Science.gov

Sample records for air flow uniformity

  1. Effects of filter housing and ductwork configuration on air flow uniformity inside air cleaning filter housings

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    Each new HEPA filter installation presents a different physical configuration based on the system requirements the available space and designer preference. Each different configuration can result in variations of air flow uniformity inside the filter housing across the filter banks. This paper will present the results of air flow uniformity testing for six different filter housing/ductwork configurations and discuss if any of the variations in air flow uniformity is attributable to the difference in the physical arrangements for the six cases.

  2. Effects of filter housing and ductwork configuration on air flow uniformity inside air cleaning filter housings

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Each new HEPA filter installation presents a different physical configuration based on the system requirements the available space and designer preference. Each different configuration can result in variations of air flow uniformity inside the filter housing across the filter banks. This paper will present the results of air flow uniformity testing for six different filter housing/ductwork configurations and discuss if any of the variations in air flow uniformity is attributable to the difference in the physical arrangements for the six cases.

  3. Brazing retort manifold design concept may minimize air contamination and enhance uniform gas flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruppe, E. P.

    1966-01-01

    Brazing retort manifold minimizes air contamination, prevents gas entrapment during purging, and provides uniform gas flow into the retort bell. The manifold is easily cleaned and turbulence within the bell is minimized because all manifold construction lies outside the main enclosure.

  4. Interactions between gravity waves and cold air outflows in a stably stratified uniform flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Wang, Ting-An; Weglarz, Ronald P.

    1993-01-01

    Interactions between gravity waves and cold air outflows in a stably stratified uniform flow forced by various combinations of prescribed heat sinks and sources are studied using a hydrostatic two-dimensional nonlinear numerical model. The formation time for the development of a stagnation point or reversed flow at the surface is not always directly proportional to the Froude number when wave reflections exist from upper levels. A density current is able to form by the wave-otuflow interaction, even though the Froude number is greater than a critical value. This is the result of the wave-outflow interaction shifting the flow response to a different location in the characteristic parameter space. A density current is able to form or be destroyed due to the wave-outflow interaction between a traveling gravity wave and cold air outflow. This is proved by performing experiments with a steady-state heat sink and an additional transient heat source. In a quiescent fluid, a region of cold air, convergence, and upward motion is formed after the collision between two outflows produced by two prescribed heat sinks. After the collision, the individual cold air outflows lose their own identity and merge into a single, stationary, cold air outflow region. Gravity waves tend to suppress this new stationary cold air outflow after the collision. The region of upward motion associated with the collision is confined to a very shallow layer. In a moving airstream, a density current produced by a heat sink may be suppressed or enhanced nonlinearly by an adjacent heat sink due to the wave-outflow interaction.

  5. Dispersion, Mixing, and Combustion in Uniform- and Variable-Density Air-Breathing High-Speed Propulsion Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-28

    modifications allowed inclined-jet injection in supersonic flow to be studied with and without chemical reactions and heat release. Work on hydrocarbon ...completion times present particular challenges for scramjet powered flight in the low Mach number regime in that chemical reactions must be preceded...numerical simulations and modeling of jet injection into supersonic flow, and dispersion, mixing, and chemical reactions of flow past a rearward-facing

  6. The premixed flame in uniform straining flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of the premixed flame in uniform straining flow are investigated by the technique of activation-energy asymptotics. An inverse method is used, which avoids some of the restrictions of previous analyses. It is shown that this method recovers known results for adiabatic flames. New results for flames with heat loss are obtained, and it is shown that, in the presence of finite heat loss, straining can extinguish flames. A stability analysis shows that straining can suppress the cellular instability of flames with Lewis number less than unity. Strain can produce instability of flames with Lewis number greater than unity. A comparison shows quite good agreement between theoretical deductions and experimental observations of Ishizuka, Miyasaka & Law (1981).

  7. Investigation Flow Uniformity in a Supersonic Duct with High Enthalpy Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balboni, John; Atler, Doug; Gokcen, Tahir; Hartman, G. Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Flow uniformity in a high enthalpy facility is investigated. The scramjet research facility is composed of a rectangular combustor duct connected to a 100 MW electric arc air heater. The Mach 3.3 flow is accelerated through a two-dimensional contoured nozzle. Instream measurements were made with water-cooled Pitot probes and stagnation point heat flux gages at stream enthalpy levels ranging from 4 to 7 Mj/kg. Flow surveys were made on the flow centerline and off centerline in order to measure the three dimensional uniformity of the flow in the rectangular duct. Measurements indicated that although the flow in the aspect ratio 6:1 duct was relatively uniform on the centerline, three dimensional viscous effects were apparent near the corners. Flow through the nozzle and constant area duct was modeled computationally using a two dimensional, Navier-Stokes, reacting gas code. The computations predict that the flow in the test section is in vibrational equilibrium. The computed and measured Pitot pressure and heat flux profiles are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Application of Photon Correlation Spectroscopy to Uniform Shear Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Hyuk K.; Sur, Jeanman; Lee, Sangjun; Kim, Kipom

    1996-11-01

    We study the application of photon correlation spectroscopy to a system of randomly diffusing particles suspended in a uniform shear flow fluid. Unifrom shear flow is generated in Zimm viscometer type Taylor Couette cell. Detecting the scattered intensity from the diffusing particles through a single slit or multiple slit, one can not only study the uniform shear nature of Taylor-Couette flow but also transform the spatial information of the scattering volume into the time information using a photon correlation technique. We discuss useful applications of this technique.

  9. Wake Oscillation of Column Wall Jet in Uniform Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yohei; Sato, Kotaro; Ono, Yoichi

    Both experiment and calculation demonstrated to clarify the effect of a column wall jet in uniform fluid flow on the characteristic of wake oscillation. The vortex intensity decreased and the oscillations attenuated when the jet direction matched the uniform flow. When the jet flow was reversed, the vortex intensity grew and the oscillations increased in magnitude. It has been found that the Strouhal number based on the half width of the flow velocity distribution was nearly constant. Also, the frequency depended on the vortex structure of the wake, which was further dependent on the jet flow velocity. In addition, the situations that gave twin peaks in the oscillation spectrum were found both in experiment and in calculation.

  10. Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows

    SciTech Connect

    Neary, Vincent S

    2011-01-01

    Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow

  11. Chirped Pulse Microwave Spectroscopy in Pulsed Uniform Supersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Oldham, James; Prozument, Kirill; Joalland, Baptiste; Park, Barratt; Field, Robert W.; Sims, Ian; Suits, Arthur; Zack, Lindsay

    2014-06-01

    We present preliminary results describing the development of a new instrument that combines two powerful techniques: Chirped Pulse-Fourier Transform MicroWave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy and pulsed uniform supersonic flows. It promises a nearly universal detection method that can deliver quantitative isomer, conformer, and vibrational level specific detection, characterization of unstable reaction products and intermediates and perform unique spectroscopic, kinetics and dynamics measurements. We have constructed a new high-power K_a-band, 26-40 GHz, chirped pulse spectrometer with sub-MHz resolution, analogous to the revolutionary CP-FTMW spectroscopic technique developed in the Pate group at University of Virginia. In order to study smaller molecules, the E-band, 60-90 GHz, CP capability was added to our spectrometer. A novel strategy for generating uniform supersonic flow through a Laval nozzle is introduced. High throughput pulsed piezo-valve is used to produce cold (30 K) uniform flow with large volumes of 150 cm^3 and densities of 1014 molecules/cm3 with modest pumping facilities. The uniform flow conditions for a variety of noble gases extend as far as 20 cm from the Laval nozzle and a single compound turbo-molecular pump maintains the operating pressure. Two competing design considerations are critical to the performance of the system: a low temperature flow is needed to maximize the population difference between rotational levels, and high gas number densities are needed to ensure rapid cooling to achieve the uniform flow conditions. At the same time, collision times shorter than the chirp duration will give inaccurate intensities and reduced signal levels due to collisional dephasing of free induction decay. Details of the instrument and future directions and challenges will be discussed.

  12. Experimental and numerical analyses of finned cross flow heat exchangers efficiency under non-uniform gas inlet flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Tomasz; Składzień, Jan; Widziewicz, Katarzyna

    2010-10-01

    The work deals with experimental and numerical thermodynamic analyses of cross-flow finned tube heat exchangers of the gas-liquid type. The aim of the work is to determine an impact of the gas non-uniform inlet on the heat exchangers performance. The measurements have been carried out on a special testing rig and own numerical code has been used for numerical simulations. Analysis of the experimental and numerical results has shown that the range of the non-uniform air inlet to the considered heat exchangers may be significant and it can significantly affect the heat exchanger efficiency.

  13. Flapping dynamics of an inverted flag in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jaeha; Park, Sung Goon; Kim, Boyoung; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2015-11-01

    Much research in recent years has focused on the flow dynamics of flexible structures in a uniform flow and particularly on the flow dynamics related to energy harvesting systems. An energy harvesting system comprising piezoelectric patches attached to the surface of a flexible structure can convert the energy stored in solid deformations into an electric current that powers a purely resistive output circuit. Recently, an inverted flag which has the freely moving leading edge and the clamped trailing edge was suggested. The inverted flag improved the amount of strain energy that was converted into the flag deformations from the surrounding fluid. In this study, the flapping dynamics of an inverted flag in a uniform flow were simulated using the immersed boundary method. The flapping dynamics of and vortical structures around the inverted flag were examined in terms of the bending rigidity and the Reynolds number. The strain energy of the inverted flag and the proportion of the strain energy of the inverted flag to the kinetic energy of the flow were considered as an indicator of the energy harvesting system efficiency.

  14. An approach to versatile highly-uniform MOVPE growth: the flow controlled stagnation point flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Makoto; Kuramata, Akito; Fujii, Takuya; Anayama, Chikashi; Okazaki, Jiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki; Yamazaki, Susumu; Nakajima, Kazuo

    1992-11-01

    We present an approach to versatile highly-uniform MOVPE growth using the controlled stagnation point flow reactor. Our approach for uniform growth involves two concepts: (1) realizing the stagnation point flow condition in a vertical reactor configuration and (2) introducing a method for versatile flow-field control using the flow-controlled multiple gas-injector technique. The versatility of the flow-control technique was investigated by evaluating how radial deposition rate uniformity is affected by variation in several hydrodynamic and reactor configuration factors: the inlet flow rate, operating pressure, susceptor temperature, susceptor rotation speed, and the inlet and susceptor separation. We confirmed that a spatially uniform deposition rate can be obtained over a wide range of hydrodynamic and configuration parameters, demonstrating that the flow-control technique can provide a stable stagnation point flow field. Even when the ideal stagnation point flow-field is disturbed, for example, by high temperature susceptor heating, it could be completely compensated by adjusting the flow rate ratio for multiple injectors, showing our technique's ability to control flow-fields. By using this technique, we obtained excellent uniformities in both layer thickness and alloy composition for two important materials - GaInAsP and AlGaInP - in the same reactor.

  15. Natural Flow Air Cooled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanagnostopoulos, Y.; Themelis, P.

    2010-01-01

    Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. We performed experiments using a prototype based on three silicon photovoltaic modules placed in series to simulate a typical sloping building roof with photovoltaic installation. In this system the air flows through a channel on the rear side of PV panels. The potential for increasing the heat exchange from the photovoltaic panel to the circulating air by the addition of a thin metal sheet (TMS) in the middle of air channel or metal fins (FIN) along the air duct was examined. The operation of the device was studied with the air duct closed tightly to avoid air circulation (CLOSED) and the air duct open (REF), with the thin metal sheet (TMS) and with metal fins (FIN). In each case the experiments were performed under sunlight and the operating parameters of the experimental device determining the electrical and thermal performance of the system were observed and recorded during a whole day and for several days. We collected the data and form PV panels from the comparative diagrams of the experimental results regarding the temperature of solar cells, the electrical efficiency of the installation, the temperature of the back wall of the air duct and the temperature difference in the entrance and exit of the air duct. The comparative results from the measurements determine the improvement in electrical performance of the photovoltaic cells because of the reduction of their temperature, which is achieved by the naturally circulating air.

  16. Boundary Layer Flow Control with a One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Surface Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, J. Reece; Sherman, Daniel M.; Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    1998-01-01

    Low speed wind tunnel data have been acquired for planar panels covered by a uniform, glow-discharge surface plasma in atmospheric pressure air known as the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP). Streamwise and spanwise arrays of flush, plasma-generating surface electrodes have been studied in laminar, transitional, and fully turbulent boundary layer flow. Plasma between symmetric streamwise electrode strips caused large increases in panel drag, whereas asymmetric spanwise electrode configurations produced a significant thrust. Smoke wire flow visualization and mean velocity diagnostics show the primary cause of the phenomena to be a combination of mass transport and vortical structures induced by strong paraelectric ElectroHydroDynamic (EHD) body forces on the flow.

  17. Free-surface flow of liquid oxygen under non-uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Shi-Ran; Zhang, Rui-Ping; Wang, Kai; Zhi, Xiao-Qin; Qiu, Li-Min

    2017-01-01

    The paramagnetic property of oxygen makes it possible to control the two-phase flow at cryogenic temperatures by non-uniform magnetic fields. The free-surface flow of vapor-liquid oxygen in a rectangular channel was numerically studied using the two-dimensional phase field method. The effects of magnetic flux density and inlet velocity on the interface deformation, flow pattern and pressure drop were systematically revealed. The liquid level near the high-magnetic channel center was lifted upward by the inhomogeneous magnetic field. The interface height difference increased almost linearly with the magnetic force. For all inlet velocities, pressure drop under 0.25 T was reduced by 7-9% due to the expanded local cross-sectional area, compared to that without magnetic field. This work demonstrates the effectiveness of employing non-uniform magnetic field to control the free-surface flow of liquid oxygen. This non-contact method may be used for promoting the interface renewal, reducing the flow resistance, and improving the flow uniformity in the cryogenic distillation column, which may provide a potential for enhancing the operating efficiency of cryogenic air separation.

  18. Uniform flow over a permeable plane with downward suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ping-Cheng; Lin, Yen-Ti

    2015-04-01

    In previous research, studies on channel flow were mostly focused on the flow profiles with consideration of the horizontal (or streamwise) velocity component only. Due to the neglect of the vertical velocity component, the governing equations were simplified and then the analytical solutions could be probably derived. However, the vertical velocity as well as the horizontal velocity is actually existent in the real world, especially at the water-porous matrix interface. This study derives an analytical solution to a two-dimensional flow field composed of a uniform flow over a plane homogeneous porous medium with downward suction. The Navier-Stokes equations are employed to describe the water flow, whereas the poroelastic theory is addressed for the pore water flow. Setting the stream function for the velocity components associated with corresponding boundary conditions, we successfully find the solutions to the dimensionless boundary-value problem by taking the six-order power series method (PSM) and differential transform method (DTM), respectively. After the stream function is solved, the vertical velocity component as well as the horizontal velocity component can be obtained. The present results agree very well with the previous study which was carried out by a numerical method. This validates the presented analytical solutions separately by PSM and DTM. The vertical velocity increases gradually from the top lid to the bottom of the porous medium. The maximum horizontal velocity component is about 1.64 times of the downward suction velocity and occurs at a little below the centerline of the total depth. It is noted that the vertical velocity component should not be neglected in a two-dimensional flow, and the horizontal velocity might be affected by the vertical one. The present study also shows that the flow field of a two-dimensional flow is possible to be solved by analytical approaches. The employed technique and methods will be applied to the future study

  19. Dynamics of an inverted flexible plate in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chao; Liu, Nan-Sheng; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2015-07-01

    The dynamics of an inverted flexible plate with a free leading-edge and a fixed trailing-edge in a uniform flow has been studied numerically by an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for the fluid flow and a finite element method for the plate deformation. Mechanisms underlying the dynamics of the fluid-plate system are elucidated systematically. A series of distinct states of the plate deformation and motion are identified and can be described as straight, flapping, deflected, deflected-flapping, and asymmetric-flapping states. Which state to occur depends mainly on the bending stiffness and aspect ratio of the plate. The forces exerted on the plate and the elastic strain energy of the plate are analyzed. It is found that the flapping state can improve the conversion of fluid kinetic energy to elastic strain energy. In addition, the effects of the mass ratio of the plate and the fluid, the Reynolds number, and the angle of attack of the uniform flow on the dynamics and the elastic strain energy of flexible plate are also investigated in detail. The vortical structures around the plate are given to discuss the connection of the evolution of vortices with the plate deformation and motion. The results obtained in this study provide physical insight into the understanding of the mechanisms on the dynamics of the fluid-plate system.

  20. Inferring temperature uniformity from gas composition measurements in a hydrogen combustion-heated hypersonic flow stream

    SciTech Connect

    Olstad, S.J.

    1995-08-01

    The application of a method for determining the temperature of an oxygen-replenished air stream heated to 2600 K by a hydrogen burner is reviewed and discussed. The purpose of the measurements is to determine the spatial uniformity of the temperature in the core flow of a ramjet test facility. The technique involves sampling the product gases at the exit of the test section nozzle to infer the makeup of the reactant gases entering the burner. Knowing also the temperature of the inlet gases and assuming the flow is at chemical equilibrium, the adiabatic flame temperature is determined using an industry accepted chemical equilibrium computer code. Local temperature depressions are estimated from heat loss calculations. A description of the method, hardware and procedures is presented, along with local heat loss estimates and uncertainty assessments. The uncertainty of the method is estimated at {+-}31 K, and the spatial uniformity was measured within {+-}35 K.

  1. Elastic deformations driven by non-uniform lubrication flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Shimon; Tulchinsky, Arie; Gat, Amir D.; Bercovici, Moran

    2017-02-01

    The ability to create dynamic deformations of micron-sized structures is relevant to a wide variety of applications such as adaptable optics, soft robotics, and reconfigurable microfluidic devices. In this work we examine non-uniform lubrication flow as a mechanism to create complex deformation fields in an elastic plate. We consider a Kirchoff-Love elasticity model for the plate and Hele-Shaw flow in a narrow gap between the plate and a parallel rigid surface. Based on linearization of the Reynolds equation, we obtain a governing equation which relates elastic deformations to gradients in non-homogenous physical properties of the fluid (e.g. body forces, viscosity, and slip velocity). We then focus on a specific case of non-uniform Helmholtz-Smoluchowski electroosmotic slip velocity, and provide a method for determining the zeta-potential distribution necessary to generate arbitrary static and quasi-static deformations of the elastic plate. Extending the problem to time-dependent solutions, we analyze transient effects on asymptotically static solutions, and finally provide a closed form solution for a Green's function for time periodic actuations.

  2. Field Test of Room-to-Room Uniformity of Ventilation Air Distribution in Two New Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, Robert; Anderson, Ren; Barley, Dennis; Rudd, Armin; Townsend, Aaron; Hancock, Ed

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a field test to characterize the uniformity of room-to-room ventilation air distribution under various operating conditions by examining multi-zone tracer gas decay curves and calculating local age-of-air.

  3. A criterion to determine uniform and non-uniform stratified liquid-gas flow through horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, A.A.; Deshpande, S.D.

    1986-04-01

    Non-uniform liquid-gas stratified flow (i.e. flow with an interfacial level gradient, ILG) can exist when high viscosity liquids and/or large diameter tubes are used. The available data, covering a wide range of liquid viscosities (0.8 to 310 mPa.s) and tube diameters (0.0254 m to 0.216 m), are analyzed. It is shown that the Lockhart-Martinelli parameter, X less than or equal to 1 is a criterion to determine uniform stratified flow and disappearance of ILG. In addition, interfacial shear stress relationships are also shown to be indicative of different types of stratified flow.

  4. Flow of Supercritical Hydrogen in a Uniformly Heated Circular Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent flow of supercritical hydrogen through a uniformly heated circular tube has been investigated using numerical methods, for the range of 4 x 10(exp 5) less than Re less than 3 x 10(exp 6), 5 less than or equal to q(sub W) less than or equal to 10 MW/sq m, 30 less than or equal to T(sub in) less than or equal to 90 K, and 5 less than or equal to P(sub in) less than or equal to 15 MPa. The purpose is to validate a turbulence model and calculation method for the design of active cooling systems of hydrogen-fueled hypersonic aircraft, where the hydrogen fuel a used as coolant. The PHOENICS software package was used for the computations, which required special provision for evaluation of the thermophysical properties of the supercritical hydrogen, and a low Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Pressure drop and heat transfer data were compared with experiment and existing correlations and good agreement was demonstrated. For the pressure range considered here a "thermal spike" was observed and shown to be due to the secondary peak in specific heat, rather than the primary peak.

  5. Effect of flow distributors on uniformity of velocity profile in a baghouse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Jen; Cheng, Man-Ting

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, the utility industry has turned to baghouses as an alternative technology for particulate emission control from pulverized-coal-fired power plants. One of the more significant issues is to improve poor gas distribution that causes bag failures in baghouse operation. Bag failures during operation are almost impossible to prevent, but proper flow design can help in their prevention. This study investigated vertical velocity profiles below the bags in a baghouse (the hopper region) to determine whether flow could be improved with the installation of flow distributors in the hopper region. Three types of flow distributors were used to improve flow distribution and were compared with the original baghouse without flow distributors. Velocity profiles were measured by a hot-wire anemometer at an inlet velocity of 18 m/sec. Uniformity of flow distribution was calculated by the uniformity value U for the velocity profile of each flow distributor. Experimental results showed that the velocity profile of the empty configuration (without flow distributors) was poor because the uniformity value was 2.048. The uniformity values of type 1 (flow distributor with three vertical vanes), type 2 (flow distributor with one vertical and one inclined vane), and type 3 (flow distributor with two inclined vanes) configurations were reduced to 1.051, 0.617, and 0.526, respectively. These results indicate that the flow distributors designed in this study made significant improvements in the velocity profile of a baghouse, with the type 3 configuration having the best performance.

  6. Sealable stagnation flow geometries for the uniform deposition of materials and heat

    DOEpatents

    McCarty, Kevin F.; Kee, Robert J.; Lutz, Andrew E.; Meeks, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    The present invention employs a constrained stagnation flow geometry apparatus to achieve the uniform deposition of materials or heat. The present invention maximizes uniform fluxes of reactant gases to flat surfaces while minimizing the use of reagents and finite dimension edge effects. This results, among other things, in large area continuous films that are uniform in thickness, composition and structure which is important in chemical vapor deposition processes such as would be used for the fabrication of semiconductors.

  7. Combined action of uniform flow and oscillating flow around marine riser at low Keulegan-Carpenter number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yue; Huang, Weiping; Zhao, Jingli

    2014-06-01

    With the increase of petroleum and gas production in deep ocean, marine risers of circular cylinder shape are widely used in the offshore oil and gas platform. In order to research the hydrodynamic performance of marine risers, the dynamic mesh technique and User-Defined Function (UDF) are used to simulate the circular cylinder motion. The motion of a transversely oscillating circular cylinder in combination of uniform flow and oscillating flow is simulated. The uniform flow and oscillating flow both are in x direction. SIMPLE algorithm is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. The User-Defined Function is used to control the cylinder transverse vibration and the inlet flow. The lift and drag coefficient changing with time and the map of vorticity isolines at different phase angle are obtained. Force time histories are shown for uniform flow at Reynolds number (Re) of 200 and for the combination of uniform and oscillating flows. With the increase of amplitude of oscillating flow in combined flow, the change of lift amplitude is not sensitive to the the change of cylinder oscillating frequency. Lift amplitude increases with the increase of oscillating flow amplitude in the combined flow, but there is no definite periodicity of the lift coefficient. The drag and inertia force coefficients change when the maximum velocity of the oscillating flow increases in the combined flow. The vortex shedding near the circular cylinder shows different characteristics.

  8. Effects of uniform rotational flow on predator-prey system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hee

    2012-12-01

    Rotational flow is often observed in lotic ecosystems, such as streams and rivers. For example, when an obstacle interrupts water flowing in a stream, energy dissipation and momentum transfer can result in the formation of rotational flow, or a vortex. In this study, I examined how rotational flow affects a predator-prey system by constructing a spatially explicit lattice model consisting of predators, prey, and plants. A predation relationship existed between the species. The species densities in the model were given as S (for predator), P (for prey), and G (for plant). A predator (prey) had a probability of giving birth to an offspring when it ate prey (plant). When a predator or prey was first introduced, or born, its health state was assigned an initial value of 20 that subsequently decreased by one with every time step. The predator (prey) was removed from the system when the health state decreased to less than zero. The degree of flow rotation was characterized by the variable, R. A higher R indicates a higher tendency that predators and prey move along circular paths. Plants were not affected by the flow because they were assumed to be attached to the streambed. Results showed that R positively affected both predator and prey survival, while its effect on plants was negligible. Flow rotation facilitated disturbances in individuals’ movements, which consequently strengthens the predator and prey relationship and prevents death from starvation. An increase in S accelerated the extinction of predators and prey.

  9. Piecewise uniform conduction-like flow channels and method therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Eric B.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.

    2006-02-28

    A low-dispersion methodology for designing microfabricated conduction channels for on-chip electrokinetic-based systems is presented. The technique relies on trigonometric relations that apply for ideal electrokinetic flows, allowing faceted channels to be designed on chips using common drafting software and a hand calculator. Flows are rotated and stretched along the abrupt interface between adjacent regions with differing permeability. Regions bounded by interfaces form flow "prisms" that can be combined with other designed prisms to obtain a wide range of turning angles and expansion ratios while minimizing dispersion. Designs are demonstrated using two-dimensional numerical solutions of the Laplace equation.

  10. A clean air continuous flow propulsion facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, R. H.; Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a contaminant-free, high enthalpy, continuous flow facility designed to obtain detailed code validation measurements of high speed combustion. The facility encompasses uncontaminated air temperature control to within 5 K, fuel temperature control to 2 K, a ceramic flow straightener, drying of inlet air, and steady state continuous operation. The air heating method provides potential for independent control of contaminant level by injection, mixing, and heating upstream. Particular attention is given to extension of current capability of 1250 K total air temperature, which simulates Scramjet enthalpy at Mach 5.

  11. Amyloid fibril formation at a uniformly sheared air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is a process by which protein molecules in solution form nuclei and aggregate into fibrils. Amyloid fibrils have long been associated with several common diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. More recently, fibril protein deposition has been implicated in uncommon disorders leading to the failure of various organs including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Fibrillization can also play a detrimental role in biotherapeutic production. Results from previous studies show that a hydrophobic interface, such air/water, can accelerate fibrillization. Studies also show that agitation accelerates fibrillization. When attempting to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of fibrillization and distinguish the effects of interfaces and flow, it can be helpful to experiment with uniformly sheared interfaces. A new Taylor-Couette device is introduced for in situ, real-time high resolution microscopy. With a sub-millimeter annular gap, surface tension acts as the channel floor, permitting a stable meniscus to be placed arbitrarily close to a microscope to study amyloid fibril formation over long periods.

  12. A model of pulsatile flow in a uniform deformable vessel.

    PubMed

    Johnson, G A; Borovetz, H S; Anderson, J L

    1992-01-01

    Simulations of blood flow in natural and artificial conduits usually require large computers for numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. Often, physical insight into the fluid dynamics is lost when the solution is purely numerical. An alternative to solving the most general form of the Navier-Stokes equations is described here, wherein a functional form of the solution is assumed in order to simplify the required computations. The assumed forms for the axial pressure gradient and velocity profile are chosen such that conservation of mass is satisfied for fully established pulsatile flow in a straight, deformable vessel. The resulting equations are cast in finite-difference form and solved explicitly. Results for the limiting cases of rigid wall and zero applied pressure are found to be in good agreement with analytical solutions. Comparison with the experimental results of Klanchar et al. [Circ. Res. 66, 1624-1635 (1990]) also shows good agreement. Application of the model to realistic physiological parameter values provides insight as to the influence of the pulsatile nature of the flow field on wall shear development in the presence of a moving wall boundary. Specifically, the model illustrates the dependence of flow rate and shear rate on the amplitude of the vessel wall motion and the phase difference between the applied pressure difference and the oscillations of the vessel radius. The present model can serve as a useful tool for experimentalists interested in quantifying the magnitude and character of velocity profiles and shearing forces in natural and artificial biologic conduits.

  13. Health woes tied to low air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J.

    1984-01-23

    Occupants in buildings with heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems which limit fresh air flow may suffer a variety of illnesses because of the buildup of noxious contaminants. Building managers need to continue conservation efforts, but they should also meet the air standards set by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) which are in the process of being strengthened. Cases of building sickness caused by indoor air pollution have increased during the past decade, prompting ASHRAE to expedite the revision of its specifications.

  14. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  15. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  16. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  17. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  18. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  19. Simulator Of Rain In Flowing Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Richard M.; Cho, Young I.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Back, Lloyd H.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes relatively inexpensive apparatus that creates simulated precipitation from drizzle to heavy rain in flowing air. Small, positive-displacement pump and water-injecting device positioned at low-airspeed end of converging section of wind tunnel 10 in. in diameter. Drops injected by array entrained in flow of air as it accelerates toward narrower outlet, 15 in. downstream. Outlet 5 in. in diameter.

  20. An integral formulation for wave propagation on weakly non-uniform potential flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Simone; Astley, R. Jeremy; Sinayoko, Samuel; Gabard, Gwénaël; Tournour, Michel

    2016-12-01

    An integral formulation for acoustic radiation in moving flows is presented. It is based on a potential formulation for acoustic radiation on weakly non-uniform subsonic mean flows. This work is motivated by the absence of suitable kernels for wave propagation on non-uniform flow. The integral solution is formulated using a Green's function obtained by combining the Taylor and Lorentz transformations. Although most conventional approaches based on either transform solve the Helmholtz problem in a transformed domain, the current Green's function and associated integral equation are derived in the physical space. A dimensional error analysis is developed to identify the limitations of the current formulation. Numerical applications are performed to assess the accuracy of the integral solution. It is tested as a means of extrapolating a numerical solution available on the outer boundary of a domain to the far field, and as a means of solving scattering problems by rigid surfaces in non-uniform flows. The results show that the error associated with the physical model deteriorates with increasing frequency and mean flow Mach number. However, the error is generated only in the domain where mean flow non-uniformities are significant and is constant in regions where the flow is uniform.

  1. Asymmetric collapse by dissolution or melting in a uniform flow

    PubMed Central

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    2016-01-01

    An advection–diffusion-limited dissolution model of an object being eroded by a two-dimensional potential flow is presented. By taking advantage of the conformal invariance of the model, a numerical method is introduced that tracks the evolution of the object boundary in terms of a time-dependent Laurent series. Simulations of a variety of dissolving objects are shown, which shrink and collapse to a single point in finite time. The simulations reveal a surprising exact relationship, whereby the collapse point is the root of a non-analytic function given in terms of the flow velocity and the Laurent series coefficients describing the initial shape. This result is subsequently derived using residue calculus. The structure of the non-analytic function is examined for three different test cases, and a practical approach to determine the collapse point using a generalized Newton–Raphson root-finding algorithm is outlined. These examples also illustrate the possibility that the model breaks down in finite time prior to complete collapse, due to a topological singularity, as the dissolving boundary overlaps itself rather than breaking up into multiple domains (analogous to droplet pinch-off in fluid mechanics). The model raises fundamental mathematical questions about broken symmetries in finite-time singularities of both continuous and stochastic dynamical systems. PMID:26997890

  2. Effects of interference among three equidistantly arranged cylinders in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsuno, Masakazu; Amamoto, Hajime; Ishi-i, Koji

    1998-05-01

    The effects of flow interference among three identical circular cylinders, which were arranged in an equidistant triangular cluster with their axes perpendicular to the uniform flow, were studied at various incidence angles to the uniform flow and at different spacing ratios. The static pressures around the circumference of each cylinder were measured individually and the drag and lift coefficients of each cylinder were determined at Reynolds number of 6.2×10 4 based on the diameter of a single cylinder. The effects of flow interference among the three cylinders are severe when the spacing ratios are small. When two cylinders arranged side by side are upstream of or behind the third one, the flow patterns are not symmetrical with respect to the uniform flow direction and the drag or lift coefficients of the two cylinders in the side-by-side arrangement are not always equal to each other at small spacing ratios. The inclination angles to the uniform flow strongly influence the drag and lift coefficients, the direction of force exerted on each cylinder and the flow patterns around the cylinders. The effects of interference among three cylinders become weak as the spacing ratios are increased.

  3. Potential Industrial Applications of the One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP) Operating in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reece Roth, J.

    2004-11-01

    The majority of industrial plasma processing with glow discharges has been conducted at pressures below 10 torr. This tends to limit applications to high value workpieces as a result of the high capital cost of vacuum systems and the production constraints of batch processing. It has long been recognized that glow discharge plasmas would play a much larger industrial role if they could be generated at one atmosphere. The One Atmosphere Uniform Glow Discharge Plasma (OAUGDP), developed at the University of Tennessee's Plasma Sciences Laboratory, is a non-thermal RF plasma operating on displacement currents with the time-resolved characteristics of a classical low pressure DC normal glow discharge. As a glow discharge, the OAUGDP operates with maximum electrical efficiency at the Stoletow point, where the energy input per ion-electron pair is a minimum [1, 2]. Several interdisciplinary teams have investigated potential applications of the OAUGDP. These teams included collaborators from the UTK Textiles and Nonwovens Development Center (TANDEC), and the Departments of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microbiology, and Food Science and Technology, as well as the NASA Langley Research Center. The potential applications of the OAUGDP have all been at one atmosphere and room temperature, using air as the working gas. These applications include sterilizing medical and dental equipment; sterilizable air filters to deal with the "sick building syndrome"; removal of soot from Diesel engine exhaust; subsonic plasma aerodynamic effects, including flow re-attachment to airfoils and boundary layer modification; electrohydrodynamic (EDH) flow control of working gases; increasing the surface energy of materials; improving the adhesion of paints and electroplated layers: improving the wettability and wickability of fabrics; stripping of photoresist; and plasma deposition and directional etching of potential microelectronic relevance. [1] J. R. Roth, Industrial Plasma Engineering

  4. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-03-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disc on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  5. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  6. Characteristics of coal mine ventilation air flows.

    PubMed

    Su, Shi; Chen, Hongwei; Teakle, Philip; Xue, Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a greenhouse gas but also a wasted energy resource if not utilised. Underground coal mining is by far the most important source of fugitive methane emissions, and approximately 70% of all coal mining related methane is emitted to the atmosphere through mine ventilation air. Therefore, research and development on mine methane mitigation and utilisation now focuses on methane emitted from underground coal mines, in particular ventilation air methane (VAM) capture and utilisation. To date, most work has focused on the oxidation of very low concentration methane. These processes may be classified based on their combustion kinetic mechanisms into thermal oxidation and catalytic oxidation. VAM mitigation/utilisation technologies are generally divided into two basic categories: ancillary uses and principal uses. However, it is possible that the characteristics of ventilation air flows, for example the variations in methane concentration and the presence of certain compounds, which have not been reported so far, could make some potential VAM mitigation and utilisation technologies unfeasible if they cannot cope with the characteristics of mine site ventilation air flows. Therefore, it is important to understand the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows. Moreover, dust, hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide, and other possible compounds emitted through mine ventilation air into the atmosphere are also pollutants. Therefore, this paper presents mine-site experimental results on the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows, including methane concentration and its variations, dust loadings, particle size, mineral matter of the dust, and other compounds in the ventilation air flows. The paper also discusses possible correlations between ventilation air characteristics and underground mining activities.

  7. Compressible Flow Tables for Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcher, Marie A.

    1947-01-01

    This paper contains a tabulation of functions of the Mach number which are frequently used in high-speed aerodynamics. The tables extend from M = 0 to M = 10.0 in increments of 0.01 and are based on the assumption that air is a perfect gas having a specific heat ratio of 1.400.

  8. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  9. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  10. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  11. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  12. Air flow through poppet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G W; Nutting, E M

    1920-01-01

    Report discusses the comparative continuous flow characteristics of single and double poppet valves. The experimental data presented affords a direct comparison of valves, single and in pairs of different sizes, tested in a cylinder designed in accordance with current practice in aviation engines.

  13. A kinetic theory treatment of heat transfer in plane Poiseuille flow with uniform pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    1992-01-01

    Plane compressible Poiseuille flow with uniform pressure (Couette flow with stationary boundaries) is revisited where the Lees two-steam method with the Enskog equation of change is applied. Single particle velocity distribution functions are chosen, which preserve the essential physical features of this flow with arbitrary but uniform plate temperatures and gas pressure. Lower moments are shown to lead to expressions for the parameter functions, molecular number densities, and temperatures which are entirely in agreement with those obtained in the analysis of Lees for compressible plane Couette flow in the limit of low Mach number and vanishing mean gas velocity. Important simplifications result, which are helpful in gaining insight into the power of kinetic theory in fluid mechanics. The temperature distribution, heat flux, as well as density, are completely determined for the whole range of Knudson numbers from free molecular flow to the continuum regime, when the pressure level is specified.

  14. Air Flow and Pressure Drop Measurements Across Porous Oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.; Cuy, Michael D.; Werner, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of air flow tests across eight porous, open cell ceramic oxide samples. During ceramic specimen processing, the porosity was formed using the sacrificial template technique, with two different sizes of polystyrene beads used for the template. The samples were initially supplied with thicknesses ranging from 0.14 to 0.20 in. (0.35 to 0.50 cm) and nonuniform backside morphology (some areas dense, some porous). Samples were therefore ground to a thickness of 0.12 to 0.14 in. (0.30 to 0.35 cm) using dry 120 grit SiC paper. Pressure drop versus air flow is reported. Comparisons of samples with thickness variations are made, as are pressure drop estimates. As the density of the ceramic material increases the maximum corrected flow decreases rapidly. Future sample sets should be supplied with samples of similar thickness and having uniform surface morphology. This would allow a more consistent determination of air flow versus processing parameters and the resulting porosity size and distribution.

  15. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, I.H.

    1990-10-16

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity. 5 figs.

  16. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOEpatents

    Stockel, Ivar H.

    1990-01-01

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity.

  17. Control of Meridional Flow by a Non-Uniform Rotational Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Ramachandran, Narayanan

    1999-01-01

    The diffusive mass transfer of species during crystal growth in vertical ampoules is significantly affected by fluid flow in the liquid mother phase (melt). For electrically conductive melts, an elegant way of remotely inducing and controlling this flow is by utilizing a uniform rotational magnetic field (RMF) in the transverse direction. It induces an azimuthal flow which tends to homogenize the thermal and solutal fields. The rotating field also reduces the diffusion boundary layer, stabilizes temperature fluctuations, and promotes better overall crystal growth. For moderate strengths of the applied magnetic field (2-20 m Tesla) with frequencies of up to 400 Hz, the induced secondary meridional flow becomes significant. It typically consists of one roll at the bottom of the liquid column and a second roll (vortex) at the top. The flow along the centerline (ampoule axis) is directed from the growing solid (interface) towards the liquid (melt). In case of convex interfaces (e.g. in floating zone crystal growth) such flow behavior is beneficial since it suppresses diffusion at the center. However, for concave interfaces (e.g. vertical Bridgman crystal growth) such a flow tends to exacerbate the situation in making the interface shape more concave. It would be beneficial to have some control of this meridional flow- for example, a single recirculating cell with controllable direction and flow magnitude will make this technique even more attractive for crystal growth. Such flow control is a possibility if a non-uniform PNE field is utilized for this purpose. Although this idea has been proposed earlier, it has not been conclusively demonstrated so far. In this work, we derive the governing equations for the fluid dynamics for such a system and obtain solutions for a few important cases. Results from parallel experimental measurements of fluid flow in a mercury column subjected to non-uniform RMF will also be presented.

  18. Peristaltic Flow of Couple Stress Fluid in a Non-Uniform Rectangular Duct Having Compliant Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellahi, R.; Mubashir Bhatti, M.; Fetecau, C.; Vafai, K.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the peristaltic flow of couple stress fluid in a non-uniform rectangular duct with compliant walls. Mathematical modeling is based upon the laws of mass and linear momentum. Analytic solutions are carried out by the eigen function expansion method under long-wavelength and low-Reynolds number approximations. The features of the flow characteristics are analyzed by plotting the graphs of various values of physical parameters of interest. Trapping bolus scheme is also presented through streamlines.

  19. The representation of planar separated flow by regions of uniform vorticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. H. B.

    Numerical models for separated flows are surveyed, with a focus on the behavior of inviscid solutions near the separation point on a solid surface. Attention is given to solutions for flows in corners and in a cusp when a Prandtl-Batchelor model is used and uniform vorticity is assumed. The high Re flows feature vorticity originating in the boundary layer and extending into the free stream as shear layers, and include a vortex sheet between zones of rotation and potential flow. Consideration is devoted to the dependence of the flow behavior on an angle between two streamlines and at an angle formed by the streamlines at the separation or reattachment point. Although the flow at reattachment is similar to the flow at separation, the pressure gradient is reversed.

  20. Multimode radiation from an unflanged, semi-infinite circular duct with uniform flow.

    PubMed

    Sinayoko, Samuel; Joseph, Phillip; McAlpine, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Multimode sound radiation from an unflanged, semi-infinite, rigid-walled circular duct with uniform subsonic mean flow everywhere is investigated theoretically. The multimode directivity depends on the amplitude and directivity function of each individual cut-on mode. The amplitude of each mode is expressed as a function of cut-on ratio for a uniform distribution of incoherent monopoles, a uniform distribution of incoherent axial dipoles, and for equal power per mode. The directivity function of each mode is obtained by applying a Lorentz transformation to the zero-flow directivity function, which is given by a Wiener-Hopf solution. This exact numerical result is compared to an analytic solution, valid in the high-frequency limit, for multimode directivity with uniform flow. The high-frequency asymptotic solution is derived assuming total transmission of power at the open end of the duct, and gives the multimode directivity function with flow in the forward arc for a general family of mode amplitude distribution functions. At high frequencies the agreement between the exact and asymptotic solutions is shown to be excellent.

  1. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  2. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  3. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  4. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  5. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  6. A circular cylinder undergoing large-amplitude transverse oscillations in a slow uniform cross flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, K. M.; Liu, P.

    2013-05-01

    This study explores the vortex patterns formed by a circular cylinder undergoing lateral cylinder oscillations with large amplitudes and in the presence of a slow uniform cross flow. It is an extension of our previous study (Lam et al., 2010b) in which formation of the 2S, 2P and P+S vortex modes were discussed from the viewpoint of interaction of a uniform cross-flow with the vortex street patterns of a cylinder oscillating in an otherwise quiescent fluid at Keulegan-Carpenter numbers up to KC=8.9. The present paper reports three additional experimental sets in which the amplitudes of cylinder oscillations have even larger values, at A/D>2.5, and lie beyond the vortex mode map usually quoted from Williamson and Roshko (1988). It is found that the slow uniform cross-flow at λ/D≈3 and Reynolds number based on cross-flow velocity at 232 acts to convect the corresponding vortex patterns in the absence of cross-flow downstream across the line of cylinder oscillation. Vortex-vortex interaction and vortex-cylinder interaction are observed to affect the subsequent development of vortices. The P+S vortex mode is found to occur up to KC=16. At KC between 16 and 24, a new vortex mode is observed in which only one vortex pair can be convected downstream every cylinder oscillation cycle. Another new vortex mode with two vortex pairs and two stationary vortices are found at KC>24.

  7. Upscaling of Solute Transport in Heterogeneous Media with Non-uniform Flow and Dispersion Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2013-10-01

    An analytical and computational model for non-reactive solute transport in periodic heterogeneous media with arbitrary non-uniform flow and dispersion fields within the unit cell of length ε is described. The model lumps the effect of non-uniform flow and dispersion into an effective advection velocity Ve and an effective dispersion coefficient De. It is shown that both Ve and De are scale-dependent (dependent on the length scale of the microscopic heterogeneity, ε), dependent on the Péclet number Pe, and on a dimensionless parameter α that represents the effects of microscopic heterogeneity. The parameter α, confined to the range of [-0.5, 0.5] for the numerical example presented, depends on the flow direction and non-uniform flow and dispersion fields. Effective advection velocity Ve and dispersion coefficient De can be derived for any given flow and dispersion fields, and . Homogenized solutions describing the macroscopic variations can be obtained from the effective model. Solutions with sub-unit-cell accuracy can be constructed by homogenized solutions and its spatial derivatives. A numerical implementation of the model compared with direct numerical solutions using a fine grid, demonstrated that the new method was in good agreement with direct solutions, but with significant computational savings.

  8. A chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave/pulsed uniform flow spectrometer. I. The low-temperature flow system.

    PubMed

    Oldham, James M; Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Zack, Lindsay N; Prozument, Kirill; Sims, Ian R; Park, G Barratt; Field, Robert W; Suits, Arthur G

    2014-10-21

    We report the development of a new instrument that combines chirped-pulse microwave spectroscopy with a pulsed uniform supersonic flow. This combination promises a nearly universal detection method that can deliver isomer and conformer specific, quantitative detection and spectroscopic characterization of unstable reaction products and intermediates, product vibrational distributions, and molecular excited states. This first paper in a series of two presents a new pulsed-flow design, at the heart of which is a fast, high-throughput pulsed valve driven by a piezoelectric stack actuator. Uniform flows at temperatures as low as 20 K were readily achieved with only modest pumping requirements, as demonstrated by impact pressure measurements and pure rotational spectroscopy. The proposed technique will be suitable for application in diverse fields including fundamental studies in spectroscopy, kinetics, and reaction dynamics.

  9. Numerical Study of Wave Propagation in a Non-Uniform Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povitsky, Alex; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The propagation of acoustic waves originating from cylindrical and spherical pulses, in a non-uniform mean flow, and in the presence of a reflecting wall is investigated by Hardin and Pope approach using compact approximation of spatial derivatives. The 2-D and 3-D stagnation flows and a flow around a cylinder are taken as prototypes of real world flows with strong gradients of mean pressure and velocity. The intensity and directivity of acoustic wave patterns appear to be quite different from the benchmark solutions obtained in a static environment for the same geometry. The physical reasons for amplification and weakening of sound are discussed in terms of dynamics of wave profile and redistribution of acoustic energy and its potential and kinetic components. For an acoustic wave in the flow around a cylinder, the observed mean acoustic pressure is approximately doubled (upstream pulse position) and halved (downstream pulse position) in comparison with the sound propagation in static ambient conditions.

  10. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... gallons per minute (gpm) or liters per minute (L/min), shall be conducted in accordance with the test... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for... Valves Test Procedures § 431.264 Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for...

  11. 10 CFR 431.264 - Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for commercial prerinse spray valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... gallons per minute (gpm) or liters per minute (L/min), shall be conducted in accordance with the test... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for... Valves Test Procedures § 431.264 Uniform test method for the measurement of flow rate for...

  12. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  13. The Effect of Uniform Background Flow on Vortex Ring Formation and Pinch-off

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, Paul S.; Dabiri, John O.; Gharib, Morteza

    2002-11-01

    Experimental investigations of vortex ring formation are extended to include the effects of a uniform background flow, in a manner relevant to the locomotion of aquatic animals utilizing jet propulsion. Gharib et. al. [J. Fluid Mech. 360, 121 (1998)] generated vortex rings using a piston/cylinder apparatus with relatively large discharge times to demonstrate that the vortex ring at the leading edge of the jet attains its maximum circulation at a piston stroke-to-diameter ratio L/D of 4. This "formation number" is robust over a range of piston motions and cylinder boundary conditions, and can be explained in terms of the Kelvin-Benjamin variational principle. To determine the effect of background flow on formation number and pinch-off of the leading vortex ring, uniform co-flow is established in a large annulus surrounding the vortex generator. The ratio of co-flow velocity to piston velocity is varied between 0 and 1. In addition, the co-flow is initiated at times both before and after the start of vortex ring formation. We present results for stroke ratios L/D = 2 and L/D = 8, in order to discern effects of the co-flow on the leading vortex ring in isolation and in the presence of a trailing jet.

  14. Effect of a uniform electric field on soot in laminar premixed ethylene/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Yao, Q.; Nathan, G.J.; Alwahabi, Z.T.; King, K.D.; Ho, K.

    2010-07-15

    The effect of a nominally uniform electric field on the initially uniform distribution of soot has been assessed for laminar premixed ethylene/air flames from a McKenna burner. An electrophoretic influence on charged soot particles was measured through changes to the deposition rate of soot on the McKenna plug, using laser extinction (LE). Soot volume fraction was measured in situ using laser-induced incandescence (LII). Particle size and morphologies were assessed through ex situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostics (TSPD). The results show that the majority of these soot particles are positively charged. The presence of a negatively charged plug was found to decrease the particle residence times in the flame and to influence the formation and oxidation progress. A positively charged plug has the opposite effect. The effect on soot volume fraction, particles size and morphology with electric field strength is also reported. Flame stability was also found to be affected by the presence of the electric field, with the balance of the electrophoretic force and drag force controlling the transition to unstable flame flicker. The presence of charged species generated by the flame was found to reduce the dielectric field strength to one seventh that of air. (author)

  15. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  16. CHF multiplier of subcooled flow boiling for non-uniform heating conditions in swirl tube

    SciTech Connect

    Inasaka, F.; Nariai, H.

    1994-12-31

    The high heat flux components of fusion reactors, such as divertor plates and beam dumps of neutral beam injectors, are estimated to be subjected to very high heat loads more than 10 MW/m{sup 2}. Critical heat flux (CHF), which determines the upper limit of heat removal, is one of the most important problems in designing cooling systems. For practical applications in cooling systems, subcooled flow boiling in water combined with swirl-flow in tubes with internal twisted tape is thought to be the most superior for CHF characteristics in fusion reactor components, heat by irradiation comes in from one side of the wall, and cooling channel is then under circumferentially non-uniform heating condition. Authors have conducted the experiments on the CHF with internal twisted tapes under circumferentially non-uniform heating conditions and showed that when the intensity of non-uniformity increased, q{sub cH} (peak heat flux at burnout under nonuniform heating condition) in tube with internal twisted tape increased above the q{sub c,unif} (CHF under uniform heating condition), though the average qualities were the same for both cases. They also showed that this CHF enhancement was not seen in smooth tubes without tape under the same average qualities.

  17. Analytical and numerical studies of the thermocapillary flow in a uniformly floating zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowlis, W. W.; Roberts, G. O.

    1986-01-01

    The microgravity environment of an orbiting vehicle permits crystal growth experiments in the presence of greatly reduced buoyant convection in the liquid melt. Crystals grown in ground-based laboratories do not achieve their potential properties because of dopant variations caused by flow in the melt. The floating zone crystal growing system is widely used to produce crystals of silicon and other materials. However, in this system the temperature gradient on the free sidewall surface of the melt is the source of a thermocapillary flow which does not disappear in the low-gravity environment. The idea of using a uniform rotation of the floating zone system to confine the thermocapillary flow to the melt sidewall leaving the interior of the melt passive is examined. A cylinder of fluid with an axial temperature gradient imposed on the cylindrical sidewall is considered. A half zone and the linearized, axisymmetric flow in the absence of crystal growth is examined. Rotation is found to confine the linear thermocapillary flow. A simplified model is extended to a full zone and both linear and nonlinear thermocapillary flows are studied theoretically. Analytical and numerical methods are used for the linear flows and numerical methods for the nonlinear flows. It was found that the linear flows in the full zone have more complicated and thicker boundary layer structures than in the half zone, and that these flows are also confined by the rotation. However, for the simplified model considered and for realistic values for silicon, the thermocapillary flow is not linear. The fully nonlinear flow is strong and unsteady (a weak oscillation is present) and it penetrates the interior. Some non-rotating flow results are also presented. Since silicon as a large value of thermal conductivity, one would expect the temperature fields to be determined by conduction alone. This is true for the linear and weakly nonlinear flows, but for the stronger nonlinear flow the results show that

  18. Uniform and non-uniform modes of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric air: fast imaging and spectroscopic measurements of electric field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chong; Dobrynin, Danil; Fridman, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report experimental results on fast ICCD imaging of development of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in atmospheric air and spectroscopic measurements of electric field in the discharge. Uniformity of the discharge images obtained with nanosecond exposure times were analyzed using chi-square test. The results indicate that DBD uniformity strongly depends on applied (global) electric field in the discharge gap, and is a threshold phenomenon. We show that in the case of strong overvoltage on the discharge gap (provided by fast rise times), there is transition from filamentary to uniform DBD mode which correlates to the corresponding decrease of maximum local electric field in the discharge. PMID:25071294

  19. Comparison of uniform perturbation solutions and numerical solutions for some potential flows past slender bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, T. C.; Liu, C. H.; Geer, J.

    1984-01-01

    Approximate solutions for potential flow past an axisymmetric slender body and past a thin airfoil are calculated using a uniform perturbation method and then compared with either the exact analytical solution or the solution obtained using a purely numerical method. The perturbation method is based upon a representation of the disturbance flow as the superposition of singularities distributed entirely within the body, while the numerical (panel) method is based upon a distribution of singularities on the surface of the body. It is found that the perturbation method provides very good results for small values of the slenderness ratio and for small angles of attack. Moreover, for comparable accuracy, the perturbation method is simpler to implement, requires less computer memory, and generally uses less computation time than the panel method. In particular, the uniform perturbation method yields good resolution near the regions of the leading and trailing edges where other methods fail or require special attention.

  20. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  1. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  2. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  3. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  4. Simulation of flexible filaments in a uniform flow by the immersed boundary method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Xi; Shin, Soo Jai; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2007-10-01

    An improved version of the immersed boundary (IB) method is developed for simulating flexible filaments in a uniform flow. The proposed IB method is based on an efficient Navier-Stokes solver adopting the fractional step method and a staggered Cartesian grid system. The fluid motion defined on an Eulerian grid and the filament motion defined on a Lagrangian grid are independently solved and their interaction force is explicitly calculated using a feedback law. A direct numerical method is developed to calculate the filament motion under the constraint of inextensibility. When applied to the case of a swinging filament analogous to a rope pendulum, the proposed method gave results very similar to those of the analytical solution derived using the perturbation method. For a flexible filament flapping in a uniform flow, the mechanism by which small vortex processions are produced was investigated. The bistable property of the system was observed by altering the filament length, and the effects of the boundary condition at the fixed end (simply supported or clamped) were studied. For two side-by-side filaments in a uniform flow, both in-phase flapping and out-of-phase flapping were reproduced in the present simulations. A repulsive force was included in the formulation to handle collisions between the free ends of side-by-side filaments undergoing out-of-phase flapping.

  5. Analysis of laminar flow heat transfer in uniform temperature circular tubes with tape inserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manglik, R. M.; Bergles, A. E.

    1986-05-01

    Constant property, laminar flow heat transfer in a semicircular tube with uniform wall temperature has been analyzed to define the lower bound of heat transfer augmentation in circular tubes with twisted-tape inserts. Two thermal boundary conditions, which correspond to the two extremes of the fin effect of twisted tapes encountered in practical applications, are considered. Numerical solutions, employing finite-difference formulations for the governing momentum and energy equations were carried out for the thermal entrance region and for fully developed flow.

  6. Flow in isothermal layers of ferrofluid by action of uniform rotating magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kashevskii, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    The author attempts to determine how intense the flow of a ferrofluid in a rotating magnetic field can become owing to the temperature dependence of the properties when a nonuniform temperature field has been produced within the volume of such a fluid. It was found that in a channel with a strong temperature dependence of viscosity, a uniform rotating magnetic field is capable of effectively influencing the flow of a ferrofluid within nonisothermal layers, which may be of interest in solving problems of heat transfer.

  7. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air... appendix F) until the compliance date of any amended energy conservation standards for room...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air... appendix F) until the compliance date of any amended energy conservation standards for room...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air... appendix F) until the compliance date of any amended energy conservation standards for room...

  10. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. (a) This section covers the test procedures you must follow if, pursuant...

  11. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. (a) This section covers the test procedures you must follow if, pursuant...

  12. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. (a) This Section covers the test procedures you must follow if, pursuant...

  13. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. (a) This Section covers the test procedures you must follow if, pursuant...

  14. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. (a) This Section covers the test procedures you must follow if, pursuant...

  15. Microbridge structures for uniform interval control of flowing droplets in microfluidic networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do-Hyun; Lee, Wonhye; Um, Eujin; Park, Je-Kyun

    2011-09-01

    Precise temporal control of microfluidic droplets such as synchronization and combinatorial pairing of droplets is required to achieve a variety range of chemical and biochemical reactions inside microfluidic networks. Here, we present a facile and robust microfluidic platform enabling uniform interval control of flowing droplets for the precise temporal synchronization and pairing of picoliter droplets with a reagent. By incorporating microbridge structures interconnecting the droplet-carrying channel and the flow control channel, a fluidic pressure drop was derived between the two fluidic channels via the microbridge structures, reordering flowing droplets with a defined uniform interval. Through the adjustment of the control oil flow rate, the droplet intervals were flexibly and precisely adjustable. With this mechanism of droplet spacing, the gelation of the alginate droplets as well as control of the droplet interval was simultaneously achieved by additional control oil flow including calcified oleic acid. In addition, by parallel linking identical microfluidic modules with distinct sample inlet, controlled synchronization and pairing of two distinct droplets were demonstrated. This method is applicable to facilitate and develop many droplet-based microfluidic applications, including biological assay, combinatorial synthesis, and high-throughput screening.

  16. Simulation of pulmonary air flow with a subject-specific boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A; Tawhai, Merryn H; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-08-10

    We present a novel image-based technique to estimate a subject-specific boundary condition (BC) for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of pulmonary air flow. The information of regional ventilation for an individual is derived by registering two computed tomography (CT) lung datasets and then passed to the CT-resolved airways as the flow BC. The CFD simulations show that the proposed method predicts lobar volume changes consistent with direct image-measured metrics, whereas the other two traditional BCs (uniform velocity or uniform pressure) yield lobar volume changes and regional pressure differences inconsistent with observed physiology.

  17. Simulation of pulmonary air flow with a subject-specific boundary condition

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel image-based technique to estimate a subject-specific boundary condition (BC) for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of pulmonary air flow. The information of regional ventilation for an individual is derived by registering two computed tomography (CT) lung datasets and then passed to the CT-resolved airways as the flow BC. The CFD simulations show that the proposed method predicts lobar volume changes consistent with direct image-measured metrics, whereas the other two traditional BCs (uniform velocity or uniform pressure) yield lobar volume changes and regional pressure differences inconsistent with observed physiology. PMID:20483412

  18. Air flow patterns in the operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Howorth, F H

    1980-04-01

    Bacteria-carrying particles and exhaled anaesthetic gases are the two contaminants found in the air flow patterns of operating rooms. Their origin, direction and speed were illustrated by a motion picture using Schlieren photography and smoke tracers. Compared with a conventionally well air conditioned operating theatre, it was shown that a downward flow of clean air reduced the number of bacteria-carrying particles at the wound site by sixty times. The Exflow method of achieving this without the restriction of any side panels or floor obstruction was described. The total body exhaust worn by the surgical team was shown to reduce the bacteria count by a further eleven times. Clinical results show that when both these systems are used together, patient infection was reduced from 9 per cent to between 0.3 per cent and 0.5 per cent, even when no pre-operative antibiotics were used. Anaesthetic gas pollution was measured and shown to be generally 1000 p.p.m. at the head of the patient, in induction, operating and recovery rooms, also in dental and labour rooms. A high volume low pressure active scavenging system was described together with its various attachments including one specially for paediatric scavenging. Results showed a reduction of nitrous oxide pollution to between zero and 3 p.p.m. The economy and cost effectiveness of both these pollution control systems was shown to be good due to the removal of health hazards from patients and theatre staff.

  19. Variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum flow transport model for compound channels accounting for distributed non-uniform lateral flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swain, Ratnakar; Sahoo, Bhabagrahi

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the fully volume conservative simplified hydrodynamic-based variable parameter McCarthy-Muskingum (VPMM) flow transport model advocated by Perumal and Price in 2013 is extended to exclusively incorporate the distributed non-uniform lateral flow in the routing scheme accounting for compound river channel flows. The revised VPMM formulation is exclusively derived from the combined form of the de Saint-Venant's continuity and momentum equations with the spatiotemporally distributed lateral flow which is solved using the finite difference box scheme. This revised model could address the earlier model limitations of: (i) non-accounting non-uniformly distributed lateral flow, (ii) ignoring floodplain flow, and (iii) non-consideration of catchment dynamics of lateral flow generation restricting its real-time application. The efficacy of the revised formulation is tested to simulate 16 years (1980-1995) river runoff from real-time storm events under scarce morpho-hydrological data conditions in a tropical monsoon-type 48 km Bolani-Gomlai reach of the Brahmani River in eastern India. The spatiotemporally distributed lateral flows generated in real-time is computed by water balance approach accounting for catchment characteristics of normalized network area function, land use land cover classes, and soil textural classes; and hydro-meteorological variables of precipitation, soil moisture, minimum and maximum temperatures, wind speed, relative humidity, and solar radiation. The multiple error measures used in this study and the simulation results reveal that the revised VPMM model has a greater practical utility in estimating the event-based and long-term meso-scale river runoff (both discharge and its stage) at any ungauged site, enhancing its application for real-time flood estimation.

  20. Observations of ferrofluid flow under a uniform rotating magnetic field in a spherical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Díaz, Isaac; Rinaldi, Carlos; Khushrushahi, Shahriar; Zahn, Markus

    2012-04-01

    Flow of a ferrofluid in spherical and cylindrical geometries were measured under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field produced by two perpendicular spherical coils, a so-called fluxball, excited by quadrature currents. Using an ultrasound velocity profile technique and a commercial oil based ferrofluid (EFH1, Ferrotec) we observed rotational flow around the z-axis. In comparison, the radial component of the flow was found to be negligible. Results show that the magnitude of the azimuthal velocity profile increases as the applied magnetic field amplitude increases. This behavior is also observed for ferrofluid in a cylindrical container placed inside the fluxball cavity and inside a two-pole stator winding. These results indicate that inhomogeneities in the magnetic field produced by slots and finite height of the stator winding used in prior experiments are not the source of previously observed flows produced by a two pole stator winding. The experiments reported here either point to the existence of non-uniform demagnetizing magnetic fields due to the finite height of the cylindrical container, the existence of couple stresses and spin viscosity in ferrofluids, or to the need to develop alternate governing and constitutive equations capable of describing the experimental observations.

  1. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  2. Why do inverted-flags flap in a uniform steady flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, John; Cossé, Julia; Kim, Daegyoum; Fan, Boyu; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of a cantilevered elastic sheet, with a uniform steady flow impinging on its clamped-end, have been studied widely and provide insight into the stability of flags and biological phenomena. Recent measurements by Kim et al. show that reversing the sheet's orientation, with the flow impinging on its free-edge, dramatically alters its dynamics. In this talk, we use a combination of mathematical theory, scaling analysis and measurement to explore the physical mechanisms driving the observed large-amplitude flapping motion of an inverted-flag. Flapping is found to be periodic predominantly, with a transition to chaos as flow speed increases. These findings have implications to leaf motion and other biological processes, such as the dynamics of individual hairs, because they also can present an inverted-flag configuration. Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation; Ministry of Trade, Industry and Energy, Republic of Korea; Australian Research Council Grants scheme.

  3. Does Kutta lift exist on a vortex ring in a uniform cross flow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, T. T.; Lua, K. B.; Thet, K.

    2008-05-01

    Past works [Y. K. Chang and A. D. Vakili, Phys. Fluids 7, 1583 (1995); R. Sau and K. Mahesh, AIAA Paper No. 2007-1316] show that a vortex ring ejected normal to a cross flow tilts and deforms as it propagates downstream, and they attribute this phenomenon to the Kutta lift or Magnus effect. Here, we show through a controlled experiment that there is no physical evidence of the existence of a Kutta lift when a fully developed vortex ring is exposed to a uniform cross flow. The observed phenomenon could be attributed to the modification of vorticity distribution of the vortex core due to the combined effect of the cross flow itself and the entrainment of boundary layer material during the formation of vortex ring.

  4. Decentralized and Tactical Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odoni, Amedeo R.; Bertsimas, Dimitris

    1997-01-01

    This project dealt with the following topics: 1. Review and description of the existing air traffic flow management system (ATFM) and identification of aspects with potential for improvement. 2. Identification and review of existing models and simulations dealing with all system segments (enroute, terminal area, ground) 3. Formulation of concepts for overall decentralization of the ATFM system, ranging from moderate decentralization to full decentralization 4. Specification of the modifications to the ATFM system required to accommodate each of the alternative concepts. 5. Identification of issues that need to be addressed with regard to: determination of the way the ATFM system would be operating; types of flow management strategies that would be used; and estimation of the effectiveness of ATFM with regard to reducing delay and re-routing costs. 6. Concept evaluation through identification of criteria and methodologies for accommodating the interests of stakeholders and of approaches to optimization of operational procedures for all segments of the ATFM system.

  5. Acoustic propagation in viscous fluid with uniform flow and a novel design methodology for ultrasonic flow meter.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Xiaoqian

    2013-02-01

    Ultrasonic flow meter with non-invasive no-moving-parts construction has good prospective application for space on-orbit fluid gauging. In traditional pulse transit time flow meter, inconsistency of ultrasonic transducers leads to measurement error and plane wave theory, bases of transit time flow meter, is valuable only for low-frequency wave propagation in inviscid fluid and will lose feasibility when fluid viscosity is considered. In this paper, based on the hydrodynamics of viscous fluid, wave propagation with uniform flow profile is mathematically formulated and a novel solution for viscous fluid using potential theory is firstly presented. Then a novel design methodology of continuous ultrasonic flow meter is proposed, where high measurement rangeability and accuracy are guaranteed individually by solving the integral ambiguity using multi-tone wide laning strategy and the fractional phase shift using phase lock loop tracking method. A comparison with transit time ultrasonic flow meter shows the advantage of proposed methodology. In the end, parametric analysis of viscosity on wave propagation and ultrasonic flow meter is compressively investigated.

  6. Interface evolution of a particle in a supersaturated solution affected by a far-field uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming-Wen; Wang, Zi-Dong

    2013-09-01

    The effect of far-field uniform flow on the morphological evolution of a spherical particle in a supersaturated solution affected by a far-field uniform flow is studied by using the matched asymptotic expansion method. The analytical solution for the interface shape, concentration field, and interface velocity of the particle growth shows that the convection induced by the far-field uniform flow facilitates the growth of the spherical particle, the upstream flow imposed on the particle enhances the growth velocity of the interface when the flow comes in, the downstream flow lowers the growth velocity of the surface when the flow goes out, and the interface morphology evolves into a peach-like shape.

  7. Stability analysis of unbounded uniform dense granular shear flow based on a viscoplastic constitutive law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Yau; Lai, Jeng-You; Young, D. L.

    2010-11-01

    Asymptotic and transient stability analyses of unbounded uniform granular shear flow at high solids volume fractions were carried out in the paper, based on a model composed of the viscoplastic constitutive law [P. Jop, Y. Forterre, and O. Pouliquen, Nature (London) 441, 727 (2006)] and the dilatancy law [O. Pouliquen et al., J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P07020]. We refer to this model as the VPDL (meaning of the "viscoplastic and dilatancy laws") thereinafter. In this model, dense granular flows were treated as a viscoplastic fluid with a Drucker-Prager-like yielding criterion. We compared our results to those obtained using the frictional-kinetic model (FKM) [M. Alam and P. R. Nott, J. Fluid Mech. 343, 267 (1997)]. Our main result is that unbounded uniform dense granular shear flows are always asymptotically stable at large time based on the VPDL model, at least for two-dimensional perturbations. This is valid for disturbances of layering modes (i.e., the perturbations whose wavenumber vectors are aligned along the transverse coordinate) as well as for nonlayering modes (the streamwise component of the wavenumber vector is nonzero). By contrast, layering modes can be unstable based on the FKM constitutive laws. Interestingly, in the framework of the VPDL, the analysis shows that significant transient growth may occur owing to the non-normality of the linear system, although disturbances eventually decay at large time.

  8. Dynamic Flow Management Problems in Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Sarah Stock

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, over six hundred thousand licensed pilots flew nearly thirty-five million flights into over eighteen thousand U.S. airports, logging more than 519 billion passenger miles. Since demand for air travel has increased by more than 50% in the last decade while capacity has stagnated, congestion is a problem of undeniable practical significance. In this thesis, we will develop optimization techniques that reduce the impact of congestion on the national airspace. We start by determining the optimal release times for flights into the airspace and the optimal speed adjustment while airborne taking into account the capacitated airspace. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Problem (TFMP). We address the complexity, showing that it is NP-hard. We build an integer programming formulation that is quite strong as some of the proposed inequalities are facet defining for the convex hull of solutions. For practical problems, the solutions of the LP relaxation of the TFMP are very often integral. In essence, we reduce the problem to efficiently solving large scale linear programming problems. Thus, the computation times are reasonably small for large scale, practical problems involving thousands of flights. Next, we address the problem of determining how to reroute aircraft in the airspace system when faced with dynamically changing weather conditions. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Rerouting Problem (TFMRP) We present an integrated mathematical programming approach for the TFMRP, which utilizes several methodologies, in order to minimize delay costs. In order to address the high dimensionality, we present an aggregate model, in which we formulate the TFMRP as a multicommodity, integer, dynamic network flow problem with certain side constraints. Using Lagrangian relaxation, we generate aggregate flows that are decomposed into a collection of flight paths using a randomized rounding heuristic. This collection of paths is used in a packing integer

  9. A computational model of rat cerebral blood flow using non-uniform rational B-splines.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Sergey V; Podoprigora, Guennady I; Comas, Laurent; Boulahdour, Hatem; Cardot, Jean-Claude; Baud, Michel; Nartsissov, Yaroslav R; Blagosklonov, Oleg

    2007-01-01

    Non-Uniform Rational B-splines (NURBS) surfaces can be used for a computer simulation of shapes. Some anatomical models of human or animal structures have been recently developed on that basis. We used positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) data for NURBS modeling of anatomical structures and isotope uptake in the rat brain. Our simplified model of the rat cerebral blood flow is the first step in a larger project aiming a simulation of PET scans in small animals followed by its validation in vivo.

  10. Liquid metal flow in a large-radius elbow with a uniform magnetic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, T.J.; Walker, J.S.

    1988-07-01

    This paper treats the liquid-metal flow in an elbow between two straight, rectangular ducts. There is a uniform magnetic field in the plane of the elbow. The duct has thin, electrically conducting walls. The Hartmann number and the interaction parameter are assumed to be large, while the magnetic Reynolds number is assumed to be small. Solutions for the velocity at each cross section of the elbow and for the pressure drop due to three-dimensional effects are presented. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  11. The interface morphology of a spherical crystal in the undercooled melt affected by a far-field uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Wang, Y. L.; Zhang, H.; Wu, L. Y.; Wang, Z. D.

    2011-05-01

    The effect of the convective flow caused by the far-field uniform flow on the interface morphology of a spherical crystal is studied by using the matched asymptotic expansion method. For the case that the far-field uniform flow is far less than the characteristic velocity of the interface, we obtain the uniformly valid asymptotic solution of the spherical crystal in the entire melt region. The analytical results show that the far-field uniform flow has significant effect on the interface morphology of the spherical crystal. The convection flow makes the interface of the growing spherical crystal enhance growth velocity in the upstream direction of the far-field uniform flow, inhibit growth in the downstream direction and decrease growth velocity on the two sides of the spherical crystal. The drag effect of the far-field uniform flow makes the interface morphology of the spherical crystal evolve into a pearlike oval shape. Our analytical result is consistent with the experimental and simulation results.

  12. Air flow exploration of abrasive feed tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shijin; Li, Xiaohong; Gu, Yilei

    2009-12-01

    An abrasive water-jet cutting process is one in which water pressure is raised to a very high pressure and forced through a very small orifice to form a very thin high speed jet beam. This thin jet beam is then directed through a chamber and then fed into a secondary nozzle, or mixing tube. During this process, a vacuum is generated in the chamber, and garnet abrasives and air are pulled into the chamber, through an abrasive feed tube, and mixes with this high speed stream of water. Because of the restrictions introduced by the abrasive feed tube geometry, a vacuum gradient is generated along the tube. Although this phenomenon has been recognized and utilized as a way to monitor nozzle condition and abrasive flowing conditions, yet, until now, conditions inside the abrasive feed line have not been completely understood. A possible reason is that conditions inside the abrasive feed line are complicated. Not only compressible flow but also multi-phase, multi-component flow has been involved in inside of abrasive feed tube. This paper explored various aspects of the vacuum creation process in both the mixing chamber and the abrasive feed tube. Based on an experimental exploration, an analytical framework is presented to allow theoretical calculations of vacuum conditions in the abrasive feed tube.

  13. Tropical-Cyclone Flow Asymmetries Induced by a Uniform Flow Revisited

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    0851077, NOAAs Hurricane Research Division and NASA grants NNH09AK561 and NNG09HG031. References Black PG D’Asoro EA Drennan WM French JR Niller PP...model: Validation tests and simulation of an Atlantic cyclone and cold front. Mon. Wea. Rev., 121, 1493-1513. Frank WM Ritchie EA. 1999 Effects of...environmental flow on tropical cyclone structure. Mon. Wea. Rev., 127, 2044-2061. Frank WM Ritchie EA. 2001 Effects of vertical wind shear on the

  14. Bed Slope Effect on Non-uniform Flow through Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanu Prakasham Reddy, N.; Krishnaiah, S.; Ramakrishna Reddy, M.

    2016-09-01

    The tilting angle or bed slope (φ) effect on piezometric head was studied in a tilting angle converging permeameter for different rate of flows and for different bed slopes or tilting angles (φ) and the equipotential lines of piezometric head are depicted pictorially to establish the suitability of the convergent flow assumption and have a proper insight into the subject of seepage flow. The porosity effect is considered while computing seepage velocity (V), linear parameter, non-linear parameter, increases with decrease of porosity (N) and increases with decrease of angle of inclination. In order to meet the objective of this study, a crushed rock of size 7.30 mm was used as media and water as fluid, to develop curves relating friction factor (FR) and Reynolds number (RR) for different ratios of width using hydraulic radius (R) as characteristic length for different bed slopes or tilting angles (φ). The effect of varying tilting angles (φ) on head loss of fluid flow through porous media when packed between convergent boundaries for different ratios of width (B1/B2) was studied and inferred that tilting angles (φ) have a significant effect on the non uniform flow.

  15. A uniform laminar air plasma plume with large volume excited by an alternating current voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Bao, Wenting; Chu, Jingdi; Zhang, Panpan; Jia, Pengying

    2015-12-01

    Using a plasma jet composed of two needle electrodes, a laminar plasma plume with large volume is generated in air through an alternating current voltage excitation. Based on high-speed photography, a train of filaments is observed to propagate periodically away from their birth place along the gas flow. The laminar plume is in fact a temporal superposition of the arched filament train. The filament consists of a negative glow near the real time cathode, a positive column near the real time anode, and a Faraday dark space between them. It has been found that the propagation velocity of the filament increases with increasing the gas flow rate. Furthermore, the filament lifetime tends to follow a normal distribution (Gaussian distribution). The most probable lifetime decreases with increasing the gas flow rate or decreasing the averaged peak voltage. Results also indicate that the real time peak current decreases and the real time peak voltage increases with the propagation of the filament along the gas flow. The voltage-current curve indicates that, in every discharge cycle, the filament evolves from a Townsend discharge to a glow one and then the discharge quenches. Characteristic regions including a negative glow, a Faraday dark space, and a positive column can be discerned from the discharge filament. Furthermore, the plasma parameters such as the electron density, the vibrational temperature and the gas temperature are investigated based on the optical spectrum emitted from the laminar plume.

  16. Induced-charge electroosmotic flow around dielectric particles in uniform electric field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Dongqing

    2013-11-15

    The current research of induced-charge electroosmotic flow (ICEOF) is mostly confined to systems with ideally or fully polarizable surfaces (e.g., metal). However, most materials in nature have various degrees of polarizability, which directly affects the induced charges and subsequently the induced-charge electroosmotic flow. This paper studied the effect of the polarizability of the materials on the ICEOF. An analytical expression of the induced potential on the surface of a dielectric particle in a uniform electrical field was derived. Three-dimensional transient numerical simulations of the ICEOF and the motion of dielectric particles were performed to study the effect of the polarizability. Simulation results show that the transportation of the dielectric particle in a microchannel is not affected by the polarizability of the particle; however, the interaction of two dielectric particles is sensitive to the polarizability of the particles.

  17. Uniformly Valid Asymptotic Solution of Steady Dendrite Growth in External Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian-Jun; Yu, Dong-Sheng

    1998-11-01

    The interaction of convection and dendritic growth has been a subject of great interest in the area of material science in recent years. Theoretical studies of the steady dendrite growth in an external flow have been conducted by a number of authors, such as Ananth and Gill (1984); Ben Amar (1988), Bouisson and Pelce (1989); Saville and Beaghton (1989), etc., numerically and analytically. Their solutions, however, are not asymptotic expansion solutions. Their approaches do not allow to generate the next order approximations, nor give an estimation of the error between their solutions and the exact solutions. The first asymptotic, uniformly valid expansion solution was obtained by Xu (1994) in the limit of the Prandtl number Pr → ∞. Xu's solution may be well applied to the case that the flow velocity, U_∞, has the same order of magnitude as the growth speed of dendrite tip, U. It, however, will not give a good approximation when U_∞ >> U . The case of U_∞ >> U is, practically, important. It was just for this case that some recent experiments were performed. In this paper, we consider steady growth with zero surface tension in the case, U_∞ >> U and obtain a uniformly valid asymptotic expansion for the steady state solution in the whole growth region as ɛ = U/U_∞ → 0.

  18. Turbulent solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for uniform shear flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    To study the nonlinear physics of uniform turbulent shear flow, the unaveraged Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically. This extends our previous work in which mean gradients were absent. For initial conditions, modified three-dimensional-cosine velocity fluctuations are used. The boundary conditions are modified periodic conditions on a stationary three-dimensional numerical grid. A uniform mean shear is superimposed on the initial and boundary conditions. The three components of the mean-square velocity fluctuations are initially equal for the conditions chosen. As in the case of no shear the initially nonrandom flow develops into an apparently random turbulence at higher Reynolds number. Thus, randomness or turbulence can apparently arise as a consequence of the structure of the Navier-Stokes equations. Except for an initial period of adjustment, all fluctuating components grow with time. The initial equality of the three intensity components is destroyed by the shear, the transverse components becoming smaller than the longitudinal one, in agreement with experiment. Also, the shear creates a small-scale structure in the turbulence. The nonlinear solutions are compared with linearized ones.

  19. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 °C inlet temperature. We investigated flow perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area. For the 30 MW/m2 case, the micro-jet array absorbed 750 W in the helium with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1280 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 801 °C. The HEMJ absorbed 750 W with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1411 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 844 °C. For comparison, both the single HEMJ finger and the micro-jet array used 5-mm-thick tungsten armor. The ratio of maximum to average temperature and variations in the local heat transfer coefficient were lower for the micro-jet array compared to the HEMJ device. Although high heat flux testing is required to validate the results obtained in these simulations, the results provide important guidance in jet design and manifolding to increase heat removal while providing more even temperature distribution and minimizing non-uniformity in the gas flow and thermal stresses at the

  20. Uniformity of Ludwieg tube flows. [temperature variations behind nonsteady expansion wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, D. A.; Knoke, G. S.; Wai, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Pressure and speed of sound measurements are used to obtain averaged gas properties in a Ludwieg combustion tube in which the gas is burned just prior to use. Absorption of a laser beam in the exit flow is used to check the predicted temperature uniformity. The burning process and the heat transfer to the cold walls are modeled. Interferograms of Ludwieg tube boundary layers are utilized to develop a new semiempirical boundary layer expression referred to as the integral density thickness, which is then applied to a recently developed linearized analysis of the effects of this layer. Pressure-time histories are determined for a wide range of tube flow Mach number and aspect ratio. Viscous and nonviscous effects are considered. It is shown that although the influence of the integral density thickness on the flow can be large, a modified linear theory can be used to estimate the effects for arbitrary tube flow Mach number and values of the aspect ratio that include cases where the boundary layers have merged.

  1. Lateral migration of a microdroplet under optical forces in a uniform flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hyunjun; Chang, Cheong Bong; Jung, Jin Ho; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2014-12-15

    The behavior of a microdroplet in a uniform flow and subjected to a vertical optical force applied by a loosely focused Gaussian laser beam was studied numerically. The lattice Boltzmann method was applied to obtain the two-phase flow field, and the dynamic ray tracing method was adopted to calculate the optical force. The optical forces acting on the spherical droplets agreed well with the analytical values. The numerically predicted droplet migration distances agreed well with the experimentally obtained values. Simulations of the various flow and optical parameters showed that the droplet migration distance nondimensionalized by the droplet radius is proportional to the S number (z{sub d}/r{sub p} = 0.377S), which is the ratio of the optical force to the viscous drag. The effect of the surface tension was also examined. These results indicated that the surface tension influenced the droplet migration distance to a lesser degree than the flow and optical parameters. The results of the present work hold for the refractive indices of the mean fluid and the droplet being 1.33 and 1.59, respectively.

  2. Simulations of non-uniform embossing:the effect of asymmetric neighbor cavities on polymer flow during nanoimprint lithography.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; King, William P. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Rowland, Harry D.

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents continuum simulations of viscous polymer flow during nanoimprint lithography (NIL) for embossing tools having irregular spacings and sizes. Simulations varied non-uniform embossing tool geometry to distinguish geometric quantities governing cavity filling order, polymer peak deformation, and global mold filling times. A characteristic NIL velocity predicts cavity filling order. In general, small cavities fill more quickly than large cavities, while cavity spacing modulates polymer deformation mode. Individual cavity size, not total filling volume, dominates replication time, with large differences in individual cavity size resulting in non-uniform, squeeze flow filling. High density features can be modeled as a solid indenter in squeeze flow to accurately predict polymer flow and allow for optimization of wafer-scale replication. The present simulations make it possible to design imprint templates capable of distributing pressure evenly across the mold surface and facilitating symmetric polymer flow over large areas to prevent mold deformation and non-uniform residual layer thickness.

  3. Influence of travel speed on spray deposition uniformity from an air-assisted variable-rate sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly developed LiDAR-guided air-assisted variable-rate sprayer for nursery and orchard applications was tested at various travel speeds to compare its spray deposition and coverage uniformity with constant-rate applications. Spray samplers, including nylon screens and water-sensitive papers (WSP)...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room...

  5. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room...

  6. Analytical orbit predictions with air drag using K-S uniformly regular canonical elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier James Raj, M.; Sharma, R. K.

    Accurate orbit prediction of the Earth's satellites is an important requirement for mission planning, satellite geodesy, spacecraft navigation, re-entry and orbital lifetime estimates. For this purpose, it has become necessary to use extremely complex force models to match with the present operational requirements and observational techniques. The problem becomes all the more complicated in the near-Earth environment due to the fact that the satellite is influenced by the non-spherical effects of the Earth's gravitational field as well as the dissipative effects of the Earth's atmosphere. The effects of the atmosphere are difficult to determine since the atmospheric density, and hence the drag, undergoes large modelled fluctuations. Though the accurate ephemeris of a near-Earth satellite can be generated by the numerical integration methods with respect to a complex force model, the analytical solutions, though difficult to obtain for complex force models and limited to relatively simple models, represent a manifold of solutions for a large domain of initial conditions and find indispensable application to mission planning and qualitative analysis. The method of the K-S total-energy element equations (Stiefel & Scheifele, 1971) is a powerful method for numerical solution with respect to any type of perturbing forces, as the equations are less sensitive to round-off and truncation errors in the numerical algorithm. The equations are everywhere regular in contrast with the classical Newtonian equations, which are singular at the collision of the two bodies. The equations are smoothed for eccentric orbits because eccentric anomaly is the independent variable. These equations have been used effectively to generate analytical solution with respect to Earth's zonal harmonic term J2 (Sharma 1997) and air drag perturbations (Sharma 1992). A particular canonical form of the K-S differential equations, known as K-S uniform regular canonical equations, where all the ten

  7. Nonlinear Dynamics of Non-uniform Current-Vortex Sheets in Magnetohydrodynamic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, C.; Nishihara, K.; Sano, T.

    2017-04-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe fully nonlinear dynamics of interfaces in two-dimensional MHD flows based on an idea of non-uniform current-vortex sheet. Application of vortex sheet model to MHD flows has a crucial difficulty because of non-conservative nature of magnetic tension. However, it is shown that when a magnetic field is initially parallel to an interface, the concept of vortex sheet can be extended to MHD flows (current-vortex sheet). Two-dimensional MHD flows are then described only by a one-dimensional Lagrange parameter on the sheet. It is also shown that bulk magnetic field and velocity can be calculated from their values on the sheet. The model is tested by MHD Richtmyer-Meshkov instability with sinusoidal vortex sheet strength. Two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations show that the nonlinear dynamics of a shocked interface with density stratification agrees fairly well with that for its corresponding potential flow. Numerical solutions of the model reproduce properly the results of the ideal MHD simulations, such as the roll-up of spike, exponential growth of magnetic field, and its saturation and oscillation. Nonlinear evolution of the interface is found to be determined by the Alfvén and Atwood numbers. Some of their dependence on the sheet dynamics and magnetic field amplification are discussed. It is shown by the model that the magnetic field amplification occurs locally associated with the nonlinear dynamics of the current-vortex sheet. We expect that our model can be applicable to a wide variety of MHD shear flows.

  8. Femtosecond laser flow tagging in non-air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibin; Calvert, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    The Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) [Michael, J. B. et al., Applied optics, 50(26), 2011] method is studied in nitrogen-containing gaseous flows. The underlying mechanism behind the FLEET process is the dissociation of molecular nitrogen into atomic nitrogen, which produces long-lived florescence as the nitrogen atoms recombine. Spectra and images of the resulting tagged line provide insight into the effects of different atmospheric gases on the FLEET process. The ionization cross-section, conductivity and energy states of the gaseous particles are each brought into consideration. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility for long-lived flow tagging on the order of hundreds of microseconds in non-air environments. Of particular interest are the enhancement of the FLEET signal with the addition of argon gas, and the non-monotonic quenching effect of oxygen on the length, duration and intensity of the resulting signal and spectra. FLEET is characterized in number of different atmospheric gases, including that simulating Mar's atmospheric composition.

  9. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  10. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    DOE PAGES

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 °C inlet temperature. We investigated flowmore » perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area. For the 30 MW/m2 case, the micro-jet array absorbed 750 W in the helium with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1280 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 801 °C. The HEMJ absorbed 750 W with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1411 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 844 °C. For comparison, both the single HEMJ finger and the micro-jet array used 5-mm-thick tungsten armor. The ratio of maximum to average temperature and variations in the local heat transfer coefficient were lower for the micro-jet array compared to the HEMJ device. Although high heat flux testing is required to validate the results obtained in these simulations, the results provide important guidance in jet design and manifolding to increase heat removal while providing more even temperature distribution and minimizing non-uniformity in the gas flow and thermal stresses at the armor joint.« less

  11. Accelerated micropolar fluid-flow past an uniformly rotating circular cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Abuzar Abid

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we formulated the non-steady flow due to the uniformly accelerated and rotating circular cylinder from rest in a stationary, viscous, incompressible and micropolar fluid. This flow problem is examined numerically by adopting a special scheme comprising the Adams-Bashforth Temporal Fourier Series method and the Runge-Kutta Temporal Special Finite-Difference method. This numerical scheme transforms the governing equation into a system of finite-difference equations. This system was further solved numerically by point successive-over-relaxation method. These results were also further extrapolated by the Richardson extrapolation method. This scheme is valid for all values of the flow and fluid-parameters and for all time. Moreover the boundary conditions of the vorticity and the spin at points far from the cylinder are being imposed and encountered too. The results are compared with existing results (for non-rotating circular cylinder in Newtonian fluids). The comparison is good. The enhancement of lift and reduction in drag is observed if the micropolarity effects are intensified. Same is happened if the rotation of a cylinder increases. Furthermore, the vortex-pair in the wake is delayed to successively higher times as rotation parameter increases. In addition, the rotation helps not only in dissolving vortices adjacent to the cylinder and adverse pressure region but also in dissolving the boundary layer separation. Furthermore, the rotation reduces the micropolar spin boundary layer.

  12. Flow and heat transfer of ferrofluids over a flat plate with uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, W. A.; Khan, Z. H.; Haq, R. U.

    2015-04-01

    The present work is dedicated to analyze the flow and heat transport of ferrofluids along a flat plate subjected to uniform heat flux and slip velocity. A magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the plate. Moreover, three different kinds of magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4, CoFe2O4, Mn-ZnFe2O4 are incorporated within the base fluid. We have considered two different kinds of base fluids (kerosene and water) having poor thermal conductivity as compared to solid magnetic nanoparticles. Self-similar solutions are obtained and are compared with the available data for special cases. A simulation is performed for each ferrofluid mixture by considering the dominant effects of slip and uniform heat flux. It is found that the present results are in an excellent agreement with the existing literature. The variation of skin friction and heat transfer is also performed at the surface of the plate and then the better heat transfer and of each mixture is analyzed. Kerosene-based magnetite Fe3O4 provides the higher heat transfer rate at the wall as compared to the kerosene-based cobalt ferrite and Mn-Zn ferrite. It is also concluded that the primary effect of the magnetic field is to accelerate the dimensionless velocity and to reduce the dimensionless surface temperature as compared to the hydrodynamic case, thereby increasing the skin friction and the heat transfer rate of ferrofluids.

  13. A Quasi-3-D Theory for Impedance Eduction in Uniform Grazing Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, W. R.; Jones, M. G.; Parrott, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    A 2-D impedance eduction methodology is extended to quasi-3-D sound fields in uniform or shearing mean flow. We introduce a nonlocal, nonreflecting boundary condition to terminate the duct and then educe the impedance by minimizing an objective function. The introduction of a parallel, sparse, equation solver significantly reduces the wall clock time for educing the impedance when compared to that of the sequential band solver used in the 2-D methodology. The accuracy, efficiency, and robustness of the methodology is demonstrated using two examples. In the first example, we show that the method reproduces the known impedance of a ceramic tubular test liner. In the second example, we illustrate that the approach educes the impedance of a four-segment liner where the first, second, and fourth segments consist of a perforated face sheet bonded to honeycomb, and the third segment is a cut from the ceramic tubular test liner. The ability of the method to educe the impedances of multisegmented liners has the potential to significantly reduce the amount of time and cost required to determine the impedance of several uniform liners by allowing them to be placed in series in the test section and to educe the impedance of each segment using a single numerical experiment. Finally, we probe the objective function in great detail and show that it contains a single minimum. Thus, our objective function is ideal for use with local, inexpensive, gradient-based optimizers.

  14. Stability of low aspect ratio inverted flags and rods in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huertas-Cerdeira, Cecilia; Sader, John E.; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-11-01

    Cantilevered elastic plates and rods in an inverted configuration, where the leading edge is free to move and the trailing edge is clamped, undergo complex dynamics when subjected to a uniform flow. The stability of low aspect ratio inverted plates and rods is theoretically examined, showing that it is markedly different from that of their large aspect ratio counterpart. In the limit of zero aspect ratio, the undeflected equilibrium position is found to be stable for all wind speeds. A saddle-node bifurcation emerges at finite wind speed, giving rise to a strongly deflected stable and a weakly deflected unstable equilibria. This theory is compared to experimental measurements, where good agreement is found. This research was supported by a Grant of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the Australian Research Council Grants scheme and a "la Caixa" Fellowship Grant for Post-Graduate Studies of "la Caixa" Banking Foundation.

  15. On eigensolutions for discontinuous liners in a duct containing uniform mean flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, W.; Moehring, W.

    1981-01-01

    Sound attenuation in a rectangular acoustically lined duct containing uniform mean flow is analytically investigated using the generalized Wiener-Hopf technique. Uniqueness of the solution is enforced for lined sections of the finite axial extent by imposing edge conditions at the liner interface. Possible edge conditions are considered, including the Kutta condition, and the causal solution corresponding to edge conditions is considered the best choice. Solution methods such as the mode matching and singularity methods imply differing edge conditions, and results show that power attenuation is insensitive to the imposed edge conditions, although significant differences are observed for the reflection coefficient. The amplitude of the exponentially increasing instability mode in the lined section must be set to zero as a first approximation to the nonlinear situation, and results indicate that measurements of the reflection factor can be used to make a more definite decision about physically appropriate edge conditions.

  16. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  17. Supersonic Mass Flux Measurements via Tunable Diode Laser Absorption and Non-Uniform Flow Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Leyen S.; Strand, Christopher L.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Capriotti, Diego P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux are obtained in a vitiated supersonic ground test facility using a sensor based on line-of-sight (LOS) diode laser absorption of water vapor. Mass flux is determined from the product of measured velocity and density. The relative Doppler shift of an absorption transition for beams directed upstream and downstream in the flow is used to measure velocity. Temperature is determined from the ratio of absorption signals of two transitions (lambda(sub 1)=1349 nm and lambda(sub 2)=1341.5 nm) and is coupled with a facility pressure measurement to obtain density. The sensor exploits wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f) for large signal-to-noise ratios and normalization with the 1f signal for rejection of non-absorption related transmission fluctuations. The sensor line-of-sight is translated both vertically and horizontally across the test section for spatially-resolved measurements. Time-resolved measurements of mass flux are used to assess the stability of flow conditions produced by the facility. Measurements of mass flux are within 1.5% of the value obtained using a facility predictive code. The distortion of the WMS lineshape caused by boundary layers along the laser line-of-sight is examined and the subsequent effect on the measured velocity is discussed. A method for correcting measured velocities for flow non-uniformities is introduced and application of this correction brings measured velocities within 4 m/s of the predicted value in a 1630 m/s flow.

  18. Non-Newtonian hydrodynamics for a dilute granular suspension under uniform shear flow.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Moisés G; Reyes, Francisco Vega; Garzó, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    We study in this work a steady shearing laminar flow with null heat flux (usually called "uniform shear flow") in a gas-solid suspension at low density. The solid particles are modeled as a gas of smooth hard spheres with inelastic collisions while the influence of the surrounding interstitial fluid on the dynamics of grains is modeled by means of a volume drag force, in the context of a rheological model for suspensions. The model is solved by means of three different but complementary routes, two of them being theoretical (Grad's moment method applied to the corresponding Boltzmann equation and an exact solution of a kinetic model adapted to granular suspensions) and the other being computational (Monte Carlo simulations of the Boltzmann equation). Unlike in previous studies on granular sheared suspensions, the collisional moment associated with the momentum transfer is determined in Grad's solution by including all the quadratic terms in the stress tensor. This theoretical enhancement allows for the detection and evaluation of the normal stress differences in the plane normal to the laminar flow. In addition, the exact solution of the kinetic model gives the explicit form of the velocity moments of the velocity distribution function. Comparison between our theoretical and numerical results shows in general a good agreement for the non-Newtonian rheological properties, the kurtosis (fourth velocity moment of the distribution function), and the velocity distribution of the kinetic model for quite strong inelasticity and not too large values of the (scaled) friction coefficient characterizing the viscous drag force. This shows the accuracy of our analytical results that allows us to describe in detail the flow dynamics of the granular sheared suspension.

  19. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  20. Flow plug with length-to-hole size uniformity for use in flow conditioning and flow metering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A flow plug of varying thickness has a plurality of holes formed therethrough. The plug fits in a conduit such that a fluid flow in the conduit passes through the plug's holes. Each hole is defined by a parameter indicative of size in terms of the cross-sectional area thereof. A ratio of hole length-to-parameter is approximately the same for all of the holes.

  1. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  2. Lava-flow hazard with optimized non-uniform grid of vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucà, Federica; Rongo, Rocco; Lupiano, Valeria; Iovine, Giulio

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the study is to assess the sensitivity to vents (in terms of number and distribution) of sectors affected by lava flows and of hazard values at Mount Etna. The proposed methodology relies on the application of the Cellular Automata model SCIARA, and on the adoption of an optimization algorithm for progressively integrating an initial uniform distribution of 1006 vents (1-km spaced) with 500 additional sources. Vents have iteratively been added, at steps of 50, through spatial simulated annealing, using slope roughness as weigh function. For each vent, 41 types of simulations have been executed to take into proper account the potential behaviour of the volcano, based on historical records. The performed simulations have been further processed to derive lava-flow hazard, by assigning each simulation: i) a spatial likelihood of vent opening; ii) a magnitude probability, depending on the type of eruption; and iii) a temporal probability of source activation, based on historical occurrences in the past 400 years. First results are discussed, and the influence of the number and distribution of additional vents is preliminarily investigated.

  3. Deformations of a pre-stretched elastic membrane driven by non-uniform electroosmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bercovici, Moran; Boyko, Evgeniy; Gat, Amir

    2016-11-01

    We study viscous-elastic dynamics of fluid confined between a rigid plate and a pre-stretched elastic membrane subjected to non-uniform electroosmotic flow, and focus on the case of a finite-size membrane clamped at its boundaries. Considering small deformations of a strongly pre-stretched membrane, and applying the lubrication approximation for the flow, we derive a linearized leading-order non-homogenous 4th order diffusion equation governing the deformation and pressure fields. We derive a time-dependent Green's function for a rectangular domain, and use it to obtain several basic solutions for the cases of constant and time varying electric fields. In addition, defining an asymptotic expansion where the small parameter is the ratio of the induced to prescribed tension, we obtain a set of four one-way coupled equations providing a first order correction for the deformation field. Funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation Programme, Grant agreement No. 678734 (MetamorphChip).

  4. One-dimensional model and solutions for creeping gas flows in the approximation of uniform pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedernikov, A.; Balapanov, D.

    2016-11-01

    A model, along with analytical and numerical solutions, is presented to describe a wide variety of one-dimensional slow flows of compressible heat-conductive fluids. The model is based on the approximation of uniform pressure valid for the flows, in which the sound propagation time is much shorter than the duration of any meaningful density variation in the system. The energy balance is described by the heat equation that is solved independently. This approach enables the explicit solution for the fluid velocity to be obtained. Interfacial and volumetric heat and mass sources as well as boundary motion are considered as possible sources of density variation in the fluid. A set of particular tasks is analyzed for different motion sources in planar, axial, and central symmetries in the quasistationary limit of heat conduction (i.e., for large Fourier number). The analytical solutions are in excellent agreement with corresponding numerical solutions of the whole system of the Navier-Stokes equations. This work deals with the ideal gas. The approach is also valid for other equations of state.

  5. Stability analysis of the rimming flow inside a uniformly heated rotating horizontal cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumawat, Tara Chand; Tiwari, Naveen

    2017-03-01

    The stability analysis is presented for a thin viscous liquid film flowing inside a uniformly heated horizontal cylinder that is rotating about its axis. The free surface evolution equation for the liquid-gas interface is obtained by simplifying the Navier-Stokes and energy equations within the lubrication approximation. Various dimensionless numbers are obtained that quantify the effect of gravity, viscous drag, inertia, surface tension, and thermocapillary stress. The film thickness evolution equation is solved numerically to obtain two-dimensional, steady state solutions neglecting axial variations. A liquid pool forms at the bottom of the cylinder when gravity dominates other forces. This liquid pool is shifted in the direction of rotation when inertia or viscous drag is increased. Small axial perturbations are then imposed to the steady solutions to study their stability behavior. It is found that the inertia and capillary pressure destabilize whereas the gravity and thermocapillary stress stabilize the rimming flow. The influence of Marangoni number is reported by computing the stable and unstable parametric regions. Thicker films are shown to be more susceptible to become unstable.

  6. Rheology of dense granular materials: steady, uniform flow and the avalanche regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajchenbach, Jean

    2005-06-01

    In the first part we present experimental results concerning the flow of a densely packed grain collection down a two-dimensional inclined channel. For the range of inclinations corresponding to a steady, uniform regime and to nonsliding conditions at the bottom, we obtain quasi-linear profiles of velocity, that are in contradiction with the predictions of the kinetic theory. We attribute this discrepancy to the inadequacy of the binary collision picture in the case of dense packings. We also show that the various velocity profiles obtained for different flow rates and slopes merge onto a single master curve, according to the following law: v_{X}/\\sqrt {gd} \\propto [\\sin (\\theta-\\theta_{\\mathrm {c}}) /\\cos \\theta_{\\mathrm {c}}]^{1 / 2 }y/d (d being the grain diameter, θ the channel inclination angle and θc the maximal angle of repose), provided that the regime is steady and uniform. Arguing that continuous paths of transient contacts are effective for transporting momentum and energy through the bulk, and that the associated dissipation time is very short compared to the time associated with shearing, we succeed in explaining this scaling behaviour and the paradoxical nonzero shear rate in the vicinity of the free surface. We also show that for dense particulate flows, the dissipation is mainly due to frictional sliding. In the second part, we emphasize some remarkable features exhibited by dry grain avalanches in laboratory experiments. According to the slope angle, the rear front propagates either upwards or downwards, with velocity approximately equal to the depth averaged velocity of the avalanche. As a counterpart, in both regimes, the velocity magnitude of the head front remains of the order of twice the depth averaged avalanche velocity. We suggest simple elementary mechanisms capable of accounting for these observations. We propose then an analytical modelling aimed at describing the combined processes governing the avalanche expansion. The two

  7. Characterization of temperature non-uniformity over a premixed CH4-air flame based on line-of-sight TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangle; Liu, Jianguo; Xu, Zhenyu; He, Yabai; Kan, Ruifeng

    2016-01-01

    A novel technique for characterizing temperature non-uniformity has been investigated based on measurements of line-of-sight tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. It utilized two fiber-coupled distributed feedback diode lasers at wavelengths around 1339 and 1392 nm as light sources to probe the field at multiple absorptions lines of water vapor and applied a temperature binning strategy combined with Gauss-Seidel iteration method to explore the temperature non-uniformity of the field in one dimension. The technique has been applied to a McKenna burner, which produced a flat premixed laminar CH4-air flame. The flame and its adjacent area formed an atmospheric field with significant non-uniformity of temperature and water vapor concentration. The effect of the number of temperature bins on column-density and temperature results has also been explored.

  8. Time-lapse Monitoring of Two-dimensional Non-uniform Unsaturated Flow Processes Using Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytle, B. A.; Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Unsaturated flow in the vadose zone often manifests as preferential flow resulting in transport of water and solutes through the soil much faster than would occur for uniform matrix flow. Time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) monitoring shows significant potential for identifying the presence of non-uniform flow and quantitative monitoring of the hydrologic response of a soil system. We investigate non-uniform flow in the vadose zone for an infiltration experiment performed in a 60 cm deep sand-filled tank that is continuously monitored with 1000 MHz reflection GPR. During the experiment, 100 constant offset and 300 common mid-point (CMP) time-lapse radar profiles were collected using an automated gantry system to rapidly position the antennas, allowing for a set of 1 constant offset and 3 CMP profiles to be collected every 13 seconds. The constant offset profiles were interpreted to evaluate spatial and temporal changes of reflected arrivals over the course of the experiment, whereas the CMPs were used to estimate the initial EM wave velocity in the tanks using a normal moveout analysis. Changes in traveltime to a static reflector were used to estimate spatial changes in velocity and to create two-dimensional velocity models. The GPR data were then migrated using the estimated 2D velocity model to improve GPR reflection images, which could then be interpreted to identify evidence of non-uniform flow phenomena. To verify the approach, the methodology was also applied to GPR data simulated using transient water contents generated by the unsaturated flow simulator HYDRUS2D given lab-measured hydraulic properties for the soil. For both the empirical and simulated data, we found that the 2D velocity analysis was effective in monitoring changes in the wetting front and that migration of the reflection profiles was able to improve the interpretation of non-uniform flow.

  9. Analysis of Air Flow in the Ventilated Insulating Air Layer of the External Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katunská, Jana; Bullová, Iveta; Špaková, Miroslava

    2016-12-01

    The paper deals with problems of impact of air flow in ventilated insulating air layer of the external wall on behaviour of thermal-technical parameters of the proposed external structure (according principles of STN 73 0549, which is not valid now), by comparing them in the calculation according to the valid STN standards, where air flow in the ventilated air layer is not taken into account, as well as by comparing them with behavior of thermal-technical parameters in the proposal of sandwich external wall with the contact heat insulation system without air cavity.

  10. Eigenfrequencies of vortex-pair equilibria near an elliptic cylinder or a flat plate in uniform flow.

    PubMed

    de Laat, T W G

    2007-03-01

    The eigenfrequencies of the potential-flow equilibria of a symmetric vortex pair behind an elliptic cylinder in uniform flow are calculated through the use of conformal mapping. These frequencies are shown to have values in agreement with measured Strouhal numbers reported in various papers. The special cases of the potential-flow equilibrium of a symmetric vortex pair behind a circular cylinder and the equilibrium behind a flat plate perpendicular to the uniform flow, are related to the measured Strouhal numbers of about 0.21 and 0.15, respectively. It is suggested that in the range of subcritical Reynolds numbers, 3x10(2) to 5x10(5) for the circular cylinder, a part of the drag is the result of the presence of a mean recirculation region in the near wake, which sheds vortices in the far wake and which is fed by vorticity from the cylinder wall.

  11. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  12. Analytical solutions to non-Fickian subsurface dispersion in uniform groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zou, S.; Xia, J.; Koussis, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    Analytical solutions are obtained by the Fourier transform technique for the one-, two-, and three-dimensional transport of a conservative solute injected instantaneously in a uniform groundwater flow. These solutions account for dispersive non-linearity caused by the heterogeneity of the hydraulic properties of aquifer systems and can be used as building blocks to construct solutions by convolution (principle of superposition) for source conditions other than slug injection. The dispersivity is assumed to vary parabolically with time and is thus constant for the entire system at any given time. Two approaches for estimating time-dependent dispersion parameters are developed for two-dimensional plumes. They both require minimal field tracer test data and, therefore, represent useful tools for assessing real-world aquifer contamination sites. The first approach requires mapped plume-area measurements at two specific times after the tracer injection. The second approach requires concentration-versus-time data from two sampling wells through which the plume passes. Detailed examples and comparisons with other procedures show that the methods presented herein are sufficiently accurate and easier to use than other available methods.

  13. Flapping Dynamics of an Inverted Flexible Foil in a Uniform Axial Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurugubelli Venkata, Pardha Saradhi; Jaiman, Rajeev K.

    2014-11-01

    This work presents a numerical study on self-induced flapping dynamics of an inverted flexible foil in uniform flow. The inverted foil considered in this study is clamped at the trailing edge and the leading edge is allowed to oscillate. A high-order coupled FSI solver based on CFEI formulation has been used to present the flapping response results for a wide range of nondimensional bending rigidity using a fixed Reynolds number of 1000 and a mass-ratio of 0.1. As a function of bending rigidity four flapping regimes have been discovered: fixed point, inverted limit-cycle oscillation, deflected flapping, and flipped flapping. The inverted foil configuration undergoes flapping motion more readily and experiences very large amplitude oscillations than the conventional foil. A wide variety of vortex wakes with a maximum of 14 vortices per oscillation cycle have been observed. The inverted limit-cycle flapping generate novel 4P +6S (14 vortices) and 2P +6S (10 vortices) wakes. On the other hand, the flipped flapping regime is characterized by a von Kármán wake. We also observe that inverted foil can extract 1000 times more energy from the surrounding fluid compared to the conventional foil.

  14. Uniform rovibrational collisional N2 bin model for DSMC, with application to atmospheric entry flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, E.; Bondar, Ye. A.; Magin, T. E.

    2016-11-01

    A state-to-state model for internal energy exchange and molecular dissociation allows for high-fidelity DSMC simulations. Elementary reaction cross sections for the N2 (v, J)+ N system were previously extracted from a quantum-chemical database, originally compiled at NASA Ames Research Center. Due to the high computational cost of simulating the full range of inelastic collision processes (approx. 23 million reactions), a coarse-grain model, called the Uniform RoVibrational Collisional (URVC) bin model can be used instead. This allows to reduce the original 9390 rovibrational levels of N2 to 10 energy bins. In the present work, this reduced model is used to simulate a 2D flow configuration, which more closely reproduces the conditions of high-speed entry into Earth's atmosphere. For this purpose, the URVC bin model had to be adapted for integration into the "Rarefied Gas Dynamics Analysis System" (RGDAS), a separate high-performance DSMC code capable of handling complex geometries and parallel computations. RGDAS was developed at the Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics in Novosibirsk, Russia for use by the European Space Agency (ESA) and shares many features with the well-known SMILE code developed by the same group. We show that the reduced mechanism developed previously can be implemented in RGDAS, and the results exhibit nonequilibrium effects consistent with those observed in previous 1D-simulations.

  15. The effect of non-uniform flow in homogeneous sediment on velocity quantification using heat as a tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rau, G. C.; Andersen, M. S.; Acworth, R. I.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years tracing water movement using heat has seen a revival, in particular methods that utilize the natural diel temperature fluctuations. However, research has mainly focused on field applications and numerical modeling with little laboratory testing. In this study heat tracing was experimentally tested for a 1D flow field through water saturated sand considered homogeneous (d_50~2 mm). Uniform pressure gradients were applied to a tank with the dimensions 0.4 x 0.4 x 1 m inducing Darcy velocities between 0 and 25 m/d (Re<0.45). As heat input either a point source with a step change or a sinusoidally varying area source were applied. The temperature response was recorded by multiple temperature probes at various locations. A number of observations indicate a significant degree of non-uniform flow in the sand, which in a hydrogeological context should be considered homogeneous. Color dye experiments were performed to visually verify the functionality of the hydraulic setup. Surprisingly, the propagation of the color dye front revealed fingering which increased with travel distance. The possibility of density fingering could be excluded because: (1) the possible density difference was well below the threshold required for density fingering, (2) the non-uniform flow phenomenon could be observed for both upward and downward flow. The thermal response to a step heat input from a point source showed a systematically increasing difference in the steady-state response at off-center line probes for increasing flow velocities. Contrary to the case of only heat conduction, the variability of temperatures measured at different locations, but at similar distances was indicative of the thermal plume spreading non-uniformly around the source. For the area heat forcing experiments flow velocities were separately calculated from amplitude damped and phase shifted temperature-depth responses recorded by vertically arranged pairs of probes using 1D analytical heat transport

  16. Effect of air flow on tubular solar still efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An experimental work was reported to estimate the increase in distillate yield for a compound parabolic concentrator-concentric tubular solar still (CPC-CTSS). The CPC dramatically increases the heating of the saline water. A novel idea was proposed to study the characteristic features of CPC for desalination to produce a large quantity of distillate yield. A rectangular basin of dimension 2 m × 0.025 m × 0.02 m was fabricated of copper and was placed at the focus of the CPC. This basin is covered by two cylindrical glass tubes of length 2 m with two different diameters of 0.02 m and 0.03 m. The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. Findings The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. Conclusions On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. PMID:23587020

  17. The flow feature of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of micro air jets in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Amini, Younes; Ganji, D. D.; Takam, ​M. Rahimi

    2017-03-01

    Scramjet is found to be the efficient method for the space shuttle. In this paper, numerical simulation is performed to investigate the fundamental flow physics of the interaction between an array of fuel jets and multi air jets in a supersonic transverse flow. Hydrogen as a fuel is released with a global equivalence ratio of 0.5 in presence of micro air jets on a flat plate into a Mach 4 crossflow. The fuel and air are injected through streamwise-aligned flush circular portholes. The hydrogen is injected through 4 holes with 7dj space when the air is injected in the interval of the hydrogen jets. The numerical simulation is performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Both the number of air jets and jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio are varied in a parametric study. The interaction of the fuel and air jet in the supersonic flow present extremely complex feature of fuel and air jet. The results present various flow features depending upon the number and mass flow rate of micro air jets. These flow features were found to have significant effects on the penetration of hydrogen jets. A variation of the number of air jets, along with the jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio, induced a variety of flow structure in the downstream of the fuel jets.

  18. Calibration of a system for measuring low air flow velocity in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krach, Andrzej; Kruczkowski, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the calibration of a system for measuring air flow velocity in a wind tunnel with a multiple-hole orifice. The comparative method was applied for the calibration. The method consists in equalising the air flow velocity in a test section of the tunnel with that of the hot-wire anemometer probe which should then read zero value. The hot-wire anemometer probe moves reciprocally in the tunnel test section with a constant velocity, aligned and opposite to the air velocity. Air velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that the minimum values of a periodic hot-wire anemometer signal displayed on an oscilloscope screen reach the lowest position (the minimum method). A sinusoidal component can be superimposed to the probe constant velocity. Then, the air flow velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that, when the probe moves in the direction of air flow, only the second harmonic of the periodically variable velocity superimposed on the constant velocity (second harmonic method) remains at the output of the low-pass filter to which the hot-wire anemometer signal, displayed on the oscilloscope screen, is supplied. The velocity of the uniform motion of the hot-wire anemometer probe is measured with a magnetic linear encoder. The calibration of the system for the measurement of low air velocities in the wind tunnel was performed in the following steps: 1. Calibration of the linear encoder for the measurement of the uniform motion velocity of the hot-wire anemometer probe in the test section of the tunnel. 2. Calibration of the system for measurement of low air velocities with a multiple-hole orifice for the velocities of 0.1 and 0.25 m s-1: - (a) measurement of the probe movement velocity setting; - (b) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel test section with comparison according to the second harmonic method; - (c) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel with comparison according to the minimum method. The calibration

  19. Rainfall simulators - innovations seeking rainfall uniformity and automatic flow rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Miroslav; Kavka, Petr; Strouhal, Luděk; Dostál, Tomáš; Krása, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Field rainfall simulators are used worldwide for many experimental purposes, such as runoff generation and soil erosion research. At CTU in Prague a laboratory simulator with swinging nozzles VeeJet has been operated since 2001. Since 2012 an additional terrain simulator is being used with 4 fixed FullJet 40WSQ nozzles with 2,4 m spacing and operating over two simultaneously sprinkled experimental plots sizing 8x2 and 1x1 m. In parallel to other research projects a specific problem was solved: improving rainfall spatial uniformity and overall intensity and surface runoff measurements. These fundamental variables significantly affect investigated processes as well as resulting water balance of the plot, therefore they need to be determined as accurately as possible. Although the original nozzles setting produced (commonly used) Christiansen uniformity index CU over 80 %, detailed measurements proved this index insufficient and showed many unrequired rainfall extremes within the plot. Moreover the number of rainfall intensity scenarios was limited and some of them required problematic multi-pressure operation of the water distribution system. Therefore the simulator was subjected to many substantial changes in 2015. Innovations ranged from pump intensification to control unit upgrade. As essential change was considered increase in number of nozzles to 9 in total and reducing their spacing to 1,2 m. However new uniformity measurements did not bring any significant improvement. Tested scenarios showed equal standard deviations of interpolated intensity rasters and equal or slightly lower CU index. Imperfections of sprinkling nozzles were found to be the limiting factor. Still many other benefits were brought with the new setup. Whole experimental plot 10x2 m is better covered with the rainfall while the water consumption is retained. Nozzles are triggered in triplets, which enables more rainfall intensity scenarios. Water distribution system is more stable due to

  20. Air/water two-phase flow test tunnel for airfoil studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.

    1990-02-01

    A test tunnel for the study of airfoil performances under air/water two-phase flow condition has been designed and constructed. This facility will serve for a better understanding of the flow phenomena and characteristics of hydraulic machinery under gas/ liquid two-phase flow operating conditions. At the test section of the tunnel, a two-dimensional isolated airfoil or a cascade of airfoils is installed in a two-phase inlet flow with a uniform velocity (up to 10 m/s) and void fraction (up to 12%) distribution. The details of the tunnel structure and the measuring systems are described and the basic characteristics of the constructed tunnel are also given. As an example of the test results, void fraction distribution around a test airfoil is shown.

  1. Air/water two-phase flow test tunnel for airfoil studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.

    1994-01-01

    A test tunnel for the study of airfoil performances under air/water two-phase flow condition has been designed and constructed. This facility will serve for a better understanding of the flow phenomena and characteristics of hydraulic machinery under gas/ liquid two-phase flow operating conditions. At the test section of the tunnel, a two-dimensional isolated airfoil or a cascade of airfoils is installed in a two-phase inlet flow with a uniform velocity (up to 10 m/s) and void fraction (up to 12%) distribution. The details of the tunnel structure and the measuring systems are described and the basic characteristics of the constructed tunnel are also given. As an example of the test results, void fraction distribution around a test airfoil is shown.

  2. Optical Diagnostics of Air Flows Induced in Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobatake, Takuya; Deguchi, Masanori; Suzuki, Junya; Eriguchi, Koji; Ono, Kouichi

    2014-10-01

    A surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator has recently been intensively studied for the flow control over airfoils and turbine blades in the fields of aerospace and aeromechanics. It consists of two electrodes placed on both sides of the dielectric, where one is a top powered electrode exposed to the air, and the other is a bottom grounded electrode encapsulated with an insulator. The unidirectional gas flow along the dielectric surfaces is induced by the electrohydrodynamic (EHD) body force. It is known that the thinner the exposed electrode, the greater the momentum transfer to the air is, indicating that the thickness of the plasma is important. To analyze plasma profiles and air flows induced in the SDBD plasma actuator, we performed time-resolved and -integrated optical emission and schlieren imaging of the side view of the SDBD plasma actuator in atmospheric air. We applied a high voltage bipolar pulse (4-8 kV, 1-10 kHz) between electrodes. Experimental results indicated that the spatial extent of the plasma is much smaller than that of the induced flows. Experimental results further indicated that in the positive-going phase, a thin and long plasma is generated, where the optical emission is weak and uniform; on the other hand, in the negative-going phase, a thick and short plasma is generated, where a strong optical emission is observed near the top electrode.

  3. Influence of movable test section elements configuration on its drag and flow field uniformity at transonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazkov, S. A.; Gorbushin, A. R.; Osipova, S. L.; Semenov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The report describes the results of flow field experimental research in TsAGI T-128 transonic wind tunnel. During the tests Mach number, stagnation pressure, test section wall perforation ratio, angles between the test section panels and mixing chamber flaps varied. Based on the test results one determined corrections to the free-stream Mach number related to the flow speed difference in the model location and in the zone of static pressure measurement on the test section walls, nonuniformity of the longitudinal velocity component in the model location, optimal position of the movable test section elements to provide flow field uniformity in the test section and minimize the test leg drag.

  4. Instability of uniform gas flow within liquid-saturated porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiberkin, Kirill

    2014-05-01

    Problem of flow instability in porous media are important for applied fields like mining, water supply, etc. There is a fundamental interest to mechanisms are influence on flow too. E.g., a viscous fingering is typical phenomenon of displacement processes in porous medium [1,2]. The instability of gas flow in liquid-saturated domain have no wide studies but it can make significant influence on heat and mass transport. If the one phase have a high saturation, the other phase will form the droplets are break and captured within pores due to the capillary forces [2-4]. It is possible to neglect the capillarity if the saturation of both fluids exceed a percolation thresholds [5,6]. We consider an infinite flat layer of uniform porous medium is saturated with gas and liquid have close saturation. Its upper boundary is impermeable for liquid phase and gas can pass freely through the border, and the down boundary is permeable for both phases. The temperature and pressure are fixed at the top while their gradients are fixed at the bottom side. Neglecting the capillarity, gas solubility, liquid evaporation and any phase transitions, we obtain a steady solution and study its' stability. The governing parameter of the flow is α = αgAPe, αg = (ρwCg )/(ρsCs), A = ρstatvstat (1) where Pe is the thermal Peclet number determines a ratio between convective and conductive heat transfer, αg is ratio of thermal capacities of fluid and matrix, and A is determined by gas density and velocity in the steady state. Analyzing the perturbations, we found that a long-wave instability realizes in the system. The critical value of parameter is: αc = a1 + k2a2 + O(ρg/ρw), (2) where a1,a2 are positive coefficients are calculated using thermal perturbations combinations and k is wave number along horizontal direction. The minimal αc equals 2.47, and it correspond the critical Peclet number near 200 in the methane-water system. An error of the dependence is of order of gas to water

  5. A Study of Air Flow in an Engine Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1939-01-01

    A 4-stroke-cycle test engine was equipped with a glass cylinder and the air movements within it were studied while the engine was being motored. Different types of air flow were produced by using shrouded intake valves in various arrangements and by altering the shape of the intake-air passage in the cylinder head. The air movements were made visible by mixing feathers with the entering air, and high-speed motion pictures were taken of them so that the air currents might be studied in detail and their velocities measured. Motion pictures were also taken of gasoline sprays injected into the cylinder on the intake stroke. The photographs showed that: a wide variety of induced air movements could be created in the cylinder; the movements always persisted throughout the compression stroke; and the only type of movement that persisted until the end of the cycle was rotation about the cylinder axis.

  6. Centrifuge modeling of air sparging - a study of air flow through saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Marulanda, C; Culligan, P J; Germaine, J T

    2000-02-25

    The success of air sparging as a remedial technology for treatment of contaminated aquifers is well documented. However, there is no consensus, to date, on the mechanisms that control the flow of injected air through the saturated ground. Currently, only qualitative results from laboratory experiments are available to predict the zone of influence of a sparging well. Given that the patterns of air flow through the soil will ultimately determine the efficiency of an air sparging treatment, it is important to quantify how sparged air travels through a saturated porous medium. The main objective of this research is to develop a model that describes air transport through saturated porous media. This paper presents results from an ongoing study that employs centrifuge modeling to reproduce in situ air sparging conditions. Centrifuge testing is an experimental technique that allows reduced-scale duplication, in the laboratory, of the stresses and pressure distributions encountered in the field. In situ conditions are critical in the development of actual air flow patterns. Experiments are being conducted in a transparent porous medium consisting of crushed borosilicate glass submerged in fluids of matching indices of refraction. Air is observed as it flows through the porous medium at varying gravitational accelerations. Recorded images of experiments allow the determination of flow patterns, breakthrough velocities, and plume shapes as a function of g-level and injection pressure. Results show that air flow patterns vary from fingering, at low g-levels, to pulsing at higher accelerations. Grain and pore size distribution of the porous medium do not exclusively control air flow characteristics. Injector geometry has a definite effect on breakthrough velocities and air plume shapes. Experiments have been conducted to compare the velocity of air flow through the saturated porous medium to that of air in pure liquids. Results show that the velocity of air through the medium

  7. The air-liquid flow in a microfluidic airway tree.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Baudoin, Michael; Manneville, Paul; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidic techniques are employed to investigate air-liquid flows in the lung. A network of microchannels with five generations is made and used as a simplified model of a section of the pulmonary airway tree. Liquid plugs are injected into the network and pushed by a flow of air; they divide at every bifurcation until they reach the exits of the network. A resistance, associated with the presence of one plug in a given generation, is defined to establish a linear relation between the driving pressure and the total flow rate in the network. Based on this resistance, good predictions are obtained for the flow of two successive plugs in different generations. The total flow rate of a two-plug flow is found to depend not only on the driving pressure and lengths of the plugs, but also the initial distance between them. Furthermore, long range interactions between daughters of a dividing plug are observed and discussed, particularly when the plugs are flowing through the bifurcations. These interactions lead to different flow patterns for different forcing conditions: the flow develops symmetrically when subjected to constant pressure or high flow rate forcing, while a low flow rate driving yields an asymmetric flow.

  8. Low power, constant-flow air pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, M.D.; Albert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A rugged, yet small and lightweight constant-flow air pump system has been designed. Flow control is achieved using a novel approach which is three times more power efficient than previous designs. The resultant savings in battery size and weight makes these pumps ideal for sampling air on balloon platforms. The pump package includes meteorological sensors and an onboard computer that stores time and sensor data and turns the constant-flow pump circuit on/off. Some applications of these systems are also presented in this report.

  9. An Analysis of Adopting RFID in the Brazilian Air Force Uniform Sales System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    DMI) – responsible for receiving and storing the material supplied by contractors , distributing the uniforms to the points of sale, and controlling...point of sale stock item, and tracks the sales. The SDAB centralizes the management and shares the system maintenance with a contractor . Currently...11 EPCglobal is leading the development of industry-driven standards for the Electronic Product Code™ ( EPC ) to support

  10. Design and Implementation of Automatic Air Flow Rate Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, A.; Saputra, C.; Munir, M. M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    Venturimeter is an apparatus that can be used to measure the air flow rate. In this experiment we designed a venturimeter which equipped with a valve that is used to control the air flow rate. The difference of pressure between the cross sections was measured with the differential pressure sensor GA 100-015WD which can calculate the difference of pressures from 0 to 3737.33 Pa. A 42M048C Z36 stepper motor was used to control the valve. The precision of this motor rotation is about 0.15 °. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed to monitor and set the value of flow rate then an 8-bit microcontroller was used to process the control system In this experiment- the venturimeter has been examined to get the optimal parameter of controller. The results show that the controller can set the stable output air flow rate.

  11. Annular fuel and air co-flow premixer

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Melton, Patrick Benedict; York, William David

    2013-10-15

    Disclosed is a premixer for a combustor including an annular outer shell and an annular inner shell. The inner shell defines an inner flow channel inside of the inner shell and is located to define an outer flow channel between the outer shell and the inner shell. A fuel discharge annulus is located between the outer flow channel and the inner flow channel and is configured to inject a fuel flow into a mixing area in a direction substantially parallel to an outer airflow through the outer flow channel and an inner flow through the inner flow channel. Further disclosed are a combustor including a plurality of premixers and a method of premixing air and fuel in a combustor.

  12. A summary of measured hydraulic data for the series of steady and unsteady flow experiments over uniform grass roughness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Dannie L.; Flynn, Kathleen M.

    1978-01-01

    The measured hydraulic data collected in the Flood Plain Simulation Facility located at the Gulf Coast Hydroscience Center, near Bay St. Louis, Miss., are summarized for a series of experiments designed to study steady and unsteady flow over uniform grass roughness. All experiments were conducted during the 1973 and 1974 test seasons. Tables of measured ground-surface elevations, water-surface elevations, and point velocities are included for all experiments. A total of 19 steady flow experiments and 7 unsteady flow experiments for varying grass heights are included. The tabulated point velocities and water-surface elevations for the unsteady flow experiments were selected to represent the general changes in the flow variables as the flood wave passed through the facility but do not include all collected data. However, all data that were collected have been stored on computer disk storage and may be retrieved using the listing programs and memory locations. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Temperature distribution of air source heat pump barn with different air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Li, J. C.; Zhao, G. Q.

    2016-08-01

    There are two type of airflow form in tobacco barn, one is air rising, the other is air falling. They are different in the structure layout and working principle, which affect the tobacco barn in the distribution of temperature field and velocity distribution. In order to compare the temperature and air distribution of the two, thereby obtain a tobacco barn whose temperature field and velocity distribution are more uniform. Taking the air source heat pump tobacco barn as the investigated subject and establishing relevant mathematical model, the thermodynamics of the two type of curing barn was analysed and compared based on Fluent. Provide a reasonable evidence for chamber arrangement and selection of outlet for air source heat pump tobacco barn.

  14. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  15. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  16. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  17. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  18. Applying non-uniform grids to evaluating susceptibility from flow-type phenomena: an example of application to Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongolan, Vena Pearl; Lupiano, Valeria; D'Ambrosio, Donato; Rongo, Rocco; Spataro, William; Iovine, Giulio

    2013-04-01

    The hazard induced by dangerous flow-type phenomena - e.g. lava flows, earth flows, debris flows, and debris avalanches - can be assessed by analysing a proper set of simulations of hypothetical events. Non-uniform grids are commonly used to study particular areas of interest in computational domains. Examples of application concern, for instance, the turbulence in a boundary layer. While non-uniform grids frequently appear in adaptive methods, they may also be used in a "static" environment. A purposive sampling method, based on a non-uniform grid of sources coupled with numerical simulations of independent events, has recently been employed to evaluate the hazard induced by flow-type phenomena. An example of application to lava-flows at Mount Etna (Italy) is described in this study. The method aims at refining the spatial distribution of hypothetical eruptive vents with respect to an original uniform grid. The density of eruptive vents has been determined by considering the historical distribution of lateral and eccentric vents, and the distribution of the main faults/structures on the volcano. A higher number of sources marks higher-probability zones of vent opening, based on classes of activation: the number of vents in each class has been set proportionally to the probability of activation of the class. By considering the different types of eruption expected from the considered volcano, based on the historical activity of the past 400 years, a set of simulations per each vent has been performed. The employed model is SCIARA-fv2, a Cellular Automata numerical code recently applied to the same study area for preliminary hazard analyses. In this work, calibration could therefore be skipped, by taking advantage from such experience of tuning of the parameters. Performed simulations have been analysed by a GIS, to verify the number of events affecting each cell of the domain. A probability of occurrence could be assigned to each simulation, based on statistics of

  19. Flow visualization of flow into 8 point-source fractures. 2: The effect of fracture non-uniformity and fluid crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.E.; Zhu, Q.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, the flow of fluids into a fracture from a point source has been the subject of several different papers. Cleary and Fonseca first suggested that convective transport should play a major role in the placement of proppant when the flow into a fracture was from a point source. Clark and Courington presented data showing that for non-viscosified fluids convection was the dominant mechanism of transport. However, they showed, that for uniform fractures, viscosifying the fluid made a large difference in the transport mechanism. In a later paper, Clark and Zhu presented data for non-uniform fractures and viscosified fluids weighted with either salt or silica flour that showed that the presence of minor non-uniformities serve to negate the effect of convection even more than viscosifying the fluids. In this work, the authors have extended the work presented in the previous two papers to high viscosity Newtonian fluids and crosslinked fluids. The experiments have all been done with various concentrations of silica flour to simulate added proppant. Both changing the nature of the non-uniformities and crosslinking the polymer solution have a profound affect on the flow into the fracture and the convective process.

  20. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  1. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  2. Flow sensitive actuators for micro-air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Hays, M.; Fernandez, E.; Oates, W.; Alvi, F. S.

    2011-10-01

    A macrofiber piezoelectric composite has been developed for boundary layer management of micro-air vehicles (MAVs). Specifically, a piezoelectric composite that is capable of self-sensing and controlling flow has been modeled, designed, fabricated, and tested in wind tunnel studies to quantify performance characteristics, such as the velocity field response to actuation, which is relevant for actively managing boundary layers (laminar and transition flow control). A nonlinear piezoelectric plate model was utilized to design the active structure for flow control. The dynamic properties of the piezoelectric composite actuator were also evaluated in situ during wind tunnel experiments to quantify sensing performance. Results based on velocity field measurements and unsteady pressure measurements show that these piezoelectric macrofiber composites can sense the state of flow above the surface and provide sufficient control authority to manipulate the flow conditions for transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  3. Reynolds stress and the energy balance of a localized two-dimensional vortex in a uniform shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummins, Patrick F.

    2015-04-01

    Consideration is given to the kinetic energy balance of a localized two-dimensional vortex in unbounded space, subject to a uniform background shear flow. For this problem, a quadratic invariant based on the total flow can be constructed that consists of the sum of the vortex self-energy and the energy of interaction with the background flow. It is shown that an energy equation also may be written for the rate of change of vortex self-energy, relating this to the rate of working by the Reynolds stress. The stress integral is demonstrated to converge for a localized vortex of finite circulation, in contrast to the total kinetic energy. The two approaches to the energy balance are shown to be complementary, and the relation between the Reynolds stress and interaction energy is discussed. As an example, the integrated Reynolds stress is evaluated for a uniformly sheared elliptical (Kirchhoff) vortex. The stress integral includes far field contributions, indicating that appreciable exchange of energy with the external flow occurs well beyond the boundary of the vortex.

  4. Two-stage fan. 2: Data and performance with redesigned second stage rotor uniform and distorted inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, H. E.; Keenan, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A two-stage fan with a first rotor tip speed of 1450 ft/sec (441.96 m/sec) and no inlet guide vanes was tested with uniform and distorted inlet flows, with a redesigned second rotor having a part span shroud to prevent flutter, with variable-stagger stators set in nominal positions, and without rotor casing treatment. The fan achieved a pressure ratio 2.8 at a corrected flow of 185.4 lbm/sec (84.0 kg/sec), an adiabatic efficiency of 85.0 percent, and a stall margin of 12 percent. The redesigned second rotor did not flutter. Tip radial distortion reduced the stall margin at intermediate speed, but had little effect on stall margin at high or low speeds. Hub radial distortion reduced the stall margin at design speed but increased stall margin at low speed. Circumferential distortion reduced stall pressure ratio and flow to give approximately the same stall lines with uniform inlet flow. Distortions were attenuated by the fan. For Vol. 1, see N74-11421.

  5. Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

    2012-07-08

    A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

  6. Evolutionary Concepts for Decentralized Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Milton; Kolitz, Stephan; Milner, Joseph; Odoni, Amedeo

    1997-01-01

    Alternative concepts for modifying the policies and procedures under which the air traffic flow management system operates are described, and an approach to the evaluation of those concepts is discussed. Here, air traffic flow management includes all activities related to the management of the flow of aircraft and related system resources from 'block to block.' The alternative concepts represent stages in the evolution from the current system, in which air traffic management decision making is largely centralized within the FAA, to a more decentralized approach wherein the airlines and other airspace users collaborate in air traffic management decision making with the FAA. The emphasis in the discussion is on a viable medium-term partially decentralized scenario representing a phase of this evolution that is consistent with the decision-making approaches embodied in proposed Free Flight concepts for air traffic management. System-level metrics for analyzing and evaluating the various alternatives are defined, and a simulation testbed developed to generate values for those metrics is described. The fundamental issue of modeling airline behavior in decentralized environments is also raised, and an example of such a model, which deals with the preservation of flight bank integrity in hub airports, is presented.

  7. Thermohydraulic analysis of the cooling air flow in a rack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natusch, Andreas; Huchler, Markus

    Manned space laboratories like the US Space Station Freedom or the European COLUMBUS APM are equipped with so-called racks for subsystem and payload accommodation. An important resource is air for cooling the unit internal heat sources, the avionics air. Each unit inside the rack must be supplied with sufficient amount of air to cool down the unit to the allowable maximum temperature. In the course of the COLUMBUS Environmental Control and Life Support Subsystem (ECLSS) project, a thermohydraulic mathematical model (THMM) of a representative COLUMBUS rack was developed to analyze and optimize the distribution of avionic air inside this rack. A sensitivity and accuracy study was performed to determine the accuracy range of the calculated avionics flow rate distribution to the units. These calculations were then compared to measurement results gained in a rack airflow distribution test, which was performed with an equipped COLUMBUS subsystem rack to show the pressure distribution inside the rack. In addition to that cold flow study, the influence of the avionics air heating due to the unit dissipations on the airflow distribution and the cooling tenmperature was investigated in a detailed warm flow analysis.

  8. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, R.F.

    1987-11-24

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs. 4 figs.

  9. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs.

  10. Microhydrodynamics of deformable particles: surprising responses of drops and vesicles to uniform electric field or shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahovska, Petia

    2015-11-01

    Particle motion in a viscous fluid is a classic problem that continues to surprise researchers. In this talk, I will discuss some intriguing, experimentally-observed behaviors of droplets and giant vesicles (cell-size lipid membrane sacs) in electric or flow fields. In a uniform electric field, a droplet deforms into an ellipsoid that can either be steadily tilted relative to the applied field direction or undergo unsteady motions (periodic shape oscillations or irregular flipping); a spherical vesicle can adopt a transient square shape or reversibly porate. In a steady shear flow, a vesicle can tank-tread, tumble or swing. Theoretical models show that the nonlinear drop dynamics originates from the interplay of Quincke rotation and interface deformation, while the vesicle dynamics stems from the membrane inextensibility. The practical motivation for this research lies in an improved understanding of technologies that rely on the manipulation of drops and cells by flow or electric fields.

  11. Research on Flow Non-Uniformity in Main Circulation Loop of a CFB Boiler with Multiple Cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Yang, H. R.; Liu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Wu, Y. X.; Yue, G. X.; Wang, Y. Z.

    Maldistribution of gas-solid tow-phase flow field in circulating fluidized bed (CFB) can cause a series of problems, such as thermal deviation, wear of water walls, etc. In this study, a cold model CFB facility, which was scaled down from a commercial 300MWe CFB boiler with three cyclones placed in an array, was built up and a series of experiments were conducted the flow non-uniformity. The results showed that in CFB boiler with multiple cyclones, the distribution of bed material in the circulation loops is different and uncertain. The gas-solid two-phase flow in the furnace is unbiased, even the circulating rates in the circulation loops are different. The circulating rate in the middle loop is larger than that in the side loops. The difference is less than 10%.

  12. Dynamics of autoignitive DME/air coflow flames in oscillating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Sili; Zhao, Peng; Mueller, Michael; Law, Chung

    2016-11-01

    The structure and dynamics of laminar nonpremixed dimethyl ether (DME)/air coflow flames were investigated at elevated temperatures and pressures, conditions at which autoignition times become competitive with flame times. Computations with detailed chemistry were performed for DME and heated coflow air at 30 atm with uniform but sinusoidally oscillating inlet velocities. These unsteady cases were compared with steady flames to elucidate the effect of oscillation frequency on the flame dynamics. In the oscillating reacting flow, periodic but hysteretic transition occurs between a multibrachial autoignition front that locates downstream at high inlet velocity and a tribrachial flame that locates upstream at low inlet velocity. The finite induction time for autoignition results in this hysteretic behavior, which diminishes at lower oscillation frequency as there is more time for chemistry to respond to the hydrodynamic changes and consequently approach steady state.

  13. Experimental Measurement of Transonic Fan Wake Response to Uniform and Simulated Boundary Layer Ingesting Inlet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, Walter F.; Ferrar, Anthony M.; Arend, David

    2011-01-01

    BWB Aircraft with embedded engines and BLI inlets offer attractive advantages in terms of reduced noise from engines and increased range and fuel economy. The BLI inlet produces inlet distortion patterns that can reduce fan performance and stall margin, and can produce undesirable forced responses. Knowledge of the dynamic response of fan flow when subjected to flow distortions of the type produced by BLI inlets is important for the design of distortion tolerant fans. This project is investigating fan response to flow distortion by measuring the response of the fan of a JT15D engine to a flow pattern following the results of the NASA Inlet A BLI wind tunnel tests.

  14. Calculation of a hollow-cone liquid spray in a uniform air stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturgess, G. J.; Syed, S. A.; McManus, K. R.

    1984-06-01

    Fluid dynamic computer codes for the simulation of flows in gas turbine engine combustion systems are being developed. NASA is currently sponsoring a two-phase program for the evaluation of the performance of current codes, taking into account also an improvement of accuracy, if needed. The present investigation forms a part of this program. The numerical technique used includes a Lagrangian spray model for liquid fuels. The spray model, in conjunction with the turbulence model, determines the distribution of fuel in the burning zone of the combustor. The numerical technique was applied to a hollow-cone pressure atomizer spraying water into a coflowing confined airstream.

  15. Effect of air pollution on peak expiratory flow rate variability.

    PubMed

    Singh, Virendra; Khandelwal, Rakesh; Gupta, A B

    2003-02-01

    Exposure to air pollution affects pulmonary functions adversely. Effect of exposure to pollution on diurnal variation of peak flow was assessed in healthy students. Three hundred healthy age-matched nonsmoker students were studied. They were categorized into two groups on the basis of their residence: commuters and living on campus. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings were made twice daily for 2 days with the Pink City Flow Meter. The measurement was then used to calculate for each subject the amplitude percentage mean, which is an index for expressing PEF variability for epidemiological purposes (Higgins BG, Britton JR, Chinns Jones TD, Jenkinson D, Burnery PG, Tattersfield AE. Distribution of peak expiratory flow variability in a population sample. Am Rev Respir Dis 1989; 140:1368-1372). Air pollution parameters were quantified by measurement of sulfur dioxide (SO2), oxides of nitrogen (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM) in the ambient air at the campus and on the roadside. The mean values of PEF variability (amplitude percent mean) in the students living on campus and in the commuters were 5.7 +/- 3.2 and 11 +/- 3.6, respectively (P < .05). Among the commuters, maximum number of subjects showed amplitude percentage mean PEFR at the higher end of variability distribution, as compared to the students living on campus, among whom the majority of subjects fell in the lower ranges of variability distribution. The ambient air quality parameters, namely SO2, NO2, CO, and RSPM were significantly lower on the campus. It can be concluded that long-term periodic exposure to air pollution can lead to increased PEF variability even in healthy subjects. Measurement of PEF variability may prove to be a simple test to measure effect of air pollution in healthy subjects.

  16. Discovery about temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-02-01

    The law of spatial fluctuations of temperature in a turbulent flow in the atmosphere was studied. The turbulent movement of air in the atmosphere manifests itself in random changes in wind velocity and in the dispersal of smoke. If a miniature thermometer with sufficient sensitivity and speed of response were placed in a air flow, its readings would fluctuate chaotically against the background of average temperature. This is Characteristic of practically every point of the flow. The temperature field forms as a result of the mixing of the air. A method using the relation of the mean square of the difference in temperatures of two points to the distance between these points as the structural characteristic of this field was proposed. It was found that the dissipation of energy in a flow and the equalization of temperatures are connected with the breaking up of eddies in a turbulent flow into smaller ones. Their energy in turn is converted into heat due to the viscosity of the medium. The law that has been discovered makes for a much broader field of application of physical methods of analyzing atmospheric phenomena.

  17. Characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental program to study the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling flows to obtain detailed and accurate data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport modeling for combustor flows is discussed. The work was also motivated by the need to investigate and quantify the influence of confinement and swirl on the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets. The flow facility was constructed in a simple way which allows easy interchange of different swirlers and the freedom to vary the jet Reynolds number. The velocity measurements were taken with a one color, one component DISA Model 55L laser-Doppler anemometer employing the forward scatter mode. Standard statistical methods are used to evaluate the various moments of the signals to give the flow characteristics. The present work was directed at the understanding of the velocity field. Therefore, only velocity and turbulence data of the axial and circumferential components are reported for inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows.

  18. Flow visualization of flow into 8 point-source fractures II: The effect of fracture non-uniformity and fluid crosslinking

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, P.E.; Zhu, Q.

    1994-12-31

    Recently, the flow of fluids into a fracture from a point source has been the subject of several different papers. Cleary and Fonseca first suggested that convective transport should play a major role in the placement of proppant when the flow into a fracture was from a point source. Clark and Courington presented data showing that for non-viscosified fluids convection was the dominant mechanism of transport. However, they showed, that for uniform fractures, viscosifying the fluid made a large difference in the transport mechanism. In a later paper, Clark and Zhu presented data for nonuniform fractures and viscosified fluids weighted with either salt or silica flour that showed that the presence of minor non-uniformities serve to negate the effect of convection even more than viscosifying the fluids. In this work, the authors have extended the work presented in the previous two papers to high viscosity Newtonian fluids and crosslinked fluids. The experiments have all been done with various concentrations of silica flour to simulate added proppant. Both changing the nature of the non-uniformities and crosslinking the polymer solution have a profound affect on the flow into the fracture and the convective process.

  19. Three dimensional aerodynamics of an annular cascade in a non-uniform inlet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manwaring, S. R.; Fleeter, S.

    1985-01-01

    Three-dimensional viscous and inviscid numerical analyses are currently being developed to predict the complex flow through turbomachine blade passages. To be of value to the designer, these numerical solutions must be evaluated and subsequent refinements directed by correlating predicted flow fields with data obtained from experiments which model the fundamental three-dimensional flow phenomena inherent in blade rows. This paper describes a series of experiments to provide such data. In particular, the effect of a potential and a rotational inlet flow field on the detailed three-dimensional aerodynamic performance of an extensively instrumented cambered airfoil cascade has been determined at two levels of aerodynamic loading. Data presented quantify the pressure and suction surface static pressure chordwise distributions on the hub, mean, and tip streamlines; the velocity distribution in the cascade aft-passage region; and the cascade exit region flow field. Appropriate data are correlated with predictions.

  20. A chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave/pulsed uniform flow spectrometer. II. Performance and applications for reaction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Zack, Lindsay N.; Park, G. Barratt; Joalland, Baptiste; Oldham, James M.; Prozument, Kirill; Ariyasingha, Nuwandi M.; Sims, Ian R.; Field, Robert W.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-12-01

    This second paper in a series of two reports on the performance of a new instrument for studying chemical reaction dynamics and kinetics at low temperatures. Our approach employs chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy to probe photolysis and bimolecular reaction products that are thermalized in pulsed uniform flows. Here we detail the development and testing of a new Ka-band CP-FTMW spectrometer in combination with the pulsed flow system described in Paper I [J. M. Oldham, C. Abeysekera, B. Joalland, L. N. Zack, K. Prozument, I. R. Sims, G. B. Park, R. W. Field, and A. G. Suits, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 154202 (2014)]. This combination delivers broadband spectra with MHz resolution and allows monitoring, on the μs timescale, of the appearance of transient reaction products. Two benchmark reactive systems are used to illustrate and characterize the performance of this new apparatus: the photodissociation of SO2 at 193 nm, for which the vibrational populations of the SO product are monitored, and the reaction between CN and C2H2, for which the HCCCN product is detected in its vibrational ground state. The results show that the combination of these two well-matched techniques, which we refer to as chirped-pulse in uniform flow, also provides insight into the vibrational and rotational relaxation kinetics of the nascent reaction products. Future directions are discussed, with an emphasis on exploring the low temperature chemistry of complex polyatomic systems.

  1. A chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave/pulsed uniform flow spectrometer. II. Performance and applications for reaction dynamics.

    PubMed

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Zack, Lindsay N; Park, G Barratt; Joalland, Baptiste; Oldham, James M; Prozument, Kirill; Ariyasingha, Nuwandi M; Sims, Ian R; Field, Robert W; Suits, Arthur G

    2014-12-07

    This second paper in a series of two reports on the performance of a new instrument for studying chemical reaction dynamics and kinetics at low temperatures. Our approach employs chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy to probe photolysis and bimolecular reaction products that are thermalized in pulsed uniform flows. Here we detail the development and testing of a new K(a)-band CP-FTMW spectrometer in combination with the pulsed flow system described in Paper I [J. M. Oldham, C. Abeysekera, B. Joalland, L. N. Zack, K. Prozument, I. R. Sims, G. B. Park, R. W. Field, and A. G. Suits, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 154202 (2014)]. This combination delivers broadband spectra with MHz resolution and allows monitoring, on the μs timescale, of the appearance of transient reaction products. Two benchmark reactive systems are used to illustrate and characterize the performance of this new apparatus: the photodissociation of SO2 at 193 nm, for which the vibrational populations of the SO product are monitored, and the reaction between CN and C2H2, for which the HCCCN product is detected in its vibrational ground state. The results show that the combination of these two well-matched techniques, which we refer to as chirped-pulse in uniform flow, also provides insight into the vibrational and rotational relaxation kinetics of the nascent reaction products. Future directions are discussed, with an emphasis on exploring the low temperature chemistry of complex polyatomic systems.

  2. Modal element method for potential flow in non-uniform ducts: Combining closed form analysis with CFD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, Kenneth J.; Baumeister, Joseph F.

    1994-01-01

    An analytical procedure is presented, called the modal element method, that combines numerical grid based algorithms with eigenfunction expansions developed by separation of variables. A modal element method is presented for solving potential flow in a channel with two-dimensional cylindrical like obstacles. The infinite computational region is divided into three subdomains; the bounded finite element domain, which is characterized by the cylindrical obstacle and the surrounding unbounded uniform channel entrance and exit domains. The velocity potential is represented approximately in the grid based domain by a finite element solution and is represented analytically by an eigenfunction expansion in the uniform semi-infinite entrance and exit domains. The calculated flow fields are in excellent agreement with exact analytical solutions. By eliminating the grid surrounding the obstacle, the modal element method reduces the numerical grid size, employs a more precise far field boundary condition, as well as giving theoretical insight to the interaction of the obstacle with the mean flow. Although the analysis focuses on a specific geometry, the formulation is general and can be applied to a variety of problems as seen by a comparison to companion theories in aeroacoustics and electromagnetics.

  3. Parametric Studies of Flow Separation using Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Boundary Layer separation causes the airfoil to stall and therefore imposes dramatic performance degradation on the airfoil. In recent years, flow separation control has been one of the active research areas in the field of aerodynamics due to its promising performance improvements on the lifting device. These active flow separation control techniques include steady and unsteady air injection as well as suction on the airfoil surface etc. This paper will be focusing on the steady and unsteady air injection on the airfoil. Although wind tunnel experiments revealed that the performance improvements on the airfoil using injection techniques, the details of how the key variables such as air injection slot geometry and air injection angle etc impact the effectiveness of flow separation control via air injection has not been studied. A parametric study of both steady and unsteady air injection active flow control will be the main objective for this summer. For steady injection, the key variables include the slot geometry, orientation, spacing, air injection velocity as well as the injection angle. For unsteady injection, the injection frequency will also be investigated. Key metrics such as lift coefficient, drag coefficient, total pressure loss and total injection mass will be used to measure the effectiveness of the control technique. A design of experiments using the Box-Behnken Design is set up in order to determine how each of the variables affects each of the key metrics. Design of experiment is used so that the number of experimental runs will be at minimum and still be able to predict which variables are the key contributors to the responses. The experiments will then be conducted in the 1ft by 1ft wind tunnel according to the design of experiment settings. The data obtained from the experiments will be imported into JMP, statistical software, to generate sets of response surface equations which represent the statistical empirical model for each of the metrics as

  4. Influence of air flow rate and backwashing on the hydraulic behaviour of a submerged filter.

    PubMed

    Cobos-Becerra, Yazmin Lucero; González-Martínez, Simón

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate backwashing effects on the apparent porosity of the filter media and on the hydraulic behaviour of a pilot scale submerged filter, prior to biofilm colonization, under different hydraulic retention times, and different air flow rates. Tracer curves were analysed with two mathematical models for ideal and non-ideal flow (axial dispersion and Wolf and Resnick models). The filter media was lava stones sieved to 4.5 mm. Backwashing causes attrition of media particles, decreasing the void volume of the filter media and, consequently, the tracer flow is more uniform. The eroded media presented lower dead volumes (79% for the filter with aeration and 8% for the filter without aeration) compared with the new media (83% for the filter with aeration and 22% for the filter without aeration). The flow patterns of eroded and new media were different because the more regular shape of the particles decreases the void volume of the filter media. The dead volume is attributed, in the case of the filter with aeration, to the turbulence caused by the air bubbles that generate preferential channelling of the bulk liquid along the filter media, creating large zones of stagnant liquid and, for the filter without aeration, to the channels formed due to the irregular shaped media.

  5. Highly Uniform and Reproducible Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering on Air-stable Metallic Glassy Nanowire Array

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue; Shao, Yang; Tang, Yao; Yao, Ke-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Preparation of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanostructures with both high sensitivity as well as high reproducibility has always been difficult and costly for routine SERS detection. Here we demonstrate air-stable metallic glassy nanowire arrays (MGNWAs), which were prepared by a cheap and rapid die nanoimprinting technique, could exhibit high SERS enhancement factor (EF) as well as excellent reproducibility. It shows that Pd40.5Ni40.5P19 MGNWA with nanowires of 55 nm in diameter and 100 nm in pitch possesses high SERS activity with an EF of 1.1 × 105, which is 1–3 orders of magnitudes higher than that of the reported crystal Ni-based nanostructures, and an excellent reproducibility with a relative standard deviation of 9.60% measured by 121 points over an area of 100 μm*100 μm. This method offers an easy, rapid, and low-cost way to prepare highly sensitive and reproducible SERS substrates and makes the SERS more practicable. PMID:25060646

  6. Yokota Air Base, Japan, Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-05

    60.4! 80.5, 80 . r 25 60.5 8C. .5 r, PC . j 574 69. 744 78: 8?.91 o3 83.9 34 . .1 e. 0. b4 . 94’ .8_.1 .,o SE. 7 -. s 76.21 81 . -85.4 45.3 6.5 16.7...81.3 I 14 81 . I4 81 .*4, 1.4. 7 2.’ 36.7 5., 53.6 65.81 69.9 71.61 78.91 81 . 83.0 83 . 8.o 83.9 8.9 .9 83.9 60, 23. 3 3.81 45.P1 54..21 66.81 71.0 76.0 80 ...6l2225_ il CONTRO,/LING OFFICE NAME AN) ADDRESS 1, -E-04Y C-E USAFETAC/CBD DEC 83 Air Weather Service (MAC) i, N,,. BE , P’AE5 S Scott AFB IL 62225 p. 320 A

  7. Pumping of dielectric liquids using non-uniform-field induced electrohydrodynamic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wonkyoung; Chun Ryu, Jae; Kweon Suh, Yong; Hyoung Kang, Kwan

    2011-11-01

    We present a method of pumping dielectric (or non-polar) liquids. The pumping method relies on the electrohydrodynamic flow generated by field dependent electrical conductivity (Onsager effect). Adding a small amount of polar liquid increases the field-dependency of conductivity. Applying either dc or ac voltage produces a fast and regular flow around electrodes. Flow speed is proportional to cube of electric-field strength and inversely to applied frequency. The experimental results agreed well with numerical analysis based on our theoretical model.

  8. Sound generation and upstream influence due to instability waves interacting with non-uniform mean flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the sound produced by artificially excited, spatially growing instability waves on subsonic shear layers. Real flows that always diverge in the downstream direction allow sound to be produced by the interaction of the instability waves with the resulting streamwise variations of the flow. The upstream influence, or feedback, can interact with the splitter plate lip to produce a downstream-propagating instability wave that may under certain conditions be the same instability wave that originally generated the upstream influence. The present treatment is restricted to very low Mach number flows, so that compressibility effects can only become important over large distances.

  9. Flow over a Modern Ram-Air Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadi, Mohammad; Johari, Hamid

    2010-11-01

    The flow field on the central section of a modern ram-air parachute canopy was examined numerically using a finite-volume flow solver coupled with the one equation Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Ram-air parachutes are used for guided airdrop applications, and the canopy resembles a wing with an open leading edge for inflation. The canopy surfaces were assumed to be impermeable and rigid. The flow field consisted of a vortex inside the leading edge opening which effectively closed off the canopy and diverted the flow around the leading edge. The flow experienced a rather bluff leading edge in contrast to the smooth leading of an airfoil, leading to a separation bubble on the lower lip of the canopy. The flow inside the canopy was stagnant beyond the halfway point. The section lift coefficient increased linearly with the angle of attack up to 8.5 and the lift curve slope was about 8% smaller than the baseline airfoil. The leading edge opening had a major effect on the drag prior to stall; the drag is at least twice the baseline airfoil drag. The minimum drag of the section occurs over the angle of attack range of 3 -- 7 .

  10. Flow regime classification in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, T; De Vuyst, F; Yamaguchi, H

    2008-05-21

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  11. Flow regime classification in air magnetic fluid two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, T.; DeVuyst, F.; Yamaguchi, H.

    2008-05-01

    A new experimental/numerical technique of classification of flow regimes (flow patterns) in air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow is proposed in the present paper. The proposed technique utilizes the electromagnetic induction to obtain time-series signals of the electromotive force, allowing us to make a non-contact measurement. Firstly, an experiment is carried out to obtain the time-series signals in a vertical upward air-magnetic fluid two-phase flow. The signals obtained are first treated using two kinds of wavelet transforms. The data sets treated are then used as input vectors for an artificial neural network (ANN) with supervised training. In the present study, flow regimes are classified into bubbly, slug, churn and annular flows, which are generally the main flow regimes. To validate the flow regimes, a visualization experiment is also performed with a glycerin solution that has roughly the same physical properties, i.e., kinetic viscosity and surface tension, as a magnetic fluid used in the present study. The flow regimes from the visualization are used as targets in an ANN and also used in the estimation of the accuracy of the present method. As a result, ANNs using radial basis functions are shown to be the most appropriate for the present classification of flow regimes, leading to small classification errors.

  12. Chirped Pulse Microwave Spectroscopy in Pulsed Uniform Supersonic Flows: Observation of K-Dependent Rates in the CL + Propyne Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyasingha, Nuwandi M.; Broderick, Bernadette M.; Thompson, James O. F.; Suits, Arthur

    2016-06-01

    Chirped-Pulse Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy in uniform supersonic flows (CPUF) has been applied to study the reaction of Cl atoms with propyne. The approach utilizes broad-band microwave spectroscopy to extract structural information with MHz resolution and near universal detection, in conjunction with a Laval flow system, which offers thermalized conditions at low temperatures and high number densities. Our previous studies have exploited this approach to obtain multichannel product branching fractions in a number of polyatomic systems, with isomer and often vibrational level specificity. This report highlights an additional capability of the CPUF technique: here, the state-specific reactant depletion is directly monitored on a microsecond timescale. In doing so, a clear dependence on the rotational quantum number K in the rate of the reaction between Cl atoms and propyne is revealed. Future prospects for the technique will be discussed.

  13. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-05-01

    In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

  14. HistoFlex--a microfluidic device providing uniform flow conditions enabling highly sensitive, reproducible and quantitative in situ hybridizations.

    PubMed

    Søe, Martin Jensen; Okkels, Fridolin; Sabourin, David; Alberti, Massimo; Holmstrøm, Kim; Dufva, Martin

    2011-11-21

    A microfluidic device (the HistoFlex) designed to perform and monitor molecular biological assays under dynamic flow conditions on microscope slide-substrates, with special emphasis on analyzing histological tissue sections, is presented. Microscope slides were reversibly sealed onto a cast polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) insert, patterned with distribution channels and reaction chambers. Topology optimization was used to design reaction chambers with uniform flow conditions. The HistoFlex provided uniform hybridization conditions, across the reaction chamber, as determined by hybridization to microscope slides of spotted DNA microarrays when applying probe concentrations generally used in in situ hybridization (ISH) assays. The HistoFlex's novel ability in online monitoring of an in situ hybridization assay was demonstrated using direct fluorescent detection of hybridization to 18S rRNA. Tissue sections were not visually damaged during assaying, which enabled adapting a complete ISH assay for detection of microRNAs (miRNA). The effects of flow based incubations on hybridization, antibody incubation and Tyramide Signal Amplification (TSA) steps were investigated upon adapting the ISH assay for performing in the HistoFlex. The hybridization step was significantly enhanced using flow based incubations due to improved hybridization efficiency. The HistoFlex device enabled a fast miRNA ISH assay (3 hours) which provided higher hybridization signal intensity compared to using conventional techniques (5 h 40 min). We further demonstrate that the improved hybridization efficiency using the HistoFlex permits more complex assays e.g. those comprising sequential hybridization and detection of two miRNAs to be performed with significantly increased sensitivity. The HistoFlex provides a new histological analysis platform that will allow multiple and sequential assays to be performed under their individual optimum assay conditions. Images can subsequently be recorded either in

  15. Measurement of velocity of air flow in the sinus maxillaris.

    PubMed

    Müsebeck, K; Rosenberg, H

    1979-03-01

    Anemometry with the hot wire and hot film technique previously described, enables the rhinologist to record slow and rapidly changing air flow in the maxillary sinus. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are considered. Anemometry together with manometry may be designated sinumetry and used as a diagnostic procedure following sinuscopy in chronic maxillary sinus disease. The value of the function from velocity of time allows the estimation of flow-volume in the sinus. Furthermore, the method is useful to evaluate the optimal therapy to restore ventilation in the case of an obstructed ostium demonstrated before and after surgical opening in the inferior meatus.

  16. Character of energy flow in air shower core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, K.; Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Energy per charged particle near the core of air showers was measured by 9 energy flow detectors, which were the combination of Cerenkov counters and scintillators. Energy per particle of each detector was normalized to energy at 2m from the core. The following results were obtained as to the energy flow: (1) integral frequency distribution of mean energy per particle (averaged over 9 detectors) is composed of two groups separated distinctly; and (2) showers contained in one group show an anisotropy of arrival direction.

  17. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gavin J.; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a ‘streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality. PMID:24019053

  18. Vision and air flow combine to streamline flying honeybees.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Gavin J; Luu, Tien; Ball, David; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2013-01-01

    Insects face the challenge of integrating multi-sensory information to control their flight. Here we study a 'streamlining' response in honeybees, whereby honeybees raise their abdomen to reduce drag. We find that this response, which was recently reported to be mediated by optic flow, is also strongly modulated by the presence of air flow simulating a head wind. The Johnston's organs in the antennae were found to play a role in the measurement of the air speed that is used to control the streamlining response. The response to a combination of visual motion and wind is complex and can be explained by a model that incorporates a non-linear combination of the two stimuli. The use of visual and mechanosensory cues increases the strength of the streamlining response when the stimuli are present concurrently. We propose this multisensory integration will make the response more robust to transient disturbances in either modality.

  19. Effects of air flow directions on composting process temperature profile

    SciTech Connect

    Kulcu, Recep; Yaldiz, Osman

    2008-07-01

    In this study, chicken manure mixed with carnation wastes was composted by using three different air flow directions: R1-sucking (downward), R2-blowing (upward) and R3-mixed. The aim was to find out the most appropriate air flow direction type for composting to provide more homogenous temperature distribution in the reactors. The efficiency of each aeration method was evaluated by monitoring the evolution of parameters such as temperature, moisture content, CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} ratio in the material and dry material losses. Aeration of the reactors was managed by radial fans. The results showed that R3 resulted in a more homogenous temperature distribution and high dry material loss throughout the composting process. The most heterogeneous temperature distribution and the lowest dry material loss were obtained in R2.

  20. An uniform DBD plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse using wire-cylinder electrode configuration in atmospheric air.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng-Chao; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Jia, Li; Yang, De-Zheng; Tang, Kai; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2014-03-25

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulsed power supply with 15 ns rising time is employed to generate an uniform dielectric barrier discharge using the wire-cylinder electrode configuration in atmospheric air. The images, waveforms of pulse voltage and discharge current, and the optical emission spectra of the discharges are recorded. The rotational and vibrational temperatures of plasma are determined by comparing the simulated spectra with the experimental spectra. The effects of pulse peak voltage, pulse repetition rate and quartz tube diameter on the emission intensities of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0) and N2(+)B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+),0-0 and the rotational and vibrational temperatures have been investigated. It is found that the uniform plasma with low gas temperature can be obtained, and the emission intensities of N2 (C(3)Πu→B(3)Πg, 0-0) and N2(+)B(2)Σu(+)→X(2)Σg(+),0-0 rise with increasing the pulse peak voltage and pulse repetition rate, while decrease as the increase of quartz tube diameter. In addition, under the condition of 28 kV pulse peak voltage, 150 Hz pulse repetition rate and 7 mm quartz tube diameter, the plasma gas temperature is determined to be 330 K. The results also indicate that the plasma gas temperature keep almost constant when increasing the pulse peak voltage and pulse repetition rate but increase with the increase of the quartz tube diameter.

  1. Interrelationships of petiole air canal architecture, water depth and convective air flow in Nymphaea odorata (Nymphaeaceae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of the study--Nymphaea odorata grows in water up to 2 m deep, producing fewer, larger leaves in deeper water. This species has a convective flow system that moves gases from younger leaves through submerged parts to older leaves, aerating submerged parts. Petiole air canals are in the conv...

  2. Investigation of rarefied gas flow in microchannels of non-uniform cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemadri, Vadiraj; Varade, Vijay V.; Agrawal, Amit; Bhandarkar, U. V.

    2016-02-01

    Study of rarefied gas flow in converging and diverging cross sections is crucial to the development of micro-nozzles and micro-thrusters. In other practical cases too, a microchannel may not always be straight and may include diverging and converging sections in the flow path. In this context, isothermal rarefied gas flow in microchannels of longitudinally varying cross section is studied experimentally in this work. The primary objective is to investigate the existence of Knudsen minimum in microchannels of varying cross sections. The effect of geometrical cross section and fluid properties on the Knudsen minimum are also investigated by performing experiments on three divergence angles (4°, 8°, and 12°) and three different gases (argon, nitrogen, and oxygen) to prove the robustness of the result. The Knudsen minimum, which is one of the characteristic features of rarefied flows, is experimentally observed for the first time in a microchannel of varying cross section. The position of the Knudsen minimum (at Kn ≈ 1) is seen to depend only weakly on the divergence angle and fluid properties.

  3. Development of an air flow thermal balance calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An air flow calorimeter, based on the idea of balancing an unknown rate of heat evolution with a known rate of heat evolution, was developed. Under restricted conditions, the prototype system is capable of measuring thermal wattages from 10 milliwatts to 1 watt, with an error no greater than 1 percent. Data were obtained which reveal system weaknesses and point to modifications which would effect significant improvements.

  4. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  5. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  6. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  8. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  9. Numerical characterization of the hydrodynamics and thermal behavior of air flow in flexible air distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharehdaghi, Samad; Moujaes, Samir

    2013-10-01

    Flexible duct air distribution systems are used in a large percentage of residential and small commercial buildings in the United States . Very few empirical or predictive data are available though to help provide the HVAC design engineer with reliable information . Moreover, because of the ducts flexibility, the shapes of these ducts offer a different set of operating fluid flow and thermal conditions from traditional smooth metal ducts. Hence, both the flow field and heat transfer through this kind of ducts are much more complex and merit to be analyzed from a numerical predictive approach. The aim of this research paper is to compute some of the hydrodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the air flow inside these ducts over a range of Re numbers commonly used in the flow conditions of these air distribution systems. The information resulting from this CFD simulation, where a κ-ɛ turbulent model is used to predict the flow conditions, provide pressure drop and average convective heat transfer coefficients that exist in these ducts and was compared to previously found data. Circulation zones in the depressions of these ducts are found to exist which are suspected of influencing the pressured drop and heat transfer coefficients as compared to smooth ducts. The results show that fully developed conditions exist much earlier with regard to the inlet for both hydrodynamic and thermal entrance regions than what would be expected in smooth ducts under the same turbulent conditions.

  10. Thermal analysis and two-directional air flow thermal management for lithium-ion battery pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kuahai; Yang, Xi; Cheng, Yongzhou; Li, Changhao

    2014-12-01

    Thermal management is a routine but crucial strategy to ensure thermal stability and long-term durability of the lithium-ion batteries. An air-flow-integrated thermal management system is designed in the present study to dissipate heat generation and uniformize the distribution of temperature in the lithium-ion batteries. The system contains of two types of air ducts with independent intake channels and fans. One is to cool the batteries through the regular channel, and the other minimizes the heat accumulations in the middle pack of batteries through jet cooling. A three-dimensional anisotropic heat transfer model is developed to describe the thermal behavior of the lithium-ion batteries with the integration of heat generation theory, and validated through both simulations and experiments. Moreover, the simulations and experiments show that the maximum temperature can be decreased to 33.1 °C through the new thermal management system in comparison with 42.3 °C through the traditional ones, and temperature uniformity of the lithium-ion battery packs is enhanced, significantly.

  11. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  12. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  13. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.240 - Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.240 Dilution air and diluted exhaust flow meters. (a) Application. Use a diluted exhaust flow... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dilution air and diluted exhaust...

  16. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... of the United States for Fiber Fineness and Maturity § 28.603 Procedures for air flow tests of...) Air flow instrument complete with accessories to measure the fineness and maturity, in combination,...

  17. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  18. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.

  19. Flow over a Ram-Air Parachute Canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslambolchi, Ali; Johari, Hamid

    2012-11-01

    The flow field over a full-scale, ram-air personnel parachute canopy was investigated numerically using a finite-volume flow solver coupled with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Ram-air parachute canopies resemble wings with arc-anhedral, surface protuberances, and an open leading edge for inflation. The rectangular planform canopy had an aspect ratio of 2.2 and was assumed to be rigid and impermeable. The chord-based Reynolds number was 3.2 million. Results indicate that the oncoming flow barely penetrates the canopy opening, and creates a large separation bubble below the lower lip of canopy. A thick boundary layer exists over the entire lower surface of the canopy. The flow over the upper surface of the canopy remains attached for an extended fraction of the chord. Lift increases linearly with angle of attack up to about 12 degrees. To assess the capability of lifting-line theory in predicting the forces on the canopy, the lift and drag data from a two-dimensional simulation of the canopy profile were extended using finite-wing expressions and compared with the forces from the present simulations. The finite-wing predicted lift and drag trends compare poorly against the full-span simulation, and the maximum lift-to-drag ratio is over-predicted by 36%. Sponsored by the US Army NRDEC.

  20. Cold air drainage flows subsidize montane valley ecosystem productivity.

    PubMed

    Novick, Kimberly A; Oishi, A Christopher; Miniat, Chelcy Ford

    2016-12-01

    In mountainous areas, cold air drainage from high to low elevations has pronounced effects on local temperature, which is a critical driver of many ecosystem processes, including carbon uptake and storage. Here, we leverage new approaches for interpreting ecosystem carbon flux observations in complex terrain to quantify the links between macro-climate condition, drainage flows, local microclimate, and ecosystem carbon cycling in a southern Appalachian valley. Data from multiple long-running climate stations and multiple eddy covariance flux towers are combined with simple models for ecosystem carbon fluxes. We show that cold air drainage into the valley suppresses local temperature by several degrees at night and for several hours before and after sunset, leading to reductions in growing season respiration on the order of ~8%. As a result, we estimate that drainage flows increase growing season and annual net carbon uptake in the valley by >10% and >15%, respectively, via effects on microclimate that are not be adequately represented in regional- and global-scale terrestrial ecosystem models. Analyses driven by chamber-based estimates of soil and plant respiration reveal cold air drainage effects on ecosystem respiration are dominated by reductions to the respiration of aboveground biomass. We further show that cold air drainage proceeds more readily when cloud cover and humidity are low, resulting in the greatest enhancements to net carbon uptake in the valley under clear, cloud-free (i.e., drought-like) conditions. This is a counterintuitive result that is neither observed nor predicted outside of the valley, where nocturnal temperature and respiration increase during dry periods. This result should motivate efforts to explore how topographic flows may buffer eco-physiological processes from macroscale climate change.

  1. Effects of tension on vortex-induced vibration (VIV) responses of a long tensioned cylinder in uniform flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ling; Ge, Fei; Wu, Xiaodong; Hong, Youshi

    2017-02-01

    The effects of tension on vortex-induced vibration (VIV) responses for a tension-dominated long cylinder with an aspect ratio of 550 in uniform flows are experimentally investigated in this paper. The results show that elevated tension suppresses fluctuations of maximum displacement with respect to flow velocity and makes chaotic VIV more likely to appear. With respect to periodic VIV, if elevated tension is applied, the dominant vibration frequency in the in-line (IL) direction will switch from a fundamental vibration frequency to twice the value of the fundamental vibration frequency, which results in a ratio of the dominant vibration frequency in the IL direction to that in the cross-flow direction of 2.0. The suppression of the elevated tension in the fluctuation of the maximum displacement causes the axial tension to become an active control parameter for the VIV maximum displacement of a tension-dominated long riser or tether of an engineering structure in deep oceans. However, the axial tension must be optimized before being used since the high dominant vibration frequency due to the elevated tension may unfavorably affect the fatigue life of the riser or tether.

  2. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications. PMID:26877244

  3. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  4. Thermal transport due to buoyant flow past a vertical, heated superhydrophobic surface with uniform stream-wise slip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searle, Matthew; Maynes, Daniel; Crockett, Julie

    2016-11-01

    An analytical investigation of thermal transport due to a steady, laminar, buoyancy-driven flow past a vertical superhydrophobic (SHPo) surface was performed. The surface temperature was constant and uniform and exceeded the temperature of the surrounding liquid. Uniform stream-wise hydrodynamic slip and temperature jump are imposed at the wall to model the SHPo surface. Applying an integral analysis within the boundary layer results in a system of differential equations which are solved numerically to obtain boundary layer thickness, maximum velocity in the profile, and local and average values of both the friction coefficient and the Nusselt number. The classical smooth hydrophobic scenario with no-slip and no temperature jump showed excellent agreement with previous analysis of the same problem. The influence of varying temperature jump length on the local and average values of the friction coefficient and the Nusselt number was obtained for Rayleigh number ranging from 104 to 109 and Prandtl number ranging from 2 to 11. Local and average Nusselt numbers decrease dramatically, concomitant with a decrease in the maximum fluid velocity, as the temperature jump length increases. National Science Foundation(NSF) Grant No. CBET-1235881.

  5. Numerical study of metal foam heat sinks under uniform impinging flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreozzi, A.; Bianco, N.; Iasiello, M.; Naso, V.

    2017-01-01

    The ever-increasing demand for performance improvement and miniaturization of electronics has led to a significant generation of waste heat that must be dissipated to ensure a reliable device operation. The miniaturization of the components complicates this task. In fact, reducing the heat transfer area, at the same required heat rate, it is necessary to increase the heat flux, so that the materials operate in a temperature range suitable to its proper functioning. Traditional heat sinks are no longer capable of dissipating the generated heat and innovative approaches are needed to address the emerging thermal management challenges. Recently, heat transfer in open-cell metal foams under an impinging jet has received attention due to the considerable heat transfer potential of combining two cooling technologies: impinging jet and porous medium. This paper presents a numerical study on Finned Metal Foam (FMF) and Metal Foam (MF) heat sinks under impinging air jet cooling. The analysis is carried out by means of the commercial software COMSOL Multiphysics®. The purpose is to analyze the thermal performance of the metal foam heat sink, finned or not, varying its geometric parameters. Results are presented in terms of predicted dissipated heat rate, convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure losses.

  6. Analytical solutions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional solute transport in ground-water systems with uniform flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the advective-dispersive solute transport equation are useful in predicting the fate of solutes in groundwater. Analytical solutions compiled from available literature or derived by the author are presented in this report for a variety of boundary condition types and solute-source configuration in one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems with uniform groundwater flow. A set of user-oriented computer programs was created to evaluate these solutions and to display the results in tabular and computer-graphics format. These programs incorporate many features that enhance their accuracy, ease of use, and versatility. Documentation for the programs describes their operation and required input data, and presents the results of sample problems. Derivations of select solutions, source codes for the computer programs, and samples of program input and output also are described. (USGS)

  7. Analytical solutions for one-, two-, and three-dimensional solute transport in ground-water systems with uniform flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical solutions to the advective-dispersive solute-transport equation are useful in predicting the fate of solutes in ground water. Analytical solutions compiled from available literature or derived by the author are presented for a variety of boundary condition types and solute-source configurations in one-, two-, and three-dimensional systems having uniform ground-water flow. A set of user-oriented computer programs was created to evaluate these solutions and to display the results in tabular and computer-graphics format. These programs incorporate many features that enhance their accuracy, ease of use, and versatility. Documentation for the programs describes their operation and required input data, and presents the results of sample problems. Derivations of selected solutions, source codes for the computer programs, and samples of program input and output also are included.

  8. Finite-difference theory for sound propagation in a lined duct with uniform flow using the wave envelope concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Finite difference equations are derived for sound propagation in a two dimensional, straight, soft wall duct with a uniform flow by using the wave envelope concept. This concept reduces the required number of finite difference grid points by one to two orders of magnitude depending on the length of the duct and the frequency of the sound. The governing acoustic difference equations in complex notation are derived. An exit condition is developed that allows a duct of finite length to simulate the wave propagation in an infinitely long duct. Sample calculations presented for a plane wave incident upon the acoustic liner show the numerical theory to be in good agreement with closed form analytical theory. Complete pressure and velocity printouts are given to some sample problems and can be used to debug and check future computer programs.

  9. Infiltration capacity of roadside filter strips with non-uniform overland flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Serrana, María; Gulliver, John S.; Nieber, John L.

    2017-02-01

    The side slope to a roadside swale (drainage ditch) constitutes a filter strip that has potential for infiltration of road runoff, thereby serving as a stormwater quantity and quality control mechanism. A total of thirty-two tests were performed during three seasons in four different highways located in the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area, MN to analyze the infiltration performance of roadside filter strips and the effect of fractional coverage of water on infiltration. Three different application rates were used in the experiments. All the tests showed that water flow on the lateral slope of a roadside swale is concentrated in fingers, instead of sheet flow, at the typical road runoff intensities for which infiltration practices are utilized to improve surface water quality. A linear relationship between flux of water from the road and fraction of wetted surface was observed, for the intensities tested. The average percentage infiltration of the medium road runoff rate (1.55 × 10-4 m2/s, without direct rainfall) experiments performed in fall was 85% and in spring 70%. For the high road runoff rate (3.1 × 10-4 m2/s, without direct rainfall) tests the average amount of water infiltrated was 47% and for the low road runoff rate (7.76 × 10-5 m2/s, without direct rainfall) tests it was 69%, both set of tests performed in spring and summer. The saturated hydraulic conductivity of swale soil was high, relative to the values typical of laboratory permeameter measurements for these types of soils. This is believed to be due to the macropores generated by vegetation roots, activity of macrofauna (e.g. earthworms), and construction/maintenance procedures. The trend was to have more infiltration when the saturated hydraulic conductivity was higher and for a greater side slope length, as expected. The vegetation, type of soil and length of the side slope are important to consider for constructing and maintaining roadside swales that will be efficient as stormwater

  10. Enhancing separation of histidine from amino acids via free-flow affinity electrophoresis with gravity-induced uniform hydrodynamic flow.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bo; Shao, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Geng, Jia-Zhen; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi; Hou, Jing-Li

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a novel mode of free-flow affinity electrophoresis (FFAE) was developed to indirectly enhance the separation of free-flow electrophoresis (FFE). In the mode of FFAE, a Ni(II) with high electric charge density and histidine (His) is chosen as a model ligand and target solute, respectively. Through the controlling of experimental conditions (10 mM pH 6.0 Na(2)HPO(4)-NaH(2)PO(4) with 2.0 mM NiCl(2)·6H(2)O background buffer), Ni(II) can combine with His and the combination leads to the high electric charge density of affinity complex of His-Ni(II) in contrast to the low density of free His molecule. But the ligand has weak interaction with uninterested amino acids. Thus, the mobility of His existing as His-Ni(II) is greatly increased from 14.5×10(-8) m(2) V(-1) s(-1) to 30.2 × 10(-8) m(2) V(-1) s(-1), while those mobilities of uninterested amino acids are almost constant. By virtue of the mode, we developed the FFAE procedure and conducted the relevant experiments. The experiments demonstrated the following merits of the FFAE technique: (i) clear enhancement of separation between the target solute of His and uninterested amino acids; (ii) simplicity, and (iii) low cost. Furthermore, the technique was used for the continuous separation of His from its complex sample, and the purity of His was near to 100%. All of the results demonstrate the feasibility of affinity separation in FFE. The developed FFAE may be used in the separation and pretreatment of some biological molecules (e.g. peptides).

  11. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  12. An air traffic flow management method based on mixed genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ying

    2009-12-01

    With the air traffic congest problem becoming more and more severe, the study of air traffic flow management is more and more important. According to the character of air traffic flow management, the author analyzed the heuristic method and genetic algorithms, later put this two method together and give a new method of air traffic flow management-mixture genetic algorithms, It has global convergence, the simulation result demonstrates that the presented algorithm is effective.

  13. Air flow paths and porosity/permeability change in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yih-Jin

    2007-04-02

    This study develops methods to estimate the change in soil characteristics and associated air flow paths in a saturated zone during in situ air sparging. These objectives were achieved by performing combined in situ air sparging and tracer testing, and comparing the breakthrough curves obtained from the tracer gas with those obtained by a numerical simulation model that incorporates a predicted change in porosity that is proportional to the air saturation. The results reveal that revising the porosity and permeability according to the distribution of gas saturation is helpful in breakthrough curve fitting, however, these changes are unable to account for the effects of preferential air flow paths, especially in the zone closest to the points of air injection. It is not known the extent to which these preferential air flow paths were already present versus created, increased, or reduced as a result of the air sparging experiment. The transport of particles from around the sparging well could account for the overall increase in porosity and permeability observed in the study. Collection of soil particles in a monitoring well within 2m of the sparging well provided further evidence of the transport of particles. Transport of particles from near the sparging well also appeared to decrease the radius of influence (ROI). Methods for predicting the effects of pressurized air injection and water flow on the creation or modification of preferential air flow paths are still needed to provide a full description of the change in soil conditions that accompany air sparging.

  14. Generation and manipulation of monodispersed ferrofluid emulsions: the effect of a uniform magnetic field in flow-focusing and T-junction configurations.

    PubMed

    Tan, Say Hwa; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2011-09-01

    This paper demonstrates the use of magnetically controlled microfluidic devices to produce monodispersed ferrofluid emulsions. By applying a uniform magnetic field on flow-focusing and T-junction configurations, the size of the ferrofluid emulsions can be actively controlled. The influences of the flow rates, the orientation, and the polarity of the magnetic field on the size of ferrofluid emulsions produced in both flow-focusing and T-junction configurations are compared and discussed.

  15. Ozone concentrations in air flowing into New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksic, Nenad; Kent, John; Walcek, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Ozone (O3) concentrations measured at Pinnacle State Park (PSPNY), very close to the southern border of New York State, are used to estimate concentrations in air flowing into New York. On 20% of the ozone season (April-September) afternoons from 2004 to 2015, mid-afternoon 500-m back trajectories calculated from PSPNY cross New York border from the south and spend less than three hours in New York State, in this area of negligible local pollution emissions. One-hour (2p.m.-3p.m.) O3 concentrations during these inflowing conditions were 46 ± 13 ppb, and ranged from a minimum of 15 ppb to a maximum of 84 ppb. On average during 2004-2015, each year experienced 11.8 days with inflowing 1-hr O3 concentrations exceeding 50 ppb, 4.3 days with O3 > 60 ppb, and 1.5 days had O3 > 70 ppb. During the same period, 8-hr average concentrations (10a.m. to 6p.m.) exceeded 50 ppb on 10.0 days per season, while 3.9 days exceeded 60 ppb, and 70 ppb was exceeded 1.2 days per season. Two afternoons of minimal in-state emission influences with high ozone concentrations were analyzed in more detail. Synoptic and back trajectory analysis, including comparison with upwind ozone concentrations, indicated that the two periods were characterized as photo-chemically aged air containing high inflowing O3 concentrations most likely heavily influenced by pollution emissions from states upwind of New York including Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Ohio. These results suggest that New York state-level attempts to comply with National Ambient Air Quality Standards by regulating in-state O3 precursor NOx and organic emissions would be very difficult, since air frequently enters New York State very close to or in excess of Federal Air Quality Standards.

  16. Flows and torques in Brownian ferrofluids subjected to rotating uniform magnetic fields in a cylindrical and annular geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Torres-Diaz, I.; Cortes, A.; Rinaldi, C.; Cedeño-Mattei, Y.; Perales-Perez, O.

    2014-01-15

    Ferrofluid flow in cylindrical and annular geometries under the influence of a uniform rotating magnetic field was studied experimentally using aqueous ferrofluids consisting of low concentrations (<0.01 v/v) of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with Brownian relaxation to test the ferrohydrodynamic equations, elucidate the existence of couple stresses, and determine the value of the spin viscosity in these fluids. An ultrasound technique was used to measure bulk velocity profiles in the spin-up (cylindrical) and annular geometries, varying the intensity and frequency of the rotating magnetic field generated by a two pole stator winding. Additionally, torque measurements in the cylindrical geometry were made. Results show rigid-body like velocity profiles in the bulk, and no dependence on the axial direction. Experimental velocity profiles were in quantitative agreement with the predictions of the spin diffusion theory, with a value of the spin viscosity of ∼10{sup −8} kg m/s, two orders of magnitude larger than the value estimated earlier for iron oxide based ferrofluids, and 12 orders of magnitude larger than estimated using dimensional arguments valid in the infinite dilution limit. These results provide further evidence of the existence of couple stresses in ferrofluids and their role in driving the spin-up flow phenomenon.

  17. Simulations of Direct Current Glow Discharges in Supersonic Air Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, there have been a significant number of computational and experimental studies investigating the application of plasma discharges as actuators for high speed flow control. The relative importance of the actuation mechanisms: volumetric heating and electrostatic forcing can be established by developing self-consistent models of the plasma and bulk supersonic flow. To simulate the plasma discharge in a supersonic air stream, a fluid model of the glow discharge is coupled with a compressible Navier-Stokes solver in a self-consistent manner. Source terms for the momentum and energy equations are calculated from the plasma model and input into the Navier-Stokes solver. In turn, the pressure, gas temperature and velocity fields from the Navier-Stokes solution are fed back into the plasma model. The results include plasma species number density contour maps in the absence and presence of Mach 3 supersonic flow, and the corresponding effect of the glow discharge on gas dynamic properties such as the gas pressure and temperature. We also examine the effect of increasing the discharge voltage on the structure of the discharge and its corresponding effect on the supersonic flow.

  18. Numerical simulation of air flow in a model of lungs with mouth cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcner, Jakub; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The air flow in a realistic geometry of human lung is simulated with computational flow dynamics approach as stationary inspiration. Geometry used for the simulation includes oral cavity, larynx, trachea and bronchial tree up to the seventh generation of branching. Unsteady RANS approach was used for the air flow simulation. Velocities corresponding to 15, 30 and 60 litres/min of flow rate were set as boundary conditions at the inlet to the model. These flow rates are frequently used as a representation of typical human activities. Character of air flow in the model for these different flow rates is discussed with respect to future investigation of particle deposition.

  19. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a "special divergence-free" (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  20. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    DOE PAGES

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a 'special divergence-free' property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. Wemore » also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Ref. [11], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Ref. [35], appears to work very well.« less

  1. Issues in measure-preserving three dimensional flow integrators: Self-adjointness, reversibility, and non-uniform time stepping

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, John M.

    2015-03-15

    Properties of integration schemes for solenoidal fields in three dimensions are studied, with a focus on integrating magnetic field lines in a plasma using adaptive time stepping. It is shown that implicit midpoint (IM) and a scheme we call three-dimensional leapfrog (LF) can do a good job (in the sense of preserving KAM tori) of integrating fields that are reversible, or (for LF) have a “special divergence-free” (SDF) property. We review the notion of a self-adjoint scheme, showing that such schemes are at least second order accurate and can always be formed by composing an arbitrary scheme with its adjoint. We also review the concept of reversibility, showing that a reversible but not exactly volume-preserving scheme can lead to a fractal invariant measure in a chaotic region, although this property may not often be observable. We also show numerical results indicating that the IM and LF schemes can fail to preserve KAM tori when the reversibility property (and the SDF property for LF) of the field is broken. We discuss extensions to measure preserving flows, the integration of magnetic field lines in a plasma and the integration of rays for several plasma waves. The main new result of this paper relates to non-uniform time stepping for volume-preserving flows. We investigate two potential schemes, both based on the general method of Feng and Shang [Numer. Math. 71, 451 (1995)], in which the flow is integrated in split time steps, each Hamiltonian in two dimensions. The first scheme is an extension of the method of extended phase space, a well-proven method of symplectic integration with non-uniform time steps. This method is found not to work, and an explanation is given. The second method investigated is a method based on transformation to canonical variables for the two split-step Hamiltonian systems. This method, which is related to the method of non-canonical generating functions of Richardson and Finn [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 014004 (2012

  2. Ignition of an organic water-coal fuel droplet floating in a heated-air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valiullin, T. R.; Strizhak, P. A.; Shevyrev, S. A.; Bogomolov, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Ignition of an organic water-coal fuel (CWSP) droplet floating in a heated-air flow has been studied experimentally. Rank B2 brown-coal particles with a size of 100 μm, used crankcase Total oil, water, and a plasticizer were used as the main CWSP components. A dedicated quartz-glass chamber has been designed with inlet and outlet elements made as truncated cones connected via a cylindrical ring. The cones were used to shape an oxidizer flow with a temperature of 500-830 K and a flow velocity of 0.5-5.0 m/s. A technique that uses a coordinate-positioning gear, a nichrome thread, and a cutter element has been developed for discharging CWSP droplets into the working zone of the chamber. Droplets with an initial size of 0.4 to 2.0 mm were used. Conditions have been determined for a droplet to float in the oxidizer flow long enough for the sustainable droplet burning to be initiated. Typical stages and integral ignition characteristics have been established. The integral parameters (ignition-delay times) of the examined processes have been compared to the results of experiments with CWSP droplets suspended on the junction of a quick-response thermocouple. It has been shown that floating fuel droplets ignite much quicker than the ones that sit still on the thermocouple due to rotation of an CWSP droplet in the oxidizer flow, more uniform heating of the droplet, and lack of heat drainage towards the droplet center. High-speed video recording of the peculiarities of floatation of a burning fuel droplet makes it possible to complement the existing models of water-coal fuel burning. The results can be used for a more substantiated modeling of furnace CWSP burning with the ANSYS, Fluent, and Sigma-Flow software packages.

  3. Phonatory air flow characteristics of adductor spasmodic dysphonia and muscle tension dysphonia.

    PubMed

    Higgins, M B; Chait, D H; Schulte, L

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if phonatory air flow characteristics differed among women with adductor spasmodic dysphonia (AdSD), muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), and normal phonation. Phonatory air flow signals were gathered during [pa] syllable repetitions. Mean phonatory air flow, coefficients of variation, and the presence of large air flow perturbations (75 ml/s or more) were examined for the three groups of speakers. There was no significant difference in mean phonatory air flow across groups, and very large intersubject variation in mean phonatory air flow occurred for both the AdSD and MTD groups. Coefficients of variation were similar for the groups of women with MTD and normal phonation but were significantly larger for the group with AdSD. Air flow perturbations were common with AdSD and rare with MTD. Relatively large coefficients of variation and air flow perturbations of at least 75 ml/s did occur for some women with normal voices who were 70 years of age or older. It appears that intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow may aid in the differentiation of AdSD and MTD when used in conjunction with other elements of a thorough voice evaluation. However, the potential contribution of aging to increased intrasubject variability in phonatory air flow must be considered when interpreting findings.

  4. Graphical User Interface Development for Representing Air Flow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaudhary, Nilika

    2004-01-01

    In the Turbine Branch, scientists carry out experimental and computational work to advance the efficiency and diminish the noise production of jet engine turbines. One way to do this is by decreasing the heat that the turbine blades receive. Most of the experimental work is carried out by taking a single turbine blade and analyzing the air flow patterns around it, because this data indicates the sections of the turbine blade that are getting too hot. Since the cost of doing turbine blade air flow experiments is very high, researchers try to do computational work that fits the experimental data. The goal of computational fluid dynamics is for scientists to find a numerical way to predict the complex flow patterns around different turbine blades without physically having to perform tests or costly experiments. When visualizing flow patterns, scientists need a way to represent the flow conditions around a turbine blade. A researcher will assign specific zones that surround the turbine blade. In a two-dimensional view, the zones are usually quadrilaterals. The next step is to assign boundary conditions which define how the flow enters or exits one side of a zone. way of setting up computational zones and grids, visualizing flow patterns, and storing all the flow conditions in a file on the computer for future computation. Such a program is necessary because the only method for creating flow pattern graphs is by hand, which is tedious and time-consuming. By using a computer program to create the zones and grids, the graph would be faster to make and easier to edit. Basically, the user would run a program that is an editable graph. The user could click and drag with the mouse to form various zones and grids, then edit the locations of these grids, add flow and boundary conditions, and finally save the graph for future use and analysis. My goal this summer is to create a graphical user interface (GUI) that incorporates all of these elements. I am writing the program in

  5. Modeling the Air Flow in the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack System

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2013-01-23

    Additional ventilation capacity has been designed for the 3410 Building filtered exhaust stack system. The updated system will increase the number of fans from two to three and will include ductwork to incorporate the new fan into the existing stack. Stack operations will involve running various two-fan combinations at any given time. The air monitoring system of the existing two-fan stack was previously found to be in compliance with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, however it is not known if the modified (three-fan) system will comply. Subsequently, a full-scale three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the modified stack system has been created to examine the sampling location for compliance with the standard. The CFD modeling results show good agreement with testing data collected from the existing 3410 Building stack and suggest that velocity uniformity and flow angles will remain well within acceptance criteria when the third fan and associated ductwork is installed. This includes two-fan flow rates up to 31,840 cfm for any of the two-fan combinations. For simulation cases in which tracer gas and particles are introduced in the main duct, the model predicts that both particle and tracer gas coefficients of variance (COVs) may be larger than the acceptable 20 percent criterion of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard for each of the two-fan, 31,840 cfm combinations. Simulations in which the tracers are introduced near the fans result in improved, though marginally acceptable, COV values for the tracers. Due to the remaining uncertainty that the stack will qualify with the addition of the third fan and high flow rates, a stationary air blender from Blender Products, Inc. is considered for inclusion in the stack system. A model of the air blender has been developed and incorporated into the CFD model. Simulation results from the CFD model that includes the air blender show striking improvements in tracer gas mixing and tracer particle

  6. An evolutionary outlook of air traffic flow management techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistan, Trevor; Gardi, Alessandro; Sabatini, Roberto; Ramasamy, Subramanian; Batuwangala, Eranga

    2017-01-01

    In recent years Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) has become pertinent even in regions without sustained overload conditions caused by dense traffic operations. Increasing traffic volumes in the face of constrained resources has created peak congestion at specific locations and times in many areas of the world. Increased environmental awareness and economic drivers have combined to create a resurgent interest in ATFM as evidenced by a spate of recent ATFM conferences and workshops mediated by official bodies such as ICAO, IATA, CANSO the FAA and Eurocontrol. Significant ATFM acquisitions in the last 5 years include South Africa, Australia and India. Singapore, Thailand and Korea are all expected to procure ATFM systems within a year while China is expected to develop a bespoke system. Asia-Pacific nations are particularly pro-active given the traffic growth projections for the region (by 2050 half of all air traffic will be to, from or within the Asia-Pacific region). National authorities now have access to recently published international standards to guide the development of national and regional operational concepts for ATFM, geared to Communications, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management and Avionics (CNS+A) evolutions. This paper critically reviews the field to determine which ATFM research and development efforts hold the best promise for practical technological implementations, offering clear benefits both in terms of enhanced safety and efficiency in times of growing air traffic. An evolutionary approach is adopted starting from an ontology of current ATFM techniques and proceeding to identify the technological and regulatory evolutions required in the future CNS+A context, as the aviation industry moves forward with a clearer understanding of emerging operational needs, the geo-political realities of regional collaboration and the impending needs of global harmonisation.

  7. THE PATTERN OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH DURING SPEECH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LANE, H.; AND OTHERS

    SINCE THE 19TH CENTURY, KYMOGRAPHIC RECORDING OF TOTAL AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH HAS BEEN USED TO DIAGNOSE THE VARYING DURATIONS AND DEGREES OF CONSTRICTIONS OF THE VOCAL TRACT DURING SPEECH. THE PRESENT PROJECT ATTEMPTS TO INTRODUCE A SECOND DIMENSION TO RECORDINGS OF AIR FLOW OUT OF THE MOUTH--NAMELY, CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA OF FLOW--ON THE…

  8. The fluid dynamics of work transfer in the non-uniform viscous rotating flow within a Tesla disc turbomachine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Abhijit; Sengupta, Sayantan

    2014-03-01

    In this article, the fluid dynamics of work transfer within the narrow spacing (usually of the order of 100 μm) of multiple concentric discs of a Tesla disc turbomachine (turbine or compressor) has been analysed theoretically and computationally. Both the overall work transfer and its spatial development have been considered. It has been established that the work transfer mechanism in a Tesla disc turbomachine is very different from that in a conventional turbomachine, and the formulation of the Euler's work equation for the disc turbomachine contains several conceptual subtleties because of the existence of complex, three dimensional, non-uniform, viscous flow features. A work equivalence principle has been enunciated, which establishes the equality between the magnitudes of work transfer determined rigorously from two different approaches—one based on the shear stress acting on the disc surfaces and the other based on the change in angular momentum of the fluid. Care is needed in identifying the shear stress components that are responsible for the generation or absorption of useful power. It is shown from the Reynolds transport theorem that mass-flow-averaged tangential velocities (as opposed to the normally used area-averaged values) must be used in determining the change in angular momentum; the calculation has to be carefully formulated since both radial velocity (that determines throughput) and tangential velocity (that generates torque) depend strongly on the coordinate perpendicular to the disc surfaces. The principle of work transfer has been examined both in the absolute and relative frames of reference, revealing the subtle role played by Coriolis force. The concept of a new non-dimensional quantity called the torque potential fraction (Δ tilde H) is introduced. The value of Δ tilde H at any radial position increases with a decrease in inter-disc spacing. The computational fluid dynamic analysis shows that, for small value of inter-disc spacing and

  9. The Brazilian Air Force Uniform Distribution Process: Using Lean Thinking, Statistical Process Control and Theory of Constraints to Address Improvement Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    serviceability – how easy is it to repair the product? (5) aesthetics – what does the product look like? ( 6 ) features – what does the product do? (7...is the definition of value, which is deemed by Kang and Apte (2007) as the heart of the lean thinking . They also define value as “form, feature or...THE BRAZILIAN AIR FORCE UNIFORM DISTRIBUTION PROCESS: USING LEAN THINKING , STATISTICAL PROCESS

  10. New sensor for measurement of low air flow velocity. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Hashemian, M.; Riggsbee, E.T.

    1995-08-01

    The project described here is the Phase I feasibility study of a two-phase program to integrate existing technologies to provide a system for determining air flow velocity and direction in radiation work areas. Basically, a low air flow sensor referred to as a thermocouple flow sensor has been developed. The sensor uses a thermocouple as its sensing element. The response time of the thermocouple is measured using an existing in-situ method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) test. The response time results are then converted to a flow signal using a response time-versus-flow correlation. The Phase I effort has shown that a strong correlation exists between the response time of small diameter thermocouples and the ambient flow rate. As such, it has been demonstrated that thermocouple flow sensors can be used successfully to measure low air flow rates that can not be measured with conventional flow sensors. While the thermocouple flow sensor developed in this project was very successful in determining air flow velocity, determining air flow direction was beyond the scope of the Phase I project. Nevertheless, work was performed during Phase I to determine how the new flow sensor can be used to determine the direction, as well as the velocity, of ambient air movements. Basically, it is necessary to use either multiple flow sensors or move a single sensor in the monitoring area and make flow measurements at various locations sweeping the area from top to bottom and from left to right. The results can then be used with empirical or physical models, or in terms of directional vectors to estimate air flow patterns. The measurements can be made continuously or periodically to update the flow patterns as they change when people and objects are moved in the monitoring area. The potential for using multiple thermocouple flow sensors for determining air flow patterns will be examined in Phase II.

  11. On the impact of entrapped air in infiltration under ponding conditions: Part a: Preferential air flow path effects on infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisbord, N.; Mizrahi, G.; Furman, A.

    2015-12-01

    Entrapped air effects on infiltration under ponding conditions could be important for massive infiltration of managed aquifer recharge or soil aquifer treatment. Earlier studies found that under ponding conditions air could reduce infiltration by 70-90%. Most studies have dealt with entrapped air effects when soil surface topography is flat. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of: (1) irregular surface topography on preferential air flow path development; (2) preferential air flow path on infiltration; and (3) hydraulic head on infiltration when air is trapped. Column experiments were used to investigate these particular effects. A 140 cm deep and 30 cm wide column packed with silica sand was used under two boundary conditions: in the first, air can only escape vertically upward through the soil surface; in the second, air is free to escape. The surface was flooded with 13 liters of water, with ponding depth decreasing with time. Two soil surface conditions were tested: flat surface and irregular. It was found that in irregular surfaces, stable air flow through preferential paths was developed in the high altitude zones. Flat surface topography caused unstable air flow through random paths. Comparison between irregular and flat surface topography showed that the entrapped air pressure was lower and the infiltration rate was about 40% higher in the irregular surface topography than in the flat surface topography. No difference of infiltration rate between flat and irregular surface topography was observed when air was free to escape along the infiltration path. It was also found that at the first stage of infiltration, higher hydraulic heads caused higher entrapped air pressures and lower infiltration rates. In contrast, higher hydraulic head results in higher infiltration rate, when air was free to escape. Our results suggest that during ponding conditions: (1) preferential air flow paths develop at high surface zones of irregular topography

  12. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture, or its equivalent. (2) A suitable supply of compressed air filtered to remove... specimen. The weight of the test specimen shall be that weight prescribed for the air flow instrument...

  13. Improved multimodal method for the acoustic propagation in waveguides with a wall impedance and a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, Jean-François; Maurel, Agnès

    2016-06-01

    We present an efficient multimodal method to describe the acoustic propagation in the presence of a uniform flow in a waveguide with locally a wall impedance treatment. The method relies on a variational formulation of the problem, which allows to derive a multimodal formulation within a rigorous mathematical framework, notably to properly account for the boundary conditions on the walls (being locally the Myers condition and the Neumann condition otherwise). Also, the method uses an enriched basis with respect to the usual cosine basis, able to absorb the less converging part of the modal series and thus, to improve the convergence of the method. Using the cosine basis, the modal method has a low convergence, 1/N, with N the order of truncation. Using the enriched basis, the improvement in the convergence is shown to depend on the Mach number, from 1/N5 to roughly 1/N1.5 for M=0 to M close to unity. The case of a continuously varying wall impedance is considered, and we discuss the limiting case of piecewise constant impedance, which defines pressure edge conditions at the impedance discontinuities.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of a compressible turbulent channel flow with uniform blowing and suction through isothermal walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kametani, Yukinori; Fukagata, Koji

    2014-11-01

    High-speed transports such as aircrafts and bullet trains support human activity in the modern society. In such applications, the turbulent friction drag is the major contributor to the energy loss. Kametani and Fukagata (J. Fluid Mech., 2011) investigated by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS) the drag reduction effect by blowing and the turbulence stabilization effect by suction in an incompressible spatially developing turbulent boundary layer, and quantitatively discussed different contributions to those effects. In this study, DNS of a compressible turbulent channel with uniform blowing and suction through the isothermal walls is performed. The Reynolds number based on the bulk mass flow rate, the viscosity on the wall and the channel half width is set to be 3000. The bulk Mach number is set to be 0.8 and 1.5 to compare the results in subsonic and supersonic cases. The drag reduction (enhancement) effect was confirmed on the blowing (suction) wall. As the Mach number increases, however, the control efficiency of blowing is found to be deteriorated because of the increased density near the wall. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.

  15. Relief, nocturnal cold-air flow and air quality in Kigali, Rwanda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henninger, Sascha

    2013-04-01

    , this result is not reassuringly, because all measured residential districts in Kigali exceeded the recommendations of the WHO, too. This suggests that the inhabitants of Kigali are exposed to enormous levels of PM10 during most of their time outdoors. So PM10 levels are increasing in areas with high rates of traffic due to the exhaust of the vehicles and the stirring up of dust from the ground, but also in fact of burning wood for cooking etc. within the residential districts. Hazardous measuring trips could be detected for nighttime measurements. Because of high temperatures, high solar radiation and a non-typical missing cloud cover the urban surface could heat up extremely, which produced a cold-air flow from the ridges and the slopes down to the "Marais" at night. This cold-air flow takes away the suspended particulate matters, which tends to accumulate within the "Marais" on the bottom of the hills, the places where most residential neighborhoods could be found and agricultural fields were used. The distinctive relief caused an accumulation within small valleys. Unfortunately, these are the favourite places of living and agriculture and this tends to high indoor-air pollution.

  16. Some Effects of Air Flow on the Penetration and Distribution of Oil Sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Beardsley, E G

    1929-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effects of air flow on the characteristics of fuel sprays from fuel injection valves. Curves and photographs are presented showing the airflow throughout the chamber and the effects of the air flow on the fuel spray characteristics. It was found that the moving air had little effect on the spray penetration except with the 0.006 inch orifice. The moving air did, however, affect the oil particles on the outside of the spray cone. After spray cut-off, the air flow rapidly distributed the atomized fuel throughout the spray chamber.

  17. Imaging based optofluidic air flow meter with polymer interferometers defined by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Song, Wuzhou; Psaltis, Demetri

    2010-08-02

    We present an optofluidic chip with integrated polymer interferometers for measuring both the microfluidic air pressure and flow rate. The chip contains a microfluidic circuit and optical cavities on a polymer which was defined by soft lithography. The pressure can be read out by imaging the interference patterns of the cavities. The air flow rate was then calculated from the differential pressure across a microfluidic Venturi circuit. Air flow rate measurement in the range of 0-2mg/second was demonstrated. This device provides a simple and versatile way for in situ measuring the microscale air pressure and flow on chip.

  18. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  19. Mechanistic understanding of monosaccharide-air flow battery electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Daniel M.; Tsang, Tsz Ho; Chetty, Leticia; Aloi, Sekotilani; Liaw, Bor Yann

    Recently, an inexpensive monosaccharide-air flow battery configuration has been demonstrated to utilize a strong base and a mediator redox dye to harness electrical power from the partial oxidation of glucose. Here the mechanistic understanding of glucose oxidation in this unique glucose-air power source is further explored by acid-base titration experiments, 13C NMR, and comparison of results from chemically different redox mediators (indigo carmine vs. methyl viologen) and sugars (fructose vs. glucose) via studies using electrochemical techniques. Titration results indicate that gluconic acid is the main product of the cell reaction, as supported by evidence in the 13C NMR spectra. Using indigo carmine as the mediator dye and fructose as the energy source, an abiotic cell configuration generates a power density of 1.66 mW cm -2, which is greater than that produced from glucose under similar conditions (ca. 1.28 mW cm -2). A faster transition from fructose into the ene-diol intermediate than from glucose likely contributed to this difference in power density.

  20. Ignition of hydrogen/air mixing layer in turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect

    Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H.; Law, C.K.

    1998-03-01

    Autoignition of a scalar hydrogen/air mixing layer in homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation. An initial counterflow of unmixed nitrogen-diluted hydrogen and heated air is perturbed by two-dimensional homogeneous turbulence. The temperature of the heated air stream is chosen to be 1,100 K which is substantially higher than the crossover temperature at which the rates of the chain branching and termination reactions become equal. Three different turbulence intensities are tested in order to assess the effect of the characteristic flow time on the ignition delay. For each condition, a simulation without heat release is also performed. The ignition delay determined with and without heat release is shown to be almost identical up to the point of ignition for all of the turbulence intensities tested, and the predicted ignition delays agree well within a consistent error band. It is also observed that the ignition kernel always occurs where hydrogen is focused, and the peak concentration of HO{sub 2} is aligned well with the scalar dissipation rate. The dependence of the ignition delay on turbulence intensity is found to be nonmonotonic. For weak to moderate turbulence the ignition is facilitated by turbulence via enhanced mixing, while for stronger turbulence, whose timescale is substantially smaller than the ignition delay, the ignition is retarded due to excessive scalar dissipation, and hence diffusive loss, at the ignition location. However, for the wide range of initial turbulence fields studied, the variation in ignition delay due to the corresponding variation in turbulence intensity appears to be quite small.

  1. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  2. The existence of longitudinal vortices in the flow of air above an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, J.; Saylor, J. R.

    2009-11-01

    Many researchers have observed the formation of longitudinal vortices in boundary layers developing over heated solid surfaces. In the present work, such vortices were observed in an air boundary layer developing over a heated water surface. The existence of these vortices was documented via infrared imaging of the water surface, which showed a consistent pattern of hot and cold streaks, coinciding with the vortex position. These vortices were also visualized through smoke injected into the air-side flow. The onset position Xc and lateral vortex spacing λ were investigated for a range of wind speeds (0.1 - 1 m/s) and air/water temperature differences (26 - 42 ^oC). Plots of Xc/λ versus the Reynolds number exhibit power-law behavior similar to that of prior work on boundary layers over heated solid surfaces. However, plots of Xc/λ versus the Grashof number show significant differences from the power-law behavior observed for heated solid plates. A theory explaining the similarity and difference between the present results and those for heated solid plates is discussed which is based on differences in the thermal boundary conditions.

  3. Minimization of temperature ranges between the top and bottom of an air flow controlling device through hybrid control in a plant factory.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seung-Mi; Kwon, Sook-Youn; Lim, Jae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    To maintain the production timing, productivity, and product quality of plant factories, it is necessary to keep the growth environment uniform. A vertical multistage type of plant factory involves different levels of growing trays, which results in the problem of difference in temperature among vertically different locations. To address it, it is necessary to install air flow devices such as air flow fan and cooling/heating device at the proper locations in order to facilitate air circulation in the facility as well as develop a controlling technology for efficient operation. Accordingly, this study compares the temperature and air distribution within the space of a vertical multistage closed-type plant factory by controlling cooling/heating devices and air flow fans harmoniously by means of the specially designed testbed. The experiment results indicate that in the hybrid control of cooling and heating devices and air flow fans, the difference in temperature decreased by as much as 78.9% compared to that when only cooling and heating devices were operated; the air distribution was improved by as much as 63.4%.

  4. Minimization of Temperature Ranges between the Top and Bottom of an Air Flow Controlling Device through Hybrid Control in a Plant Factory

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    To maintain the production timing, productivity, and product quality of plant factories, it is necessary to keep the growth environment uniform. A vertical multistage type of plant factory involves different levels of growing trays, which results in the problem of difference in temperature among vertically different locations. To address it, it is necessary to install air flow devices such as air flow fan and cooling/heating device at the proper locations in order to facilitate air circulation in the facility as well as develop a controlling technology for efficient operation. Accordingly, this study compares the temperature and air distribution within the space of a vertical multistage closed-type plant factory by controlling cooling/heating devices and air flow fans harmoniously by means of the specially designed testbed. The experiment results indicate that in the hybrid control of cooling and heating devices and air flow fans, the difference in temperature decreased by as much as 78.9% compared to that when only cooling and heating devices were operated; the air distribution was improved by as much as 63.4%. PMID:25013867

  5. Time resolved measurements of vortex-induced vibrations of a positively buoyant tethered sphere in uniform water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshbal, L.; Krakovich, A.; van Hout, R.

    2012-11-01

    Vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) of a positively buoyant (light) tethered sphere in uniform flow as well as its wake characteristics were measured in a closed loop water channel. Experiments were performed at free stream velocities ranging between 0.048 and 0.22 m/s, corresponding to sphere Reynolds numbers ranging from ReD=430 to 1925. The measurements were done using high-speed sphere tracking as well as time resolved particle image velocimetry in a horizontal plane located at the sphere's center. Until the Hopf bifurcation, the sphere remained stationary and the wake was characterized by a train of hairpin vortices exhibiting near-symmetry in the vertical plane similar to stationary sphere visualization results. For our limited parameter range, the amplitude response of two different data sets (same sphere and free stream velocity but different water viscosity) collapsed better when plotted versus ReD than when plotted versus the reduced velocity, U*. The amplitude response beyond the first bifurcation displayed continuously increasing rms amplitudes in agreement with the sphere's small mass parameter (

  6. 10 CFR 431.96 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. 431.96 Section 431.96 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial... energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. (a) Scope. This section contains...

  7. Singing with reduced air sac volume causes uniform decrease in airflow and sound amplitude in the zebra finch.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Emily Megan; Goller, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Song of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) is a complex temporal sequence generated by a drastic change to the regular oscillations of the normal respiratory pattern. It is not known how respiratory functions, such as supply of air volume and gas exchange, are controlled during song. To understand the integration between respiration and song, we manipulated respiration during song by injecting inert dental medium into the air sacs. Increased respiratory rate after injections indicates that the reduction of air affected quiet respiration and that birds compensated for the reduced air volume. During song, air sac pressure, tracheal airflow and sound amplitude decreased substantially with each injection. This decrease was consistently present during each expiratory pulse of the song motif irrespective of the air volume used. Few changes to the temporal pattern of song were noted, such as the increased duration of a minibreath in one bird and the decrease in duration of a long syllable in another bird. Despite the drastic reduction in air sac pressure, airflow and sound amplitude, no increase in abdominal muscle activity was seen. This suggests that during song, birds do not compensate for the reduced physiological or acoustic parameters. Neither somatosensory nor auditory feedback mechanisms appear to effect a correction in expiratory effort to compensate for reduced air sac pressure and sound amplitude.

  8. Non-linear heat and mass transfer in a MHD Homann nanofluid flow through a porous medium with chemical reaction, heat generation and uniform inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    EL-Dabe, N. T.; Attia, H. A.; Essawy, M. A. I.; Ramadan, A. A.; Abdel-Hamid, A. H.

    2016-11-01

    The steady MHD axisymmetric flow of an incompressible viscous electrically conducting nanofluid impinging on a permeable plate is investigated with heat and mass transfer. An external uniform magnetic field as well as a uniform inflow, in the presence of either suction or injection, are applied normal to the plate. The effects of heat (generation/absorption) and chemical reaction have been accentuated. This study indicates the incorporated influence of both the thermophoresis phenomenon and the Brownian behavior. Numerical solutions for the governing non-linear momentum, energy and nanoparticle equations have been obtained. The rates of heat and mass transfer are presented and discussed.

  9. Investigation of Countercurrent Helium-Air Flows in Air-ingress Accidents for VHTRs

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiaodong; Christensen, Richard; Oh, Chang

    2013-10-03

    The primary objective of this research is to develop an extensive experimental database for the air- ingress phenomenon for the validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses. This research is intended to be a separate-effects experimental study. However, the project team will perform a careful scaling analysis prior to designing a scaled-down test facility in order to closely tie this research with the real application. As a reference design in this study, the team will use the 600 MWth gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) developed by General Atomic. In the test matrix of the experiments, researchers will vary the temperature and pressure of the helium— along with break size, location, shape, and orientation—to simulate deferent scenarios and to identify potential mitigation strategies. Under support of the Department of Energy, a high-temperature helium test facility has been designed and is currently being constructed at Ohio State University, primarily for high- temperature compact heat exchanger testing for the VHTR program. Once the facility is in operation (expected April 2009), this study will utilize high-temperature helium up to 900°C and 3 MPa for loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) depressurization and air-ingress experiments. The project team will first conduct a scaling study and then design an air-ingress test facility. The major parameter to be measured in the experiments is oxygen (or nitrogen) concentration history at various locations following a LOCA scenario. The team will use two measurement techniques: 1) oxygen (or similar type) sensors employed in the flow field, which will introduce some undesirable intrusiveness, disturbing the flow, and 2) a planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging technique, which has no physical intrusiveness to the flow but requires a transparent window or test section that the laser beam can penetrate. The team will construct two test facilities, one for high-temperature helium tests with

  10. Dynamic stochastic optimization models for air traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Avijit

    This dissertation presents dynamic stochastic optimization models for Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) that enables decisions to adapt to new information on evolving capacities of National Airspace System (NAS) resources. Uncertainty is represented by a set of capacity scenarios, each depicting a particular time-varying capacity profile of NAS resources. We use the concept of a scenario tree in which multiple scenarios are possible initially. Scenarios are eliminated as possibilities in a succession of branching points, until the specific scenario that will be realized on a particular day is known. Thus the scenario tree branching provides updated information on evolving scenarios, and allows ATFM decisions to be re-addressed and revised. First, we propose a dynamic stochastic model for a single airport ground holding problem (SAGHP) that can be used for planning Ground Delay Programs (GDPs) when there is uncertainty about future airport arrival capacities. Ground delays of non-departed flights can be revised based on updated information from scenario tree branching. The problem is formulated so that a wide range of objective functions, including non-linear delay cost functions and functions that reflect equity concerns can be optimized. Furthermore, the model improves on existing practice by ensuring efficient use of available capacity without necessarily exempting long-haul flights. Following this, we present a methodology and optimization models that can be used for decentralized decision making by individual airlines in the GDP planning process, using the solutions from the stochastic dynamic SAGHP. Airlines are allowed to perform cancellations, and re-allocate slots to remaining flights by substitutions. We also present an optimization model that can be used by the FAA, after the airlines perform cancellation and substitutions, to re-utilize vacant arrival slots that are created due to cancellations. Finally, we present three stochastic integer programming

  11. MODELING AIR FLOW DYNAMICS IN RADON MITIGATION SYSTEMS: A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper refines and extends an earlier study--relating to the design of optimal radon mitigation systems based on subslab depressurization-- that suggested that subslab air flow induced by a central suction point be treated as radial air flow through a porous bed contained betw...

  12. Use of exhaust gas as sweep flow to enhance air separation membrane performance

    DOEpatents

    Dutart, Charles H.; Choi, Cathy Y.

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system for an internal combustion engine is provided with purge gas or sweep flow on the permeate side of separation membranes in the air separation device. Exhaust gas from the engine is used as a purge gas flow, to increase oxygen flux in the separation device without increasing the nitrogen flux.

  13. Flow measurement in base cooling air passages of a rotating turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Pollack, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    The operational performance is decribed of a shaft-mounted system for measuring the air mass flow rate in the base cooling passages of a rotating turbine blade. Shaft speeds of 0 to 9000 rpm, air mass flow rates of 0.0035 to 0.039 kg/sec (0.0077 to 0.085 lbm/sec), and blade air temperatures of 300 to 385 K (80 to 233 F) were measured. Comparisons of individual rotating blade flows and corresponding stationary supply orifice flows agreed to within 10 percent.

  14. Bitburg Air Base, West Germany. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-29

    UNIT NUMBERS Air Force Environmental Technical Apple Center Scott AFB IL 62225 It. SWOt ~ t g Ws ~g FICE NAME AND ADORESS IS REPORT DATE AiU ete evc MC...forms or from automated data collections for all Air Force operated stations. For those stations observing less than 24 hours per day, and where maxi ...for any column. Two tables of daily extremes are prepared: a. Exree maxi temperature E b. Extreme minimum temperature NOTE: The following symbols are

  15. Egomotion estimation with optic flow and air velocity sensors.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Adam J; Miller, Mikel M; Quinn, Roger D; Willis, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    We develop a method that allows a flyer to estimate its own motion (egomotion), the wind velocity, ground slope, and flight height using only inputs from onboard optic flow and air velocity sensors. Our artificial algorithm demonstrates how it could be possible for flying insects to determine their absolute egomotion using their available sensors, namely their eyes and wind sensitive hairs and antennae. Although many behaviors can be performed by only knowing the direction of travel, behavioral experiments indicate that odor tracking insects are able to estimate the wind direction and control their absolute egomotion (i.e., groundspeed). The egomotion estimation method that we have developed, which we call the opto-aeronautic algorithm, is tested in a variety of wind and ground slope conditions using a video recorded flight of a moth tracking a pheromone plume. Over all test cases that we examined, the algorithm achieved a mean absolute error in height of 7% or less. Furthermore, our algorithm is suitable for the navigation of aerial vehicles in environments where signals from the Global Positioning System are unavailable.

  16. Simulation of regional-scale groundwater flow in the Azul River basin, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varni, Marcelo R.; Usunoff, Eduardo J.

    A three-dimensional modular model (MODFLOW) was used to simulate groundwater flow in the Azul River basin, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina, in order to assess the correctness of the conceptual model of the hydrogeological system. Simulated heads satisfactorily match observed heads in the regional water-table aquifer. Model results indicate that: (1) groundwater recharge is not uniform throughout the region but is best represented by three recharge rates, decreasing downgradient, similar to the distribution of soils and geomorphological characteristics; and (2) evapotranspiration rates are larger than previous estimates, which were made by using the Thornthwaite-Mather method. Evapotranspiration rates estimated by MODFLOW agree with results of independent studies of the region. Model results closely match historical surface-flow records, thereby suggesting that the model description of the aquifer-river relationship is correct. Résumé Un modèle modulaire tridimensionnel (MODFLOW) a été utilisé pour simuler les écoulements souterrains dans le bassin de la rivière Azul (Province de Buenos Aires, Argentine), dans le but d'évaluer la justesse du modèle conceptuel du système hydrogéologique. La piézométrie simulée s'ajuste de façon satisfaisante à celle observée pour l'ensemble de la nappe. Les résultats du modèle indiquent que: (1) la recharge de la nappe n'est pas uniforme sur toute la région, mais qu'elle est mieux approchée par trois valeurs différentes, décroissant vers l'aval-gradient, en suivant la même distribution que les sols et les caractéristiques géomorphologiques et (2) l'évapotranspiration est nettement plus importante que prévu initialement à partir de la méthode de Thornthwaite-Mather. Les valeurs d'évapotranspiration fournies par MODFLOW concordent bien avec les résultats d'autres études portant sur la région. Les résultats du modèle reproduisent convenablement les chroniques de débit des écoulements de surface

  17. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single Family Homes (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.; Martin, E.; Moyer, N.

    2012-10-01

    This document focuses on managing the driving forces which move air and moisture across the building envelope. While other previously published Measure Guidelines focus on elimination of air pathways, the ultimate goal of this Measure Guideline is to manage drivers which cause air flow and water vapor transport across the building envelope (and also within the home), control air infiltration, keep relative humidity (RH) within acceptable limits, avoid combustion safety problems, improve occupant comfort, and reduce house energy use.

  18. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  19. [Invention of an air forced ventilated micro-isolation cage and rack system--environment within the cages: ventilation, air flow].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, T; Yoshida, K; Okamoto, M; Tajima, M

    1993-10-01

    A forced air ventilation system for small laboratory animals was developed. The system consists of an air handling unit with air supply and exhaust fans, a rack, hard cage covers with a large diameter air inlet and an outlet, and shoe box cages. Air flow from the supply duct, to the exhaust duct and within the cage were observed. Variations in air flow among cages was minimal. The optimal air exchange rate of the cages in this system was determined to be 60 times per hour based on the results obtained in the present study. At this air exchange rate, air flow at the base of the cages had a velocity of less than 0.09m/sec, which was within the range of recommended values for humans. The observed results show that the system developed is capable of sustaining a laboratory animal microenvironment well in terms of air flow, without too much energy cost.

  20. Experimental analysis of the velocity field of the air flowing through the swirl diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszczur, M.; Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Borowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of flow of air through diffusers. Presented laboratory model is a simplification of the real system and was made in a geometric scale 1:10. Simplifying refer both to the geometry of the object and conditions of air flow. The aim of the study is to determine the actual velocity fields of air flowing out of the swirl diffuser. The results obtained for the diffuser various settings are presented. We have tested various flow rates of air. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) method was used to measure all velocity vector components. The experimental results allow to determine the actual penetration depth of the supply air into the room. This will allow for better definition of the conditions of ventilation in buildings.

  1. An experimental setup for the study of the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Joaquín; José Vega, Emilio; Castilla, Alejandro; Marcos, Alberto; María Montanero, José; Barrio, Raúl

    2012-04-01

    We present an experimental setup for studying the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber. An engine block containing the inlet manifold was placed on a test bench. A steady air stream crossed the inlet manifold and entered a glass chamber driven by a fan. A PIV system was set up around the bench to measure the in-chamber flow. An air spray gun was used as seed generator to producing sub-millimeter droplets, easily dragged by the air stream. Images of the in-flow chamber were acquired in the course of the experiments, and processed to measure the velocity field. The pressure drop driven the air current and the mass flow rate were also measured.

  2. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  3. Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Daisuke

    1998-11-01

    Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field*, Daisuke Okano, Kyushu Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, Japan. -----We have studied on guiding discharge path by weak ionized region between plasmas produced by a visible laser, that is, a YAG laser with wavelength 532nm, in an atmospheric air gap with DC non-uniform electric field using a rod-to-plate electrode. We succeeded in capturing the framing images in the temporal evolution on guiding discharge along the YAG laser light path. From the results of experiments, the region between two plasmas produced by a YAG laser can guide a discharge path, and the region between two plasmas on the laser light path is considered as well as a weak ionized one [1] produced by an excimer laser. [1]J.Sasaki, S.Kubodera, R.Ozaki and T.Uchiyama, J. Appl. Phys., 60 (1986) 3845. *This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)-no.10650295 of The Ministry of education, Science Sports and Culture in japan.

  4. Plant pneumatics: stem air flow is related to embolism - new perspectives on methods in plant hydraulics.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Luciano; Bittencourt, Paulo R L; Oliveira, Rafael S; Junior, Mauro B M; Barros, Fernanda V; Ribeiro, Rafael V; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2016-07-01

    Wood contains a large amount of air, even in functional xylem. Air embolisms in the xylem affect water transport and can determine plant growth and survival. Embolisms are usually estimated with laborious hydraulic methods, which can be prone to several artefacts. Here, we describe a new method for estimating embolisms that is based on air flow measurements of entire branches. To calculate the amount of air flowing out of the branch, a vacuum was applied to the cut bases of branches under different water potentials. We first investigated the source of air by determining whether it came from inside or outside the branch. Second, we compared embolism curves according to air flow or hydraulic measurements in 15 vessel- and tracheid-bearing species to test the hypothesis that the air flow is related to embolism. Air flow came almost exclusively from air inside the branch during the 2.5-min measurements and was strongly related to embolism. We propose a new embolism measurement method that is simple, effective, rapid and inexpensive, and that allows several measurements on the same branch, thus opening up new possibilities for studying plant hydraulics.

  5. Indoor air flow and pollutant removal in a room with desk-top ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Faulkner, D.; Fisk, W.J.; Sullivan, D.P.

    1993-04-01

    In a furnished experimental facility with three workstations separated by partitions, we studied indoor air flow patterns and tobacco smoke removal efficiency of a desk-top task ventilation system. The task ventilation system permits occupant control of the temperature, flow rate and direction of air supplied through two desk-mounted supply nozzles. In the configuration evaluated, air exited the ventilated space through a ceiling-mounted return grill. To study indoor air flow patterns, we measured the age of air at multiple indoor locations using the tracer gas step-up procedure. To study the intra-room transport of tobacco smoke particles and the efficiency of panicle removal by ventilation, a cigarette was smoked mechanically in one workstation and particle concentrations were measured at multiple indoor locations including the exhaust airstream. Test variables included the direction of air supply from the nozzles, supply nozzle area, supply flow rate and temperature, percent recirculation of chamber air, and internal heatloads. With nozzles pointed toward the occupants, 100% outside air supplied at the desk-top, and air supply rates of approximately 40 L/s per workstation, the age of air at the breathing level of ventilated workstations was approximately 30% less than the age of air that would occur throughout the test space with perfectly mixed indoor air. With smaller air supply rates and/or air supplied parallel to the edges of the desk, ages of air at breathing locations were not significantly lower than the age with perfect mixing. Indoor tobacco smoke particle concentrations at specific locations were generally within 12% of the average measured indoor concentration and concentrations of particles in the exhaust airstream were not significantly different from concentration of particles at breathing locations.

  6. 10 CFR 431.96 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... paragraphs (d) and (e) of this section will be used. Energy Efficiency Standards ... efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. 431.96 Section 431.96 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT...

  7. Cold air performance of a 12.766-centimeter-tip-diameter axial-flow cooled turbine. 2: Effect of air ejection on turbine performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, J. E.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    An air cooled version of a single-stage, axial-flow turbine was investigated to determine aerodynamic performance with and without air ejection from the stator and rotor blades surfaces to simulate the effect of cooling air discharge. Air ejection rate was varied from 0 to 10 percent of turbine mass flow for both the stator and the rotor. A primary-to-air ejection temperature ratio of about 1 was maintained.

  8. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  9. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  10. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  11. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  12. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. The resistance to air flowing from the...

  13. Effect of uniform magnetic and electric fields on microstructure and substructure characteristics of combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, A. P.; Mostovshchikov, A. V.; Pak, A. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    We have analyzed the effect of constant electric and magnetic fields on the micro- and substructure characteristics of the combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air. It has been found that the combustion of aluminum nanopowder in a magnetic field leads to the formation of single crystals of the hexagonal habitus, while the combustion in an electric field results in the formation of faceted crystallites with layered morphology. The fields noticeably affect the crystal lattice parameters of aluminum oxide and nitride (reduce the coherent scattering regions in aluminum nitride and increase such regions in aluminum γ-oxide). At the same time, the displacement of atoms relative to the equilibrium position becomes noticeably smaller for all crystal phases under the action of the fields (except for aluminum nitride in a magnetic field). These results have been explained by the orienting and stabilizing actions of the fields on the combustion products of aluminum nanopowder in air.

  14. Program and charts for determining shock tube, and expansion tunnel flow quantities for real air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program in FORTRAN 4 language was written to determine shock tube, expansion tube, and expansion tunnel flow quantities for real-air test gas. This program permits, as input data, a number of possible combinations of flow quantities generally measured during a test. The versatility of the program is enhanced by the inclusion of such effects as a standing or totally reflected shock at the secondary diaphragm, thermochemical-equilibrium flow expansion and frozen flow expansion for the expansion tube and expansion tunnel, attenuation of the flow in traversing the acceleration section of the expansion tube, real air as the acceleration gas, and the effect of wall boundary layer on the acceleration section air flow. Charts which provide a rapid estimation of expansion tube performance prior to a test are included.

  15. Using color intensity projections to visualize air flow in operating theaters with the goal of reducing infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cover, Keith S.; van Asperen, Niek; de Jong, Joost; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2013-03-01

    Infection following neurosurgery is all too common. One possible source of infection is the transportation of dust and other contaminates into the open wound by airflow within the operating theatre. While many modern operating theatres have a filtered, uniform and gentle flow of air cascading down over the operating table from a large area fan in the ceiling, many obstacles might introduce turbulence into the laminar flow including lights, equipment and personal. Schlieren imaging - which is sensitive to small disturbances in the laminar flow such as breathing and turbulence caused by air warmed by a hand at body temperature - was used to image the air flow due to activities in an operating theatre. Color intensity projections (CIPs) were employed to reduce the workload of analyzing the large amount of video data. CIPs - which has been applied to images in angiography, 4D CT, nuclear medicine and astronomy - summarizes the changes over many gray scale images in a single color image in a way which most interpreters find intuitive. CIPs uses the hue, saturation and brightness of the color image to encode the summary. Imaging in an operating theatre showed substantial disruptions to the airflow due to equipment such as the lighting. When these disruptions are combined with such minor factors as heat from the hand, reversal of the preferred airflow patterns can occur. These reversals of preferred airflow patterns have the potential to transport contaminates into the open wound. Further study is required to understand both the frequency of the reversed airflow patterns and the impact they may have on infection rates.

  16. Forced convective flow and heat transfer of upward cocurrent air-water slug flow in vertical plain and swirl tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shyy Woei; Yang, Tsun Lirng

    2009-10-15

    This experimental study comparatively examined the two-phase flow structures, pressured drops and heat transfer performances for the cocurrent air-water slug flows in the vertical tubes with and without the spiky twisted tape insert. The two-phase flow structures in the plain and swirl tubes were imaged using the computerized high frame-rate videography with the Taylor bubble velocity measured. Superficial liquid Reynolds number (Re{sub L}) and air-to-water mass flow ratio (AW), which were respectively in the ranges of 4000-10000 and 0.003-0.02 were selected as the controlling parameters to specify the flow condition and derive the heat transfer correlations. Tube-wise averaged void fraction and Taylor bubble velocity were well correlated by the modified drift flux models for both plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition. A set of selected data obtained from the plain and swirl tubes was comparatively examined to highlight the impacts of the spiky twisted tape on the air-water interfacial structure and the pressure drop and heat transfer performances. Empirical heat transfer correlations that permitted the evaluation of individual and interdependent Re{sub L} and AW impacts on heat transfer in the developed flow regions of the plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition were derived. (author)

  17. Effect of air-flow rate and turning frequency on bio-drying of dewatered sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ling; Gu, Wei-Mei; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming

    2010-12-01

    Sludge bio-drying is an approach for biomass energy utilization, in which sludge is dried by means of the heat generated by aerobic degradation of its organic substances. The study aimed at investigating the interactive influence of air-flow rate and turning frequency on water removal and biomass energy utilization. Results showed that a higher air-flow rate (0.0909m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) led to lower temperature than did the lower one (0.0455m(3)h(-1)kg(-1)) by 17.0% and 13.7% under turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate and lower turning frequency, temperature cumulation was almost similar to that with the lower air-flow rate and higher turning frequency. The doubled air-flow rate improved the total water removal ratio by 2.86% (19.5gkg(-1) initial water) and 11.5% (75.0gkg(-1) initial water) with turning per two days and four days respectively, indicating that there was no remarkable advantage for water removal with high air-flow rate, especially with high turning frequency. The heat used for evaporation was 60.6-72.6% of the total heat consumption (34,400-45,400kJ). The higher air-flow rate enhanced volatile solids (VS) degradation thus improving heat generation by 1.95% (800kJ) and 8.96% (3200kJ) with turning per two days and four days. With the higher air-flow rate, heat consumed by sensible heat of inlet air and heat utilization efficiency for evaporation was higher than the lower one. With the higher turning frequency, sensible heat of materials and heat consumed by turning was higher than lower one.

  18. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR RESIDENTIAL HVAC RETURNS

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-02-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent). Because manufacturers’ accuracy estimates for their equipment do not include many of the sources of error found in actual field measurements (and replicated in the laboratory testing in this study) it is essential for a test method that could be used to determine the actual uncertainty in this specific application. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  19. Lie group analysis for MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer over stretching sheet in presence of viscous dissipation and uniform heat source/sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metri, Prashant G.; Guariglia, Emanuel; Silvestrov, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    An analysis for the MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer towards stretching sheet is carried out via symmetry analysis. A steady two dimensional flow of an electrically conducting incompressible fluid flow over a stretching sheet. The flow is permeated by a uniform transverse magnetic field. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of ordinary differential equations by the scaling symmetries. The symmetry groups admitted by the corresponding boundary value problem are obtained by using special Lie group transformations. The scaling of group transformations is applied to the governing equations. The system remains invariant due to some relation among the parameters of the transformations. After finding two absolute invariants a third order ordinary differential equation corresponding to momentum equation and second order differential equation corresponding to energy equation are derived. The equations along with boundary conditions solved numerically. Numerical solutions of these equations are obtained by using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg scheme. Further more attention is paid to the effects of some physical parameters magnetic field (Mn), Prandtl number (Pr), Eckert number (Ec) and uniform heat source/sink, on velocity and thermal boundary layer. The results thus obtained are presented graphically and discussed.

  20. Pulsed-flow air classification for waste to energy production. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Peirce, J.J.; Vesilind, P.A.

    1983-09-30

    The development and testing of pulsed-flow air classification for waste-to-energy production are discussed. Standard designs generally permit large amounts of combustible material to escape as reject while producing a fuel that is high in metal and glass contaminants. Pulsed-flow classification is presented as a concept which can avoid both pitfalls. Each aspect of theory and laboratory testing is summarized: particle characteristics, theory of pulsed-flow classification, laboratory testing, and pulsed-flow air classification for waste-to-energy production. Conclusions from the research are summarized.

  1. Slab-Dip Variability and Trench-Parallel Flow beneath Non-Uniform Overriding Plates: Insights form 3D Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-González, J.; Billen, M. I.; Negredo, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    Forces driving plate tectonics are reasonably well known but some factors controlling the dynamics and the geometry of subduction processes are still poorly understood. The effect of the thermal state of the subducting and overriding plates on the slab dip have been systematically studied in previous works by means of 2D and 3D numerical modeling. These models showed that kinematically-driven slabs subducting under a cold overriding plate are affected by an increased hydrodynamic suction, due to the lower temperature of the mantle wedge, which leads to a lower subduction angle, and eventually to the formation of flat slab segments. In these models the subduction is achieved by imposing a constant velocity at the top of the overriding plate, which may lead to unrealistic results. Here we present the results of 3D non-Newtonian thermo-mechanical numerical models, considering a dynamically-driven self-sustained subduction, to test the influence of a non-uniform overriding plate. Variations of the thermal state of the overriding plate along the trench cause variation in the hydrodynamic suction, which lead to variations of the slab dip along strike (Fig. 1) and a significant trench-parallel flow. When the material can flow around the edges of the slab, through the addition of lateral plates, the trench parallel flow is enhanced (Fig. 2), whereas the variations on the slab dip are diminished.; Effect of a non-uniform overriding plate on slab-dip. 3D view of the 1000 C isosurface. ; Effect of a non-uniform overriding plate on trench-parallel flow. Map view of the slab at different depths and times, showing the viscosity (colormap) and the velocity (arrows).

  2. Hydraulic Resistance and Liberation of Air in Aviation Kerosene Flow Through Diaphragms at Low Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitanin, É. L.; Kitanina, E. É.; Zherebtsov, V. A.; Peganova, M. M.; Stepanov, S. G.; Bondarenko, D. A.; Morisson, D.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental investigations of the liberation of air in gravity flow of aviation fuel through a pipeline with diaphragms. Experiments were carried out in the pressure range 0.2-1.0 bar and temperature range -20 to +20°C. The TC-1 kerosene was preliminarily saturated with air at atmospheric pressure. The liberation of air after the diaphragms with three ratios of the flow area to the cross-sectional area of the pipeline has been investigated. The results of investigations of the two-phase flow in several experimental pipelines containing one or two diaphragms and other local hydraulic resistances have been generalized. The obtained approximation equations permit calculating the hydraulic resistance of the diaphragm in the two-phase flow and the mass gas content of air after the diaphragm in pipelines of complex geometry.

  3. Decentralized Control of an Unidirectional Air Traffic Flow with Flight Speed Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoichi; Takeichi, Noboru

    A decentralized control of an air traffic flow is discussed. This study aims to clarify a fundamental strategy for an unidirectional air traffic flow control considering the flight speed distribution. It is assumed that the decentralized control is made based on airborne surveillance systems. The separation control between aircraft is made by turning, and 4 types of route composition are compared; the optimum route only, the optimum route with permissible range, the optimum route with subroutes determined by relative speed of each aircraft, and the optimum route with subroutes defined according to the optimum speed of each aircraft. Through numerical simulations, it is clarified that the route composition with a permissible range makes the air traffic flow safer and more efficient. It is also shown that the route design with multiple subroutes corresponding to speed ranges and the aircraft control using route intent information can considerably improve the safety and workload of the air traffic flow.

  4. Air Vehicles Technology Integration Program (AVTIP). Delivery Order 0020: Prediction of Manufacturing Tolerances for Laminar Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    AFRL-VA-WP-TR-2005-3060 AIR VEHICLES TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION PROGRAM (AVTIP) Delivery Order 0020 : Prediction Of... Technology Integration Program (AVTIP) 5b. GRANT NUMBER Delivery Order 0020 : Prediction Of Manufacturing Tolerances For Laminar Flow 5c. PROGRAM

  5. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  6. Flow of Power-Law Liquids in a Hele-Shaw Cell Driven by Non-Uniform Electroosmotic Slip in the Case of Strong Depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyko, Evgeniy; Bercovici, Moran; Gat, Amir

    2016-11-01

    We analyze flow of a non-Newtonian fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell, subjected to spatially non-uniform electroosmotic flow. We specifically focus on power-law fluids with wall depletion properties and derive a p-Poisson equation governing the pressure field, as well as a set of linearized equations representing its asymptotic approximation for weakly non-Newtonian behavior. To investigate the effect of non-Newtonian properties on the resulting fluidic pressure and velocity, we consider several configurations in one and two dimensions, and calculate both exact and approximate solutions. We show that the asymptotic approximation is in good agreement with exact solutions even for fluids with significant non-Newtonian behavior. The asymptotic model thus enables prediction of the flow and pressure fields for non-Newtonian fluids, and may be particularly useful for the analysis and design of microfluidic systems involving electro-kinetic transport of such fluids.

  7. Bioinspired carbon nanotube fuzzy fiber hair sensor for air-flow detection.

    PubMed

    Maschmann, Matthew R; Ehlert, Gregory J; Dickinson, Benjamin T; Phillips, David M; Ray, Cody W; Reich, Greg W; Baur, Jeffery W

    2014-05-28

    Artificial hair sensors consisting of a piezoresistive carbon-nanotube-coated glass fiber embedded in a microcapillary are assembled and characterized. Individual sensors resemble a hair plug that may be integrated in a wide range of host materials. The sensors demonstrate an air-flow detection threshold of less than 1 m/s with a piezoresistive sensitivity of 1.3% per m/s air-flow change.

  8. Mixing characteristics of pulsed air-assist liquid jet into an internal subsonic cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inchul; Kang, Youngsu; Koo, Jaye

    2010-04-01

    Penetration depth, spray dispersion angle, droplet sizes in breakup processes and atomization processes are very important parameters in combustor of air-breathing engine. These processes will enhance air/fuel mixing inside the combustor. Experimental results from the pulsed air-assist liquid jet injected into a cross-flow are investigated. And experiments were conducted to a range of cross-flow velocities from 42˜136 m/s. Air is injected with 0˜300kPa, with air-assist pulsation frequency of 0˜20Hz. Pulsation frequency was modulated by solenoid valve. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer(PDPA) was utilized to quantitatively measuring droplet characteristics. High-speed CCD camera was used to obtain injected spray structure. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will offer rapid mixing and good liquid jet penetration. Air-assist makes a very fine droplet which generated mist-like spray. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will introduce additional supplementary turbulent mixing and control of penetration depth into a cross-flow field. The results show that pulsation frequency has an effect on penetration, transverse velocities and droplet sizes. The experimental data generated in these studies are used for a development of active control strategies to optimize the liquid jet penetration in subsonic cross-flow conditions and predict combustion low frequency instability.

  9. Vortex shedding induced energy harvesting from piezoelectric materials in heating, ventilation and air conditioning flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, L. A.; Cacan, M. R.; So, P. M.; Wright, P. K.

    2012-04-01

    A cantilevered piezoelectric beam is excited in a heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) flow. This excitation is amplified by the interactions between (a) an aerodynamic fin attached at the end of the piezoelectric cantilever and (b) the vortex shedding downstream from a bluff body placed in the air flow ahead of the fin/cantilever assembly. The positioning of small weights along the fin enables tuning of the energy harvester to operate at resonance for flow velocities from 2 to 5 m s-1, which are characteristic of HVAC ducts. In a 15 cm diameter air duct, power generation of 200 μW for a flow speed of 2.5 m s-1 and power generation of 3 mW for a flow speed of 5 m s-1 was achieved. These power outputs are sufficient to power a wireless sensor node for HVAC monitoring systems or other sensors for smart building technology.

  10. COMIS -- an international multizone air-flow and contaminant transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H.E.

    1998-08-01

    A number of interzonal models have been developed to calculate air flows and pollutant transport mechanisms in both single and multizone buildings. A recent development in multizone air-flow modeling, the COMIS model, has a number of capabilities that go beyond previous models, much as COMIS can be used as either a stand-alone air-flow model with input and output features or as an infiltration module for thermal building simulation programs. COMIS was designed during a 12 month workshop at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in 1988-89. In 1990, the Executive Committee of the International Energy Agency`s Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems program created a working group on multizone air-flow modeling, which continued work on COMIS. The group`s objectives were to study physical phenomena causing air flow and pollutant (e.g., moisture) transport in multizone buildings, develop numerical modules to be integrated in the previously designed multizone air flow modeling system, and evaluate the computer code. The working group supported by nine nations, officially finished in late 1997 with the release of IISiBat/COMIS 3.0, which contains the documented simulation program COMIS, the user interface IISiBat, and reports describing the evaluation exercise.

  11. Measurement of the resistivity of porous materials with an alternating air-flow method.

    PubMed

    Dragonetti, Raffaele; Ianniello, Carmine; Romano, Rosario A

    2011-02-01

    Air-flow resistivity is a main parameter governing the acoustic behavior of porous materials for sound absorption. The international standard ISO 9053 specifies two different methods to measure the air-flow resistivity, namely a steady-state air-flow method and an alternating air-flow method. The latter is realized by the measurement of the sound pressure at 2 Hz in a small rigid volume closed partially by the test sample. This cavity is excited with a known volume-velocity sound source implemented often with a motor-driven piston oscillating with prescribed area and displacement magnitude. Measurements at 2 Hz require special instrumentation and care. The authors suggest an alternating air-flow method based on the ratio of sound pressures measured at frequencies higher than 2 Hz inside two cavities coupled through a conventional loudspeaker. The basic method showed that the imaginary part of the sound pressure ratio is useful for the evaluation of the air-flow resistance. Criteria are discussed about the choice of a frequency range suitable to perform simplified calculations with respect to the basic method. These criteria depend on the sample thickness, its nonacoustic parameters, and the measurement apparatus as well. The proposed measurement method was tested successfully with various types of acoustic materials.

  12. Thermal performance evaluation of MSFC hot air collectors with various flow channel depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The test procedures used and the results obtained during the evaluation test program on the MSFC air collector with flow channel depth of 3 in., 2 in., and 1 in., under simulated conditions are presented. The MSFC hot air collector consists of a single glass cover with a nonselective coating absorber plate and uses air as the heat transfer medium. The absorber panel consists of a thin flat sheet of aluminum.

  13. Uniform, stable, and efficient planar-heterojunction perovskite solar cells by facile low-pressure chemical vapor deposition under fully open-air conditions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Paifeng; Liu, Zhaofan; Xia, Wei; Yuan, Chenchen; Cheng, Jigui; Lu, Yingwei

    2015-02-04

    Recently, hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have attracted extensive attention due to their high efficiency and simple preparing process. Herein, a facile low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) technology is first developed to fabricate PSCs, which can effectively reduce the over-rapid intercalating reaction rate and easily overcome this blocking issue during the solution process. As a result, the prepared uniform perovskite films exhibit good crystallization, strong absorption, and long carrier diffusion length. More strikingly, CH3NH3PbI3 absorbers by LPCVD demonstrate excellent moisture-resistant feature even under laser illumination and high-temperature conditions, which indicates that our proprietary method is very suitable for the future low-cost, nonvacuum production of the new generation photovoltaic devices. Finally, high efficiency of 12.73% is successfully achieved under fully open-air conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of efficient PSCs with such a high humidity above 60%.

  14. Two-stage fan. 3: Data and performance with rotor tip casing treatment, uniform and distorted inlet flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, G. D.; Hodges, T. R.; Keenan, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    A two stage fan with a 1st-stage rotor design tip speed of 1450 ft/sec, a design pressure ratio of 2.8, and corrected flow of 184.2 lbm/sec was tested with axial skewed slots in the casings over the tips of both rotors. The variable stagger stators were set in the nominal positions. Casing treatment improved stall margin by nine percentage points at 70 percent speed but decreased stall margin, efficiency, and flow by small amounts at design speed. Treatment improved first stage performance at low speed only and decreased second stage performance at all operating conditions. Casing treatment did not affect the stall line with tip radially distorted flow but improved stall margin with circumferentially distorted flow. Casing treatment increased the attenuation for both types of inlet flow distortion.

  15. Pressure-loss and flow coefficients inside a chordwise-finned, impingement, convection, and film air-cooled turbine vane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Total-pressure-loss coefficients, flow discharge coefficients, and friction factors were determined experimentally for the various area and geometry changes and flow passages within an air-cooled turbine vane. The results are compared with those of others obtained on similar configurations, both actual and large models, of vane passages. The supply and exit air pressures were controlled and varied. The investigation was conducted with essentially ambient-temperature air and without external flow of air over the vane.

  16. Thermo-Flow Structure and Epitaxial Uniformity in Large-Scale Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition Reactors with Rotating Susceptor and Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soong, Chyi-Yeou; Chyuan, Chung-Hsing; Tzong, Ruey-Yau

    1998-10-01

    The transport phenomena in large-scale metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactors with a rotating susceptor are investigated by numerical simulation of thin-film epitaxial growth of gallium arsenide. We are mainly concerned with the thermo-flow structure, its influence on epitaxial growth rate, and the means of improving epilayer flatness. The effects of susceptor rotation and thermo-flow conditions on gas flow, temperature and concentration fields are studied. The present results show the flow structure and transport characteristics in various flow regimes. A parameter map and the associated correlations of boundary curves of the flow-mode transition are proposed. It is demonstrated that the epilayer flatness can be tuned either by properly controlling the vortex strength in a rotation-dominated flow regime and/or by employing an inlet flow control technique proposed in the present work.

  17. 42 CFR 84.148 - Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class; minimum requirements. 84.148 Section 84.148 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... flow class; minimum requirements. (a) Respirators tested under this section shall be approved only...

  18. Origin and Control of the Flow Structure on Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Prescrtbed by ANSI Ski Z3S.18 AFOSR Final Repot 013108 ORIGIN AND CONTROL OF THE FLOW STRUCTURE ON UNMANNED COMBAT AIR VEHICLES AFOSR GRANT #FA9550-05...1991) described low-dimensional models for flows past a grooved channel and circular cylinders. By employing a Galerkin method, a governing partial

  19. Uniform-burning matrix burner

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, Mark S.; Anselmo, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

  20. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  1. An experimental study of geyser-like flows induced by a pressurized air pocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elayeb, I. S.; Leon, A.; Choi, Y.; Alnahit, A. O.

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies argues that the entrapment of pressurized air pockets within combined sewer systems can produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows. To verify that pressurized air pockets can effectively produce geysers, laboratory experiments were conducted. However, past experiments were conducted in relatively small-scale apparatus (i.e. maximum φ2" vertical shaft). This study conducted a set of experiments in a larger apparatus. The experimental setup consists of an upstream head tank, a downstream head tank, a horizontal pipe (46.5ft long, φ6") and a vertical pipe (10ft long, φ6"). The initial condition for the experiments is constant flow discharge through the horizontal pipe. The experiments are initiated by injecting an air pocket with pre-determined volume and pressure at the upstream end of the horizontal pipe. The air pocket propagates through the horizontal pipe until it arrives to the vertical shaft, where it is released producing a geyser-like flow. Three flow rates in the horizontal pipe and three injected air pressures were tested. The variables measured were pressure at two locations in the horizontal pipe and two locations in the vertical pipe. High resolution videos at two regions in the vertical shaft were also recorded. To gain further insights in the physics of air-water interaction, the laboratory experiments were complemented with numerical simulations conducted using a commercial 3D CFD model, previously validated with experiments.

  2. Control of turbulent boundary layer through air blowing due to external-flow resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V. I.; Boiko, A. V.; Kavun, I. N.

    2015-07-01

    The possibility to control turbulent incompressible boundary layer using air blowing through a finely perforated wall presenting part of the streamlined flat-plate surface was examined. The control was exercised via an action on the state and characteristics of the near-wall flow exerted by controlled (through variation of external-pressure-flow velocity) blowing of air through an air intake installed on the idle side of the plate. A stable reduction of the local values of skin friction coefficient along the model, reaching 50 % at the end of the perforated area, has been demonstrated. The obtained experimental and calculated data are indicative of a possibility to model the process of turbulentboundary-layer control by air blowing due to external-flow resources.

  3. Fourth Order Nonlinear Evolution Equation For Interfacial Gravity Waves In The Presence Of Air Flowing Over Water And A Basic Current Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, D. P.; Dhar, A. K.

    2015-08-01

    A fourth order nonlinear evolution equation, which is a good starting point for the study of nonlinear water waves as first pointed out by Dysthe (1979) is derived for gravity waves propagating at the interface of two superposed fluids of infinite depth in the presence of air flowing over water and a basic current shear. A stability analysis is then made for a uniform Stokes gravity wave train. Graphs are plotted for the maximum growth rate of instability and for wave number at marginal stability against wave steepness for different values of air flow velocity and basic current shears. Significant deviations are noticed from the results obtained from the third order evolution equation, which is the nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  4. Graphene Oxide Involved Air-Controlled Electrospray for Uniform, Fast, Instantly Dry, and Binder-Free Electrode Fabrication.

    PubMed

    Fei, Ling; Yoo, Sang Ha; Villamayor, Rachel Ann R; Williams, Brian P; Gong, Seon Young; Park, Sunchan; Shin, Kyusoon; Joo, Yong Lak

    2017-03-22

    We report a facile air-controlled electrospray method to directly deposit binder-free active materials/graphene oxide (GO) onto current collectors. This method is inspired from an electrospinning process, and possesses all the advantages that electrospinning has such as low cost, easy scaling up, and simultaneous solvent evaporation during the spraying process. Moreover, the spray slurry is only a simple mixture of active materials and GO suspension in water, no binder polymer, organic solvent, and conductive carbon required. In our research, high-capacity Si nanoparticles (Si NP, 70-100 nm) and SiO microparticles (SiO MP, 3-10 μm) were selected to demonstrate the capability of this method to accommodate particles with different sizes. Their mixture with GO was sprayed onto a collector and then thermally annealed in an inert gas to obtain Si NP or SiO MP/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) binder-free electrodes. We are also able to directly deposit fairly large electrode sheets (e.g., 12 × 21 in.) upon the application requirement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the simplest approach to produce Si-related materials/RGO layered structures directly on current collector with controllable area and loading. Si and SiO MP/RGO are evaluated in both half and full lithium cells, showing good electrochemical performance. Prelithiation is also studied and gives a high first cycle Coulombic efficiency. In addition to Si-related materials, other materials with different shapes and sizes (e.g., MoO3 nanobelts, Sn/carbon nanofibers, and commercial sulfur particles) can also be sprayed. Beyond the preparation of battery electrodes, this approach can also be applied for other types of electrode preparation such as that of a supercapacitor, fuel cell, and solar cell.

  5. Thin-Film Air-Mass-Flow Sensor of Improved Design Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gustave C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny P.

    2003-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center have developed a new air-mass-flow sensor to solve the problems of existing mass flow sensor designs. NASA's design consists of thin-film resistors in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement. The resistors are fabricated on a thin, constant-thickness airfoil to minimize disturbance to the airflow being measured. The following photograph shows one of NASA s prototype sensors. In comparison to other air-mass-flow sensor designs, NASA s thin-film sensor is much more robust than hot wires, causes less airflow disturbance than pitot tubes, is more accurate than vane anemometers, and is much simpler to operate than thermocouple rakes. NASA s thin-film air-mass-flow sensor works by converting the temperature difference seen at each leg of the thin-film Wheatstone bridge into a mass-flow rate. The following figure shows a schematic of this sensor with air flowing around it. The sensor operates as follows: current is applied to the bridge, which increases its temperature. If there is no flow, all the arms are heated equally, the bridge remains in balance, and there is no signal. If there is flow, the air passing over the upstream legs of the bridge reduces the temperature of the upstream legs and that leads to reduced electrical resistance for those legs. After the air has picked up heat from the upstream legs, it continues and passes over the downstream legs of the bridge. The heated air raises the temperature of these legs, increasing their electrical resistance. The resistance difference between the upstream and downstream legs unbalances the bridge, causing a voltage difference that can be amplified and calibrated to the airflow rate. Separate sensors mounted on the airfoil measure the temperature of the airflow, which is used to complete the calculation for the mass of air passing by the sensor. A current application for air-mass-flow sensors is as part of the intake system for an internal combustion engine. A mass-flow sensor is

  6. Bifurcations of a creeping air-water flow in a conical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Adnan; Brøns, Morten; Herrada, Miguel A.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2016-10-01

    This numerical study describes the eddy emergence and transformations in a slow steady axisymmetric air-water flow, driven by a rotating top disk in a vertical conical container. As water height Hw and cone half-angle β vary, numerous flow metamorphoses occur. They are investigated for β =30°, 45°, and 60°. For small Hw, the air flow is multi-cellular with clockwise meridional circulation near the disk. The air flow becomes one cellular as Hw exceeds a threshold depending on β . For all β , the water flow has an unbounded number of eddies whose size and strength diminish as the cone apex is approached. As the water level becomes close to the disk, the outmost water eddy with clockwise meridional circulation expands, reaches the interface, and induces a thin layer with anticlockwise circulation in the air. Then this layer expands and occupies the entire air domain. The physical reasons for the flow transformations are provided. The results are of fundamental interest and can be relevant for aerial bioreactors.

  7. Air Ejector Pumping Enhancement Through Pulsing Primary Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    CFD ) analysis show that pulsing the primary jet flow, an active metho of flow control, improved ejector performance. The physics of this improvement...without an entrance shape was found to be still reasonably efficient. Both experiments and Computer Fluid Dynamics( CFD ) analysis show that pulsing the...other shapes. A tube without an entrance shape was found to be still reasonably efficient. Both experiments and Computer Fluid Dynamics( CFD ) analysis

  8. The Nature of Air Flow About the Tail of an Airplane in a Spin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scudder, N F; Miller, M P

    1932-01-01

    Air flow about the fuselage and empennage during a high-angle-of-attack spin was made visible in flight by means of titanium-tetrachloride smoke and was photographed with a motion-picture camera. The angular relation of the direction of the smoke streamer to the airplane axes was computed and compared with the angular direction of the motion in space derived from instrument measurement of the spin of the airplane for a nearly identical mass distribution. The results showed that the fin and upper part of the rudder were almost completely surrounded by dead air, which would render them inoperative; that the flow around the lower portion of the rudder and the fuselage was nonturbulent; and that air flowing past the cockpit in a high-angle-of-attack spin could not subsequently flow around control surfaces.

  9. Propagation of density disturbances in air-water flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassos, G. P.

    1969-01-01

    Study investigated the behavior of density waves propagating vertically in an atmospheric pressure air-water system using a technique based on the correlation between density change and electric resistivity. This information is of interest to industries working with heat transfer systems and fluid power and control systems.

  10. High quality and uniformity GaN grown on 150 mm Si substrate using in-situ NH3 pulse flow cleaning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Panfeng; Yang, Xuelin; Feng, Yuxia; Cheng, Jianpeng; Zhang, Jie; Hu, Anqi; Song, Chunyan; Wu, Shan; Shen, Jianfei; Tang, Jun; Tao, Chun; Pan, Yaobo; Wang, Xinqiang; Shen, Bo

    2017-04-01

    By using in-situ NH3 pulse flow cleaning method, we have achieved the repeated growth of high quality and uniformity GaN and AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) on 150 mm Si substrate. The two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility is 2200 cm2/Vs with an electron density of 7.3 × 1012 cm-2. The sheet resistance is 305 ± 4 Ω/□ with ±1.3% variation. The achievement is attributed to the fact that this method can significantly remove the Al, Ga, etc. metal droplets coating on the post growth flow flange and reactor wall which are difficult to clean by normal bake process under H2 ambient.

  11. Radiation effects on the flow of Powell-Eyring fluid past an unsteady inclined stretching sheet with non-uniform heat source/sink.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Asad, Sadia; Mustafa, Meraj; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the unsteady flow of Powell-Eyring fluid past an inclined stretching sheet. Unsteadiness in the flow is due to the time-dependence of the stretching velocity and wall temperature. Mathematical analysis is performed in the presence of thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink. The relevant boundary layer equations are reduced into self-similar forms by suitable transformations. The analytic solutions are constructed in a series form by homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence interval of the auxiliary parameter is obtained. Graphical results displaying the influence of interesting parameters are given. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed.

  12. Radiation Effects on the Flow of Powell-Eyring Fluid Past an Unsteady Inclined Stretching Sheet with Non-Uniform Heat Source/Sink

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Asad, Sadia; Mustafa, Meraj; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the unsteady flow of Powell-Eyring fluid past an inclined stretching sheet. Unsteadiness in the flow is due to the time-dependence of the stretching velocity and wall temperature. Mathematical analysis is performed in the presence of thermal radiation and non-uniform heat source/sink. The relevant boundary layer equations are reduced into self-similar forms by suitable transformations. The analytic solutions are constructed in a series form by homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence interval of the auxiliary parameter is obtained. Graphical results displaying the influence of interesting parameters are given. Numerical values of skin friction coefficient and local Nusselt number are computed and analyzed. PMID:25072515

  13. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Air Flow, Heat Transfer and Thermal Comfort in Buildings with Different Heating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanskis, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of temperature, humidity and air flow velocity is performed in 5 experimental buildings with the inner size of 3×3×3 m3 located in Riga, Latvia. The buildings are equipped with different heating systems, such as an air-air heat pump, air-water heat pump, capillary heating mat on the ceiling and electric heater. Numerical simulation of air flow and heat transfer by convection, conduction and radiation is carried out using OpenFOAM software and compared with experimental data. Results are analysed regarding the temperature and air flow distribution as well as thermal comfort.

  14. Numerical analysis of flow non-uniformity in the hot gas manifold of the Space Shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thoenes, J.; Robertson, S. J.; Ratliff, A. W.; Anderson, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Three-dimensional viscous flow in a conceptual hot gas manifold (HGM) for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (SSME HPFTP) was numerically analyzed. A finite difference scheme was used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. The exact geometry of the SSME HGM was modeled using boundary fitted curvilinear coordinates and the General Interpolants Method (GIM) code. Slight compressibility of the subsonic flow was modeled using a linearized equation of state with artificial compressibility. A time relaxation method was used to obtain a steady state solution. The feasibility and potential usefulness of computational methods in assisting the design of SSME components which involves the flow of fluids within complex geometrical shapes is demonstrated.

  15. An open-access modeled passenger flow matrix for the global air network in 2010.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuojie; Wu, Xiao; Garcia, Andres J; Fik, Timothy J; Tatem, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    The expanding global air network provides rapid and wide-reaching connections accelerating both domestic and international travel. To understand human movement patterns on the network and their socioeconomic, environmental and epidemiological implications, information on passenger flow is required. However, comprehensive data on global passenger flow remain difficult and expensive to obtain, prompting researchers to rely on scheduled flight seat capacity data or simple models of flow. This study describes the construction of an open-access modeled passenger flow matrix for all airports with a host city-population of more than 100,000 and within two transfers of air travel from various publicly available air travel datasets. Data on network characteristics, city population, and local area GDP amongst others are utilized as covariates in a spatial interaction framework to predict the air transportation flows between airports. Training datasets based on information from various transportation organizations in the United States, Canada and the European Union were assembled. A log-linear model controlling the random effects on origin, destination and the airport hierarchy was then built to predict passenger flows on the network, and compared to the results produced using previously published models. Validation analyses showed that the model presented here produced improved predictive power and accuracy compared to previously published models, yielding the highest successful prediction rate at the global scale. Based on this model, passenger flows between 1,491 airports on 644,406 unique routes were estimated in the prediction dataset. The airport node characteristics and estimated passenger flows are freely available as part of the Vector-Borne Disease Airline Importation Risk (VBD-Air) project at: www.vbd-air.com/data.

  16. An Open-Access Modeled Passenger Flow Matrix for the Global Air Network in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhuojie; Wu, Xiao; Garcia, Andres J.; Fik, Timothy J.; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The expanding global air network provides rapid and wide-reaching connections accelerating both domestic and international travel. To understand human movement patterns on the network and their socioeconomic, environmental and epidemiological implications, information on passenger flow is required. However, comprehensive data on global passenger flow remain difficult and expensive to obtain, prompting researchers to rely on scheduled flight seat capacity data or simple models of flow. This study describes the construction of an open-access modeled passenger flow matrix for all airports with a host city-population of more than 100,000 and within two transfers of air travel from various publicly available air travel datasets. Data on network characteristics, city population, and local area GDP amongst others are utilized as covariates in a spatial interaction framework to predict the air transportation flows between airports. Training datasets based on information from various transportation organizations in the United States, Canada and the European Union were assembled. A log-linear model controlling the random effects on origin, destination and the airport hierarchy was then built to predict passenger flows on the network, and compared to the results produced using previously published models. Validation analyses showed that the model presented here produced improved predictive power and accuracy compared to previously published models, yielding the highest successful prediction rate at the global scale. Based on this model, passenger flows between 1,491 airports on 644,406 unique routes were estimated in the prediction dataset. The airport node characteristics and estimated passenger flows are freely available as part of the Vector-Borne Disease Airline Importation Risk (VBD-Air) project at: www.vbd-air.com/data. PMID:23691194

  17. On the stability of an accelerated coupled air-water flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Ierley, Glenn; Melville, W. Kendall

    2000-11-01

    We present the results of a study of the stability of the interface of an accelerated coupled air-water flow. We develop a general solution of the two-layer, laminar parallel flow driven by a pressure gradient in the air. The velocity profiles in both fluids are given by analytical functions for pressure gradients that can be represented as power series in time. The stability of the coupled flow is then examined by solving the two layer Orr-Sommerfeld equations allowing for linear displacements of the interface. In the simple case of the linearly accelerating flow, we find that the flow is always stable for an air velocity below 0.6 m s-1. Instabilities first appear in the form of surface waves with a phase speed of approximately 30 cm s-1 and a wavenumber of O(1) cm-1. In cases when the flow in the air is turbulent, and represented by a continuously differentiable analytical approximation of the log-linear mean velocity profile, we find that the flow is rapidly unstable to surface waves. Comparisons are made with the previous computations of Kawai (1979) and Wheless and Csanady (1993), and with the measurements of Veron and Melville (2000).

  18. Convective heat transfer by oscillating flow in an enclosure with non-uniform spatial bottom wall temperature profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raheimpour Angeneh, Saeid; Aktas, Murat Kadri

    2016-11-01

    Effects of the acoustic streaming motion on convective heat transfer in a rectangular shallow enclosure with sinusoidal spatial bottom wall temperature distribution are investigated numerically. Acoustic excitation is generated by the periodic vibration of left wall. The top wall of the enclosure is isothermal while the side walls are adiabatic. A FORTRAN code is developed to predict the oscillatory and mean flow fields by considering the compressible form of the Navier -Stokes equation and solved by flux-corrected transport algorithm. In order to validate the results of the simulations, a case with an unheated bottom wall is considered and compared with the existing literature. Applying the sinusoidal temperature profile to the bottom wall provides axial and transverse temperature gradients. In return these gradients strongly affect the flow pattern in the enclosure. Heat transfer depends on the flow structure considerably. This is the first time that the effect of nonzero mean vibrational flow on thermal convection from a surface with sinusoidal temperature profile investigated. Results of this study may lead up to design of new heat removal applications.

  19. Effect of air on water capillary flow in silica nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, Harvey; Walther, Jens; Oyarzua, Elton

    2013-11-01

    Capillarity is a classical topic in fluid dynamics. The fundamental relationship between capillarity and surface tension is solidly established. Nevertheless, capillarity is an active research area especially as the miniaturization of devices is reaching the molecular scale. Currently, with the fabrication of microsystems integrated by nanochannels, a thorough understanding of the transport of fluids in nanoconfinement is required for a successful operation of the functional parts of such devices. In this work, Molecular Dynamics simulations are conducted to study the spontaneous imbibition of water in sub 10 nm silica channels. The capillary filling speed is computed in channels subjected to different air pressures. In order to describe the interactions between the species, an effective force field is developed, which is calibrated by reproducing the water contact angle. The results show that the capillary filling speed qualitatively follows the classical Washburn model, however, quantitatively it is lower than expected. Furthermore, it is observed that the deviations increase as air pressure is higher. We attribute the deviations to amounts of air trapped at the silica-water interface which leads to changes in the dynamics contact angle of the water meniscus.

  20. Application of a 2D air flow model to soil vapor extraction and bioventing case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mohr, D.H.; Merz, P.H.

    1995-05-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is frequently the technology of choice to clean up hydrocarbon contamination in unsaturated soil. A two-dimensional air flow model provides a practical tool to evaluate pilot test data and estimate remediation rates for soil vapor extraction systems. The model predictions of soil vacuum versus distance are statistically compared to pilot test data for 65 SVE wells at 44 sites. For 17 of 21 sites where there was asphalt paving, the best agreement was obtained for boundary conditions with no barrier to air flow at the surface. The model predictions of air flow rates and stream lines around the well allow an estimate of the gasoline removal rates by both evaporation and bioremediation. The model can be used to quickly estimate the effective radius of influence, defined here as the maximum distance from the well where there is enough air flow to remove the contaminant present within the allowable time. The effective radius of influence is smaller than a radius of influence defined by soil vacuum only. For a case study, in situ bioremediation rates were estimated using the air flow model and compared to independent estimates based on changes in soil temperature. These estimate bioremediation rates for heavy fuel oil ranged from 2.5 to 11 mg oil degraded per kg soil per day, in agreement with values in the literature.

  1. Experimental and numerical investigations on reliability of air barrier on oil containment in flowing water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinshu; Xu, Zhenfeng; Xu, Song; Xie, Sensen; Wu, Haoxiao; Yang, Zhenbo; Liu, Xueqiang

    2015-06-15

    Air barriers have been recently developed and employed as a new type of oil containment boom. This paper presents systematic investigations on the reliability of air barriers on oil containments with the involvement of flowing water, which represents the commonly-seen shearing current in reality, by using both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Both the numerical and experimental investigations are carried out in a model scale. In the investigations, a submerged pipe with apertures is installed near the bottom of a tank to generate the air bubbles forming the air curtain; and, the shearing water flow is introduced by a narrow inlet near the mean free surface. The effects of the aperture configurations (including the size and the spacing of the aperture) and the location of the pipe on the effectiveness of the air barrier on preventing oil spreading are discussed in details with consideration of different air discharges and velocities of the flowing water. The research outcome provides a foundation for evaluating and/or improve the reliability of a air barrier on preventing spilled oil from further spreading.

  2. The Marriage of Spectroscopy and Dynamics: Chirped-Pulse Fourier-Transform Mm-Wave Cp-Ft Spectroscopy in Pulsed Uniform Supersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Oldham, James M.; Suits, Arthur G.; Park, G. Barratt; Field, Robert W.

    2012-06-01

    A new experimental scheme is presented that combines two powerful emerging technologies: chirped-pulse Fourier-transform mm-Wave spectroscopy and pulsed uniform supersonic flows. It promises a nearly universal detection method that can deliver quantitative isomer, conformer, and vibrational level specific detection, characterization of unstable reaction products and intermediates, and perform unique spectroscopic, kinetics, and dynamics measurements. Chirped-pulse Fourier-transform microwave (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy, pioneered by Pate and coworkers, allows rapid acquisition of broadband microwave spectrum through advancements in waveform generation and oscilloscope technology. This revolutionary approach has successfully been adapted to higher frequencies by the Field group at MIT. Our new apparatus will exploit amplified chirped pulses in the range of 26-40 GHz, in combination with a pulsed uniform supersonic flow from a Laval nozzle. This nozzle source, pioneered by Rowe, Sims, and Smith for low temperature kinetics studies, produces thermalized reactants at high densities and low temperatures perfectly suitable for reaction dynamics experiments studied using the CP-mmW approach. This combination of techniques shall enhance the thousand-fold improvement in data acquisition rate achieved in the CP method by a further 2-3 orders of magnitude. A pulsed flow alleviates the challenges of continuous uniform flow, e.g. large gas loads and reactant consumption rates. In contrast to other pulsed Laval systems currently in use, we will use a fast piezo valve and small chambers to achieve the desired pressures while minimizing the gas load, so that a 10 Hz repetition rate can be achieved with one turbomolecular pump. The proposed technique will be suitable for many diverse fields, including fundamental studies in spectroscopy and reaction dynamics, reaction kinetics, combustion, atmospheric chemistry, and astrochemistry. We expect a significant advancement in the ability to

  3. Spatially Uniform Thin-Film Formation of Polymeric Organic Semiconductors on Lyophobic Gate Insulator Surfaces by Self-Assisted Flow-Coating.

    PubMed

    Bulgarevich, Kirill; Sakamoto, Kenji; Minari, Takeo; Yasuda, Takeshi; Miki, Kazushi

    2017-02-22

    Surface hydrophobization by self-assembled monolayer formation is a powerful technique for improving the performance of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). However, organic thin-film formation on such a surface by solution processing often fails due to the repellent property of the surface against common organic solvents. Here, a scalable unidirectional coating technique that can solve this problem, named self-assisted flow-coating, is reported. Producing a specially designed lyophobic-lyophilic pattern on the lyophobic surface enables organic thin-film formation in the lyophobic surface areas by flow-coating. To demonstrate the usefulness of this technique, OFET arrays with an active layer of poly(2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophene-2-yl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophene) are fabricated. The ideal transfer curves without hysteresis behavior are obtained for all OFETs. The average field-effect hole mobility in the saturation regime is 0.273 and 0.221 cm(2)·V(-1)·s(-1) for the OFETs with the channels parallel and perpendicular to the flow-coating direction, respectively, and the device-to-device variation is less than 3% for each OFET set. Very small device-to-device variation is also obtained for the on-state current, threshold voltage, and subthreshold swing. These results indicate that the self-assisted flow-coating is a promising coating technique to form spatially uniform thin films of polymeric organic semiconductors on lyophobic gate insulator surfaces.

  4. Numerical simulation and analysis of the internal flow in a Francis turbine with air admission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, A.; Luo, X. W.; Ji, B.

    2015-01-01

    In case of hydro turbines operated at part-load condition, vortex ropes usually occur in the draft tube, and consequently generate violent pressure fluctuation. This unsteady flow phenomenon is believed harmful to hydropower stations. This paper mainly treats the internal flow simulation in the draft tube of a Francis turbine. In order to alleviate the pressure fluctuation induced by the vortex rope, air admission from the main shaft center is applied, and the water-air two phase flow in the entire flow passage of a model turbine is simulated based on a homogeneous flow assumption and SST k-ω turbulence model. It is noted that the numerical simulation reasonably predicts the pressure fluctuations in the draft tube, which agrees fairly well with experimental data. The analysis based on the vorticity transport equation shows that the vortex dilation plays a major role in the vortex evolution with air admission in the turbine draft tube, and there is large value of vortex dilation along the vortex rope. The results show that the aeration with suitable air volume fraction can depress the vortical flow, and alleviate the pressure fluctuation in the draft tube.

  5. Flow characteristics of an inclined air-curtain range hood in a draft

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Jia-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The inclined air-curtain technology was applied to build an inclined air-curtain range hood. A draft generator was applied to affect the inclined air-curtain range hood in three directions: lateral (θ=0°), oblique (θ=45°), and front (θ=90°). The three suction flow rates provided by the inclined air-curtain range hood were 10.1, 10.9, and 12.6 m3/min. The laser-assisted flow visualization technique and the tracer-gas test method were used to investigate the performance of the range hood under the influence of a draft. The results show that the inclined air-curtain range hood has a strong ability to resist the negative effect of a front draft until the draft velocity is greater than 0.5 m/s. The oblique draft affected the containment ability of the inclined air-curtain range hood when the draft velocity was larger than 0.3 m/s. When the lateral draft effect was applied, the capture efficiency of the inclined air-curtain range hood decreased quickly in the draft velocity from 0.2 m/s to 0.3 m/s. However, the capture efficiencies of the inclined air-curtain range hood under the influence of the front draft were higher than those under the influence of the oblique draft from 0.3 m/s to 0.5 m/s. PMID:25810445

  6. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  7. The effect of different inlet conditions of air in a rectangular channel on convection heat transfer: Turbulence flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtbas, Irfan

    2008-10-15

    Theoretical and empirical correlations for duct flow are given for hydrodynamically and thermally developed flow in most of previous studies. However, this is commonly not a realistic inlet configuration for heat exchanger, in which coolant flow generally turns through a serpentine shaped passage before entering heat sinks. Accordingly, an experimental investigation was carried out to determine average heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated rectangular channel with 45 and 90 turned flow, and with wall mounted a baffle. The channel was heated through bottom side with the baffle. In present work, a detailed study was conducted for three different height of entry channel (named as the ratio of the height of entry channel to the height of test section (anti H{sub c}=h{sub c}/H)) by varying Reynolds number (Re{sub Dh}). Another variable parameter was the ratio of the baffle height to the channel height (anti H{sub b}=h{sub b}/H). Only one baffle was attached on the bottom (heating) surface. The experimental procedure was validated by comparing the data for the straight channel with no baffle. Reynolds number (Re{sub Dh}) was varied from 2800 to 30,000, so the flow was considered as only turbulent regime. All experiments were conduced with air accordingly; Prandtl number (Pr) was approximately fixed at 0.71. The results showed that average Nusselt number for {theta}=45 and {theta}=90 were 9% and 30% higher, respectively, than that of the straight channel without baffle. Likewise, the pressure drop increased up to 4.4 to 5.3 times compare to the straight channel. (author)

  8. Pressure Drop Across Woven Screens Under Uniform and Nonuniform Flow Conditions. [flow characteristics of water through Dutch twill and square weave fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludewig, M.; Omori, S.; Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the experimental pressure drop and velocity data for water flowing through woven screens. The types of materials used are dutch twill and square weave fabrics. Pressure drop measures were made at four locations in a rectangular channel. The data are presented as change in pressure compared with the average entry velocity and the numerical relationship is determined by dividing the volumetric flow rate by the screen area open to flow. The equations of continuity and momentum are presented. A computer program listing an extension of a theoretical model and data from that computer program are included.

  9. Implications of Air Ingress Induced by Density-Difference Driven Stratified Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Richard Schultz; David Petti; C. P. Liou

    2008-06-01

    One of the design basis accidents for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a high temperature gas-cooled reactor, is air ingress subsequent to a pipe break. Following a postulated double-ended guillotine break in the hot duct, and the subsequent depressurization to nearly reactor cavity pressure levels, air present in the reactor cavity will enter the reactor vessel via density-gradient-driven-stratified flow. Because of the significantly higher molecular weight and lower initial temperature of the reactor cavity air-helium mixture, in contrast to the helium in the reactor vessel, the air-helium mixture in the cavity always has a larger density than the helium discharging from the reactor vessel through the break into the reactor cavity. In the later stages of the helium blowdown, the momentum of the helium flow decreases sufficiently for the heavier cavity air-helium mixture to intrude into the reactor vessel lower plenum through the lower portion of the break. Once it has entered, the heavier gas will pool at the bottom of the lower plenum. From there it will move upwards into the core via diffusion and density-gradient effects that stem from heating the air-helium mixture and from the pressure differences between the reactor cavity and the reactor vessel. This scenario (considering density-gradient-driven stratified flow) is considerably different from the heretofore commonly used scenario that attributes movement of air into the reactor vessel and from thence to the core region via diffusion. When density-gradient-driven stratified flow is considered as a contributing phenomena for air ingress into the reactor vessel, the following factors contribute to a much earlier natural circulation-phase in the reactor vessel: (a) density-gradient-driven stratified flow is a much more rapid mechanism (at least one order of magnitude) for moving air into the reactor vessel lower plenum than diffusion, and consequently, (b) the diffusion dominated phase begins with a

  10. Experimental study on heat transfer performance of aluminium foam parallel-flow condenser in air conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Wan, Z. M.; Chang, H. W.; Wang, Y. D.

    2017-01-01

    Open cell aluminium foam was used in parallel-flow condenser in air conditioner, and two condensers with different pore density were fabricated. The experimental study was conducted on the heat transfer performance and temperature distribution. The experimental results show that both of the heat transfer load and air pressure drop increase with the increase of pore density, air velocity is 2.5m/s, the heat transfer capacities of the condenser with 10PPI and 8PPI are 4.786kw and 3.344kW respectively. Along the flow direction of refrigerant, the outlet temperatures of refrigerant drop with the rise of air velocity when the inlet temperature is constant. The outlet temperature of the refrigerant decreases with the increase of pore density.

  11. Fluid flow and heat transfer in an air-to-water double-pipe heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Gorji-Bandpy, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports experimental and numerical investigations on flow and heat transfer in an air-to-water double-pipe heat exchanger. The working fluids are air and water. To achieve fully developed conditions, the heat exchanger was built with additional lengths before and after the test section. The inner and outer tube was made from copper and Plexiglas, respectively. The experiments are conducted in the range of air flow Reynolds number for various cases with different water flow rate and water inlet temperature. Correlations for the Nusselt number and friction factor are presented according to experimental data. Also the commercial code ANSYS 15 is used for numerical simulation. Results show that the Nusselt number is an increasing function of Reynolds number and Prandtl number which are calculated at bulk temperature.

  12. Experimental study on corrugated cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Minsung; Baik, Young-Jin; Park, Seong-Ryong; Ra, Ho-Sang; Lim, Hyug

    2010-11-15

    Experimental study on cross-flow air-cooled plate heat exchangers (PHEs) was performed. The two prototype PHEs were manufactured in a stack of single-wave plates and double-wave plates in parallel. Cooling air flows through the PHEs in a crosswise direction against internal cooling water. The heat exchanger aims to substitute open-loop cooling towers with closed-loop water circulation, which guarantees cleanliness and compactness. In this study, the prototype PHEs were tested in a laboratory scale experiments. From the tests, double-wave PHE shows approximately 50% enhanced heat transfer performance compared to single-wave PHE. However, double-wave PHE costs 30% additional pressure drop. For commercialization, a wide channel design for air flow would be essential for reliable performance. (author)

  13. Improving the performance of a compression ignition engine by directing flow of inlet air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemper, Carlton

    1946-01-01

    The object of this report is to present the results of tests performed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics to determine the effect on engine performance of directing the flow of the inlet air to a 5-inch by 7-inch cylinder, solid injection, compression ignition engine, After a few preliminary tests, comparative runs were made at a speed of 1500 r.p.m. with and without directed air flow. It was found that directing the flow of the inlet air toward the fuel injection valve gave steadier engine operation, and an appreciable increase in power, and decreased fuel consumption. The results indicate the possibility of improving the performance of a given type of combustion chamber without changing its shape and with no change in valve timing. They would also seem to prove that directional turbulence, set up before the inlet valve of a four-stroke cycle engine, continues in the engine cylinder throughout the compression stroke.

  14. The ground vortex flow field associated with a jet in a cross flow impinging on a ground plane for uniform and annular turbulent axisymmetric jets. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavage, William M.; Kuhlman, John M.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted of the impingement of a single circular jet on a ground plane in a cross flow. This geometry is a simplified model of the interaction of propulsive jet exhaust from a V/STOL aircraft with the ground in forward flight. Jets were oriented normal to the cross flow and ground plane. Jet size, cross flow-to-jet velocity ratio, ground plane-to-jet board spacing, and jet exit turbulence level and mean velocity profile shape were all varied to determine their effects on the size of the ground vortex interaction region which forms on the ground plane, using smoke injection into the jet. Three component laser Doppler velocimeter measurements were made with a commercial three color system for the case of a uniform jet with exit spacing equal to 5.5 diameters and cross flow-to-jet velocity ratio equal to 0.11. The flow visualization data compared well for equivalent runs of the same nondimensional jet exit spacing and the same velocity ratio for different diameter nozzles, except at very low velocity ratios and for the larger nozzle, where tunnel blockage became significant. Variation of observed ground vortex size with cross flow-to-jet velocity ratio was consistent with previous studies. Observed effects of jet size and ground plane-to-jet board spacing were relatively small. Jet exit turbulence level effects were also small. However, an annular jet with a low velocity central core was found to have a significantly smaller ground vortex than an equivalent uniform jet at the same values of cross flow-to-jet velocity ratio and jet exit-to-ground plane spacing. This may suggest a means of altering ground vortex behavior somewhat, and points out the importance of proper simulation of jet exit velocity conditions. LV data indicated unsteady turbulence levels in the ground vortex in excess of 70 percent.

  15. Numerical simulation of endocytosis: Viscous flow driven by membranes with non-uniformly distributed curvature-inducing molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowengrub, John; Allard, Jun; Aland, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    The formation of membrane vesicles from a larger membrane that occurs during endocytosis and other cell processes is typically orchestrated by curvature-inducing molecules attached to the membrane. Recent reports demonstrate that vesicles can form de novo in a few milliseconds. Membrane dynamics at these scales are strongly influenced by hydrodynamic interactions. To study this problem, we develop new diffuse interface models for the dynamics of inextensible vesicles in a viscous fluid with stiff, curvature-inducing molecules. The model couples the Navier-Stokes equations with membrane-induced bending forces that incorporate concentration-dependent bending stiffness coefficients and spontaneous curvatures, with equations for molecule transport and for a Lagrange multiplier to enforce local inextensibility. Two forms of surface transport equations are considered: Fickian surface diffusion and Cahn-Hilliard surface dynamics, with the former being more appropriate for small molecules and the latter being better for large molecules. The system is solved using adaptive finite element methods in 3D axisymmetric geometries. The results demonstrate that hydrodynamics can indeed enable the rapid formation of a small vesicle attached to the membrane by a narrow neck. When the Fickian model is used, this is a transient state with the steady state being a flat membrane with a uniformly distributed molecule concentration due to diffusion. When the Cahn-Hilliard model is used, molecule concentration gradients are sustained, the neck stabilizes and the system evolves to a steady-state with a small, compact vesicle attached to the membrane. By varying the membrane coverage of molecules in the Cahn-Hilliard model, we find that there is a critical (smallest) neck radius and a critical (fastest) budding time. These critical points are associated with changes in the vesicle morphology from spherical to mushroom-like as the molecule coverage on the membrane is increased.

  16. Study on Flows inside and outside an Air Diffuser for Membrane Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Fumihiro; Furuno, Shinsuke; Hayashi, Kosuke; Sampei, Tomoyuki; Tomiyama, Akio

    Effects of the total gas flow rate on the water level in a diffuser pipe for a membrane bioreactor, the gas flow rate from each aeration hole and the bubble diameter are investigated. The diffuser has evenly positioned five aeration holes on the top and a larger hole on the bottom for introducing the liquid into the pipe. The gas flow rate from each aeration hole is measured by capturing generated bubbles. The water level and gas velocity inside the diffuser are computed by processing video images. The bubble diameter is calculated using the gas flow rate and the bubble generation frequency measured from the video images. The conclusions obtained are as follows: (1) the gas flow rate from the aeration hole depends on the water level inside the diffuser and becomes constant for all the holes as the total gas flow rate increases since the high total gas flow rate make the water level uniform, which results in a constant gas pressure in the diffuser, (2) the onset of slugging in the diffuser is well correlated in terms of the local gas velocity and the Mishima-Ishii's slugging model, (3) the increase in the total gas flow rate decreases the water level, causing suppression of the onset of slugging, (4) the diameter of aeration hole strongly affects the gas flow rate from each aeration hole and water level, and (5) the Davidson-Schuler correlation gives reasonable estimations of the bubble diameter, provided that the influence of slugging is not significant.

  17. Propulsive jet simulation with air and helium in launcher wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    The influence on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher model due to the presence of an under-expanded jet is investigated experimentally. Wake flow phenomena represent a significant source of uncertainties in the design of a space launcher. Especially critical are dynamic loads on the structure. The wake flow is investigated at supersonic (M=2.9 ) and hypersonic (M=5.9 ) flow regimes. The jet flow is simulated using air and helium as working gas. Due to the lower molar mass of helium, higher jet velocities are realized, and therefore, velocity ratios similar to space launchers can be simulated. The degree of under-expansion of the jet is moderate for the supersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 5 ) and high for the hypersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 90 ). The flow topology is described by Schlieren visualization and mean-pressure measurements. Unsteady pressure measurements are performed to describe the dynamic wake flow. The influences of the under-expanded jet and different jet velocities are reported. On the base fluctuations at a Strouhal number, around St_D ≈ 0.25 dominate for supersonic free-stream flows. With air jet, a fluctuation-level increase on the base is observed for Strouhal numbers above St_D ≈ 0.75 in hypersonic flow regime. With helium jet, distinct peaks at higher frequencies are found. This is attributed to the interactions of wake flow and jet.

  18. Rapid Induction of Therapeutic Hypothermia Using Transnasal High Flow Dry Air.

    PubMed

    Chava, Raghuram; Zviman, Menekhem; Raghavan, Madhavan Srinivas; Halperin, Henry; Maqbool, Farhan; Geocadin, Romergryko; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Kolandaivelu, Aravindan; Rosen, Benjamin A; Tandri, Harikrishna

    2017-03-01

    Early induction of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is recommended in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (CA); however, currently no reliable methods exist to initiate cooling. We investigated the effect of high flow transnasal dry air on brain and body temperatures in adult porcine animals. Adult porcine animals (n = 23) under general anesthesia were subject to high flow of transnasal dry air. Mouth was kept open to create a unidirectional airflow, in through the nostrils and out through the mouth. Brain, internal jugular, and aortic temperatures were recorded. The effect of varying airflow rate and the air humidity (0% or 100%) on the temperature profiles were recorded. The degree of brain cooling was measured as the differential temperature from baseline. A 10-minute exposure of high flow dry air caused rapid cooling of brain and gradual cooling of the jugular and the aortic temperatures in all animals. The degree of brain cooling was flow dependent and significantly higher at higher airflow rates (0.8°C ± 0.3°C, 1.03°C ± 0.6°C, and 1.3°C ± 0.7°C for 20, 40, and 80 L, respectively, p < 0.05 for all comparisons). Air temperature had minimal effect on the brain cooling over 10 minutes with similar decrease in temperature at 4°C and 30°C. At a constant flow rate (40 LPM) and temperature, the degree of cooling over 10 minutes during dry air exposure was significantly higher compared to humid air (100% saturation) (1.22°C ± 0.35°C vs. 0.21°C ± 0.12°C, p < 0.001). High flow transnasal dry air causes flow dependent cooling of the brain and the core temperatures in intubated porcine animals. The mechanism of cooling appears to be evaporation of nasal mucus as cooling is mitigated by humidifying the air. This mechanism may be exploited to initiate TH in CA.

  19. Effects of saline-water flow rate and air speed on leakage current in RTV coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Hackam, R.

    1995-10-01

    Room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber is increasingly being used to coat porcelain and glass insulators in order to improve their electrical performance in the presence of pollution and moisture. A study of the dependence of leakage current, pulse current count and total charge flowing across the surface of RTV on the flow rate of the saline water and on the compressed air pressure used to create the salt-fog is reported. The fog was directed at the insulating rods either from one or two sides. The RTV was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane polymer, a filler of alumina trihydrate (ATH), a polymerization catalyst and fumed silica reinforcer, all dispersed in 1,1,1-trichloroethane solvent. The saline water flow rate was varied in the range 0.4 to 2.0 l/min. The compressed air pressure at the input of the fog nozzles was varied from 0.20 to 0.63 MPa. The air speed at the surface of the insulating rods was found to depend linearly on the air pressure measured at the inlet to the nozzles and varied in the range 3 to 14 km/hr. The leakage current increased with increasing flow rate and increasing air speed. This is attributed to the increased loss of hydrophobicity with a larger quantity of saline fog and a larger impact velocities of fog droplets interacting with the surface of the RTV coating.

  20. Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine Employing Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    The effects of air flow on fuel spray and flame formation in a high-speed compression-ignition engine have been investigated by means of the NACA combustion apparatus. The process was studied by examining high-speed motion pictures taken at the rate of 2,200 frames a second. The combustion chamber was of the flat-disk type used in previous experiments with this apparatus. The air flow was produced by a rectangular displacer mounted on top of the engine piston. Three fuel-injection nozzles were tested: a 0.020-inch single-orifice nozzle, a 6-orifice nozzle, and a slit nozzle. The air velocity within the combustion chamber was estimated to reach a value of 425 feet a second. The results show that in no case was the form of the fuel spray completely destroyed by the air jet although in some cases the direction of the spray was changed and the spray envelope was carried away by the moving air. The distribution of the fuel in the combustion chamber of a compression-ignition engine can be regulated to some extent by the design of the combustion chamber, by the design of the fuel-injection nozzle, and by the use of air flow.

  1. Responses of the Rat Olfactory Epithelium to Retronasal Air Flow

    PubMed Central

    Scott, John W.; Acevedo, Humberto P.; Sherrill, Lisa; Phan, Maggie

    2008-01-01

    Responses of the rat olfactory epithelium were assessed with the electroolfactogram while odorants were presented to the external nares with an artificial sniff or to the internal nares by positive pressure. A series of seven odorants that varied from very polar, hydrophilic odorants to very non-polar, hydrophobic odorants were used. While the polar odorants activated the dorsal olfactory epithelium when presented by the external nares (orthonasal presentation), they were not effective when forced through the nasal cavity from the internal nares (retronasal presentation). However, the non-polar odorants were effective in both stimulus modes. These results were independent of stimulus concentration or of humidity of the carrier air. Similar results were obtained with multiunit recording from olfactory bulb. These results help to explain why human investigations often report differences in the sensation or ability to discriminate odorants presented orthonasally vs. retronasally. The results also strongly support the importance of odorant sorption in normal olfactory processes. PMID:17215498

  2. Numerical Study on a Detailed Air Flows in an Urban Area Using a CFD model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, detailed air flows in an urban area were analyzed using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. For this model buildings used as the surface boundary in the model were constructed using Los Angeles Region Imagery Acquisition Consortium 2 Geographic Information System (LARIAC2 GIS) data. Three target areas centered at the cross roads of Broadway & 7th St., Olive & 12th St., and Wilshire blvd. & Carondelet, Los Angeles, California were considered. The size of each numerical domain is 400 m, 400 m, and 200 m in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions, respectively. The grid sizes in the x‒, y‒, and z‒directions are 2 m, 2 m, and 2 m, respectively. Based on the inflow wind data provided by California Air Resources Board, detailed flow characteristics were investigated for each target area. Descending air flow were developed at the leeward area of tall building and ascending air current were occurred on the windward area of tall building. Vertically rotating vortices were formed in spaces between buildings, so-called, street canyons and horizontally rotating vortices appeared near cross roads. When flows came into narrow street canyon from wide street canyon, channeling effects appeared and flow speed increased for satisfying mass continuity.

  3. An experimental investigation of gas jets in confined swirling air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongia, H.; Ahmed, S. A.; Mongia, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of jets in confined swirling flows which is of importance to designers of turbine combustors and solid fuel ramjets used to power missiles fired from cannons were examined. The fluid dynamics of gas jets of different densities in confined swirling flows were investigated. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are made with a one color, one component laser velocimeter operating in the forward scatter mode. It is shown that jets in confined flow with large area ratio are highly dissipative which results in both air and helium/air jet centerline velocity decays. For air jets, the jet like behavior in the tube center disappears at about 20 diameters downstream of the jet exit. This phenomenon is independent of the initial jet velocity. The turbulence field at this point also decays to that of the background swirling flow. A jet like behavior in the tube center is noticed even at 40 diameters for the helium/air jets. The subsequent flow and turbulence field depend highly on the initial jet velocity. The jets are fully turbulent, and the cause of this difference in behavior is attributed to the combined action swirl and density difference. This observation can have significant impact on the design of turbine combustors and solid fuel ramjets subject to spin.

  4. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P.; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG. PMID:23935422

  5. Flow structures and particle deposition patterns in double-bifurcation airway models. Part 1. Air flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comer, J. K.; Kleinstreuer, C.; Zhang, Z.

    2001-05-01

    The understanding and quantitative assessment of air flow fields and local micron-particle wall concentrations in tracheobronchial airways are very important for estimating the health risks of inhaled particulate pollutants, developing algebraic transfer functions of global lung deposition models used in dose-response analyses, and/or determining proper drug-aerosol delivery to target sites in the lung. In this paper (Part 1) the theory, model geometries, and air flow results are provided. In a companion paper (Part 2, Comer et al. 2001), the history of particle deposition patterns and comparisons with measured data sets are reported. Decoupling of the naturally dilute particle suspension makes it feasible to present the results in two parts.

  6. Tomographic optical emission spectroscopy of a high enthalpy air plasma flow.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Tobias; Löhle, Stefan; Fasoulas, Stefanos; Andrianatos, Andreas

    2016-12-20

    A method is presented allowing for locally resolved emission spectroscopy using a tomographic setup. The approach presented in this work is applied to a high enthalpy air plasma flow. The resulting data sets allow for a three-dimensional (3D) representation of the non-symmetric flow field using photographs of the test section and 2D representation of the spectrally resolved radiance of the flow field. An analysis of different exposure times shows that transient fluctuations of the plasma can result in substantial asymmetry that approaches symmetry only for longer exposure times when the temporal averaging of the emission is significant. The spectral data allows the analysis of species selective excitation and emission. A non-equilibrium between atomic and molecular excitation temperatures is concluded for the investigated air plasma flow field. The spatial distribution of atomic electronic excitation temperatures are close to rotational symmetry while molecular rotational and vibrational temperatures exhibit asymmetric behavior.

  7. On the vortex dynamics of flow past a sphere at Re = 3700 in a uniformly stratified fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongsiripinyo, Karu; Pal, Anikesh; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2017-02-01

    Vortex dynamics in the flow past a sphere in a linearly stratified environment is investigated numerically. Simulations are carried out for a flow with Reynolds number of Re = 3700 and for several Froude numbers ranging from the unstratified case with F r =∞ to a highly stratified wake with Fr = 0.025. Isosurface of Q criterion is used to elucidate stratification effects on vortical structures near the sphere and in the wake. Vortical structures in the unstratified case are tube-like and show no preference in their orientation. Moderate stratification alters the orientation of vortical structures to streamwise preference but does not change their tube-like form. In strongly stratified cases with F r ≤0.5 , there is strong suppression in vertical motion so that isotropically oriented vortex tubes of approximately circular cross section are replaced by flattened vortex tubes that are horizontally oriented. At Fr = 0.025, pancake eddies and surfboard-like inclined structures emerge in the near wake and have a regular streamwise spacing that is associated with the frequency of vortex shedding from the sphere. Enstrophy variance budget is used to analyze the vortical structure dynamics. Increasing stratification generally decreases enstrophy variance for F r ≥O (1 ) cases. The flow enters a new regime in strongly stratified cases with F r ≤ 0.25: increasing the stratification increases enstrophy variance, especially near the body. Stratification distorts the cross-sectional distribution of enstrophy variance from a circular isotropic shape in the unstratified wake into different shapes, depending on Fr and distance from the sphere, that include (1) elliptical distribution, (2) twin peaks suggestive of two-dimensional vortex shedding, and (3) triple-layer distribution where a relatively low enstrophy layer is sandwiched between the upper and the lower layers with high enstrophy. In the near wake, vortex stretching by fluctuating and mean strain are both

  8. Slip-length measurement of confined air flow using dynamic atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Maali, Abdelhamid; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-08-01

    We present an experimental measurement of the slip length of air flow close to solid surfaces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) in dynamic mode. The air was confined between a glass surface and a spherical glass particle glued to an AFM cantilever. The Knudsen number was varied continuously over three decades by varying the distance between the two surfaces. Our results show that the effect of confining the air is purely dissipative. The data are described by an isothermal Maxwell slip-boundary condition, and the measured slip-length value was 118 nm .

  9. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Flow Properties of Supersonic Helium-Air Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.; Veltin, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Heated high speed subsonic and supersonic jets operating on- or off-design are a source of noise that is not yet fully understood. Helium-air mixtures can be used in the correct ratio to simulate the total temperature ratio of heated air jets and hence have the potential to provide inexpensive and reliable flow and acoustic measurements. This study presents a combination of flow measurements of helium-air high speed jets and numerical simulations of similar helium-air mixture and heated air jets. Jets issuing from axisymmetric convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles are investigated, and the results show very strong similarity with heated air jet measurements found in the literature. This demonstrates the validity of simulating heated high speed jets with helium-air in the laboratory, together with the excellent agreement obtained in the presented data between the numerical predictions and the experiments. The very close match between the numerical and experimental data also validates the frozen chemistry model used in the numerical simulation.

  10. The effect of a small isolated roughness element on the forces on a sphere in uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A. K.; McKeon, B. J.

    2011-10-01

    The effect of an isolated roughness element on the forces on a sphere was examined for a Reynolds number range of 5 × 104 < Re < 5 × 105 using a novel sting-mounted sphere apparatus. The roughness element was a circular cylinder, and its width and height was varied to be 1, 2, and 4% of the sphere diameter. At subcritical Re, a lateral force is produced in the direction of the roughness, while at supercritical Re, the force is in the opposite direction. This is caused by asymmetric boundary layer separation, as shown using particle image velocimetry. At supercritical Re, a roughness element that is only 1% the sphere diameter produces a lift to drag ratio of almost one. It was found that the isolated roughness element has the largest effect on the lateral forces when it is located between a streamwise angle of about 40° and 80°. In addition to the mean forces, the unsteady forces were also measured. It was found that at subcritical Re, vortex shedding is aligned to the plane of the roughness element. In addition, the probability distribution of the forces was nearly Gaussian for subcritical Re, but for supercritical Re, the skewness and kurtosis deviate from Gaussian, and the details are dependent on the roughness size. A simple model developed for the vortical structure formed behind the roughness element can be extended to explain aspects of nominally smooth sphere flow, in which external disturbances perturb the sphere boundary layer in an azimuthally local sense. These results also form the basis of comparison for an investigation into the effectiveness of a moving isolated roughness element for manipulating sphere flow.

  11. Unique, clean-air, continuous-flow, high-stagnation-temperature facility for supersonic combustion research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, R. H.; Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.; Scott, J. E., Jr.; Whitehurst, R. B., III; Segal, C.

    1988-01-01

    Accurate, spatially-resolved measurements can be conducted of a model supersonic combustor in a clean air/continuous flow supersonic combustion facility whose long run times will allow not only the point-by-point mapping of flow field variables with laser diagnostics but facilitate the simulation of steady-state combustor conditions. The facility will provide a Mach 2 freestream with static pressures in the 1 to 1/6 atm range, and stagnation temperatures of up to 2000 K.

  12. Air-side flow and heat transfer in compact heat exchangers: A discussion of enhancement mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, A.M.; Shah, R.K.

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of air flows in complex heat exchanger passages is reviewed with a focus on the heat transfer effects of boundary-layer development, turbulence, spanwise and streamwise vortices, and wake management. Each of these flow features is discussed for the plain, wavy, and interrupted passages found in contemporary compact heat exchanger designs. Results from the literature are used to help explain the role of these mechanisms in heat transfer enhancement strategies.

  13. Compressed air energy storage system two-phase flow experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kumamaru, Hiroshige; Ohtsu, Iwao; Murata, Hideo

    1996-08-01

    A water/CO{sub 2}-combination test facility, having a vertical shaft height of {approximately} 25 m and a shaft inner diameter of 0.2 m, has been constructed in simulating a water/air full-size CAES system, having a shaft height of {approximately} 1,000 m and an inner diameter of {approximately} 3 m. Totally fifteen experiments have been performed in this test facility. In an experiment of CO{sub 2} high-concentration ({approximately} 0.4 MPa) and medium water injection velocity ({approximately} 0.5 m/s), the shaft void fraction during gas charging to a lower reservoir (i.e. during water injection to the shaft) became highest in all the experiment. This experiment may correspond to the severest situation in a full-size CAES system; however, the blowout did not occur in this experiment. In an experiment of CO{sub 2} high-concentration({approximately} 0.4 MPa) and very-high injection velocity ({approximately} 2.5 m/s), after gas charging stopped, CO{sub 2}-supersaturated water, remained in the shaft, formed bubbles vigorously, and thereafter the blowout occurred. However, the injection velocity of {approximately} 2.5 m/s corresponds to a velocity of {approximately} 100 m/s in a full-size CAES system and may be unreal.

  14. Viscous computations of cold air/air flow around scramjet nozzle afterbody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baysal, Oktay; Engelund, Walter C.

    1991-01-01

    The flow field in and around the nozzle afterbody section of a hypersonic vehicle was computationally simulated. The compressible, Reynolds averaged, Navier Stokes equations were solved by an implicit, finite volume, characteristic based method. The computational grids were adapted to the flow as the solutions were developing in order to improve the accuracy. The exhaust gases were assumed to be cold. The computational results were obtained for the two dimensional longitudinal plane located at the half span of the internal portion of the nozzle for over expanded and under expanded conditions. Another set of results were obtained, where the three dimensional simulations were performed for a half span nozzle. The surface pressures were successfully compared with the data obtained from the wind tunnel tests. The results help in understanding this complex flow field and, in turn, should help the design of the nozzle afterbody section.

  15. Cloud-based large-scale air traffic flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    The ever-increasing traffic demand makes the efficient use of airspace an imperative mission, and this paper presents an effort in response to this call. Firstly, a new aggregate model, called Link Transmission Model (LTM), is proposed, which models the nationwide traffic as a network of flight routes identified by origin-destination pairs. The traversal time of a flight route is assumed to be the mode of distribution of historical flight records, and the mode is estimated by using Kernel Density Estimation. As this simplification abstracts away physical trajectory details, the complexity of modeling is drastically decreased, resulting in efficient traffic forecasting. The predicative capability of LTM is validated against recorded traffic data. Secondly, a nationwide traffic flow optimization problem with airport and en route capacity constraints is formulated based on LTM. The optimization problem aims at alleviating traffic congestions with minimal global delays. This problem is intractable due to millions of variables. A dual decomposition method is applied to decompose the large-scale problem such that the subproblems are solvable. However, the whole problem is still computational expensive to solve since each subproblem is an smaller integer programming problem that pursues integer solutions. Solving an integer programing problem is known to be far more time-consuming than solving its linear relaxation. In addition, sequential execution on a standalone computer leads to linear runtime increase when the problem size increases. To address the computational efficiency problem, a parallel computing framework is designed which accommodates concurrent executions via multithreading programming. The multithreaded version is compared with its monolithic version to show decreased runtime. Finally, an open-source cloud computing framework, Hadoop MapReduce, is employed for better scalability and reliability. This framework is an "off-the-shelf" parallel computing model

  16. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  17. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... micronaire reading. In determining in terms of micronaire readings, the fiber fineness and maturity, in... cotton in terms of micronaire reading on the curvilinear scale adopted in September 1950 by...

  18. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... micronaire reading. In determining in terms of micronaire readings, the fiber fineness and maturity, in... cotton in terms of micronaire reading on the curvilinear scale adopted in September 1950 by...

  19. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... micronaire reading. In determining in terms of micronaire readings, the fiber fineness and maturity, in... cotton in terms of micronaire reading on the curvilinear scale adopted in September 1950 by...

  20. Effect of laminar air flow and clean-room dress on contamination rates of intravenous admixtures.

    PubMed

    Brier, K L; Latiolais, C J; Schneider, P J; Moore, T D; Buesching, W J; Wentworth, B C

    1981-08-01

    The effect of laminar air flow conditions and clean-room dress on the microbial contamination rates of intravenous admixtures was investigated. Intravenous admixtures were prepared by one investigator using aseptic technique under four environmental conditions: laminar air flow conditions with clean-room dress; laminar air flow without clean-room dress; clean table top with clean-room dress; and clean table top without clean-room dress. In each environmental condition, 350 admixtures were compounded. Negative-control samples (n = 150) were also tested, as were 10 positive-control samples. Samples were tested in each of two growth media and incubated at 35 degrees C for 14 days or until growth occurred. The incidence of contamination of admixtures compounded in laminar air flow conditions was significantly less than the contamination of those compounded on a clean table top (p less than 0.05) regardless of the operator's dress. The incidence of contamination of admixtures compounded while wearing clean-room dress was not significantly different from those prepared while not wearing clean-room dress regardless of the environment in which the admixture was prepared. The overall low level of contamination [0.79% (11/1400)] was inconclusive regarding the effect of dress on the incidence of contamination when admixtures were prepared under LAF conditions. It is concluded that, when one adheres to aseptic technique, the environment in which admixtures are compounded is the most important variable affecting the microbial contamination rate.

  1. Turbine Air-Flow Test Rig CFD Results for Test Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Josh

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the Turbine Air-Flow Test (TAFT) rig computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results for test matrix. The topics include: 1) TAFT Background; 2) Design Point CFD; 3) TAFT Test Plan and Test Matrix; and 4) CFD of Test Points. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  2. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.

  3. High enthalpy, hypervelocity flows of air and argon in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, A. J; Stalker, R. J.; Paull, A.

    1991-01-01

    An expansion tube with a free piston driver has been used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon and air at flow velocities in excess of 9 km/s. Irregular test flow unsteadiness has limited the performance of previous expansion tubes, and it has been found that this can be avoided by attention to the interaction between the test gas accelerating expansion and the contact surface in the primary shock tube. Test section measurements of pitot pressure, static pressure and flat plate heat transfer are reported. An approximate analytical theory has been developed for predicting the velocities achieved in the unsteady expansion of the ionizing or dissociating test gas.

  4. A Novel Biobjective Risk-Based Model for Stochastic Air Traffic Network Flow Optimization Problem

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kaiquan; Jia, Yaoguang; Zhu, Yanbo; Xiao, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Network-wide air traffic flow management (ATFM) is an effective way to alleviate demand-capacity imbalances globally and thereafter reduce airspace congestion and flight delays. The conventional ATFM models assume the capacities of airports or airspace sectors are all predetermined. However, the capacity uncertainties due to the dynamics of convective weather may make the deterministic ATFM measures impractical. This paper investigates the stochastic air traffic network flow optimization (SATNFO) problem, which is formulated as a weighted biobjective 0-1 integer programming model. In order to evaluate the effect of capacity uncertainties on ATFM, the operational risk is modeled via probabilistic risk assessment and introduced as an extra objective in SATNFO problem. Computation experiments using real-world air traffic network data associated with simulated weather data show that presented model has far less constraints compared to stochastic model with nonanticipative constraints, which means our proposed model reduces the computation complexity. PMID:26180842

  5. Measured pressure distributions of large-angle cones in hypersonic flows of tetrafluoromethane, air, and helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. A.; Hunt, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of surface pressure distributions on a family of blunt and sharp large angle cones was made in hypersonic flows of helium, air, and tetrafluoromethane. The effective isentropic exponents of these flows were 1.67, 1.40, and 1.12. Thus, the effect of large shock density ratios such as might be encountered during planetary entry because of real-gas effects could be studied by comparing results in tetrafluoromethane with those in air and helium. It was found that shock density ratio had a large effect on both shock shape and pressure distribution. The differences in pressure distribution indicate that for atmospheric flight at high speed where real-gas effects produce large shock density ratios, large-angle cone vehicles can be expected to experience different trim angles of attack, drag coefficient, and lift-drag ratios than those for ground tests in air wind tunnels.

  6. A Novel Biobjective Risk-Based Model for Stochastic Air Traffic Network Flow Optimization Problem.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kaiquan; Jia, Yaoguang; Zhu, Yanbo; Xiao, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    Network-wide air traffic flow management (ATFM) is an effective way to alleviate demand-capacity imbalances globally and thereafter reduce airspace congestion and flight delays. The conventional ATFM models assume the capacities of airports or airspace sectors are all predetermined. However, the capacity uncertainties due to the dynamics of convective weather may make the deterministic ATFM measures impractical. This paper investigates the stochastic air traffic network flow optimization (SATNFO) problem, which is formulated as a weighted biobjective 0-1 integer programming model. In order to evaluate the effect of capacity uncertainties on ATFM, the operational risk is modeled via probabilistic risk assessment and introduced as an extra objective in SATNFO problem. Computation experiments using real-world air traffic network data associated with simulated weather data show that presented model has far less constraints compared to stochastic model with nonanticipative constraints, which means our proposed model reduces the computation complexity.

  7. Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-04-28

    A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

  8. Air-water two-phase flow in a 3-mm horizontal tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ing Youn; Chang, Yu-Juei; Wang, Chi-Chung

    2000-01-01

    Two-phase flow pattern and friction characteristics for air-water flow in a 3.17 mm smooth tube are reported in this study. The range of air-water mass flux is between 50 to 700 kg/m2.s and gas quality is between 0.0001 to 0.9. The pressure drop data are analyzed using the concept of the two-phase frictional multipliers and the Martinelli parameter. Experimental data show that the two-phase friction multipliers are strongly related to the flow pattern. Taitel & Dukler flow regime map fails to predict the stratified flow pattern data. Their transition lines between annular-wavy and annular-intermittent give fair agreement with data. A modified correlation from Klimenko and Fyodoros criterion is able to distinguish the annular and stratified data. For two-phase flow in small tubes, the effect of surface tension force should be significantly present as compared to gravitational force. The tested empirical frictional correlations couldn't predict the pressure drop in small tubes for various working fluids. It is suggested to correlate a reliable frictional multiplier for small horizontal tubes from a large database of various working fluids, and to develop the flow pattern dependent models for the prediction of two-phase pressure drop in small tubes. .

  9. The measurement error analysis when a pitot probe is used in supersonic air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, XiWen; Hao, PengFei; Yao, ZhaoHui

    2011-04-01

    Pitot probes enable a simple and convenient way of measuring mean velocity in air flow. The contrastive numerical simulation between free supersonic airflow and pitot tube at different positions in supersonic air flow was performed using Navier-Stokes equations, the ENN scheme with time-dependent boundary conditions (TDBC) and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The physical experimental results including pitot pressure and shadowgraph are also presented. Numerical results coincide with the experimental data. The flow characteristics of the pitot probe on the supersonic flow structure show that the measurement gives actually the total pressure behind the detached shock wave by using the pitot probe to measure the total pressure. The measurement result of the distribution of the total pressure can still represent the real free jet flow. The similar features of the intersection and reflection of shock waves can be identified. The difference between the measurement results and the actual ones is smaller than 10%. When the pitot probe is used to measure the region of L=0-4 D, the measurement is smaller than the real one due to the increase of the shock wave strength. The difference becomes larger where the waves intersect. If the pitot probe is put at L=8 D-10 D, where the flow changes from supersonic to subsonic, the addition of the pitot probe turns the original supersonic flow region subsonic and causes bigger measurement errors.

  10. Simulation of 3-D Nonequilibrium Seeded Air Flow in the NASA-Ames MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D nonequilibrium seeded air flow in the NASA-Ames experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed us ing a 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime: The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. The algorithm has been extended in the present study to account for nonequilibrium seeded air flows. The electrical conductivity of the flow is determined using the program of Park. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the seeded flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Measurement of temperature and velocity fields in a convective fluid flow in air using schlieren images.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, A; Moreno-Hernández, D; Guerrero-Viramontes, J A

    2013-08-01

    A convective fluid flow in air could be regulated if the physical process were better understood. Temperature and velocity measurements are required in order to obtain a proper characterization of a convective fluid flow. In this study, we show that a classical schlieren system can be used for simultaneous measurements of temperature and velocity in a convective fluid flow in air. The schlieren technique allows measurement of the average fluid temperature and velocity integrated in the direction of the test beam. Therefore, in our experiments we considered surfaces with isothermal conditions. Temperature measurements are made by relating the intensity level of each pixel in a schlieren image to the corresponding knife-edge position measured at the exit focal plane of the schlieren system. The same schlieren images were also used to measure the velocity of the fluid flow by using optical flow techniques. The algorithm implemented analyzes motion between consecutive schlieren frames to obtain a tracked sequence and finally velocity fields. The proposed technique was applied to measure the temperature and velocity fields in natural convection of air due to unconfined and confined heated rectangular plates.

  12. Laser filamentation induced air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-04-22

    We numerically simulated the air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber induced by femtosecond laser filaments for different chopping rates. A two dimensional model was employed, where the laser filaments were treated as a heat flux source. The simulated patterns of flow fields and maximum velocity of updraft compare well with the experimental results for the chopping rates of 1, 5, 15 and 150 Hz. A quantitative inconsistency appears between simulated and experimental maximum velocity of updraft for 1 kHz repetition rate although a similar pattern of flow field is obtained, and the possible reasons were analyzed. Based on the present simulated results, the experimental observation of more water condensation/snow at higher chopping rate can be explained. These results indicate that the specific way of laser filament heating plays a significant role in the laser-induced motion of air flow, and at the same time, our previous conclusion of air flow having an important effect on water condensation/snow is confirmed.

  13. Formation of thermal flow fields and chemical transport in air and water by atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Tetsuji; Iwafuchi, Yutaka; Morfill, Gregor E.; Sato, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is a potential tool for medical purposes, e.g. disinfection/sterilization. In order for it to be effective and functional, it is crucial to understand the transport mechanism of chemically reactive species in air as well as in liquid. An atmospheric plasma discharge was produced between a platinum pin electrode and the surface of water. The thermal flow field of a cold atmospheric plasma as well as its chemical components was measured. A gas flow with a velocity of around 15 m s-1 to the water's surface was shown to be induced by the discharge. This air flow induced a circulating flow in the water from the discharge point at the water's surface because of friction. It was also demonstrated that the chemical components generated in air dissolved in water and the properties of the water changed. The reactive species were believed to be distributed mainly by convective transport in water, because the variation in the pH profile indicated by a methyl red solution resembled the induced flow pattern.

  14. Product Branching in the Low Temperature Reaction of CN with Propyne by Chirped-Pulse Microwave Spectroscopy in a Uniform Supersonic Flow.

    PubMed

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Ariyasingha, Nuwandi; Zack, Lindsay N; Sims, Ian R; Field, Robert W; Suits, Arthur G

    2015-05-07

    A new chirped-pulse/uniform flow (CPUF) spectrometer has been developed and used to determine product branching in a multichannel reaction. With this technique, bimolecular reactions can be initiated in a cold, thermalized, high-density molecular flow and a broadband microwave spectrum acquired for all products with rotational transitions within a chosen frequency window. In this work, the CN + CH3CCH reaction was found to yield HCN via a direct H-abstraction reaction, whereas indirect addition/elimination pathways to HCCCN, CH3CCCN, and CH2CCHCN were also probed. From these observations, quantitative branching ratios were established for all products as 12(5)%, 66(4)%, 22(6)%, and 0(8)% into HCN, HCCCN, CH3CCCN, and CH2CCHCN, respectively. The values are consistent with statistical calculations based on new ab initio results at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. This work is a demonstration of CPUF as a powerful technique for quantitatively determining the branching into polyatomic products from a bimolecular reaction.

  15. Effects of red blood cell deformability on the non-uniform distribution of platelet-sized particles in blood flow through microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugihara-Seki, Masako; Sakamoto, Keisuke; Itano, Tomoaki; Seki, Junji

    2016-11-01

    In blood flow through microvessels, platelets are known to have enhanced concentrations near the vessel wall, which is the so-called "near-wall excess (NWE)". This phenomenon is considered to be caused by the interaction with red blood cells (RBCs); since RBCs have a tendency to approach the vessel centerline due to their highly deformability, they may push away less deformable platelets toward the near-wall region. In order to examine this proposition by in vitro experiments, we measured the distribution of platelet-sized particles mixed in intact RBC or hardened RBC suspensions flowing through microchannels of 50 μm x 50 μm cross-section. Hardened RBCs were prepared by immersing human RBCs in glutaraldehayde solution of 40 - 4000 ppm. Fluorescent observations were conducted with the use of a confocal laser scanning microscope system with a high-speed video camera. It was found that platelet-sized particles exhibited high concentrations near the channel wall, i.e., NWE, when they were mixed in intact RBC suspensions. By contrast, the particles mixed in hardened RBC suspensions showed weak NWE or uniform distribution over the channel cross-section, indicating that deformability of RBCs plays an essential role in the NWE phenomenon.

  16. Interaction of levitating microdroplets with moist air flow in the contact line region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabov, Oleg; Zaitsev, Dmitry; Kirichenko, Dmitry; Ajaev, Vladimir

    2016-11-01

    Self-organization of levitating microdroplets of condensate over a liquid-gas interface has been observed in several recent experiments involving evaporation at high heat fluxes, although the nature of thin phenomenon is still not completely understood. We conduct experimental investigation of behavior of an ordered array of levitating microdroplets as it approaches a region of intense evaporation near the contact line. Interaction of the array with the local highly non-uniform gas flow is shown to result in the break-up of the pattern. Furthermore, our experimental set-up provides a unique tool for investigation of the Stefan flow originating near the contact line by using microdroplets as tracers. Local gas flow velocities near the contact line are obtained based on trajectories of the droplets. This work was supported by the Russian Science Foundation (Project No. 14-19-01755).

  17. Mechanical Design of a Performance Test Rig for the Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, John C.; Xenofos, George D.; Farrow, John L.; Tyler, Tom; Williams, Robert; Sargent, Scott; Moharos, Jozsef

    2004-01-01

    To support development of the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS84 rocket engine, a full-flow, reaction turbine geometry was integrated into the NASA-MSFC turbine air-flow test facility. A mechanical design was generated which minimized the amount of new hardware while incorporating all test and instrumentation requirements. This paper provides details of the mechanical design for this Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT) test rig. The mechanical design process utilized for this task included the following basic stages: Conceptual Design. Preliminary Design. Detailed Design. Baseline of Design (including Configuration Control and Drawing Revision). Fabrication. Assembly. During the design process, many lessons were learned that should benefit future test rig design projects. Of primary importance are well-defined requirements early in the design process, a thorough detailed design package, and effective communication with both the customer and the fabrication contractors.

  18. 30 CFR 57.22212 - Air flow (I-C, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22212 Air flow (I-C, II-A, and V-A mines). Air flow across each working face shall be sufficient to carry away any accumulation of methane,...

  19. 30 CFR 57.22212 - Air flow (I-C, II-A, and V-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22212 Air flow (I-C, II-A, and V-A mines). Air flow across each working face shall be sufficient to carry away any accumulation of methane,...

  20. Flow visualization study of grooved surface/surfactant/air sheet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Jason C.; Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of groove geometry, surfactants, and airflow rate have been ascertained by a flow-visualization study of grooved-surface models which addresses the possible conditions for skin friction-reduction in marine vehicles. It is found that the grooved surface geometry holds the injected bubble stream near the wall and, in some cases, results in a 'tube' of air which remains attached to the wall. It is noted that groove dimension and the use of surfactants can substantially affect the stability of this air tube; deeper grooves, surfactants with high contact angles, and angled air injection, are all found to increase the stability of the attached air tube, while convected disturbances and high shear increase interfacial instability.

  1. Downward flow of water with entrained air in a nonuniformaly heated subdivided annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.S.; May, C.P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study in which water was fed to a vertical annulus, entraining air in downward flow. The annulus was subdivided by longitudinal fins into four subchannels and was heated with an azimuthally varying heat flux. A bypass was provided to simulate flow in parallel channels. For steady liquid flow, inlet temperature, and pressure boundary conditions, the power was increased until critical heat flux was reached. Overheating characteristics were grouped according to the prevailing flow pattern. In annular flows (j{sub L} < 0.3 m/s) overheating of the whole test section occurs when steam production causes countercurrent flooding. In intermittent flows (0.3 < j{sub L} < 0.9 m/s) the overheating is confined to a portion of the hot subchannel. The mechanism is postulated to be stagnation of a large bubble. In bubble flows (0.9 m/s < j{sub L}) overheating occurs by diverting inlet flow to the bypass and again involves the whole test section. Except at the very lowest flow rates, critical heat flux occurs when the effluent liquid temperature is below saturation.

  2. Downward flow of water with entrained air in a nonuniformaly heated subdivided annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, B.S.; May, C.P.

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes an experimental study in which water was fed to a vertical annulus, entraining air in downward flow. The annulus was subdivided by longitudinal fins into four subchannels and was heated with an azimuthally varying heat flux. A bypass was provided to simulate flow in parallel channels. For steady liquid flow, inlet temperature, and pressure boundary conditions, the power was increased until critical heat flux was reached. Overheating characteristics were grouped according to the prevailing flow pattern. In annular flows (j{sub L} < 0.3 m/s) overheating of the whole test section occurs when steam production causes countercurrent flooding. In intermittent flows (0.3 < j{sub L} < 0.9 m/s) the overheating is confined to a portion of the hot subchannel. The mechanism is postulated to be stagnation of a large bubble. In bubble flows (0.9 m/s < j{sub L}) overheating occurs by diverting inlet flow to the bypass and again involves the whole test section. Except at the very lowest flow rates, critical heat flux occurs when the effluent liquid temperature is below saturation.

  3. Measurement of air distribution and void fraction of an upwards air-water flow using electrical resistance tomography and a wire-mesh sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olerni, Claudio; Jia, Jiabin; Wang, Mi

    2013-03-01

    Measurements on an upwards air-water flow are reported that were obtained simultaneously with a dual-plane electrical resistance tomograph (ERT) and a wire-mesh sensor (WMS). The ultimate measurement target of both ERT and WMS is the same, the electrical conductivity of the medium. The ERT is a non-intrusive device whereas the WMS requires a net of wires that physically crosses the flow. This paper presents comparisons between the results obtained simultaneously from the ERT and the WMS for evaluation and calibration of the ERT. The length of the vertical testing pipeline section is 3 m with an internal diameter of 50 mm. Two distinct sets of air-water flow rate scenarios, bubble and slug regimes, were produced in the experiments. The fast impedance camera ERT recorded the data at an approximate time resolution of 896 frames per second (fps) per plane in contrast with the 1024 fps of the wire-mesh sensor WMS200. The set-up of the experiment was based on well established knowledge of air-water upwards flow, particularly the specific flow regimes and wall peak effects. The local air void fraction profiles and the overall air void fraction were produced from two systems to establish consistency for comparison of the data accuracy. Conventional bulk flow measurements in air mass and electromagnetic flow metering, as well as pressure and temperature, were employed, which brought the necessary calibration to the flow measurements. The results show that the profiles generated from the two systems have a certain level of inconsistency, particularly in a wall peak and a core peak from the ERT and WMS respectively, whereas the two tomography instruments achieve good agreement on the overall air void fraction for bubble flow. For slug flow, when the void fraction is over 30%, the ERT underestimates the void fraction, but a linear relation between ERT and WMS is still observed.

  4. Effect of air pressure differential on vapor flow through sample building walls

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.E. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    Laboratory scale experiments were performed on two small sample composite walls of typical building construction to determine the approximate opposing air pressure difference required to stop or significantly reduce the transmission of water vapor due to a water vapor pressure difference. The experiments used wall section samples between two controlled atmosphere chambers. One chamber was held at a temperature and humidity condition approximating that of a typical summer day, while the other chamber was controlled at a condition typical of indoor conditioned space. Vapor transmission data through the wall samples were obtained over a range of vapor pressure differentials and opposing air pressure differentials. The results show that increasing opposing air pressure differences decrease water vapor transmission, as expected, and relatively small opposing air pressure differentials are required for wall materials of small vapor permeability and large air permeability. The opposing air pressure that stopped or significantly reduced the flow of water vapor through the wall sample was determined experimentally and also compared to air pressures as predicted by an analytical model.

  5. Base-flow data in the Arnold Air Force Base area, Tennessee, June and October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, John A.; Haugh, Connor J.

    2004-01-01

    Arnold Air Force Base (AAFB) occupies about 40,000 acres in Coffee and Franklin Counties, Tennessee. The primary mission of AAFB is to support the development of aerospace systems. This mission is accomplished through test facilities at Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC), which occupies about 4,000 acres in the center of AAFB. Base-flow data including discharge, temperature, and specific conductance were collected for basins in and near AAFB during high base-flow and low base-flow conditions. Data representing high base-flow conditions from 109 sites were collected on June 3 through 5, 2002, when discharge measurements at sites with flow ranged from 0.005 to 46.4 ft3/s. Data representing low base-flow conditions from 109 sites were collected on October 22 and 23, 2002, when discharge measurements at sites with flow ranged from 0.02 to 44.6 ft3/s. Discharge from the basin was greater during high base-flow conditions than during low base-flow conditions. In general, major tributaries on the north side and southeastern side of the study area (Duck River and Bradley Creek, respectively) had the highest flows during the study. Discharge data were used to categorize stream reaches and sub-basins. Stream reaches were categorized as gaining, losing, wet, dry, or unobserved for each base-flow measurement period. Gaining stream reaches were more common during the high base-flow period than during the low base-flow period. Dry stream reaches were more common during the low base-flow period than during the high base-flow period. Losing reaches were more predominant in Bradley Creek and Crumpton Creek. Values of flow per square mile for the study area of 0.55 and 0.37 (ft3/s)/mi2 were calculated using discharge data collected on June 3 through 5, 2002, and October 22 and 23, 2002, respectively. Sub-basin areas with surplus or deficient flow were defined within the basin. Drainage areas for each stream measurement site were delineated and measured from topographic maps

  6. Color Uniformity in Navy Uniforms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    realized in contracting with a specific trouser, skirt, shirt or blouse manufacturer. Uniform items are issued on the basis of size and not on a top...Blue 3346 Spec. No.: MIL-C-29147 End Item: Men’s Winter Shirt Method of Issue: Stock Item - DPSC Procured Optional - NAVRESSO Method of Dyeing: Standard...Polyester Color: Blue 3346 Spec. No.: MIL-C-87051 End Item: Women’s Winter Shirt (new) Method of Issue: Stock Item - DPSC Procured Method of Dyeing: Piece

  7. Modelling river bank erosion using a 2D depth-averaged numerical model of flow and non-cohesive, non-uniform sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kadi Abderrezzak, Kamal; Die Moran, Andrés; Tassi, Pablo; Ata, Riadh; Hervouet, Jean-Michel

    2016-07-01

    Bank erosion can be an important form of morphological adjustment in rivers. With the advances made in computational techniques, two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged numerical models have become valuable tools for resolving many engineering problems dealing with sediment transport. The objective of this research work is to present a simple, new, bank-erosion operator that is integrated into a 2D Saint-Venant-Exner morphodynamic model. The numerical code is based on an unstructured grid of triangular elements and finite-element algorithms. The slope of each element in the grid is compared to the angle of repose of the bank material. Elements for which the slope is too steep are tilted to bring them to the angle of repose along a horizontal axis defined such that the volume loss above the axis is equal to the volume gain below, thus ensuring mass balance. The model performance is assessed using data from laboratory flume experiments and a scale model of the Old Rhine. For the flume experiment case with uniform bank material, relevant results are obtained for bank geometry changes. For the more challenging case (i.e. scale model of the Old Rhine with non-uniform bank material), the numerical model is capable of reproducing the main features of the bank failure, induced by the newly designed groynes, as well as the transport of the mobilized sediment material downstream. Some deviations between the computed results and measured data are, however, observed. They are ascribed to the effects of three-dimensional (3D) flow structures, pore pressure and cohesion, which are not considered in the present 2D model.

  8. Air release measurements of V-oil 1404 downstream of a micro orifice at choked flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudigmann, H.-A.; Iben, U.; Pelz, P. F.

    2015-12-01

    This study presents measurements on air release of V-oil 1404 in the back flow of a micro orifice at choked flow conditions using a shadowgraph imaging method. The released air was determined at three positions downstream of the orifice for different pressure conditions. It was found that more than 23% of the initially dissolved air is released and appears downstream of the orifice in the form of bubbles.

  9. The Unsteady Response of an Axial Flow Turbo-Machinery Rotor to Inlet Flow Distortions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-12

    the rotor inflow velocity. Distorted inlet flow is a very realistic and prevalent problem in jet air - craft engines, and the consequences of...Turbomachinery In designing the blading of a compressor or turbine, the air flow is assumed to be steady. The existence of a uniform, steady flow is...surface of the air - k- foil. When this occurs in a compressor, surge can occur. Surge will result in very large fluctuating forces on the blades which

  10. Simulation study of the lethality effect of high-power laser with supersonic air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xin; Zhao, Guomin; Chen, Minsun

    2016-10-01

    The lethality effect of high power laser on target is simulated with CFD method under different conditions of supersonic air flow on the surface of the target. Materials used in the experiments are 2cm aluminum plate. With the Mach number changing from 1 to 5, the lethality effects of the high power laser can be obtained from the simulations under these conditions of supersonic air flow. The flow-structure-laser coupling impact on the failure time of the target is discussed based on the simulation. Results show that with the increase of mach number, the effect on the aluminum plate is increase first and then decrease by the pressure. Because that it is obvious that the maximum area of pressure is away from the center of deformation region when the mach number is bigger than 5 . At the same time, when mach number is increase, the aerodynamic heating play more important role than the convective heat transfer on the temperature field of aluminum plate. there are two impacts from the supersonic flow. Firstly , the flow can produce the pressure on the surface of the aluminum plate. Secondly, the flow can produce aerodynamic heat on the aluminum plate.

  11. Piloted Ignition of Polypropylene/Glass Composites in a Forced Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Rich, D.; Lautenberger, C.; Stefanovich, A.; Metha, S.; Torero, J.; Yuan, Z.; Ross, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Forced Ignition and Spread Test (FIST) is being used to study the flammability characteristics of combustible materials in forced convective flows. The FIST methodology is based on the ASTM E-1321, Lateral Ignition and Flame Spread Test (LIFT) which is used to determine the ignition and flame spread characteristics of materials, and to produce 'Flammability Diagrams' of materials. The LIFT apparatus, however, relies on natural convection to bring air to the combustion zone and the fuel vapor to the pilot flame, and thus cannot describe conditions where the oxidizer flow velocity may change. The FIST on the other hand, by relying on a forced flow as the dominant transport mechanism, can be used to examine variable oxidizer flow characteristics, such as velocity, oxygen concentration, and turbulence intensity, and consequently has a wider applicability. Particularly important is its ability to determine the flammability characteristics of materials used in spacecraft since in the absence of gravity the only flow present is that forced by the HVAC of the space facility. In this paper, we report work on the use of the FIST approach on the piloted ignition of a blended polypropylene fiberglass (PP/GL) composite material exposed to an external radiant flux in a forced convective flow of air. The effect of glass concentration under varying external radiant fluxes is examined and compared qualitatively with theoretical predictions of the ignition process. The results are used to infer the effect of glass content on the fire safety characteristics of composites.

  12. Simulation Analysis of Air Flow and Turbulence Statistics in a Rib Grit Roughened Duct

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, I. I.; Denizopoulou, A. C.; Ntinas, G. K.; Fragos, V. P.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of variable artificial roughness patterns on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the rate of heat transfer to fluid flow in the ducts of solar air heaters. Different geometries of roughness elements investigated have demonstrated the pivotal role that vortices and associated turbulence have on the heat transfer characteristics of solar air heater ducts by increasing the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper we investigate the two-dimensional, turbulent, unsteady flow around rectangular ribs of variable aspect ratios by directly solving the transient Navier-Stokes and continuity equations using the finite elements method. Flow characteristics and several aspects of turbulent flow are presented and discussed including velocity components and statistics of turbulence. The results reveal the impact that different rib lengths have on the computed mean quantities and turbulence statistics of the flow. The computed turbulence parameters show a clear tendency to diminish downstream with increasing rib length. Furthermore, the applied numerical method is capable of capturing small-scale flow structures resulting from the direct solution of Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. PMID:25057511

  13. 10 CFR Appendix M to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... entering and leaving the indoor coil. If needed, use an air sampling device to divert air to a sensor(s... device may also divert air to a remotely located sensor(s) that measures dry bulb temperature. The air sampling device and the remotely located temperature sensor(s) may be used to determine the entering...

  14. CFD analyses of flow structures in air-ingress and rod bundle problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hong-Chan

    Two topics from nuclear engineering field are included in this dissertation. One study is the air-ingress phenomenon during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) scenario, and the other is a 5-by-5 bundle assembly with a PWR design. The objectives were to investigate the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of the gravity-driven stratified flows inside a coaxial pipe and the effects caused by two types of spacers at the downstream of the rod bundle. Richardson extrapolation was used for the grid independent study. The simulation results show good agreements with the experiments. Wavelet analysis and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) were used to study the flow behaviors and flow patterns. For the air-ingress phenomenon, Brunt-Vaisala frequency, or buoyancy frequency, predicts a frequency of 2.34 Hz; this is confirmed by the dominant frequency of 2.4 Hz obtained from the wavelet analysis between times 1.2 s and 1.85 s. For the rod bundle study, the dominant frequency at the center of the subchannel was determined to be 2.4 Hz with a secondary dominant frequency of 4 Hz and a much minor frequency of 6 Hz. Generally, wavelet analysis has much better performance than POD, in the air-ingress phenomenon, for a strongly transient scenario; they are both appropriate for the rod bundle study. Based on this study, when the fluid pair in a real condition is used, the time which air intrudes into the reactor is predictable.

  15. Air-bubbling, hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration.

    PubMed

    Nishii, K; Sode, K; Karube, I

    1990-05-01

    Continuous asymmetric reduction of dyhydrooxoisophorone (DOIP) to 4-hydroxy-2,2,6-trimethylcyclo-hexanone (4-HTMCH) was achieved by a thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NK86-0151. Three reactors were used: an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration, an air-lift reactor, and a CSTR with PAA immobilized cells. The maximum cell concentration of 11.1 g dry wt L(-1) was obtained in an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor, while in the other reactors the cell densities were between 3.5 and 4.1 g dry wt L(-1) The optimum bleed ratio was 0.1 at the dilution rate 0.3 h(-1) in the hollow-fiber reactor. The highest viable cell concentration was maintained in the dilution range of 0.4-0.7 h(-1) by a combination of proper cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration. The maximum volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH reached 826 mg L(-1) h(-1) at the dilution rate 0.54 h(-1). This value was 4 and 2 times higher than those in the air-lift reactor and CSTR, respectively. The increasing viable cell concentration increased the volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH. A cell free product solution was continuously obtained by cross-flow filtration.

  16. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, M. N. K.; Zuradzman, M. Razlan; Hazry, D.; Khairunizam, Wan; Shahriman, A. B.; Yaacob, S.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Hussain, Abadalsalam T.

    2014-12-01

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  17. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, M. N. K. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  18. Evolution of the air cavity during a depressurized wave impact. I. The kinematic flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugni, C.; Miozzi, M.; Brocchini, M.; Faltinsen, O. M.

    2010-05-01

    This paper describes a systematic experimental study of the role of the ambient pressure on wave impact events in depressurized environments. A wave impact event of "mode (b)" [see Lugni et al., "Wave impact loads: The role of the flip-through," Phys. Fluids 18, 122101 (2006)] causes entrapment of an air cavity. Here the topological and kinematic aspects of its oscillation and evolution toward collapse into a mixture of water and air bubbles are studied, while Part II [Lugni et al., "Evolution of the air cavity during a depressurized wave impact. II. The dynamic field," Phys. Fluids 22, 056102 (2010)] focuses on the dynamic features of the flow. Four distinct stages characterize the flow evolution: (1) the closure of the cavity onto the wall, (2) the isotropic compression/expansion of the cavity, (3) its anisotropic compression/expansion, and (4) the rise of the cavity up the wall. The first two stages are mainly governed by the air leakage, the last two by the surrounding hydrodynamic flow, which contributes to compressing the bubble horizontally and to convecting it up the wall. Ullage pressure affects the ratio between the minimum and maximum cavity areas. An ullage pressure of 2.5% of the atmospheric pressure leads to an area ratio of about 360% of the equivalent ratio at atmospheric conditions.

  19. Computing Isentropic Flow Properties of Air/R-134a Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Ray

    2006-01-01

    MACHRK is a computer program that calculates isentropic flow properties of mixtures of air and refrigerant R-134a (tetrafluoroethane), which are used in transonic aerodynamic testing in a wind tunnel at Langley Research Center. Given the total temperature, total pressure, static pressure, and mole fraction of R-134a in a mixture, MACHRK calculates the Mach number and the following associated flow properties: dynamic pressure, velocity, density, static temperature, speed of sound, viscosity, ratio of specific heats, Reynolds number, and Prandtl number. Real-gas effects are taken into account by treating the gases comprising the mixture as both thermally and calorically imperfect. The Redlich-Kwong equation of state for mixtures and the constant-pressure ideal heat-capacity equation for the mixture are used in combination with the departure- function approach of thermodynamics to obtain the equations for computing the flow properties. In addition to the aforementioned calculations for air/R-134a mixtures, a research version of MACHRK can perform the corresponding calculations for mixtures of air and R-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) and for air/SF6 mixtures. [R-12 was replaced by R-134a because of environmental concerns. SF6 has been considered for use in increasing the Reynolds-number range.

  20. Low-Flow Liquid Desiccant Air-Conditioning: Demonstrated Performance and Cost Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Kozubal, E.; Herrmann, L.; Deru, M.; Clark, J.; Lowenstein, A.

    2014-09-01

    Cooling loads must be dramatically reduced when designing net-zero energy buildings or other highly efficient facilities. Advances in this area have focused primarily on reducing a building's sensible cooling loads by improving the envelope, integrating properly sized daylighting systems, adding exterior solar shading devices, and reducing internal heat gains. As sensible loads decrease, however, latent loads remain relatively constant, and thus become a greater fraction of the overall cooling requirement in highly efficient building designs, particularly in humid climates. This shift toward latent cooling is a challenge for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. Traditional systems typically dehumidify by first overcooling air below the dew-point temperature and then reheating it to an appropriate supply temperature, which requires an excessive amount of energy. Another dehumidification strategy incorporates solid desiccant rotors that remove water from air more efficiently; however, these systems are large and increase fan energy consumption due to the increased airside pressure drop of solid desiccant rotors. A third dehumidification strategy involves high flow liquid desiccant systems. These systems require a high maintenance separator to protect the air distribution system from corrosive desiccant droplet carryover and so are more commonly used in industrial applications and rarely in commercial buildings. Both solid desiccant systems and most high-flow liquid desiccant systems (if not internally cooled) add sensible energy which must later be removed to the air stream during dehumidification, through the release of sensible heat during the sorption process.

  1. Steady film flow over 2D topography with air inclusion formed inside the trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamopoulos, John; Varchanis, Stylianos; Dimakopoulos, Yannis

    2016-11-01

    Liquid film flow along an inclined, solid substrate featuring periodic rectangular trenches may either completely wet the trench floor (Wenzel state) or pin on the entrance and exit corners of the trench (Cassie state) or assume any other configuration in between these two extremes. In the intermediate cases a second gas-liquid interface inside the trench is formed, which adheres to the walls of the trench forming two three-phase contact lines, and encloses a different amount of air under different physical conditions. The Galerkin finite element method is used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations in a physical domain, which is adaptively re-meshed. Multiple steady solutions, connected by turning points and transcritical bifurcations as well as isolated solution branches, are revealed by pseudo arc-length continuation. Two possible cases of a single air inclusion inside the trench are examined. The penetration of the liquid inside the trench is enhanced primarily by increasing either the wettability of the substrate or the capillarity or by decreasing the flow rate. Flow hysteresis may occur when the liquid does not penetrate deep enough inside the trench leading to different flow patterns. The interplay of inertia, viscous, gravity and capillary forces along with substrate wettability determines the volume of the air encapsulated in the trench and the extent of free surface deformation. GSRT of Greece via the program "Excellence" and the LIMMAT foundation.

  2. Do terrestrial hermit crabs sniff? Air flow and odorant capture by flicking antennules

    PubMed Central

    Koehl, M. A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Capture of odorant molecules by olfactory organs from the surrounding fluid is the first step of smelling. Sniffing intermittently moves fluid across sensory surfaces, increasing delivery rates of molecules to chemosensory receptors and providing discrete odour samples. Aquatic malacostracan crustaceans sniff by flicking olfactory antennules bearing arrays of chemosensory hairs (aesthetascs), capturing water in the arrays during downstroke and holding the sample during return stroke. Terrestrial malacostracans also flick antennules, but how their flicking affects odour capture from air is not understood. The terrestrial hermit crab, Coenobita rugosus, uses antennules bearing shingle-shaped aesthetascs to capture odours. We used particle image velocimetry to measure fine-scale fluid flow relative to a dynamically scaled physical model of a flicking antennule, and computational simulations to calculate diffusion to aesthetascs by odorant molecules carried in that flow. Air does not flow into the aesthetasc array during flick downstrokes or recovery strokes. Odorants are captured from air flowing around the outside of the array during flick downstrokes, when aesthetascs face upstream and molecule capture rates are 21% higher than for stationary antennules. Bursts of flicking followed by pauses deliver discrete odour samples to olfactory sensors, causing intermittency in odour capture by a different mechanism than aquatic crustaceans use. PMID:26763332

  3. Steady-state response of a charcoal bed to radon in flowing air with water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Blue, T.E.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.

    1995-06-01

    Previously we have developed a mathematical model of radon adsorption in active air with water vapor on small U.S. Environmental Protection Agency charcoal canisters that are used for environmental measurements of radon. The purpose of this paper is to extend this mathematical model to describe the adsorption of radon by large charcoal beds with radon-laden air flowing through them. The resulting model equations are solved analytically to predict the steady-state adsorption of radon by such beds. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Improved Apparatus for the Measurement of Fluctuations of Air Speed in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, W C , Jr; Dryden, H L

    1934-01-01

    This report describes recent improvements in the design of the equipment associated with the hot-wire anemometer for the measurement of fluctuating air speeds in turbulent air flow, and presents the results of some experimental investigations dealing with the response of the hot wire to speed fluctuations of various frequencies. Attempts at measuring the frequency of the fluctuations encountered in the Bureau of Standards' 54-inch wind tunnel are also reported. In addition, the difficulties encountered in the use of such apparatus and the precautions found helpful in avoiding them are discussed.

  5. Velocity and phase distribution measurements in vertical air-water annular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.

    1997-07-01

    Annular flow topology for three air-water conditions in a vertical duct is investigated through the use of a traversing double-sensor hot-film anemometry probe and differential pressure measurements. Near wall measurements of mean and fluctuating velocities, as well as local void fraction, are taken in the liquid film, with the highest turbulent fluctuations occurring for the flow condition with the largest pressure drop. A modified law-of-the-wall formulation for wall shear is presented which, using near wall values of mean velocity and kinetic energy, agrees reasonably well with the average stress obtained from direct pressure drop measurements. The linear profile using wall coordinates in the logarithmic layer is preserved in annular flow; however, the slope and intercept of the profile differ from the single-phase values for the annular flow condition which has a thicker, more turbulent, liquid film.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Transport Enhancement in Convective Air Flow by the Use of a Vortex Promoter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaluria, Yogesh; Gomes, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    This paper focuses on the effect of placing a passive vortex generator in a flow and the resulting increase in transport rates. The flow circumstance considered is that of a flat plate with protruding heat sources, placed in a uniform flow, with a vortex generator located upstream of the leading edge. The study consists of three parts. In the first part, the flow due to the vortex promoter by itself is considered. The periodic or chaotic behavior in the wake behind the promoter is investigated. By studying different sizes and shapes of vortex promoters, it is determined which configuration offers the largest disturbance in the flow and the frequency at which it occurs. In the second part of the study, the flow over a plate with isolated, finite-sized, protruding heat sources, without a vortex promoter, is considered. Again, the frequency of the disturbance downstream is investigated to determine the nature of the resulting flow and the disturbance frequency. The effect of varying the dimensions and locations of the heat sources on the flow downstream is investigated. It is found that a larger separation distance between two sources leads to higher transport rates. In the last part of the study, tests are done for the combination of vortex promoter and the plate, placing a vortex promoter in front of the plate. An effort is made to match the frequencies of the disturbances due to the vortex generator with those due to the plate in an attempt to achieve resonance. From these results, an optimal promoter is chosen that would lead to maximum heat transfer rate.

  7. Modelling Air and Water Two-Phase Annular Flow in a Small Horizontal Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jun; Yao, Yufeng; Arini, Antonino; McIiwain, Stuart; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been carried out to study air and water two-phase flow in a small horizontal pipe of an inner diameter of 8.8mm, in order to investigate unsteady flow pattern transition behaviours and underlying physical mechanisms. The surface liquid film thickness distributions, determined by either wavy or full annular flow regime, are shown in reasonable good agreement with available experimental data. It was demonstrated that CFD simulation was able to predict wavy flow structures accurately using two-phase flow sub-models embedded in ANSYS-Fluent solver of Eulerian-Eulerian framework, together with a user defined function subroutine ANWAVER-UDF. The flow transient behaviours from bubbly to annular flow patterns and the liquid film distributions revealed the presence of gas/liquid interferences between air and water film interface. An increase of upper wall liquid film thickness along the pipe was observed for both wavy annular and full annular scenarios. It was found that the liquid wavy front can be further broken down to form the water moisture with liquid droplets penetrating upwards. There are discrepancies between CFD predictions and experimental data on the liquid film thickness determined at the bottom and the upper wall surfaces, and the obtained modelling information can be used to assist further 3D user defined function subroutine development, especially when CFD simulation becomes much more expense to model full 3D two-phase flow transient performance from a wavy annular to a fully developed annular type.

  8. In-cylinder air motion measurements by laser velocimetry under steady-state flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Coghe, A.; Gamma, F.; Mauri, M.; Brunello, G.; Calderini, F.; Antoni, L.F.D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) has been used to investigate the in-cylinder flow pattern produced by the helical inlet port of a model cylinder head, typical of those used in internal combustion engines. Measurements in a steady state flow rig were taken of the axial and tangential velocity components. The LDV results showed that the axial vortex formed behind the inlet port extends to more than one bore from the cylinder head and the tangential velocity profile is never that of a pure forced vortex. At lower lifts of the valve a smaller contra-rotating swirl was found together with the main swirl pattern, whereas at higher lifts a single swirl was established at the one bore position. Both the tangential and axial fluctuating velocity components were found more uniform than the mean values, with zones of higher turbulence around the flow reversal points. Flow visualization was also used to investigate the flow pattern in the whole cylinder, and hot-wire probes were employed to take advantage of their excellent frequency characteristics in deriving turbulence time scales.

  9. Flow control of a centrifugal fan in a commercial air conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jiyu; Bang, Kyeongtae; Choi, Haecheon; Seo, Eung Ryeol; Kang, Yonghun

    2015-11-01

    Air-conditioning fans require a low noise level to provide user comfort and quietness. The aerodynamic noise sources are generated by highly unsteady, turbulent structures near the fan blade. In this study, we investigate the flow characteristics of a centrifugal fan in an air-conditioner indoor unit and suggest control ideas to develop a low noise fan. The experiment is conducted at the operation condition where the Reynolds number is 163000 based on the blade tip velocity and chord length. Intermittent separation occurs at the blade leading edge and thus flow significantly fluctuates there, whereas vortex shedding occurs at the blade trailing edge. Furthermore, the discharge flow observed in the axial plane near the shroud shows low-frequency intermittent behaviors, resulting in high Reynolds stresses. To control these flow structures, we modify the shapes of the blade leading edge and shroud of the centrifugal fan and obtain noise reduction. The flow characteristics of the base and modified fans will be discussed. Supported by 0420-20130051.

  10. Simultaneous measurements of temperature and density in air flows using UV laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of temperature and density using laser-induced fluorescence of oxygen in combination with Q-branch Raman scattering of nitrogen and oxygen is demonstrated in a low-speed air flow. The lowest density and temperature measured in the experiment correspond to the freestream values at Mach 5 in the Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel for stagnation conditions of 100 atm and 1000 K. The experimental results demonstrate the viability of the optical technique for measurements that support the study of compressible turbulence and the validation of numerical codes in supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnel flows.

  11. Penetration Characteristics of Air, Carbon Dioxide and Helium Transverse Sonic Jets in Mach 5 Cross Flow

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Erinc; Kontis, Konstantinos; Saravanan, Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sonic air, CO2 and Helium transverse jets in Mach 5 cross flow was carried out over a flat plate. The jet to freestream momentum flux ratio, J, was kept the same for all gases. The unsteady flow topology was examined using high speed schlieren visualisation and PIV. Schlieren visualisation provided information regarding oscillating jet shear layer structures and bow shock, Mach disc and barrel shocks. Two-component PIV measurements at the centreline, provided information regarding jet penetration trajectories. Barrel shocks and Mach disc forming the jet boundary were visualised/quantified also jet penetration boundaries were determined. Even though J is kept the same for all gases, the penetration patterns were found to be remarkably different both at the nearfield and the farfield. Air and CO2 jet resulted similar nearfield and farfield penetration pattern whereas Helium jet spread minimal in the nearfield. PMID:25494348

  12. Effect of Marangoni Flows on the Shape of Thin Sessile Droplets Evaporating into Air.

    PubMed

    Tsoumpas, Yannis; Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2015-12-15

    Freely receding evaporating sessile droplets of perfectly wetting liquids, for which the observed finite contact angles are attributed to evaporation, are studied with a Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The experimentally obtained droplet shapes are found to depart, under some conditions, from the classical macroscopic static profile of a sessile droplet. The observed deviations (or the absence thereof) are explained in terms of a Marangoni flow due to evaporation-induced thermal gradients along the liquid-air interface. When such a Marangoni effect is strong, the experimental profiles exhibit a maximum of the slope at a certain distance from the contact line. In this case, the axisymmetric flow is directed from the contact line to the apex (along the liquid-air interface), hence delivering more liquid to the center of the droplet and making it appear inflated. These findings are quantitatively confirmed by predictions of a lubrication model accounting for the impact of the Marangoni effect on the droplet shape.

  13. Numerical simulation in finite elements of turbulent flows of viscous incompressible fluids in air intakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begue, C.; Periaux, J.; Perrier, P.; Pouletty, C.

    1985-11-01

    A self-adaptive finite-element method, coupled to a homogenization model of turbulence, is presented for the numerical simulation of unsteady turbulent flow of viscous fluids in air intakes. The nonlinear subproblem due to the convection is solved by an iterative algorithm, and the linear Stokes subproblem due to the diffusion is solved by a Hood-Taylor type iterative algorithm. An efficient and precise minielement approximation is used, and the adaptive mesh procedure is automatic in the calculation, using the physical criteria of rotation and divergence to determine the submeshing zones. The numerical method is demonstrated for the example of three-dimensional laminar flow around and in air intake at a Reynolds number of 200.

  14. A multi-channel, low velocity, hot film anemometry system for measuring air flows in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Guire, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A complete analytical and experimental development of a multichannel anemometry system is presented. The system consists of an array of low velocity sensors (0.0 m/s to 1.0 m/s), a constant current power supply, and the required data acquisition equipment. The velocity sensors can be scanned simultaneously yielding absolute air velocities and absolute ambient air temperatures at each of the probe positions in the array. One of the key results that this system can produce is the relationship between boundary layer flow and pressure driven flow through a large irregular aperture, such as a doorway, which up until now has been difficult to accomplish with regard to cost and experimental error incurred. 7 refs., 57 figs.

  15. Dependence of charge transfer phenomena during solid-air two-phase flow on particle disperser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanoue, Ken-ichiro; Suedomi, Yuuki; Honda, Hirotaka; Furutani, Satoshi; Nishimura, Tatsuo; Masuda, Hiroaki

    2012-12-01

    An experimental investigation of the tribo-electrification of particles has been conducted during solid-air two-phase turbulent flow. The current induced in a metal plate by the impact of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) particles in a high-speed air flow was measured for two different plate materials. The results indicated that the contact potential difference between the particles and a stainless steel plate was positive, while for a nickel plate it was negative. These results agreed with theoretical contact charge transfer even if not only the particle size but also the kind of metal plate was changed. The specific charge of the PMMA particles during solid-air two-phase flow using an ejector, a stainless steel branch pipe, and a stainless steel straight pipe was measured using a Faraday cage. Although the charge was negative in the ejector, the particles had a positive specific charge at the outlet of the branch pipe, and this positive charge increased in the straight pipe. The charge decay along the flow direction could be reproduced by the charging and relaxation theory. However, the proportional coefficients in the theory changed with the particle size and air velocity. Therefore, an unexpected charge transfer occurred between the ejector and the branch pipe, which could not be explained solely by the contact potential difference. In the ejector, an electrical current in air might have been produced by self-discharge of particles with excess charge between the nickel diffuser in the ejector and the stainless steel nozzle or the stainless steel pipe due to a reversal in the contact potential difference between the PMMA and the stainless steel. The sign of the current depended on the particle size, possibly because the position where the particles impacted depended on their size. When dual coaxial glass pipes were used as a particle disperser, the specific charge of the PMMA particles became more positive along the particle flow direction due to the contact

  16. A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    C O R P O R A T I O N Research Report A Methodology for Modeling the Flow of Military Personnel Across Air Force Active and Reserve Components...Lisa M. Harrington, James H . Bigelow, Alexander Rothenberg, James Pita, Paul D. Emslie Limited Print and Electronic Distribution Rights This document...of a particular component—whether active , guard, or reserve. As a result, when personnel policies are implemented in one component, little is known

  17. Oxidation resistance of selected mechanical carbons at 650 deg C in dry flowing air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, G. P.; Wisander, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Oxidation experiments were conducted with several experimental mechanical carbons at 650 C in air flowing at 28 cu cm/sec (STP). Experiments indicate that boron carbide addition and zinc phosphate treatment definitely improved oxidation resistance. Impregnation with coal tar pitch before final graphitization had some beneficial effect on oxidation resistance and it markedly improved flexure strength and hardness. Graphitization temperature alone did not affect oxidation resistance, but with enough added boron carbide the oxidation resistance was increased although the hardness greatly decreased.

  18. Temperature Measurements in an Ethylene-Air-Opposed Flow Diffusion Flame

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Temperature Measurements in an Ethylene-Air-Opposed Flow Diffusion Flame by Matthew S. Kurman, John M. Densmore, Chol -Bum M. Kweon, and...Oak Ridge Associated Universities John M. Densmore Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Chol -Bum M. Kweon Vehicle Technology Directorate... Chol -Bum M. Kweon, and Kevin L. McNesby 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 1VP2J1 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  19. Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, James; Withers, Charles; Martin, Eric; Moyer, Neil

    2012-10-01

    This report is a revision of an earlier report titled: Measure Guideline: Managing the Drivers of Air Flow and Water Vapor Transport in Existing Single-Family Homes. Revisions include: Information in the text box on page 1 was revised to reflect the most accurate information regarding classifications as referenced in the 2012 International Residential Code. “Measure Guideline” was dropped from the title of the report. An addition was made to the reference list.

  20. Flow on Magnetizable Particles in Turbulent Air Streams. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davey, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The flow of magnetizable particles in a turbulent air stream in the presence of an imposed magnetic field and the phenomenon of drag reduction produced by the introduction of particles in turbulent boundary layer are investigated. The nature of the particle magnetic force is discussed and the inherent difference between electric and magnetic precipitation is considered. The incorporation of turbulent diffusion theory with an imposed magnetic migration process both with and without inertia effects is examined.

  1. An Air-flow-direction Pickup Suitable for Telemetering Use on Pilotless Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikard, Wallace L

    1956-01-01

    A vane-type air-flow-direction pickup is described which is suitable for telemetering angle-of-attack and angle-of-sideslip data from rocket-propelled pilotless aircraft models. Test results which are presented show that the device performs well under high accelerations and is stable throughout a Mach number rage from subsonic to above a Mach number of 2.5.

  2. Alternating-Current Equipment for the Measurement of Fluctuations of Air Speed in Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mock, W C , Jr

    1937-01-01

    Recent electrical and mechanical improvements have been made in the equipment developed at the National Bureau of Standards for measurement of fluctuations of air speed in turbulent flow. Data useful in the design of similar equipment are presented. The design of rectified alternating-current power supplies for such apparatus is treated briefly, and the effect of the power supplies on the performance of the equipment is discussed.

  3. Effects of Temperature, Humidity and Air Flow on Fungal Growth Rate on Loaded Ventilation Filters.

    PubMed

    Tang, W; Kuehn, T H; Simcik, Matt F

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the fungal growth ratio on loaded ventilation filters under various temperature, relative humidity (RH), and air flow conditions in a controlled laboratory setting. A new full-size commercial building ventilation filter was loaded with malt extract nutrients and conidia of Cladosporium sphaerospermum in an ASHRAE Standard 52.2 filter test facility. Small sections cut from this filter were incubated under the following conditions: constant room temperature and a high RH of 97%; sinusoidal temperature (with an amplitude of 10°C, an average of 23°C, and a period of 24 hr) and a mean RH of 97%; room temperature and step changes between 97% and 75% RH, 97% and 43% RH, and 97% and 11% RH every 12 hr. The biomass on the filter sections was measured using both an elution-culture method and by ergosterol assay immediately after loading and every 2 days up to 10 days after loading. Fungal growth was detected earlier using ergosterol content than with the elution-culture method. A student's t-test indicated that Cladosporium sphaerospermum grew better at the constant room temperature condition than at the sinusoidal temperature condition. By part-time exposure to dry environments, the fungal growth was reduced (75% and 43% RH) or even inhibited (11% RH). Additional loaded filters were installed in the wind tunnel at room temperature and an RH greater than 95% under one of two air flow test conditions: continuous air flow or air flow only 9 hr/day with a flow rate of 0.7 m(3)/s (filter media velocity 0.15 m/s). Swab tests and a tease mount method were used to detect fungal growth on the filters at day 0, 5, and 10. Fungal growth was detected for both test conditions, which indicates that when temperature and relative humidity are optimum, controlling the air flow alone cannot prevent fungal growth. In real applications where nutrients are less sufficient than in this laboratory study, fungal growth rate may be reduced under the same operating conditions.

  4. Thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of gaseous products resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Results of calculations to determine thermodynamic, transport, and flow properties of combustion product gases are presented. The product gases are those resulting from combustion of methane-air-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures. The oxygen content of products resulting from the combustion of methane-air-oxygen mixtures was similiar to that of air; however, the oxygen contained in products of methane-oxygen combustion ranged from 20 percent by volume to zero for stoichiometric combustion. Calculations were made for products of reactant mixtures with fuel percentages, by mass, of 7.5 to 20. Results are presented for specific mixtures for a range of pressures varying from 0.0001 to 1,000 atm and for temperatures ranging from 200 to 3,800 K.

  5. Low Dimensional Tools for Flow-Structure Interaction Problems: Application to Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, Ryan F.; Glauser, Mark N.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    A low dimensional tool for flow-structure interaction problems based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and modified Linear Stochastic Estimation (mLSE) has been proposed and was applied to a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) wing. The method utilizes the dynamic strain measurements from the wing to estimate the POD expansion coefficients from which an estimation of the velocity in the wake can be obtained. For this experiment the MAV wing was set at five different angles of attack, from 0 deg to 20 deg. The tunnel velocities varied from 44 to 58 ft/sec with corresponding Reynolds numbers of 46,000 to 70,000. A stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to measure the wake of the MAV wing simultaneously with the signals from the twelve dynamic strain gauges mounted on the wing. With 20 out of 2400 POD modes, a reasonable estimation of the flow flow was observed. By increasing the number of POD modes, a better estimation of the flow field will occur. Utilizing the simultaneously sampled strain gauges and flow field measurements in conjunction with mLSE, an estimation of the flow field with lower energy modes is reasonable. With these results, the methodology for estimating the wake flow field from just dynamic strain gauges is validated.

  6. Impact of traffic flows and wind directions on air pollution concentrations in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngkook; Guldmann, Jean-Michel

    2011-05-01

    Vehicle emissions are responsible for a substantial share of urban air pollution concentrations. Various integrated air quality modeling systems have been developed to analyze the consequences of air pollution caused by traffic flows. However, the quantitative relationship between vehicle-kilometers-traveled (VKT) and pollution concentrations while considering wind direction effects has rarely been explored in the context of land-use regression models (LUR). In this research, VKTs occurring within circular buffers around air pollution monitoring stations are simulated, using a traffic assignment model, and weighted by eight wind directions frequencies. The relationships between monitored pollution concentrations and weighted VKTs are estimated using regression analysis. In general, the wind direction weighted VKT variable increases the explanatory power of the models, particularly for nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide. The case of ozone is more complex, due to the effects of solar radiation, which appears to overwhelm the effects of wind direction in the afternoon hours. The statistical significance of the weighted VKT variable is high, which makes the models appropriate for impact analysis of traffic flow growth.

  7. Parametric study of fluid flow and heat transfer over louvered fins of air heat pump evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muszyński, Tomasz; Kozieł, Sławomir Marcin

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional numerical investigations of the fluid flow and heat transfer have been carried out for the laminar flow of the louvered fin-plate heat exchanger, designed to work as an air-source heat pump evaporator. The transferred heat and the pressure drop predicted by simulation have been compared with the corresponding experimental data taken from the literature. Two dimensional analyses of the louvered fins with varying geometry have been conducted. Simulations have been performed for different geometries with varying louver pitch, louver angle and different louver blade number. Constant inlet air temperature and varying velocity ranging from 2 to 8 m/s was assumed in the numerical experiments. The air-side performance is evaluated by calculating the temperature and the pressure drop ratio. Efficiency curves are obtained that can be used to select optimum louver geometry for the selected inlet parameters. A total of 363 different cases of various fin geometry for 7 different air velocities were investigated. The maximum heat transfer improvement interpreted in terms of the maximum efficiency has been obtained for the louver angle of 16 ° and the louver pitch of 1.35 mm. The presented results indicate that varying louver geometry might be a convenient way of enhancing performance of heat exchangers.

  8. Experimental study of convective heat transfer of compressed air flow in radially rotating ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, G.J,; Tzeng, S.C.; Mao, C.P.

    1999-07-01

    The convective heat transfer of pressurized air flow in radially rotating serpentine channel is investigated experimentally in the present study. The main governing parameters are the Prandtl number, the Reynolds number for forced convection, the rotation number for the Coriolis force induced cross stream secondary flow and the Grashof number for natural convection. To simulate the operation conditions of a real gas turbine, the present study kept the parameters in the test rig approximately the same as those in a real engine. The air in the present serpentine channel was pressurized to increase the air density for making up the low rotational speed in the experiment. Before entering the rotating ducts, the air was also cooled to gain a high density ratio of approximately 1/3 in the ducts. This high density ratio will give a similar order of magnitude of Grashof number in a real operation condition. The local heat transfer rate on the four channel walls are present and compared with that in existing literature.

  9. [Estimation of average traffic emission factor based on synchronized incremental traffic flow and air pollutant concentration].

    PubMed

    Li, Run-Kui; Zhao, Tong; Li, Zhi-Peng; Ding, Wen-Jun; Cui, Xiao-Yong; Xu, Qun; Song, Xian-Feng

    2014-04-01

    On-road vehicle emissions have become the main source of urban air pollution and attracted broad attentions. Vehicle emission factor is a basic parameter to reflect the status of vehicle emissions, but the measured emission factor is difficult to obtain, and the simulated emission factor is not localized in China. Based on the synchronized increments of traffic flow and concentration of air pollutants in the morning rush hour period, while meteorological condition and background air pollution concentration retain relatively stable, the relationship between the increase of traffic and the increase of air pollution concentration close to a road is established. Infinite line source Gaussian dispersion model was transformed for the inversion of average vehicle emission factors. A case study was conducted on a main road in Beijing. Traffic flow, meteorological data and carbon monoxide (CO) concentration were collected to estimate average vehicle emission factors of CO. The results were compared with simulated emission factors of COPERT4 model. Results showed that the average emission factors estimated by the proposed approach and COPERT4 in August were 2.0 g x km(-1) and 1.2 g x km(-1), respectively, and in December were 5.5 g x km(-1) and 5.2 g x km(-1), respectively. The emission factors from the proposed approach and COPERT4 showed close values and similar seasonal trends. The proposed method for average emission factor estimation eliminates the disturbance of background concentrations and potentially provides real-time access to vehicle fleet emission factors.

  10. Drag reductions and the air-water interface stability of superhydrophobic surfaces in rectangular channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingxian; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Flow in a rectangular channel with superhydrophobic (SH) top and bottom walls was investigated experimentally. Different SH surfaces, including hierarchical structured surfaces and surfaces with different micropost sizes (width and spacing) but the same solid fraction, were fabricated and measured. Pressure loss and flow rate in the channel with SH top and bottom walls were measured, with Reynolds number changing from 700 to 4700, and the corresponding friction factor for the SH surface was calculated. The statuses of the air plastron on different SH surfaces were observed during the experiment. In our experiment, compared with the experiment for the smooth surface, drag reductions were observed for all SH surfaces, with the largest drag reduction of 42.2%. It was found that the hierarchy of the microstructure can increase the drag reduction by decreasing the solid fraction and enhancing the stability of the air-water interface. With a fixed solid fraction, the drag reduction decreases as the post size (width and spacing) increases, due to the increasing curvature and instability effects of the air-water interface. A correlation parameter between the contact angle hysteresis, the air-water interface stability, and the drag reduction of the SH surfaces was found.

  11. Drag reductions and the air-water interface stability of superhydrophobic surfaces in rectangular channel flow.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxian; Yao, Zhaohui; Hao, Pengfei

    2016-11-01

    Flow in a rectangular channel with superhydrophobic (SH) top and bottom walls was investigated experimentally. Different SH surfaces, including hierarchical structured surfaces and surfaces with different micropost sizes (width and spacing) but the same solid fraction, were fabricated and measured. Pressure loss and flow rate in the channel with SH top and bottom walls were measured, with Reynolds number changing from 700 to 4700, and the corresponding friction factor for the SH surface was calculated. The statuses of the air plastron on different SH surfaces were observed during the experiment. In our experiment, compared with the experiment for the smooth surface, drag reductions were observed for all SH surfaces, with the largest drag reduction of 42.2%. It was found that the hierarchy of the microstructure can increase the drag reduction by decreasing the solid fraction and enhancing the stability of the air-water interface. With a fixed solid fraction, the drag reduction decreases as the post size (width and spacing) increases, due to the increasing curvature and instability effects of the air-water interface. A correlation parameter between the contact angle hysteresis, the air-water interface stability, and the drag reduction of the SH surfaces was found.

  12. Liquid Steel at Low Pressure: Experimental Investigation of a Downward Water Air Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thumfart, Maria

    2016-07-01

    In the continuous casting of steel controlling the steel flow rate to the mould is critical because a well-defined flow field at the mould level is essential for a good quality of the cast product. The stopper rod is a commonly used device to control this flow rate. Agglomeration of solid material near the stopper rod can lead to a reduced cross section and thus to a decreased casting speed or even total blockage (“clogging”). The mechanisms causing clogging are still not fully understood. Single phase considerations of the flow in the region of the stopper rod result in a low or even negative pressure at the smallest cross section. This can cause degassing of dissolved gases from the melt, evaporation of alloys and entrainment of air through the porous refractory material. It can be shown that the degassing process in liquid steel is taking place mainly at the stopper rod tip and its surrounding. The steel flow around the stopper rod tip is highly turbulent. In addition refractory material has a low wettability to liquid steel. So the first step to understand the flow situation and transport phenomena which occur near the stopper is to understand the behaviour of this two phase (steel, gas) flow. To simulate the flow situation near the stopper rod tip, water experiments are conducted using a convergent divergent nozzle with three different wall materials and three different contact angles respectively. These experiments show the high impact of the wettability of the wall material on the actual flow structure at a constant gas flow rate.

  13. Practical Strategies for Stable Operation of HFF-QCM in Continuous Air Flow

    PubMed Central

    Wessels, Alexander; Klöckner, Bernhard; Siering, Carsten; Waldvogel, Siegfried R.

    2013-01-01

    Currently there are a few fields of application using quartz crystal microbalances (QCM). Because of environmental conditions and insufficient resolution of the microbalance, chemical sensing of volatile organic compounds in an open system was as yet not possible. In this study we present strategies on how to use 195 MHz fundamental quartz resonators for a mobile sensor platform to detect airborne analytes. Commonly the use of devices with a resonant frequency of about 10 MHz is standard. By increasing the frequency to 195 MHz the frequency shift increases by a factor of almost 400. Unfortunately, such kinds of quartz crystals tend to exhibit some challenges to obtain a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. It was possible to reduce the noise in frequency in a continuous air flow of 7.5 m/s to 0.4 Hz [i.e., σ(τ) = 2 × 10−9] by elucidating the major source of noise. The air flow in the vicinity of the quartz was analyzed to reduce turbulences. Furthermore, we found a dependency between the acceleration sensitivity and mechanical stress induced by an internal thermal gradient. By reducing this gradient, we achieved reduction of the sensitivity to acceleration by more than one decade. Hence, the resulting sensor is more robust to environmental conditions such as temperature, acceleration and air flow. PMID:24021970

  14. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in convective air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Daniel; Bosbach, Johannes; Wagner, Claus

    2014-03-01

    Thermal convective air flows are of great relevance in fundamental studies and technical applications such as heat exchangers or indoor ventilation. Since these kinds of flow are driven by temperature gradients, simultaneous measurements of instantaneous velocity and temperature fields are highly desirable. A possible solution is the combination of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle image thermography (PIT) using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) as tracer particles. While combined PIV and PIT is already state of the art for measurements in liquids, this is not yet the case for gas flows. In this study we address the adaptation of the measuring technique to gaseous fluids with respect to the generation of the tracer particles, the particle illumination and the image filtering process. Results of the simultaneous PIV/PIT stemming from application to a fluid system with continuous air exchange are presented. The measurements were conducted in a cuboidal convection sample with air in- and outlet at a Rayleigh number Ra ≈ 9.0 × 107. They prove the feasibility of the method by providing absolute and relative temperature accuracies of σT = 0.19 K and σΔT = 0.06 K, respectively. Further open issues that have to be addressed in order to mature the technique are identified.

  15. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor.

  16. Hybridized electromagnetic-triboelectric nanogenerator for scavenging air-flow energy to sustainably power temperature sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue; Wang, Shuhua; Yang, Ya; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-04-28

    We report a hybridized nanogenerator with dimensions of 6.7 cm × 4.5 cm × 2 cm and a weight of 42.3 g that consists of two triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) and two electromagnetic generators (EMGs) for scavenging air-flow energy. Under an air-flow speed of about 18 m/s, the hybridized nanogenerator can deliver largest output powers of 3.5 mW for one TENG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 8.8 mW/g and 14.6 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 3 MΩ and 1.8 mW for one EMG (in correspondence of power per unit mass/volume: 0.3 mW/g and 0.4 kW/m(3)) at a loading resistance of 2 kΩ, respectively. The hybridized nanogenerator can be utilized to charge a capacitor of 3300 μF to sustainably power four temperature sensors for realizing self-powered temperature sensor networks. Moreover, a wireless temperature sensor driven by a hybridized nanogenerator charged Li-ion battery can work well to send the temperature data to a receiver/computer at a distance of 1.5 m. This work takes a significant step toward air-flow energy harvesting and its potential applications in self-powered wireless sensor networks.

  17. Flow Field in a Single-Stage Model Air Turbine With Seal Rings and Pre-Swirled Purge Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Dennis M.

    Modern gas turbines operate at high mainstream gas temperatures and pressures, which requires high durability materials. A method of preventing these hot gases from leaking into the turbine cavities is essential for improved reliability and cost reduction. Utilizing bleed-off air from the compressor to cool internal components has been a common solution, but at the cost of decreasing turbine performance. The present work thoroughly describes the complex flow field between the mainstream gas and a single rotor-stator disk cavity, and mechanisms of mainstream gas ingestion. A combined approach of experimental measurement and numerical simulation are performed on the flow in a single-stage model gas turbine. Mainstream gas ingestion into the cavity is further reduced by utilizing two axially overlapping seal rings, one on the rotor disk and the other on the stator wall. Secondary purge air is injected into the rotor-stator cavity pre-swirled through the stator radially inboard of the two seal rings. Flow field predictions from the simulations are compared against experimental measurements of static pressure, velocity, and tracer gas concentration acquired in a nearly identical model configuration. Operational conditions were performed with a main airflow Reynolds number of 7.86e4 and a rotor disk speed of 3000rpm. Additionally the rotational Reynolds number was 8.74 e5 with a purge air nondimensional flow rate cw=4806. The simulation models a 1/14 rotationally periodic sector of the turbine rig, consisting of four rotor blades and four stator vanes. Gambit was used to generate the three-dimensional unstructured grids ranging from 10 to 20 million cells. Effects of turbulence were modeled using the single-equation Spalart-Allmaras as well as the realizable k-epsilon models. Computations were performed using FLUENT for both a simplified steady-state and subsequent time-dependent formulation. Simulation results show larger scale structures across the entire sector angle

  18. Studies on the mixing of liquid jets and pre-atomized sprays in confined swirling air flows for lean direct injection combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jun-Young

    A lean direct injection (LDI) combustion concept was introduced recently to obtain both low NOsbx emissions and high performance for advanced aircraft gas turbine engines. It was reported that pollutant emissions, especially NOsbx, in a lean combustion mode depend significantly on the degree of mixing (mixedness) of supplied air and liquid fuel droplets. From a viewpoint of environmental protection, therefore, uniform mixing of fuel and air in a very short period of time, i.e., well-stirred mixing, is crucially important in the LDI combustion mode. In the present study, as the first stage toward understanding the combustion phenomena in a lean direct injection (LDI) mode, the hydrodynamic behavior of liquid jets and pre-atomized sprays in confined swirling air flows is investigated. Laser-based flow visualization and image analysis techniques are applied to analyze the instantaneous motion of the mixing process of the jets and pre-atomized sprays. Statistical analysis system (SAS) software is utilized to analyze the experimental data, and correlate experimental parameters. Statistical parameters, such as centrality, degree of spread, and total area ratio of particles, are defined in this study, and used to quantify the mixedness (degree of mixing) of liquid particles in confined geometry. Two empirical equations are obtained to predict jet intact lengths and spray angles, respectively, in confined swirling air flows. It is found that initial jet characteristics, such as intact length and spray angle, determine the mixing of the liquid particles resulting from the jet. It is verified that image analysis is feasible in quantitative determination of the mixedness of liquid particles. Even though substantial improvements in liquid fuel injector systems are required before they can be considered adequate for LDI combustion at high pressure and high temperature, the results and ideas obtained from the present study will help engineers find better mixing methods for LDI

  19. Analysis of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans using a 3D sonic anemometer.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, F Javier; Vidal, Mariano; Boné, Antonio; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The flow of air generated by a new design of air assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans of reversed rotation was analyzed. For this goal, a 3D sonic anemometer has been used (accuracy: 1.5%; measurement range: 0 to 45 m/s). The study was divided into a static test and a dynamic test. During the static test, the air velocity in the working vicinity of the sprayer was measured considering the following machine configurations: (1) one activated fan regulated at three air flows (machine working as a traditional sprayer); (2) two activated fans regulated at three air flows for each fan. In the static test 72 measurement points were considered. The location of the measurement points was as follow: left and right sides of the sprayer; three sections of measurement (A, B and C); three measurement distances from the shaft of the machine (1.5 m, 2.5 m and 3.5 m); and four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). The static test results have shown significant differences in the module and the vertical angle of the air velocity vector in function of the regulations of the sprayer. In the dynamic test, the air velocity was measured at 2.5 m from the axis of the sprayer considering four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). In this test, the sprayer regulations were: one or two activated fans; one air flow for each fan; forward speed of 2.8 km/h. The use of one fan (back) or two fans (back and front) produced significant differences on the duration of the presence of wind in the measurement point and on the direction of the air velocity vector. The module of the air velocity vector was not affected by the number of activated fans.

  20. Comparison of Space Shuttle Hot Gas Manifold analysis to air flow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, P. K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper summarizes several recent analyses of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Hot Gas Manifold and compares predicted flow environments to air flow data. Codes used in these analyses include INS3D, PAGE, PHOENICS, and VAST. Both laminar (Re = 250, M = 0.30) and turbulent (Re = 1.9 million, M = 0.30) results are discussed, with the latter being compared to data for system losses, outer wall static pressures, and manifold exit Mach number profiles. Comparison of predicted results for the turbulent case to air flow data shows that the analysis using INS3D predicted system losses within 1 percent error, while the PHOENICS, PAGE, and VAST codes erred by 31, 35, and 47 percent, respectively. The INS3D, PHOENICS, and PAGE codes did a reasonable job of predicting outer wall static pressure, while the PHOENICS code predicted exit Mach number profiles with acceptable accuracy. INS3D was approximately an order of magnitude more efficient than the other codes in terms of code speed and memory requirements. In general, it is seen that complex internal flows in manifold-like geometries can be predicted with a limited degree of confidence, and further development is necessary to improve both efficiency and accuracy of codes if they are to be used as design tools for complex three-dimensional geometries.

  1. Electro-Hydrodynamics and Kinetic Modeling of Dry and Humid Air Flows Activated by Corona Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    P. Sarrette, J.; Eichwald, O.; Marchal, F.; Ducasse, O.; Yousfi, M.

    2016-05-01

    The present work is devoted to the 2D simulation of a point-to-plane Atmospheric Corona Discharge Reactor (ACDR) powered by a DC high voltage supply. The corona reactor is periodically crossed by thin mono filamentary streamers with a natural repetition frequency of some tens of kHz. The study compares the results obtained in dry air and in air mixed with a small amount of water vapour (humid air). The simulation involves the electro-dynamics, chemical kinetics and neutral gas hydrodynamics phenomena that influence the kinetics of the chemical species transformation. Each discharge lasts about one hundred of a nanosecond while the post-discharge occurring between two successive discharges lasts one hundred of a microsecond. The ACDR is crossed by a lateral dry or humid air flow initially polluted with 400 ppm of NO. After 5 ms, the time corresponding to the occurrence of 50 successive discharge/post-discharge phases, a higher NO removal rate and a lower ozone production rate are found in humid air. This change is due to the presence of the HO2 species formed from the H primary radical in the discharge zone.

  2. Effects of cold dry air nasal stimulation on airway mucosal blood flow in humans.

    PubMed

    Le Merre, C; Isber, J; Chediak, A D; Wanner, A

    2003-10-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that nasal challenges can induce reflex responses in the respiratory system. Some authors have described bronchoconstriction and modification of the pattern of breathing following nasal challenges by irritants and cold air. We propose to determine the effect of nasal stimulation with cold dry air on airway mucosal blood flow (Qaw) in the proximal tracheal bronchial tree of healthy humans. Nine healthy subjects participated in the study. Baseline measurement Qaw, nasal airway resistance (NAR) and airway caliber by specific airways conductance (SGaw) were followed by nasal challenge with cold dry air. Qaw, NAR and Sgaw were determined after the challenge. In those subjects in which a significant decline in Qaw was recorded the protocol was repeated after pretreatment with nasal anesthesia using topical lidocaine. Cold dry air challenge produced a significant decrease in mean Qaw for the nine subjects and this response was abolished by pretreatment with nasal anesthesia using topical lidocaine. There was no significant change in Sgaw and NAR after the challenge and topical lidocaine anesthesia. Our data indicates that nasal stimulation with cold dry air leads to a reduction in Qaw and that this effect may be mediated by a nasal reflex.

  3. Onsite survey on the mechanism of passive aeration and air flow path in a semi-aerobic landfill.

    PubMed

    Matsuto, Toshihiko; Zhang, Xin; Matsuo, Takayuki; Yamada, Shuhei

    2015-02-01

    The semi-aerobic landfill is a widely accepted landfill concept in Japan because it promotes stabilization of leachates and waste via passive aeration without using any type of mechanical equipment. Ambient air is thought to be supplied to the landfill through a perforated pipe network made of leachate collection pipe laid along the bottom and a vertically erected gas vent. However, its underlying air flow path and driving forces are unclear because empirical data from real-world landfills is inadequate. The objective of this study is to establish scientific evidence about the aeration mechanisms and air flow path by an on-site survey of a full-scale, semi-aerobic landfill. First, all passive vents located in the landfill were monitored with respect to temperature level and gas velocity in different seasons. We found a linear correlation between the outflow rate and gas temperature, suggesting that air flow is driven by a buoyancy force caused by the temperature difference between waste in the landfill and the ambient temperature. Some vents located near the landfill bottom acted as air inflow vents. Second, we conducted a tracer test to determine the air flow path between two vents, by injecting tracer gas from an air sucking vent. The resulting slowly increasing gas concentration at the neighboring vent suggested that fresh air flow passes through the waste layer toward the gas vents from leachate collection pipes, as well as directly flowing through the pipe network. Third, we monitored the temperature of gas flowing out of a vent at night. Since the temperature drop of the gas was much smaller than that of the environment, the air collected at the gas vents was estimated to flow mostly through the waste layer, i.e., the semi-aerobic landfill has considerable aeration ability under the appropriate conditions.

  4. Nocturnal Katabatic Air Flow in a Forested Watershed: Measurements and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unsworth, M. H.; Pypker, T.; Ocheltree, T.; Mahrt, L.; Skyllingstad, E. D.; Bond, B. J.

    2003-12-01

    Many productive forest ecosystems are in mountainous regions where their carbon and energy exchange with the atmosphere cannot be readily studied using micrometeorological methods. At night, katabatic air drainage flow commonly develops in sloping forested watersheds. Such flow is maintained by a three-way balance between gravitational forcing, turbulent mixing and non-linear advection. The carbon dioxide concentration and carbon isotope composition in nocturnal drainage flows may provide information about recent ecosystem productivity, but to interpret these data it is necessary to understand how the properties of the flow are influenced by forest structure and turbulence. We report measurements from a tower erected near the base of an incised watershed in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the Oregon Cascade Range, and include early results from a numerical modeling program. The watershed is forested with Douglas-fir about 45 years old and 25m high. The tower, 28m high, carries sonic and cup anemometers and thermistor temperature sensors at eight levels. Katabatic drainage flow occurs almost every night and persists for up to 18 hours. The depth of the flow is at least 28m on occasions, and the windspeed often peaks in mid-canopy. The in-canopy flow is well-mixed, with very small vertical gradients of carbon dioxide concentration and temperature. There are some indications that radiative cooling at the canopy top may encourage additional uncoupled drainage flow above the canopy. A numerical model of katabatic flow on slopes is being modified to include roughness elements to simulate a forest canopy. Comparisons between observations and the model will be reported.

  5. Study of interfacial area transport and sensitivity analysis for air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Sun, X.; Ishii, M.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-09-01

    The interfacial area transport equation applicable to the bubbly flow is presented. The model is evaluated against the data acquired by the state-of-the-art miniaturized double-sensor conductivity probe in an adiabatic air-water co-current vertical test loop under atmospheric pressure condition. In general, a good agreement, within the measurement error of plus/minus 10%, is observed for a wide range in the bubbly flow regime. The sensitivity analysis on the individual particle interaction mechanisms demonstrates the active interactions between the bubbles and highlights the mechanisms playing the dominant role in interfacial area transport. The analysis employing the drift flux model is also performed for the data acquired. Under the given flow conditions, the distribution parameter of 1.076 yields the best fit to the data.

  6. Interfacial structures of confined air-water two-phase bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ishii, M.; Wu, Q.; McCreary, D.; Beus, S.G.

    2000-08-01

    The interfacial structure of the two-phase flows is of great importance in view of theoretical modeling and practical applications. In the present study, the focus is made on obtaining detailed local two-phase parameters in the air-water bubbly flow in a rectangular vertical duct using the double-sensor conductivity probe. The characteristic wall-peak is observed in the profiles of the interracial area concentration and the void fraction. The development of the interfacial area concentration along the axial direction of the flow is studied in view of the interfacial area transport and bubble interactions. The experimental data is compared with the drift flux model with C{sub 0} = 1.35.

  7. Flow patterns of natural convection in an air-filled vertical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakitani, Shunichi

    1998-08-01

    Flow patterns of two-dimensional natural convection in a vertical air-filled tall cavity with differentially heated sidewalls are investigated. Numerical simulations based on a finite difference method are carried out for a wide range of Rayleigh numbers and aspect ratios from the onset of the steady multicellular flow, through the reverse transition to the unicellular pattern, to the unsteady multicellular flow. For aspect ratios (height/width) from 10 to 24, the various cellular structures characterized by the number of secondary cells are clarified from the simulations by means of gradually increasing Rayleigh number to 106. Unsteady multicellular solutions are found in some region of Rayleigh numbers less than those at which the reverse transition has occurred.

  8. Ground-to-air flow visualization using Solar Calcium-K line Background-Oriented Schlieren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Michael A.; Haering, Edward A.

    2017-01-01

    The Calcium-K Eclipse Background-Oriented Schlieren experiment was performed as a proof of concept test to evaluate the effectiveness of using the solar disk as a background to perform the Background-Oriented Schlieren (BOS) method of flow visualization. A ground-based imaging system was equipped with a Calcium-K line optical etalon filter to enable the use of the chromosphere of the sun as the irregular background to be used for BOS. A US Air Force T-38 aircraft performed three supersonic runs which eclipsed the sun as viewed from the imaging system. The images were successfully post-processed using optical flow methods to qualitatively reveal the density gradients in the flow around the aircraft.

  9. Experimental modeling of air blowing into a turbulent boundary layer using an external pressure flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V. I.; Boiko, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We have experimentally investigated the characteristics of an incompressible turbulent boundary layer on a plane plate upon the passive blowing of air through a fine-perforated surface and flushing it by supplying an external pressure flow through a wind tunnel using an intake device equipped with an attachment for draining the boundary layer on the inactive side of the plate. A stable decrease in the local values of the surface coefficient of friction, which reaches 80% at the end of the perforated region, has been detected over the length of the plate. The possibility of controlling surface friction by changing the velocity of the external flow and selecting the meshes and filters at the inlet to the flow passage has been demonstrated.

  10. Numerical study of atmospheric air flow in the vicinity of urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valger, S. A.; Fedorova, N. N.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    The article is devoted to the numerical simulation of turbulent air flows in the vicinity of building complexes. The simulation was performed under isothermal assumption on the basis of 3D URANS equations supplemented with the k-ω SST turbulence model. The ANSYS Fluent Software was used as the main modeling tool. The atmospheric flow in the neighborhood of a building of a complex shape was carried out taking into account the surrounding objects. The numerical simulation was performed under the conditions of the experiments. The 3D structure of the flow in the vicinity of the building was obtained and the comparison of the calculation results with the experimental data on the pressure coefficient distribution on the walls of the building was performed.

  11. A study of the accuracy of neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerho, Michael F.

    1993-01-01

    Research has been performed to determine the accuracy of neutrally buoyant and near neutrally buoyant bubbles used as flow tracers in air. Theoretical, computational, and experimental results are presented to evaluate the dynamics of bubble trajectories and factors affecting their ability to trace flow-field streamlines. The equation of motion for a single bubble was obtained and evaluated using a computational scheme to determine the factors which affect a bubble's trajectory. A two-dimensional experiment was also conducted to experimentally determine bubble trajectories in the stagnation region of NACA 0012 airfoil at 0 deg angle of attack using a commercially available helium bubble generation system. Physical properties of the experimental bubble trajectories were estimated using the computational scheme. These properties included the density ratio and diameter of the individual bubbles. the helium bubble system was then used to visualize and document the flow field about a 30 deg swept semispan wing with simulated glaze ice. Results were compared to Navier-Stokes calculations and surface oil flow visualization. The theoretical and computational analysis have shown that neutrally buoyant bubbles will trace even the most complex flow patterns. Experimental analysis revealed that the use of bubbles to trace flow patterns should be limited to qualitative measurements unless care is taken to ensure neutral buoyancy. This is due to the difficulty in the production of neutrally buoyant bubbles.

  12. Flow mechanism for the long-range transport of air pollutants by the sea breeze causing inland nighttime high oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Ueda, H.; Mitsumoto, S.; Kurita, H.

    1988-02-01

    Flow mechanism causing nightttime smog was investigated by analyzing 1) continuous records of meteorological data and concentration of oxidants (Ox) for 15 days and 2) aircraft data along the transportation route of a polluted air mass.

  13. An experimental validation of a turbulence model for air flow in a mining chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Wodziak, W.; Jaszczur, M.; Nowak, R.; Szmyd, J. S.

    2014-08-01

    In copper mines, excavation chambers are ventilated by jet fans. A fan is installed at the inlet of the dead-end chamber, which is usually 20-30m long. The effectiveness of ventilation depends on the stream range generated by the fan. The velocity field generated by the supply air stream is fully three-dimensional and the flow is turbulent. Currently, the parameters of 3D air flows are determined using the CFD approach. This paper presents the results of experimental testing and numerical simulations of airflow in a laboratory model of a blind channel, aired by a forced ventilation system. The aim of the investigation is qualitative and quantitative verification of computer modelling data. The analysed layout is a geometrically re-scaled and simplified model of a real object. The geometrical scale of the physical model is 1:10. The model walls are smooth, the channel cross-section is rectangular. Measurements were performed for the average airflow velocity in the inlet duct equal 35.4m/s, which gives a Reynolds number of about 180 000. The components of the velocity vector were measured using the Particle Image Velocimetry approach. The numerical procedures presented in this paper use two turbulence models: the standard k-ɛ model and the Reynolds Stress model. The experimental results have been compared against the results of numerical simulations. In the investigated domain of flow - extending from the air inlet to the blind wall of the chamber - we can distinguish two zones with recirculating flows. The first, reaching a distance of about lm from the inlet is characterized by intense mixing of air. A second vortex is formed into a distance greater than lm from the inlet. Such an image of the velocity field results from both the measurements and calculations. Based on this study, we can conclude that the RSM model provides better predictions than the standard k-ɛ model. Good qualitative agreement is achieved between Reynolds Stress model predictions and measured

  14. On the potential importance of transient air flow in advective radon entry into buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; Tsang, Y.W.; Holman, H.Y. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors have investigated, using a mathematical model, the temporal variations of air flux within the soil mass surrounding a basement in the presence of time dependent periodic variations of barometric pressure and a persistent under-pressure at the basement. The results of transient air flow show that for a homogeneous soil medium, the effects of barometric fluctuations are most significant in the cases where soil permeability to air is low and the fluctuation frequency is high. In these cases, the barometric fluctuation can greatly enhance the magnitude of fluxes as well as introduce flow direction reversals from surrounding soil into the basement. These large fluxes with direction reversals have strong implications in regard to advective transport of radon. The results suggest that the transient oscillations have to be accounted for in quantifying radon entry into buildings. In the actual field set up, the transient behavior will be further influenced by soil permeability heterogeneity, by soil moisture variations, and by the effects of multiple periodic components in the barometric pressure fluctuations.

  15. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i

  16. Simplified configuration for the combustor of an oil burner using a low pressure, high flow air-atomizing nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Butcher, Thomas A.; Celebi, Yusuf; Fisher, Leonard

    2000-09-15

    The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion of oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The improved fuel burner uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle that does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design. Inventors:

  17. Extinction Dynamics of a Co-flow Diffusion Flame by Very Small Water Droplets Injected into the Air Stream

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-28

    flame extinction with UFM are available in the literature. Ndubizu et al. [18-20] conducted experiments on the effects of UFM on a forced convection ...injected air Reynolds number of 4 x 105 (Re=650). This suggests that the bulk of the air is affected by the natural convection and deviates...significantly from the streamlines of the injected air at the bottom of the burner. Therefore, the fluid flow set up by the natural convection is

  18. Air and groundwater flow at the interface between fractured host rock and a bentonite buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessirier, B.; Jarsjo, J.; Frampton, A.

    2014-12-01

    Designs of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel include several levels of confinement. The Swedish and Finnish concept KBS-3 targets for example sparsely fractured crystalline bedrock as host formation and would have the waste canisters embedded in an engineered buffer of compacted MX-80 bentonite. The host rock is a highly heterogeneous dual porosity material containing fractures and a rock matrix. Bentonite is a complex expansive porous material. Its water content and mechanical properties are interdependent. Beyond the specific physics of unsaturated flow and transport in each medium, the interface between them is critical. Detailed knowledge of the transitory two-phase flow regime, induced by the insertion of the unsaturated buffer in a saturated rock environment, is necessary to assess the performance of planned KBS-3 deposition holes. A set of numerical simulations based on the equations of two-phase flow for water and air in porous media were conducted to investigate the dynamics of air and groundwater flow near the rock/bentonite interface in the period following installation of the unsaturated bentonite buffer. We assume state of the two-phase flow parameter values for bentonite from laboratory water uptake tests and typical fracture and rock properties from the Äspö Hard rock laboratory (Sweden) gathered under several field characterization campaigns. The results point to desaturation of the rock domain as far as 10 cm away from the interface into matrix-dominated regions for up to 160 days. Similar observations were made during the Bentonite Rock Interaction Experiment (BRIE) at the Äspö HRL, with a desaturation sustained for even longer times. More than the mere time to mechanical and hydraulic equilibrium, the occurrence of sustained unsaturated conditions opens the possibility for biogeochemical processes that could be critical in the safety assessment of the planned repository.

  19. The impact of traffic-flow patterns on air quality in urban street canyons.

    PubMed

    Thaker, Prashant; Gokhale, Sharad

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of different urban traffic-flow patterns on pollutant dispersion in different winds in a real asymmetric street canyon. Free-flow traffic causes more turbulence in the canyon facilitating more dispersion and a reduction in pedestrian level concentration. The comparison of with and without a vehicle-induced-turbulence revealed that when winds were perpendicular, the free-flow traffic reduced the concentration by 73% on the windward side with a minor increase of 17% on the leeward side, whereas for parallel winds, it reduced the concentration by 51% and 29%. The congested-flow traffic increased the concentrations on the leeward side by 47% when winds were perpendicular posing a higher risk to health, whereas reduced it by 17-42% for parallel winds. The urban air quality and public health can, therefore, be improved by improving the traffic-flow patterns in street canyons as vehicle-induced turbulence has been shown to contribute significantly to dispersion.

  20. Test Data of Flow Field of Shuttle SRM Nozzle Joint with Bond Defects, Using Unheated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, Leroy M.; McAnally, James V.; Hengel, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The nozzle-to-case joint on the Shuttle SRM (as redesigned after the Challenger accident) features an adhesive sealant filling and bonding the joint, with a wiper O-ring to prevent the adhesive from reaching and disabling the closure O-ring. Flawless implementation of that joint design would ensure that hot, corrosive propellant combustion gases never reach the closure O-ring. However, understanding the flow field related to bonding defects is prudent. A comprehensive test program was conducted to quantify such flow fields and associated heating environments. A two-dimensional, full-scale model represented 65 inches of the nozzle joint, using unheated air as the test medium, in a blowdown mode. Geometry variations modeled RSRM assembly tolerances, and two types of bonding defects: pullaways and blowholes. A range of the magnitude of each type defect was tested. Also a range of operational parameters was tested, representative of the RSRM flow environment, including duplication of RSRM Mach and Reynolds numbers. Extensive instrumentation was provided to quantify pressures, heat rates, and velocities. The resulting data established that larger geometric defects cause larger pressure and larger heating, at the closure O-ring region. Velocity trends were not so straight-forward. Variations in assembly tolerances did not generally affect flow fields or heating. Operational parameters affected flow fields and heating as might be expected, increasing density or velocity increased heating. Complete details of this test effort are presented.