. The flow sensor and electronics operated continuously during the course of the 5-hour experiment after the incision on the animal was closed. PMID:23091251

  7. High-Density, High-Resolution, Low-Cost Air Quality Sensor Networks for Urban Air Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A.; Stewart, G.; Bright, V.; Kaye, P.; Saffell, J.

    2012-12-01

    Monitoring air quality in highly granular environments such as urban areas which are spatially heterogeneous with variable emission sources, measurements need to be made at appropriate spatial and temporal scales. Current routine air quality monitoring networks generally are either composed of sparse expensive installations (incorporating e.g. chemiluminescence instruments) or higher density low time resolution systems (e.g. NO2 diffusion tubes). Either approach may not accurately capture important effects such as pollutant "hot spots" or adequately capture spatial (or temporal) variability. As a result, analysis based on data from traditional low spatial resolution networks, such as personal exposure, may be inaccurate. In this paper we present details of a sophisticated, low-cost, multi species (gas phase, speciated PM, meteorology) air quality measurement network methodology incorporating GPS and GPRS which has been developed for high resolution air quality measurements in urban areas. Sensor networks developed in the Centre for Atmospheric Science (University of Cambridge) incorporated electrochemical gas sensors configured for use in urban air quality studies operating at parts-per-billion (ppb) levels. It has been demonstrated that these sensors can be used to measure key air quality gases such as CO, NO and NO2 at the low ppb mixing ratios present in the urban environment (estimated detection limits <4ppb for CO and NO and <1ppb for NO2. Mead et al (submitted Aug., 2012)). Based on this work, a state of the art multi species instrument package for deployment in scalable sensor networks has been developed which has general applicability. This is currently being employed as part of a major 3 year UK program at London Heathrow airport (the Sensor Networks for Air Quality (SNAQ) Heathrow project). The main project outcome is the creation of a calibrated, high spatial and temporal resolution data set for O3, NO, NO2, SO2, CO, CO2, VOCstotal, size-speciated PM

  8. Influence of Visitors' Flows on Indoor Air Quality of Museum Premises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovgaliuk, Volodymyr; Lysak, Pavlo

    2012-06-01

    The article considers the influence of visitors' flows on indoor air quality of museum premises and work of ventilation and air conditioning systems. The article provides the analysis of the heat input from visitors, the results of mathematical simulation of visitors flow influence on indoor air quality. Several advice options are provided on application of variable air volume systems for provision of constant indoor air quality.

  9. Flow Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors. 2; Sub-Scale Air Flow Simulation of Port Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y. P.; Ramandran, N.; Smith, A. W.; Heaman, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    The injection-flow issuing from a porous medium in the cold-flow simulation of internal port flows in solid rocket motors is characterized by a spatial instability termed pseudoturbulence that produces a rather non-uniform (lumpy) injection-velocity profile. The objective of this study is to investigate the interaction between the injection- and the developing axial-flows. The findings show that this interaction generally weakens the lumpy injection profile and affects the subsequent development of the axial flow. The injection profile is found to depend on the material characteristics, and the ensuing pseudoturbulence is a function of the injection velocity, the axial position and the distance from the porous wall. The flow transition (from laminar to turbulent) of the axial-flow is accelerated in flows emerging from smaller pores primarily due to the higher pseudoturbulence produced by the smaller pores in comparison to that associated with larger pores. In flows with rather uniform injection-flow profiles (weak or no pseudoturbulence), the axial and transverse velocity components in the porous duct are found to satisfy the sine/cosine analytical solutions derived from inviscid assumptions. The transition results from the present study are compared with previous results from surveyed literature, and detailed flow development measurements are presented in terms of the blowing fraction, and characterizing Reynolds numbers.

  10. Self-mixing laser Doppler flow sensor: an optofluidic implementation.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Milan; Hicks, Elaine; Lim, Yah Leng; Bertling, Karl; Rakić, Aleksandar D

    2013-11-20

    We present the miniaturization of self-mixing interferometry (SMI) into a microfluidic circuit using an optical fiber, forming an optofluidic device that can be used as a component in lab on a chip systems. We characterize the performance of the device as a fluid velocity (and hence flow) sensor, showing it to produce good accuracy and correlation with theory over a range of velocities from 0.5 to 60  mm/s and almost four decades of scatterer concentration. SMI in an optofluidic system has the advantage that only a single path to the optical inspection point is needed, as the laser source is also the receiver of light. In addition, the same system that is used for measuring fluid velocity can be used to measure other quantities such as particle size. The configuration presented is inherently easy to optically align due to the self-aligned property of SMI and divergent nature of light exiting the embedded optical fiber, providing for low-cost manufacturing. PMID:24513768

  11. Comparison of deliverable and exhaustible pressurized air flow rates in laboratory gloveboxes

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J.A.

    1994-10-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate the maximum credible flow rates of pressurized air into Plutonium Process Support Laboratories gloveboxes. Classical equations for compressible fluids were used to estimate the flow rates. The calculated maxima were compared to another`s estimates of glovebox exhaust flow rates and corresponding glovebox internal pressures. No credible pressurized air flow rate will pressurize a glovebox beyond normal operating limits. Unrestricted use of the pressurized air supply is recommended.

  12. Sensor gas analyzer for acetone determination in expired air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Vitaly V.

    2001-05-01

    Diseases and changes in the way of life change the concentration and composition of the expired air. Our adaptable gas analyzer is intended for the selective analysis of expired air and can be adapted for the solution of current diagnostic and analytical tasks by the user (a physician or a patient). Having analyzed the existing trends in the development of noninvasive diagnostics we have chosen the method of noninvasive acetone detection in expired air, where the acetone concentration correlates with blood and urine glucose concentrations. The appearance of acetone in expired air is indicative of disorders that may be caused not only by diabetes but also be wrong diet, incorrect sportsmen training etc. To control the disorders one should know the acetone concentration in the human body. This knowledge allows one to judge upon the state of the patient, choose a correct diet that will not cause damage to the patient's health, determine sportsmen training efficiency and results and solve the artificial pancreas problem. Our device provide highly accurate analysis, rapid diagnostics and authentic acetone quantification in the patient's body at any time aimed at prediction of the patient's state and assessing the efficiency of the therapy used. Clinical implementation of the device will improve the health and save lives of many thousands of diabetes sufferers.

  13. Numerical simulation of air flow in a model of lungs with mouth cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcner, Jakub; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The air flow in a realistic geometry of human lung is simulated with computational flow dynamics approach as stationary inspiration. Geometry used for the simulation includes oral cavity, larynx, trachea and bronchial tree up to the seventh generation of branching. Unsteady RANS approach was used for the air flow simulation. Velocities corresponding to 15, 30 and 60 litres/min of flow rate were set as boundary conditions at the inlet to the model. These flow rates are frequently used as a representation of typical human activities. Character of air flow in the model for these different flow rates is discussed with respect to future investigation of particle deposition.

  14. Thermal effects on bacterial bioaerosols in continuous air flow.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Hee; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-08-01

    Exposure to bacterial bioaerosols can have adverse effects on health, such as infectious diseases, acute toxic effects, and allergies. The search for ways of preventing and curing the harmful effects of bacterial bioaerosols has created a strong demand for the study and development of an efficient method of controlling bioaerosols. We investigated the thermal effects on bacterial bioaerosols of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis by using a thermal electric heating system in continuous air flow. The bacterial bioaerosols were exposed to a surrounding temperature that ranged from 20 degrees C to 700 degrees C for about 0.3 s. Both E. coli and B. subtilis vegetative cells were rendered more than 99.9% inactive at 160 degrees C and 350 degrees C of wall temperature of the quartz tube, respectively. Although the data on bacterial injury showed that the bacteria tended to sustain greater damage as the surrounding temperature increased, Gram-negative E. coli was highly sensitive to structural injury but Gram-positive B. subtilis was slightly more sensitive to metabolic injury. In addition, the inactivation of E. coli endotoxins was found to range from 9.2% (at 200 degrees C) to 82.0% (at 700 degrees C). However, the particle size distribution and morphology of both bacterial bioaerosols were maintained, despite exposure to a surrounding temperature of 700 degrees C. Our results show that thermal heating in a continuous air flow can be used with short exposure time to control bacterial bioaerosols by rendering the bacteria and endotoxins to a large extent inactive. This result could also be useful for developing more effective thermal treatment strategies for use in air purification or sterilization systems to control bioaerosols.

  15. An Autonomous Sensor System Architecture for Active Flow and Noise Control Feedback

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphreys, William M, Jr.; Culliton, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-channel sensor fusion represents a powerful technique to simply and efficiently extract information from complex phenomena. While the technique has traditionally been used for military target tracking and situational awareness, a study has been successfully completed that demonstrates that sensor fusion can be applied equally well to aerodynamic applications. A prototype autonomous hardware processor was successfully designed and used to detect in real-time the two-dimensional flow reattachment location generated by a simple separated-flow wind tunnel model. The success of this demonstration illustrates the feasibility of using autonomous sensor processing architectures to enhance flow control feedback signal generation.

  16. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  17. Development of a multi-analyte integrated optical sensor platform for indoor air-quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaughey, Orla; Nooney, Robert; McEvoy, Aisling K.; McDonagh, Colette; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2005-11-01

    The major trends driving optical chemical sensor technology are miniaturisation and multi-parameter functionality on a single platform (so-called multi-analyte sensing). A multi-analyte sensor chip device based on miniature waveguide structures, porous sensor materials and compact optoelectronic components has been developed. One of the major challenges in fluorescence-based optical sensor design is the efficient capture of emitted fluorescence from a fluorophore and the effective detection of the signal. In this work, the sensor platform has been fabricated using poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, as the waveguide material. These platforms employ a novel optical configuration along with rapid prototyping technology, which facilitates the production of an effective sensor platform. Sensing films for oxygen, carbon dioxide and humidity have been developed. These films consist of a fluorescent indicator dye entrapped in a porous immobilisation matrix. The analyte diffuses through the porous matrix and reacts with the indicator dye, causing changes in the detected fluorescence. The reaction between the dye and the analyte is completely reversible with no degradation of the signal after detection of different concentrations of the analyte. A single LED excitation source is used for all three analytes, and the sensor platform is housed in a compact unit containing the excitation source, filters and detector. The simultaneous detection of several analytes is a major requirement for fields such as food packaging, environmental quality control and biomedical diagnostics. The current sensor chip is designed for use in indoor air-quality monitoring.

  18. 42 CFR 84.148 - Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.148 Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements. (a) Respirators tested under this section shall be approved only...

  19. An experimental and theoretical study of the flow phenomena within a vortex sink rate sensor. Ph.D. Thesis - Old Dominion Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, D. K.

    1974-01-01

    A description of the flow field within a vortex sink rate sensor was obtained, and the influence of viscous effects on its performance was observed. The sensor basically consisted of a vortex chamber and a sink tube. The vortex chamber consisted of two circular coaxial disks held apart, at their periphery, by a porous coupling. One circular disk had an opening to permit the mounting of the sink tube, in such a manner that the vortex chamber as well as the sink tube had a common axis of rotation. Air was supplied radially to the sensor through its porous coupling as the sensor was rotated at various speeds. Particular emphasis was directed toward an understanding of the flow field in the sink tube region. Thus velocity measurements at various stations along the length of the sink tube as well as along a given radius at any designated station were taken.

  20. Performance of WPA Conductivity Sensor during Two-Phase Fluid Flow in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Layne; O'Connor, Edward W.; Snowdon, Doug

    2003-01-01

    The Conductivity Sensor designed for use in the Node 3 Water Processor Assembly (WPA) was based on the existing Space Shuttle application for the fuel cell water system. However, engineering analysis has determined that this sensor design is potentially sensitive to two-phase fluid flow (gadliquid) in microgravity. The source for this sensitivity is the fact that gas bubbles will become lodged between the sensor probe and the wall of the housing without the aid of buoyancy in l-g. Once gas becomes lodged in the housing, the measured conductivity will be offset based on the volume of occluded gas. A development conductivity sensor was flown on the NASA Microgravity Plan to measure the offset, which was determined to range between 0 and 50%. Based on these findings, a development program was initiated at the sensor s manufacturer to develop a sensor design fully compatible with two-phase fluid flow in microgravity.

  1. Diagnostics of two-phase flows with high concentration of a solid dispersed phase using fiber-optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evseev, A. R.

    2016-10-01

    This paper is focused on the physical modeling of two-phase flows with high concentration of the dispersed phase. The fiber-optical sensors and their calibration procedure were developed for bubble concentration measurements in the fluidized bed apparatus (FB). Distributions of bubble concentration in the 2D and 3D FB apparatuses, which determine the quality of fluidization and local density of filling material, were obtained. The techniques of particle velocity and concentration measurements in the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) was developed using three-fiber sensor (the differential scheme of LDA) operated in backscattering regime. Sensor operation was analyzed and the main systematic measurement errors were determined; the original construction of the sensor was designed. The data on the velocity and concentration profiles of dispersed phase in a large-scale CFB apparatus were obtained for fluidization of particles by air. It was found that with increasing circulation velocity in the CFB apparatus, the particle concentration increases in the near-wall region much higher than in the flow core. The method of particle velocity measurements in a liquid was developed using the laser Doppler fiber anemometer (LDFA-1), operating in the backscattering regime. The signal to noise ratio was obtained for particles of different size and material in test measurements. The rates of consolidated precipitation of cryolite particles in a sedimentation apparatus with the inclined walls were measured.

  2. Design of Helical Capacitance Sensor for Holdup Measurement in Two-Phase Stratified Flow: A Sinusoidal Function Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Lam Ghai; Pao, William K. S.; Hamid, Nor Hisham; Tang, Tong Boon

    2016-01-01

    A 360° twisted helical capacitance sensor was developed for holdup measurement in horizontal two-phase stratified flow. Instead of suppressing nonlinear response, the sensor was optimized in such a way that a ‘sine-like’ function was displayed on top of the linear function. This concept of design had been implemented and verified in both software and hardware. A good agreement was achieved between the finite element model of proposed design and the approximation model (pure sinusoidal function), with a maximum difference of ±1.2%. In addition, the design parameters of the sensor were analysed and investigated. It was found that the error in symmetry of the sinusoidal function could be minimized by adjusting the pitch of helix. The experiments of air-water and oil-water stratified flows were carried out and validated the sinusoidal relationship with a maximum difference of ±1.2% and ±1.3% for the range of water holdup from 0.15 to 0.85. The proposed design concept therefore may pose a promising alternative for the optimization of capacitance sensor design. PMID:27384567

  3. Design of Helical Capacitance Sensor for Holdup Measurement in Two-Phase Stratified Flow: A Sinusoidal Function Approach.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lam Ghai; Pao, William K S; Hamid, Nor Hisham; Tang, Tong Boon

    2016-07-04

    A 360° twisted helical capacitance sensor was developed for holdup measurement in horizontal two-phase stratified flow. Instead of suppressing nonlinear response, the sensor was optimized in such a way that a 'sine-like' function was displayed on top of the linear function. This concept of design had been implemented and verified in both software and hardware. A good agreement was achieved between the finite element model of proposed design and the approximation model (pure sinusoidal function), with a maximum difference of ±1.2%. In addition, the design parameters of the sensor were analysed and investigated. It was found that the error in symmetry of the sinusoidal function could be minimized by adjusting the pitch of helix. The experiments of air-water and oil-water stratified flows were carried out and validated the sinusoidal relationship with a maximum difference of ±1.2% and ±1.3% for the range of water holdup from 0.15 to 0.85. The proposed design concept therefore may pose a promising alternative for the optimization of capacitance sensor design.

  4. Design of Helical Capacitance Sensor for Holdup Measurement in Two-Phase Stratified Flow: A Sinusoidal Function Approach.

    PubMed

    Lim, Lam Ghai; Pao, William K S; Hamid, Nor Hisham; Tang, Tong Boon

    2016-01-01

    A 360° twisted helical capacitance sensor was developed for holdup measurement in horizontal two-phase stratified flow. Instead of suppressing nonlinear response, the sensor was optimized in such a way that a 'sine-like' function was displayed on top of the linear function. This concept of design had been implemented and verified in both software and hardware. A good agreement was achieved between the finite element model of proposed design and the approximation model (pure sinusoidal function), with a maximum difference of ±1.2%. In addition, the design parameters of the sensor were analysed and investigated. It was found that the error in symmetry of the sinusoidal function could be minimized by adjusting the pitch of helix. The experiments of air-water and oil-water stratified flows were carried out and validated the sinusoidal relationship with a maximum difference of ±1.2% and ±1.3% for the range of water holdup from 0.15 to 0.85. The proposed design concept therefore may pose a promising alternative for the optimization of capacitance sensor design. PMID:27384567

  5. THE PATTERN OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH DURING SPEECH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, H.; AND OTHERS

    SINCE THE 19TH CENTURY, KYMOGRAPHIC RECORDING OF TOTAL AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH HAS BEEN USED TO DIAGNOSE THE VARYING DURATIONS AND DEGREES OF CONSTRICTIONS OF THE VOCAL TRACT DURING SPEECH. THE PRESENT PROJECT ATTEMPTS TO INTRODUCE A SECOND DIMENSION TO RECORDINGS OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH--NAMELY, CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA OF FLOW--ON THE…

  6. On the impact of entrapped air in infiltration under ponding conditions: Part a: Preferential air flow path effects on infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbord, N.; Mizrahi, G.; Furman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Entrapped air effects on infiltration under ponding conditions could be important for massive infiltration of managed aquifer recharge or soil aquifer treatment. Earlier studies found that under ponding conditions air could reduce infiltration by 70-90%. Most studies have dealt with entrapped air effects when soil surface topography is flat. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of: (1) irregular surface topography on preferential air flow path development; (2) preferential air flow path on infiltration; and (3) hydraulic head on infiltration when air is trapped. Column experiments were used to investigate these particular effects. A 140 cm deep and 30 cm wide column packed with silica sand was used under two boundary conditions: in the first, air can only escape vertically upward through the soil surface; in the second, air is free to escape. The surface was flooded with 13 liters of water, with ponding depth decreasing with time. Two soil surface conditions were tested: flat surface and irregular. It was found that in irregular surfaces, stable air flow through preferential paths was developed in the high altitude zones. Flat surface topography caused unstable air flow through random paths. Comparison between irregular and flat surface topography showed that the entrapped air pressure was lower and the infiltration rate was about 40% higher in the irregular surface topography than in the flat surface topography. No difference of infiltration rate between flat and irregular surface topography was observed when air was free to escape along the infiltration path. It was also found that at the first stage of infiltration, higher hydraulic heads caused higher entrapped air pressures and lower infiltration rates. In contrast, higher hydraulic head results in higher infiltration rate, when air was free to escape. Our results suggest that during ponding conditions: (1) preferential air flow paths develop at high surface zones of irregular topography

  7. Simulation and Feasibility Study of Flow Sensor on Flexible Polymer for Healthcare Application.

    PubMed

    Maji, Debashis; Das, Soumen

    2013-12-01

    Development of microfabrication technology, along with an ever-increasing demand for reliable, low-cost clinical healthcare has led to the realization of various BioMEMS devices. Present study aims at developing a flexible flow sensor on polymer substrate to monitor real-time blood flow and determine plague formation satisfying sensitivity, biocompatibility, and reliability requirements. Transient simulation of temperature and velocity profile of the thermal-anemometer-based sensor wrapped around the catheter has been studied. Initial fabrication of the sensor over polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer along with thermal coefficient of resistance (TCR) measurement and flow sensing over straight heater has also been performed. The simulation and fabrication works show promising results toward successful development of a flow sensor for effective healthcare delivery.

  8. Development of fiber optic sensor for fluid flow of astronauts’ life-support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shachneva, E. A.; Murashkina, T. I.

    2016-08-01

    This paper proposes a fiber optic sensor consumption (volume, speed) of liquids in life-support systems of astronauts, as well as offers a simple method and apparatus for reproducing the parameters of fluid flow needed in research, yustiovke and adjusting the optical sensor system.

  9. Performance of a CO2 Impedimetric Sensor Prototype for Air Quality Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Mandayo, Gemma García; Herrán, Jaime; Castro-Hurtado, Irene; Castaño, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide detection is a relevant issue in many fields, and this work focuses on the use of a BaTiO3-CuO sputtered thin film layer in a gas sensor prototype for air quality measurements. For this, a double side sensor was fabricated, with a Pt heater on one side and the sensing layer over the electrodes on the other side. The uniformity of the temperature on the sensing layer was tested and further tests to check its sensing performance were carried out. Humidity influence in the detection was found to be almost negligible within the usual range in air quality measurements and repeatability tests show satisfactory results for air quality control purposes. PMID:22163889

  10. Performance of a CO2 impedimetric sensor prototype for air quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mandayo, Gemma García; Herrán, Jaime; Castro-Hurtado, Irene; Castaño, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Carbon dioxide detection is a relevant issue in many fields, and this work focuses on the use of a BaTiO(3)-CuO sputtered thin film layer in a gas sensor prototype for air quality measurements. For this, a double side sensor was fabricated, with a Pt heater on one side and the sensing layer over the electrodes on the other side. The uniformity of the temperature on the sensing layer was tested and further tests to check its sensing performance were carried out. Humidity influence in the detection was found to be almost negligible within the usual range in air quality measurements and repeatability tests show satisfactory results for air quality control purposes. PMID:22163889

  11. Relief, nocturnal cold-air flow and air quality in Kigali, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    , this result is not reassuringly, because all measured residential districts in Kigali exceeded the recommendations of the WHO, too. This suggests that the inhabitants of Kigali are exposed to enormous levels of PM10 during most of their time outdoors. So PM10 levels are increasing in areas with high rates of traffic due to the exhaust of the vehicles and the stirring up of dust from the ground, but also in fact of burning wood for cooking etc. within the residential districts. Hazardous measuring trips could be detected for nighttime measurements. Because of high temperatures, high solar radiation and a non-typical missing cloud cover the urban surface could heat up extremely, which produced a cold-air flow from the ridges and the slopes down to the "Marais" at night. This cold-air flow takes away the suspended particulate matters, which tends to accumulate within the "Marais" on the bottom of the hills, the places where most residential neighborhoods could be found and agricultural fields were used. The distinctive relief caused an accumulation within small valleys. Unfortunately, these are the favourite places of living and agriculture and this tends to high indoor-air pollution.

  12. Surface-slip equations for multicomponent nonequilibrium air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Scott, C. D.; Moss, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    Equations are presented for the surface-slip (or jump) values of species concentration, pressure, velocity, and temperature in the low-Reynolds number, high-altitude flight regime of a space vehicle. The equations are obtained from closed form solutions of the mass, momentum, and energy flux equations using the Chapman-Enskog velocity distribution function. This function represents a solution of the Boltzmann equation in the Navier-Stokes approximation. The analysis, obtained for nonequilibrium multicomponent air flow, includes the finite-rate surface catalytic recombination and changes in the internal energy during reflection from the surface. Expressions for the various slip quantities were obtained in a form which can be employed in flowfield computations. A consistent set of equations is provided for multicomponent, binary, and single species mixtures. Expression is also provided for the finite-rate, species-concentration boundary condition for a multicomponent mixture in absence of slip.

  13. Development of a FBG vortex flow sensor for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, L. K.; Schiferli, W.; Nieuwland, R. A.; Franzen, A.; den Boer, J. J.; Jansen, T. H.

    2011-05-01

    A robust fibre optic flow sensor has been developed to measure liquid or gas flows at ambient temperatures up to 300 ºC and pressures up to 100 bar. While such environmental conditions are typical in pressurized steam systems in the oil and gas industry (downhole and surface), wider applications are envisaged. The flow sensor uses a specially-designed bluff body to generate vortex-induced pressure fluctuations as a function of flow. The pressure fluctuations result in mechanical strain fluctuations in the sensor plate which is attached to the bluff-body. This is detected by means of a Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG). The frequency of the pressure fluctuations is proportional to the flow velocity and is measured by analyzing the spectrum of the FBG sensor signal. Flow velocity measurements ranging from ~1 m/s to ~25 m/s have been demonstrated. Special mechanical design, gluing and packaging processes have been developed to enable applications at high temperatures and high pressures (HPHT). Although the working principle is the same as for conventional vortex flow meters, this flow sensor does not require electronics, which is a great advantage at high temperatures.

  14. Theoretical and Experimental Study on Wide Range Optical Fiber Turbine Flow Sensor.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuhuan; Guo, Yingqing

    2016-07-15

    In this paper, a novel fiber turbine flow sensor was proposed and demonstrated for liquid measurement with optical fiber, using light intensity modulation to measure the turbine rotational speed for converting to flow rate. The double-circle-coaxial (DCC) fiber probe was introduced in frequency measurement for the first time. Through the divided ratio of two rings light intensity, the interference in light signals acquisition can be eliminated. To predict the characteristics between the output frequency and flow in the nonlinear range, the turbine flow sensor model was built. Via analyzing the characteristics of turbine flow sensor, piecewise linear equations were achieved in expanding the flow measurement range. Furthermore, the experimental verification was tested. The results showed that the flow range ratio of DN20 turbine flow sensor was improved 2.9 times after using piecewise linear in the nonlinear range. Therefore, combining the DCC fiber sensor and piecewise linear method, it can be developed into a strong anti-electromagnetic interference(anti-EMI) and wide range fiber turbine flowmeter.

  15. Theoretical and Experimental Study on Wide Range Optical Fiber Turbine Flow Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuhuan; Guo, Yingqing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel fiber turbine flow sensor was proposed and demonstrated for liquid measurement with optical fiber, using light intensity modulation to measure the turbine rotational speed for converting to flow rate. The double-circle-coaxial (DCC) fiber probe was introduced in frequency measurement for the first time. Through the divided ratio of two rings light intensity, the interference in light signals acquisition can be eliminated. To predict the characteristics between the output frequency and flow in the nonlinear range, the turbine flow sensor model was built. Via analyzing the characteristics of turbine flow sensor, piecewise linear equations were achieved in expanding the flow measurement range. Furthermore, the experimental verification was tested. The results showed that the flow range ratio of DN20 turbine flow sensor was improved 2.9 times after using piecewise linear in the nonlinear range. Therefore, combining the DCC fiber sensor and piecewise linear method, it can be developed into a strong anti-electromagnetic interference(anti-EMI) and wide range fiber turbine flowmeter. PMID:27428976

  16. Theoretical and Experimental Study on Wide Range Optical Fiber Turbine Flow Sensor.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuhuan; Guo, Yingqing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel fiber turbine flow sensor was proposed and demonstrated for liquid measurement with optical fiber, using light intensity modulation to measure the turbine rotational speed for converting to flow rate. The double-circle-coaxial (DCC) fiber probe was introduced in frequency measurement for the first time. Through the divided ratio of two rings light intensity, the interference in light signals acquisition can be eliminated. To predict the characteristics between the output frequency and flow in the nonlinear range, the turbine flow sensor model was built. Via analyzing the characteristics of turbine flow sensor, piecewise linear equations were achieved in expanding the flow measurement range. Furthermore, the experimental verification was tested. The results showed that the flow range ratio of DN20 turbine flow sensor was improved 2.9 times after using piecewise linear in the nonlinear range. Therefore, combining the DCC fiber sensor and piecewise linear method, it can be developed into a strong anti-electromagnetic interference(anti-EMI) and wide range fiber turbine flowmeter. PMID:27428976

  17. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng

    2014-04-11

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  18. Mechanistic understanding of monosaccharide-air flow battery electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Daniel M.; Tsang, Tsz Ho; Chetty, Leticia; Aloi, Sekotilani; Liaw, Bor Yann

    Recently, an inexpensive monosaccharide-air flow battery configuration has been demonstrated to utilize a strong base and a mediator redox dye to harness electrical power from the partial oxidation of glucose. Here the mechanistic understanding of glucose oxidation in this unique glucose-air power source is further explored by acid-base titration experiments, 13C NMR, and comparison of results from chemically different redox mediators (indigo carmine vs. methyl viologen) and sugars (fructose vs. glucose) via studies using electrochemical techniques. Titration results indicate that gluconic acid is the main product of the cell reaction, as supported by evidence in the 13C NMR spectra. Using indigo carmine as the mediator dye and fructose as the energy source, an abiotic cell configuration generates a power density of 1.66 mW cm -2, which is greater than that produced from glucose under similar conditions (ca. 1.28 mW cm -2). A faster transition from fructose into the ene-diol intermediate than from glucose likely contributed to this difference in power density.

  19. Effect of air-flow on the evaluation of refractive surgery ablation patterns.

    PubMed

    Dorronsoro, Carlos; Schumacher, Silvia; Pérez-Merino, Pablo; Siegel, Jan; Mrochen, Michael; Marcos, Susana

    2011-02-28

    An Allegretto Eye-Q laser platform (Wavelight GmbH, Erlangen, Germany) was used to study the effect of air-flow speed on the ablation of artificial polymer corneas used for testing refractive surgery patterns. Flat samples of two materials (PMMA and Filofocon A) were ablated at four different air flow conditions. The shape and profile of the ablated surfaces were measured with a precise non-contact optical surface profilometer. Significant asymmetries in the measured profiles were found when the ablation was performed with the clinical air aspiration system, and also without air flow. Increasing air-flow produced deeper ablations, improved symmetry, and increased the repeatability of the ablation pattern. Shielding of the laser pulse by the plume of smoke during the ablation of plastic samples reduced the central ablation depth by more than 40% with no-air flow, 30% with clinical air aspiration, and 5% with 1.15 m/s air flow. A simple model based on non-inertial dragging of the particles by air flow predicts no central shielding with 2.3 m/s air flow, and accurately predicts (within 2 μm) the decrease of central ablation depth by shielding. The shielding effects for PMMA and Filofocon A were similar despite the differences in the ablation properties of the materials and the different full-shielding transmission coefficient, which is related to the number of particles ejected and their associated optical behavior. Air flow is a key factor in the evaluation of ablation patterns in refractive surgery using plastic models, as significant shielding effects are found with typical air-flow levels used under clinical conditions. Shielding effects can be avoided by tuning the air flow to the laser repetition rate.

  20. Flight calibration tests of a nose-boom-mounted fixed hemispherical flow-direction sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armistead, K. H.; Webb, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    Flight calibrations of a fixed hemispherical flow angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip sensor were made from Mach numbers of 0.5 to 1.8. Maneuvers were performed by an F-104 airplane at selected altitudes to compare the measurement of flow angle of attack from the fixed hemispherical sensor with that from a standard angle-of-attack vane. The hemispherical flow-direction sensor measured differential pressure at two angle-of-attack ports and two angle-of-sideslip ports in diametrically opposed positions. Stagnation pressure was measured at a center port. The results of these tests showed that the calibration curves for the hemispherical flow-direction sensor were linear for angles of attack up to 13 deg. The overall uncertainty in determining angle of attack from these curves was plus or minus 0.35 deg or less. A Mach number position error calibration curve was also obtained for the hemispherical flow-direction sensor. The hemispherical flow-direction sensor exhibited a much larger position error than a standard uncompensated pitot-static probe.

  1. Optimum design of bipolar plates for separate air flow cooling system of PEM fuel cells stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    The paper discusses about thermal management of PEM fuel cells. The objective is to define criteria and guidelines for the design of the air flow cooling system of fuel cells stacks for different combination of power density, bipolar plates material, air flow rate, operating temperature It is shown that the optimization of the geometry of the channel permits interesting margins for maintaining the use of separate air flow cooling systems for high power density PEM fuel cells.

  2. Investigating the Use Of Portable Air Pollution Sensors to Capture the Spatial Variability Of Traffic-Related Air Pollution.

    PubMed

    Deville Cavellin, Laure; Weichenthal, Scott; Tack, Ryan; Ragettli, Martina S; Smargiassi, Audrey; Hatzopoulou, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Advances in microsensor technologies for air pollution monitoring encourage a growing use of portable sensors. This study aims at testing their performance in the development of exposure surfaces for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3). In Montreal, Canada, a data-collection campaign was conducted across three seasons in 2014 for 76 sites spanning the range of land uses and built environments of the city; each site was visited from 6 to 12 times, for 20 min, using NO2 and O3 sensors manufactured by Aeroqual. Land-use regression models were developed, achieving R(2) values of 0.86 for NO2 and 0.92 for O3 when adjusted for regional meteorology to control for the fact that all of the locations were not monitored at the same time. A total of two exposure surfaces were then developed for NO2 and O3 as averages over spring, summer, and fall. Validation against the fixed-station data and previous campaigns suggests that Aeroqual sensors tend to overestimate the highest NO2 and O3 concentrations, thus increasing the range of values across the city. However, the sensors suggest a good performance with respect to capturing the spatial variability in NO2 and O3 and are very convenient to use, having great potential for capturing temporal variability.

  3. Optical flows method for lightweight agile remote sensor design and instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Xing, Fei; Wang, Hongjian; You, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    Lightweight agile remote sensors have become one type of the most important payloads and were widely utilized in space reconnaissance and resource survey. These imaging sensors are designed to obtain the high spatial, temporary and spectral resolution imageries. Key techniques in instrumentation include flexible maneuvering, advanced imaging control algorithms and integrative measuring techniques, which are closely correlative or even acting as the bottle-necks for each other. Therefore, mutual restrictive problems must be solved and optimized. Optical flow is the critical model which to be fully represented in the information transferring as well as radiation energy flowing in dynamic imaging. For agile sensors, especially with wide-field-of view, imaging optical flows may distort and deviate seriously when they perform large angle attitude maneuvering imaging. The phenomena are mainly attributed to the geometrical characteristics of the three-dimensional earth surface as well as the coupled effects due to the complicated relative motion between the sensor and scene. Under this circumstance, velocity fields distribute nonlinearly, the imageries may badly be smeared or probably the geometrical structures are changed since the image velocity matching errors are not having been eliminated perfectly. In this paper, precise imaging optical flow model is established for agile remote sensors, for which optical flows evolving is factorized by two forms, which respectively due to translational movement and image shape changing. Moreover, base on that, agile remote sensors instrumentation was investigated. The main techniques which concern optical flow modeling include integrative design with lightweight star sensors along with micro inertial measurement units and corresponding data fusion, the assemblies of focal plane layout and control, imageries post processing for agile remote sensors etc. Some experiments show that the optical analyzing method is effective to

  4. The evolution of hairpin vortices in subcritical air channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svizher, A.; Cohen, J.

    2001-11-01

    Experimental investigation of artificially generated hairpin vortical structures in air channel flow has been performed. The basic plane Poiseuille flow at a range of Reynolds numbers from 1000 to 2000, based on half channel height and centreline velocity, has been disturbed by injecting smoke through a streamwise slot located at the bottom channel wall. Employing hot-wire anemometry and PIV measurements, the characteristics of these hairpin structures and the parameters that govern their generation and evolution have been studied. In order to carefully examine the topology and dynamics of these coherent structures, the instantaneous three-dimensional velocity (and vorticity) distribution over the entire sample volume is required. To accomplish this task Holographic PIV system has been built. The optical setup consists of two mutually perpendicular hybrid HPIV systems for simultaneous recording of two holograms. By combining these holograms, all three coordinates indicating the particle position may be achieved at the same level of accuracy. Switching the reference beam between the Laser pulses (by electrooptic Pockels cell), enables one to reconstruct separately the double exposed holograms for future cross-correlation analysis. Preliminary results obtained in this experimental setup are promising.

  5. Some Effects of Air Flow on the Penetration and Distribution of Oil Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Beardsley, E G

    1929-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effects of air flow on the characteristics of fuel sprays from fuel injection valves. Curves and photographs are presented showing the airflow throughout the chamber and the effects of the air flow on the fuel spray characteristics. It was found that the moving air had little effect on the spray penetration except with the 0.006 inch orifice. The moving air did, however, affect the oil particles on the outside of the spray cone. After spray cut-off, the air flow rapidly distributed the atomized fuel throughout the spray chamber.

  6. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  7. Imaging based optofluidic air flow meter with polymer interferometers defined by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Song, Wuzhou; Psaltis, Demetri

    2010-08-01

    We present an optofluidic chip with integrated polymer interferometers for measuring both the microfluidic air pressure and flow rate. The chip contains a microfluidic circuit and optical cavities on a polymer which was defined by soft lithography. The pressure can be read out by imaging the interference patterns of the cavities. The air flow rate was then calculated from the differential pressure across a microfluidic Venturi circuit. Air flow rate measurement in the range of 0-2mg/second was demonstrated. This device provides a simple and versatile way for in situ measuring the microscale air pressure and flow on chip.

  8. Imaging based optofluidic air flow meter with polymer interferometers defined by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Song, Wuzhou; Psaltis, Demetri

    2010-08-01

    We present an optofluidic chip with integrated polymer interferometers for measuring both the microfluidic air pressure and flow rate. The chip contains a microfluidic circuit and optical cavities on a polymer which was defined by soft lithography. The pressure can be read out by imaging the interference patterns of the cavities. The air flow rate was then calculated from the differential pressure across a microfluidic Venturi circuit. Air flow rate measurement in the range of 0-2mg/second was demonstrated. This device provides a simple and versatile way for in situ measuring the microscale air pressure and flow on chip. PMID:20721045

  9. The Air Sensor Citizen Science Toolbox: A Collaboration in Community Air Quality Monitoring and Mapping?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Project GoalDevelop tools Citizen Scientists can use to assist them in conducting environmental monitoringResearch PlanIdentify a citizen science project as a potential pilot study locationEstablish their pollutant monitoring interestsDevelop a sensor package to meet their needs ...

  10. Blown Away: The Shedding and Oscillation of Sessile Drops by Cross Flowing Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew James Barnabas

    For drops sessile on a solid surface, cross flowing air can drive drop oscillation or shedding, based on the balance and interaction of aerodynamic drag force (based on drop size/shape and air speed) and adhesion/capillary forces (based on surface tension and drop size/shape). Better understanding of the above has applications to, e.g., fuel cell flooding, airfoil icing, and visibility in rain. To understand the basic physics, experiments studying individual sessile drops in a low speed wind tunnel were performed in this thesis. Analysis of high speed video gave time resolved profiles and airspeed for shedding. Testing 0.5 mul to 100 mul drops of water and hexadecane on poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA, Teflon, and a superhydrophobic surface (SHS) yielded a master curve describing critical airspeed for shedding for water drops on all surface tested. This curve predicts behavior for new surfaces, and explains experimental results published previously. It also indicates that the higher contact angle leads to easier shedding due to decreased adhesion and increased drag. Developing a novel floating element differential drag sensor gave the first measurements of the microNewton drag force experienced by drops. Forces magnitude is comparable to gravitational shedding from a tilted plate and to simplified models for drop adhesion, with deviations that suggest effects due to the air flow. Fluid properties are seen to have little effect on drag versus airspeed, and decreased adhesion is seen to be more important than increased drag for easing shedding. The relation between drag coefficient and Reynolds number increases slightly with liquid-solid contact angle, and with drop volume. Results suggest that the drop experiences increased drag compared to similarly shaped solid bodies due to drop oscillations aeroelasticly coupling into the otherwise laminar flow. The bulk and surface oscillations of sessile drops in cross flow was also studied, using a full profile analysis

  11. Effect of groundwater flow on remediation of dissolved-phase VOC contamination using air sparging.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K R; Adams, J A

    2000-02-25

    This paper presents two-dimensional laboratory experiments performed to study how groundwater flow may affect the injected air zone of influence and remedial performance, and how injected air may alter subsurface groundwater flow and contaminant migration during in situ air sparging. Tests were performed by subjecting uniform sand profiles contaminated with dissolved-phase benzene to a hydraulic gradient and two different air flow rates. The results of the tests were compared to a test subjected to a similar air flow rate but a static groundwater condition. The test results revealed that the size and shape of the zone of influence were negligibly affected by groundwater flow, and as a result, similar rates of contaminant removal were realized within the zone of influence with and without groundwater flow. The air flow, however, reduced the hydraulic conductivity within the zone of influence, reducing groundwater flow and subsequent downgradient contaminant migration. The use of a higher air flow rate further reduced the hydraulic conductivity and decreased groundwater flow and contaminant migration. Overall, this study demonstrated that air sparging may be effectively implemented to intercept and treat a migrating contaminant plume.

  12. The Air Sensor Citizen Science Toolbox: A Collaboration in Community Air Quality Monitoring and Mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research in Action: Collect air quality data to characterize near-road/near-source hotspots; Determine potential impact on nearby residences & roadways; Case study of successful use of such data; Relationship between distance to roadways and industrial sources, exposure to...

  13. A barometric pressure sensor based on the air-gap scale effect in a cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh-Dung, Nguyen; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2013-09-01

    The most common structure for a conventional barometric pressure sensor consists of a vacuum-sealed cavity and a diaphragm. However, we hypothesize that a simple structure with an unsealed cavity and an ultra-thin cantilever can provide more sensitive measurements. We produced a 300-nm-thick cantilever with a small spring constant, which made the cantilever sensitive to low pressures. We demonstrated that miniaturizing the air-gap of the cantilever enables the sensor to measure barometric pressure changes at a low pressure change rate with a high resolution, which was 1 Pa at 0.05 Hz, and for a gap size of 1.7 μm.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF OZONE EMISSIONS FROM AIR CLEANERS EQUIPPED WITH OZONE GENERATORS AND SENSOR AND FEEDBACK CONTROL CIRCUITRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper give results of a characterization of ozone emissions from air cleaners equipped with ozone generators and sensor and feedback control circuitry. Ozone emission rates of several consumer appliances, marketed as indoor air treatment or air purification systems, were det...

  15. A Computer Program for Processing In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor Data

    1996-04-15

    FLOW4.02 is used to interpret data from In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors which are instruments that directly measure groundwater flow velocity in saturated, unconsolidated geologic formations (Ballard, 1994, 1996: Ballard et al., 1994: Ballard et al., in press). The program accepts as input the electrical resistance measurements from the thermistors incorporated within the flow sensors, converts the resistance data to temperatures and then uses the temperature information to calculate the groundwater flow velocity and associatedmore » uncertainty. The software includes many capabilities for manipulating, graphically displaying and writing to disk the raw resistance data, the temperature data and the calculated flow velocity information. This version is a major revision of a previously copyrighted version (FLOW1.0).« less

  16. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Ling Cheng; Mamoru Ishii; Beus, Stephen G.

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions. (authors)

  17. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect

    X. Sun; S. Kim; L. Cheng; M. Ishii; S.G. Beus

    2001-10-31

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in a cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 20-cm in width and 1-cm in gap. The miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions.

  18. Self-Powered Triboelectric Micro Liquid/Gas Flow Sensor for Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Guo, Hengyu; Zheng, Jiangeng; Huang, Yingzhou; Liu, Guanlin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-08-23

    Liquid and gas flow sensors are important components of the micro total analysis systems (μTAS) for modern analytical sciences. In this paper, we proposed a self-powered triboelectric microfluidic sensor (TMS) by utilizing the signals produced from the droplet/bubble via the capillary and the triboelectrification effects on the liquid/solid interface for real-time liquid and gas flow detection. By alternating capillary with different diameters, the sensor's detecting range and sensitivity can be adjusted. Both the relationship between the droplet/bubble and capillary size, and the output signal of the sensor are systematically studied. By demonstrating the monitoring of the transfusion process for a patient and the gas flow produced from an injector, it shows that TMS has a great potential in building a self-powered micro total analysis system.

  19. Self-Powered Triboelectric Micro Liquid/Gas Flow Sensor for Microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Guo, Hengyu; Zheng, Jiangeng; Huang, Yingzhou; Liu, Guanlin; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-08-23

    Liquid and gas flow sensors are important components of the micro total analysis systems (μTAS) for modern analytical sciences. In this paper, we proposed a self-powered triboelectric microfluidic sensor (TMS) by utilizing the signals produced from the droplet/bubble via the capillary and the triboelectrification effects on the liquid/solid interface for real-time liquid and gas flow detection. By alternating capillary with different diameters, the sensor's detecting range and sensitivity can be adjusted. Both the relationship between the droplet/bubble and capillary size, and the output signal of the sensor are systematically studied. By demonstrating the monitoring of the transfusion process for a patient and the gas flow produced from an injector, it shows that TMS has a great potential in building a self-powered micro total analysis system. PMID:27490518

  20. Multi-sensor fusion techniques for state estimation of micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavanik, Daniel; Hardt-Stremayr, Alexander; Gremillion, Gregory; Weiss, Stephan; Nothwang, William

    2016-05-01

    Aggressive flight of micro air vehicles (MAVs) in unstructured, GPS-denied environments poses unique challenges for estimation of vehicle pose and velocity due to the noise, delay, and drift in individual sensor measurements. Maneuvering flight at speeds in excess of 5 m/s poses additional challenges even for active range sensors; in the case of LIDAR, an assembled scan of the vehicles environment will in most cases be obsolete by the time it is processed. Multi-sensor fusion techniques which combine inertial measurements with passive vision techniques and/or LIDAR have achieved breakthroughs in the ability to maintain accurate state estimates without the use of external positioning sensors. In this paper, we survey algorithmic approaches to exploiting sensors with a wide range of nonlinear dynamics using filter and bundle-adjustment based approaches for state estimation and optimal control. From this foundation, we propose a biologically-inspired framework for incorporating the human operator in the loop as a privileged sensor in a combined human/autonomy paradigm.

  1. Three-dimensional tracking of sensor capsules mobilised by fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Robert L.; Šutalo, Ilija D.; Wong, Chong Y.

    2015-03-01

    A new technique for simultaneously measuring particle trajectories and temperature in fluids using specially designed light-emitting sensor capsules/particles is reported. The sensor capsules each contain a microcontroller (with integrated temperature sensor), uniquely coloured light emitting diodes (LEDs), a battery, and other components. When inserted into a fluid, the sensor capsules are mobilised by fluid flow. As they emit light they can be readily tracked and their 3D position over time measured, using an externally positioned camera along with a planar mirror in a calibrated set-up. The capsules can also take intra-fluid temperature measurements and transmit encoded data by modulating their LEDs whilst moving. Controlled experiments with a sensor capsule placed on a rotating turntable and unconstrained fluid-driven motion of multiple sensor capsules placed in a mixing tank are reported. The results demonstrate how the pathlines of capsules (and instantaneous velocities) and temperature can be simultaneously measured.

  2. Combination of spaceborne sensor(s) and 3-D aerosol models to assess global daily near-surface air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacenelenbogen, M.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol Particulate Matter (PM), measured by ground-based monitoring stations, is used as a standard by the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) to evaluate daily air quality. PM monitoring is particularly important for human health protection because the exposure to suspended particles can contribute, among others, to lung and respiratory diseases and even premature death. However, most of the PM monitoring stations are located close to cities, leaving large areas without any operational data. Satellite remote sensing is well suited for a global coverage of the aerosol load and can provide an independent and supplemental data source to in situ monitoring. Nevertheless, PM at the ground cannot easily be determined from satellite AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) without additional information on the optical/microphysical properties and vertical distribution of the aerosols. The objective of this study is to explore the efficacy and accuracy of combining a 3-D aerosol transport model and satellite remote sensing as a cost-effective approach for estimating ground-level PM on a global and daily basis. The estimation of the near-surface PM will use the vertical distribution (and, if possible, the physicochemical properties) of the aerosols inferred from a transport model and the measured total load of particles in the atmospheric column retrieved by satellite sensor(s). The first step is to select a chemical transport model (CTM) that provides “good” simulated aerosol vertical profiles. A few global (e.g., WRF-Chem-GOCART) or regional (e.g., MM5-CMAQ, PM-CAMx) CTM will be compared during selected airborne campaigns like ARCTAS-CARB (Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites- California Air Resources Board). The next step will be to devise an algorithm that combines the satellite and model data to infer PM mass estimates at the ground, after evaluating different spaceborne instruments and possible multi-sensor combinations.

  3. Experimental investigation on the interfacial characteristics of stratified air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudaya, Akhmad Zidni; Kuntoro, Hadiyan Yusuf; Dinaryanto, Okto; Deendarlianto, Indarto

    2016-06-01

    The interfacial wave characteristics of stratified air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe were experimentally investigated by using the flush-mounted constant electric current method (CECM) sensors. The experiments were conducted in a horizontal two-phase flow loop 9.5 m long (L) consisting of transparent acrylic pipe of 26 mm i.d. (D). To obtain the stratified flow pattern, the superficial gas and liquid velocities were set to 1.02 - 3.77 m/s and 0.016 - 0.92 m/s, respectively. Several interfacial wave patterns as described by several investigators were identified. The common parameters such as liquid hold-up, probability distribution function, wave velocity and wave frequency were investigated as the function of the liquid and gas flow rates. The interfacial curvature was calculated on the basis of the liquid hold-up data from the CECM sensors and the liquid film thickness data from the image processing technique in the previous work. As a result, it was found that the mean liquid hold-up decreases with the increase of the superficial gas velocity. In the same sub flow pattern, the wave velocity increases as the superficial gas velocity increases. On the other hand, in the two-dimensional wave region, the dominant frequency decreases with the increase of the superficial liquid velocity.

  4. Refinement of a SPR sensor for application within air-tight buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, Emma; Sommerville, James; Aidoo, Kofi

    2009-08-01

    The development of air-tight buildings to significantly reduce the carbon emissions from buildings is a relatively new building technique. However the side effects of the new approach have not been fully investigated. One potential issue arising is from insufficient ventilation resulting in an increase in poor indoor air quality from exacerbated microbial growth through elevated humidity and temperature. At the moment there is no in situ real-time sensor for the detection of multiple microbes within the built environment. Developing a sensor utilizing the phenomena of Surface Plasmon Resonance as its detection method to continuously monitor in situ multiple microbial species and fungi is being undertaken. The research involves the refinement of the specialised instruments commercially available, simplifying the components and advancing the architecture of the interface allowing for the monitoring of multiple species and a novel output detection method.

  5. Diode laser-based air mass flux sensor for subsonic aeropropulsion inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Michael F.; Kessler, William J.; Allen, Mark G.

    1996-08-01

    An optical air mass flux sensor based on a compact, room-temperature diode laser in a fiber-coupled delivery system has been tested on a full-scale gas turbine engine. The sensor is based on simultaneous measurements of O 2 density and Doppler-shifted velocity along a line of sight across the inlet duct. Extensive tests spanning engine power levels from idle to full afterburner demonstrate accuracy and precision of the order of 1 2 of full scale in density, velocity, and mass flux. The precision-limited velocity at atmospheric pressure was as low as 40 cm s. Multiple data-reduction procedures are quantitatively compared to suggest optimal strategies for flight sensor packages.

  6. Ram-air sample collection device for a chemical warfare agent sensor

    DOEpatents

    Megerle, Clifford A.; Adkins, Douglas R.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2002-01-01

    In a surface acoustic wave sensor mounted within a body, the sensor having a surface acoustic wave array detector and a micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator exposed on a surface of the body, an apparatus for collecting air for the sensor, comprising a housing operatively arranged to mount atop the body, the housing including a multi-stage channel having an inlet and an outlet, the channel having a first stage having a first height and width proximate the inlet, a second stage having a second lower height and width proximate the micro-fabricated sample preconcentrator, a third stage having a still lower third height and width proximate the surface acoustic wave array detector, and a fourth stage having a fourth height and width proximate the outlet, where the fourth height and width are substantially the same as the first height and width.

  7. Inline chemical process analysis in micro-plants based on thermoelectric flow and impedimetric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, T.; Kutzner, C.; Kropp, M.; Brokmann, G.; Lang, W.; Steinke, A.; Kienle, A.; Hauptmann, P.

    2010-10-01

    In micro-plants, as used in chemical micro-process engineering, an integrated inline analytics is regarded as an important factor for the development and optimization of chemical processes. Up to now, there is a lack of sensitive, robust and low-priced micro-sensors for monitoring mixing and chemical conversion in micro-fluidic channels. In this paper a novel sensor system combining an impedimetric sensor and a novel pressure stable thermoelectric flow sensor for monitoring chemical reactions in micro-plants is presented. The CMOS-technology-based impedimetric sensor mainly consists of two capacitively coupled interdigital electrodes on a silicon chip. The thermoelectric flow sensor consists of a heater in between two thermopiles on a perforated membrane. The pulsed and constant current feeds of the heater were analyzed. Both sensors enable the analysis of chemical conversion by means of changes in the thermal and electrical properties of the liquid. The homogeneously catalyzed synthesis of n-butyl acetate as a chemical model system was studied. Experimental results revealed that in an overpressure regime, relative changes of less than 1% in terms of thermal and electrical properties can be detected. Furthermore, the transition from one to two liquid phases accompanied by the change in slug flow conditions could be reproducibly detected.

  8. An electrochemical-sensor system for real-time flow measurements in porous materials.

    PubMed

    Bathany, Cédric; Han, Ja-Ryoung; Abi-Samra, Kameel; Takayama, Shuichi; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung

    2015-08-15

    Flow monitoring in porous materials is critical for the engineering of paper-based microfluidic bioassays. Here, we present an electrochemical-sensor system that monitors the liquid flow in porous materials without affecting the real flow in paper-strip samples. The developed microfluidic sensor records an amperometric signal created by the solution movement mediated by paper wicking. This approach allows the in situ monitoring of the different hydrodynamic conditions of a specific paper geometry or composition. In addition, the method proposed in this work was employed to characterise the fluid flow of different nitrocellulose paper strips after oxygen-plasma treatment or dextran coating. The dextran fluid-flow modifiers were further used on the paper strip-based assays as means of signal enhancement. The proposed electrochemical-sensing method offers a valuable alternative to existing optical-based monitoring techniques for flow measurement in paper-based microfluidic systems.

  9. MEMS Microphone Array Sensor for Air-Coupled Impact-Echo.

    PubMed

    Groschup, Robin; Grosse, Christian U

    2015-01-01

    Impact-Echo (IE) is a nondestructive testing technique for plate like concrete structures. We propose a new sensor concept for air-coupled IE measurements. By using an array of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) microphones, instead of a single receiver, several operational advantages compared to conventional sensing strategies in IE are achieved. The MEMS microphone array sensor is cost effective, less sensitive to undesired effects like acoustic noise and has an optimized sensitivity for signals that need to be extracted for IE data interpretation. The proposed sensing strategy is justified with findings from numerical simulations, showing that the IE resonance in plate like structures causes coherent surface displacements on the specimen under test in an area around the impact location. Therefore, by placing several MEMS microphones on a sensor array board, the IE resonance is easier to be identified in the recorded spectra than with single point microphones or contact type transducers. A comparative measurement between the array sensor, a conventional accelerometer and a measurement microphone clearly shows the suitability of MEMS type microphones and the advantages of using these microphones in an array arrangement for IE. The MEMS microphone array will make air-coupled IE measurements faster and more reliable.

  10. MEMS Microphone Array Sensor for Air-Coupled Impact-Echo

    PubMed Central

    Groschup, Robin; Grosse, Christian U.

    2015-01-01

    Impact-Echo (IE) is a nondestructive testing technique for plate like concrete structures. We propose a new sensor concept for air-coupled IE measurements. By using an array of MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical system) microphones, instead of a single receiver, several operational advantages compared to conventional sensing strategies in IE are achieved. The MEMS microphone array sensor is cost effective, less sensitive to undesired effects like acoustic noise and has an optimized sensitivity for signals that need to be extracted for IE data interpretation. The proposed sensing strategy is justified with findings from numerical simulations, showing that the IE resonance in plate like structures causes coherent surface displacements on the specimen under test in an area around the impact location. Therefore, by placing several MEMS microphones on a sensor array board, the IE resonance is easier to be identified in the recorded spectra than with single point microphones or contact type transducers. A comparative measurement between the array sensor, a conventional accelerometer and a measurement microphone clearly shows the suitability of MEMS type microphones and the advantages of using these microphones in an array arrangement for IE. The MEMS microphone array will make air-coupled IE measurements faster and more reliable. PMID:26121610

  11. Laser doppler blood flow imaging using a CMOS imaging sensor with on-chip signal processing.

    PubMed

    He, Diwei; Nguyen, Hoang C; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R; Zhu, Yiqun; Crowe, John A; Gill, Cally; Clough, Geraldine F; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-09-18

    The first fully integrated 2D CMOS imaging sensor with on-chip signal processing for applications in laser Doppler blood flow (LDBF) imaging has been designed and tested. To obtain a space efficient design over 64 × 64 pixels means that standard processing electronics used off-chip cannot be implemented. Therefore the analog signal processing at each pixel is a tailored design for LDBF signals with balanced optimization for signal-to-noise ratio and silicon area. This custom made sensor offers key advantages over conventional sensors, viz. the analog signal processing at the pixel level carries out signal normalization; the AC amplification in combination with an anti-aliasing filter allows analog-to-digital conversion with a low number of bits; low resource implementation of the digital processor enables on-chip processing and the data bottleneck that exists between the detector and processing electronics has been overcome. The sensor demonstrates good agreement with simulation at each design stage. The measured optical performance of the sensor is demonstrated using modulated light signals and in vivo blood flow experiments. Images showing blood flow changes with arterial occlusion and an inflammatory response to a histamine skin-prick demonstrate that the sensor array is capable of detecting blood flow signals from tissue.

  12. Laser Doppler Blood Flow Imaging Using a CMOS Imaging Sensor with On-Chip Signal Processing

    PubMed Central

    He, Diwei; Nguyen, Hoang C.; Hayes-Gill, Barrie R.; Zhu, Yiqun; Crowe, John A.; Gill, Cally; Clough, Geraldine F.; Morgan, Stephen P.

    2013-01-01

    The first fully integrated 2D CMOS imaging sensor with on-chip signal processing for applications in laser Doppler blood flow (LDBF) imaging has been designed and tested. To obtain a space efficient design over 64 × 64 pixels means that standard processing electronics used off-chip cannot be implemented. Therefore the analog signal processing at each pixel is a tailored design for LDBF signals with balanced optimization for signal-to-noise ratio and silicon area. This custom made sensor offers key advantages over conventional sensors, viz. the analog signal processing at the pixel level carries out signal normalization; the AC amplification in combination with an anti-aliasing filter allows analog-to-digital conversion with a low number of bits; low resource implementation of the digital processor enables on-chip processing and the data bottleneck that exists between the detector and processing electronics has been overcome. The sensor demonstrates good agreement with simulation at each design stage. The measured optical performance of the sensor is demonstrated using modulated light signals and in vivo blood flow experiments. Images showing blood flow changes with arterial occlusion and an inflammatory response to a histamine skin-prick demonstrate that the sensor array is capable of detecting blood flow signals from tissue. PMID:24051525

  13. Use of exhaust gas as sweep flow to enhance air separation membrane performance

    DOEpatents

    Dutart, Charles H.; Choi, Cathy Y.

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system for an internal combustion engine is provided with purge gas or sweep flow on the permeate side of separation membranes in the air separation device. Exhaust gas from the engine is used as a purge gas flow, to increase oxygen flux in the separation device without increasing the nitrogen flux.

  14. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; diesel engines. 86.313-79 Section 86.313-79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow...

  15. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; diesel engines. 86.313-79 Section 86.313-79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow...

  16. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...; diesel engines. 86.313-79 Section 86.313-79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow...

  17. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; diesel engines. 86.313-79 Section 86.313-79 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Emission Regulations for New Gasoline-Fueled and Diesel-Fueled Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow...

  18. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152 Section 75.152 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Qualified and Certified Persons § 75.152 Tests of air flow; qualified person....

  19. MODELING AIR FLOW DYNAMICS IN RADON MITIGATION SYSTEMS: A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper refines and extends an earlier study--relating to the design of optimal radon mitigation systems based on subslab depressurization-- that suggested that subslab air flow induced by a central suction point be treated as radial air flow through a porous bed contained betw...

  20. Improvements to a Flow Sensor for Liquid Bismuth-Fed Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonds, Kevin; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, there has been significant interest in using bismuth metal as a propellant in Hall Thrusters [1, 2]. Bismuth offers some considerable cost, weight, and space savings over the traditional propellant--xenon. Quantifying the performance of liquid metal-fed Hall thrusters requires a very precise measure of the low propellant flow rates [1, 2]. The low flow rates (10 mg/sec) and the temperature at which free flowing liquid bismuth exists (above 300 C) preclude the use of off-the-shelf flow sensing equipment [3]. Therefore a new type of sensor is required. The hotspot bismuth flow sensor, described in Refs. [1-5] is designed to perform a flow rate measurement by measuring the velocity at which a thermal feature moves through a flow chamber. The mass flow rate can be determined from the time of flight of the thermal peak, [4, 5]. Previous research and testing has been concerned mainly with the generation of the thermal peak and it's subsequent detection. In this paper, we present design improvements to the sensor concept; and the results of testing conducted to verify the functionality of these improvements. A ceramic material is required for the sensor body (see Fig. 1), which must allow for active heating of the bismuth flow channel to keep the propellant in a liquid state. The material must be compatible with bismuth and must be bonded to conductive elements to allow for conduction of current into the liquid metal and measurement of the temperature in the flow. The new sensor requires fabrication techniques that will allow for a very small diameter flow chamber, which is required to produce useful measurements. Testing of various materials has revealed several that are potentially compatible with liquid bismuth. Of primary concern in the fabrication and testing of a robust, working prototype, is the compatibility of the selected materials with one another. Specifically, the thermal expansion rates of the materials relative to the ceramic body cannot expand so

  1. Ignition of hydrocarbon-air supersonic flow by volumetric ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfeld, Marat A.; Pozdnyakov, George A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper describes the results of the electron-beam initiation of the combustion in the mixtures of hydrogen, natural gas or kerosene vapors with air. Electron beam characteristics were studied in closed volume with immobile gas. The researches included definition of an integrated current of an electronic beam, distribution of a current density and an estimation of average energy of electrons. Possibility of fuel mixtures ignition by means of this approach in the combustor at high velocity at the entrance was demonstrated. Experiments were carried out at Mach numbers of 4 and 5. Process of ignition and combustion under electron beam action was researched. It was revealed that ignition of mixture occurs after completion of electron gun operation. Data obtained have confirmed effectiveness of electron beam application for ignition of hydrogen and natural gas. The numerical simulation of the combustion of mixture in channel was carried out by means of ANSYS CFD 12.0 instrumentation on the basis of Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equation using SST/k-ω turbulence model. For combustion modeling, a detailed kinetic scheme with 38 reactions of 8 species was implemented taking into account finite rate chemistry. Computations have shown that the developed model allow to predict ignition of a mixture and flame propagation even at low flow temperatures.

  2. A Prototype Flux-Plate Heat-Flow Sensor for Venus Surface Heat-Flow Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Reyes, Celso; Smrekar, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System in terms of size, and the densities of the two planets are almost identical when selfcompression of the two planets is taken into account. Venus is the closest planet to Earth, and the simplest interpretation of their similar densities is that their bulk compositions are almost identical. Models of the thermal evolution of Venus predict interior temperatures very similar to those indicated for the regions of Earth subject to solid-state convection, but even global analyses of the coarse Pioneer Venus elevation data suggest Venus does not lose heat by the same primary heat loss mechanism as Earth, i.e., seafloor spreading. The comparative paucity of impact craters on Venus has been interpreted as evidence for relatively recent resurfacing of the planet associated with widespread volcanic and tectonic activity. The difference in the gross tectonic styles of Venus and Earth, and the origins of some of the enigmatic volcano-tectonic features on Venus, such as the coronae, appear to be intrinsically related to Venus heat loss mechanism(s). An important parameter in understanding Venus geological evolution, therefore, is its present surface heat flow. Before the complications of survival in the hostile Venus surface environment were tackled, a prototype fluxplate heat-flow sensor was built and tested for use under synthetic stable terrestrial surface conditions. The design parameters for this prototype were that it should operate on a conforming (sand) surface, with a small, self-contained power and recording system, capable of operating without servicing for at least several days. The precision and accuracy of the system should be < 5 mW/sq m. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  3. A Portable Low-Cost High Density Sensor Network for Air Quality at London Heathrow Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popoola, Olalekan; Mead, Iq; Bright, Vivien; Baron, Ronan; Saffell, John; Stewart, Gregor; Kaye, Paul; Jones, Roderic

    2013-04-01

    Outdoor air quality and its impact on human health and the environment have been well studied and it has been projected that poor air quality will surpass poor sanitation as the major course of environmental premature mortality by 2050 (IGAC / IGBP, release statement, 2012). Transport-related pollution has been regulated at various levels by enactment of legislations at local, national, regional and global stages. As part of the mitigation measures, routine measurements of atmospheric pollutants such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have to be established in areas where air quality problems are identified. In addition, emission inventories are also generated for different atmospheric environments including urban areas and airport environments required for air quality models. Whilst recognising that most of the existing sparse monitoring networks provide high temporal measurements, spatial data of these highly variable pollutants are not captured, making it difficult to adequately characterise the highly heterogeneous air quality. Spatial information is often obtained from model data which can only be constrained using measurements from the sparse monitoring networks. The work presented here shows the application of low-cost sensor networks aimed at addressing this missing spatial information. We have shown in previous studies the application of low-cost electrochemical sensor network instruments in monitoring road transport pollutants including CO, NO and NO2 in an urban environment (Mead et. al. 2012, accepted Atmospheric Environment). Modified versions of these instruments which include additional species such as O3, SO2, VOCs and CO2 are currently deployed at London Heathrow Airport (LHR) as part of the Sensor Network for Air Quality (SNAQ) project. Meteorology data such as temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction are also measured as well as size-speciated particulates (0.38 to 17.4 µm). A network of 50

  4. Precise nanoliter fluid handling system with integrated high-speed flow sensor.

    PubMed

    Haber, Carsten; Boillat, Marc; van der Schoot, Bart

    2005-04-01

    A system for accurate low-volume delivery of liquids in the micro- to nanoliter range makes use of an integrated miniature flow sensor as part of an intelligent feedback control loop driving a micro-solenoid valve. The flow sensor is hydraulically connected with the pressurized system liquid in the dispensing channel and located downstream from the pressure source, above the solenoid valve. The sensor operates in a differential mode and responds in real-time to the internal flow-pulse resulting from the brief opening interval of the solenoid valve leading to a rapid ejection of a fluid droplet. The integral of the flow-pulse delivered by the sensor is directly proportional to the volume of the ejected droplet from the nozzle. The quantitative information is utilized to provide active control of the effectively dispensed or aspirated volume by adjusting the solenoid valve accordingly. This process significantly enhances the precision of the fluid delivery. The system furthermore compensates automatically for any changes in the viscosity of the dispensed liquid. The data delivered by the flow sensor can be saved and backtracked in order to confirm and validate the aspiration and dispensing process in its entirety. The collected dispense information can be used for quality control assessments and automatically be made part of an electronic record.

  5. Fiber optic sensor for flow and viscosity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei-Chih; Leang, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    A sensitive fluid viscosity and flow measurement device using optical intensity based sensing is presented. The sensing principle makes use of the damping characteristic of a vibrating optical fiber probe with approximate hinge-free end configuration. The viscosity and mass flow are determined by measuring the vibration of a sinusoidally excited tapered optical fiber under different flow conditions. By measuring the frequency response of the fiber probe, viscosity and mass flow can be deduced from the damping coefficient of the response. The concepts and experimental data presented demonstrate and refine the sensing process of the proposed system.

  6. Measurement of Respiration, Heart Beat and Body Movement on a Bed Using Dynamic Air-Pressure Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Hiroaki; Takashima, Mitsuru; Okawai, Hiroaki

    In this study, the possibility of the measurement of respiration, heart beat, and body movement on a bed was examined using the dynamic air-pressure sensor aiming at a daily health monitoring. The dynamic air-pressure sensor measures vital information using a change of air pressure. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in this study. The dynamic air-pressure sensor was installed under the bed mat and respiration and heart beat information were measured. This information was compared with the standard waveforms obtained from respiratory belt transducer and the electrocardiograph. As a result, both waveforms demonstrate a high correlation, and confirmed the validity of this method. A change of waveform and a quantitative evaluation of respiration, heart beat, and body movement measured from during sleep using this sensor can be useful for a daily health monitoring.

  7. Air-dropped sensor network for real-time high-fidelity volcano monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Song, W.-Z.; Huang, R.; Xu, M.; Ma, A.; Shirazi, B.; LaHusen, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design and deployment experience of an air-dropped wireless sensor network for volcano hazard monitoring. The deployment of five stations into the rugged crater of Mount St. Helens only took one hour with a helicopter. The stations communicate with each other through an amplified 802.15.4 radio and establish a self-forming and self-healing multi-hop wireless network. The distance between stations is up to 2 km. Each sensor station collects and delivers real-time continuous seismic, infrasonic, lightning, GPS raw data to a gateway. The main contribution of this paper is the design and evaluation of a robust sensor network to replace data loggers and provide real-time long-term volcano monitoring. The system supports UTC-time synchronized data acquisition with 1ms accuracy, and is online configurable. It has been tested in the lab environment, the outdoor campus and the volcano crater. Despite the heavy rain, snow, and ice as well as gusts exceeding 120 miles per hour, the sensor network has achieved a remarkable packet delivery ratio above 99% with an overall system uptime of about 93.8% over the 1.5 months evaluation period after deployment. Our initial deployment experiences with the system have alleviated the doubts of domain scientists and prove to them that a low-cost sensor network system can support real-time monitoring in extremely harsh environments. Copyright 2009 ACM.

  8. Liquid-air based Fabry-Pérot cavity on fiber tip sensor.

    PubMed

    Llera, Miguel; Aellen, Thierry; Hervas, Javier; Salvadé, Yves; Senn, Pascal; Le Floch, Sébastien; Keppner, Herbert

    2016-04-18

    This paper presents a Fabry-Perot fiber tip sensor based on an air-liquid filled cavity. The cavity is sealed off by a thin gold coated membrane of parylene C, between 300 and 350 nm, creating a particularly flexible diaphragm. In order to retrieve and track the cavity of interest from other cavities formed within the sensor tip, a signal processing of the feedback signal is performed by inverse fast Fourier transform. The experimental sensor has been manufactured and tested for temperature, giving cavity length sensitivities of 6.1 nm/°C and 9.6 nm/°C for temperature increase and decrease respectively. The external gas pressure response gives a sensitivity of 15 nm/kPa. The fiber sensor has also been adapted for force sensing after silicone embedment and has shown a sensitivity of about 8.7 nm/mN. Finally, the sensor has been tested on insertion into a human temporal bone, proving that it could be an interesting candidate for insertion force monitoring for robotic cochlear implantation.

  9. Liquid-air based Fabry-Pérot cavity on fiber tip sensor.

    PubMed

    Llera, Miguel; Aellen, Thierry; Hervas, Javier; Salvadé, Yves; Senn, Pascal; Le Floch, Sébastien; Keppner, Herbert

    2016-04-18

    This paper presents a Fabry-Perot fiber tip sensor based on an air-liquid filled cavity. The cavity is sealed off by a thin gold coated membrane of parylene C, between 300 and 350 nm, creating a particularly flexible diaphragm. In order to retrieve and track the cavity of interest from other cavities formed within the sensor tip, a signal processing of the feedback signal is performed by inverse fast Fourier transform. The experimental sensor has been manufactured and tested for temperature, giving cavity length sensitivities of 6.1 nm/°C and 9.6 nm/°C for temperature increase and decrease respectively. The external gas pressure response gives a sensitivity of 15 nm/kPa. The fiber sensor has also been adapted for force sensing after silicone embedment and has shown a sensitivity of about 8.7 nm/mN. Finally, the sensor has been tested on insertion into a human temporal bone, proving that it could be an interesting candidate for insertion force monitoring for robotic cochlear implantation. PMID:27137244

  10. The effects of forced air flow and oxygen concentration on flammability, smoke density, and pyrolytic toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauers, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    The question is posed whether forced air flow should be incorporated into flammability tests as a relevant variable. A test apparatus is described which permits tests to be conducted on small test specimens in a forced flow which is (continuously) variable over flow velocities from zero to 300 feet per minute (1.52 m/s). The effects of air-flow rate and oxygen concentration on flame propagation rate, maximum smoke density, and pyrolytic product toxicity were measured for a single material and were statistically evaluated. Regression analysis was used to graph the resulting relationships. It is concluded that air velocity is an important variable for laboratory flammability testing.

  11. Sap flow is Underestimated by Thermal Dissipation Sensors due to Alterations of Wood Anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marañón-Jiménez, S.; Wiedemann, A.; van den Bulcke, J.; Cuntz, M.; Rebmann, C.; Steppe, K.

    2014-12-01

    The thermal dissipation technique (TD) is one of the most commonly adopted methods for sap flow measurements. However, underestimations of up to 60% of the tree transpiration have been reported with this technique, although the causes are not certainly known. The insertion of TD sensors within the stems causes damage of the wood tissue and subsequent healing reactions, changing wood anatomy and likely the sap flow path. However, the anatomical changes in response to the insertion of sap flow sensors and the effects on the measured flow have not been assessed yet. In this study, we investigate the alteration of vessel anatomy on wounds formed around TD sensors. Our main objectives were to elucidate the anatomical causes of sap flow underestimation for ring-porous and diffuse-porous species, and relate these changes to sap flow underestimations. Successive sets of TD probes were installed in early, mid and end of the growing season in Fagus sylvatica (diffuse-porous) and Quercus petraea (ring-porous) trees. They were logged after the growing season and additional sets of sensors were installed in the logged stems with presumably no healing reaction. The wood tissue surrounding each sensor was then excised and analysed by X-ray computed microtomography (X-ray micro CT). This technique allowed the quantification of vessel anatomical characteristics and the reconstruction of the 3-D internal microstructure of the xylem vessels so that extension and shape of the altered area could be determined. Gels and tyloses clogged the conductive vessels around the sensors in both beech and oak. The extension of the affected area was larger for beech although these anatomical changes led to similar sap flow underestimations in both species. The higher vessel size in oak may explain this result and, therefore, larger sap flow underestimation per area of affected conductive tissue. The wound healing reaction likely occurred within the first weeks after sensor installation, which

  12. Recent Development in Optical Chemical Sensors Coupling with Flow Injection Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Catalina Bosch; Rojas, Fuensanta Sánchez

    2006-01-01

    Optical techniques for chemical analysis are well established and sensors based on these techniques are now attracting considerable attention because of their importance in applications such as environmental monitoring, biomedical sensing, and industrial process control. On the other hand, flow injection analysis (FIA) is advisable for the rapid analysis of microliter volume samples and can be interfaced directly to the chemical process. The FIA has become a widespread automatic analytical method for more reasons; mainly due to the simplicity and low cost of the setups, their versatility, and ease of assembling. In this paper, an overview of flow injection determinations by using optical chemical sensors is provided, and instrumentation, sensor design, and applications are discussed. This work summarizes the most relevant manuscripts from 1980 to date referred to analysis using optical chemical sensors in FIA.

  13. Personal Air Pollution Exposure Monitoring using Low Cost Sensors in Chennai City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy Yasa, Pavan; Shiva, Nagendra S. N.

    2016-04-01

    Air quality in many cities is deteriorating due to rapid urbanization and motorization. In the past, most of the health impacts studies in the urban areas have considered stationary air quality monitoring station data for health impact assessment. Since, there exist a spatial and temporal variation of air quality because of rapid change in land use pattern and complex interaction between emission sources and meteorological conditions, the human exposure assessment using stationary data may not provide realistic information. In such cases low cost sensors monitoring is viable in providing both spatial and temporal variations of air pollutant concentrations. In the present study an attempt has been made to use low cost sensor for monitoring the personal exposure to the two criteria pollutants CO and PM2.5 at 3 different locations of Chennai city. Maximum and minimum concentrations of CO and PM2.5 were found to be 5.4ppm, 0.8ppm and 534.8μg/m3, 1.9μg/m3 respectively. Results showed high concentrations near the intersection and low concentrations in the straight road.

  14. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  15. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B; Monje, O; Tanner, B

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature. PMID:11538791

  16. Measurement of interfacial structures in horizontal air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, J. D.; Worosz, T.; Dodds, M. R.; Kim, S.

    2012-07-01

    In order to predict multi-dimensional phenomena in nuclear reactor systems, methods relying on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are essential. However, to be applicable in assessing thermal-hydraulic safety, these codes must be able to accurately predict the development of two-phase flows. Therefore, before practical application these codes must be assessed using experimental databases that capture multi-dimensional phenomena. While a large database exists that can be employed to assess predictions in vertical flows, the available database for horizontal flows is significantly lacking. Therefore, the current work seeks to develop an additional database in air-water horizontal bubbly flow through a 38.1 mm ID test section with a total development length of approximately 250 diameters. The experimental conditions are chosen to cover a wide range of the bubbly flow regime based upon flow visualization using a high-speed video camera. A database of local time-averaged void fraction, bubble velocity, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter are acquired throughout the pipe cross-section using a four-sensor conductivity probe. To investigate the evolution of the flow, measurements are made at axial locations of 44, 116, and 244 diameters downstream of the inlet. In the current work, only measurements obtained at L/D = 244 are presented. It is found that increasing the liquid superficial velocity tends to reduce both the bubble size and the degree of bubble packing near the upper wall. However, it is observed that the position of the maximum void fraction value remains nearly constant and is located approximately one bubble diameter away from the upper wall. It is also found that the bubble velocity exhibits a power law behavior resembling a single phase liquid turbulent velocity profile. Moreover, the local bubble velocity tends to decrease as the local void fraction increases. Conversely, increasing the gas superficial velocity is found to

  17. Microfabricated Air-Microfluidic Sensor for Personal Monitoring of Airborne Particulate Matter: Design, Fabrication, and Experimental Results

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present the design and fabrication of a micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) air-microfluidic particulate matter (PM) sensor, and show experimental results obtained from exposing the sensor to concentrations of tobacco smoke and diesel exhaust, two commonly occurring P...

  18. Finite-Element Modeling of Electrostatic Sensors for the Flow Measurement of Particles in Pneumatic Pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Krabicka, J.; Yan, Y.

    2009-08-15

    Electrostatic sensors are used in certain industries for the flow measurement of pneumatically conveyed solids. However, despite various advances that have been made in recent years, relatively little information is known about the exact nature of the electrostatic charge induced onto the sensor electrode due to moving particles, which is dependent on electrode geometry, particle distribution, and particle velocity. This paper presents a novel approach to the study of the charge induced onto electrostatic sensors based on fitting a Lorentzian curve to the results of a finite-element model of the electrostatic sensor and pipeline. The modeling method is validated by comparing the modeling results of a nonintrusive circular electrode with an established analytical solution. The modeling results are used for in-depth analysis and informed design of a particular sensor configuration.

  19. A Flexible Flow Sensor System and Its Characteristics for Fluid Mechanics Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Zhu, Rong; Que, Ruiyi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel micromachined hot-film flow sensor system realized by a technique using a film depositing processes and incorporating a standard printed circuit. Sensor electrodes and electronic circuits are preprinted on a flexible substrate of polyimide (PI), i.e., a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB). The sensing element, which is made of Cr/Ni/Pt with a temperature coefficient of resistance around 2,000 ppm/K, is fabricated on the FPCB by either magnetron sputtering technology or pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The sensor can be packed efficiently at high-density and integrated with signal processing circuits without additional pads. A simple fabrication process using mature technique and materials selection guarantees that the time and costs are greatly reduced. Both steady-state and transient characteristics of the sensors are experimentally tested, and the results presented to validate the effectiveness of the sensors. PMID:22303137

  20. A flexible flow sensor system and its characteristics for fluid mechanics measurements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Zhu, Rong; Que, Ruiyi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel micromachined hot-film flow sensor system realized by a technique using a film depositing processes and incorporating a standard printed circuit. Sensor electrodes and electronic circuits are preprinted on a flexible substrate of polyimide (PI), i.e., a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB). The sensing element, which is made of Cr/Ni/Pt with a temperature coefficient of resistance around 2,000 ppm/K, is fabricated on the FPCB by either magnetron sputtering technology or pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The sensor can be packed efficiently at high-density and integrated with signal processing circuits without additional pads. A simple fabrication process using mature technique and materials selection guarantees that the time and costs are greatly reduced. Both steady-state and transient characteristics of the sensors are experimentally tested, and the results presented to validate the effectiveness of the sensors.

  1. Dual-modality wire-mesh sensor for the visualization of three-phase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, E. N.; Vendruscolo, T. P.; Morales, R. E. M.; Schleicher, E.; Hampel, U.; Da Silva, M. J.

    2015-10-01

    Three-phase gas-liquid-liquid flows are very common in petroleum extraction, production, and transport. In this work a dual-modality measuring technique is introduced which may be well applied for three-phase flow visualization. The measuring principle is based on simultaneous excitation with two distinct frequencies to interrogate each crossing point of a mesh sensor, which in turn are linked to conductive and capacitive parts of fluid impedance. The developed system can operate eight transmitter and eight receiver electrodes at a frame repetition frequency up to 781 Hz. The system has been evaluated by measuring reference components. The overall measurement uncertainty was 8.4%, which considering the fast repetition frequency of measurements is suitable for flow investigation. Furthermore, a model-based method to fuse the data from the dual-modality wire-mesh sensor and to obtain individual phase fraction of gas-oil-water flow is introduced. Here a parametrized model is fitted to the measured conductivity and permittivity distributions enabling one to obtain phase fraction from measured data. The method has been applied and tested to the acquired data from a mesh sensor in static and dynamic three-phase mixtures of gas, oil, and water. Fused images and quantitative values show good agreement with reference values. The newly developed dual-modality wire-mesh sensor has the potential to investigate three-phase flows to a good degree of detail, being a valuable tool to investigate such flows.

  2. Shock tunnel measurements of surface pressures in shock induced separated flow field using MEMS sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, R.; Ram, S. N.; Hegde, G. M.; Nayak, M. M.; Jagadeesh, G.

    2015-09-01

    Characterized not just by high Mach numbers, but also high flow total enthalpies—often accompanied by dissociation and ionization of flowing gas itself—the experimental simulation of hypersonic flows requires impulse facilities like shock tunnels. However, shock tunnel simulation imposes challenges and restrictions on the flow diagnostics, not just because of the possible extreme flow conditions, but also the short run times—typically around 1 ms. The development, calibration and application of fast response MEMS sensors for surface pressure measurements in IISc hypersonic shock tunnel HST-2, with a typical test time of 600 μs, for the complex flow field of strong (impinging) shock boundary layer interaction with separation close to the leading edge, is delineated in this paper. For Mach numbers 5.96 (total enthalpy 1.3 MJ kg-1) and 8.67 (total enthalpy 1.6 MJ kg-1), surface pressures ranging from around 200 Pa to 50 000 Pa, in various regions of the flow field, are measured using the MEMS sensors. The measurements are found to compare well with the measurements using commercial sensors. It was possible to resolve important regions of the flow field involving significant spatial gradients of pressure, with a resolution of 5 data points within 12 mm in each MEMS array, which cannot be achieved with the other commercial sensors. In particular, MEMS sensors enabled the measurement of separation pressure (at Mach 8.67) near the leading edge and the sharply varying pressure in the reattachment zone.

  3. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  4. Multiplexed fibre optic sensors for monitoring resin infusion, flow, and cure in composite material processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehura, Edmon; Jarzebinska, Renata; Da Costa, Elisabete F. R.; Skordos, Alexandros A.; James, Stephen W.; Partridge, Ivana K.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2013-04-01

    The infusion, flow and cure of RTM6 resin in a carbon fibre reinforced composite preform have been monitored using a variety of multiplexed fibre optic sensors. Optical fibre Fresnel sensors and tilted fibre Bragg grating (TFBG) sensors were configured to monitor resin infusion/flow in-plane of the component. The results obtained from the different sensors were in good agreement with visual observations. The degree of cure was monitored by Fresnel sensors via a measurement of the refractive index of the resin which was converted to degree of cure using a calibration determined from Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Fibre Bragg grating sensors fabricated in highly linearly birefringent fibre were used to monitor the development of transverse strain during the cure process, revealing through-thickness material shrinkage of about 712 μɛ and residual strain of 223 μɛ. An alternative approach to infusion monitoring, based on an array of multiplexed tapered optical fibre sensors interrogated using optical frequency domain reflectometry, was also investigated in a separate carbon fibre preform that was infused with RTM6 resin.

  5. Fiber optic liquid mass flow sensor and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Gregory, Don Allen (Inventor); Wiley, John T. (Inventor); Pedersen, Kevin W. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for sensing the mass flow rate of a fluid flowing through a pipe. A light beam containing plural individual wavelengths is projected from one side of the pipe across the width of the pipe so as to pass through the fluid under test. Fiber optic couplers located at least two positions on the opposite side of the pipe are used to detect the light beam. A determination is then made of the relative strengths of the light beam for each wavelength at the at least two positions and based at least in part on these relative strengths, the mass flow rate of the fluid is determined.

  6. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  7. Flow properties in expansion tube with helium, argon, air, and CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.

    1974-01-01

    Test flow velocities from 5 to 7 km/sec were generated in a 6-in. expansion tube using helium, argon, air, and CO2 test gases. Pitot pressure profiles across the flow at the test section are presented for the four test gases, and measured flow quantities are compared to computer predicted values. Comparison of predicted and measured flow quantities suggests the expansion to be near thermochemical equilibrium for all test gases and implies the existence of a totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm. Argon, air, and CO2 flows were observed to attenuate while traversing the acceleration section, whereas no attenuation was observed for helium.

  8. Composition Pulse Time-Of-Flight Mass Flow Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Mosier, Bruce P.; Crocker, Robert W.; Harnett, Cindy K. l

    2004-01-13

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 10,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined

  9. Air Enquirer's multi-sensor boxes as a tool for High School Education and Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morguí, Josep-Anton; Font, Anna; Cañas, Lidia; Vázquez-García, Eusebi; Gini, Andrea; Corominas, Ariadna; Àgueda, Alba; Lobo, Agustin; Ferraz, Carlos; Nofuentes, Manel; Ulldemolins, Delmir; Roca, Alex; Kamnang, Armand; Grossi, Claudia; Curcoll, Roger; Batet, Oscar; Borràs, Silvia; Occhipinti, Paola; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    An educational tool was designed with the aim of making more comprehensive the research done on Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) in the ClimaDat Spanish network of atmospheric observation stations (www.climadat.es). This tool is called Air Enquirer and it consist of a multi-sensor box. It is envisaged to build more than two hundred boxes to yield them to the Spanish High Schools through the Education department (www.educaixa.com) of the "Obra Social 'La Caixa'", who funds this research. The starting point for the development of the Air Enquirers was the experience at IC3 (www.ic3.cat) in the CarboSchools+ FP7 project (www.carboschools.cat, www.carboschools.eu). The Air Enquirer's multi-sensor box is based in Arduino's architecture and contains sensors for CO2, temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and both infrared and visible luminance. The Air Enquirer is designed for taking continuous measurements. Every Air Enquirer ensemble of measurements is used to convert values to standard units (water content in ppmv, and CO2 in ppmv_dry). These values are referred to a calibration made with Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry (Picarro®) under different temperature, pressure, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Multiple sets of Air Enquirers are intercalibrated for its use in parallel during the experiments. The different experiments proposed to the students will be outdoor (observational) or indoor (experimental, in the lab) focusing on understanding the biogeochemistry of GHGs in the ecosystems (mainly CO2), the exchange (flux) of gases, the organic matter production, respiration and decomposition processes, the influence of the anthropogenic activities on the gases (and particles) exchanges, and their interaction with the structure and composition of the atmosphere (temperature, water content, cooling and warming processes, radiative forcing, vertical gradients and horizontal patterns). In order to ensure Air Enquirers a high-profile research performance the experimental designs

  10. A Low Cost High Density Sensor Network for Air Quality at London Heathrow Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, V.; Mead, M. I.; Popoola, O. A.; Baron, R. P.; Saffell, J.; Stewart, G.; Kaye, P.; Jones, R.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric composition within urban areas has a direct effect on the air quality of an environment in which a large majority of people live and work. Atmospheric pollutants including ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and particulate matter (PM) can have a significant effect on human health. As such it is important to determine the potential exposure of individuals to these atmospheric constituents and investigate the processes that lead to the degradation of air quality within the urban environment. Whilst modelled pollutant levels on the local scale often suggest high degrees of spatial and temporal variability, the relatively sparse fixed site automated urban networks only provide low spatial resolution data that do not appear adequate in detecting such small scale variability. In this paper we demonstrate that measurements can now be made using networks of low-cost sensors that utilise a variety of techniques, including electrochemical and optical, to measure concentrations of atmospheric species. Once equipped with GPS and GPRS to determine position and transmit data respectively, these networks have the potential to provide valuable insights into pollutant variability inherent on the local or micro-scale. The methodology has been demonstrated successfully in field campaigns carried out in cities including London and Valencia, and is now being deployed as part of the Sensor Networks for Air Quality currently deployed at London Heathrow airport (SNAQ-Heathrow) which is outlined in the partner paper presented by Mead et al. (this conference). The SNAQ-Heathrow network of 50 sensor nodes will provide an unprecedented data set that includes measurements of O3, NO, NO2, CO, CO2, SO2, total VOCs, size-speciated PM as well as meteorological variables that include temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction. This network will provide high temporal (20 second intervals) and spatial (50 sites within the airport area

  11. Low-Cost Sensor Network for Stream Flow Monitoring in the Alto Beni Region of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, M. D.; Fry, L. M.; Mihelcic, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Lack of data is a persistent problem in hydrology and other field work in developing countries. Low cost monitoring devices allow investigators to maximize spatial coverage on a limited budget, as well as to minimize the financial risk of loss of instruments placed in vulnerable locations. This work contributes to an ongoing project to evaluate the sustainability of discharge from springs supplying gravity-fed potable water systems in the Alto Beni region of Bolivia where land use is rapidly changing from forest to agriculture. The approach is to estimate ground water recharge as a function of land use variables using a water balance model in several representative watersheds. Monthly stream discharge is currently estimated using monthly manual measurements of water level by a local technician. Continuous water level measurements will allow an improved estimate of the cumulative discharge, and generate data on statistical distribution of daily flow that may be useful to estimate discharge in similar, ungaged watersheds. Continuous water level measurements, along with available precipitation data, will allow analysis and comparison of the response of watersheds to individual precipitation events as a function of land use variables. We assembled a low cost level logging system for stream flow monitoring that measures and records distance up to 6 m to the nearest 25 mm every ten minutes, and runs for a month on six rechargeable AA batteries. The system consists of a sonic range finder sensor (MaxSonar-EZ2, Maxbotix Inc., Baxter, MN, 30), a temperature sensor (MCP9701, Microchip Technology Inc., Chandler, AZ, 0.25), and a datalogger (Hobo U12, Onset Computer Corp., Pocasset, MA, 104) along with a weather-resistant enclosure and common items for a total cost of 230 per unit. The level loggers were attached to bridges over three subject streams. A local technician visits the sites monthly to download data, replace the rechargeable batteries, and take a manual water level

  12. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  13. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  14. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, W. A.; Spuler, S. M.; Spowart, M.; Lenschow, D. H.; Friesen, R. B.

    2014-03-01

    A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with an uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s-1 (standard error) and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard-error uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the Global Positioning System, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents) that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that the new laser air-motion sensor, combined with parametrized fits to correction factors for the measured dynamic and ambient pressure, provides a measurement of temperature that is independent of any other temperature sensor.

  15. Plant pneumatics: stem air flow is related to embolism - new perspectives on methods in plant hydraulics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano; Bittencourt, Paulo R L; Oliveira, Rafael S; Junior, Mauro B M; Barros, Fernanda V; Ribeiro, Rafael V; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    Wood contains a large amount of air, even in functional xylem. Air embolisms in the xylem affect water transport and can determine plant growth and survival. Embolisms are usually estimated with laborious hydraulic methods, which can be prone to several artefacts. Here, we describe a new method for estimating embolisms that is based on air flow measurements of entire branches. To calculate the amount of air flowing out of the branch, a vacuum was applied to the cut bases of branches under different water potentials. We first investigated the source of air by determining whether it came from inside or outside the branch. Second, we compared embolism curves according to air flow or hydraulic measurements in 15 vessel- and tracheid-bearing species to test the hypothesis that the air flow is related to embolism. Air flow came almost exclusively from air inside the branch during the 2.5-min measurements and was strongly related to embolism. We propose a new embolism measurement method that is simple, effective, rapid and inexpensive, and that allows several measurements on the same branch, thus opening up new possibilities for studying plant hydraulics.

  16. Plant pneumatics: stem air flow is related to embolism - new perspectives on methods in plant hydraulics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano; Bittencourt, Paulo R L; Oliveira, Rafael S; Junior, Mauro B M; Barros, Fernanda V; Ribeiro, Rafael V; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    Wood contains a large amount of air, even in functional xylem. Air embolisms in the xylem affect water transport and can determine plant growth and survival. Embolisms are usually estimated with laborious hydraulic methods, which can be prone to several artefacts. Here, we describe a new method for estimating embolisms that is based on air flow measurements of entire branches. To calculate the amount of air flowing out of the branch, a vacuum was applied to the cut bases of branches under different water potentials. We first investigated the source of air by determining whether it came from inside or outside the branch. Second, we compared embolism curves according to air flow or hydraulic measurements in 15 vessel- and tracheid-bearing species to test the hypothesis that the air flow is related to embolism. Air flow came almost exclusively from air inside the branch during the 2.5-min measurements and was strongly related to embolism. We propose a new embolism measurement method that is simple, effective, rapid and inexpensive, and that allows several measurements on the same branch, thus opening up new possibilities for studying plant hydraulics. PMID:26918522

  17. The next generation of low-cost personal air quality sensors for quantitative exposure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedrahita, R.; Xiang, Y.; Masson, N.; Ortega, J.; Collier, A.; Jiang, Y.; Li, K.; Dick, R.; Lv, Q.; Hannigan, M.; Shang, L.

    2014-03-01

    Advances in embedded systems and low-cost gas sensors are enabling a new wave of low cost air quality monitoring tools. Our team has been engaged in the development of low-cost wearable air quality monitors (M-Pods) using the Arduino platform. The M-Pods use commercially available metal oxide semiconductor (MOx) sensors to measure CO, O3, NO2, and total VOCs, and NDIR sensors to measure CO2. MOx sensors are low in cost and show high sensitivity near ambient levels; however they display non-linear output signals and have cross sensitivity effects. Thus, a quantification system was developed to convert the MOx sensor signals into concentrations. Two deployments were conducted at a regulatory monitoring station in Denver, Colorado. M-Pod concentrations were determined using laboratory calibration techniques and co-location calibrations, in which we place the M-Pods near regulatory monitors to then derive calibration function coefficients using the regulatory monitors as the standard. The form of the calibration function was derived based on laboratory experiments. We discuss various techniques used to estimate measurement uncertainties. A separate user study was also conducted to assess personal exposure and M-Pod reliability. In this study, 10 M-Pods were calibrated via co-location multiple times over 4 weeks and sensor drift was analyzed with the result being a calibration function that included drift. We found that co-location calibrations perform better than laboratory calibrations. Lab calibrations suffer from bias and difficulty in covering the necessary parameter space. During co-location calibrations, median standard errors ranged between 4.0-6.1 ppb for O3, 6.4-8.4 ppb for NO2, 0.28-0.44 ppm for CO, and 16.8 ppm for CO2. Median signal to noise (S/N) ratios for the M-Pod sensors were higher for M-Pods than the regulatory instruments: for NO2, 3.6 compared to 23.4; for O3, 1.4 compared to 1.6; for CO, 1.1 compared to 10.0; and for CO2, 42.2 compared to 300

  18. Cold air performance of a 12.766-centimeter-tip-diameter axial-flow cooled turbine. 2: Effect of air ejection on turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    An air cooled version of a single-stage, axial-flow turbine was investigated to determine aerodynamic performance with and without air ejection from the stator and rotor blades surfaces to simulate the effect of cooling air discharge. Air ejection rate was varied from 0 to 10 percent of turbine mass flow for both the stator and the rotor. A primary-to-air ejection temperature ratio of about 1 was maintained.

  19. Heat transfer measurements in fully turbulent flows: basic investigations with an advanced thin foil triple sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocikat, H.; Herwig, H.

    2008-07-01

    In a former article in this journal a double layer hot film with two 10 μm nickel foils, separated by a 25 μm polyimide foil was introduced as a multi-purpose sensor. Each foil can be operated as a (calibrated) temperature sensor in its passive mode by imposing an electric current small enough to avoid heating by dissipation of electrical energy. Alternatively, however, each foil can also serve as a heater in an active mode with electric currents high enough to cause Joule heating. This double foil sensor can be used as a conventional heat flux sensor in its passive mode when mounted on an externally heated surface. In fully turbulent flows it alternatively can be operated in an active mode on a cold, i.e. not externally heated surface. Then, by heating the upper foil, a local heat transfer is initiated from which the local heat transfer coefficient h can be determined, once the lower foil is heated to the same temperature as the upper one, thus acting as a counter-heater. For further investigations with respect to the underlying sensor concept a triple sensor has been built which consists of three double layer film sensors very close to each other. Various aspects of heat transfer measurements in active modes can be addressed by this sensor.

  20. Design and Fabrication of a MEMS Flow Sensor and Its Application in Precise Liquid Dispensing

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaxin; Chen, Liguo; Sun, Lining

    2009-01-01

    A high speed MEMS flow sensor to enhance the reliability and accuracy of a liquid dispensing system is proposed. Benefitting from the sensor information feedback, the system can self-adjust the open time of the solenoid valve to accurately dispense desired volumes of reagent without any pre-calibration. First, an integrated high-speed liquid flow sensor based on the measurement of the pressure difference across a flow channel is presented. Dimensions of the micro-flow channel and two pressure sensors have been appropriately designed to meet the static and dynamic requirements of the liquid dispensing system. Experiments results show that the full scale (FS) flow measurement ranges up to 80 μL/s, with a nonlinearity better than 0.51% FS. Secondly, a novel closed-loop control strategy is proposed to calculate the valve open time in each dispensing cycle, which makes the system immune to liquid viscosity, pressure fluctuation, and other sources of error. Finally, dispensing results show that the system can achieve better dispensing performance, and the coefficient of variance (CV) for liquid dispensing is below 3% at 1 μL and below 4% at 100 nL. PMID:22408517

  1. Detection of flow separation and stagnation points using artificial hair sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, D. M.; Ray, C. W.; Hagen, B. J.; Su, W.; Baur, J. W.; Reich, G. W.

    2015-11-01

    Recent interest in fly-by-feel approaches for aircraft control has motivated the development of novel sensors for use in aerial systems. Artificial hair sensors (AHSs) are one type of device that promise to fill a unique niche in the sensory suite for aerial systems. In this work, we investigate the capability of an AHS based on structural glass fibers to directly identify flow stagnation and separation points on a cylindrical domain in a steady flow. The glass fibers are functionalized with a radially aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forest and elicit a piezoresistive response as the CNT forest impinges on electrodes in a micropore when the hair is deflected due to viscous drag forces. Particle image velocimetry is used to measure the flow field allowing for the resulting moment and force acting on the hair to be correlated with the electrical response. It is demonstrated that the AHS provides estimates for the locations of both the stagnation and separation in steady flow. From this, a simulation of a heading estimation is presented to demonstrate a potential application for hair sensors. These results motivate the construction of large arrays of hair sensors for imaging and resolving flow structures in real time.

  2. Two-Dimensional Automatic Measurement for Nozzle Flow Distribution Using Improved Ultrasonic Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Changyuan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wang, Xiu; Wang, Ning; Zou, Wei; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Spray deposition and distribution are affected by many factors, one of which is nozzle flow distribution. A two-dimensional automatic measurement system, which consisted of a conveying unit, a system control unit, an ultrasonic sensor, and a deposition collecting dish, was designed and developed. The system could precisely move an ultrasonic sensor above a pesticide deposition collecting dish to measure the nozzle flow distribution. A sensor sleeve with a PVC tube was designed for the ultrasonic sensor to limit its beam angle in order to measure the liquid level in the small troughs. System performance tests were conducted to verify the designed functions and measurement accuracy. A commercial spray nozzle was also used to measure its flow distribution. The test results showed that the relative error on volume measurement was less than 7.27% when the liquid volume was 2 mL in trough, while the error was less than 4.52% when the liquid volume was 4 mL or more. The developed system was also used to evaluate the flow distribution of a commercial nozzle. It was able to provide the shape and the spraying width of the flow distribution accurately. PMID:26501288

  3. Two-dimensional automatic measurement for nozzle flow distribution using improved ultrasonic sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Changyuan; Zhao, Chunjiang; Wang, Xiu; Wang, Ning; Zou, Wei; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Spray deposition and distribution are affected by many factors, one of which is nozzle flow distribution. A two-dimensional automatic measurement system, which consisted of a conveying unit, a system control unit, an ultrasonic sensor, and a deposition collecting dish, was designed and developed. The system could precisely move an ultrasonic sensor above a pesticide deposition collecting dish to measure the nozzle flow distribution. A sensor sleeve with a PVC tube was designed for the ultrasonic sensor to limit its beam angle in order to measure the liquid level in the small troughs. System performance tests were conducted to verify the designed functions and measurement accuracy. A commercial spray nozzle was also used to measure its flow distribution. The test results showed that the relative error on volume measurement was less than 7.27% when the liquid volume was 2 mL in trough, while the error was less than 4.52% when the liquid volume was 4 mL or more. The developed system was also used to evaluate the flow distribution of a commercial nozzle. It was able to provide the shape and the spraying width of the flow distribution accurately. PMID:26501288

  4. A novel low profile wireless flow sensor to monitor hemodynamic changes in cerebral aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanfei; Jankowitz, Brian T.; Cho, Sung Kwon; Chun, Youngjae

    2015-03-01

    A proof of concept of low-profile flow sensor has been designed, fabricated, and subsequently tested to demonstrate its feasibility for monitoring hemodynamic changes in cerebral aneurysm. The prototype sensor contains three layers, i.e., a thin polyurethane layer was sandwiched between two sputter-deposited thin film nitinol layers (6μm thick). A novel superhydrophilic surface treatment was used to create hemocompatible surface of thin nitinol electrode layers. A finite element model was conducted using ANSYS Workbench 15.0 Static Structural to optimize the dimensions of flow sensor. A computational fluid dynamics calculations were performed using ANSYS Workbench Fluent to assess the flow velocity patterns within the aneurysm sac. We built a test platform with a z-axis translation stage and an S-beam load cell to compare the capacitance changes of the sensors with different parameters during deformation. Both LCR meter and oscilloscope were used to measure the capacitance and the resonant frequency shifts, respectively. The experimental compression tests demonstrated the linear relationship between the capacitance and applied compression force and decreasing the length, width and increasing the thickness improved the sensor sensitivity. The experimentally measured resonant frequency dropped from 12.7MHz to 12.48MHz, indicating a 0.22MHz shift with 200g ( 2N) compression force while the theoretical resonant frequency shifted 0.35MHz with 50g ( 0.5N). Our recent results demonstrated a feasibility of the low-profile flow sensor for monitoring haemodynamics in cerebral aneurysm region, as well as the efficacy of the use of the surface treated thin film nitinol for the low-profile sensor materials.

  5. Design of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor with small thermal hysteresis for air data modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jin Woo; Lee, Jang-Sub; An, Jun-Eon; Park, Chan Gook

    2015-06-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation results of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor fabricated by the dry etching process are described in this paper. The proposed sensor is designed to have optimal performances in mid-pressure range from 0 psi to 20 psi suitable for a precision air data module. The piezoresistors with a Wheatstone bridge structure are implanted where the thermal effects are minimized subject to sustainment of the sensitivity. The rectangular-shaped silicon diaphragm is adopted and its dimension is analyzed for improving pressure sensitivity and linearity. The bridge resistors are driven by constant current to compensate temperature effects on sensitivity. The designed differential pressure sensor is fabricated by using MEMS dry etching techniques, and the fabricated sensing element is attached and packaged in a Kovar package in consideration of leakage and temperature hysteresis. The implemented sensors are tested and evaluated as well. The evaluation results show the static RSS (root sum square) accuracy including nonlinearity, non-repeatability, and pressure hysteresis before temperature compensation is about 0.09%, and the total error band which includes the RSS accuracy, the thermal hysteresis, and other thermal effects is about 0.11%, which confirm the validity of the proposed design process.

  6. Design of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor with small thermal hysteresis for air data modules.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin Woo; Lee, Jang-Sub; An, Jun-Eon; Park, Chan Gook

    2015-06-01

    The design, fabrication, and evaluation results of a MEMS piezoresistive differential pressure sensor fabricated by the dry etching process are described in this paper. The proposed sensor is designed to have optimal performances in mid-pressure range from 0 psi to 20 psi suitable for a precision air data module. The piezoresistors with a Wheatstone bridge structure are implanted where the thermal effects are minimized subject to sustainment of the sensitivity. The rectangular-shaped silicon diaphragm is adopted and its dimension is analyzed for improving pressure sensitivity and linearity. The bridge resistors are driven by constant current to compensate temperature effects on sensitivity. The designed differential pressure sensor is fabricated by using MEMS dry etching techniques, and the fabricated sensing element is attached and packaged in a Kovar package in consideration of leakage and temperature hysteresis. The implemented sensors are tested and evaluated as well. The evaluation results show the static RSS (root sum square) accuracy including nonlinearity, non-repeatability, and pressure hysteresis before temperature compensation is about 0.09%, and the total error band which includes the RSS accuracy, the thermal hysteresis, and other thermal effects is about 0.11%, which confirm the validity of the proposed design process.

  7. Composition pulse time-of-flight mass flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Harnett, Cindy K.; Crocker, Robert W.; Mosier, Bruce P.; Caton, Pamela F.; Stamps, James F.

    2007-06-05

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 2,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined. A pair of spaced apart electrodes can be used to produce the electrochemical pulse. In those instances where it is desired to measure a wide range of fluid flow rates a three electrode configuration in which the electrodes are spaced at unequal distances has been found to be desirable.

  8. How Small Can We Go: Exploring the Limitations and Scaling laws of Air-Microfluidic Particulate Matter Sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air-microfluidics is a field that has the potential to dramatically reduce the size, cost, and power requirements of future air quality sensors. Microfabrication provides a suite of relatively new tools for the development of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) that can be ap...

  9. Seluge++: A Secure Over-the-Air Programming Scheme in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Doroodgar, Farzan; Razzaque, Mohammad Abdur; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2014-01-01

    Over-the-air dissemination of code updates in wireless sensor networks have been researchers' point of interest in the last few years, and, more importantly, security challenges toward the remote propagation of code updating have occupied the majority of efforts in this context. Many security models have been proposed to establish a balance between the energy consumption and security strength, having their concentration on the constrained nature of wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes. For authentication purposes, most of them have used a Merkle hash tree to avoid using multiple public cryptography operations. These models mostly have assumed an environment in which security has to be at a standard level. Therefore, they have not investigated the tree structure for mission-critical situations in which security has to be at the maximum possible level (e.g., military applications, healthcare). Considering this, we investigate existing security models used in over-the-air dissemination of code updates for possible vulnerabilities, and then, we provide a set of countermeasures, correspondingly named Security Model Requirements. Based on the investigation, we concentrate on Seluge, one of the existing over-the-air programming schemes, and we propose an improved version of it, named Seluge++, which complies with the Security Model Requirements and replaces the use of the inefficient Merkle tree with a novel method. Analytical and simulation results show the improvements in Seluge++ compared to Seluge. PMID:24618781

  10. Measurement of air exchange rates in different indoor environments using continuous CO2 sensors.

    PubMed

    You, Yan; Niu, Can; Zhou, Jian; Liu, Yating; Bai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Jiefeng; He, Fei; Zhang, Nan

    2012-01-01

    A new air exchange rate (AER) monitoring method using continuous CO2 sensors was developed and validated through both laboratory experiments and field studies. Controlled laboratory simulation tests were conducted in a 1-m3 environmental chamber at different AERs (0.1-10.0 hr(-1)). AERs were determined using the decay method based on box model assumptions. Field tests were conducted in classrooms, dormitories, meeting rooms and apartments during 2-5 weekdays using CO2 sensors coupled with data loggers. Indoor temperature, relative humidity (RH), and CO2 concentrations were continuously monitored while outdoor parameters combined with on-site climate conditions were recorded. Statistical results indicated that good laboratory performance was achieved: duplicate precision was within 10%, and the measured AERs were 90%-120% of the real AERs. Average AERs were 1.22, 1.37, 1.10, 1.91 and 0.73 hr(-1) in dormitories, air-conditioned classrooms, classrooms with an air circulation cooling system, reading rooms, and meeting rooms, respectively. In an elderly particulate matter exposure study, all the homes had AER values ranging from 0.29 to 3.46 hr(-1) in fall, and 0.12 to 1.39 hr(-1) in winter with a median AER of 1.15.

  11. Seluge++: a secure over-the-air programming scheme in wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Doroodgar, Farzan; Abdur Razzaque, Mohammad; Isnin, Ismail Fauzi

    2014-03-11

    Over-the-air dissemination of code updates in wireless sensor networks have been researchers' point of interest in the last few years, and, more importantly, security challenges toward the remote propagation of code updating have occupied the majority of efforts in this context. Many security models have been proposed to establish a balance between the energy consumption and security strength, having their concentration on the constrained nature of wireless sensor network (WSN) nodes. For authentication purposes, most of them have used a Merkle hash tree to avoid using multiple public cryptography operations. These models mostly have assumed an environment in which security has to be at a standard level. Therefore, they have not investigated the tree structure for mission-critical situations in which security has to be at the maximum possible level (e.g., military applications, healthcare). Considering this, we investigate existing security models used in over-the-air dissemination of code updates for possible vulnerabilities, and then, we provide a set of countermeasures, correspondingly named Security Model Requirements. Based on the investigation, we concentrate on Seluge, one of the existing over-the-air programming schemes, and we propose an improved version of it, named Seluge++, which complies with the Security Model Requirements and replaces the use of the inefficient Merkle tree with a novel method. Analytical and simulation results show the improvements in Seluge++ compared to Seluge.

  12. MEMS sensors for assessing flow-related control of an underwater biomimetic robotic stingray.

    PubMed

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Haghighi, Reza; Cloitre, Audren; Alvarado, Pablo Valdivia Y; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-05-18

    A major difference between manmade underwater robotic vehicles (URVs) and undersea animals is the dense arrays of sensors on the body of the latter which enable them to execute extreme control of their limbs and demonstrate super-maneuverability. There is a high demand for miniaturized, low-powered, lightweight and robust sensors that can perform sensing on URVs to improve their control and maneuverability. In this paper, we present the design, fabrication and experimental testing of two types of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors that benefit the situational awareness and control of a robotic stingray. The first one is a piezoresistive liquid crystal polymer haircell flow sensor which is employed to determine the velocity of propagation of the stingray. The second one is Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O3 piezoelectric micro-diaphragm pressure sensor which measures various flapping parameters of the stingray's fins that are key parameters to control the robot locomotion. The polymer flow sensors determine that by increasing the flapping frequency of the fins from 0.5 to 3 Hz the average velocity of the stingray increases from 0.05 to 0.4 BL s(-1), respectively. The role of these sensors in detecting errors in control and functioning of the actuators in performing tasks like flapping at a desired amplitude and frequency, swimming at a desired velocity and direction are quantified. The proposed sensors are also used to provide inputs for a model predictive control which allows the robot to track a desired trajectory. Although a robotic stingray is used as a platform to emphasize the role of the MEMS sensors, the applications can be extended to most URVs.

  13. MEMS sensors for assessing flow-related control of an underwater biomimetic robotic stingray.

    PubMed

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Haghighi, Reza; Cloitre, Audren; Alvarado, Pablo Valdivia Y; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-06-01

    A major difference between manmade underwater robotic vehicles (URVs) and undersea animals is the dense arrays of sensors on the body of the latter which enable them to execute extreme control of their limbs and demonstrate super-maneuverability. There is a high demand for miniaturized, low-powered, lightweight and robust sensors that can perform sensing on URVs to improve their control and maneuverability. In this paper, we present the design, fabrication and experimental testing of two types of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors that benefit the situational awareness and control of a robotic stingray. The first one is a piezoresistive liquid crystal polymer haircell flow sensor which is employed to determine the velocity of propagation of the stingray. The second one is Pb(Zr(0.52)Ti(0.48))O3 piezoelectric micro-diaphragm pressure sensor which measures various flapping parameters of the stingray's fins that are key parameters to control the robot locomotion. The polymer flow sensors determine that by increasing the flapping frequency of the fins from 0.5 to 3 Hz the average velocity of the stingray increases from 0.05 to 0.4 BL s(-1), respectively. The role of these sensors in detecting errors in control and functioning of the actuators in performing tasks like flapping at a desired amplitude and frequency, swimming at a desired velocity and direction are quantified. The proposed sensors are also used to provide inputs for a model predictive control which allows the robot to track a desired trajectory. Although a robotic stingray is used as a platform to emphasize the role of the MEMS sensors, the applications can be extended to most URVs. PMID:25984934

  14. Experimental and analytical dynamic flow characteristics of an axial-flow fan from an air cushion landing system model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. C.; Boghani, A. B.; Leland, T. J. W.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to compare the steady-state and dynamic flow characteristics of an axial-flow fan which had been used previously as the air supply fan for some model air cushion landing system studies. Steady-state flow characteristics were determined in the standard manner by using differential orifice pressures for the flow regime from free flow to zero flow. In this same regime, a correlative technique was established so that fan inlet and outlet pressures could be used to measure dynamic flow as created by a rotating damper. Dynamic tests at damper frequencies up to 5 Hz showed very different flow characteristics when compared with steady-state flow, particularly with respect to peak pressures and the pressure-flow relationship at fan stall and unstall. A generalized, rational mathematical fan model was developed based on physical fan parameters and a steady-state flow characteristic. The model showed good correlation with experimental tests at damper frequencies up to 5 Hz.

  15. Computational modeling of air-breathing microfluidic fuel cells with flow-over and flow-through anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Ye, Ding-ding; Sui, Pang-Chieh; Djilali, Ned; Zhu, Xun

    2014-08-01

    A three-dimensional computational model for air-breathing microfluidic fuel cells (AMFCs) with flow-over and flow-through anodes is developed. The coupled multiphysics phenomena of fluid flow, species transport and electrochemical reactions are resolved numerically. The model has been validated against experimental data using an in-house AMFC prototype with a flow-through anode. Characteristics of fuel transfer and fuel crossover for both types of anodes are investigated. The model results reveal that the fuel transport to the flow-over anode is intrinsically limited by the fuel concentration boundary layer. Conversely, fuel transport for the flow-through anode is convectively enhanced by the permeate flow, and no concentration boundary layer is observed. An unexpected additional advantage of the flow-through anode configuration is lower parasitic (crossover) current density than the flow-over case at practical low flow rates. Cell performance of the flow-through case is found to be limited by reaction kinetics. The present model provides insights into the fuel transport and fuel crossover in air-breathing microfluidic fuel cells and provides guidance for further design and operation optimization.

  16. Monitoring of atmospheric aerosol emissions using a remotely piloted air vehicle (RPV)-Borne Sensor Suite

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    We have developed a small sensor system, the micro-atmospheric measurement system ({mu}-AMS), to monitor and track aerosol emissions. The system was developed to fly aboard a remotely piloted air vehicle, or other mobile platform, to provide real-time particle measurements in effluent plumes and to collect particles for chemical analysis. The {mu}-AMS instrument measures atmospheric parameters including particle mass concentration and size distribution, temperature, humidity, and airspeed, altitude and position (by GPS receiver) each second. The sensor data are stored onboard and are also down linked to a ground station in real time. The {mu}-AMS is battery powered, small (8 in. dia x 36 in.), and lightweight (15 pounds). Aerosol concentrations and size distributions from above ground explosive tests, airbone urban pollution, and traffic-produced particulates are presented.

  17. A study on the characteristics of upward air-water two-phase flow in a large diameter pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xiuzhong; Saito, Yasushi; Mishima, Kaichiro; Nakamura, Hideo

    2006-10-15

    An adiabatic upward co-current air-water two-phase flow in a vertical large diameter pipe (inner diameter, D: 0.2m, ratio of pipe length to diameter, L/D: 60.5) was experimentally investigated under various inlet conditions. Flow regimes were visually observed, carefully analyzed and classified into five, i.e. undisturbed bubbly, agitated bubbly, churn bubbly, churn slug and churn froth. Void fraction, bubble frequency, Sauter mean diameter, interfacial area concentration (IAC) and interfacial direction were measured with four-sensor optical probes. Both the measured void fraction and the measured IAC demonstrated radial core-peak distributions in most of the flow regimes and radial wall peak in the undisturbed bubbly flow only. The bubble frequency also showed a wall-peak radial distribution only when the bubbles were small in diameter and the flow was in the undisturbed bubbly flow. The Sauter mean diameter of bubbles did not change much in the radial direction in undisturbed bubbly, agitated bubbly and churn bubbly flows and showed a core-peak radial distribution in the churn slug flow due to the existence of certain amount of large and deformed bubbles in this flow regime. The measurements of interfacial direction showed that the main and the secondary bubbly flow could be displayed by the main flow peak and the secondary flow peak, respectively, in the probability density function (PDF) of the interfacial directional angle between the interfacial direction and the z-axis, {eta}{sub zi}. The local average {eta}{sub zi }at the bubble front or rear hemisphere ({eta}{sub zi}{sup F} and {eta}{sub zi}{sup R}) reflected the local bubble movement and was in direct connection with the flow regimes. Based on the analysis, the authors classified the flow regimes in the vertical large diameter pipe quantitatively by the cross-sectional area-averaged {eta}{sub zi }at bubbly front hemisphere ({eta}{sub zi}{sup F}-bar). Bubbles in the undisturbed bubbly flow moved in a

  18. Assessment of diffusion parameters of new passive samplers using optical chemical sensor for on-site measuring formaldehyde in indoor air: experimental and numerical studies.

    PubMed

    Vignau-Laulhere, Jane; Mocho, Pierre; Plaisance, Hervé; Raulin, Katarzyna; Desauziers, Valérie

    2016-03-01

    New passive samplers using a sensor consisting of a sol-gel matrix entrapping Fluoral-P as sampling media were developed for the determination of formaldehyde in indoor air. The reaction between Fluoral-P and formaldehyde produces a colored compound which is quantified on-site by means of a simple optical reading module. The advantages of this sensor are selectivity, low cost, ppb level limit of detection, and on-site direct measurement. In the development process, it is necessary to determine the sampling rate, a key parameter that cannot be directly assessed in the case of diffusive samplers using optical chemical sensor. In this study, a methodology combining experimental tests and numerical modeling is proposed and applied at five different radial diffusive samplers equipped with the same optical chemical sensor to assess the sampled material flows and sampling rates. These radial diffusive samplers differ in the internal volume of the sampler (18.97 and 6.14 cm(3)), the position of sensor inside the sampler (in front and offset of 1.2 cm above the membrane) and the width of the diffusion slot (1.4 and 5.9 mm). The influences of these three parameters (internal volume, position of sensor inside the sampler, and width of the diffusion slot) were assessed and discussed with regard to the formaldehyde sampling rate and water uptake by sensor (potential interference of measure). Numerical simulations based on Fick's laws are in agreement with the experimental results and provide to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde through the membrane (3.50 × 10(-6) m(2) s(-1)). Conversion factors between the sensor response, sampled formaldehyde mass and sampling rate were also assessed.

  19. Assessment of diffusion parameters of new passive samplers using optical chemical sensor for on-site measuring formaldehyde in indoor air: experimental and numerical studies.

    PubMed

    Vignau-Laulhere, Jane; Mocho, Pierre; Plaisance, Hervé; Raulin, Katarzyna; Desauziers, Valérie

    2016-03-01

    New passive samplers using a sensor consisting of a sol-gel matrix entrapping Fluoral-P as sampling media were developed for the determination of formaldehyde in indoor air. The reaction between Fluoral-P and formaldehyde produces a colored compound which is quantified on-site by means of a simple optical reading module. The advantages of this sensor are selectivity, low cost, ppb level limit of detection, and on-site direct measurement. In the development process, it is necessary to determine the sampling rate, a key parameter that cannot be directly assessed in the case of diffusive samplers using optical chemical sensor. In this study, a methodology combining experimental tests and numerical modeling is proposed and applied at five different radial diffusive samplers equipped with the same optical chemical sensor to assess the sampled material flows and sampling rates. These radial diffusive samplers differ in the internal volume of the sampler (18.97 and 6.14 cm(3)), the position of sensor inside the sampler (in front and offset of 1.2 cm above the membrane) and the width of the diffusion slot (1.4 and 5.9 mm). The influences of these three parameters (internal volume, position of sensor inside the sampler, and width of the diffusion slot) were assessed and discussed with regard to the formaldehyde sampling rate and water uptake by sensor (potential interference of measure). Numerical simulations based on Fick's laws are in agreement with the experimental results and provide to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde through the membrane (3.50 × 10(-6) m(2) s(-1)). Conversion factors between the sensor response, sampled formaldehyde mass and sampling rate were also assessed. PMID:26847188

  20. Program and charts for determining shock tube, and expansion tunnel flow quantities for real air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program in FORTRAN 4 language was written to determine shock tube, expansion tube, and expansion tunnel flow quantities for real-air test gas. This program permits, as input data, a number of possible combinations of flow quantities generally measured during a test. The versatility of the program is enhanced by the inclusion of such effects as a standing or totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm, thermochemical-equilibrium flow expansion and frozen flow expansion for the expansion tube and expansion tunnel, attenuation of the flow in traversing the acceleration section of the expansion tube, real air as the acceleration gas, and the effect of wall boundary layer on the acceleration section air flow. Charts which provide a rapid estimation of expansion tube performance prior to a test are included.

  1. Groundwater remediation engineering sparging using acetylene--study on the flow distribution of air.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Mei; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Guo-Qiang; Jiang, Bin; Li, Xin-Gang

    2005-01-01

    Air sparging (AS) is an emerging method to remove VOCs from saturated soils and groundwater. Air sparging performance highly depends on the air distribution resulting in the aquifer. In order to study gas flow characterization, a two-dimensional experimental chamber was designed and installed. In addition, the method by using acetylene as the tracer to directly image the gas distribution results of AS process has been put forward. Experiments were performed with different injected gas flow rates. The gas flow patterns were found to depend significantly on the injected gas flow rate, and the characterization of gas flow distributions in porous media was very different from the acetylene tracing study. Lower and higher gas flow rates generally yield more irregular in shape and less effective gas distributions.

  2. In situ permeable flow sensor - OST reference No. 99. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This summary reports describes the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor (ISPFS) developed to directly measure the direction and velocity of groundwater flow at a point in saturated soil sediments. The ISPFS provides information for locating, designing, and monitoring waste disposal sites, and for monitoring remediated waste sites. The design and performance are described and compared to alternative methods. Economic, regulatory, and policy issues are discussed. Applicability of the ISPFS to specific situations is also summarized. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Air Flow Through Two Wintertime Mid-Latitude Cyclones Interacting with Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugman, M. M.; Macdonald, A.; Mo, R.; Milbrandt, J.; Mctaggart-Cowan, R.; Smith, T.; Goosen, J.; Isaac, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    The conveyor belt and tropospheric folding conceptual models of a mid-latitude storm system were examined to determine their utility for improving analysis and forecasting of wintertime precipitation events over the rugged coastal mountains of British Columbia. A Doppler C-band radar probed the underside of several strong cyclones as they crossed the BC coastal ranges. The radar profiles indicated wind shifts and reflectivity layering. The layering was also evident in the moisture, precipitation (type and amount), temperature and wind patterns data collected by SNOW-V10 during the Vancouver 2010 Olympics. Storms from Feb 13-14 and March 12, 2010 are examined in this paper. Air Quality data from Whistler Mountain (elevation 2182 m asl) showed elevated ozone levels ahead of the warm front. The lower elevation sensors nearby did not show ozone with the same warm front or ahead of Trowal features. The ozone pattern observed for these storms was characteristic of similar storms investigated during 2010-2011 and can be best explained using a combination of tropospheric folding and conveyor belt conceptual models. Diabatic cooling due to melting snowfall and associated down valley winds were observed, but flow speeds were greater than expected from the existing operational forecasting models. Results imply that tropospheric folding (STE), cold conveyor dynamics and stronger low level outflow of dry air contribute to enhanced diabatic cooling. This appears to generate stronger down valley outflow winds that help excite gravity waves beneath the warm moist conveyor belt. A feedback between storm intensification, diabatic cooling and heavy precipitation is suggested by the results. A multi-moment precipitation scheme in the experimental Olympic GEM 2.5 and 1 km models reproduced some but not all diabatic effects. A review of all the major winter storms identified by the SNOW-V10 researchers, the 2010 Olympic forecasters and the Pacific Storm Prediction Centre operational

  4. Smart monolithic integration of inkjet printed thermal flow sensors with fast prototyping polymer microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etxebarria, Ikerne; Elizalde, Jorge; Pacios, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for built-in flow sensors in order to effectively control microfluidic processes due to the high number of available microfluidic applications. The possible solutions should be inexpensive and easy to connect to both, the microscale features and the macro setup. In this paper, we present a novel approach to integrate a printed thermal flow sensor with polymeric microfluidic channels. This approach is focused on merging two high throughput production processes, namely inkjet printing and fast prototyping technologies, in order to produce trustworthy and low cost devices. These two technologies are brought together to obtain a sensor located outside the microfluidic device. This avoids the critical contact between the sensor material and the fluids through the microchannels that can seriously damage the conducting paths under continuous working regimes. In this way, we ensure reliable and stable operation modes. For this application, a silver nanoparticle based ink and cyclic olefin polymer were used. This flow sensor operates linearly in the range of 0–10 μl min‑1 for water and 0–20 μl min‑1 for ethanol in calorimetric mode. Switching to anemometric mode, the range can be expanded up to 40 μl min‑1.

  5. Smart monolithic integration of inkjet printed thermal flow sensors with fast prototyping polymer microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etxebarria, Ikerne; Elizalde, Jorge; Pacios, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for built-in flow sensors in order to effectively control microfluidic processes due to the high number of available microfluidic applications. The possible solutions should be inexpensive and easy to connect to both, the microscale features and the macro setup. In this paper, we present a novel approach to integrate a printed thermal flow sensor with polymeric microfluidic channels. This approach is focused on merging two high throughput production processes, namely inkjet printing and fast prototyping technologies, in order to produce trustworthy and low cost devices. These two technologies are brought together to obtain a sensor located outside the microfluidic device. This avoids the critical contact between the sensor material and the fluids through the microchannels that can seriously damage the conducting paths under continuous working regimes. In this way, we ensure reliable and stable operation modes. For this application, a silver nanoparticle based ink and cyclic olefin polymer were used. This flow sensor operates linearly in the range of 0-10 μl min-1 for water and 0-20 μl min-1 for ethanol in calorimetric mode. Switching to anemometric mode, the range can be expanded up to 40 μl min-1.

  6. Development of an amperometric flow analysis sensor for specific detection of D-psicose.

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, Nobumitsu; Sato, Naruhide; Nakakita, Shin-Ichi; Sumiyoshi, Wataru; Morimoto, Kenji; Okuma, Hirokazu; Tokuda, Masaaki; Izumori, Ken; Watanabe, Etsuo; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2008-04-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple, rapid and highly sensitive sensor for measuring the rare sugar d-psicose. The proposed system adopts amperometric flow analysis and two consecutive enzyme reactions consisting of a reactor packed with d-tagatose 3-epimerase (DTE)-immobilized beads, which converts d-psicose to d-fructose, and a carbon-paste electrode containing d-fructose dehydrogenase (DFDH). In order to fabricate a robust sensor system, various experimental parameters were optimized including the buffer composition, flow rate for the two enzyme reactions and the size of micro-flow cell. The developed sensor responded linearly to d-psicose concentration in the range from 0.08 to 50mM (R(2)=0.988). The signal/noise ratio was 3.0 for the 0.08 mM d-psicose solution, and the relative standard deviations were 1.7 (n=20) and 2.6% (n=20) for the 10 and 20mM d-psicose solutions, respectively. One round of assay was completed within 8 min. Our results suggest that the sensor can be used not only for the detection of d-psicose in food samples but also for monitoring d-psicose within the environment. Moreover, the sensor system can be applied to the detection of many other rare sugars by using the same measurement principle.

  7. Forced convective flow and heat transfer of upward cocurrent air-water slug flow in vertical plain and swirl tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shyy Woei; Yang, Tsun Lirng

    2009-10-15

    This experimental study comparatively examined the two-phase flow structures, pressured drops and heat transfer performances for the cocurrent air-water slug flows in the vertical tubes with and without the spiky twisted tape insert. The two-phase flow structures in the plain and swirl tubes were imaged using the computerized high frame-rate videography with the Taylor bubble velocity measured. Superficial liquid Reynolds number (Re{sub L}) and air-to-water mass flow ratio (AW), which were respectively in the ranges of 4000-10000 and 0.003-0.02 were selected as the controlling parameters to specify the flow condition and derive the heat transfer correlations. Tube-wise averaged void fraction and Taylor bubble velocity were well correlated by the modified drift flux models for both plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition. A set of selected data obtained from the plain and swirl tubes was comparatively examined to highlight the impacts of the spiky twisted tape on the air-water interfacial structure and the pressure drop and heat transfer performances. Empirical heat transfer correlations that permitted the evaluation of individual and interdependent Re{sub L} and AW impacts on heat transfer in the developed flow regions of the plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition were derived. (author)

  8. Effect of air-flow rate and turning frequency on bio-drying of dewatered sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Gu, Wei-Mei; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Sludge bio-drying is an approach for biomass energy utilization, in which sludge is dried by means of the heat generated by aerobic degradation of its organic substances. The study aimed at investigating the interactive influence of air-flow rate and turning frequency on water removal and biomass energy utilization. Results showed that a higher air-flow rate (0.0909m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) led to lower temperature than did the lower one (0.0455m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) by 17.0% and 13.7% under turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate and lower turning frequency, temperature cumulation was almost similar to that with the lower air-flow rate and higher turning frequency. The doubled air-flow rate improved the total water removal ratio by 2.86% (19.5gkg(-1) initial water) and 11.5% (75.0gkg(-1) initial water) with turning per two days and four days respectively, indicating that there was no remarkable advantage for water removal with high air-flow rate, especially with high turning frequency. The heat used for evaporation was 60.6-72.6% of the total heat consumption (34,400-45,400kJ). The higher air-flow rate enhanced volatile solids (VS) degradation thus improving heat generation by 1.95% (800kJ) and 8.96% (3200kJ) with turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate, heat consumed by sensible heat of inlet air and heat utilization efficiency for evaporation was higher than the lower one. With the higher turning frequency, sensible heat of materials and heat consumed by turning was higher than lower one.

  9. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR RESIDENTIAL HVAC RETURNS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-02-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent). Because manufacturers’ accuracy estimates for their equipment do not include many of the sources of error found in actual field measurements (and replicated in the laboratory testing in this study) it is essential for a test method that could be used to determine the actual uncertainty in this specific application. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  10. Experimental study of a cylindrical air inlet designed on the basis of plane flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vnuchkov, D. A.; Zvegintsev, V. I.; Nalivaichenko, D. G.

    2014-04-01

    Results of an experimental study of a cylindrical air inlet designed for high flight speeds on the basis of plane flows are reported. For an air inlet intended for Mach number M = 4, the flow-rate characteristics at M = 2.85, 3.83, and 4.95 for angles of attack ranging from 0 to 9 degrees have been measured. The results of tests have shown that at free-stream Mach number M = 3.83, close to the design Mach number, the mass rate of the air flow captured by the air inlet was 96 % of its design value, and this rate increased to 99 % as the Mach number was increased to 4.95. At a lower, in comparison with the design value, free-stream Mach number, M = 2.85, the mass rate of the air flow captured by the inlet installed under zero angle of attack has decreased to 68 %. For all the examined Mach numbers, an increase in the angle of attack from 0 to 9 degrees resulted in an 8-14 % decrease of the mass rate of inlet-captured air flow. For comparison, numerical calculation of the air-inlet flow at Mach number M = 3.83 was performed. The obtained data were found to be in a qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  11. Simulation of air-droplet mixed phase flow in icing wind-tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengyao, Leng; Shinan, Chang; Menglong, Wu; Yunhang, Li

    2013-07-01

    Icing wind-tunnel is the main ground facility for the research of aircraft icing, which is different from normal wind-tunnel for its refrigeration system and spraying system. In stable section of icing wind-tunnel, the original parameters of droplets and air are different, for example, to keep the nozzles from freezing, the droplets are heated while the temperature of air is low. It means that complex mass and heat transfer as well as dynamic interactive force would happen between droplets and air, and the parameters of droplet will acutely change along the passageway. Therefore, the prediction of droplet-air mixed phase flow is necessary in the evaluation of icing researching wind-tunnel. In this paper, a simplified droplet-air mixed phase flow model based on Lagrangian method was built. The variation of temperature, diameter and velocity of droplet, as well as the air flow field, during the flow process were obtained under different condition. With calculating three-dimensional air flow field by FLUENT, the droplet could be traced and the droplet distribution could also be achieved. Furthermore, the patterns about how initial parameters affect the parameters in test section were achieved. The numerical simulation solving the flow and heat and mass transfer characteristics in the mixing process is valuable for the optimization of experimental parameters design and equipment adjustment.

  12. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  13. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  14. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  15. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  16. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. 84.155 Section... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type... shall not exceed 25 mm. (1 inch) of water-column height when the air flow into the...

  17. Sensor for Individual Burner Control of Firing Rate, Fuel-Air Ratio, and Coal Fineness Correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Hill; Roger Demler; Robert G. Mudry

    2006-03-01

    To minimize program cost, additional testing was performed in concert with EPRI-funded testing at the Coal Flow Test Facility in late July. The major focus of this effort was noise reduction. As it turned out, the main source of the noise proved to be related to electrical grounding issues and the adjustments needed to address these problems took most of the test period. Once those changes were in place, a very limited quantity of high quality data was obtained and an excellent correlation between the dynamic signature and coal flow was obtained. Additional data were then collected during August. Unfortunately, the sensor signal for the August data collection proved to be extremely weak. Therefore, Airflow Sciences will collect additional laboratory data in October before proceeding with the collection of field data. This will allow the calibration to be expanded to include a wider range of flow conditions and improve the potential applicability to data to be collected at the coal plants.

  18. The next generation of low-cost personal air quality sensors for quantitative exposure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedrahita, R.; Xiang, Y.; Masson, N.; Ortega, J.; Collier, A.; Jiang, Y.; Li, K.; Dick, R. P.; Lv, Q.; Hannigan, M.; Shang, L.

    2014-10-01

    Advances in embedded systems and low-cost gas sensors are enabling a new wave of low-cost air quality monitoring tools. Our team has been engaged in the development of low-cost, wearable, air quality monitors (M-Pods) using the Arduino platform. These M-Pods house two types of sensors - commercially available metal oxide semiconductor (MOx) sensors used to measure CO, O3, NO2, and total VOCs, and NDIR sensors used to measure CO2. The MOx sensors are low in cost and show high sensitivity near ambient levels; however they display non-linear output signals and have cross-sensitivity effects. Thus, a quantification system was developed to convert the MOx sensor signals into concentrations. We conducted two types of validation studies - first, deployments at a regulatory monitoring station in Denver, Colorado, and second, a user study. In the two deployments (at the regulatory monitoring station), M-Pod concentrations were determined using collocation calibrations and laboratory calibration techniques. M-Pods were placed near regulatory monitors to derive calibration function coefficients using the regulatory monitors as the standard. The form of the calibration function was derived based on laboratory experiments. We discuss various techniques used to estimate measurement uncertainties. The deployments revealed that collocation calibrations provide more accurate concentration estimates than laboratory calibrations. During collocation calibrations, median standard errors ranged between 4.0-6.1 ppb for O3, 6.4-8.4 ppb for NO2, 0.28-0.44 ppm for CO, and 16.8 ppm for CO2. Median signal to noise (S / N) ratios for the M-Pod sensors were higher than the regulatory instruments: for NO2, 3.6 compared to 23.4; for O3, 1.4 compared to 1.6; for CO, 1.1 compared to 10.0; and for CO2, 42.2 compared to 300-500. By contrast, lab calibrations added bias and made it difficult to cover the necessary range of environmental conditions to obtain a good calibration. A separate user study

  19. Blood flow measurement using a highly filled carbon polymer sandwich sensor and an elasto-pseudo compressible vascular flow.

    PubMed

    Mehdian, M; Rahnejat, H

    1996-01-01

    Vascular grafts are widely employed in clinical practice and still pose significant problems of compatibility and longevity, particularly when the prosthesis is to replace arteries of small diameter. Once a graft has been implanted in the vascular tree, there is no easy way of assessing its interactions with the surrounding tissue. Doppler flow probes or some imaging techniques are commonly used to monitor flow velocity in vascular prostheses. It is, however, difficult to monitor a patient's recovery on a continuous basis. Continuous means of measurement can be quite invaluable. This paper presents a high-carbon filled polymer (HCFP) sensor that is developed for blood flow measurement in vascular grafts. Furthermore, a computational fluid dynamics model of incompressible blood flow in elastic blood vessels is presented. PMID:9046189

  20. Ultrasensitive detection of microbial cells using magnetic focus enhanced lateral flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen; Cho, Il-Hoon; Zhou, Zhongwu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-04-01

    We report on an improved lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) sensor with a magnetic focus for ultrasensitive naked-eye detection of pathogenic microorganisms at a near single cell limit without any pre-enrichment steps, by allowing the magnetic probes to focus the labelled pathogens to the target zone of the LF strip.

  1. Pulsed-flow air classification for waste to energy production. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peirce, J.J.; Vesilind, P.A.

    1983-09-30

    The development and testing of pulsed-flow air classification for waste-to-energy production are discussed. Standard designs generally permit large amounts of combustible material to escape as reject while producing a fuel that is high in metal and glass contaminants. Pulsed-flow classification is presented as a concept which can avoid both pitfalls. Each aspect of theory and laboratory testing is summarized: particle characteristics, theory of pulsed-flow classification, laboratory testing, and pulsed-flow air classification for waste-to-energy production. Conclusions from the research are summarized.

  2. Environmental sensor technologies and procedures for detecting and identifying indoor air pollution. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, E.T.; Kermath, D.; Kemme, M.R.

    1992-03-01

    Public concern about environmental quality now encompasses the indoor environment-the buildings where people work and live. In recent years researchers have been discovering new links between indoor air quality (IAQ) and the occupants' comfort, health, and productivity. As the operator of many thousands of buildings, and the employer of the millions of people who use those buildings, the U.S. Army has a strong interest in maintaining and promoting good IAQ. This report presents a concise summary of the key IAQ parameters of interest to building managers, the most common indoor air contaminants, the variety of sensor technology currently available for detect and identifying those contaminants, and basic procedures for using that technology.

  3. Air flow and particle control with different ventilation systems in a classroom.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, S; Chen, Q

    2003-06-01

    Most ventilation and air conditioning systems are designed without much concern about how settling particles behave in ventilation air flows. For displacement ventilation systems, designers normally assume that all pollutants follow the buoyant air flow into an upper zone, where they are evacuated. This is, however, not always true. Previous studies show that high concentrations of settling respirable particles can be found in the breathing zone, and that the exposure rates can be a health hazard to occupants. The emphasis here is on how ventilation systems should be designed to minimize respirable airborne particles in the breathing zone. The supply and exhaust conditions of the ventilation air flow are shown to play an important role in the control of air quality. Computer simulation programs of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) type are used. Particle concentrations, thermal conditions and modified ventilation system solutions are reported.

  4. A micromachined thin-film gas flow sensor for microchemical reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, W. C.; Besser, R. S.

    2006-04-01

    As microchemical systems (MCS) have gained in importance since their introduction in the last decade, it has become recognized that appropriate sensing and control capabilities are needed if MCS are to reach their potential. In this context, we present a study of the working behavior of a novel thin-film micro flow sensor which is integrated with a silicon microreactor with a submillimeter channel. A simple-to-fabricate device based on the concept of calorimetric sensing was chosen as a model structure to understand the important factors controlling sensor performance. Various design options for the sensor were explored by the use of computational fluid dynamics simulations. We found that sensitivity depends strongly on certain design factors. In summary, sensitivity is improved with (a) higher values of the resistors that detect flow-induced temperature changes, (b) shorter distances between the resistor that provides a source of heat and the thermally sensitive resistors and (c) higher input power to the heating resistor. Item (a) was found to have by far the strongest effect of the three. Reproducibility tests were conducted and the sensor exhibited consistent performance throughout the entire test range of 0-20 sccm which is an appropriate fit to the flow capacity of the microchannel. Finally, response time was assessed by simulating the transient behavior of the sensor with a thermal capacitance model, which yielded an accurate prediction of the experimental response of the device. The response time is approximately 70 ms at a typical flow rate of 10 sccm. According to the understanding gained from the model, the sensor response time can be improved by reducing the substrate thickness, using a lower density substrate material, and increasing the convective heat transfer coefficient in the channel.

  5. Experimental study on bi-phase flow Air-Oil in Water Emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnone, Davide; Poesio, Pietro

    2015-11-01

    Bi-phase slug flow oil-in-water emulsion [5%-20%] and air through a horizontal pipe (inner diameter 22mm) is experimentally studied. A test with water and air has been performed as comparison. First we create and analyze the flow pattern map to identify slug flow liquid and air inlet conditions. Flow maps are similar for all the used liquid. A video analysis procedure using an high speed camera has been created to obtain all the characteristics of unit slugs: slug velocity, slug length, bubble velocity, bubbles length and slug frequency. We compare translational velocity and frequency with models finding a good agreement. We calculate the pdfs of the lengths to find the correlations between mean values and STD on different air and liquid superficial velocities. We also perform pressure measurements along the pipe. We conclude that the percentage of oil-in- water has no influence on results in terms of velocity, lengths, frequency and pressure drop.

  6. Phonation time, phonation volume and air flow rate in normal adults.

    PubMed

    Prathanee, B; Watthanathon, J; Ruangjirachuporn, P

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the average phonation time, phonation volume and air flow rate, as well as the relationship between each of these parameters during two conditions (normal and deep breaths). Researchers expect to use these averages in screening of voice disorders. One hundred and three subjects, 67 males and 36 females, were studied. The instruments were a 9 liter respirometer, a tape recorder and a stop watch. The results indicated that the parameters for males were significantly greater than those for females. In addition, the findings suggested that the values of mean phonation time, phonation volume and air flow rate during deep breath were significantly greater than those during normal breath (p < 0.05). The phonation time was inversely related to the air flow rate. However, there was a positive relationship between phonation time and phonation volume, as well as between phonation volume and air flow rate. The findings supported our hypothesises.

  7. Intercooler cooling-air weight flow and pressure drop for minimum drag loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reuter, J George; Valerino, Michael F

    1944-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the drag losses in airplane flight of cross-flow plate and tubular intercoolers to determine the cooling-air weight flow and pressure drop that give a minimum drag loss for any given cooling effectiveness and, thus, a maximum power-plant net gain due to charge-air cooling. The drag losses considered in this analysis are those due to (1) the extra drag imposed on the airplane by the weight of the intercooler, its duct, and its supports and (2) the drag sustained by the cooling air in flowing through the intercooler and its duct. The investigation covers a range of conditions of altitude, airspeed, lift-drag ratio, supercharger-pressure ratio, and supercharger adiabatic efficiency. The optimum values of cooling air pressure drop and weight flow ratio are tabulated. Curves are presented to illustrate the results of the analysis.

  8. A dual sensor device to estimate fluid flow velocity at diffuse hydrothermal vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrazin, J.; Rodier, P.; Tivey, M. K.; Singh, H.; Schultz, A.; Sarradin, P. M.

    2009-11-01

    Numerous attempts have been made over the last thirty years to estimate fluid flow rates at hydrothermal vents, either at the exit of black smoker chimneys or within diffuse flow areas. In this study, we combine two methods to accurately estimate fluid flow velocities at diffuse flow areas. While the first method uses a hot film anemometer that performs high-frequency measurements, the second allows a relatively rapid assessment of fluid flow velocity through video imagery and provides in situ data to calibrate the sensor. Measurements of flow velocities on hydrothermal diffuse flow areas were obtained on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). They range from 1.1 to 4.9 mm/s at the substratum level, in low-temperature (4.5-16.4 °C) diffuse flow areas from the Tour Eiffel sulfide edifice. A strong correlation was observed between fluid flow velocities and temperature, supporting the possible use of temperature as a proxy to estimate the flow rates in diffuse flow areas where such a simple linear flow/temperature relation is shown to dominate.

  9. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  10. Development of a Low Pressure, Air Atomized Oil Burner with High Atomizer Air Flow: Progress Report FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Butcher, T.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes technical advances made to the concept of a low pressure, air atomized oil burner for home heating applications. Currently all oil burners on the market are of the pressure atomized, retention head type. These burners have a lower firing rate limit of about 0.5 gallons per hour of oil, due to reliability problems related to small flow passage sizes. High pressure air atomized burners have been shown to be one route to avoid this problem but air compressor cost and reliability have practically eliminated this approach. With the low pressure air atomized burner the air required for atomization can be provided by a fan at 5-8 inches of water pressure. A burner using this concept, termed the Fan-Atomized Burner or ''FAB'' has been developed and is currently being commercialized. In the head of the FAB, the combustion air is divided into three parts, much like a conventional retention head burner. This report describes development work on a new concept in which 100% of the air from the fan goes through the atomizer. The primary advantage of this approach is a great simplification of the head design. A nozzle specifically sized for this concept was built and is described in the report. Basic flow pressure tests, cold air velocity profiles, and atomization performance have been measured. A burner head/flame tube has been developed which promotes a toroidal recirculation zone near the nozzle for flame stability. The burner head has been tested in several furnace and boiler applications over the firing rate range 0.2 to 0.28 gallons per hour. In all cases the burner can operate with very low excess air levels (under 10%) without producing smoke. Flue gas NO{sub x} concentration varied from 42 to 62 ppm at 3% O{sub 2}. The concept is seen as having significant potential and planned development efforts are discussed.

  11. Faster Array Training and Rapid Analysis for a Sensor Array Intended for an Event Monitor in Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Shevade, A. V.; Fonollosa, J.; Huerta, R.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental monitoring, in particular, air monitoring, is a critical need for human space flight. Both monitoring and life support systems have needs for closed loop process feedback and quality control for environmental factors. Monitoring protects the air environment and water supply for the astronaut crew and different sensors help ensure that the habitat falls within acceptable limits, and that the life support system is functioning properly and efficiently. The longer the flight duration and the farther the destination, the more critical it becomes to have carefully monitored and automated control systems for life support. There is an acknowledged need for an event monitor which samples the air continuously and provides near real-time information on changes in the air. Past experiments with the JPL ENose have demonstrated a lifetime of the sensor array, with the software, of around 18 months. We are working on a sensor array and new algorithms that will incorporate transient sensor responses in the analysis. Preliminary work has already showed more rapid quantification and identification of analytes and the potential for faster training time of the array. We will look at some of the factors that contribute to demonstrating faster training time for the array. Faster training will decrease the integrated sensor exposure to training analytes, which will also help extend sensor lifetime.

  12. Is it Necessary to Consider Air Flow in Land Surface Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Y.; Su, Z.; Wan, L.; Wen, J.

    2011-12-01

    From a subsurface physical point of view, this paper discusses the necessity and feasibility of considering two-phase heat and mass transfer process in land surface models (LSMs). The potential-based equations of coupled mass and heat transport under constant air pressure are adopted as the basis. The proposed model is developed on this basis by considering dry air as a single phase, and including mechanical dispersion in the water vapor and dry air transfer. The adsorbed liquid flux due to thermal gradient is also taken into account. The set of equations for the two-phase heat and mass transfer is formulated fully considering diffusion, advection and dispersion. The advantage of the proposed model over the traditional equation system is discussed. The accuracy of the proposed model is assessed through comparison with analytical work for coupled mass and heat transfer and experimental work for isothermal two-phase flow (moisture/air transfer). Further investigation is carried out to elucidate how the coupled moisture and heat transfer is influenced by adding the air flow, and how the isothermal two-phase flow is affected by considering the heat flow. The importance of including the air flow in the coupled mass and heat transfer is clearly identified. Concerning the two-phase flow, the influence of heat flow is only significant if the air phase plays a significant role in solving the equations of the water phase. Based on a field experiment, the proposed model is compared with the measured soil moisture, temperature and evaporation rate, the results show clearly that it is necessary to consider the air flow mechanism for soil-atmosphere interaction studies.

  13. Effect of pyrolysis temperature and air flow on toxicity of gases from a polycarbonate polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Brick, V. E.; Brauer, D. P.

    1978-01-01

    A polycarbonate polymer was evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases generated at various temperatures without forced air flow and with 1 L/min air flow, using the toxicity screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Time to various animal responses decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperature over the range from 500 C to 800 C. There appeared to be no significant toxic effects at 400 C and lower temperatures.

  14. Temperature-modulated graphene oxide resistive humidity sensor for indoor air quality monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Luca, A.; Santra, S.; Ghosh, R.; Ali, S. Z.; Gardner, J. W.; Guha, P. K.; Udrea, F.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) micro-hotplate technology for the monitoring and control of indoor air quality (IAQ). GO powder is obtained by chemical exfoliation, dispersed in water and deposited via ink-jet printing onto a low power micro-hotplate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) show the typical layered and wrinkled morphology of the GO. Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that the GO flakes possess a significant number of oxygen containing functional groups (epoxy, carbonyl, hydroxyl) extremely attractive for humidity detection. Electro-thermal characterisation of the micro-hotplates shows a thermal efficiency of 0.11 mW per °C, resulting in a sensor DC power consumption of only 2.75 mW at 50 °C. When operated in an isothermal mode, the sensor response is detrimentally affected by significant drift, hysteretic behaviour, slow response/recovery times and hence poor RH level discrimination. Conversely, a temperature modulation technique coupled with a differential readout methodology results in a significant reduction of the sensor drift, improved linear response with a sensitivity of 0.14 mV per %, resolution below 5%, and a maximum hysteresis of +/-5% response and recovery times equal to 189 +/- 49 s and 89 +/- 5 s, respectively. These performance parameters satisfy current IAQ monitoring requirements. We have thus demonstrated the effectiveness of integrating GO on a micro-hotplate CMOS-compatible platform enabling temperature modulation schemes to be easily applied in order to achieve compact, low power, low cost humidity IAQ monitoring.In this paper we present a temperature-modulated graphene oxide (GO) resistive humidity sensor that employs complementary

  15. Student Flow and Curriculum Matrix. AIR 1983 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Michael E.; And Others

    An analytic system for determining student flow in different subject fields in order to produce departmental workload forecasts is examined. The system consists of three steps. The first step, student flow calculation, computes the relationship of enrollments by major and student level from one year to another. This calculation utilizes historical…

  16. Image processing analysis on the air-water slug two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinaryanto, Okto; Widyatama, Arif; Majid, Akmal Irfan; Deendarlianto, Indarto

    2016-06-01

    Slug flow is a part of intermittent flow which is avoided in industrial application because of its irregularity and high pressure fluctuation. Those characteristics cause some problems such as internal corrosion and the damage of the pipeline construction. In order to understand the slug characteristics, some of the measurement techniques can be applied such as wire-mesh sensors, CECM, and high speed camera. The present study was aimed to determine slug characteristics by using image processing techniques. Experiment has been carried out in 26 mm i.d. acrylic horizontal pipe with 9 m long. Air-water flow was recorded 5 m from the air-water mixer using high speed video camera. Each of image sequence was processed using MATLAB. There are some steps including image complement, background subtraction, and image filtering that used in this algorithm to produce binary images. Special treatments also were applied to reduce the disturbance effect of dispersed bubble around the bubble. Furthermore, binary images were used to describe bubble contour and calculate slug parameter such as gas slug length, gas slug velocity, and slug frequency. As a result the effect of superficial gas velocity and superficial liquid velocity on the fundamental parameters can be understood. After comparing the results to the previous experimental results, the image processing techniques is a useful and potential technique to explain the slug characteristics.

  17. Measurement of the resistivity of porous materials with an alternating air-flow method.

    PubMed

    Dragonetti, Raffaele; Ianniello, Carmine; Romano, Rosario A

    2011-02-01

    Air-flow resistivity is a main parameter governing the acoustic behavior of porous materials for sound absorption. The international standard ISO 9053 specifies two different methods to measure the air-flow resistivity, namely a steady-state air-flow method and an alternating air-flow method. The latter is realized by the measurement of the sound pressure at 2 Hz in a small rigid volume closed partially by the test sample. This cavity is excited with a known volume-velocity sound source implemented often with a motor-driven piston oscillating with prescribed area and displacement magnitude. Measurements at 2 Hz require special instrumentation and care. The authors suggest an alternating air-flow method based on the ratio of sound pressures measured at frequencies higher than 2 Hz inside two cavities coupled through a conventional loudspeaker. The basic method showed that the imaginary part of the sound pressure ratio is useful for the evaluation of the air-flow resistance. Criteria are discussed about the choice of a frequency range suitable to perform simplified calculations with respect to the basic method. These criteria depend on the sample thickness, its nonacoustic parameters, and the measurement apparatus as well. The proposed measurement method was tested successfully with various types of acoustic materials.

  18. Improving flow and spillage characteristics of range hoods by using an inclined air-curtain technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Nian, You-Cyun; Chen, Jia-Kun; Peng, Kuan-Lin

    2011-03-01

    The current study developed a new type of range hood, which was termed an 'inclined air-curtain range hood', in order to improve the flow and performance of the conventionally used wall-mounted range hood. The flow characteristics and oil mist spillages of air-curtain and conventional range hoods under the influences of both a mannequin presence and a simulated walk-by motion were experimentally examined. The study examined flow patterns by using a laser-light-sheet-assisted smoke-flow visualization technique and diagnosed spillages by using the tracer gas concentration test method. A mannequin presented in front of the conventional hood induced turbulent dispersion of oil mists toward the chest and nose of the mannequin owing to the complex interaction among the suction, wake, and wall effect, while the inclined air-curtain hood presented excellent hood performance by isolating the oil mists from the mannequin with an air curtain and therefore could reduce spillages out into the atmosphere and the mannequin's breathing zone. Both flow visualization and the tracer gas test indicated that the air-curtain hood had excellent 'robustness' over the conventional hood in resisting the influence of walk-by motion. The air-curtain technique could drastically improve the flow characteristics and performance of the range hood by consuming less energy.

  19. Thermal performance evaluation of MSFC hot air collectors with various flow channel depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The test procedures used and the results obtained during the evaluation test program on the MSFC air collector with flow channel depth of 3 in., 2 in., and 1 in., under simulated conditions are presented. The MSFC hot air collector consists of a single glass cover with a nonselective coating absorber plate and uses air as the heat transfer medium. The absorber panel consists of a thin flat sheet of aluminum.

  20. Self-assembled and highly selective sensors based on air-bridge-structured nanowire junction arrays.

    PubMed

    Park, Won Jeong; Choi, Kyung Jin; Kim, Myung Hwa; Koo, Bon Hyeong; Lee, Jong-Lam; Baik, Jeong Min

    2013-08-14

    We describe a strategy for creating an air-bridge-structured nanowire junction array platform that capable of reliably discriminating between three gases (hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen dioxide) in air. Alternatively driven dual nanowire species of ZnO and CuO with the average diameter of ∼30 nm on a single substrate are used and decorated with metallic nanoparticles to form two-dimensional microarray, which do not need to consider the post fabrications. Each individual nanowires in the array form n-n, p-p, and p-n junctions at the micro/nanoscale on single substrate and the junctions act as electrical conducting path for carriers. The adsorption of gas molecules to the surface changes the potential barrier height formed at the junctions and the carrier transport inside the straight semiconductors, which provide the ability of a given sensor array to differentiate among the junctions. The sensors were tested for their ability to distinguish three gases (H2, CO, and NO2), which they were able to do unequivocally when the data was classified using linear discriminant analysis. PMID:23841667