Science.gov

Sample records for air flow velocities

  1. Measurement of velocity of air flow in the sinus maxillaris.

    PubMed

    Müsebeck, K; Rosenberg, H

    1979-03-01

    Anemometry with the hot wire and hot film technique previously described, enables the rhinologist to record slow and rapidly changing air flow in the maxillary sinus. The advantages and disadvantages of this method are considered. Anemometry together with manometry may be designated sinumetry and used as a diagnostic procedure following sinuscopy in chronic maxillary sinus disease. The value of the function from velocity of time allows the estimation of flow-volume in the sinus. Furthermore, the method is useful to evaluate the optimal therapy to restore ventilation in the case of an obstructed ostium demonstrated before and after surgical opening in the inferior meatus.

  2. Egomotion estimation with optic flow and air velocity sensors.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Adam J; Miller, Mikel M; Quinn, Roger D; Willis, Mark A

    2011-06-01

    We develop a method that allows a flyer to estimate its own motion (egomotion), the wind velocity, ground slope, and flight height using only inputs from onboard optic flow and air velocity sensors. Our artificial algorithm demonstrates how it could be possible for flying insects to determine their absolute egomotion using their available sensors, namely their eyes and wind sensitive hairs and antennae. Although many behaviors can be performed by only knowing the direction of travel, behavioral experiments indicate that odor tracking insects are able to estimate the wind direction and control their absolute egomotion (i.e., groundspeed). The egomotion estimation method that we have developed, which we call the opto-aeronautic algorithm, is tested in a variety of wind and ground slope conditions using a video recorded flight of a moth tracking a pheromone plume. Over all test cases that we examined, the algorithm achieved a mean absolute error in height of 7% or less. Furthermore, our algorithm is suitable for the navigation of aerial vehicles in environments where signals from the Global Positioning System are unavailable.

  3. New sensor for measurement of low air flow velocity. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Hashemian, M.; Riggsbee, E.T.

    1995-08-01

    The project described here is the Phase I feasibility study of a two-phase program to integrate existing technologies to provide a system for determining air flow velocity and direction in radiation work areas. Basically, a low air flow sensor referred to as a thermocouple flow sensor has been developed. The sensor uses a thermocouple as its sensing element. The response time of the thermocouple is measured using an existing in-situ method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) test. The response time results are then converted to a flow signal using a response time-versus-flow correlation. The Phase I effort has shown that a strong correlation exists between the response time of small diameter thermocouples and the ambient flow rate. As such, it has been demonstrated that thermocouple flow sensors can be used successfully to measure low air flow rates that can not be measured with conventional flow sensors. While the thermocouple flow sensor developed in this project was very successful in determining air flow velocity, determining air flow direction was beyond the scope of the Phase I project. Nevertheless, work was performed during Phase I to determine how the new flow sensor can be used to determine the direction, as well as the velocity, of ambient air movements. Basically, it is necessary to use either multiple flow sensors or move a single sensor in the monitoring area and make flow measurements at various locations sweeping the area from top to bottom and from left to right. The results can then be used with empirical or physical models, or in terms of directional vectors to estimate air flow patterns. The measurements can be made continuously or periodically to update the flow patterns as they change when people and objects are moved in the monitoring area. The potential for using multiple thermocouple flow sensors for determining air flow patterns will be examined in Phase II.

  4. Calibration of a system for measuring low air flow velocity in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krach, Andrzej; Kruczkowski, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This article presents the calibration of a system for measuring air flow velocity in a wind tunnel with a multiple-hole orifice. The comparative method was applied for the calibration. The method consists in equalising the air flow velocity in a test section of the tunnel with that of the hot-wire anemometer probe which should then read zero value. The hot-wire anemometer probe moves reciprocally in the tunnel test section with a constant velocity, aligned and opposite to the air velocity. Air velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that the minimum values of a periodic hot-wire anemometer signal displayed on an oscilloscope screen reach the lowest position (the minimum method). A sinusoidal component can be superimposed to the probe constant velocity. Then, the air flow velocity in the tunnel test section is adjusted so that, when the probe moves in the direction of air flow, only the second harmonic of the periodically variable velocity superimposed on the constant velocity (second harmonic method) remains at the output of the low-pass filter to which the hot-wire anemometer signal, displayed on the oscilloscope screen, is supplied. The velocity of the uniform motion of the hot-wire anemometer probe is measured with a magnetic linear encoder. The calibration of the system for the measurement of low air velocities in the wind tunnel was performed in the following steps: 1. Calibration of the linear encoder for the measurement of the uniform motion velocity of the hot-wire anemometer probe in the test section of the tunnel. 2. Calibration of the system for measurement of low air velocities with a multiple-hole orifice for the velocities of 0.1 and 0.25 m s-1: - (a) measurement of the probe movement velocity setting; - (b) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel test section with comparison according to the second harmonic method; - (c) measurement of air velocity in the tunnel with comparison according to the minimum method. The calibration

  5. Experimental analysis of the velocity field of the air flowing through the swirl diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaszczur, M.; Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Borowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the results of experimental studies of flow of air through diffusers. Presented laboratory model is a simplification of the real system and was made in a geometric scale 1:10. Simplifying refer both to the geometry of the object and conditions of air flow. The aim of the study is to determine the actual velocity fields of air flowing out of the swirl diffuser. The results obtained for the diffuser various settings are presented. We have tested various flow rates of air. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (SPIV) method was used to measure all velocity vector components. The experimental results allow to determine the actual penetration depth of the supply air into the room. This will allow for better definition of the conditions of ventilation in buildings.

  6. Measurement of temperature and velocity fields in a convective fluid flow in air using schlieren images.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, A; Moreno-Hernández, D; Guerrero-Viramontes, J A

    2013-08-01

    A convective fluid flow in air could be regulated if the physical process were better understood. Temperature and velocity measurements are required in order to obtain a proper characterization of a convective fluid flow. In this study, we show that a classical schlieren system can be used for simultaneous measurements of temperature and velocity in a convective fluid flow in air. The schlieren technique allows measurement of the average fluid temperature and velocity integrated in the direction of the test beam. Therefore, in our experiments we considered surfaces with isothermal conditions. Temperature measurements are made by relating the intensity level of each pixel in a schlieren image to the corresponding knife-edge position measured at the exit focal plane of the schlieren system. The same schlieren images were also used to measure the velocity of the fluid flow by using optical flow techniques. The algorithm implemented analyzes motion between consecutive schlieren frames to obtain a tracked sequence and finally velocity fields. The proposed technique was applied to measure the temperature and velocity fields in natural convection of air due to unconfined and confined heated rectangular plates.

  7. A multi-channel, low velocity, hot film anemometry system for measuring air flows in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Guire, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    A complete analytical and experimental development of a multichannel anemometry system is presented. The system consists of an array of low velocity sensors (0.0 m/s to 1.0 m/s), a constant current power supply, and the required data acquisition equipment. The velocity sensors can be scanned simultaneously yielding absolute air velocities and absolute ambient air temperatures at each of the probe positions in the array. One of the key results that this system can produce is the relationship between boundary layer flow and pressure driven flow through a large irregular aperture, such as a doorway, which up until now has been difficult to accomplish with regard to cost and experimental error incurred. 7 refs., 57 figs.

  8. Velocity and phase distribution measurements in vertical air-water annular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Vassallo, P.

    1997-07-01

    Annular flow topology for three air-water conditions in a vertical duct is investigated through the use of a traversing double-sensor hot-film anemometry probe and differential pressure measurements. Near wall measurements of mean and fluctuating velocities, as well as local void fraction, are taken in the liquid film, with the highest turbulent fluctuations occurring for the flow condition with the largest pressure drop. A modified law-of-the-wall formulation for wall shear is presented which, using near wall values of mean velocity and kinetic energy, agrees reasonably well with the average stress obtained from direct pressure drop measurements. The linear profile using wall coordinates in the logarithmic layer is preserved in annular flow; however, the slope and intercept of the profile differ from the single-phase values for the annular flow condition which has a thicker, more turbulent, liquid film.

  9. A model for sound velocity in a two-phase air-water bubbly flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, N.M.; Lin, W.K.; Pei, B.S.; Hsu, Y.Y. )

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, wave propagation in a homogeneous, low void fraction, two-phase air-water bubbly flow is analyzed through the compressibility of a single bubble to derive a P({rho}) relation; the dispersion relation is then derived by a homogeneous model. The phase velocity and attenuation calculated from the model are compared with existing data and are in good agreement. The momentum transfer effect is considered through the virtual mass term and is significant at a higher void fraction. The interfacial heat transfer between phases is significant at low frequency, while bubble scattering effects are important at high frequency (near resonance). Bubble behavior at both low and high frequency is derived based on the isothermal and the adiabatic cases, respectively. The phase velocity occurs at the limiting condition in both cases. Furthermore, resonance is present in the model, and the resonant frequency is determined.

  10. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in convective air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Daniel; Bosbach, Johannes; Wagner, Claus

    2014-03-01

    Thermal convective air flows are of great relevance in fundamental studies and technical applications such as heat exchangers or indoor ventilation. Since these kinds of flow are driven by temperature gradients, simultaneous measurements of instantaneous velocity and temperature fields are highly desirable. A possible solution is the combination of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle image thermography (PIT) using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs) as tracer particles. While combined PIV and PIT is already state of the art for measurements in liquids, this is not yet the case for gas flows. In this study we address the adaptation of the measuring technique to gaseous fluids with respect to the generation of the tracer particles, the particle illumination and the image filtering process. Results of the simultaneous PIV/PIT stemming from application to a fluid system with continuous air exchange are presented. The measurements were conducted in a cuboidal convection sample with air in- and outlet at a Rayleigh number Ra ≈ 9.0 × 107. They prove the feasibility of the method by providing absolute and relative temperature accuracies of σT = 0.19 K and σΔT = 0.06 K, respectively. Further open issues that have to be addressed in order to mature the technique are identified.

  11. A pulsed wire probe for the measurement of velocity and flow direction in slowly moving air.

    PubMed

    Olson, D E; Parker, K H; Snyder, B

    1984-02-01

    This report describes the theory and operation of a pulsed-probe anemometer designed to measure steady three-dimensional velocity fields typical of pulmonary tracheo-bronchial airflows. Local velocities are determined by measuring the transport time and orientation of a thermal pulse initiated at an upstream wire and sensed at a downstream wire. The transport time is a reproducible function of velocity and the probe wire spacing, as verified by a theoretical model of convective heat transfer. When calibrated the anemometer yields measurements of velocity accurate to +/- 5 percent and resolves flow direction to within 1 deg at airspeeds greater than or equal to 10 cm/s. Spatial resolution is +/- 0.5 mm. Measured flow patterns typical of curved circular pipes are included as examples of its application.

  12. Calculation and measurement of a neutral air flow velocity impacting a high voltage capacitor with asymmetrical electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Malík, M. Primas, J.; Kopecký, V.; Svoboda, M.

    2014-01-15

    This paper deals with the effects surrounding phenomenon of a mechanical force generated on a high voltage asymmetrical capacitor (the so called Biefeld-Brown effect). A method to measure this force is described and a formula to calculate its value is also given. Based on this the authors derive a formula characterising the neutral air flow velocity impacting an asymmetrical capacitor connected to high voltage. This air flow under normal circumstances lessens the generated force. In the following part this velocity is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry measuring technique and the results of the theoretically calculated velocity and the experimentally measured value are compared. The authors found a good agreement between the results of both approaches.

  13. Tunable diode laser absorption sensor for temperature and velocity measurements of O2 in air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philippe, L. C.; Hanson, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A fast and nonintrusive velocity and temperature diagnostic based on oxygen absorption is presented. The system uses a GaAlAs tunable diode laser, ramped and modulated in wavelength at high frequency. Detection is performed at twice the modulating frequency, leading to second harmonic absorption lineshapes. Velocity is inferred from the wavelength shift of the absorption line center due to the Doppler effect. Temperature is determined by comparing experimental and calculated lineshapes. Capabilities of the technique for studies of transient high-speed flows are demonstrated in shock tube experiments. Good agreement is obtained with predicted temperatures and velocities when pressure-induced shifts are accounted for.

  14. Anomalous high-velocity outbursts ejected from the surface of tungsten microdroplets in a flow of argon-air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, I. P.; Dolmatov, A. V.; Gulyaev, P. Yu; Iordan, V. I.; Kharlamov, M. Yu; Krivtsun, I. V.

    2016-02-01

    For the first time, a phenomenon of high-velocity outbursts ejected from the surface of liquid tungsten microparticles in a flow of argon-air plasma under atmospheric pressure was observed. As tungsten particles sized 50 to 200 μm moved in a plasma flow, stratified radiating spheres up to 9 mm in diameter formed around such particles. The spheres were sources of high-velocity outbursts whose ejection direction coincided with the direction of the plasma flow. The velocity of the anomalous outbursts amounted to 3-20 km/s. In the outburst images, the distribution of glow intensity along outburst tracks exhibited a wavy decaying behavior with a wavelength of 5-15 mm. Possible physical factors that could be the cause of the phenomenon are discussed.

  15. Performance of a combined three-hole conductivity probe for void fraction and velocity measurement in air-water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, João Eduardo; Pereira, Nuno H. C.; Matos, Jorge; Frizell, Kathleen H.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a three-hole pressure probe with back-flushing combined with a conductivity probe, used for measuring simultaneously the magnitude and direction of the velocity vector in complex air-water flows, is described in this paper. The air-water flows envisaged in the current work are typically those occurring around the rotors of impulse hydraulic turbines (like the Pelton and Cross-Flow turbines), where the flow direction is not known prior to the data acquisition. The calibration of both the conductivity and three-hole pressure components of the combined probe in a rig built for the purpose, where the probe was placed in a position similar to that adopted for the flow measurements, will be reported. After concluding the calibration procedure, the probe was utilized in the outside region of a Cross-Flow turbine rotor. The experimental results obtained in the present study illustrate the satisfactory performance of the combined probe, and are encouraging toward its use for characterizing the velocity field of other complex air-water flows.

  16. Performance of a Compression-ignition Engine with a Precombustion Chamber Having High-Velocity Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A; Moore, C S

    1931-01-01

    Presented here are the results of performance tests made with a single-cylinder, four stroke cycle, compression-ignition engine. These tests were made on a precombustion chamber type of cylinder head designed to have air velocity and tangential air flow in both the chamber and cylinder. The performance was investigated for variable load and engine speed, type of fuel spray, valve opening pressure, injection period and, for the spherical chamber, position of the injection spray relative to the air flow. The pressure variations between the pear-shaped precombustion chamber and the cylinder for motoring and full load conditions were determined with a Farnboro electric indicator. The combustion chamber designs tested gave good mixing of a single compact fuel spray with the air, but did not control the ensuing combustion sufficiently. Relative to each other, the velocity of air flow was too high, the spray dispersion by injection too great, and the metering effect of the cylinder head passage insufficient. The correct relation of these factors is of the utmost importance for engine performance.

  17. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity of air flow over 1000°C using two color phosphor thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuta, Masatoshi; Someya, Satoshi; Munakata, Tetsuo; LCS Team

    2016-11-01

    Thermal barrier coatings were applied to the gas turbines and the internal combustion engines for the high thermal efficiency. The evaluation and the improvement of coatings require to measure transient gaseous flow near the wall with coatings. An aim of this study is to combine a two color phosphor thermometry with the PIV to measure simultaneously temperature and velocity of the gas over 1000°C. The temperature and velocity distribution of an impinging jet of high temperature air was simultaneously visualized in experiments. The temperature was estimated from an intensity ratio of luminescent in different ranges of wavelength, 500 600 nm and 400 480 nm. Uncertainty of measured temperature was less than 10°C. Temperatures measured by the developed method and by thermocouples were agreed well. The measured velocity by the PIV with phosphor particles were also agreed well with the velocity measured by a Laser Doppler Velocimeter.

  18. Effect of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics in laser ignition of natural gas and air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, J.; Riley, M. J. W.; Borman, A.; Dowding, C.; Kirk, A.; Bickerton, R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser induced spark ignition offers the potential for greater reliability and consistency in ignition of lean air/fuel mixtures. This increased reliability is essential for the application of gas turbines as primary or secondary reserve energy sources in smart grid systems, enabling the integration of renewable energy sources whose output is prone to fluctuation over time. This work details a study into the effect of flow velocity and temperature on minimum ignition energies in laser-induced spark ignition in an atmospheric combustion test rig, representative of a sub 15 MW industrial gas turbine (Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd., Lincoln, UK). Determination of minimum ignition energies required for a range of temperatures and flow velocities is essential for establishing an operating window in which laser-induced spark ignition can operate under realistic, engine-like start conditions. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 532 nm wavelength and 4 ns pulse length. Analysis of the influence of flow velocity and temperature on ignition characteristics is presented in terms of required photon flux density, a useful parameter to consider during the development laser ignition systems.

  19. Experimental determination of the velocity and strain rate field in a laminar H2/Air counter-flow diffusion flame via LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, S. H.; Dancey, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the axial and radial components of velocity on the air side of stagnation in an axisymmetric H2/Air laminar counter-flow diffusion flame are reported. Results include the two-dimensional velocity field and computed velocity gradients (strain rates) along the stagnation streamline at two 'characteristic' strain rates, below the extinction limit. The measurements generally verify the modeling assumptions appropriate to the model of Kee et al. (1988). The 'traditional' potential flow model is not consistent with the measured results.

  20. Measurements of the Air-flow Velocity in the Cylinder of an Airplane Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenger, Hermann

    1939-01-01

    The object of the present investigation is to determine the velocity in the BMW-VI cylinder of an externally driven single-cylinder test engine at high engine speeds using the hot-wire method of Ulsamer.

  1. Provide a suitable range to include the thermal creeping effect on slip velocity and temperature jump of an air flow in a nanochannel by lattice Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimipour, Arash

    2017-01-01

    The thermal creeping effect on slip velocity of air forced convection through a nanochannel is studied for the first time by using a lattice Boltzmann method. The nanochannel side walls are kept hot while the cold inlet air streams along them. The computations are presented for the wide range of Reynolds number, Knudsen number and Eckert number while slip velocity and temperature jump effects are involved. Moreover appropriate validations are performed versus previous works concerned the micro-nanoflows. The achieved results are shown as the velocity and temperature profiles at different cross sections, streamlines and isotherms and also the values of slip velocity and temperature jump along the nanochannel walls. The ability of the lattice Boltzmann method to simulate the thermal creeping effects on hydrodynamic and thermal domains of flow is shown at this study; so that its effects should be involved at lower values of Eckert number and higher values of Reynolds number especially at entrance region where the most temperature gradient exists.

  2. Investigations of the air flow velocity field structure above the wavy surface under severe wind conditions by particle image velosimetry technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Kandaurov, Alexander; Sergeev, Daniil; Ermakova, Olga

    2013-04-01

    Preliminary experiments devoted to measuring characteristics of the air flow above the waved water surface for the wide range of wind speeds were performed with the application of modified Particle Image Velosimetry (PIV) technique. Experiments were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS (length 10 °, cross section of air channel 0.4×0.4 m) for four different axial wind speeds: 8.7, 13.5, 19 and 24 m/s, corresponding to the equivalent 10-m wind speeds 15, 20, 30 40 m/s correspondingly. Intensive wave breaking with forming foam crest and droplets generations was occurred for two last wind conditions. The modified PIV-method based on the use of continuous-wave (CW) laser illumination of the airflow seeded by tiny particles and with highspeed video. Spherical 20 μm polyamide particles with density 1.02 g/sm3 and inertial time 7•10-3 s were used for seeding airflow with special injecting device. Green (532 nm) CW laser with 4 Wt output power was used as a source for light sheet. High speed digital camera Videosprint was used for taking visualized air flow images with the frame rate 2000 Hz s and exposure time 10 ms Combination including iteration Canny method [1] for obtaining curvilinear surface from the images in the laser sheet view and contact measurements of surface elevation by wire wave gauge installed near the border of working area for the surface wave profile was used. Then velocity air flow field was retrieved by PIV images processing with adaptive cross-correlation method on the curvilinear grid following surface wave profile. The mean wind velocity profiles were retrieved by averaging over obtained ensembles of wind velocity field realizations and over a wave period even for the cases of intensive wave breaking and droplets generation. To verify the PIV method additional measurements of mean velocity profiles over were carried out by the contact method using the Pitot tube. In the area of overlap, wind velocity profiles measured by

  3. Vortex shedding flow meter performance at high flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegwarth, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    In some of the ducts of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), the maximum liquid oxygen flow velocities approach 10 times those at which liquid flow measurements are normally made. The hydrogen gas flow velocities in other ducts exceed the maximum for gas flow measurement by more than a factor of 3. The results presented here show from water flow tests that vortex shedding flow meters of the appropriate design can measure water flow to velocities in excess of 55 m/s, which is a Reynolds number of about 2 million. Air flow tests have shown that the same meter can measure flow to a Reynolds number of at least 22 million. Vortex shedding meters were installed in two of the SSME ducts and tested with water flow. Narrow spectrum lines were obtained and the meter output frequencies were proportional to flow to + or - 0.5% or better over the test range with no flow conditioning, even though the ducts had multiple bends preceeding the meter location. Meters with the shedding elements only partially spanning the pipe and some meters with ring shaped shedding elements were also tested.

  4. Measurement of Gas and Liquid Velocities in an Air-Water Two-Phase Flow using Cross-Correlation of Signals from a Double Senor Hot-Film Probe

    SciTech Connect

    B. Gurau; P. Vassalo; K. Keller

    2002-02-19

    Local gas and liquid velocities are measured by cross-correlating signals from a double sensor hot-film anemometer probe in pure water flow and air water two-phase flow. The gas phase velocity measured in two-phase flow agrees with velocity data obtained using high-speed video to within +/-5%. A turbulent structure, present in the liquid phase, allows a correlation to be taken, which is consistent with the expected velocity profiles in pure liquid flow. This turbulent structure is also present in the liquid phase of a two-phase flow system. Therefore, a similar technique can be applied to measure the local liquid velocity in a two-phase system, when conditions permit.

  5. Velocity visualization in gaseous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Hiller, B.; Hassa, C.; Booman, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques yielding simultaneous, multiple-point measurements of velocity in reacting or nonreacting flow fields have the potential to significantly impact basic and applied studies of fluid mechanics. This research program is aimed at investigating several candidate schemes which could provide such measurement capability. The concepts under study have in common the use of a laser source (to illuminate a column, a grid, a plane or a volume in the flow) and the collection of light at right angles (from Mie scattering, fluorescence, phosphorescence or chemiluminescence) using a multi-element solid-state camera (100 x 100 array of photodiodes). The work will include an overview and a status report of work in progress with particular emphasis on the method of Doppler-modulated absorption.

  6. Flow velocities of Alaskan glaciers.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Evan W; Forster, Richard R; Larsen, Christopher F

    2013-01-01

    Our poor understanding of tidewater glacier dynamics remains the primary source of uncertainty in sea level rise projections. On the ice sheets, mass lost from tidewater calving exceeds the amount lost from surface melting. In Alaska, the magnitude of calving mass loss remains unconstrained, yet immense calving losses have been observed. With 20% of the global new-water sea level rise coming from Alaska, partitioning of mass loss sources in Alaska is needed to improve sea level rise projections. Here we present the first regionally comprehensive map of glacier flow velocities in Central Alaska. These data reveal that the majority of the regional downstream flux is constrained to only a few coastal glaciers. We find regional calving losses are 17.1 Gt a(-1), which is equivalent to 36% of the total annual mass change throughout Central Alaska.

  7. Simulation of air velocity in a vertical perforated air distributor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngu, T. N. W.; Chu, C. M.; Janaun, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    Perforated pipes are utilized to divide a fluid flow into several smaller streams. Uniform flow distribution requirement is of great concern in engineering applications because it has significant influence on the performance of fluidic devices. For industrial applications, it is crucial to provide a uniform velocity distribution through orifices. In this research, flow distribution patterns of a closed-end multiple outlet pipe standing vertically for air delivery in the horizontal direction was simulated. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), a tool of research for enhancing and understanding design was used as the simulator and the drawing software SolidWorks was used for geometry setup. The main purpose of this work is to establish the influence of size of orifices, intervals between outlets, and the length of tube in order to attain uniformity of exit flows through a multi outlet perforated tube. However, due to the gravitational effect, the compactness of paddy increases gradually from top to bottom of dryer, uniform flow pattern was aimed for top orifices and larger flow for bottom orifices.

  8. Air velocity distributions from a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer for tree applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A capability that implements tree structure to control liquid and air flow rates is the preferential design in the development of variable-rate orchard and nursery sprayers. Air jet velocity distributions from an air assisted, five-port sprayer which was under the development to achieve variable-rat...

  9. LOW-VELOCITY COMPRESSIBLE FLOW THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The widespread application of incompressible flow theory dominates low-velocity fluid dynamics, virtually preventing research into compressible low-velocity flow dynamics. Yet, compressible solutions to simple and well-defined flow problems and a series of contradictions in incom...

  10. Slip velocity and velocity inversion in a cylindrical Couette flow.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangrak

    2009-03-01

    Velocity inversion in a nanoscale cylindrical Couette flow is investigated with the Navier-Stokes (NS) equation and molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation. With general slip boundary conditions in the NS equation, the flow can be classified into five distinct profiles. The condition of velocity inversion is explored in the whole space of four dimensionless variables of beta , slip velocity ratio u('), radius ratio a('), and angular velocity ratio omega('). MD computer simulations are performed to estimate the constitutive coefficient of the slip velocities at the walls. The flow is generated by a rotating inner wall and a stationary outer wall in conformity with the theoretical result. By varying an attraction parameter in the Lennard-Jones potential, the slip velocities can be easily controlled. The theoretical predictions are compared with the simulation results. We find that in the intermediate range of the attraction parameter the two results are quite comparable to some extent, but at both extreme values of the attraction parameter, they are quite different.

  11. Air Velocity Mapping of Environmental Test Chambers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    variable that must be measured for the evaluations of the air diffusion performance index (ADPI), or the thermal comfort indices such as predicted mean...altered. The impact of asymmetrical airflow patterns undoubtedly affect human thermal comfort votes. The standardized 6 technique described in this...report could be easily employed prior to or along with specific studies requiring precise air velocity data, and coupled with human thermal comfort surveys

  12. Achromatic Emission Velocity Measurements in Luminous Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, S. J.; Fulghum, S. F.; Rostler, P. S.

    1997-01-01

    A new velocity measurement instrument for luminous flows was developed by Science Research Laboratory for NASA. The SIEVE (Segmented Image Emission VElocimeter) instrument uses broadband light emitted by the flow for the velocity measurement. This differs from other velocimetry techniques in that it does not depend on laser illumination and/or light scattering from particles in the flow. The SIEVE is a passive, non-intrusive diagnostic. By moving and adjusting the imaging optics, the SIEVE can provide three-dimensional mapping of a flow field and determine turbulence scale size. A SIEVE instrument was demonstrated on an illuminated rotating disk to evaluate instrument response and noise and on an oxy-acetylene torch to measure flame velocities. The luminous flow in rocket combustors and plumes is an ideal subject for the SIEVE velocity measurement technique.

  13. Effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC flux rates from CAFO manure and wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers are often used to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC emission ...

  14. Air velocity distribution in a commercial broiler house

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing air velocity during tunnel ventilation in commercial broiler production facilities improves production efficiency, and many housing design specifications require a minimum air velocity. Air velocities are typically assessed with a hand-held velocity meter at random locations, rather than ...

  15. Influence of flow velocity on flow field's optical tomography diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun-yun; Yu, Yang; Zhong, Xia; Zhang, Ying-ying

    2017-01-01

    The effect of flow velocity is usually neglected when optical computerized tomography (OCT) methods are chosen to measure the temperature distribution of the flow fields up to now. In this paper, two sets of experiment are supplied to verify the effect of flow velocity on flow field's moiré tomography. Specifically speaking, the temperature results with the assumption that it is an isobaric process (omit the effect of flow velocity) in the measured flame flow fields, manifest that the isobaric supposition is not suitable for all the flames. And then, a condition, which can be adopted to judge that when the effect of flow velocity on its temperature reconstruction can not be neglected any more, is proposed. This study would provide some reference to the temperature diagnosis by the optical methods which are based on the measurement of the refractive index.

  16. Velocity filtering applied to optical flow calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1990-01-01

    Optical flow is a method by which a stream of two-dimensional images obtained from a forward-looking passive sensor is used to map the three-dimensional volume in front of a moving vehicle. Passive ranging via optical flow is applied here to the helicopter obstacle-avoidance problem. Velocity filtering is used as a field-based method to determine range to all pixels in the initial image. The theoretical understanding and performance analysis of velocity filtering as applied to optical flow is expanded and experimental results are presented.

  17. Velocity-vorticity patterns in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    Pelz, R.B.; Yakhot, V.; Orszag, S.A.; Shtilman, L.; Levich, E.

    1985-06-10

    Direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations is used for the investigation of local helicity fluctuations in plane Poiseuille (channel) and Taylor-Green vortex flows. It is shown that in regions of high dissipation, the cosine of the angle between velocity and vorticity is evenly distributed; in regions of low dissipation, the velocity and vorticity vectors have a tendency to align. It is also shown that near the central part of the channel, velocity and vorticity vectors have a strong tendency to be aligned, while in the buffer region, all angles are nearly equally probable.

  18. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  19. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concentrations in accordance with the applicable levels. Mean entry air velocity shall be determined at or near... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity....

  20. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... concentrations in accordance with the applicable levels. Mean entry air velocity shall be determined at or near... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity....

  1. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... concentrations in accordance with the applicable levels. Mean entry air velocity shall be determined at or near... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity....

  2. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... concentrations in accordance with the applicable levels. Mean entry air velocity shall be determined at or near... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity....

  3. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  4. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  5. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  6. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  7. 30 CFR 57.22211 - Air flow (I-A mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22211 Air flow (I-A mines). The average air velocity... openings nearest the face, shall be at least 40 feet per minute. The velocity of air ventilating each...

  8. Gentle protein ionization assisted by high-velocity gas flow.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengxiang; Cooks, R Graham; Ouyang, Zheng; Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2005-10-01

    Gentle protein electrospray ionization is achieved using the high-velocity gas flow of an air amplifier to improve desolvation in conventional ESI and generate intact folded protein ions in the gas phase. Comparisons are made between the ESI spectra of a number of model proteins, including ubiquitin, cytochrome c, lysozyme, and myoglobin, over a range of pH values under optimized conditions, with and without using an air amplifier to achieve high-velocity gas flow. Previously reported increased ion signals are confirmed. In addition, the peaks recorded using the air amplifier are shown to be narrower, corresponding to more complete desolvation. Significant changes in the charge-state distribution also are observed, with a shift to lower charge state at high-velocity flow. The relationship between the observed charge-state distribution and protein conformation was explored by comparing the charge-state shifts and the distributions of charge states for proteins that are or are not stable in their native conformations in low pH solutions. The data suggest retention of native or nativelike protein conformations using the air amplifier in all cases examined. This is explained by a mechanism in which the air amplifier rapidly creates small droplets from the original large ESI droplets and these microdroplets then desolvate without a significant decrease in pH, resulting in retention of the folded protein conformations. Furthermore, the holoform of ionized myoglobin is visible at pH 3.5, a much lower value than the minimum needed to see this form in conventional ESI. These results provide evidence for the importance of the conditions used in the desolvation process for the preservation of the protein conformation and suggest that the conditions achieved when using high-velocity gas flows to assist droplet evaporation and ion desolvation are much gentler than those in conventional ESI experiments.

  9. Drop size distribution and air velocity measurements in air assist swirl atomizer sprays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, C.-P.; Oechsle, V.; Chigier, N.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurements of mean drop size (SMD) and size distribution parameters have been made using a Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing instrument in a series of sprays generated by an air assist swirl atomizer. Thirty-six different combinations of fuel and air mass flow rates were examined with liquid flow rates up to 14 lbm/hr and atomizing air flow rates up to 10 lbm/hr. Linear relationships were found between SMD and liquid to air mass flow rate ratios. SMD increased with distance downstream along the center line and also with radial distance from the axis. Increase in obscuration with distance downstream was due to an increase in number density of particles as the result of deceleration of drops and an increase in the exposed path length of the laser beam. Velocity components of the atomizing air flow field measured by a laser anemometer show swirling jet air flow fields with solid body rotation in the core and free vortex flow in the outer regions.

  10. The Effect of Solid Admixtures on the Velocity of Motion of a Free Dusty Air Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. P.

    1957-01-01

    In dusty air flows occurring in industrial practice in transport by air pressure of friable materials, in the drying, annealing, and so forth, of a pulverized solid mass in suspension, and in other processes, the concentration of solid particles usually has a magnitude of the order of 1 kg per 1 kg of air. At such a concentration, the ratio of the volume of the particles to the volume of the air is small (less than one-thousandth part). However, regardless of this, the presence of a solid admixture manifests itself in the rules for the velocity distribution of the air in a dusty air flow. As a result, the rules of velocity change are different for clean and for dusty air flows. The estimation of the influence of the admixture on the velocity of the motion of the flow presents a definitive interest. One of the attempts to estimate that influence on the axial velocity of a free axially symmetrical jet with admixtures was made by Abramovich. Abramovich assumed beforehand that the fine particles of the admixture in the jet are subject to the motion of the air (that is, that the velocity of the admixture is approximately equal to the local velocity of the air); he then took as the basis of his considerations, in solving the problem, the condition that the amount of motion of the two-phase jet must be constant.

  11. Development of Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Low Velocity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) is a molecular tagging technique that relies on the photo-dissociation of water vapor into OH radicals and their subsequent tracking using laser induced fluorescence. Velocities are then obtained from time-of-flight calculations. At ambient temperature in air, the OH species lifetime is relatively short (<50 µs), making it suited for high speed flows. Lifetime and radicals formation increases with temperature, which allows HTV to also probe low-velocity, high-temperature flows or reacting flows such as flames. The present work aims at extending the domain of applicability of HTV, particularly towards low-speed (<10 m/s) and moderate (<500 K) temperature flows. Results are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements recorded in identical conditions. Single shot and averaged velocity profiles are obtained in an air jet at room temperature. By modestly raising the temperature (100-200 degC) the OH production increases, resulting in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Use of nitrogen - a non-reactive gas with minimal collisional quenching - extends the OH species lifetime (to over 500 µs), which allows probing of slower flows or, alternately, increases the measurement precision at the expense of spatial resolution. Instantaneous velocity profiles are resolved in a 100degC nitrogen jet (maximum jet-center velocity of 6.5 m/s) with an uncertainty down to 0.10 m/s (1.5%) at 68% confidence level. MTV measurements are compared with particle image velocimetry and show agreement within 2%.

  12. Critical Velocities in Open Capillary Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Langbein, Dieter; Rath, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed research program on open capillary flow and the preliminary work performed theoretically and in drop tower experiments. The work focuses on the fundamental physical understanding of the flow through capillary bound geometries, where the circumference of the cross section of the flow path contains free surfaces. Examples for such a flow configuration are capillary vanes in surface tension tanks, flow along edges and corners and flow through liquid bridges. The geometries may be classified by their cross section areas, wetted circumferences and the radii of curvature of the free surfaces. In the streaming float zone the flow path is bound by a free surface only. The ribbon vane is a model for vane types used in surface tension tanks, where a structure in proximity to the tank wall forms a capillary gap. A groove is used in heat pipes for the transportation of the condensed working fluid to the heat source and a wedge may occur in a spaceborne experiment where fluid has to be transported by the means of surface tension. The research objectives are the determination of the maximum volume flux, the observation of the free surfaces and the liquid flow inside the flow path as well as the evaluation of the limiting capillary wave speed. The restriction of the maximum volume flux is due to convective forces (flow velocity exceeding the capillary wave speed) and/or viscous forces, i.e. the viscous head loss along the flow path must be compensated by the capillary pressure due to the curved free surface. Exceeding the maximum volume flux leads to the choking of the flow path, thus the free surface collapses and.gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. The means are ground-based experimental work with plateau tanks and in a drop tower, a sounding rocket flight, and theoretical analysis with integral balances as well as full three dimensional CFD solutions for flow with free surfaces.

  13. Critical Velocity in Open Capillary Channel Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosendahl, Uwe; Dreyer, Michael E.; Rath, Hans J.; Motil, Brian; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate forced liquid flows through open capillary channels with free surfaces experimentally. The experiments were performed under low gravity conditions in the Bremen Drop Tower and on board the sounding rocket TEXUS-37. Open capillary channels (vanes) are used in surface tension tanks to transport the propellant and to provide a flow path for the bubble-free liquid supply to the thrusters. Since the free surfaces can only withstand a certain pressure differential between the liquid and ambient, the flow rate in the channel is limited. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the surfaces collapse and gas is ingested into the outlet. Since experimental and theoretical data of this flow rate limitation is lacking, the safety factors for the application of vanes in surface tension tanks must be unnecessary high. The aim of the investigation is to determine the maximum liquid flow rate and the corresponding critical flow velocity. The characteristic nondimensional parameters, OHNESORGE number, and gap ratio, cover a wide range of usual vanes. For the theoretical approach a one-dimensional momentum balance was set up. The numerical solution yields the maximum volume flux and the position of the free surface in good agreement with the experiments.

  14. STARE velocities: 2. Evening westward electron flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspensky, M.; Koustov, A.; Janhunen, P.; Kauristie, K.; Amm, O.; Pellinen, R.; Opgenoorth, H.; Pirjola, R.

    2003-04-01

    Four evening events of joint EISCAT/STARE radar observations (~18 hours in total) are considered to study differences between the STARE line-of-sight velocities and the EISCAT electron drifts along the STARE beams. We show that Finland velocities were persistently smaller than the EISCAT drifts by a factor of 1.5-2 implying stronger differences than reported in the past. The Norway velocities were also smaller than the EISCAT drifts, but the effect was not as significant as for the Finland radar. We show that stronger STARE/EISCAT velocity differences lead to significant STARE total electron drift underestimation not only with the standard merging method but also with the ion-acoustic approach (IAA), especially for slow total electron flows of less than 800-1000 m/s. We test the performance of a new approach recently proposed by Uspensky et al., Ann. Geophys., 2003 (in press). It is based on the assumption that a coherent radar receives signals from all electrojet heights. For this approach, information on the electron density distribution in the E region is required. We demonstrate for one event (February 12, 1999) for which N(h) profiles were known from concurrent EISCAT measurements that STARE predicitons of the electron drift are consistent with the EISCAT drift measurements. This validates the approach for the analysis of evening westward electron flow observations (validation for the morning eastward flows was presented by Uspensky et al., 2003). We also show the "robustness" of the new approach by looking at other 3 evening events for which no information on the electron density was available.

  15. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Ivo R.; Gekle, Stephan; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-03-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disc on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  16. The modal and flow velocity corrections of microphone turbulence screens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davy, J. L.

    2007-09-01

    Microphone turbulence screens are used to suppress turbulent pressure fluctuations when measuring the acoustic pressure inside a duct with flow. They consist of a long tube with a slit covered with porous material, and thus are also called sampling tubes. Because they are not omnidirectional, it is necessary to calculate corrections when higher-order modes are propagating in the duct. In order to calculate these corrections it is necessary to know the directivity of the microphone turbulence screen, the propagation direction and energy of the duct modes and the flow velocity of the air in the duct. This paper derives a theoretical formula for the directivity of a microphone turbulence screen. It shows that this theoretical formula agrees better with experimental directivity data than the previously used empirical directivity formula. Because the empirical directivity formula is not a function of the flow velocity, previous research has separated the modal correction from the flow velocity correction. It is shown that it is not theoretically valid to separate the corrections, and that doing so can lead to large errors at high frequencies in the outlet duct. A new method of calculating the modal correction with flow is presented. This method uses a statistical room acoustics approach in contrast to the deterministic numerical approach of the older method. The new method requires much less computing. It is shown that the new method agrees fairly well with the old method for modal corrections without flow. The new method is compared with experimental measurements of the combined modal and flow velocity corrections. Although the trend is the same, the experimental results are higher than the theoretical results in the mid frequency range. The new method agrees reasonably well with the corrections given in ISO 5136:2003.

  17. Hydrokinetic canal measurements: inflow velocity, wake flow velocity, and turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gunawan, Budi

    2014-06-11

    The dataset consist of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) velocity measurements in the wake of a 3-meter diameter vertical-axis hydrokinetic turbine deployed in Roza Canal, Yakima, WA, USA. A normalized hub-centerline wake velocity profile and two cross-section velocity contours, 10 meters and 20 meters downstream of the turbine, are presented. Mean velocities and turbulence data, measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) at 50 meters upstream of the turbine, are also presented. Canal dimensions and hydraulic properties, and turbine-related information are also included.

  18. Quantification of ultrasound correlation-based flow velocity mapping and edge velocity gradient measurement.

    PubMed

    Park, Dae Woo; Kruger, Grant H; Rubin, Jonathan M; Hamilton, James; Gottschalk, Paul; Dodde, Robert E; Shih, Albert J; Weitzel, William F

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the use of ultrasound speckle decorrelation- and correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking methods for transverse and longitudinal blood velocity profile measurement, respectively. By studying the blood velocity gradient at the vessel wall, vascular wall shear stress, which is important in vascular physiology as well as the pathophysiologic mechanisms of vascular diseases, can be obtained. Decorrelation-based blood velocity profile measurement transverse to the flow direction is a novel approach, which provides advantages for vascular wall shear stress measurement over longitudinal blood velocity measurement methods. Blood flow velocity profiles are obtained from measurements of frame-to-frame decorrelation. In this research, both decorrelation and lateral speckle-tracking flow estimation methods were compared with Poiseuille theory over physiologic flows ranging from 50 to 1000 mm/s. The decorrelation flow velocity measurement method demonstrated more accurate prediction of the flow velocity gradient at the wall edge than the correlation-based lateral speckle-tracking method. The novelty of this study is that speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements determine the blood velocity across a vessel. In addition, speckle decorrelation-based flow velocity measurements have higher axial spatial resolution than Doppler ultrasound measurements to enable more accurate measurement of blood velocity near a vessel wall and determine the physiologically important wall shear.

  19. Velocity Estimate Following Air Data System Failure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    12 Figure 2.2. Pitot Tube...that relay pitot -static information from the aircraft’s air data system and inertial measurement information from the Inertial Navigation System...Air data systems receive total and static pressure inputs from a pitot -static system. A typical pitot tube, as shown below, receives total pressure

  20. Instantaneous velocity field imaging instrument for supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Legner, H. H.; Mcmanus, K. R.; Mulhall, P. A.; Parker, T. E.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    The technical tasks conducted to develop and demonstrate a new gas velocity measurement technique for high enthalpy reacting flows is described. The technique is based on Doppler-shifted Planar Laser-induced Fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical. The imaging approach permits, in principle, single-shot measurements of the 2-D distribution of a single velocity component in the measurement plane, and is thus a technique of choice for applications in high enthalpy transient flow facilities. In contrast to previous work in this area, the present program demonstrated an approach which modified the diagnostic technique to function under the constraints of practical flow conditions of engineering interest, rather than vice-versa. In order to accomplish the experimental demonstrations, the state-of-the-art in PLIF diagnostic techniques was advanced in several ways. Each of these tasks is described in detail and is intended to serve as a reference in supporting the transition of this new capability to the fielded PLIF instruments now installed at several national test facilities. Among the new results of general interest in LlF-based flow diagnostics, a detailed set of the first measurements of the collisional broadening and shifting behavior of OH (1,0) band transitions in H7-air combustion environments is included. Such measurements are critical in the design of a successful strategy for PLIF velocity imaging; they also relate to accurate concentration and temperature measurements, particularly in compressible flow regimes. Furthermore, the results shed new light on the fundamental relationship between broadening and energy transfer collisions in OH A(sup 2)Sigma(+)v(sup ') = 1. The first single-pulse, spectrally-resolved measurements of the output of common pulsed dye lasers were also produced during the course of this effort. As with the OH broadening measurements, these data are a significant aspect of a successful velocity imaging strategy, and also have

  1. Natural Flow Air Cooled Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanagnostopoulos, Y.; Themelis, P.

    2010-01-01

    Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. Our experimental study aims to investigate the improvement in the electrical performance of a photovoltaic installation on buildings through cooling of the photovoltaic panels with natural air flow. We performed experiments using a prototype based on three silicon photovoltaic modules placed in series to simulate a typical sloping building roof with photovoltaic installation. In this system the air flows through a channel on the rear side of PV panels. The potential for increasing the heat exchange from the photovoltaic panel to the circulating air by the addition of a thin metal sheet (TMS) in the middle of air channel or metal fins (FIN) along the air duct was examined. The operation of the device was studied with the air duct closed tightly to avoid air circulation (CLOSED) and the air duct open (REF), with the thin metal sheet (TMS) and with metal fins (FIN). In each case the experiments were performed under sunlight and the operating parameters of the experimental device determining the electrical and thermal performance of the system were observed and recorded during a whole day and for several days. We collected the data and form PV panels from the comparative diagrams of the experimental results regarding the temperature of solar cells, the electrical efficiency of the installation, the temperature of the back wall of the air duct and the temperature difference in the entrance and exit of the air duct. The comparative results from the measurements determine the improvement in electrical performance of the photovoltaic cells because of the reduction of their temperature, which is achieved by the naturally circulating air.

  2. Design of passively aerated compost piles: Vertical air velocities between the pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, N.J.; Cherry, R.S.

    1996-09-01

    Passively aerated compost piles are built on a base of porous materials, such as straw or wood chips, in which perforated air supply pipes are distributed. The piles are not turned during composting, nor is forced-aeration equipment used, which significantly reduces the operating and capital expenses associated with these piles. Currently, pile configurations and materials are worked out by trial and error. Fundamentally based design procedures are difficult to develop because the natural convection air flow rate is not explicitly known, but rather is closely coupled with the pile temperature. This paper develops a mathematical model to analytically determine the maximum upward air flow velocity over an air supply pipe and the drop in vertical velocity away from the pipe. This model has one dimensionless number, dependent on the pile and base properties, which fully characterizes the velocity profile between the pipes. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Solute Transport in Soils Under Conditions of Variable Flow Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liwang; Selim, H. M.

    1996-11-01

    Temporal and spatial variabilities of flow distribution significantly influence solute transport in soils. This laboratory study was designed to investigate the effects of temporal variation in flow velocity on pesticide transport in soils. Two pesticides, metribuzin (weakly adsorbed) and atrazine (moderately adsorbed), were chosen along with the following two soils: Cecil (<2 mm) and Sharkey (2-4 mm). Several tritium pulses were introduced into packed soil columns (15 or 30 cm in length) under different flow velocities to obtain velocity-dependent dispersion coefficients (D). Subsequently, several atrazine and metribuzin pulses were introduced under conditions of constant and variable velocities. For each experiment, changes in flow velocity were stepwise using a piston flow pump and were carried out during pulse application and leaching. For constant and variable flow velocity experiments, approximately similar pulse volumes and average flow velocities were maintained. Values of D versus pore water velocity (ν) from tritium breakthrough curves (BTCs) were well described using a linear equation for both soils. Identical BTCs for metribuzin were observed under conditions of constant or variable flow velocities in the Cecil soil column. However, metribuzin transport in the Sharkey soil was significantly influenced by velocity variations. Atrazine transport in the Sharkey soil was also significantly affected by variations in flow velocity. We further examined the error when an average rather than actual velocity distribution was used in BTC representation. The resulting experimental BTCs (concentration versus velocity-averaged pore volume) exhibited early arrival and the appearance of multiple peaks. Moreover, predictions of such BTCs based on the convective-dispersive equation were not successful. We concluded that actual water velocity distributions should be used in BTC representation, and, whenever possible, the use of an average velocity should be avoided.

  4. [Time lag effect between poplar' s sap flow velocity and microclimate factors in agroforestry system in West Liaoning Province].

    PubMed

    Di, Sun; Guan, De-xin; Yuan, Feng-hui; Wang, An-zhi; Wu, Jia-bing

    2010-11-01

    By using Granier's thermal dissipation probe, the sap flow velocity of the poplars in agroforestry system in west Liaoning was continuously measured, and the microclimate factors were measured synchronously. Dislocation contrast method was applied to analyze the sap flow velocity and corresponding air temperature, air humidity, net radiation, and vapor pressure deficit to discuss the time lag effect between poplar' s sap flow velocity and microclimate factors on sunny days. It was found that the poplar's sap flow velocity advanced of air temperature, air humidity, and vapor pressure deficit, and lagged behind net radiation. The sap flow velocity in June, July, August, and September was advanced of 70, 30, 50, and 90 min to air temperature, of 80, 30, 40, and 90 min to air humidity, and of 90, 50, 70, and 120 min to vapor pressure deficit, but lagged behind 10, 10, 40, and 40 min to net radiation, respectively. The time lag time of net radiation was shorter than that of air temperature, air humidity, and vapor pressure. The regression analysis showed that in the cases the time lag effect was contained and not, the determination coefficients between comprehensive microclimate factor and poplar's sap flow velocity were 0.903 and 0.855, respectively, indicating that when the time lag effect was contained, the determination coefficient was ascended by 2.04%, and thus, the simulation accuracy of poplar's sap flow velocity was improved.

  5. Laser Doppler anemometer signal processing for blood flow velocity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdova, M A; Fedosov, I V; Tuchin, V V

    2015-03-31

    A new method for analysing the signal in a laser Doppler anemometer based on the differential scheme is proposed, which provides the flow velocity measurement in strongly scattering liquids, particularly, blood. A laser Doppler anemometer intended for measuring the absolute blood flow velocity in animal and human near-surface arterioles and venules is developed. The laser Doppler anemometer signal structure is experimentally studied for measuring the flow velocity in optically inhomogeneous media, such as blood and suspensions of scattering particles. The results of measuring the whole and diluted blood flow velocity in channels with a rectangular cross section are presented. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Reconstruction of velocity fields in electromagnetic flow tomography.

    PubMed

    Lehtikangas, Ossi; Karhunen, Kimmo; Vauhkonen, Marko

    2016-06-28

    Electromagnetic flow meters (EMFMs) are the gold standard in measuring flow velocity in process industry. The flow meters can measure the mean flow velocity of conductive liquids and slurries. A drawback of this approach is that the velocity field cannot be determined. Asymmetric axial flows, often encountered in multiphase flows, pipe elbows and T-junctions, are problematic and can lead to serious systematic errors. Recently, electromagnetic flow tomography (EMFT) has been proposed for measuring velocity fields using several coils and a set of electrodes attached to the surface of the pipe. In this work, a velocity field reconstruction method for EMFT is proposed. The method uses a previously developed finite-element-based computational forward model for computing boundary voltages and a Bayesian framework for inverse problems. In the approach, the vz-component of the velocity field along the longitudinal axis of the pipe is estimated on the pipe cross section. Different asymmetric velocity fields encountered near pipe elbows, solids-in-water flows in inclined pipes and in stratified or multiphase flows are tested. The results suggest that the proposed reconstruction method could be used to estimate velocity fields in complicated pipe flows in which the conventional EMFMs have limited accuracy. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  7. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  8. Air velocity distributions inside tree canopies from a variable-rate air-assisted sprayer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variable-rate, air assisted, five-port sprayer had been in development to achieve variable discharge rates of both liquid and air. To verify the variable air rate capability by changing the fan inlet diameter of the sprayer, air jet velocities impeded by plant canopies were measured at various loc...

  9. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    SciTech Connect

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  10. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    DOE PAGES

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results aremore » used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.« less

  11. Centrifuge modeling of air sparging - a study of air flow through saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Marulanda, C; Culligan, P J; Germaine, J T

    2000-02-25

    The success of air sparging as a remedial technology for treatment of contaminated aquifers is well documented. However, there is no consensus, to date, on the mechanisms that control the flow of injected air through the saturated ground. Currently, only qualitative results from laboratory experiments are available to predict the zone of influence of a sparging well. Given that the patterns of air flow through the soil will ultimately determine the efficiency of an air sparging treatment, it is important to quantify how sparged air travels through a saturated porous medium. The main objective of this research is to develop a model that describes air transport through saturated porous media. This paper presents results from an ongoing study that employs centrifuge modeling to reproduce in situ air sparging conditions. Centrifuge testing is an experimental technique that allows reduced-scale duplication, in the laboratory, of the stresses and pressure distributions encountered in the field. In situ conditions are critical in the development of actual air flow patterns. Experiments are being conducted in a transparent porous medium consisting of crushed borosilicate glass submerged in fluids of matching indices of refraction. Air is observed as it flows through the porous medium at varying gravitational accelerations. Recorded images of experiments allow the determination of flow patterns, breakthrough velocities, and plume shapes as a function of g-level and injection pressure. Results show that air flow patterns vary from fingering, at low g-levels, to pulsing at higher accelerations. Grain and pore size distribution of the porous medium do not exclusively control air flow characteristics. Injector geometry has a definite effect on breakthrough velocities and air plume shapes. Experiments have been conducted to compare the velocity of air flow through the saturated porous medium to that of air in pure liquids. Results show that the velocity of air through the medium

  12. Particle displacement tracking applied to air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic Particle Image Velocimeter (PIV) techniques offer many advantages over conventional photographic PIV methods such as fast turn around times and simplified data reduction. A new all electronic PIV technique was developed which can measure high speed gas velocities. The Particle Displacement Tracking (PDT) technique employs a single cw laser, small seed particles (1 micron), and a single intensified, gated CCD array frame camera to provide a simple and fast method of obtaining two-dimensional velocity vector maps with unambiguous direction determination. Use of a single CCD camera eliminates registration difficulties encountered when multiple cameras are used to obtain velocity magnitude and direction information. An 80386 PC equipped with a large memory buffer frame-grabber board provides all of the data acquisition and data reduction operations. No array processors of other numerical processing hardware are required. Full video resolution (640x480 pixel) is maintained in the acquired images, providing high resolution video frames of the recorded particle images. The time between data acquisition to display of the velocity vector map is less than 40 sec. The new electronic PDT technique is demonstrated on an air nozzle flow with velocities less than 150 m/s.

  13. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    SciTech Connect

    Raptis, A.C.

    1981-07-17

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow is disclosed. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  15. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOEpatents

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  16. Velocity and pressure distribution behind bodies in an air current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, A

    1924-01-01

    The following experiments on the air flow behind bodies were made for the purpose of assisting in the explanation of the phenomena connected with air resistance. The first two series of experiments dealt with the phenomena behind a cylinder. The third series of experiments was carried out behind a streamlined strut.

  17. A study of methods to estimate debris flow velocity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prochaska, A.B.; Santi, P.M.; Higgins, J.D.; Cannon, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    Debris flow velocities are commonly back-calculated from superelevation events which require subjective estimates of radii of curvature of bends in the debris flow channel or predicted using flow equations that require the selection of appropriate rheological models and material property inputs. This research investigated difficulties associated with the use of these conventional velocity estimation methods. Radii of curvature estimates were found to vary with the extent of the channel investigated and with the scale of the media used, and back-calculated velocities varied among different investigated locations along a channel. Distinct populations of Bingham properties were found to exist between those measured by laboratory tests and those back-calculated from field data; thus, laboratory-obtained values would not be representative of field-scale debris flow behavior. To avoid these difficulties with conventional methods, a new preliminary velocity estimation method is presented that statistically relates flow velocity to the channel slope and the flow depth. This method presents ranges of reasonable velocity predictions based on 30 previously measured velocities. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Quantitative velocity distributions via nuclear magnetic resonance flow metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Keelan T.; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate the use of Tikhonov regularisation as a data inversion technique to determine the velocity distributions of flowing liquid streams. Regularisation is applied to the signal produced by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) flow measurement system consisting of a pre-polarising permanent magnet located upstream of an Earth's magnetic field NMR detection coil. A simple free induction decay (FID) NMR signal is measured for the flowing stream in what is effectively a 'time-of-flight' measurement. The FID signal is then modelled as a function of fluid velocity and acquisition time, enabling determination of the velocity probability distributions via regularisation. The mean values of these velocity distributions were successfully validated against in-line rotameters. The ability to quantify multi-modal velocity distributions was also demonstrated using a two-pipe system.

  19. Velocity envelope of vector flow estimation with spatial quadrature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Richard F.; Anderson, Martin E.

    2003-05-01

    We present the results of two studies investigating the optimal aperture configuration for maximized lateral blood flow velocity estimation using Heterodyned Spatial Quadrature. Our objective was to determine the maximum velocities that can be estimated at Doppler angles of 90 degrees and 60 degrees with a bias of less than 5% for both uniform scatterer motion in a tissue-mimicking phantom and blood-mimicking fluid circulated through a wall-less vessel flow phantom. Constant flow rates ranging from 3.0 to 18.0 ml/sec were applied in the flow phantom, producing expected peak velocities of 15.0 to 89.8 cm/sec under laminar flow conditions. Velocity estimates were obtained at each flow rate using 256 trials, with each trial consisting of an ensemble of 32 vectors. For an f/1 receive geometry with bi-lobed Hamming apodization, all peak flow velocities tested were estimated to within 5% of their expected values for both 90 degree and 60 degree Doppler angles. An f/2 receive geometry featuring bi-lobed Blackman apodization generally provided accurate lateral velocity estimates up to 71.9 cm/sec for a Doppler angle of 90 degrees, and accurate lateral component estimates up to 50.1 cm/sec for a 60 degree Doppler angle. The implications of these findings will be discussed.

  20. Heat Transfer and Hydraulic Flow Resistance for Streams of High Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelchuk, V. L.

    1943-01-01

    Problems of hydraulic flow resistance and heat transfer for streams with velocities comparable with acoustic have present great importance for various fields of technical science. Especially, they have great importance for the field of heat transfer in designing and constructing boilers.of the "Velox" type. In this article a description of experiments and their results as regards definition of the laws of heat transfer in differential form for high velocity air streams inside smooth tubes are given.

  1. Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity for viscoelastic electroosmotic flows.

    PubMed

    Park, H M; Lee, W M

    2008-01-15

    Many biofluids such as blood and DNA solutions are viscoelastic and exhibit extraordinary flow behaviors, not existing in Newtonian fluids. Adopting appropriate constitutive equations these exotic flow behaviors can be modeled and predicted reasonably using various numerical methods. However, the governing equations for viscoelastic flows are not easily solvable, especially for electroosmotic flows where the streamwise velocity varies rapidly from zero at the wall to a nearly uniform velocity at the outside of the very thin electric double layer. In the present investigation, we have devised a simple method to find the volumetric flow rate of viscoelastic electroosmotic flows through microchannels. It is based on the concept of the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity which is widely adopted in the electroosmotic flows of Newtonian fluids. It is shown that the Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity for viscoelastic fluids can be found by solving a simple cubic algebraic equation. The volumetric flow rate obtained using this Helmholtz-Smoluchowski velocity is found to be almost the same as that obtained by solving the governing partial differential equations for various viscoelastic fluids.

  2. Correlation and spectral measurements of fluctuating pressures and velocities in annular turbulent flow. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.J.; Jones, B.G.; Roy, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    An experimental study of the fluctuating velocity field, the fluctuating static wall pressure and the in-stream fluctuating static pressure in an annular turbulent air flow system with a radius ratio of 4.314 has been conducted. The study included direct measurements of the mean velocity profile, turbulent velocity field; fluctuating static wall pressure and in-stream fluctuating static pressure from which the statistical values of the turbulent intensity levels, power spectral densities of the turbulent quantities, the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating static pressure in the core region of the flow and the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating velocity field in the core region of the flow were obtained.

  3. Analysis of debris-flow velocities due to superelevation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidl, C.; Rickenmann, D.; McArdell, B. W.

    2012-12-01

    For debris flows the estimation of the maximum flow-velocity is considered to be essential. Often the runout or the degree of exposure of a debris-flow event can only be predicted, based on the assessment of the maximum velocity. In practice, geomorphologic traces like flood marks on banks provide important information about the flowing process of a debris flow. A possible approach to estimate maximum flow velocities is based on the vortex equation by using superelevation marks. Superelevation can be observed in bending channels, where the flow-height of the inner-curvature is lower than the flow-height of the outer-curvature, caused by the centrifugal acceleration of the flow. For the estimation of debris-flow velocities with the vortex equation, a correction factor (>1) is often introduced, accounting for the viscosity and vertical sorting of the bulk mixture. Several studies show that the correction factor may be as high as 10 and may depend on bend geometry and debris flow material properties. The objective of this work is therefore to analyze the influence of channel geometry and material properties on the vortex equation when applying to debris flows. In particular, the project aims to compare observed flow velocities from physical modeling in flume experiments with observations from debris-flow field sites. In a first step experimental investigations are done at the laboratory of the Swiss Federal Institute WSL, Birmensdorf. The flume consists of a flexible plastic half-pipe and is mounted on a wooden plane construction. At the moment two different bend radii (1.0 m and 3.0 m) with a bend angle of 60° are implemented. The total length of the flume is further covered with 40 grit silicon carbide sandpaper reflecting a constant basal friction layer. To apply for the complexity of a debris-flow process, three different material mixtures based on three different grain size distributions, were defined. Superelevation is measured by using high speed cameras

  4. Characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, R. M. C.; Ahmed, S. A.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental program to study the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling flows to obtain detailed and accurate data for the evaluation and improvement of turbulent transport modeling for combustor flows is discussed. The work was also motivated by the need to investigate and quantify the influence of confinement and swirl on the characteristics of inhomogeneous jets. The flow facility was constructed in a simple way which allows easy interchange of different swirlers and the freedom to vary the jet Reynolds number. The velocity measurements were taken with a one color, one component DISA Model 55L laser-Doppler anemometer employing the forward scatter mode. Standard statistical methods are used to evaluate the various moments of the signals to give the flow characteristics. The present work was directed at the understanding of the velocity field. Therefore, only velocity and turbulence data of the axial and circumferential components are reported for inhomogeneous jets in confined swirling air flows.

  5. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.; Davis, S. J.; Kessler, W. J.; Sonnenfroh, D. M.

    1992-01-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties.

  6. Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.G.; Davis, S.J.; Kessler, W.J.; Sonnenfroh, D.M. )

    1992-07-01

    The application of Doppler-shifted fluorescence imaging of velocity fields in supersonic reacting flows is analyzed. Focussing on fluorescence of the OH molecule in typical H2-air Scramjet flows, the effects of uncharacterized variations in temperature, pressure, and collisional partner composition across the measurement plane are examined. Detailed measurements of the (1,0) band OH lineshape variations in H2-air combustions are used, along with single-pulse and time-averaged measurements of an excimer-pumped dye laser, to predict the performance of a model velocimeter with typical Scramjet flow properties. The analysis demonstrates the need for modification and control of the laser bandshape in order to permit accurate velocity measurements in the presence of multivariant flow properties. 13 refs.

  7. Continuous flow measurements using ultrasonic velocity meters - an update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltmann, Rick

    1995-01-01

    An article in the summer 1993 Newsletter described USGS work to continously monitor tidal flows in the delta using ultrasonic velocity meters.  This article updates progress since 1993, including new installations, results of data analysis, damage during this year's high flows, and the status of each site.

  8. Optical flow based velocity estimation for mobile robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiuzhi; Zhao, Guanrong; Jia, Songmin; Qin, Baoling; Yang, Ailin

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents an optical flow based novel technique to perceive the instant motion velocity of mobile robots. The primary focus of this study is to determine the robot's ego-motion using displacement field in temporally consecutive image pairs. In contrast to most previous approaches for estimating velocity, we employ a polynomial expansion based dense optical flow approach and propose a quadratic model based RANSAC refinement of flow fields to render our method more robust with respect to noise and outliers. Accordingly, techniques for geometrical transformation and interpretation of the inter-frame motion are presented. Advantages of our proposal are validated by real experimental results conducted on Pioneer robot.

  9. Title: Spatial velocity fluctuations in flow through porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramideh, Soroush; Guo, Tianqi; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Ardekani, Arezoo M.

    2016-11-01

    Understanding the flow in porous media is of great importance and has direct impact on many processes in chemical and oil industries, fuel cell design, and filtration. In this work, we use direct numerical simulations (DNS) to examine the flow through variety of sphere packings with different levels of complexity and heterogeneity. DNS results are validated with velocity fields obtained via volumetric particle tracking velocimetry at high resolution. We show that flow in random close packing of spheres has unique statistical properties while the medium is random itself. Furthermore, we quantify the relationship between pore geometry and velocity fluctuations.

  10. Turbulence in Flowing Soap Films: Velocity, Vorticity, and Thickness Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera, M.; Vorobieff, P.; Ecke, R.E.

    1998-08-01

    We report experimental measurements of the velocity, vorticity, and thickness fields of turbulent flowing soap films using a modified particle-image velocimetry technique. These data yield the turbulent energy and enstrophy of the two-dimensional flows with microscale Reynolds numbers of about 100 and demonstrate the effects of compressibility arising from variations in film thickness. Despite the compressibility of the flow, real-space correlations of velocity, vorticity, and enstrophy flux are consistent with theoretical predictions for two-dimensional turbulence. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  11. Effect of Wind Tunnel Air Velocity on VOC Flux from Standard Solutions and CAFO Manure/Wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used wind tunnels and flux chambers to quantify the flux of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and estimate emission factors from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without accounting for effects of air velocity or sweep air flow rate. L...

  12. Bubbly flow velocity measurements near a heated cylindrical conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Canaan, R.E.; Hassan, Y.A. )

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to apply recent advances and improvements in the digital pulsed laser velocimetry (DPLV) technique to the analysis of two-phase bubbly flow about a cylindrical conductor emitting a constant heat flux within a transparent rectangular enclosure. Pulsed laser velocimetry is a rapidly advancing fluid flow visualization technique that determines full-field instantaneous velocity vectors of a quantitative nature such that the flow field remains undisturbed by the measurement. The DPLV method offers several significant advantages over more traditional fluid velocity measurement techniques such as hot wire/film anemometry and laser Doppler anemometry because reliable instantaneous velocity data may be acquired over substantial flow areas in a single experiment.

  13. Mean velocities and Reynolds stresses in a juncture flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, H.; Hubbartt, J.; Kubendran, L.

    1982-01-01

    Values of three mean velocity components and six turbulence stresses measured in a juncture flow are presented and discussed. The juncture flow is generated by a constant thickness body, having an elliptical leading edge, which is mounted perpendicular to a large flat plate along which a turbulent boundary layer is growing. The measurements were carried out at two streamwise stations in the juncture and were made using two single sensor hot-wire probes. The secondary flow in the juncture results in a considerable distortion in the mean velocity profiles. The secondary flow also transports turbulence in the juncture flow and has a large effect on the turbulence stresses. From visual inspection of the results, there is considerable evidence of similarity between the turbulent shear stresses and the mean flow strain rates. There is some evidence of similarity between the variations in the turbulent stress components.

  14. Thermal Ion Flow Velocities: Signatures of the Enceladus Torus?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, R. J.; Tokar, R. L.; Henderson, M. G.

    2008-12-01

    For the middle/outer (> 5.5 RS) magnetosphere of Saturn, Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) ion counting data provides thermal ion moments obtained assuming Maxwellian distributions for each ion species [Wilson et al., 2008]. However, in the inner magnetosphere (< 5.5 RS) within Saturn's extended neutral cloud and proposed Enceladus torus [Johnson et al., 2006], there is fresh ion production via charge exchange [Tokar et al., 2008], yielding a complex ion velocity distribution. In this study, a new technique is investigated to analyze the CAPS data in the inner region. The technique concentrates on finding the ion flow velocity using only the assumption that the ions are gryotropic. The available ion velocity space viewed by CAPS in a slice perpendicular to the magnetic field is translated within that plane to find the optimum flow velocity that yields gyrotropic ions. Near-equatorial trajectories of Cassini in the inner region are surveyed to determine both azimuthal and radial ion flow velocity. The azimuthal flow velocity profile with radial distance, a proxy for fresh ion production, is compared with models for both the Enceladus torus and extended neutral cloud. References: Wilson, R.J. et al., J. Geophys. Res. in press, doi:10.1029/2008ja013486 Johnson, R.E. et al., The Astrophysical Journal, pg L137, 20 June 2006. Tokar, R.L. et al, Geophys. Res. Letts., vol. 35, L14202, doi:10.1029/2008GL034749

  15. Velocity Measurements of Turbulent Wake Flow Over a Circular Cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chang-Lung; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Keh-Chin; Wang, Muh-Rong

    2016-06-01

    There are two general concerns in the velocity measurements of turbulence. One is the temporal characteristics which governs the turbulent mixing process. Turbulence is rotational and is characterized by high levels of fluctuating vorticity. In order to obtain the information of vorticity dynamics, the spatial characteristics is the other concern. These varying needs can be satisfied by using a variety of diagnostic techniques such as invasive physical probes and non-invasive optical instruments. Probe techniques for the turbulent measurements are inherently simple and less expensive than optical methods. However, the presence of a physical probe may alter the flow field, and velocity measurements usually become questionable when probing recirculation zones. The non-invasive optical methods are mostly made of the foreign particles (or seeding) instead of the fluid flow and are, thus, of indirect method. The difference between the velocities of fluid and foreign particles is always an issue to be discussed particularly in the measurements of complicated turbulent flows. Velocity measurements of the turbulent wake flow over a circular cylinder will be made by using two invasive instruments, namely, a cross-type hot-wire anemometry (HWA) and a split-fiber hot-film anemometry (HFA), and a non-invasive optical instrument, namely, particle image velocimetry (PIV) in this study. Comparison results show that all three employed diagnostic techniques yield similar measurements in the mean velocity while somewhat deviated results in the root-mean-squared velocity, particularly for the PIV measurements. It is demonstrated that HFA possesses more capability than HWA in the flow measurements of wake flow. Wake width is determined in terms of either the flatness factor or shear-induced vorticity. It is demonstrated that flow data obtained with the three employed diagnostic techniques are capable of yielding accurate determination of wake width.

  16. Flow sensitive actuators for micro-air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Hays, M.; Fernandez, E.; Oates, W.; Alvi, F. S.

    2011-10-01

    A macrofiber piezoelectric composite has been developed for boundary layer management of micro-air vehicles (MAVs). Specifically, a piezoelectric composite that is capable of self-sensing and controlling flow has been modeled, designed, fabricated, and tested in wind tunnel studies to quantify performance characteristics, such as the velocity field response to actuation, which is relevant for actively managing boundary layers (laminar and transition flow control). A nonlinear piezoelectric plate model was utilized to design the active structure for flow control. The dynamic properties of the piezoelectric composite actuator were also evaluated in situ during wind tunnel experiments to quantify sensing performance. Results based on velocity field measurements and unsteady pressure measurements show that these piezoelectric macrofiber composites can sense the state of flow above the surface and provide sufficient control authority to manipulate the flow conditions for transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  17. How pyroclastic flows attain high velocities- new insights from large-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breard, E.; Lube, G.; Jones, J.; Valentine, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are most deadly when highly mobile pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) sweep down mountain flanks after eruption columns or lava domes collapse. An important goal in volcanic hazard assessment is to predict the velocity of PDCs in numerical hazard models. To date, this has only been partially successful for dilute PDCs, and major uncertainties remain with regard to the dynamics of PDCs that have coupled dense underflow and dilute ash-cloud regions. Interrogating these complex multiphase processes is only practical in the laboratory, but this introduces the problem of scale where it is difficult to minimise the boundary layer effects which, in small flows, can dominate behaviour. To bridge the gap, we synthesized large-scale PDCs by gravitational collapse of 1300 kg of a natural pyroclastic mixture and examined flow front velocity fields on inclined slopes. We show that, proximally, PDCs experience rapid expulsion of gas that entrains particles and yields a fast-moving turbulent and dilute cloud that becomes the flow head and moves at 200-250% of the impact velocity. Downstream, the turbulent cloud moves ahead of the underflow. We show that the velocity-dependent friction coefficient (which represents the major dissipative form of energy) directly relates to the kinematics of the underflow front. In experimental situations where the dilute flow front velocity exceeds at all times the underflow velocity, we propose a new analytical model to quantify the asymptotic waning of the flow front velocity with distance. Using measurements of the flow head geometry and density, we show that our model successfully predicts the flow front kinematics including a long-lasting period of deceleration. Importantly, the interplay between the turbulent flow front and the presence of an underflow leads to the formation of a wedge-shaped head characterized by unexpectedly high coefficients of entrainment of ambient air.

  18. A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles is described. This technique utilizes an arc-discharge-electron-beam system to produce a luminous disturbance in the flow. The time of flight of this disturbance was measured. Experimental tests were conducted in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. The measured velocities were of the order of 6000 m/sec over a free-stream density range from 0.000196 to 0.00186 kg/cu m. The fractional error in the velocity measurements was less than 5 percent. Long arc discharge columns (0.356 m) were generated under hypersonic flow conditions in the expansion-tube modified to operate as an expansion tunnel.

  19. Quantitative blood flow velocity imaging using laser speckle flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Nadort, Annemarie; Kalkman, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-01-01

    Laser speckle flowmetry suffers from a debated quantification of the inverse relation between decorrelation time (τc) and blood flow velocity (V), i.e. 1/τc = αV. Using a modified microcirculation imager (integrated sidestream dark field - laser speckle contrast imaging [SDF-LSCI]), we experimentally investigate on the influence of the optical properties of scatterers on α in vitro and in vivo. We found a good agreement to theoretical predictions within certain limits for scatterer size and multiple scattering. We present a practical model-based scaling factor to correct for multiple scattering in microcirculatory vessels. Our results show that SDF-LSCI offers a quantitative measure of flow velocity in addition to vessel morphology, enabling the quantification of the clinically relevant blood flow, velocity and tissue perfusion. PMID:27126250

  20. Quantitative blood flow velocity imaging using laser speckle flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadort, Annemarie; Kalkman, Koen; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2016-04-01

    Laser speckle flowmetry suffers from a debated quantification of the inverse relation between decorrelation time (τc) and blood flow velocity (V), i.e. 1/τc = αV. Using a modified microcirculation imager (integrated sidestream dark field - laser speckle contrast imaging [SDF-LSCI]), we experimentally investigate on the influence of the optical properties of scatterers on α in vitro and in vivo. We found a good agreement to theoretical predictions within certain limits for scatterer size and multiple scattering. We present a practical model-based scaling factor to correct for multiple scattering in microcirculatory vessels. Our results show that SDF-LSCI offers a quantitative measure of flow velocity in addition to vessel morphology, enabling the quantification of the clinically relevant blood flow, velocity and tissue perfusion.

  1. Sensors for Using Times of Flight to Measure Flow Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralick, Gutave; Wrbanek, John D.; Hwang, Danny; Turso, James

    2006-01-01

    Thin-film sensors for measuring flow velocities in terms of times of flight are undergoing development. These sensors are very small and can be mounted flush with surfaces of airfoils, ducts, and other objects along which one might need to measure flows. Alternatively or in addition, these sensors can be mounted on small struts protruding from such surfaces for acquiring velocity measurements at various distances from the surfaces for the purpose of obtaining boundary-layer flow-velocity profiles. These sensors are related to, but not the same as, hot-wire anemometers. Each sensor includes a thin-film, electrically conductive loop, along which an electric current is made to flow to heat the loop to a temperature above that of the surrounding fluid. Instantaneous voltage fluctuations in segments of the loop are measured by means of electrical taps placed at intervals along the loop. These voltage fluctuations are caused by local fluctuations in electrical resistance that are, in turn, caused by local temperature fluctuations that are, in turn, caused by fluctuations in flow-induced cooling and, hence, in flow velocity. The differential voltage as a function of time, measured at each pair of taps, is subjected to cross-correlation processing with the corresponding quantities measured at other pairs of taps at different locations on the loop. The cross-correlations yield the times taken by elements of fluid to travel between the pairs of taps. Then the component of velocity along the line between any two pairs of taps is calculated simply as the distance between the pairs of taps divided by the travel time. Unlike in the case of hot-wire anemometers, there is no need to obtain calibration data on voltage fluctuations versus velocity fluctuations because, at least in principle, the correlation times are independent of the calibration data.

  2. A Study of Air Flow in an Engine Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Dana W

    1939-01-01

    A 4-stroke-cycle test engine was equipped with a glass cylinder and the air movements within it were studied while the engine was being motored. Different types of air flow were produced by using shrouded intake valves in various arrangements and by altering the shape of the intake-air passage in the cylinder head. The air movements were made visible by mixing feathers with the entering air, and high-speed motion pictures were taken of them so that the air currents might be studied in detail and their velocities measured. Motion pictures were also taken of gasoline sprays injected into the cylinder on the intake stroke. The photographs showed that: a wide variety of induced air movements could be created in the cylinder; the movements always persisted throughout the compression stroke; and the only type of movement that persisted until the end of the cycle was rotation about the cylinder axis.

  3. Validation of a CFD Model by Using 3D Sonic Anemometers to Analyse the Air Velocity Generated by an Air-Assisted Sprayer Equipped with Two Axial Fans

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramos, F. Javier; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, A. Javier; Boné, Antonio; Puyuelo, Javier; Vidal, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans was developed and validated by practical experiments in the laboratory. The CFD model was developed by considering the total air flow supplied by the sprayer fan to be the main parameter, rather than the outlet air velocity. The model was developed for three air flows corresponding to three fan blade settings and assuming that the sprayer is stationary. Actual measurements of the air velocity near the sprayer were taken using 3D sonic anemometers. The workspace sprayer was divided into three sections, and the air velocity was measured in each section on both sides of the machine at a horizontal distance of 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5 m from the machine, and at heights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 m above the ground The coefficient of determination (R2) between the simulated and measured values was 0.859, which demonstrates a good correlation between the simulated and measured data. Considering the overall data, the air velocity values produced by the CFD model were not significantly different from the measured values. PMID:25621611

  4. Velocity measurement of flow over random soft porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkirk, Isreal; Mirbod, Parisa

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work is to experimentally examine the flow over random soft porous media in a three-dimensional channel. Various combination of fibrous material and the morphology of the fibers were chosen to achieve void volume fraction (ɛ) ranging from 0.4 to 0.7. Care has been taken to keep the Reynolds number low so that the flow was laminar. The channel height was constant, however the thickness of the fibrous media was varied to achieve different filling fraction. Before starting the tests in the duct with fiber arrays, a series of tests in an empty duct (i.e., without fibers) conducted to validate the experimental measurements. We also discussed the error and uncertainty sources in the experiments and described the techniques to improve their impact. We studied detailed velocity measurements of the flow over fibrous material inside a rectangular duct using a planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique. Using these measurements, we determined the values of the slip velocity at the interface between the fibrous media and the flow. It was found that values of the slip velocity normalized by the maximum velocity in the flow depend on solid volume fraction, pore spaces, and fraction of channel filled by the fiber layers.

  5. Advective velocity and energy dissipation rate in an oscillatory flow.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ziaul; Hondzo, Miki; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2005-07-01

    Characterizing the transport processes at the sediment-water interface along sloping boundaries in lakes and reservoirs is of fundamental interest in lake and reservoir water quality management. The turbulent bottom boundary layer (TBBL) along a slope, induced by the breaking of internal waves in a linearly stratified fluid, was investigated through laboratory measurements. Fast response micro-scale conductivity and temperature probes in conjunction with laser-Doppler velocimetry were used to measure the time series of salinity, temperature, and velocity along a sloping boundary. Turbulent energy spectra were computed from the velocity data using a time-dependent advective velocity and Taylor's hypothesis. The energy spectra were used to estimate the energy dissipation rate at different positions in the TBBL. The advective velocity in this near-zero mean shear flow is based on an integral time scale (T(int)). The integral time scale is related to the average frequency of the spectral energy density of the flow velocity. The energy dissipation rate estimated from the variable advective velocity with an averaging time window equal to the integral time scale (T=T(int)) was 43% higher than the energy dissipation rate estimated from a constant advective velocity. The estimated dissipation rates with T=T(int) were comparable to values obtained by curve-fitting a theoretical Batchelor spectrum for the temperature gradient spectra. This study proposes the integral time scale to be used for the oscillatory flows as (a) a time-averaging window to estimate the advective velocity and associated energy dissipation level, and (b) a normalizing parameter in the energy spectrum.

  6. What is the velocity profile of debris flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, Fabian; McArdell, Brian

    2015-04-01

    The distribution of flow velocity within a debris flow is difficult to determine at full scale in the field due to the large forces and inherently destructive nature of the flow. However, knowledge of the distribution of velocity within a flow would be helpful to constrain rheological models and to better understand the internal dynamics of such flows. Here we describe recent efforts to determine the velocity of debris flows as a function of distance from the channel bed. Measurements were made at the Illgraben, Switzerland, which exhibits a wide variety of flows, ranging from turbulent debris floods to flows which resemble laminar mud flows to more classical debris flows with a clear granular front. The Illgraben observation station is therefore an ideal location to investigate debris flow dynamics. Our measurements were made using sensors embedded on a 14 m long, 2.5 m tall steel-reinforced concrete wall constructed flush with the torrent channel walls. The main instrumentation consists of 18 geophones (10 Hz natural frequency) installed on square steel plates with a side length of 0.3 m. Each steel plate is acoustically isolated from the wall and the other plates through the use of elastomer elements. The geophone plates are arranged in six rows of three sensors with a dimension of 1.8 m in the vertical direction and 1.5 m in the horizontal direction (i.e. parallel to the flow direction). A sensorless plate separates each plate in the horizontal direction. The data are collected at 2 kHz using a high-speed (synchronous) capture card in a pc. The elevation of the flow surface is determined at a cross-stream distance 1 m away from the wall, using a laser sensor installed on a bridge above the wall. We present a processing approach for the geophone data with the goal to track particle sliding across the sensor plates. For signals near or above the sensors' natural frequency (10 Hz), the measured time series are poorly correlated between sensors. Therefore, we use a

  7. Prediction of inverted velocity profile for gas flow in nanochannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. T.; Ren, Y. R.

    2014-11-01

    Velocity inversion is an interesting phenomenon of nanoscale which means that the velocity near the wall is greater than that of center. To solve this problem, fluid flow in nanochannel attracts more attention in recent years. The physical model of gas flow in two-dimensional nanochannel was established here. To describe the process with conventional control equations, Navier-Stokes equations combined with high-order accurate slip boundary conditions was used as mathematical model. With the introduction of new dimensionless variables, the problem was reduced to an ordinary differential equation. Then it was analytically solved and investigated using homotopy analysis method (HAM). The results were verified by comparing with other available experiment data. Result shows that the proposed method could predict velocity phenomenon.

  8. Kinematics of velocity and vorticity correlations in turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, P. S.

    1983-08-01

    The kinematic problem of calculating second-order velocity moments from given values of the vorticity covariance is examined. Integral representation formulas for second-order velocity moments in terms of the two-point vorticity correlation tensor are derived. The special relationships existing between velocity moments in isotropic turbulence are expressed in terms of the integral formulas yielding several kinematic constraints on the two-point vorticity correlation tensor in isotropic turbulence. Numerical evaluation of these constraints suggests that a Gaussian curve may be the only form of the longitudinal velocity correlation coefficient which is consistent with the requirement of isotropy. It is shown that if this is the case, then a family of exact solutions to the decay of isotropic turbulence may be obtained which contains Batchelor's final period solution as a special case. In addition, the computed results suggest a method of approximating the integral representation formulas in general turbulent shear flows.

  9. Kinematics of velocity and vorticity correlations in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    The kinematic problem of calculating second-order velocity moments from given values of the vorticity covariance is examined. Integral representation formulas for second-order velocity moments in terms of the two-point vorticity correlation tensor are derived. The special relationships existing between velocity moments in isotropic turbulence are expressed in terms of the integral formulas yielding several kinematic constraints on the two-point vorticity correlation tensor in isotropic turbulence. Numerical evaluation of these constraints suggests that a Gaussian curve may be the only form of the longitudinal velocity correlation coefficient which is consistent with the requirement of isotropy. It is shown that if this is the case, then a family of exact solutions to the decay of isotropic turbulence may be obtained which contains Batchelor's final period solution as a special case. In addition, the computed results suggest a method of approximating the integral representation formulas in general turbulent shear flows.

  10. Effect of velocity profile skewing on blood velocity and volume flow waveforms derived from maximum Doppler spectral velocity.

    PubMed

    Mynard, Jonathan P; Steinman, David A

    2013-05-01

    Given evidence that fully developed axisymmetric flow may be the exception rather than the rule, even in nominally straight arteries, maximum velocity (V(max)) can lie outside the Doppler sample volume (SV). The link between V(max) and derived quantities, such as volume flow (Q), may therefore be more complex than commonly thought. We performed idealized virtual Doppler ultrasound on data from image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the normal human carotid artery and investigated how velocity profile skewing and choice of sample volume affected V(max) waveforms and derived Q variables, considering common assumptions about velocity profile shape (i.e., Poiseuille or Womersley). Severe velocity profile skewing caused substantial errors in V(max) waveforms when using a small, centered SV, although peak V(max) was reliably detected; errors with a long SV covering the vessel diameter were orientation dependent but lower overall. Cycle-averaged Q calculated from V(max) was typically within ±15%, although substantial skewing and use of a small SV caused 10%-25% underestimation. Peak Q derived from Womersley's theory was generally accurate to within ±10%. V(max) pulsatility and resistance indexes differed from Q-based values, although the Q-based resistance index could be predicted reliably. Skewing introduced significant error into V(max)-derived Q waveforms, particularly during mid-to-late systole. Our findings suggest that errors in the V(max) and Q waveforms related to velocity profile skewing and use of a small SV, or orientation-dependent errors for a long SV, could limit their use in wave analysis or for constructing characteristic or patient-specific flow boundary conditions for model studies.

  11. Flow velocity measurement with the nonlinear acoustic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Didenkulov, Igor; Pronchatov-Rubtsov, Nikolay

    2015-10-28

    A problem of noninvasive measurement of liquid flow velocity arises in many practical applications. To this end the most often approach is the use of the linear Doppler technique. The Doppler frequency shift of signal scattered from the inhomogeneities distributed in a liquid relatively to the emitted frequency is proportional to the sound frequency and velocities of inhomogeneities. In the case of very slow flow one needs to use very high frequency sound. This approach fails in media with strong sound attenuation because acoustic wave attenuation increases with frequency and there is limit in increasing sound intensity, i.e. the cavitation threshold. Another approach which is considered in this paper is based on the method using the difference frequency Doppler Effect for flows with bubbles. This method is based on simultaneous action of two high-frequency primary acoustic waves with closed frequencies on bubbles and registration of the scattered by bubbles acoustic field at the difference frequency. The use of this method is interesting since the scattered difference frequency wave has much lower attenuation in a liquid. The theoretical consideration of the method is given in the paper. The experimental examples confirming the theoretical equations, as well as the ability of the method to be applied in medical diagnostics and in technical applications on measurement of flow velocities in liquids with strong sound attenuation is described. It is shown that the Doppler spectrum form depends on bubble concentration velocity distribution in the primary acoustic beams crossing zone that allows one to measure the flow velocity distribution.

  12. Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

  13. Effects of Flow Velocity and Particle Size on Transport of Ultrafine Bubbles in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamoto, S.; Nihei, N.; Ueda, Y.; Nishimura, T.

    2015-12-01

    Potential applications of ultrafine bubbles (UFBs) have drawn more attention, especially in environmental engineering fields such as soil/groundwater remediation. Understanding a transport mechanism of UFBs in soils is essential to optimize remediation techniques using UFBs. In this study, column transport experiments using glass beads with different size fraction were conducted, where UFBs created by either air or oxygen were injected to the column with different flow conditions. Effects of particle size and flow velocities on transport characteristics of UFBs were investigated based on the column experiments. The results showed that attachments of UFBs were enhanced under lower water velocity condition, exhibiting more than 50% of UFBs injected were attached inside the column. The mobility of O2-UFBs which have lower zeta potential was higher than that of Air-UFBs. A convection-dispersion model including bubble attachment and detachment terms was applied to the obtained breakthrough curves for each experiment, showing good fitness against the measured data.

  14. Numerical simulation of air flow in a model of lungs with mouth cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcner, Jakub; Lizal, Frantisek; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-04-01

    The air flow in a realistic geometry of human lung is simulated with computational flow dynamics approach as stationary inspiration. Geometry used for the simulation includes oral cavity, larynx, trachea and bronchial tree up to the seventh generation of branching. Unsteady RANS approach was used for the air flow simulation. Velocities corresponding to 15, 30 and 60 litres/min of flow rate were set as boundary conditions at the inlet to the model. These flow rates are frequently used as a representation of typical human activities. Character of air flow in the model for these different flow rates is discussed with respect to future investigation of particle deposition.

  15. Drift Velocity of Electrons in Hot and Moist Air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abner, Douglas

    1999-10-01

    The drift velocity of electrons in hot and moist air is presented. The apparatus consisted of a pulsed Townsend-type drift tube with an oil-free vacuum system and employed a temperature controller and heating system to regulate the temperature of the gas mixture and chamber to within 0.1 deg. C. over a range of ambient to 200 deg C. The drift tube is equipped with a movable anode allowing the anode-cathode separation to be varied from 0.8 to 7.4 cm. Water vapor concentration in the air mixture ranged from 0.7510.0Temperature was varied from ambient to 150 deg C. E/N (electric field normalized to gas density) ranged from 1.0 to 16 Td (1 Td = 10-17 V-cm2). Comparisons of data collected at elevated temperature, data collected at ambient temperature, and Boltzmann transport equation calculations show the effects of enhanced rotational and vibrational populations on the drift velocity.

  16. Measuring OutdoorAir Intake Rates Using Electronic Velocity Sensors at Louvers and Downstream of Airflow Straighteners

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2008-10-01

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100percent, and were often greater than 25percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  17. Choice of velocity variables for complex flow computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shyy, W.; Chang, G. C.

    1991-01-01

    The issue of adopting the velocity components as dependent velocity variables for the Navier-Stokes flow computations is investigated. The viewpoint advocated is that a numerical algorithm should preferably honor both the physical conservation law in differential form and the geometric conservation law in discrete form. With the use of Cartesian velocity vector, the momentum equations in curvilinear coordinates can retain the full conservation-law form and satisfy the physical conservation laws. With the curvilinear velocity components, source terms appear in differential equations and hence the full conservation law form can not be retained. In discrete expressions, algorithms based on the Cartesian components can satisfy the geometric conservation-law form for convection terms but not for viscous terms; those based on the curvilinear components, on the other hand, cannot satisfy the geometric conservation-law form for either convection or viscous terms. Several flow solutions for domain with 90 and 360 degree turnings are presented to illustrate the issues of using the Cartesian velocity components and the staggered grid arrangement.

  18. The effect of nitrous oxide on cerebral blood flow velocity in children anaesthetised with sevoflurane.

    PubMed

    Rowney, D A; Fairgrieve, R; Bissonnette, B

    2004-01-01

    To determine the effects of nitrous oxide on middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (CBFV) during sevoflurane anaesthesia in children, CBFV was measured using transcranial Doppler sonography in 16 ASA I or II children. Anaesthesia consisted of 1.0 MAC sevoflurane in 30% oxygen with intermittent positive pressure ventilation maintaining FEco2 at 38 mmHg (5.0 kPa) and a caudal epidural block using 0.25% bupivacaine 1.0 ml.kg-1. The remainder of the inspired gas was varied in one of two sequences either air/nitrous oxide/air or nitrous oxide/air/nitrous oxide. The results showed that CBFV decreased when nitrous oxide was replaced by air (p = 0.03) and returned to its initial value when nitrous oxide was reintroduced. CBFV increased when air was replaced by nitrous oxide (p = 0.04) and returned to its initial value when air was reintroduced. Mean heart rate and blood pressure remained constant. We conclude that nitrous oxide increases cerebral blood flow velocity in healthy children anaesthetised with 1.0 MAC sevoflurane.

  19. Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas using vector velocity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Lange, Theis; Heerwagen, Søren; Pedersen, Mads Møller; Rix, Marianne; Lönn, Lars; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2014-11-01

    Volume flow in arteriovenous fistulas for hemodialysis was measured using the angle-independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging and compared with flow measurements using the ultrasound dilution technique during dialysis. Using an UltraView 800 ultrasound scanner (BK Medical, Herlev, Denmark) with a linear transducer, 20 arteriovenous fistulas were scanned directly on the most superficial part of the fistula just before dialysis. Vector Flow Imaging volume flow was estimated with two different approaches, using the maximum and the average flow velocities detected in the fistula. Flow was estimated to be 242 mL/min and 404 mL/min lower than the ultrasound dilution technique estimate, depending on the approach. The standard deviations of the two Vector Flow Imaging approaches were 175.9 mL/min and 164.8 mL/min compared with a standard deviation of 136.9 mL/min using the ultrasound dilution technique. The study supports that Vector Flow Imaging is applicable for volume flow measurements.

  20. Deployable Emergency Shutoff Device Blocks High-Velocity Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a device and method for blocking the flow of fluid from an open pipe. Motivated by the sea-bed oil-drilling catastrophe in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, NASA innovators designed the device to plug, control, and meter the flow of gases and liquids. Anchored with friction fittings, spikes, or explosively activated fasteners, the device is well-suited for harsh environments and high fluid velocities and pressures. With the addition of instrumentation, it can also be used as a variable area flow metering valve that can be set based upon flow conditions. With robotic additions, this patent-pending innovation can be configured to crawl into a pipe then anchor and activate itself to block or control fluid flow.

  1. Evaluation of the tablets' surface flow velocities in pan coaters.

    PubMed

    Dreu, Rok; Toschkoff, Gregor; Funke, Adrian; Altmeyer, Andreas; Knop, Klaus; Khinast, Johannes; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The tablet pan coating process involves various types of transverse tablet bed motions, ranging from rolling to cascading. To preserve satisfactory results in terms of coating quality after scale-up, understanding the dynamics of pan coating process should be achieved. The aim of this study was to establish a methodology of estimating translational surface velocities of the tablets in a pan coater and to assess their dependence on the drum's filling degree, the pan speed, the presence of baffles and the selected tablet properties in a dry bed system and during coating while varying the drum's filling degree and the pan speed. Experiments were conducted on the laboratory scale and on the pilot scale in side-vented pan coaters. Surface movement of biconvex two-layer tablets was assessed before, during and after the process of active coating. In order to determine the tablets' surface flow velocities, a high-speed video of the tablet surface flow was recorded via a borescope inserted into the coating drum and analysed via a cross-correlation algorithm. The obtained tablet velocity data were arranged in a linear fashion as a function of the coating drum's radius and frequency. Velocity data obtained during coating were close to those of dry tablets after coating. The filling degree had little influence on the tablet velocity profile in a coating drum with baffles but clearly affected it in a coating drum without baffles. In most but not all cases, tablets with a lower static angle of repose had tablet velocity profiles with lower slopes than tablets with higher inter-tablet friction. This particular tablet velocity response can be explained by case specific values of tablet bed's dynamic angle of repose.

  2. Velocity Measurements of Free Surface Liquid Metal Flows in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Scott; Ji, Hantao; Nornberg, Mark; Rhoads, John

    2008-11-01

    A potential probe diagnostic was developed and calibrated to map the velocity profile of free-surface liquid metal channel flow and quantify the effect an applied magnetic field played in shaping the velocity profile. The setup for this experiment consists of a wide aspect ratio channel sealed from the air, with argon replacing the air in the channel, placed within an electromagnet capable of producing more than a 2000 Gauss field perpendicular to the flow. An alloy of GaInSn, which is liquid at room temperature, is pumped through the channel by a screw pump at a specified rate. The velocity profile is obtained by measuring the voltage across pairs of probes. Various materials were used to determine which probe material would maximize the signal from the voltage induced by the Hall effect and reduce the voltage due to thermoelectric effects. Extensive calibration was then carried out to ensure an accurate velocity measurement. After amplification and filtering this signal gives us a good measurement of the velocity of the liquid metal over the cross-section of a specific probe.

  3. Performance of conical jet nozzles in terms of flow and velocity coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grey, Ralph E; Wilsted, H Dean

    1949-01-01

    Performance characteristics of conical jet nozzles were determined in an investigation covering a range of pressure ratios from 1.0 to 2.8, cone half-angles from 5 degrees to 90 degrees, and outlet-inlet diameter ratios from 0.50 to 0.91. All nozzles investigated had an inlet diameter of 5 inches. The flow coefficients of the conical nozzles investigated were dependent on the cone half-angle, outlet-inlet diameter ratio, and pressure ratio. The velocity coefficients were essentially constant at pressure ratios below the critical. For increasing pressures above critical pressure ratio, there was a small decrease in velocity coefficient that was dependent on pressure ratio and independent of cone half-angle and outlet-inlet diameter ratio. Therefore the variation in performance (air flow and thrust) of several nozzles, selected for the same performance at a particular design condition, was proportional to the ratio of their flow coefficients.

  4. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  5. Hyperconcentrated flow and men velocity estimation: a study case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Termini, Donatella

    2015-04-01

    Due to the complexity of the debris-flow process, numerical models to simulate propagation phenomenon are still limited. Different approaches (either monophase or two-phase) have been proposed in literature to solve the set of governing equations. But, the difficulty is due to the fact that these equations require suitable closure relations that should be valid in a very wide range of slope and materials characteristics. The point is that, in order to perform a hazard assessment and/or to design protective measures against debris flows, it is necessary to estimate important parameters such as mean flow velocity, peak discharge and runout distance. Experimental program has been recently conducted at the Hydraulic laboratory of the Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospatial and of Materials (DICAM) - University of Palermo (Italy) in order to evaluate the influence of different geometrical parameters (such as the slope and the geometrical characteristics of the confluences to the main channel) on the propagation phenomenon of the debris flow and its deposition. The experimental apparatus includes a high-precision camera allowing the estimation of hyperconcentrated flow velocity by applying the VIA technique. In a previous work (Termini and Di Leonardo, 2014) the influence of geometrical parameters on the propagation phenomenon were analyzed. In the present work the attention is devoted to the mean velocity and its estimation for different concentrations of solid materials. References Termini D., Di Leonardo A. 2014. "Propagation of hyperconcentrated flows in protection channels around urban areas:experimental investigation" -Urban and urbanization. ST. KLIMENT OHRIDSKI. University Press. Sofia.

  6. A clean air continuous flow propulsion facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauss, R. H.; Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a contaminant-free, high enthalpy, continuous flow facility designed to obtain detailed code validation measurements of high speed combustion. The facility encompasses uncontaminated air temperature control to within 5 K, fuel temperature control to 2 K, a ceramic flow straightener, drying of inlet air, and steady state continuous operation. The air heating method provides potential for independent control of contaminant level by injection, mixing, and heating upstream. Particular attention is given to extension of current capability of 1250 K total air temperature, which simulates Scramjet enthalpy at Mach 5.

  7. Flowing layer kinematics for constant dimension flowing layers with variable erosion velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitulnik, Adam; Pohlman, Nicholas

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of granular flow assume a consistent flowing layer profile observed in circular tumblers that were half full. While the constant shear rate model predicts mixing kinematics adequately, the model has not been empirically tested in systems where the erosion from the solid body has velocity components along the dynamic angle of repose. This research reports on experiments where the relationship between tumbler fill fraction and the kinematics of the erosion boundary transition into the flowing layer is analyzed. Tumblers greater than 50% full have inertial velocity along the angle of repose; fill conditions less than 50% enter with velocity opposite the free surface angle. Results show that varying the fill level while maintaining constant flowing layer length does not change the advection pattern within the flowing layer. The conclusion is that the 50% model is independent of fill level due to the kinetic energy of the flowing layer exceeding the potential energy at the erosion boundary.

  8. Improved technique for blood flow velocity measurement using Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadares Oliveira, Eduardo J.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.; Maia, Joaquim M.; Costa, Eduardo T.

    2002-04-01

    The Doppler velocimeter developed allows to determine the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the velocity vector of the flow, and to calculate the precise blood flow in a vessel. Four piezoelectric transducers constitute the Doppler velocimeter. Three of these transducers are positioned to form an equilateral triangle (base of a pyramid). When these transducers move simultaneously, backward or forward from the initial position, the emitted ultrasonic beams focalize on a position (peak of the pyramid) closer or farther from the transducers faces, according to the depth of the vessel where we intend to measure de flow. The angle between the transducers allows adjusting the height of this pyramid and the position of the focus (where the three beams meet). A forth transducer is used to determine the diameter of the vessel and monitor the position of the Doppler velocimeter relative to the vessel. Simulation results showed that with this technique is possible to accomplish precise measurement of blood flow.

  9. Visualization of turbulent flows with simultaneous velocity and vorticity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Lawrence

    1992-09-01

    An experimental study of the turbulent boundary layer at Re(sub theta) approx. equals 1070 was conducted. This study combines velocity and vorticity measurements using a nine-sensor hot-wire probe with simultaneously obtained flow visualization images. Detailed measurements within the boundary layer with and without smoke marking of the wall layer fluid were performed at various distances from the wall, ranging from approximately y(+) approx. equals 14 to y(+) approx. equals 156, and at three axial locations downstream from the smoke injection slot. The mean statistical properties of the fluctuating velocity and vorticity components agree well with previous experimental and numerically simulated data. These boundary layer measurements were used in a joint probability analysis of the various instantaneous velocity, velocity gradient and vorticity correlations that appear in the vorticity and enstrophy transport equations. Substantial evidence supporting postulated inclined vortex models was found. Conditional analysis based on the detection of strong Reynolds stress and enstrophy events was carried out. The combined visual and hot-wire data provide evidence showing that these smoke marked regions in the flow field, which indicate vertical mass flux, are also regions of high vertical momentum flux.

  10. Mass flow velocity distribution in the solar chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    A study of chromospheric lines (those of Si-II and Si-III) was made using the data from high resolution telescope and spectrograph (HRTS). The optically thick line profiles such as lambda 1206 due to Si-III and lambda 1265 and lambda 1533 due to Si-II were to be investigated in detail using the techniques of spectrum synthesis in an attempt to model the mass flow velocity distribution in the region of the solar atmosphere.

  11. Study of the velocity gradient tensor in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Wei-Ping; Cantwell, Brian

    1996-01-01

    The behavior of the velocity gradient tensor, A(ij)=delta u(i)/delta x(j), was studied using three turbulent flows obtained from direct numerical simulation The flows studies were: an inviscid calculation of the interaction between two vortex tubes, a homogeneous isotropic flow, and a temporally evolving planar wake. Self-similar behavior for each flow was obtained when A(ij) was normalized with the mean strain rate. The case of the interaction between two vortex tubes revealed a finite sized coherent structure with topological characteristics predictable by a restricted Euler model. This structure was found to evolve with the peak vorticity as the flow approached singularity. Invariants of A(ij) within this structure followed a straight line relationship of the form: gamma(sup 3)+gammaQ+R=0, where Q and R are the second and third invariants of A(ij), and the eigenvalue gamma is nearly constant over the volume of this structure. Data within this structure have local strain topology of unstable-node/saddle/saddle. The characteristics of the velocity gradient tensor and the anisotropic part of a related acceleration gradient tensor H(ij) were also studied for a homogeneous isotropic flow and a temporally evolving planar wake. It was found that the intermediate principal eigenvalue of the rate-of-strain tensor of H(ij) tended to be negative, with local strain topology of the type stable-node/saddle/saddle. There was also a preferential eigenvalue direction. The magnitude of H(ij) in the wake flow was found to be very small when data were conditioned at high local dissipation regions. This result was not observed in the relatively low Reynolds number simulation of homogeneous isotropic flow. A restricted Euler model of the evolution of A(ij) was found to reproduce many of the topological features identified in the simulations.

  12. Ultraviolet Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Used to Measure Velocity in High-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular Rayleigh scattering offers a means to measure gas flow parameters including density, temperature, and velocity. No seeding of the flow is necessary. The Rayleigh scattered power is proportional to the gas density, the spectral width is related to the gas temperature, and the shift in the frequency of the spectral peak is proportional to one component of the fluid velocity. Velocity measurements based on Rayleigh scattering are more suitable for high-speed flow, where the bulk fluid velocity is on the order of, or larger than, the molecular thermal velocities. Use of ultraviolet wavelengths for Rayleigh scattering diagnostics is attractive for two reasons. First, the Rayleigh scattering cross section is proportional to the inverse 4th power of the wavelength. And second, the reflectivity of metallic surfaces is generally less than it is at longer wavelengths. This is of particular interest in confined flow situations, such as in small wind tunnels and aircraft engine components, where the stray laser light scattered from the windows and internal surfaces in the test facility limits the application of Rayleigh scattering diagnostics. In this work at the NASA Lewis Research Center, molecular Rayleigh scattering of the 266-nm fourth harmonic of a pulsed, injection seeded Nd:YAG (neodymium:yttriumaluminum- garnet) laser was used to measure velocity in a supersonic free air jet with a 9.3- mm exit diameter. The frequency of the Rayleigh scattered light was analyzed with a planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer used in a static imaging mode, with the images recorded on a cooled, high-quantum-efficiency charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera. In addition, some unshifted light from the same laser pulse was imaged through the interferometer to generate a reference. Data were obtained with single laser pulses at velocities up to Mach 1.3. The measured velocities were in good agreement with velocities calculated from isentropic flow relations. Our conclusion from

  13. Velocity Measurements of Thermoelectric Driven Flowing Liquid Lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szott, Matthew; Xu, Wenyu; Fiflis, Peter; Haehnlein, Ian; Kapat, Aveek; Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Ruzic, David N.

    2014-10-01

    Liquid lithium has garnered additional attention as a PFC due to its several advantages over solid PFCs, including reduced erosion and thermal fatigue, increased heat transfer, higher device lifetime, and enhanced plasma performance due to the establishment of low recycling regimes at the wall. The Lithium Metal Infused Trenches concept (LiMIT) has demonstrated thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic flow of liquid lithium through horizontal open-faced metal trenches with measured velocities varying from 3.7+/-0.5 cm/s in the 1.76 T field of HT-7 to 22+/-3 cm/s in the SLiDE facility at UIUC at 0.059 T. To demonstrate the versatility of the concept, a new LiMIT design using narrower trenches shows steady state, thermoelectric-driven flow at an arbitrary angle from horizontal. Velocity characteristics are measured and discussed. Based on this LiMIT concept, a new limiter design has been developed to be tested on the mid-plane of the EAST plasma. Preliminary modelling suggests lithium flow of 6 cm/s in this device. Additionally, recent testing at the Magnum-PSI facility has given encouraging results, and velocity measurements in relation to magnetic field strength and plasma flux are also presented.

  14. The Effect of Compressibility on the Pressure Reading of a Prandtl Pitot Tube at Subsonic Flow Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walchner, O

    1939-01-01

    Errors arising from yawed flow were also determined up to 20 degrees angle of attack. In axial flow, the Prandtl pitot tube begins at w/a approx. = 0.8 to give an incorrect static pressure reading, while it records the tank pressure correctly, as anticipated, up to sonic velocity. Owing to the compressibility of the air, the Prandtl pitot tube manifests compression shocks when the air speed approaches velocity of sound. This affects the pressure reading of the instrument. Because of the increasing importance of high speed in aviation, this compressibility effect is investigated in detail.

  15. Health woes tied to low air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, J.

    1984-01-23

    Occupants in buildings with heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems which limit fresh air flow may suffer a variety of illnesses because of the buildup of noxious contaminants. Building managers need to continue conservation efforts, but they should also meet the air standards set by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) which are in the process of being strengthened. Cases of building sickness caused by indoor air pollution have increased during the past decade, prompting ASHRAE to expedite the revision of its specifications.

  16. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  17. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  18. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air flow measurement specifications. 89... Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method used... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  19. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  20. 40 CFR 89.414 - Air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Emission Test Procedures § 89.414 Air flow measurement specifications. (a) The air flow measurement method... incorporates devices that affect the air flow measurement (such as air bleeds) that result in......

  1. Simulator Of Rain In Flowing Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Richard M.; Cho, Young I.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Back, Lloyd H.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes relatively inexpensive apparatus that creates simulated precipitation from drizzle to heavy rain in flowing air. Small, positive-displacement pump and water-injecting device positioned at low-airspeed end of converging section of wind tunnel 10 in. in diameter. Drops injected by array entrained in flow of air as it accelerates toward narrower outlet, 15 in. downstream. Outlet 5 in. in diameter.

  2. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  3. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  4. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  5. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  6. 42 CFR 84.140 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.140 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  7. The in situ permeable flow sensor: A device for measuring groundwater flow velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, S.; Barker, G.T.; Nichols, R.L.

    1994-03-01

    A new technology called the In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. These sensors use a thermal perturbation technique to directly measure the direction and magnitude of the full three dimensional groundwater flow velocity vector in unconsolidated, saturated, porous media. The velocity measured is an average value characteristic of an approximately 1 cubic meter volume of the subsurface. During a test at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, two flow sensors were deployed in a confined aquifer in close proximity to a well which was screened over the entire vertical extent of the aquifer and the well was pumped at four different pumping rates. In this situation horizontal flow which is radially directed toward the pumping well is expected. The flow sensors measured horizontal flow which was directed toward the pumping well, within the uncertainty in the measurements. The observed magnitude of the horizontal component of the flow velocity increased linearly with pumping rate, as predicted by theoretical considerations. The measured horizontal component of the flow velocity differed from the predicted flow velocity, which was calculated with the assumptions that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer were radially homogeneous and isotropic, by less than a factor of two. Drawdown data obtained from other wells near the pumping well during the pump test indicate that the hydraulic properties of the aquifer are probably not radially homogeneous but the effect of the inhomogeneity on the flow velocity field around the pumping well was not modeled because the degree and distribution of the inhomogeneity are unknown. Grain size analysis of core samples from wells in the area were used to estimate the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity.

  8. Burning Velocity Measurements in Aluminum-Air Suspensions using Bunsen Type Dust Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, John; Goroshin, Samuel; Kolbe, Massimiliano

    2001-01-01

    Laminar burning velocity (sometimes also referred in literature as fundamental or normal flame propagation speed) is probably the most important combustion characteristic of the premixed combustible mixture. The majority of experimental data on burning velocities in gaseous mixtures was obtained with the help of the Bunsen conical flame. The Bunsen cone method was found to be sufficiently accurate for gaseous mixtures with burning velocities higher than 10-15 cm/s at normal pressure. Hans Cassel was the first to demonstrate that suspensions of micron-size solid fuel particles in a gaseous oxidizer can also form self-sustained Bunsen flames. He was able to stabilize Bunsen flames in a number of suspensions of different nonvolatile solid fuels (aluminum, carbon, and boron). Using the Bunsen cone method he estimated burning velocities in the premixed aluminum-air mixtures (particle size less than 10 microns) to be in the range of 30-40 cm/s. Cassel also found, that the burning velocity in dust clouds is a function of the burner diameter. In our recent work, we have used the Bunsen cone method to investigate dependence of burning velocity on dust concentration in fuel-rich aluminum dust clouds. Burning velocities in stoichiometric and fuel-rich aluminum dust suspensions with average particle sizes of about 5 microns were found to be in the range of 20-25 cm/s and largely independent on dust concentration. These results raise the question to what degree burning velocities derived from Bunsen flame specifically and other dust flame configurations in general, are indeed fundamental characteristics of the mixture and to what degree are they apparatus dependent. Dust flames in comparison to gas combustion, are thicker, may be influenced by radiation heat transfer in the flame front, respond differently to heat losses, and are fundamentally influenced by the particular flow configuration due to the particles inertia. Since characteristic spatial scales of dust flames are

  9. Flow measurements in sewers based on image analysis: automatic flow velocity algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jeanbourquin, D; Sage, D; Nguyen, L; Schaeli, B; Kayal, S; Barry, D A; Rossi, L

    2011-01-01

    Discharges of combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and stormwater are recognized as an important source of environmental contamination. However, the harsh sewer environment and particular hydraulic conditions during rain events reduce the reliability of traditional flow measurement probes. An in situ system for sewer water flow monitoring based on video images was evaluated. Algorithms to determine water velocities were developed based on image-processing techniques. The image-based water velocity algorithm identifies surface features and measures their positions with respect to real world coordinates. A web-based user interface and a three-tier system architecture enable remote configuration of the cameras and the image-processing algorithms in order to calculate automatically flow velocity on-line. Results of investigations conducted in a CSO are presented. The system was found to measure reliably water velocities, thereby providing the means to understand particular hydraulic behaviors.

  10. Reconstruction of velocity profiles in axisymmetric and asymmetric flows using an electromagnetic flow meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, László E.; Lucas, Gary P.; Meng, Yiqing

    2015-05-01

    An analytical method that was developed formerly for the reconstruction of velocity profiles in asymmetric flows is improved to be applicable for both axisymmetric and asymmetric flows. The method is implemented in Matlab, and predicts the velocity profile from measured electrical potential distributions obtained around the boundary of a multi-electrode electromagnetic flow meter (EMFM). Potential distributions are measured in uniform and non-uniform magnetic fields, and the velocity is assumed as a sum of axisymmetric and polynomial components. The procedure requires three steps. First, the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is applied to the potential distribution obtained in a uniform magnetic field. Since the direction of polynomial components of order greater than two in the plane of the pipe cross section is not unique multiple solutions exist, therefore all possible polynomial velocity profiles are determined. Then, the DFT is applied to the potential distribution obtained in a specific non-uniform magnetic field, and used to calculate the exponent in a power-law representation of the axisymmetric component. Finally, the potential distribution in the non-uniform magnetic field is calculated for all of the possible velocity profile solutions using weight values, and the velocity profile with the calculated potential distribution which is closest to the measured one provides the optimum solution. The method is validated by reconstructing two quartic velocity profiles, one of which includes an axisymmetric component. The potential distributions are obtained from simulations using COMSOL Multiphysics where a model of the EMFM is constructed. The reconstructed velocity profiles show satisfactory agreement with the input velocity profiles. The main benefits of the method described in this paper are that it provides a velocity distribution in the circular cross section of a pipe as an analytical function of the spatial coordinates which is suitable for both

  11. Nonequilibrium velocity fluctuations and energy amplification in planar Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz de Zárate, José M.; Sengers, Jan V.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we investigate intrinsic thermally excited nonequilibrium velocity fluctuations in laminar planar Couette flow. For this purpose we have complemented the solution of the stochastic Orr-Sommerfeld equation for the intensity of the fluctuations of the wall-normal velocity, presented in a previous publication, with a solution of the stochastic Squire equation for the intensity of the fluctuations of the wall-normal vorticity. We have obtained exact solutions of these equations without boundary conditions and solutions in a Galerkin approximation when appropriate boundary conditions are included. These results enable us to make a quantitative assessment of the intensity of these nonequilibrium fluctuations, as well as of the related energy amplification, which are always present, even in the absence of any externally imposed noise.

  12. A novel technique to measure subsurface flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, S.; Weiler, M.

    2010-12-01

    To better understand subsurface flow (SSF) processes at the hillslope scale, measuring subsurface flow velocity should be of great interest. However, due to the large heterogeneity in time and space, we are faced with the need to continuously measure SSF velocity at several locations within a hillslope over a distance being representative for certain hillslope segments. At present, SSF velocity is either measured by tracer tests over larger distances or via centimeter-scale measurements using heat dissipation or other tracers. This calls for a cheap and easily applicable method to continuously detect subsurface flow velocity in the field over a distance representative for certain hillslope segments. We currently develop a novel technique, which has shown promising results in the laboratory. The technique is based on an automatic salt tracer injection into a small-diameter borehole once the soil matrix has reached saturation. The tracer signal is captured by a 5TE probe (Decagon Devices) measuring soil moisture, electrical conductivity, and temperature every two minutes, which is inserted a few decimetres downslope of the injection point into the soil. The automatic injection is also controlled by the 5TE probe, which is connected to a CR1000 Logger (Campbell Scientific). Once saturated conditions have been established, a plug valve attached to an above-mounted bottle with NaCl solution is opened for 2 seconds and the tracer is injected into the borehole via a small steel tube screened at the bottom. Under saturated conditions the automatic injection is conducted every two hours and the breakthrough curves are analyzed for the mean effective velocity. In a first step, the technique was tested in a sand filled box with constant in- and outflow conditions representing a homogeneous miniature hillslope. Several experimental set-ups differing in hydraulic gradient, distance from injection point to 5TE probe, orientation of 5TE probe, and amount and concentration of

  13. Air-water flow in subsurface systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, A.; Mishra, P.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater traces its roots to tackle challenges of safe and reliable drinking water and food production. When the groundwater level rises, air pressure in the unsaturated Vadose zone increases, forcing air to escape from the ground surface. Abnormally high and low subsurface air pressure can be generated when the groundwater system, rainfall, and sea level fluctuation are favorably combined [Jiao and Li, 2004]. Through this process, contamination in the form of volatile gases may diffuse from the ground surface into residential areas, or possibly move into groundwater from industrial waste sites. It is therefore crucial to understand the combined effects of air-water flow in groundwater system. Here we investigate theoretically and experimentally the effects of air and water flow in groundwater system.

  14. Characteristics of coal mine ventilation air flows.

    PubMed

    Su, Shi; Chen, Hongwei; Teakle, Philip; Xue, Sheng

    2008-01-01

    Coal mine methane (CMM) is not only a greenhouse gas but also a wasted energy resource if not utilised. Underground coal mining is by far the most important source of fugitive methane emissions, and approximately 70% of all coal mining related methane is emitted to the atmosphere through mine ventilation air. Therefore, research and development on mine methane mitigation and utilisation now focuses on methane emitted from underground coal mines, in particular ventilation air methane (VAM) capture and utilisation. To date, most work has focused on the oxidation of very low concentration methane. These processes may be classified based on their combustion kinetic mechanisms into thermal oxidation and catalytic oxidation. VAM mitigation/utilisation technologies are generally divided into two basic categories: ancillary uses and principal uses. However, it is possible that the characteristics of ventilation air flows, for example the variations in methane concentration and the presence of certain compounds, which have not been reported so far, could make some potential VAM mitigation and utilisation technologies unfeasible if they cannot cope with the characteristics of mine site ventilation air flows. Therefore, it is important to understand the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows. Moreover, dust, hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide, and other possible compounds emitted through mine ventilation air into the atmosphere are also pollutants. Therefore, this paper presents mine-site experimental results on the characteristics of mine ventilation air flows, including methane concentration and its variations, dust loadings, particle size, mineral matter of the dust, and other compounds in the ventilation air flows. The paper also discusses possible correlations between ventilation air characteristics and underground mining activities.

  15. Compressible Flow Tables for Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcher, Marie A.

    1947-01-01

    This paper contains a tabulation of functions of the Mach number which are frequently used in high-speed aerodynamics. The tables extend from M = 0 to M = 10.0 in increments of 0.01 and are based on the assumption that air is a perfect gas having a specific heat ratio of 1.400.

  16. Equalization of flow velocities in diesel fuel hydrotreating reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Telyashev, G.G.; Prokopyuk, S.G.; Khamzin, R.K.

    1995-07-01

    In the design of hydrotreating reactors with a fixed bed of granular catalyst, it is assumed that the flows of feed and hydrogen-rich gas (HRG) are uniformly distributed across the section of the vessel. However, operating data obtained on such reactors show that the reactant distribution may be nonuniform under certain conditions. The aerodynamic parameters of the catalyst grains influence the chemical reaction rate and the effective service life of the catalyst, as well as its selectivity, activity, and grain condition (coking, sintering). One of the manifestations of low nonuniformity is higher velocities at the walls. This phenomenon is governed by parameters of the granular medium.

  17. Nonintrusive Temperature and Velocity Measurements in a Hypersonic Nozzle Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of nitric oxide vibrational temperature, rotational temperature and velocity have been measured in the hypersonic freestream at the exit of a conical nozzle, using planar laser-induced fluorescence. Particular attention has been devoted to reducing the major sources of systematic error that can affect fluorescence tempera- ture measurements, including beam attenuation, transition saturation effects, laser mode fluctuations and transition choice. Visualization experiments have been performed to improve the uniformity of the nozzle flow. Comparisons of measured quantities with a simple one-dimensional computation are made, showing good agreement between measurements and theory given the uncertainty of the nozzle reservoir conditions and the vibrational relaxation rate.

  18. Species and velocity visualization of unseeded heated air and combusting hydrogen jets using laser and flashlamp sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Glenn S.; Lempert, Walter R.; Miles, Richard B.

    1990-01-01

    Three techniques for the visualization of species and/or velocity in unseeded H2/air flames and heated air jets are described and preliminary image data are presented. The techniques described are: (1) simultaneous ArF laser imaging of H2, O2, and Rayleigh cross-section weighted density in an H2, O2, and Rayleigh cross-section weighted density in an H2/air flame; (2) ultraviolet flashlamp imaging of O2, OH, and Rayleigh cross-section weighted density in an H2/air flame; and (3) Raman Excitation plus Laser Induced Electronic Fluorescence velocimetry in heater air flows, up to static temperatures of 700 K. Application of these techniques, individually or in combination, should provide useful insight into mixing and reacting flows containing H2, O2, N2 and reaction intermediates such as OH.

  19. Ultrasonic 3-D Vector Flow Method for Quantitative In Vivo Peak Velocity and Flow Rate Estimation.

    PubMed

    Holbek, Simon; Ewertsen, Caroline; Bouzari, Hamed; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Stuart, Matthias Bo; Thomsen, Carsten; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2017-03-01

    Current clinical ultrasound (US) systems are limited to show blood flow movement in either 1-D or 2-D. In this paper, a method for estimating 3-D vector velocities in a plane using the transverse oscillation method, a 32×32 element matrix array, and the experimental US scanner SARUS is presented. The aim of this paper is to estimate precise flow rates and peak velocities derived from 3-D vector flow estimates. The emission sequence provides 3-D vector flow estimates at up to 1.145 frames/s in a plane, and was used to estimate 3-D vector flow in a cross-sectional image plane. The method is validated in two phantom studies, where flow rates are measured in a flow-rig, providing a constant parabolic flow, and in a straight-vessel phantom ( ∅=8 mm) connected to a flow pump capable of generating time varying waveforms. Flow rates are estimated to be 82.1 ± 2.8 L/min in the flow-rig compared with the expected 79.8 L/min, and to 2.68 ± 0.04 mL/stroke in the pulsating environment compared with the expected 2.57 ± 0.08 mL/stroke. Flow rates estimated in the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer are compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measured flow rates using a 1-D through-plane velocity sequence. Mean flow rates were 333 ± 31 mL/min for the presented method and 346 ± 2 mL/min for the MRI measurements.

  20. Application of velocity filtering to optical-flow passive ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barniv, Yair

    1992-01-01

    The performance of the velocity filtering method as applied to optical-flow passive ranging under real-world conditions is evaluated. The theory of the 3-D Fourier transform as applied to constant-speed moving points is reviewed, and the space-domain shift-and-add algorithm is derived from the general 3-D matched filtering formulation. The constant-speed algorithm is then modified to fit the actual speed encountered in the optical flow application, and the passband of that filter is found in terms of depth (sensor/object distance) so as to cover any given range of depths. Two algorithmic solutions for the problems associated with pixel interpolation and object expansion are developed, and experimental results are presented.

  1. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  2. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  3. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  4. 40 CFR 91.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Procedures § 91.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the...

  5. Air flow through poppet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, G W; Nutting, E M

    1920-01-01

    Report discusses the comparative continuous flow characteristics of single and double poppet valves. The experimental data presented affords a direct comparison of valves, single and in pairs of different sizes, tested in a cylinder designed in accordance with current practice in aviation engines.

  6. Velocity fluctuations and energy amplification in laminar fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz de Zarate, Jose M.; Sengers, Jan V.

    2008-11-01

    We present a systematic procedure for evaluating the intrinsic velocity fluctuations and the resulting intrinsic energy amplification that are always present in laminar fluid flows. For this purpose we formulate a stochastic Orr-Sommerfeld equation and a stochastic Squire equation by applying a fluctuation-dissipation theorem for the random part of the dissipative stresses. From the solution of the stochastic Orr- Sommerfeld and Squire equations the intrinsic energy amplification can be deduced. As an illustration of the procedure we present an explicit solution for the case of planar Couette flow. We first solve the fluctuating hydrodynamics equations in the bulk, obtaining an exact representation of the spatial spectrum of the velocity fluctuations valid for large wave numbers. The resulting energy amplification is proportional to Re^3/2. Next, we show how to a good approximation confinement can be incorporated by a simple Galerkin projection technique. The effect of the boundary conditions is to reduce the energy amplification to a logarithmic dependence on Re. We shall also indicate how an exact solution for the case of confined geometries can be obtained by an expansion into a set of hydrodynamic modes, conveniently expressed in terms of Airy functions.

  7. Discovery about temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-02-01

    The law of spatial fluctuations of temperature in a turbulent flow in the atmosphere was studied. The turbulent movement of air in the atmosphere manifests itself in random changes in wind velocity and in the dispersal of smoke. If a miniature thermometer with sufficient sensitivity and speed of response were placed in a air flow, its readings would fluctuate chaotically against the background of average temperature. This is Characteristic of practically every point of the flow. The temperature field forms as a result of the mixing of the air. A method using the relation of the mean square of the difference in temperatures of two points to the distance between these points as the structural characteristic of this field was proposed. It was found that the dissipation of energy in a flow and the equalization of temperatures are connected with the breaking up of eddies in a turbulent flow into smaller ones. Their energy in turn is converted into heat due to the viscosity of the medium. The law that has been discovered makes for a much broader field of application of physical methods of analyzing atmospheric phenomena.

  8. Modeling of High-Velocity Flows in ITAM Impulse Facilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    the remaining part of the wind tunnel (nozzle, test section, and vacuum tank ) is evacuated by vacuum pumps to a pressure of ~10–2 mmHg. During the...diaphragm 3; 4 – plunger; 5 – pressure multiplier; 6 – two-step piston; 7 – damping fluid; 8 – tank for fluid; 9 – controller of the flow rate; 10...8, the pressure in the fuel tank was maintained constant, and the air-to-fuel ratio was α = 0.7–1.2. Figure 4 shows an example of static pressure

  9. Multiple Velocity Profile Measurements in Hypersonic Flows Using Sequentially-Imaged Fluorescence Tagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Ivey,Christopher b.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric-oxide planar laser-induced fluorescence (NO PLIF) was used to perform velocity measurements in hypersonic flows by generating multiple tagged lines which fluoresce as they convect downstream. For each laser pulse, a single interline, progressive scan intensified CCD (charge-coupled device) camera was used to obtain two sequential images of the NO molecules that had been tagged by the laser. The CCD configuration allowed for sub-microsecond acquisition of both images, resulting in sub-microsecond temporal resolution as well as sub-mm spatial resolution (0.5-mm horizontal, 0.7-mm vertical). Determination of axial velocity was made by application of a cross-correlation analysis of the horizontal shift of individual tagged lines. A numerical study of measured velocity error due to a uniform and linearly-varying collisional rate distribution was performed. Quantification of systematic errors, the contribution of gating/exposure duration errors, and the influence of collision rate on temporal uncertainty were made. Quantification of the spatial uncertainty depended upon the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired profiles. This velocity measurement technique has been demonstrated for two hypersonic flow experiments: (1) a reaction control system (RCS) jet on an Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) wind tunnel model and (2) a 10-degree half-angle wedge containing a 2-mm tall, 4-mm wide cylindrical boundary layer trip. The experiments were performed at the NASA Langley Research Center's 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel.

  10. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  11. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  12. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  13. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  14. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  15. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  16. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  17. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  18. 42 CFR 84.202 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... PROTECTIVE DEVICES Chemical Cartridge Respirators § 84.202 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  19. 42 CFR 84.1139 - Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1139 Air velocity and noise levels; hoods and helmets; minimum requirements. Noise levels generated by the respirator will be measured inside the hood or...

  20. Tidal reversal and flow velocities using temperature and specific conductance in a small wetland creek

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Timothy T.

    2016-11-01

    Characterizing flow dynamics in very small tidal creeks is complicated and not well suited to methods developed for upland streams or coastal estuaries, due to low flows, bidirectionality and shallow waters. Simple instrumentation enables thermal and salinity signals to be used to observe flow directions and estimate velocities in these settings. Using multiple inexpensive sensors over 500 m along a tidally influenced wetland creek, I demonstrate how advection of temperature and specific conductance pulses reveal flood and ebb tides and the temporary reversal of flow by warmer, estuarine water from the receiving embayment. The sequential rise of temperature upstream was most evident under hot and dry conditions, after daily peak air temperatures of 25 °C or above, and was subdued or disrupted under cooler or rainy conditions in summertime. Changes in specific conductance at successive sites upstream were less susceptible to environmental influences and confirm tidal flood velocity of between 0.07 and 0.37 m/s. The tidally-induced flow reversal suggests that periodic high tide conditions can interfere with rapid dispersal of pollution discharges, such as from the combined sewer overflow (CSO) located upstream of the studied creek reach. This low-cost approach of temperature and specific conductance sensing in vegetated coastal wetlands where access, precise elevation control and creek discharge measurements are difficult, provides a simple way of tracking water masses when sufficient contrast exists between water sources.

  1. Blood flow velocity in monocular retinoblastoma assessed by color doppler

    PubMed Central

    Bonanomi, Maria Teresa B C; Saito, Osmar C; de Lima, Patricia Picciarelli; Bonanomi, Roberta Chizzotti; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the flow of retrobulbar vessels in retinoblastoma by color Doppler imaging. METHODS: A prospective study of monocular retinoblastoma treated by enucleation between 2010 and 2014. The examination comprised fundoscopy, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography and color Doppler imaging. The peak blood velocities in the central retinal artery and central retinal vein of tumor-containing eyes (tuCRAv and tuCRVv, respectively) were assessed. The velocities were compared with those for normal eyes (nlCRAv and nlCRVv) and correlated with clinical and pathological findings. Tumor dimensions in the pathological sections were compared with those in magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography and were correlated with tuCRAv and tuCRVv. In tumor-containing eyes, the resistivity index in the central retinal artery and the pulse index in the central retinal vein were studied in relation to all variables. RESULTS: Eighteen patients were included. Comparisons between tuCRAv and nlCRAv and between tuCRVv and nlCRVv revealed higher velocities in tumor-containing eyes (p<0.001 for both), with a greater effect in the central retinal artery than in the central retinal vein (p=0.024). Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography measurements were as reliable as pathology assessments (p=0.675 and p=0.375, respectively). A positive relationship was found between tuCRAv and the tumor volume (p=0.027). The pulse index in the central retinal vein was lower in male patients (p=0.017) and in eyes with optic nerve invasion (p=0.0088). CONCLUSIONS: TuCRAv and tuCRVv are higher in tumor-containing eyes than in normal eyes. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography measurements are reliable. The tumor volume is correlated with a higher tuCRAv and a reduced pulse in the central retinal vein is correlated with male sex and optic nerve invasion. PMID:26735219

  2. [Invention of an air forced ventilated micro-isolation cage and rack system--environment within the cages: ventilation, air flow].

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, T; Yoshida, K; Okamoto, M; Tajima, M

    1993-10-01

    A forced air ventilation system for small laboratory animals was developed. The system consists of an air handling unit with air supply and exhaust fans, a rack, hard cage covers with a large diameter air inlet and an outlet, and shoe box cages. Air flow from the supply duct, to the exhaust duct and within the cage were observed. Variations in air flow among cages was minimal. The optimal air exchange rate of the cages in this system was determined to be 60 times per hour based on the results obtained in the present study. At this air exchange rate, air flow at the base of the cages had a velocity of less than 0.09m/sec, which was within the range of recommended values for humans. The observed results show that the system developed is capable of sustaining a laboratory animal microenvironment well in terms of air flow, without too much energy cost.

  3. Velocity measurements of the liquid - gas flow using gamma absorption and modified conditional averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, Robert; Zych, Marcin; Kowalczyk, Adam; Petryka, Leszek

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents idea and an exemplary application of gamma-absorption in the measurement of gas bubbles transportation in a gas-liquid mixture flow through a horizontal pipeline. In the tests on laboratory installation two 241Am radioactive sources and probes with NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals have been used. For analysis of electrical signals obtained from detectors the modified conditional averaging of the absolute value of delayed signal (CAAV) is proposed. The proposed method is based on the quotient of classical cross-correlation (CCF) and CAAV. Results of the time delay estimation and gas-phase velocity measurements are compared with one obtained using CCF. The combined uncertainties of the mean velocity of air bubbles evaluation in the presented experiment did not exceed 2.1% (CCF) and 1.7% (CCF/CAAV), which is a satisfactory result in industrial applications.

  4. Velocity measurements within a shock and reshock induced air/SF6 turbulent mixing zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, Jean-Francois; Bouzgarrou, Ghazi; Bury, Yannick; Jamme, Stephane; Joly, Laurent; Shock-induced mixing Team

    2012-11-01

    A turbulent mixing zone (TMZ) is created in a shock tube (based in ISAE, DAEP) when a Mach 1.2 shock wave in air accelerates impulsively to 70 m/s an air/SF6 interface. The gases are initially separated by a 1 μm thick plastic microfilm maintained flat and parallel to the shock by two wire grids. The upper grid of square spacing 1.8 mm imposes the nonlinear initial perturbation for the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI). After interaction with a reshock and a rarefaction, the TMZ remains approximately stagnant but much more turbulent. High speed Schlieren visualizations enable the choice of abscissae for Laser Doppler Velocity (LDV) measurements. For a length of the SF6 section equal to 250 mm, the LDV abscissae are 43, 135 and 150 mm from the initial position of the interface. Because of numerous microfilm fragments in the flow and a limited number of olive oil droplets as seeding particles for the LDV, statistical convergence requires the superposition of a least 50 identical runs at each abscissa. The dependence of TMZ structure and velocity field on length of the SF6 section between 100 and 300 mm will be presented. This experimental investigation is carried out in support of modeling and multidimensional simulation efforts at CEA, DAM, DIF. Financial support from CEA is thanksfully appreciated by ISAE.

  5. Arc Conductance and Flow Velocity Affected by Transient Recovery Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Reo; Ishikawa, Yuya; Ono, Seisui; Sato, Ken; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the stable supply of electric power is indispensable. The GCB (Gas Circuit Breaker) can prevent the spread of the fault current. However, it should have the reliability more. Therefore the GCB has been researched for performance improvement of the arc interruption of abnormal fault current without the fail. Therefore, it is important to prevent the breakdown such as the re-ignition and thermal re-ignition of arc after the arc interruption. It is necessary to reduce the arc conductance in order to prevent the re-ignition of arc. The arc conductance is derived from the temperature distribution and the volume of the arc. The temperature distribution of the arc is formed by convection. In this research, the arc conductance and flow velocity affected by transient recovery voltage are elucidated. The flow rate and temperature distribution of the arc is calculated with changing transient recovery voltage. In addition, the arc conductance is calculated in order to know the extinguish arc ability. As a result, when the transient recovery voltage increases, the probability of re-ignition increases. Therefore, the arc temperature and the arc conductance were increased.

  6. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  7. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  8. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  9. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  10. 40 CFR 1065.225 - Intake-air flow meter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Flow-Related Measurements § 1065.225 Intake-air flow meter. (a) Application. You may use an intake-air flow meter in combination with a chemical... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake-air flow meter....

  11. Parametric Studies of Flow Separation using Air Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Boundary Layer separation causes the airfoil to stall and therefore imposes dramatic performance degradation on the airfoil. In recent years, flow separation control has been one of the active research areas in the field of aerodynamics due to its promising performance improvements on the lifting device. These active flow separation control techniques include steady and unsteady air injection as well as suction on the airfoil surface etc. This paper will be focusing on the steady and unsteady air injection on the airfoil. Although wind tunnel experiments revealed that the performance improvements on the airfoil using injection techniques, the details of how the key variables such as air injection slot geometry and air injection angle etc impact the effectiveness of flow separation control via air injection has not been studied. A parametric study of both steady and unsteady air injection active flow control will be the main objective for this summer. For steady injection, the key variables include the slot geometry, orientation, spacing, air injection velocity as well as the injection angle. For unsteady injection, the injection frequency will also be investigated. Key metrics such as lift coefficient, drag coefficient, total pressure loss and total injection mass will be used to measure the effectiveness of the control technique. A design of experiments using the Box-Behnken Design is set up in order to determine how each of the variables affects each of the key metrics. Design of experiment is used so that the number of experimental runs will be at minimum and still be able to predict which variables are the key contributors to the responses. The experiments will then be conducted in the 1ft by 1ft wind tunnel according to the design of experiment settings. The data obtained from the experiments will be imported into JMP, statistical software, to generate sets of response surface equations which represent the statistical empirical model for each of the metrics as

  12. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Air Flow, Heat Transfer and Thermal Comfort in Buildings with Different Heating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanskis, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of temperature, humidity and air flow velocity is performed in 5 experimental buildings with the inner size of 3×3×3 m3 located in Riga, Latvia. The buildings are equipped with different heating systems, such as an air-air heat pump, air-water heat pump, capillary heating mat on the ceiling and electric heater. Numerical simulation of air flow and heat transfer by convection, conduction and radiation is carried out using OpenFOAM software and compared with experimental data. Results are analysed regarding the temperature and air flow distribution as well as thermal comfort.

  13. The application of flow competence evaluations to the assessment of flood-flow velocities and stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, Paul D.

    1987-01-01

    The concept of flow competence is generally employed to evaluate the velocities, discharges, and bottom stresses of river floods inferred from the size of the largest sediment particles transported. Flow competence has become an important tool for evaluating the hydraulics of exceptional floods on Earth, including those which eroded the Channeled Scabland of eastern Washington, and has potential for similar evaluations of the floods which carved the outflow channels on Mars. For the most part, flow-competence evaluations were empirical, based on data compiled from a variety of sources including major terrestrial floods caused by natural processes or dam failures. Such flow-competence relationships would appear to provide a straight-forward assessment of flood-flow stresses and velocities based on the maximum size of gravel and boulders transported. However, a re-examination of the data base and comparisons with measurements of selective entrainment and transport of gravel in rivers open to question such evaluations. Analyses of the forces acting on the grain during entrainment by pivoting, rolling, or sliding, an approach which focuses more on the physical processes than the purely empirical relationships can be demonstrated. These derived equations require further testing by flume and field measurements before being applied to flow-competence evaluations. Such tests are now underway.

  14. Interventional physiology. Part XVI: normal coronary flow velocity patterns: considerations of artifacts, arrhythmias, and anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tron, C; Donohue, T J; Kern, M J

    1995-04-01

    During normal flow velocity recording, various physiologic or technical problems may appear which can produce confusing flow signals. This section of Interventional Physiology reviews the patterns of normal coronary flow velocity and examines several artifacts and other features encountered in clinical practice. Recognition of these variations will help the interventional cardiologist to differentiate between physiologic and pathologic events.

  15. Velocity and shear rate estimates of some non-Newtonian oscillatory flows in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutev, N.; Tabakova, S.; Radev, S.

    2016-10-01

    The two-dimensional Newtonian and non-Newtonian (Carreau viscosity model used) oscillatory flows in straight tubes are studied theoretically and numerically. The corresponding analytical solution of the Newtonian flow and the numerical solution of the Carreau viscosity model flow show differences in velocity and shear rate. Some estimates for the velocity and shear rate differences are theoretically proved. As numerical examples the blood flow in different type of arteries and the polymer flow in pipes are considered.

  16. Optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Milner, T.E.; Dave, D.; Nelson, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    An optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media is described. ODT combines Doppler velocimetry with the high spatial resolution of low-coherence optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Tomographic imaging of particle flow velocity within a circular conduit submerged 1mm below the surface in a highly scattering phantom of Intralipid is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital Optical Society of America}

  17. Detailed computational procedure for design of cascade blades with prescribed velocity distributions in compressible potential flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, George R; Cummings, Robert L; Sinnette, John T , Jr

    1952-01-01

    A detailed step-by-step computational outline is presented for the design of two-dimensional cascade blades having a prescribed velocity distribution on the blade in a potential flow of the usual compressible fluid. The outline is based on the assumption that the magnitude of the velocity in the flow of the usual compressible nonviscous fluid is proportional to the magnitude of the velocity in the flow of a compressible nonviscous fluid with linear pressure-volume relation.

  18. Modeling Cerebral Blood Flow Velocity During Orthostatic Stress.

    PubMed

    Mader, Greg; Olufsen, Mette; Mahdi, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral autoregulation refers to the physiological process that maintains stable cerebral blood flow (CBF) during changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP). In this study, we propose a simple, nonlinear quantitative model with only four parameters that can predict CBF velocity as a function of ABP. The model was motivated by the viscoelastic-like behavior observed in the data collected during postural change from sitting to standing. Qualitative testing of the model involved analysis of dynamic responses to step-changes in pressure both within and outside the autoregulatory range, while quantitative testing was used to show that the model can fit dynamics observed in data measured from a healthy young and a healthy elderly subject. The latter involved analysis of structural and practical identifiability, sensitivity analysis, and parameter estimation. Results showed that the model is able to reproduce observed overshoot and adaptation and predict the different responses in the healthy young and the healthy elderly subject. For the healthy young subject, the overshoot was significantly more pronounced than for the elderly subject, but the recovery time was longer for the young subject. These differences resulted in different parameter values estimated using the two datasets.

  19. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  20. Gas and liquid measurements in air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.; Doup, B.; Sun, X.

    2012-07-01

    Local measurements of gas- and liquid-phase flow parameters are conducted in an air-water two-phase flow loop. The test section is a vertical pipe with an inner diameter of 50 mm and a height of 3.2 m. The measurements are performed at z/D = 10. The gas-phase measurements are performed using a four-sensor conductivity probe. The data taken from this probe are processed using a signal processing program to yield radial profiles of the void fraction, bubble velocity, and interfacial area concentration. The velocity measurements of the liquid-phase are performed using a state-of-the-art Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The raw PIV images are acquired using fluorescent particles and an optical filtration device. Image processing is used to remove noise in the raw PIV images. The statistical cross correlation is introduced to determine the axial velocity field and turbulence intensity of the liquid-phase. Measurements are currently being performed at z/D = 32 to provide a more complete data set. These data can be used for computational fluid dynamic model development and validation. (authors)

  1. Laser Light Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Flow Velocity in Vicinity of Propagating Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Buggele, Alvin E.

    2002-01-01

    A laser light scattering diagnostic for measurement of dynamic flow velocity at a point is described. The instrument is being developed for use in the study of propagating shock waves and detonation waves in pulse detonation engines under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The approach uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer to measure the Doppler shift of laser light scattered from small (submicron) particles in the flow. The high-speed detection system required to resolve the transient response as a shock wave crosses the probe volume uses fast response photodetectors, and a PC based data acquisition system. Preliminary results of measurements made in the GRC Mach 4, 10 by 25 cm supersonic wind tunnel are presented. Spontaneous condensation of water vapor in the flow is used as seed. The tunnel is supplied with continuous air flow at up to 45 psia and the flow is exhausted into the GRC laboratory-wide altitude exhaust system at pressures down to 0.3 psia.

  2. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  3. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  4. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  5. 40 CFR 90.416 - Intake air flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intake air flow measurement... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.416 Intake air flow measurement specifications. (a) If used, the engine intake air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure...

  6. An experimental setup for the study of the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Joaquín; José Vega, Emilio; Castilla, Alejandro; Marcos, Alberto; María Montanero, José; Barrio, Raúl

    2012-04-01

    We present an experimental setup for studying the steady air flow in a diesel engine chamber. An engine block containing the inlet manifold was placed on a test bench. A steady air stream crossed the inlet manifold and entered a glass chamber driven by a fan. A PIV system was set up around the bench to measure the in-chamber flow. An air spray gun was used as seed generator to producing sub-millimeter droplets, easily dragged by the air stream. Images of the in-flow chamber were acquired in the course of the experiments, and processed to measure the velocity field. The pressure drop driven the air current and the mass flow rate were also measured.

  7. A new test chamber to measure material emissions under controlled air velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Bortoli, M. de; Ghezzi, E.; Knoeppel, H.; Vissers, H.

    1999-05-15

    A new 20-L glass chamber for the determination of VOC emissions from construction materials and consumer products under controlled air velocity and turbulence is described. Profiles of air velocity and turbulence, obtained with precisely positioned hot wire anemometric probes, show that the velocity field is homogeneous and that air velocity is tightly controlled by the fan rotation speed; this overcomes the problem of selecting representative positions to measure air velocity above a test specimen. First tests on material emissions show that the influence of air velocity on the emission rate of VOCs is negligible for sources limited by internal diffusion and strong for sources limited by evaporation. In a velocity interval from 0.15 to 0.30 m s{sup {minus}1}, an emission rate increase of 50% has been observed for pure n-decane and 1,4-dichlorobenzene and of 30% for 1,2-propanediol from a water-based paint. In contrast, no measurable influence of turbulence could be observed during vaporization of 1,4-dichlorobenzene within a 3-fold turbulence interval. Investigations still underway show that the chamber has a high recovery for the heavier VOC (TXIB), even at low concentrations.

  8. Coronary Flow Velocity Reserve during Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    de Abreu, José Sebastião; Lima, José Wellington Oliveira; Diógenes, Tereza Cristina Pinheiro; Siqueira, Jordana Magalhães; Pimentel, Nayara Lima; Gomes, Pedro Sabino; de Abreu, Marília Esther Benevides; Paes, José Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Background A coronary flow velocity reserve (CFVR) ≥ 2 is adequate to infer a favorable prognosis or the absence of significant coronary artery disease. Objective To identify parameters which are relevant to obtain CFVR (adequate or inadequate) in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) during dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE). Methods 100 patients referred for detection of myocardial ischemia by DSE were evaluated; they were instructed to discontinue the use of β-blockers 72 hours prior to the test. CFVR was calculated as a ratio of the diastolic peak velocity (cm/s) (DPV) on DSE (DPV-DSE) to baseline DPV at rest (DPV-Rest). In group I, CFVR was < 2 and, in group II, CFVR was ≥ 2. The Fisher's exact test and Student's t test were used for the statistical analyses. P values < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results At rest, the time (in seconds) to obtain Doppler in LAD in groups I and II was not different (53±31 vs. 45±32; p=0.23). During DSE, LAD was recorded in 92 patients. Group I patients were older (65.9±9.3 vs. 61.2±10.8 years; p=0.04), had lower ejection fraction (61±10 vs. 66±6%; p=0.005), higher DPV-Rest (36.81±08 vs. 25.63 ± 06cm/s; p<0.0001) and lower CFVR (1.67 ± 0.24 vs. 2.53 ± 0.57; p<0.0001), but no difference was observed regarding DPVDSE (61.40±16 vs. 64.23±16cm/s; p=0.42). β-blocker discontinuation was associated with a 4-fold higher chance of a CFVR < 2 (OR= 4; 95% CI [1.171-13.63], p=0.027). Conclusion DPV-Rest was the main parameter to determine an adequate CFVR. β-blocker discontinuation was significantly associated with inadequate CFVR. The high feasibility and the time to record the LAD corroborate the use of this methodology. PMID:24676368

  9. Assessment of air velocity sensors for use in animal produciton facilities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ventilation is an integral part of thermal environment control in animal production facilities. Accurately measuring the air velocity distribution within these facilities is cumbersome using the traverse method and a distributed velocity measurement system would reduce the time necessary to perform ...

  10. Spatially and Temporally Resolved Measurements of Velocity in a H2-air Combustion-Heated Supersonic Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bivolaru, Daniel; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Baurle, Robert a.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents simultaneous measurements at multiple points of two orthogonal components of flow velocity using a single-shot interferometric Rayleigh scattering (IRS) technique. The measurements are performed on a large-scale Mach 1.6 (Mach 5.5 enthalpy) H2-air combustion jet during the 2007 test campaign in the Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The measurements are performed simultaneously with CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) using a combined CARS-IRS instrument with a common path 9-nanosecond pulsed, injection-seeded, 532-nm Nd:YAG laser probe pulse. The paper summarizes the measurements of velocities along the core of the vitiated air flow as well as two radial profiles. The average velocity measurement near the centerline at the closest point from the nozzle exit compares favorably with the CFD calculations using the VULCAN code. Further downstream, the measured axial velocity shows overall higher values than predicted with a trend of convergence at further distances. Larger discrepancies are shown in the radial profiles.

  11. Simultaneous Measurement of Air Temperature and Humidity Based on Sound Velocity and Attenuation Using Ultrasonic Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motegi, Takahiro; Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, an acoustic technique for air temperature and humidity measurement in moist air is described. The previous ultrasonic probe can enable the estimation of temperature from sound velocity in dry air by making use of the relationship between sound velocity and temperature. However, temperature measurement using the previous ultrasonic probe is not suitable in moist air because sound velocity also depends on humidity, and the temperature estimated from the sound velocity measured in moist air must be adjusted. Moreover, a method of humidity measurement by using only an ultrasonic probe has not been established. Thus, we focus on sound attenuation, which depends on temperature and humidity. Our proposed technique utilizes two parameters, sound velocity and attenuation, and can measure both temperature and humidity simultaneously. The acoustic technique for temperature and humidity measurement has the advantages that instantaneous temperature and humidity can be measured, and the measurement is not affected by thermal radiation because air itself is used as a sensing element. As an experiment, temperature and humidity are measured in a chamber, and compared with the reference values. The experimental results indicate the achievement of a practical temperature measurement accuracy of within +/-0.5 K in moist air, of which the temperature is 293-308 K and relative humidity (RH) is 50-90% RH, and the simultaneous measurement of temperature and humidity.

  12. The Calculation of Compressible Flows with Local Regions of Supersonic Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goethert, B.; Kawalki, K. H.

    1947-01-01

    This report addresses a method for the approximate calculation of compressible flows about profiles with local regions of supersonic velocity. The flow around a slender profile is treated as an example.

  13. Effects of friction massage of the popliteal fossa on blood flow velocity of the popliteal vein

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Koji; Mizukami, Masafumi; Asakawa, Yasutsugu; Endo, Yusuke; Takata, Yuichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshio, Masaharu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Friction massage (friction) of the popliteal fossa is provided for the purpose of relieving pain related to circulatory disorders by improving venous flow in the lower legs. The purpose of this study is to verify the effects of enhancing the venous flow based on measuring the blood flow velocity of the popliteal vein before and after providing friction to the patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy male university students participated in the study. The Doppler ultrasonography (DU) was used to measure the blood flow velocity of the popliteal vein, in order to verify the effects of enhancing the venous flow by comparing the measured values before and after a friction massage. [Results] The result of comparing the blood flow velocity before and after providing friction showed that there was a significant increase after friction. [Conclusion] This study proved that friction to the popliteal fossa is effectively enhances venous flow by increasing the blood flow velocity in the popliteal vein. PMID:28356643

  14. Effect of flow distributors on uniformity of velocity profile in a baghouse.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Jen; Cheng, Man-Ting

    2005-07-01

    In recent years, the utility industry has turned to baghouses as an alternative technology for particulate emission control from pulverized-coal-fired power plants. One of the more significant issues is to improve poor gas distribution that causes bag failures in baghouse operation. Bag failures during operation are almost impossible to prevent, but proper flow design can help in their prevention. This study investigated vertical velocity profiles below the bags in a baghouse (the hopper region) to determine whether flow could be improved with the installation of flow distributors in the hopper region. Three types of flow distributors were used to improve flow distribution and were compared with the original baghouse without flow distributors. Velocity profiles were measured by a hot-wire anemometer at an inlet velocity of 18 m/sec. Uniformity of flow distribution was calculated by the uniformity value U for the velocity profile of each flow distributor. Experimental results showed that the velocity profile of the empty configuration (without flow distributors) was poor because the uniformity value was 2.048. The uniformity values of type 1 (flow distributor with three vertical vanes), type 2 (flow distributor with one vertical and one inclined vane), and type 3 (flow distributor with two inclined vanes) configurations were reduced to 1.051, 0.617, and 0.526, respectively. These results indicate that the flow distributors designed in this study made significant improvements in the velocity profile of a baghouse, with the type 3 configuration having the best performance.

  15. Spatial and velocity statistics of inertial particles in turbulent flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bec, J.; Biferale, L.; Cencini, M.; Lanotte, A. S.; Toschi, F.

    2011-12-01

    Spatial and velocity statistics of heavy point-like particles in incompressible, homogeneous, and isotropic three-dimensional turbulence is studied by means of direct numerical simulations at two values of the Taylor-scale Reynolds number Reλ ~ 200 and Reλ ~ 400, corresponding to resolutions of 5123 and 20483 grid points, respectively. Particles Stokes number values range from St ≈ 0.2 to 70. Stationary small-scale particle distribution is shown to display a singular -multifractal- measure, characterized by a set of generalized fractal dimensions with a strong sensitivity on the Stokes number and a possible, small Reynolds number dependency. Velocity increments between two inertial particles depend on the relative weight between smooth events - where particle velocity is approximately the same of the fluid velocity-, and caustic contributions - when two close particles have very different velocities. The latter events lead to a non-differentiable small-scale behaviour for the relative velocity. The relative weight of these two contributions changes at varying the importance of inertia. We show that moments of the velocity difference display a quasi bi-fractal-behavior and that the scaling properties of velocity increments for not too small Stokes number are in good agreement with a recent theoretical prediction made by K. Gustavsson and B. Mehlig arXiv: 1012.1789v1 [physics.flu-dyn], connecting the saturation of velocity scaling exponents with the fractal dimension of particle clustering.

  16. Effects of air velocity on laying hen production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal conditions play a major role in production efficiency in commercial poultry production. Mitigation of thermal stress can improve productivity, but must be achieved economically. Weather and system design can limit effectiveness of evaporative cooling and increased air movement has been sho...

  17. On the stability of an accelerated coupled air-water flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Ierley, Glenn; Melville, W. Kendall

    2000-11-01

    We present the results of a study of the stability of the interface of an accelerated coupled air-water flow. We develop a general solution of the two-layer, laminar parallel flow driven by a pressure gradient in the air. The velocity profiles in both fluids are given by analytical functions for pressure gradients that can be represented as power series in time. The stability of the coupled flow is then examined by solving the two layer Orr-Sommerfeld equations allowing for linear displacements of the interface. In the simple case of the linearly accelerating flow, we find that the flow is always stable for an air velocity below 0.6 m s-1. Instabilities first appear in the form of surface waves with a phase speed of approximately 30 cm s-1 and a wavenumber of O(1) cm-1. In cases when the flow in the air is turbulent, and represented by a continuously differentiable analytical approximation of the log-linear mean velocity profile, we find that the flow is rapidly unstable to surface waves. Comparisons are made with the previous computations of Kawai (1979) and Wheless and Csanady (1993), and with the measurements of Veron and Melville (2000).

  18. An experimental investigation of gas jets in confined swirling air flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mongia, H.; Ahmed, S. A.; Mongia, H. C.

    1984-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of jets in confined swirling flows which is of importance to designers of turbine combustors and solid fuel ramjets used to power missiles fired from cannons were examined. The fluid dynamics of gas jets of different densities in confined swirling flows were investigated. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements are made with a one color, one component laser velocimeter operating in the forward scatter mode. It is shown that jets in confined flow with large area ratio are highly dissipative which results in both air and helium/air jet centerline velocity decays. For air jets, the jet like behavior in the tube center disappears at about 20 diameters downstream of the jet exit. This phenomenon is independent of the initial jet velocity. The turbulence field at this point also decays to that of the background swirling flow. A jet like behavior in the tube center is noticed even at 40 diameters for the helium/air jets. The subsequent flow and turbulence field depend highly on the initial jet velocity. The jets are fully turbulent, and the cause of this difference in behavior is attributed to the combined action swirl and density difference. This observation can have significant impact on the design of turbine combustors and solid fuel ramjets subject to spin.

  19. Air flow patterns in the operating theatre.

    PubMed

    Howorth, F H

    1980-04-01

    Bacteria-carrying particles and exhaled anaesthetic gases are the two contaminants found in the air flow patterns of operating rooms. Their origin, direction and speed were illustrated by a motion picture using Schlieren photography and smoke tracers. Compared with a conventionally well air conditioned operating theatre, it was shown that a downward flow of clean air reduced the number of bacteria-carrying particles at the wound site by sixty times. The Exflow method of achieving this without the restriction of any side panels or floor obstruction was described. The total body exhaust worn by the surgical team was shown to reduce the bacteria count by a further eleven times. Clinical results show that when both these systems are used together, patient infection was reduced from 9 per cent to between 0.3 per cent and 0.5 per cent, even when no pre-operative antibiotics were used. Anaesthetic gas pollution was measured and shown to be generally 1000 p.p.m. at the head of the patient, in induction, operating and recovery rooms, also in dental and labour rooms. A high volume low pressure active scavenging system was described together with its various attachments including one specially for paediatric scavenging. Results showed a reduction of nitrous oxide pollution to between zero and 3 p.p.m. The economy and cost effectiveness of both these pollution control systems was shown to be good due to the removal of health hazards from patients and theatre staff.

  20. Interfacial area, velocity and void fraction in two-phase slug flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kojasoy, G.; Riznic, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    The internal flow structure of air-water plug/slug flow in a 50.3 mm dia transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a four-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 0.55 to 2.20 m/s and 0.27 to 2.20 m/s, respectively, and area-averaged void fractions ranged from about 10 to 70%. The local distributions of void fractions, interfacial area concentration and interface velocity were measured. Contributions from small spherical bubbles and large elongated slug bubbles toward the total void fraction and interfacial area concentration were differentiated. It was observed that the small bubble void contribution to the overall void fraction was small indicating that the large slug bubble void fraction was a dominant factor in determining the total void fraction. However, the small bubble interfacial area contribution was significant in the lower and upper portions of the pipe cross sections.

  1. Errors in acoustic doppler profiler velocity measurements caused by flow disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, D.S.; Abad, J.D.; Garcia, C.M.; Gartner, J.W.; Garcia, M.H.; Oberg, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are commonly used to measure streamflow and water velocities in rivers and streams. This paper presents laboratory, field, and numerical model evidence of errors in ADCP measurements caused by flow disturbance. A state-of-the-art three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic model is validated with and used to complement field and laboratory observations of flow disturbance and its effect on measured velocities. Results show that near the instrument, flow velocities measured by the ADCP are neither the undisturbed stream velocity nor the velocity of the flow field around the ADCP. The velocities measured by the ADCP are biased low due to the downward flow near the upstream face of the ADCP and upward recovering flow in the path of downstream transducer, which violate the flow homogeneity assumption used to transform beam velocities into Cartesian velocity components. The magnitude of the bias is dependent on the deployment configuration, the diameter of the instrument, and the approach velocity, and was observed to range from more than 25% at 5cm from the transducers to less than 1% at about 50cm from the transducers for the scenarios simulated. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  2. Simultaneous velocity and concentration measurements of a turbulent jet mixing flow.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hui; Saga, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Toshio; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki

    2002-10-01

    A method for the simultaneous measurement of velocity and passive scalar concentration fields by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser induced florescence (PLIF) techniques is described here. An application of the combined PIV-PLIF system is demonstrated by performing simultaneous velocity and concentration measurements in the near field of a turbulent jet mixing flow. The distributions of the ensemble-averaged velocity and concentration, turbulent velocity fluctuation, concentration standard deviation, and the correlation terms between the fluctuating velocities and concentration in the near field of the turbulent jet flow are presented as the measurement results of the simultaneous PIV-PLIF system.

  3. High enthalpy, hypervelocity flows of air and argon in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neely, A. J; Stalker, R. J.; Paull, A.

    1991-01-01

    An expansion tube with a free piston driver has been used to generate quasi-steady hypersonic flows in argon and air at flow velocities in excess of 9 km/s. Irregular test flow unsteadiness has limited the performance of previous expansion tubes, and it has been found that this can be avoided by attention to the interaction between the test gas accelerating expansion and the contact surface in the primary shock tube. Test section measurements of pitot pressure, static pressure and flat plate heat transfer are reported. An approximate analytical theory has been developed for predicting the velocities achieved in the unsteady expansion of the ionizing or dissociating test gas.

  4. Forced convective flow and heat transfer of upward cocurrent air-water slug flow in vertical plain and swirl tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shyy Woei; Yang, Tsun Lirng

    2009-10-15

    This experimental study comparatively examined the two-phase flow structures, pressured drops and heat transfer performances for the cocurrent air-water slug flows in the vertical tubes with and without the spiky twisted tape insert. The two-phase flow structures in the plain and swirl tubes were imaged using the computerized high frame-rate videography with the Taylor bubble velocity measured. Superficial liquid Reynolds number (Re{sub L}) and air-to-water mass flow ratio (AW), which were respectively in the ranges of 4000-10000 and 0.003-0.02 were selected as the controlling parameters to specify the flow condition and derive the heat transfer correlations. Tube-wise averaged void fraction and Taylor bubble velocity were well correlated by the modified drift flux models for both plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition. A set of selected data obtained from the plain and swirl tubes was comparatively examined to highlight the impacts of the spiky twisted tape on the air-water interfacial structure and the pressure drop and heat transfer performances. Empirical heat transfer correlations that permitted the evaluation of individual and interdependent Re{sub L} and AW impacts on heat transfer in the developed flow regions of the plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition were derived. (author)

  5. Near Continuum Velocity and Temperature Coupled Compressible Boundary Layer Flow over a Flat Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xin; Cai, Chunpei

    2017-04-01

    The problem of a compressible gas flows over a flat plate with the velocity-slip and temperature-jump boundary conditions are being studied. The standard single- shooting method is applied to obtain the exact solutions for velocity and temperature profiles when the momentum and energy equations are weakly coupled. A double-shooting method is applied if these two equations are closely coupled. If the temperature affects the velocity directly, more significant velocity slip happens at locations closer to the plate's leading edge, and inflections on the velocity profiles appear, indicating flows may become unstable. As a consequence, the temperature-jump and velocity-slip boundary conditions may trigger earlier flow transitions from a laminar to a turbulent flow state.

  6. Mixing characteristics of pulsed air-assist liquid jet into an internal subsonic cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inchul; Kang, Youngsu; Koo, Jaye

    2010-04-01

    Penetration depth, spray dispersion angle, droplet sizes in breakup processes and atomization processes are very important parameters in combustor of air-breathing engine. These processes will enhance air/fuel mixing inside the combustor. Experimental results from the pulsed air-assist liquid jet injected into a cross-flow are investigated. And experiments were conducted to a range of cross-flow velocities from 42˜136 m/s. Air is injected with 0˜300kPa, with air-assist pulsation frequency of 0˜20Hz. Pulsation frequency was modulated by solenoid valve. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer(PDPA) was utilized to quantitatively measuring droplet characteristics. High-speed CCD camera was used to obtain injected spray structure. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will offer rapid mixing and good liquid jet penetration. Air-assist makes a very fine droplet which generated mist-like spray. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will introduce additional supplementary turbulent mixing and control of penetration depth into a cross-flow field. The results show that pulsation frequency has an effect on penetration, transverse velocities and droplet sizes. The experimental data generated in these studies are used for a development of active control strategies to optimize the liquid jet penetration in subsonic cross-flow conditions and predict combustion low frequency instability.

  7. Association of pulsatile and mean cerebral blood flow velocity with age and neuropsychological performance.

    PubMed

    Pase, Matthew P; Grima, Natalie A; Stough, Con; Scholey, Andrew; Pipingas, Andrew

    2014-05-10

    Low cerebral blood flow velocity is associated with cognitive decline. However, the association between pulsatile brain blood flow velocity and cognition has not been investigated. High pulsatile hemodynamic stress in the brain may impair cognitive function through damage to small cerebral vessels. The current objective was to examine the cross-sectional association of pulsatile and mean cerebral blood flow velocity with age and neuropsychological performance. We also examined whether cerebral blood flow velocity was associated with aortic pulse pressure, a measure of arterial ageing and aortic stiffness. Cerebral blood flow velocity was measured in the middle cerebral artery using Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography (TDU) while neuropsychological performance was measured using a computerized cognitive test battery. Aortic pulse pressure was non-invasively derived from applanation tonometry of the radial artery. The sample comprised 160 healthy adults aged 50-70 years. Results indicated that increasing age correlated with lower mean (r=-0.23, p<0.01) and higher pulsatile (r=0.27, p<0.01) brain blood flow velocity. In multivariate adjusted models, both peripheral (β=0.28, p<0.05) and aortic (β=0.24, p<0.05) pulse pressure were associated with higher pulsatile flow velocity through the middle cerebral artery. In adjusted models, neither mean nor pulsatile cerebral blood flow velocity was associated with performance on any cognitive task. In conclusion, arterial ageing was associated with increased pulsatile hemodynamic stress in the brain. However, this was not associated with impaired neuropsychological performance.

  8. Combustor air flow control method for fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Clingerman, Bruce J.; Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2001-01-01

    A method for controlling the heat output of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual air inlet streams including atmospheric air and fuel cell cathode effluent containing oxygen depleted air. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is provided by regulating the quantity of the air flow stream to the combustor to support fuel cell processor heat requirements. A control provides a quick fast forward change in an air valve orifice cross section in response to a calculated predetermined air flow, the molar constituents of the air stream to the combustor, the pressure drop across the air valve, and a look up table of the orifice cross sectional area and valve steps. A feedback loop fine tunes any error between the measured air flow to the combustor and the predetermined air flow.

  9. Comparison of Simultaneous PIV and Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry in Low Velocity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxyl tagging velocimetry (HTV) is a molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) technique that relies on the photo- dissociation of water vapor into OH radicals and their subsequent tracking using laser-induced fluorescence. At ambient temperature in air, the OH species lifetime is about 50 micro-s. The feasibility of using HTV for probing low- speed flows (a few m/s) is investigated by using an inert, heated gas as a means to increase the OH species lifetime. Unlike particle-based techniques, MTV does not suffer from tracer settling, which is particularly problematic at low speeds. Furthermore, the flow needs to be seeded with only a small mole fraction of water vapor, making it safer for both the user and facilities than other MTV techniques based on corrosive or toxic chemical tracers. HTV is demonstrated on a steam-seeded nitrogen jet at approximately 75 C in the laminar (Umean=3.31 m/s, Re=1,540), transitional (Umean=4.48 m/s, Re=2,039), and turbulent (Umean=6.91 m/s, Re=3,016) regimes at atmospheric pressure. The measured velocity profiles are compared with particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements performed simultaneously with a second imager. Seeding for the PIV is achieved by introducing micron-sized water droplets into the flow with the steam; the same laser sheet is used for PIV and HTV to guarantee spatial and temporal overlap of the data. Optimizing each of these methods, however, requires conflicting operating conditions: higher temperatures benefit the HTV signals but reduce the available seed density for the PIV through evaporation. Nevertheless, data are found to agree within 10% for the instantaneous velocity profiles and within 5% for the mean profiles and demonstrate the feasibility of HTV for low-speed flows at moderate to high temperatures.

  10. Laser transit anemometer measurements of a JANNAF nozzle base velocity flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, William W., Jr.; Russ, C. E., Jr.; Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Velocity flow fields of a nozzle jet exhausting into a supersonic flow were surveyed. The measurements were obtained with a laser transit anemometer (LTA) system in the time domain with a correlation instrument. The LTA data is transformed into the velocity domain to remove the error that occurs when the data is analyzed in the time domain. The final data is shown in velocity vector plots for positions upstream, downstream, and in the exhaust plane of the jet nozzle.

  11. Fast measurements of average flow velocity by Low-Field ¹H NMR.

    PubMed

    Osán, T M; Ollé, J M; Carpinella, M; Cerioni, L M C; Pusiol, D J; Appel, M; Freeman, J; Espejo, I

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a method for measuring the average flow velocity of a sample by means of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. This method is based on the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence and does not require the application of any additional static or pulsed magnetic field gradients to the background magnetic field. The technique is based on analyzing the early-time behavior of the echo amplitudes of the CPMG sequence. Measurements of average flow velocity of water are presented. The experimental results show a linear relationship between the slope/y-intercept ratio of a linear fit of the first echoes in the CPMG sequence, and the average flow velocity of the flowing fluid. The proposed method can be implemented in low-cost Low-Field NMR spectrometers allowing a continuous monitoring of the average velocity of a fluid in almost real-time, even if the flow velocity changes rapidly.

  12. Decentralized and Tactical Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odoni, Amedeo R.; Bertsimas, Dimitris

    1997-01-01

    This project dealt with the following topics: 1. Review and description of the existing air traffic flow management system (ATFM) and identification of aspects with potential for improvement. 2. Identification and review of existing models and simulations dealing with all system segments (enroute, terminal area, ground) 3. Formulation of concepts for overall decentralization of the ATFM system, ranging from moderate decentralization to full decentralization 4. Specification of the modifications to the ATFM system required to accommodate each of the alternative concepts. 5. Identification of issues that need to be addressed with regard to: determination of the way the ATFM system would be operating; types of flow management strategies that would be used; and estimation of the effectiveness of ATFM with regard to reducing delay and re-routing costs. 6. Concept evaluation through identification of criteria and methodologies for accommodating the interests of stakeholders and of approaches to optimization of operational procedures for all segments of the ATFM system.

  13. Radiocarbon Determinations for Estimating Groundwater Flow Velocities in Central Florida.

    PubMed

    Hanshaw, B B; Back, W; Rubin, M

    1965-04-23

    Carbon-14 activity was determined from HCO(3)(-) in samples of groundwater obtained from the principal artesian aquifer in Florida. From these data the "age" of water obtained from a series of wells, each progressively farther down gradient on the piezometric surface, was established. Relative carbon-14 ages indicated a velocity of groundwater movement of 23 feet (7 meters) per year for about 85 miles (137 kilometers) of travel. A velocity of 23 feet per year was calculated independently from Darcy's law.

  14. Experimental study on heat transfer performance of aluminium foam parallel-flow condenser in air conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Wan, Z. M.; Chang, H. W.; Wang, Y. D.

    2017-01-01

    Open cell aluminium foam was used in parallel-flow condenser in air conditioner, and two condensers with different pore density were fabricated. The experimental study was conducted on the heat transfer performance and temperature distribution. The experimental results show that both of the heat transfer load and air pressure drop increase with the increase of pore density, air velocity is 2.5m/s, the heat transfer capacities of the condenser with 10PPI and 8PPI are 4.786kw and 3.344kW respectively. Along the flow direction of refrigerant, the outlet temperatures of refrigerant drop with the rise of air velocity when the inlet temperature is constant. The outlet temperature of the refrigerant decreases with the increase of pore density.

  15. Flow characteristics of an inclined air-curtain range hood in a draft

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, Jia-Kun

    2015-01-01

    The inclined air-curtain technology was applied to build an inclined air-curtain range hood. A draft generator was applied to affect the inclined air-curtain range hood in three directions: lateral (θ=0°), oblique (θ=45°), and front (θ=90°). The three suction flow rates provided by the inclined air-curtain range hood were 10.1, 10.9, and 12.6 m3/min. The laser-assisted flow visualization technique and the tracer-gas test method were used to investigate the performance of the range hood under the influence of a draft. The results show that the inclined air-curtain range hood has a strong ability to resist the negative effect of a front draft until the draft velocity is greater than 0.5 m/s. The oblique draft affected the containment ability of the inclined air-curtain range hood when the draft velocity was larger than 0.3 m/s. When the lateral draft effect was applied, the capture efficiency of the inclined air-curtain range hood decreased quickly in the draft velocity from 0.2 m/s to 0.3 m/s. However, the capture efficiencies of the inclined air-curtain range hood under the influence of the front draft were higher than those under the influence of the oblique draft from 0.3 m/s to 0.5 m/s. PMID:25810445

  16. Water velocity at water-air interface is not zero: Comment on "Three-dimensional quantification of soil hydraulic properties using X-ray computed tomography and image-based modeling" by Saoirse R. Tracy et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. X.; Fan, X. Y.; Li, Z. Y.

    2016-07-01

    Tracy et al. (2015, doi: 10.1002/2014WR016020) assumed in their recent paper that water velocity at the water-air interface is zero in their pore-scale simulations of water flow in 3-D soil images acquired using X-ray computed tomography. We comment that such a treatment is physically wrong, and explain that it is the water-velocity gradient in the direction normal to the water-air interface, rather than the water velocity, that should be assumed to be zero at the water-air interface if one needs to decouple the water flow and the air flow. We analyze the potential errors caused by incorrectly taking water velocity at the water-air interface zero based on two simple examples, and conclude that it is not physically sound to make such a presumption because its associated errors are unpredictable.

  17. Study on measurement of the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes of a boiler with relationship between air velocity and pressure drop

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, W.; Shen, F.; Lin, W.; Chen, L.; Zhang, D.; Wang, Q.; Ke, J.; Quan, W.

    1999-07-01

    According to the theoretical relationship between air velocity and pressure drop in different solid-air mass flow in vertical pipes with the condition of upward air-solid flowing, the experimental research on measuring the coal powder concentration is directed against the pneumatic pipes of a boiler's combustion system in the energy industry. Through analyzing the experimental results, a mathematical model for measuring the coal powder concentration in pneumatic pipes is obtained. Then, the error analysis is done, and the method of on-line measurement and its function are provided.

  18. Study of flow fields induced by surface dielectric barrier discharge actuator in low-pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Che, Xueke E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn; Nie, Wansheng; Tian, Xihui; Hou, Zhiyong; He, Haobo; Zhou, Penghui; Zhou, Siyin; Yang, Chao; Shao, Tao E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn

    2014-04-15

    Surface dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) is a promising method for a flow control. Flow fields induced by a SDBD actuator driven by the ac voltage in static air at low pressures varying from 1.0 to 27.7 kPa are measured by the particle image velocimetry method. The influence of the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude on the induced flow fields is studied. The results show that three different classes of flow fields (wall jet flow field, complex flow field, and vortex-shape flow field) can be induced by the SDBD actuator in the low-pressure air. Among them, the wall jet flow field is the same as the tangential jet at atmospheric pressure, which is, together with the vertical jet, the complex flow field. The vortex-shape flow field is composed of one vertical jet which points towards the wall and two opposite tangential jets. The complex and the vortex-shape flow fields can be transformed to the wall jet flow field when the applied ac voltage frequency and magnitude are changed. It is found that the discharge power consumption increases initially, decreases, and then increases again at the same applied ac voltage magnitude when the air pressure decreases. The tangential velocity of the wall jet flow field increases when the air pressure decreases. It is however opposite for the complex flow field. The variation of the applied ac voltage frequency influences differently three different flow fields. When the applied ac voltage magnitude increases at the same applied ac voltage frequency, the maximal jet velocity increases, while the power efficiency increases only initially and then decreases again. The discharge power shows either linear or exponential dependences on the applied ac voltage magnitude.

  19. Simulations of Direct Current Glow Discharges in Supersonic Air Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2008-10-01

    In recent years, there have been a significant number of computational and experimental studies investigating the application of plasma discharges as actuators for high speed flow control. The relative importance of the actuation mechanisms: volumetric heating and electrostatic forcing can be established by developing self-consistent models of the plasma and bulk supersonic flow. To simulate the plasma discharge in a supersonic air stream, a fluid model of the glow discharge is coupled with a compressible Navier-Stokes solver in a self-consistent manner. Source terms for the momentum and energy equations are calculated from the plasma model and input into the Navier-Stokes solver. In turn, the pressure, gas temperature and velocity fields from the Navier-Stokes solution are fed back into the plasma model. The results include plasma species number density contour maps in the absence and presence of Mach 3 supersonic flow, and the corresponding effect of the glow discharge on gas dynamic properties such as the gas pressure and temperature. We also examine the effect of increasing the discharge voltage on the structure of the discharge and its corresponding effect on the supersonic flow.

  20. Dynamic Flow Management Problems in Air Transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Sarah Stock

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, over six hundred thousand licensed pilots flew nearly thirty-five million flights into over eighteen thousand U.S. airports, logging more than 519 billion passenger miles. Since demand for air travel has increased by more than 50% in the last decade while capacity has stagnated, congestion is a problem of undeniable practical significance. In this thesis, we will develop optimization techniques that reduce the impact of congestion on the national airspace. We start by determining the optimal release times for flights into the airspace and the optimal speed adjustment while airborne taking into account the capacitated airspace. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Problem (TFMP). We address the complexity, showing that it is NP-hard. We build an integer programming formulation that is quite strong as some of the proposed inequalities are facet defining for the convex hull of solutions. For practical problems, the solutions of the LP relaxation of the TFMP are very often integral. In essence, we reduce the problem to efficiently solving large scale linear programming problems. Thus, the computation times are reasonably small for large scale, practical problems involving thousands of flights. Next, we address the problem of determining how to reroute aircraft in the airspace system when faced with dynamically changing weather conditions. This is called the Air Traffic Flow Management Rerouting Problem (TFMRP) We present an integrated mathematical programming approach for the TFMRP, which utilizes several methodologies, in order to minimize delay costs. In order to address the high dimensionality, we present an aggregate model, in which we formulate the TFMRP as a multicommodity, integer, dynamic network flow problem with certain side constraints. Using Lagrangian relaxation, we generate aggregate flows that are decomposed into a collection of flight paths using a randomized rounding heuristic. This collection of paths is used in a packing integer

  1. Determination of object position, vortex shedding frequency and flow velocity using artificial lateral line canals

    PubMed Central

    Bleckmann, Horst

    2011-01-01

    Summary The lateral line system of fish consists of superficial neuromasts, and neuromasts embedded in lateral line canals. Lateral line neuromasts allow fish to sense both minute water motions and pressure gradients, thereby enabling them to detect predators and prey or to recognize and discriminate stationary objects while passing them. With the aid of the lateral line, fish can also sense vortices caused by an upstream object or by undulatory swimming movements of fish. We show here that artificial lateral line canals equipped with optical flow sensors can be used to detect the water motions generated by a stationary vibrating sphere, the vortices caused by an upstream cylinder or the water (air) movements caused by a passing object. The hydrodynamic information retrieved from optical flow sensors can be used to calculate bulk flow velocity and thus the size of the cylinder that shed the vortices. Even a bilateral sensor platform equipped with only one artificial lateral line canal on each side is sufficient to determine the position of an upstream cylinder. PMID:21977440

  2. In vivo lateral blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tiantian; Hozan, Mohsen; Bashford, Gregory R

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, we proposed blood measurement using speckle size estimation, which estimates the lateral component of blood flow within a single image frame based on the observation that the speckle pattern corresponding to blood reflectors (typically red blood cells) stretches (i.e., is "smeared") if blood flow is in the same direction as the electronically controlled transducer line selection in a 2-D image. In this observational study, the clinical viability of ultrasound blood flow velocity measurement using speckle size estimation was investigated and compared with that of conventional spectral Doppler of carotid artery blood flow data collected from human patients in vivo. Ten patients (six male, four female) were recruited. Right carotid artery blood flow data were collected in an interleaved fashion (alternating Doppler and B-mode A-lines) with an Antares Ultrasound Imaging System and transferred to a PC via the Axius Ultrasound Research Interface. The scanning velocity was 77 cm/s, and a 4-s interval of flow data were collected from each subject to cover three to five complete cardiac cycles. Conventional spectral Doppler data were collected simultaneously to compare with estimates made by speckle size estimation. The results indicate that the peak systolic velocities measured with the two methods are comparable (within ±10%) if the scan velocity is greater than or equal to the flow velocity. When scan velocity is slower than peak systolic velocity, the speckle stretch method asymptotes to the scan velocity. Thus, the speckle stretch method is able to accurately measure pure lateral flow, which conventional Doppler cannot do. In addition, an initial comparison of the speckle size estimation and color Doppler methods with respect to computational complexity and data acquisition time indicated potential time savings in blood flow velocity estimation using speckle size estimation. Further studies are needed for calculation of the speckle stretch method

  3. Vortex shedding induced energy harvesting from piezoelectric materials in heating, ventilation and air conditioning flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinstein, L. A.; Cacan, M. R.; So, P. M.; Wright, P. K.

    2012-04-01

    A cantilevered piezoelectric beam is excited in a heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) flow. This excitation is amplified by the interactions between (a) an aerodynamic fin attached at the end of the piezoelectric cantilever and (b) the vortex shedding downstream from a bluff body placed in the air flow ahead of the fin/cantilever assembly. The positioning of small weights along the fin enables tuning of the energy harvester to operate at resonance for flow velocities from 2 to 5 m s-1, which are characteristic of HVAC ducts. In a 15 cm diameter air duct, power generation of 200 μW for a flow speed of 2.5 m s-1 and power generation of 3 mW for a flow speed of 5 m s-1 was achieved. These power outputs are sufficient to power a wireless sensor node for HVAC monitoring systems or other sensors for smart building technology.

  4. Propulsive jet simulation with air and helium in launcher wake flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, Sören; Radespiel, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    The influence on the turbulent wake of a generic space launcher model due to the presence of an under-expanded jet is investigated experimentally. Wake flow phenomena represent a significant source of uncertainties in the design of a space launcher. Especially critical are dynamic loads on the structure. The wake flow is investigated at supersonic (M=2.9 ) and hypersonic (M=5.9 ) flow regimes. The jet flow is simulated using air and helium as working gas. Due to the lower molar mass of helium, higher jet velocities are realized, and therefore, velocity ratios similar to space launchers can be simulated. The degree of under-expansion of the jet is moderate for the supersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 5 ) and high for the hypersonic case (p_e/p_∞ ≈ 90 ). The flow topology is described by Schlieren visualization and mean-pressure measurements. Unsteady pressure measurements are performed to describe the dynamic wake flow. The influences of the under-expanded jet and different jet velocities are reported. On the base fluctuations at a Strouhal number, around St_D ≈ 0.25 dominate for supersonic free-stream flows. With air jet, a fluctuation-level increase on the base is observed for Strouhal numbers above St_D ≈ 0.75 in hypersonic flow regime. With helium jet, distinct peaks at higher frequencies are found. This is attributed to the interactions of wake flow and jet.

  5. Estimation of Critical Flow Velocity for Collapse of Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Guillen; Mark J. Russell

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents calculations performed to determine the critical flow velocity for plate collapse due to static instability for the Gas Test Loop booster fuel assembly. Long, slender plates arranged in a parallel configuration can experience static divergence and collapse at sufficiently high coolant flow rates. Such collapse was exhibited by the Oak Ridge High Flux Reactor in the 1940s and the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory in the 1950s. Theoretical formulas outlined by Miller, based upon wide-beam theory and Bernoulli’s equation, were used for the analysis. Calculations based upon Miller’s theory show that the actual coolant flow velocity is only 6% of the predicted critical flow velocity. Since there is a considerable margin between the theoretically predicted plate collapse velocity and the design velocity, the phenomena of plate collapse due to static instability is unlikely.

  6. Intermittent Lagrangian velocities and accelerations in three-dimensional porous medium flow.

    PubMed

    Holzner, M; Morales, V L; Willmann, M; Dentz, M

    2015-07-01

    Intermittency of Lagrangian velocity and acceleration is a key to understanding transport in complex systems ranging from fluid turbulence to flow in porous media. High-resolution optical particle tracking in a three-dimensional (3D) porous medium provides detailed 3D information on Lagrangian velocities and accelerations. We find sharp transitions close to pore throats, and low flow variability in the pore bodies, which gives rise to stretched exponential Lagrangian velocity and acceleration distributions characterized by a sharp peak at low velocity, superlinear evolution of particle dispersion, and double-peak behavior in the propagators. The velocity distribution is quantified in terms of pore geometry and flow connectivity, which forms the basis for a continuous-time random-walk model that sheds light on the observed Lagrangian flow and transport behaviors.

  7. PADDLEFISH BUCCAL FLOW VELOCITY DURING RAM SUSPENSION FEEDING AND RAM VENTILATION

    PubMed

    Cech; Cheer

    1994-01-01

    A micro-thermistor probe was inserted into the buccal cavity of freely swimming paddlefish to measure flow velocity during ram ventilation, ram suspension feeding and prey processing. Swimming speed was measured from videotapes recorded simultaneously with the buccal flow velocity measurements. Both swimming velocity and buccal flow velocity were significantly higher during suspension feeding than during ram ventilation. As the paddlefish shifted from ventilation to feeding, buccal flow velocity increased to approximately 60 % of the swimming velocity. During prey processing, buccal flow velocity was significantly higher than the swimming velocity, indicating that prey processing involves the generation of suction. The Reynolds number (Re) for flow at the level of the paddlefish gill rakers during feeding is about 30, an order of magnitude lower than the Re calculated previously for pump suspension-feeding blackfish. These data, combined with data available from the literature, indicate that the gill rakers of ram suspension-feeding teleost fishes may operate at a substantially lower Re than the rakers of pump suspension feeders.

  8. Air flow exploration of abrasive feed tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shijin; Li, Xiaohong; Gu, Yilei

    2009-12-01

    An abrasive water-jet cutting process is one in which water pressure is raised to a very high pressure and forced through a very small orifice to form a very thin high speed jet beam. This thin jet beam is then directed through a chamber and then fed into a secondary nozzle, or mixing tube. During this process, a vacuum is generated in the chamber, and garnet abrasives and air are pulled into the chamber, through an abrasive feed tube, and mixes with this high speed stream of water. Because of the restrictions introduced by the abrasive feed tube geometry, a vacuum gradient is generated along the tube. Although this phenomenon has been recognized and utilized as a way to monitor nozzle condition and abrasive flowing conditions, yet, until now, conditions inside the abrasive feed line have not been completely understood. A possible reason is that conditions inside the abrasive feed line are complicated. Not only compressible flow but also multi-phase, multi-component flow has been involved in inside of abrasive feed tube. This paper explored various aspects of the vacuum creation process in both the mixing chamber and the abrasive feed tube. Based on an experimental exploration, an analytical framework is presented to allow theoretical calculations of vacuum conditions in the abrasive feed tube.

  9. Inert gas influence on the laminar burning velocity of methane-air mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mitu, Maria; Giurcan, Venera; Razus, Domnina; Oancea, Dumitru

    2017-01-05

    Flame propagation was studied in methane-air-inert (He, Ar, N2 or CO2) mixtures with various initial pressures and compositions using pressure-time records obtained in a spherical vessel with central ignition. The laminar burning velocities of CH4-air and CH4-air-inert mixtures obtained from experimental p(t) records of the early stage of combustion were compared with literature data and with those obtained from numerical modeling of 1D flames. The overall reaction orders of methane oxidation were determined from the baric coefficients of the laminar burning velocities determined from power-law equations. For all mixtures, the adiabatic flames temperatures were computed, assuming that the chemical equilibrium is reached in the flame front. The overall activation energy for the propagation stage of the combustion process was determined from the temperature dependence of the laminar burning velocity.

  10. Influence of air velocity on the habit of ice crystal growth from the vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W.; Hallett, J.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of air velocity on the growth behavior of ice crystals growing from water vapor was investigated at temperatures between 0 and -35 C and at supersaturation levels ranging from 2 to 40 percent, using a laboratory chamber in which it was possible to make these variations. It was found that crystal growth was most sensitive to changes in the air velocity at temperatures near -4 C and -15 C where, near water saturation, the introduction of only a 5 cm/s air velocity induced skeletal transitions (columns to needles near -4 C and plates to dendrites near -15 C). The experiments provide conditions which simulate growth of ice crystals in the atmosphere, where crystal growth takes place at or somewhat below water saturation.

  11. Electrification : A New Approach To Evaluate Slip Velocity During Flow Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Fabrice; Allal, Ahmed; Guerret-Piècourt, Christelle

    2007-04-01

    The original feature of this work consists in the parallel study, in extrusion, of the polymer electrification and flow instabilities. On one hand, the Mhetar and Archer model has been used to predict the evolution of slip velocity versus shear stress and on the other hand, the double layer theory seem to be the better theory to explain electrification. We have shown that electrification measurements allow us to measure the slip velocity. The slip velocity values calculated via double layer theory are consistent with those calculated with the Methar and Archer model and allow us to validate our approach. The conclusion is that it's possible to determine the slip velocity during flow instabilities.

  12. Velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity profiles in hydrogen-oxygen MHD duct flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greywall, M. S.; Pian, C. C. P.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional duct flow computations for radial distributions of velocity, temperature, and electrical conductivity are reported. Calculations were carried out for the flow conditions representative of a hydrogen-oxygen combustion driven MHD duct. Results are presented for: profiles of developing flow in a smooth duct, and for profiles of fully developed pipe flow with a specified streamwise shear stress distribution. The predicted temperature and electrical conductivity profiles for the developing flows compare well with available experimental data.

  13. Velocity-Field Measurements of an Axisymmetric Separated Flow Subjected to Amplitude-Modulated Excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trosin, Barry James

    2007-01-01

    Active flow control was applied at the point of separation of an axisymmetric, backward-facing-step flow. The control was implemented by employing a Helmholtz resonator that was externally driven by an amplitude-modulated, acoustic disturbance from a speaker located upstream of the wind tunnel. The velocity field of the separating/reattaching flow region downstream of the step was characterized using hotwire velocity measurements with and without flow control. Conventional statistics of the data reveal that the separating/reattaching flow is affected by the imposed forcing. Triple decomposition along with conditional averaging was used to distinguish periodic disturbances from random turbulence in the fluctuating velocity component. A significant outcome of the present study is that it demonstrates that amplitude-modulated forcing of the separated flow alters the flow in the same manner as the more conventional method of periodic excitation.

  14. Egomotion Estimation with Optic Flow and Air Velocity Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-22

    any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN... control their absolute ego- motion (i.e. groundspeed). The egomotion estimation method that we have developed, which we call the opto-aeronautic algorithm...that some insects can control their groundspeed in an absolute sense, particularly in insects that use pheromones to attract and find mates. In several

  15. Egomotion Estimation with Optic Flow and Air Velocity Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-17

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED...insects are able to estimate the wind direction and control their absolute ego- motion (i.e. groundspeed). The egomotion estimation method that we have...equation (1). w(t) = vg(t)− va(t) (1) There is evidence that some insects can control their groundspeed in an absolute sense, particularly in insects that

  16. Effects of mass flow rate and droplet velocity on surface heat flux during cryogen spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Karapetian, Emil; Aguilar, Guillermo; Kimel, Sol; Lavernia, Enrique J; Nelson, J Stuart

    2003-01-07

    Cryogen spray cooling (CSC) is used to protect the epidermis during dermatologic laser surgery. To date, the relative influence of the fundamental spray parameters on surface cooling remains incompletely understood. This study explores the effects of mass flow rate and average droplet velocity on the surface heat flux during CSC. It is shown that the effect of mass flow rate on the surface heat flux is much more important compared to that of droplet velocity. However, for fully atomized sprays with small flow rates, droplet velocity can make a substantial difference in the surface heat flux.

  17. Finding the peak velocity in a flow from its Doppler spectrum.

    PubMed

    Vilkomerson, David; Ricci, Stefano; Tortoli, Piero

    2013-10-01

    The signal backscattered by blood cells crossing a sample volume produces a Doppler power spectrum determined by the scatterers¿ velocity distribution. Because of intrinsic spectral broadening, the peak Doppler frequency observed does not correspond to the peak velocity in the flow. Several methods have been proposed for estimating the maximum velocity component--an important clinical parameter--but these methods are approximate, based on heuristic thresholds that can be inaccurate and strongly affected by noise. Reported here is a method of modeling the Doppler power spectrum of a flow, and from that model, determining what Doppler frequency on the descending slope of the power spectrum corresponds to the peak velocity in the insonated flow. It is shown that, for a fully insonated flow with a parabolic velocity distribution, the peak velocity corresponds to the Doppler frequency at the half-power point on that slope. The method is demonstrated to be robust with regard to the effects of noise and valid for a wide range of acquisition parameters. Experimental maximum velocity measurements on steady flows with rates between 100 and 300 mL/min (peak velocity range 6.6 cm/s to 19.9 cm/s) show a mean bias error that is smaller than 1%.

  18. On the method of indirectly measuring gas and particulate phase velocities in shock induced dusty-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, G. D.

    A method of indirectly measuring the temporally varying velocities of the gas and particulate phases in the nonequilibrium region of a shock wave moving at constant speed in a dusty-gas flow is described, and this method is assessed by using experimental data from shock-induced air flows containing 40-micron-diameter glass beads in a dusty-gas shock-tube facility featuring a large horizontal channel (19.7-cm by 7.6-cm in cross section). Simultaneous measurements of the shock-front speed with time-of-arrival gauges, particle concentration by light extinctiometry, and gas-particle mixture density by beta-ray absorption are used in conjunction with two mass conservation laws to obtain the indirect velocity measurements of both phases. A second indirect measurement of the gas-phase velocity is obtained when the gas pressure is simultaneously recorded along with the particle concentration and shock-front speed when used in conjunction with the conservation of mixture momentum. Direct measurements of the particulate-phase velocity by laser-Doppler velocimetry are also presented as a means of assessing the indirect velocity measurement method.

  19. Relationship of 133Xe cerebral blood flow to middle cerebral arterial flow velocity in men at rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. M.; Skolnick, B. E.; Gelfand, R.; Farber, R. E.; Stierheim, M.; Stevens, W. C.; Beck, G. Jr; Lambertsen, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by 133Xe clearance simultaneously with the velocity of blood flow through the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) over a wide range of arterial PCO2 in eight normal men. Average arterial PCO2, which was varied by giving 4% and 6% CO2 in O2 and by controlled hyperventilation on O2, ranged from 25.3 to 49.9 mm Hg. Corresponding average values of global CBF15 were 27.2 and 65.0 ml 100 g min-1, respectively, whereas MCA blood-flow velocity ranged from 42.8 to 94.2 cm/s. The relationship of CBF to MCA blood-flow velocity over the imposed range of arterial PCO2 was described analytically by a parabola with the equation: CBF = 22.8 - 0.17 x velocity + 0.006 x velocity2 The observed data indicate that MCA blood-flow velocity is a useful index of CBF response to change in arterial PCO2 during O2 breathing at rest. With respect to baseline values measured while breathing 100% O2 spontaneously, percent changes in velocity were significantly smaller than corresponding percent changes in CBF at increased levels of arterial PCO2 and larger than CBF changes at the lower arterial PCO2. These observed relative changes are consistent with MCA vasodilation at the site of measurement during exposure to progressive hypercapnia and also during extreme hyperventilation hypocapnia.

  20. Laminar Flame Velocity and Temperature Exponent of Diluted DME-Air Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseer Mohammed, Abdul; Anwar, Muzammil; Juhany, Khalid A.; Mohammad, Akram

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, the laminar flame velocity and temperature exponent diluted dimethyl ether (DME) air mixtures are reported. Laminar premixed mixture of DME-air with volumetric dilutions of carbon dioxides (CO2) and nitrogen (N2) are considered. Experiments were conducted using a preheated mesoscale high aspect-ratio diverging channel with inlet dimensions of 25 mm × 2 mm. In this method, flame velocities are extracted from planar flames that were stabilized near adiabatic conditions inside the channel. The flame velocities are then plotted against the ratio of mixture temperature and the initial reference temperature. A non-linear power law regression is observed suitable. This regression analysis gives the laminar flame velocity at the initial reference temperature and temperature exponent. Decrease in the laminar flame velocity and increase in temperature exponent is observed for CO2 and N2 diluted mixtures. The addition of CO2 has profound influence when compared to N2 addition on both flame velocity and temperature exponent. Numerical prediction of the similar mixture using a detailed reaction mechanism is obtained. The computational mechanism predicts higher magnitudes for laminar flame velocity and smaller magnitudes of temperature exponent compared to experimental data.

  1. Size and Velocity Characteristics of Droplets Generated by Thin Steel Slab Continuous Casting Secondary Cooling Air-Mist Nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchaca M, J. I.; Castillejos E, A. H.; Acosta G, F. A.

    2011-06-01

    Direct spray impingement of high temperature surfaces, 1473 K to 973 K (1200 °C to 700 °C), plays a critical role in the secondary cooling of continuously cast thin steel slabs. It is known that the spray parameters affecting the local heat flux are the water impact flux w as well as the droplet velocity and size. However, few works have been done to characterize the last two parameters in the case of dense mists ( i.e., mists with w in the range of 2 to 90 L/m2s). This makes it difficult to rationalize how the nozzle type and its operating conditions must be selected to control the cooling process. In the present study, particle/droplet image analysis was used to determine the droplet size and velocity distributions simultaneously at various locations along the major axis of the mist cross section at a distance where the steel strand would stand. The measurements were carried out at room temperature for two standard commercial air-assisted nozzles of fan-discharge type operating over a broad range of conditions of practical interest. To achieve statistically meaningful samples, at least 6000 drops were analyzed at each location. Measuring the droplet size revealed that the number and volume frequency distributions were fitted satisfactorily by the respective log-normal and Nukiyama-Tanasawa distributions. The correlation of the parameters of the distribution functions with the water- and air-nozzle pressures allowed for reasonable estimation of the mean values of the size of the droplets generated. The ensemble of measurements across the mist axis showed that the relationship between the droplet velocity and the diameter exhibited a weak positive correlation. Additionally, increasing the water flow rate at constant air pressure caused a decrease in the proportion of the water volume made of finer droplets, whereas the volume proportion of faster droplets augmented until the water flow reached a certain value, after which it decreased. Diminishing the air

  2. Analysis of the air flow generated by an air-assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans using a 3D sonic anemometer.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, F Javier; Vidal, Mariano; Boné, Antonio; Malón, Hugo; Aguirre, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The flow of air generated by a new design of air assisted sprayer equipped with two axial fans of reversed rotation was analyzed. For this goal, a 3D sonic anemometer has been used (accuracy: 1.5%; measurement range: 0 to 45 m/s). The study was divided into a static test and a dynamic test. During the static test, the air velocity in the working vicinity of the sprayer was measured considering the following machine configurations: (1) one activated fan regulated at three air flows (machine working as a traditional sprayer); (2) two activated fans regulated at three air flows for each fan. In the static test 72 measurement points were considered. The location of the measurement points was as follow: left and right sides of the sprayer; three sections of measurement (A, B and C); three measurement distances from the shaft of the machine (1.5 m, 2.5 m and 3.5 m); and four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). The static test results have shown significant differences in the module and the vertical angle of the air velocity vector in function of the regulations of the sprayer. In the dynamic test, the air velocity was measured at 2.5 m from the axis of the sprayer considering four measurement heights (1 m, 2 m, 3 m and 4 m). In this test, the sprayer regulations were: one or two activated fans; one air flow for each fan; forward speed of 2.8 km/h. The use of one fan (back) or two fans (back and front) produced significant differences on the duration of the presence of wind in the measurement point and on the direction of the air velocity vector. The module of the air velocity vector was not affected by the number of activated fans.

  3. GALAXY CLUSTER BULK FLOWS AND COLLISION VELOCITIES IN QUMOND

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Harley; McGaugh, Stacy; Teuben, Peter; Angus, G. W. E-mail: stacy.mcgaugh@case.edu E-mail: angus.gz@gmail.com

    2013-07-20

    We examine the formation of clusters of galaxies in numerical simulations of a QUMOND cosmogony with massive sterile neutrinos. Clusters formed in these exploratory simulations develop higher velocities than those found in {Lambda}CDM simulations. The bulk motions of clusters attain {approx}1000 km s{sup -1} by low redshift, comparable to observations whereas {Lambda}CDM simulated clusters tend to fall short. Similarly, high pairwise velocities are common in cluster-cluster collisions like the Bullet Cluster. There is also a propensity for the most massive clusters to be larger in QUMOND and to appear earlier than in {Lambda}CDM, potentially providing an explanation for ''pink elephants'' like El Gordo. However, it is not obvious that the cluster mass function can be recovered.

  4. A one-dimensional numerical model for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y.; Leon, A.; Apte, S.

    2015-12-01

    The presence of pressurized air pockets in combined sewer systems is argued to produce geyser flows, which is an oscillating jetting of a mixture of gas-liquid flows through vertical shafts. A 1D numerical model is developed for predicting pressure and velocity oscillations of a compressed air-pocket in a vertical shaft which in turn attempts to simulate geyser like flows. The vertical shaft is closed at the bottom and open to ambient pressure at the top. Initially, the lower section of the vertical shaft is filled with compressed air and the upper section with water. The interaction between the pressurized air pocket and the water column in the vertical shaft exhibits an oscillatory motion of the water column that decays over time. The model accounts for steady and unsteady friction to estimate the energy dissipation. The model also includes the falling flow of water around the external perimeter of the pressurized air pocket by assuming that any expansion in the pressurized air pocket would result in the falling volume of water. The acceleration of air-water interface is predicted through a force balance between the pressurized air pocket and the water column combined with the Method of Characteristics that resolves pressure and velocity within the water column. The expansion and compression of the pressurized air pocket is assumed to follow either isothermal process or adiabatic process. Results for both assumptions; isothermal and adiabatic processes, are presented. The performance of the developed 1D numerical model is compared with that of a commercial 3D CFD model. Overall, a good agreement between both models is obtained for pressure and velocity oscillations. The paper will also present a sensitivity analysis of the 3D CFD model.

  5. Control of turbulent boundary layer through air blowing due to external-flow resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V. I.; Boiko, A. V.; Kavun, I. N.

    2015-07-01

    The possibility to control turbulent incompressible boundary layer using air blowing through a finely perforated wall presenting part of the streamlined flat-plate surface was examined. The control was exercised via an action on the state and characteristics of the near-wall flow exerted by controlled (through variation of external-pressure-flow velocity) blowing of air through an air intake installed on the idle side of the plate. A stable reduction of the local values of skin friction coefficient along the model, reaching 50 % at the end of the perforated area, has been demonstrated. The obtained experimental and calculated data are indicative of a possibility to model the process of turbulentboundary-layer control by air blowing due to external-flow resources.

  6. Femtosecond laser flow tagging in non-air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yibin; Calvert, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    The Femtosecond Laser Electronic Excitation Tagging (FLEET) [Michael, J. B. et al., Applied optics, 50(26), 2011] method is studied in nitrogen-containing gaseous flows. The underlying mechanism behind the FLEET process is the dissociation of molecular nitrogen into atomic nitrogen, which produces long-lived florescence as the nitrogen atoms recombine. Spectra and images of the resulting tagged line provide insight into the effects of different atmospheric gases on the FLEET process. The ionization cross-section, conductivity and energy states of the gaseous particles are each brought into consideration. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility for long-lived flow tagging on the order of hundreds of microseconds in non-air environments. Of particular interest are the enhancement of the FLEET signal with the addition of argon gas, and the non-monotonic quenching effect of oxygen on the length, duration and intensity of the resulting signal and spectra. FLEET is characterized in number of different atmospheric gases, including that simulating Mar's atmospheric composition.

  7. A Study on the Air flow outside Ambient Vaporizer Fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, G.; Lee, T.; Jeong, H.; Chung, H.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we interpreted Fog's Fluid that appear in the Ambient Vaporizer and predict the point of change Air to Fog. We interpreted using Analysis working fluid was applied to LNG and Air. We predict air flow when there is chill of LNG in the air Temperature and that makes fog. Also, we interpreted based on Summer and Winter criteria in the air temperature respectively. Finally, we can check the speed of the fog when fog excreted.

  8. Experimental Study on the Flow Regimes and Pressure Gradients of Air-Oil-Water Three-Phase Flow in Horizontal Pipes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadhrami, Luai M.; Shaahid, S. M.; Tunde, Lukman O.; Al-Sarkhi, A.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the flow regimes and pressure gradients of air-oil-water three-phase flows in 2.25 ID horizontal pipe at different flow conditions. The effects of water cuts, liquid and gas velocities on flow patterns and pressure gradients have been studied. The experiments have been conducted at 20°C using low viscosity Safrasol D80 oil, tap water and air. Superficial water and oil velocities were varied from 0.3 m/s to 3 m/s and air velocity varied from 0.29 m/s to 52.5 m/s to cover wide range of flow patterns. The experiments were performed for 10% to 90% water cuts. The flow patterns were observed and recorded using high speed video camera while the pressure drops were measured using pressure transducers and U-tube manometers. The flow patterns show strong dependence on water fraction, gas velocities, and liquid velocities. The observed flow patterns are stratified (smooth and wavy), elongated bubble, slug, dispersed bubble, and annular flow patterns. The pressure gradients have been found to increase with the increase in gas flow rates. Also, for a given superficial gas velocity, the pressure gradients increased with the increase in the superficial liquid velocity. The pressure gradient first increases and then decreases with increasing water cut. In general, phase inversion was observed with increase in the water cut. The experimental results have been compared with the existing unified Model and a good agreement has been noticed. PMID:24523645

  9. Flow Scales of Influence on the Settling Velocities of Particles with Varying Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Corrine N.; Merchant, Wilmot; Jendrassak, Marek; Limpasuvan, Varavut; Gurka, Roi; Hackett, Erin E.

    2016-01-01

    The settling velocities of natural, synthetic, and industrial particles were measured in a grid turbulence facility using optical measurement techniques. Particle image velocimetry and 2D particle tracking were used to measure the instantaneous velocities of the flow and the particles’ trajectories simultaneously. We find that for particles examined in this study (Rep = 0.4–123), settling velocity is either enhanced or unchanged relative to stagnant flow for the range of investigated turbulence conditions. The smallest particles’ normalized settling velocities exhibited the most consistent trends when plotted versus the Kolmogorov-based Stokes numbers suggesting that the dissipative scales influence their dynamics. In contrast, the mid-sized particles were better characterized with a Stokes number based on the integral time scale. The largest particles were largely unaffected by the flow conditions. Using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD), the flow pattern scales are compared to particle trajectory curvature to complement results obtained through dimensional analysis using Stokes numbers. The smallest particles are found to have trajectories with curvatures of similar scale as the small flow scales (higher POD modes) whilst mid-sized particle trajectories had curvatures that were similar to the larger flow patterns (lower POD modes). The curvature trajectories of the largest particles did not correspond to any particular flow pattern scale suggesting that their trajectories were more random. These results provide experimental evidence of the “fast tracking” theory of settling velocity enhancement in turbulence and demonstrate that particles align themselves with flow scales in proportion to their size. PMID:27513958

  10. Measuring two-dimensional components of a flow velocity vector using a hot-wire probe.

    PubMed

    Kiełbasa, Jan

    2007-08-01

    The article presents a single-hot-wire probe adapted to detect the direction of flow velocity. The modification consists of the introduction of a third support which allows to measure voltage at the central point of the wire. The sign of voltage difference DeltaU between both parts of the wire is the measure of the direction of flow velocity in a system of coordinates associated with the probe.

  11. The velocity field near the orifice of a Helmholtz resonator in grazing flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charwat, A. F.; Walker, B. E.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement of the time-dependent velocities induced inside and outside the opening of acoustically excited, two-dimensional Helmholtz resonator imbedded in a grazing flow are presented. The remarkably clear structure of the perturbation field which evokes a pulsating source and a coherently pulsating vortex-image pair is described. The simple phenomenological "lid-model" which correlates the variation in the components of the acoustic impedance with the velocity of the grazing flow is discussed and extended.

  12. Cup anemometer calibration: effect of flow velocity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccato, A.; Spazzini, P. G.; Malvano, R.

    2011-10-01

    The effects of different working conditions and specifically of different velocity profiles on the output of a commercial cup anemometer were analysed experimentally. A simple mathematical model is also presented and provides results in line with the experiments. Results show that a cup anemometer with certain geometrical features can be calibrated through a rotating drag rig by correcting for the bias on the instrument output. The increase in uncertainty caused by this systematic correction was evaluated and applied to the results. The correction was validated by checking the compatibility of calibrations of a cup anemometer at the rotating rig and in a wind tunnel.

  13. Preservation of Cognitive Performance with Age during Exertional Heat Stress under Low and High Air Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wright Beatty, Heather E.; Keillor, Jocelyn M.; Hardcastle, Stephen G.; Boulay, Pierre; Kenny, Glen P.

    2015-01-01

    Older adults may be at greater risk for occupational injuries given their reduced capacity to dissipate heat, leading to greater thermal strain and potentially cognitive decrements. Purpose. To examine the effects of age and increased air velocity, during exercise in humid heat, on information processing and attention. Methods. Nine young (24 ± 1 years) and 9 older (59 ± 1 years) males cycled 4 × 15 min (separated by 15 min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in humid heat (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (low) and 3.0 (high) m·s−1 air velocity wearing coveralls. At rest, immediately following exercise (end exercise), and after the final recovery, participants performed an abbreviated paced auditory serial addition task (PASAT, 2 sec pace). Results. PASAT numbers of correct responses at end exercise were similar for young (low = 49 ± 3; high = 51 ± 3) and older (low = 46 ± 5; high = 47 ± 4) males and across air velocity conditions, and when scored relative to age norms. Psychological sweating, or an increased sweat rate with the administration of the PASAT, was observed in both age groups in the high condition. Conclusion. No significant decrements in attention and speeded information processing were observed, with age or altered air velocity, following intermittent exercise in humid heat. PMID:25874223

  14. Measurement of the Group Velocity Dispersion of air using a femtosecond comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al salamah, Reem

    In this thesis, the Group Velocity Dispersion (GVD) of air has been measured by using a femtosecond frequency comb at 1.5 microm. By comparing the spectra from a balanced and unbalanced Mach - Zehnder interferometer, the need for vacuum tube is eliminated. The method employs the Fast Fourier Transform of both auto- and cross correlation to find the spectral and their differences. The GVD of air is then calculated from these spectral phase differences. With twenty-five independent measurements, the GVD of air was found to be 0.0120 fs2/mm, with a standard deviation of 0.0075 fs2/mm.

  15. A simple measuring technique of surface flow velocity to analyze the behavior of velocity fields in hydraulic engineering applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez, Jackson; Gomez, Manuel; Russo, Beniamino; Redondo, Jose M.

    2015-04-01

    An important achievement in hydraulic engineering is the proposal and development of new techniques for the measurement of field velocities in hydraulic problems. The technological advances in digital cameras with high resolution and high speed found in the market, and the advances in digital image processing techniques now provides a tremendous potential to measure and study the behavior of the water surface flows. This technique was applied at the Laboratory of Hydraulics at the Technical University of Catalonia - Barcelona Tech to study the 2D velocity fields in the vicinity of a grate inlet. We used a platform to test grate inlets capacity with dimensions of 5.5 m long and 4 m wide allowing a zone of useful study of 5.5m x 3m, where the width is similar of the urban road lane. The platform allows you to modify the longitudinal slopes from 0% to 10% and transversal slope from 0% to 4%. Flow rates can arrive to 200 l/s. In addition a high resolution camera with 1280 x 1024 pixels resolution with maximum speed of 488 frames per second was used. A novel technique using particle image velocimetry to measure surface flow velocities has been developed and validated with the experimental data from the grate inlets capacity. In this case, the proposed methodology can become a useful tools to understand the velocity fields of the flow approaching the inlet where the traditional measuring equipment have serious problems and limitations. References DigiFlow User Guide. (2012), (June). Russo, B., Gómez, M., & Tellez, J. (2013). Methodology to Estimate the Hydraulic Efficiency of Nontested Continuous Transverse Grates. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, 139(10), 864-871. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)IR.1943-4774.0000625 Teresa Vila (1), Jackson Tellez (1), Jesus Maria Sanchez (2), Laura Sotillos (1), Margarita Diez (3, 1), and J., & (1), M. R. (2014). Diffusion in fractal wakes and convective thermoelectric flows. Geophysical Research Abstracts - EGU General Assembly 2014

  16. Measurement of the resistivity of porous materials with an alternating air-flow method.

    PubMed

    Dragonetti, Raffaele; Ianniello, Carmine; Romano, Rosario A

    2011-02-01

    Air-flow resistivity is a main parameter governing the acoustic behavior of porous materials for sound absorption. The international standard ISO 9053 specifies two different methods to measure the air-flow resistivity, namely a steady-state air-flow method and an alternating air-flow method. The latter is realized by the measurement of the sound pressure at 2 Hz in a small rigid volume closed partially by the test sample. This cavity is excited with a known volume-velocity sound source implemented often with a motor-driven piston oscillating with prescribed area and displacement magnitude. Measurements at 2 Hz require special instrumentation and care. The authors suggest an alternating air-flow method based on the ratio of sound pressures measured at frequencies higher than 2 Hz inside two cavities coupled through a conventional loudspeaker. The basic method showed that the imaginary part of the sound pressure ratio is useful for the evaluation of the air-flow resistance. Criteria are discussed about the choice of a frequency range suitable to perform simplified calculations with respect to the basic method. These criteria depend on the sample thickness, its nonacoustic parameters, and the measurement apparatus as well. The proposed measurement method was tested successfully with various types of acoustic materials.

  17. Research on inert gas narcosis and air velocity effects on metabolic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The effects of air velocity on metabolic performance are studied by using high forced airflow in a closed environment as a mechanism to control the concentration of volatile animal wastes. Air velocities between 100 and 200 ft/min are without significant effects on the metabolism of rats. At velocities of 200 ft/min and above, oxygen consumption and CO2 production as well as food consumption increase. In most instances, the changes are on the order of 5-10%. At the same time, the RQ for the animals increases slightly and generally correlates well with oxygen consumption and CO2 production. Experiments on the nature of inert gas narcosis show that halothane and methoxyflurane are rather potent inhibitors of the NADH:O2 oxidoreductase system in rats. These experiments suggest that the mechanism of inert gas narcosis is not mandatorily related to a membrane surface phenomenon.

  18. The Terminal Velocity of a Bubble in an Oscillating Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, L. A.; Kraynik, A. M.; Torczynski, J. R.

    2010-11-01

    A bubble in an acoustic field experiences a net "Bjerknes" force from the nonlinear coupling of its radial oscillations with the oscillating buoyancy force. It is typically assumed that the bubble's net terminal velocity can be found by considering a spherical bubble with the imposed "Bjerknes stresses". We have analyzed the motion of such a bubble using a rigorous perturbation approach and found that one must include a term involving an effective mass flux through the bubble that arises from the time average of the second-order nonlinear terms in the kinematic boundary condition. The importance of this term is governed by the dimensionless parameter α=R^2φ / R^2φ ν . - ν, where R is the bubble radius, φ is the driving frequency, and ν is the liquid kinematic viscosity. If α is large, this term is unimportant, but if α is small, this term is the dominant factor in determining the terminal velocity. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Differences in response of flow velocities of an adjacent Alpine blue ice- and rock glacier to climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartl, Lea; Fischer, Andrea; Stocker-Waldhuber, Martin; Schneider, Heralt

    2014-05-01

    main flow line. From 1965 to the late 1970s, flow velocities at KWF increased to rates of up to 90 m/a in the lower regions of the glacier. In the 1980s, velocities began to decrease rapidly. The glacier began retreating again at this time, after advancing from 1970 to 1985. Since 1990, KWF moves at rates of less than 10 m/a at all altitudes above 3100 m, with little year to year variation. While year to year velocity variations at HEK appear to be strongly correlated with air temperature, KWF seems to have a slower response time to temperature changes. Under a trend of increasing temperatures, KWF has slowed down for over 20 years, while HEK seems to underlie a general trend of speeding up. This implies fundamental differences in flow regime at the HEK and KWF.

  20. Increased Air Velocity Reduces Thermal and Cardiovascular Strain in Young and Older Males during Humid Exertional Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Wright Beatty, Heather E; Hardcastle, Stephen G; Boulay, Pierre; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    Older adults have been reported to have a lower evaporative heat loss capacity than younger adults during exercise when full sweat evaporation is permitted. However, it is unclear how conditions of restricted evaporative and convective heat loss (i.e., high humidity, clothing insulation) alter heat stress. to the purpose of this study was to examine the heat stress responses of young and older males during and following exercise in a warm/humid environment under two different levels of air velocity. Ten young (YOUNG: 24±2 yr) and 10 older (OLDER: 59±3 yr) males, matched for body surface area performed 4×15-min cycling bouts (15-min rest) at a fixed rate of heat production (400 W) in warm/humid conditions (35°C, 60% relative humidity) under 0.5 (Low) and 3.0 (High) m·s(-1) air velocity while wearing work coveralls. Rectal (Tre) and mean skin (MTsk) temperatures, heart rate (HR), local sweat rate, % max skin blood flow (SkBF) (recovery only), and blood pressure (recovery only) were measured. High air velocity reduced core and skin temperatures (p < 0.05) equally in YOUNG and OLDER males (p > 0.05) but was more effective in reducing cardiovascular strain (absolute and % max HR; p < 0.05) in YOUNG males (p < 0.05). Greater increases in local dry heat loss responses (% max SkBF and cutaneous vascular conductance) were detected across time in OLDER than YOUNG males in both conditions (p < 0.05). Local dry heat loss responses and cardiovascular strain were attenuated during the High condition in YOUNG compared to OLDER (p < 0.05). High air velocity reduced the number of males surpassing the 38.0°C Tre threshold from 90% (Low) to 50% (High). Despite age-related local heat loss differences, YOUNG and OLDER males had similar levels of heat stress during intermittent exercise in warm and humid conditions while wearing work coveralls. Increased air velocity was effective in reducing heat stress equally, and cardiovascular strain to a greater extent, in YOUNG and OLDER

  1. The residual zonal flow in tokamak plasmas toroidally rotating at arbitrary velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Deng

    2014-08-15

    Zonal flows, initially driven by ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, may evolve due to the neoclassic polarization in a collisionless tokamak plasma. In our previous work [D. Zhou, Nucl. Fusion 54, 042002 (2014)], the residual zonal flow in a tokamak plasma rotating toroidally at sonic speed is found to have the same form as that of a static plasma. In the present work, the form of the residual zonal flow is presented for tokamak plasmas rotating toroidally at arbitrary velocity. The gyro-kinetic equation is analytically solved for low speed rotation to give the expression of residual zonal flows, and the expression is then generalized for cases with arbitrary rotating velocity through interpolation. The zonal flow level decreases as the rotating velocity increases. The numerical evaluation is in good agreement with the former simulation result for high aspect ratio tokamaks.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of human aspiration in low velocity air: orientation effects on nose-breathing simulations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kimberly R; Anthony, T Renée

    2014-06-01

    An understanding of how particles are inhaled into the human nose is important for developing samplers that measure biologically relevant estimates of exposure in the workplace. While previous computational mouth-breathing investigations of particle aspiration have been conducted in slow moving air, nose breathing still required exploration. Computational fluid dynamics was used to estimate nasal aspiration efficiency for an inhaling humanoid form in low velocity wind speeds (0.1-0.4 m s(-1)). Breathing was simplified as continuous inhalation through the nose. Fluid flow and particle trajectories were simulated over seven discrete orientations relative to the oncoming wind (0, 15, 30, 60, 90, 135, 180°). Sensitivities of the model simplification and methods were assessed, particularly the placement of the recessed nostril surface and the size of the nose. Simulations identified higher aspiration (13% on average) when compared to published experimental wind tunnel data. Significant differences in aspiration were identified between nose geometry, with the smaller nose aspirating an average of 8.6% more than the larger nose. Differences in fluid flow solution methods accounted for 2% average differences, on the order of methodological uncertainty. Similar trends to mouth-breathing simulations were observed including increasing aspiration efficiency with decreasing freestream velocity and decreasing aspiration with increasing rotation away from the oncoming wind. These models indicate nasal aspiration in slow moving air occurs only for particles <100 µm.

  3. 30 CFR 57.22213 - Air flow (III mines).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow (III mines). 57.22213 Section 57.22213 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE... Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Ventilation § 57.22213 Air flow (III mines). The quantity of...

  4. Concentration and velocity measurements in the flow of droplet suspensions through a tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalewski, T. A.

    1984-12-01

    Two optical methods, light absorption and LDA, are applied to measure the concentration and velocity profiles of droplet suspensions flowing through a tube. The droplet concentration is non-uniform and has two maxima, one near the tube wall and one on the tube axis. The measured velocity profiles are blunted, but a central plug-flow region is not observed. The concentration of droplets on the tube axis and the degree of velocity profile blunting depend on relative viscosity. These results can be qualitatively compared with the theory of Chan and Leal.

  5. A Tool and a Method for Obtaining Hydrologic Flow Velocity Measurements in Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C.R.; Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.

    1986-01-21

    Downhole instruments based on a thermal perturbation principle are being developed to measure heat flow in permeable formations where convective transport of heat is important. To make heat flow measurements in these regions, the ground water velocity vector must be determined. A downhole probe has been designed to measure the local ground water velocity vector. The probe is a cylindrical heat source operated at a constant heat flux. In a convecting environment, surface temperatures on the probe are perturbed from those values of a purely conductive environment. With the aid of analytical and numerical models, these temperature differences can be related to the local velocity vector.

  6. Tool and a method for obtaining hydrologic flow velocity measurements in geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C.R.; Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    Downhole instruments based on a thermal perturbation principle are being developed to measure heat flow in permeable formations where convective transport of heat is important. To make heat flow measurements in these regions, the ground water velocity vector must be determined. A downhole probe has been designed to measure the local ground water velocity vector. The probe is a cylindrical heat source operated at a constant heat flux. In a convecting environment, surface temperatures on the probe are perturbed from those values of a purely conductive environment. With the aid of analytical and numerical models, these temperature differences can be related to the local velocity vector. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Synchrotron microimaging technique for measuring the velocity fields of real blood flows

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Kim, Guk Bae

    2005-03-15

    Angiography and Doppler methods used for diagnosing vascular diseases give information on the shape of blood vessels and pointwise blood speed but do not provide detailed information on the flow fields inside the blood vessels. In this study, we developed a method for visualizing blood flow by using coherent synchrotron x rays. This method, which does not require the addition of any contrast agent or tracer particles, visualizes the flow pattern of blood by enhancing the diffraction and interference characteristics of the blood cells. This was achieved by optimizing the sample- (blood) to-detector (charge-coupled device camera) distance and the sample thickness. The proposed method was used to extract quantitative velocity field information from blood flowing inside an opaque microchannel by applying a two-frame particle image velocimetry algorithm to enhanced x-ray images of the blood flow. The measured velocity field data showed a flow structure typical of flow in a macrochannel.

  8. Visualization of moving fluid: quantitative analysis of blood flow velocity using MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Matsuda, T; Sakurai, T; Fujita, A; Ohara, H; Okamura, S; Hashimoto, S; Mano, H; Kawai, C; Kiri, M

    1986-04-01

    A new method for the measurement of blood flow using magnetic resonance imaging has been developed. The flow velocities are calculated from the distances that the fluid has moved. The distances are directly visualized by a new pulse sequence. In a phantom study, the measured flow rates showed very good correlation with actual flow rates of up to 20 l/min (3 m/sec). In a volunteer study, pulsatile flow velocities of a large artery were measured with electrocardiographic gating. The flow pattern of a cardiac cycle at the abdominal aorta is similar to that revealed by other methods of measurement, such as Doppler ultrasound. This method allows reasonably accurate quantitative analysis of blood flow in the large arteries.

  9. Reducing artifacts in one-dimensional Fourier velocity encoding for fast and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Lee, Daeho; Santos, Juan M; Hu, Bob S; Pauly, John M; Kerr, Adam B

    2012-12-01

    When evaluating the severity of valvular stenosis, the peak velocity of the blood flow is routinely used to estimate the transvalvular pressure gradient. One-dimensional Fourier velocity encoding effectively detects the peak velocity with an ungated time series of spatially resolved velocity spectra in real time. However, measurement accuracy can be degraded by the pulsatile and turbulent nature of stenotic flow and the existence of spatially varying off-resonance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of improving the peak velocity detection capability of one-dimensional Fourier velocity encoding for stenotic flow using a novel echo-shifted interleaved readout combined with a variable-density circular k-space trajectory. The shorter echo and readout times of the echo-shifted interleaved acquisitions are designed to reduce sensitivity to off-resonance. Preliminary results from limited phantom and in vivo results also indicate that some artifacts from pulsatile flow appear to be suppressed when using this trajectory compared to conventional single-shot readouts, suggesting that peak velocity detection may be improved. The efficiency of the new trajectory improves the temporal and spatial resolutions. To realize the proposed readout, a novel multipoint-traversing algorithm is introduced for flexible and automated gradient-waveform design.

  10. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, J. Christopher

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen`s work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille`s solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  11. Fish responses to flow velocity and turbulence in relation to size, sex and parasite load

    PubMed Central

    Hockley, F. A.; Wilson, C. A. M. E.; Brew, A.; Cable, J.

    2014-01-01

    Riverine fish are subjected to heterogeneous flow velocities and turbulence and may use this to their advantage by selecting regions that balance energy expenditure for station holding while maximizing energy gain through feeding opportunities. This study investigated microhabitat selection by guppies Poecilia reticulata in terms of flow characteristics generated by hemisphere boulders in an open channel flume. Velocity and turbulence influenced the variation in swimming behaviour with respect to size, sex and parasite intensity. With increasing body length, fish swam further and more frequently between boulder regions. Larger guppies spent more time in the areas of high-velocity and low-turbulence regions beside the boulders, whereas smaller guppies frequented the low-velocity and high-turbulence regions directly behind the boulders. Male guppies selected the regions of low velocity, indicating possible reduced swimming ability owing to hydrodynamic drag imposed by their fins. With increasing Gyrodactylus turnbulli burden, fish spent more time in regions with moderate velocity and lowest turbulent kinetic energy which were the most spatially and temporally homogeneous in terms of velocity and turbulence. These findings highlight the importance of heterogeneous flow conditions in river channel design owing to the behavioural variability within a species in response to velocity and turbulence. PMID:24284893

  12. Velocity measurements of low Reynolds number tube flow using fiber-optic technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, J.C.

    1993-03-01

    In 1988 Nielsen started work to measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector being transported in a porous medium. To measure the spatial variability of the mass flux vector, the spatial variability of its components(velocity, concentration) must be measured. Nielsen was successful in measuring the pore level concentration at many different pores and in verifying the assumption that a nonuniform concentration field exists within the mixing zone between two miscible fluids. However, Nielsen was unable to conduct the necessary pore level velocity measurements needed. Nielsen's work is being continued and a probe is being developed that will measure both velocity and concentration components at pore level. The probe is essentially the same probe used to make the pore level concentration measurements with added capabilities needed to make the velocity measurements. This probe has several design variables, dealing primarily with the velocity component, that need further investigation. The research presented in this thesis investigates these parameters by performing experiments in a capillary tube. The tube is a controlled system where the velocity of the fluid can be determined from the volumetric flow rate using Poiseuille's solution for viscous flow. Also, a statistically based relationship between the velocity measured with the probe and the velocity determined from the volumetric flow rate has been developed.

  13. Effects of filter housing and ductwork configuration on air flow uniformity inside air cleaning filter housings

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.

    1992-12-31

    Each new HEPA filter installation presents a different physical configuration based on the system requirements the available space and designer preference. Each different configuration can result in variations of air flow uniformity inside the filter housing across the filter banks. This paper will present the results of air flow uniformity testing for six different filter housing/ductwork configurations and discuss if any of the variations in air flow uniformity is attributable to the difference in the physical arrangements for the six cases.

  14. Effects of filter housing and ductwork configuration on air flow uniformity inside air cleaning filter housings

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Each new HEPA filter installation presents a different physical configuration based on the system requirements the available space and designer preference. Each different configuration can result in variations of air flow uniformity inside the filter housing across the filter banks. This paper will present the results of air flow uniformity testing for six different filter housing/ductwork configurations and discuss if any of the variations in air flow uniformity is attributable to the difference in the physical arrangements for the six cases.

  15. Measurement of gas flow velocity: anemometer with a vibrating hot wire.

    PubMed

    Kiełbasa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    I propose a new method to measure velocity of a gas flow, which utilizes the time derivative of the voltage observed on a vibrating hot-wire sensor. The wire vibrates with an amplitude a and a frequency f, and is kept perpendicular to the gas flow direction in the plane containing the flow velocity vector v(g). When the parameters of vibrations are tuned, the number of zeros per vibration period of the hot-wire voltage function changes. I demonstrate that at the point of change, the unknown gas velocity is directly expressed by the parameters of vibrations v(g)=2pifa. Therefore, the velocity can be measured without any prior calibration of the hot-wire speed-voltage curve and the method can be used for gases of slowly changing temperature or composition.

  16. Correlation algorithm for computing the velocity fields in microchannel flows with high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karchevskiy, M. N.; Tokarev, M. P.; Yagodnitsyna, A. A.; Kozinkin, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    A cross-correlation algorithm, which enables the obtaining of the velocity field in the flow with a spatial resolution up to a single pixel per vector, has been realized in the work. It gives new information about the structure of microflows as well as increases considerably the accuracy of the measurement of the flow velocity field. In addition, the realized algorithm renders information about the velocity fluctuations in the flow structure. The algorithm was tested on synthetic data at a different number of test images the velocity distribution on which was specified by the Siemens star. The experimental validation was done on the data provided within the international project "4th International PIV Challenge". Besides, a detailed comparison with the Particle Image Velocimetry algorithm, which was realized previously, was carried out.

  17. Sensory and chemical characterization of VOC emissions from building products: impact of concentration and air velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, H. N.; Kjaer, U. D.; Nielsen, P. A.; Wolkoff, P.

    The emissions from five commonly used building products were studied in small-scale test chambers over a period of 50 days. The odor intensity was assessed by a sensory panel and the concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of concern for the indoor air quality were measured. The building products were three floor coverings: PVC, floor varnish on beechwood parquet and nylon carpet on a latex foam backing; an acrylic sealant, and a waterborne wall paint on gypsum board. The impacts of the VOC concentration in the air and the air velocity over the building products on the odor intensity and on the emission rate of VOCs were studied. The emission from each building product was studied under two or three different area-specific ventilation rates, i.e. different ratios of ventilation rate of the test chamber and building product area in the test chamber. The air velocity over the building product samples was adjusted to different levels between 0.1 and 0.3 m s -1. The origin of the emitted VOCs was assessed in order to distinguish between primary and secondary emissions. The results show that it is reasonable after an initial period of up to 14 days to consider the emission rate of VOCs of primary origin from most building products as being independent of the concentration and of the air velocity. However, if the building product surface is sensitive to oxidative degradation, increased air velocity may result in increased secondary emissions. The odor intensity of the emissions from the building products only decayed modestly over time. Consequently, it is recommended to use building products which have a low impact on the perceived air quality from the moment they are applied. The odor indices (i.e. concentration divided by odor threshold) of primary VOCs decayed markedly faster than the corresponding odor intensities. This indicates that the secondary emissions rather than the primary emissions, are likely to affect the perceived air quality in the

  18. Water velocity and the nature of critical flow in large rapids on the Colorado River, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Magirl, C.S.; Gartner, J.W.; Smart, G.M.; Webb, R.H.

    2009-01-01

     Rapids are an integral part of bedrock-controlled rivers, influencing aquatic ecology, geomorphology, and recreational value. Flow measurements in rapids and high-gradient rivers are uncommon because of technical difficulties associated with positioning and operating sufficiently robust instruments. In the current study, detailed velocity, water surface, and bathymetric data were collected within rapids on the Colorado River in eastern Utah. With the water surface survey, it was found that shoreline-based water surface surveys may misrepresent the water surface slope along the centerline of a rapid. Flow velocities were measured with an ADCP and an electronic pitot-static tube. Integrating multiple measurements, the ADCP returned velocity data from the entire water column, even in sections of high water velocity. The maximum mean velocity measured with the ADCP was 3.7 m/s. The pitot-static tube, while capable of only point measurements, quantified velocity 0.39 m below the surface. The maximum mean velocity measured with the pitot tube was 5.2 m/s, with instantaneous velocities up to 6.5 m/s. Analysis of the data showed that flow was subcritical throughout all measured rapids with a maximum measured Froude number of 0.7 in the largest measured rapids. Froude numbers were highest at the entrance of a given rapid, then decreased below the first breaking waves. In the absence of detailed bathymetric and velocity data, the Froude number in the fastest-flowing section of a rapid was estimated from near-surface velocity and depth soundings alone.

  19. Development and testing of a novel single-wire sensor for wide range flow velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Salaymeh, A.; Durst, F.

    2004-05-01

    Thermal flow sensors with a wide dynamic range, e.g. 1:1000 and more, are currently not available in spite of the great demand for such sensors in practical fluid flow measurements. The present paper introduces a sensor of this kind. The new sensor is mechanically the same as the 'sending' wire of the two-wire thermal flow sensor described by Durst et al, but it is excited by discrete, widely separated, square waves of electrical current rather than a continuous sinusoidal current. The nominal 'output' of the new sensor is the increase in wire temperature so that an integral of the resistance over the pulse length can be used for measurements. This 'output' is a function of the time constant ('thermal inertia') of the heated wire and thus also of the velocity of flow. The time constant decreases as the flow velocity increases, while the heat transfer increases. At very low flow velocities the response is determined almost entirely by the time constant of the wire while at high velocities the device acts almost like a 'constant current' hot-wire anemometer. That is, the effect of thermal inertia augments the output signal of the basic hot wire, thus increasing the flow rate range/sensitivity of the device, especially at the low-velocity end, above than that of a simple hot-wire flowmeter. The sensor described here was developed for slowly changing unidirectional flows, and uses one wire of 12.5 µm diameter. It is excited at 30 Hz frequency and its usable flow velocity range is 0.01-25 m s-1.

  20. Double electrostatic probe for measuring density, temperature, and velocity of a flowing plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    A method for obtaining plasma electron temperature and density, as well as the Mach number and flow velocity from the current-voltage characteristic of a flat-faced double probe, is presented. Calculated momentum fluxes of a flowing argon plasma obtained with this probe are compared with experimentally determined momentum fluxes. Reasonable agreement is obtained.

  1. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, M. N. K.; Zuradzman, M. Razlan; Hazry, D.; Khairunizam, Wan; Shahriman, A. B.; Yaacob, S.; Ahmed, S. Faiz; Hussain, Abadalsalam T.

    2014-12-01

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  2. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, M. N. K. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  3. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  4. Trace projection transformation: a new method for measurement of debris flow surface velocity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yan; Cui, Peng; Guo, Xiaojun; Ge, Yonggang

    2016-12-01

    Spatiotemporal variation of velocity is important for debris flow dynamics. This paper presents a new method, the trace projection transformation, for accurate, non-contact measurement of a debris-flow surface velocity field based on a combination of dense optical flow and perspective projection transformation. The algorithm for interpreting and processing is implemented in C ++ and realized in Visual Studio 2012. The method allows quantitative analysis of flow motion through videos from various angles (camera positioned at the opposite direction of fluid motion). It yields the spatiotemporal distribution of surface velocity field at pixel level and thus provides a quantitative description of the surface processes. The trace projection transformation is superior to conventional measurement methods in that it obtains the full surface velocity field by computing the optical flow of all pixels. The result achieves a 90% accuracy of when comparing with the observed values. As a case study, the method is applied to the quantitative analysis of surface velocity field of a specific debris flow.

  5. Investigation on Plasma Jet Flow Phenomena During DC Air Arc Motion in Bridge-Type Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Guofu; Bo, Kai; Chen, Mo; Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Xinlei

    2016-05-01

    Arc plasma jet flow in the air was investigated under a bridge-type contacts in a DC 270 V resistive circuit. We characterized the arc plasma jet flow appearance at different currents by using high-speed photography, and two polished contacts were used to search for the relationship between roughness and plasma jet flow. Then, to make the nature of arc plasma jet flow phenomena clear, a simplified model based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory was established and calculated. The simulated DC arc plasma was presented with the temperature distribution and the current density distribution. Furthermore, the calculated arc flow velocity field showed that the circular vortex was an embodiment of the arc plasma jet flow progress. The combined action of volume force and contact surface was the main reason of the arc jet flow. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51307030, 51277038)

  6. ADL ORVIS: An air-delay-leg, line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trott, Wayne M.; Castañeda, Jaime N.; Cooper, Marcia A.

    2014-04-01

    An interferometry system that enables acquisition of spatially resolved velocity-time profiles with very high velocity sensitivity has been designed and applied to two diverse, instructive experimental problems: (1) measurement of low-amplitude reverberations in laser-driven flyer plates and (2) measurement of ramp-wave profiles in symmetric impact studies of fused silica. The delay leg in this version of a line-imaging optically recording velocity interferometer system (ORVIS) consists of a long air path that includes relay optics to transmit the optical signal through the interferometer cavity. Target image quality from the delay path at the image recombination plane is preserved by means of a compact and flexible optical design utilizing two parabolic reflectors (serving as the relay optics) in a folded path. With an instrument tuned to a velocity per fringe constant of 22.4 m s-1 fringe-1, differences of 1-2 m s-1 across the probe line segment can be readily distinguished. Measurements that capture small spatial variations in flyer velocity are presented and briefly discussed. In the fused silica impact experiments, the ramp-wave profile observed by this air-delay instrument compares favorably to the profile recorded simultaneously by a conventional line-imaging ORVIS.

  7. Novel Optical Technique Developed and Tested for Measuring Two-Point Velocity Correlations in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Goldburg, Walter I.

    2002-01-01

    A novel technique for characterizing turbulent flows was developed and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The work is being done in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, through a grant from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. The technique we are using, Homodyne Correlation Spectroscopy (HCS), is a laser-light-scattering technique that measures the Doppler frequency shift of light scattered from microscopic particles in the fluid flow. Whereas Laser Doppler Velocimetry gives a local (single-point) measurement of the fluid velocity, the HCS technique measures correlations between fluid velocities at two separate points in the flow at the same instant of time. Velocity correlations in the flow field are of fundamental interest to turbulence researchers and are of practical importance in many engineering applications, such as aeronautics.

  8. A real-time device for converting Doppler ultrasound audio signals into fluid flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Herr, Michael D; Hogeman, Cynthia S; Koch, Dennis W; Krishnan, Anandi; Momen, Afsana; Leuenberger, Urs A

    2010-05-01

    A Doppler signal converter has been developed to facilitate cardiovascular and exercise physiology research. This device directly converts audio signals from a clinical Doppler ultrasound imaging system into a real-time analog signal that accurately represents blood flow velocity and is easily recorded by any standard data acquisition system. This real-time flow velocity signal, when simultaneously recorded with other physiological signals of interest, permits the observation of transient flow response to experimental interventions in a manner not possible when using standard Doppler imaging devices. This converted flow velocity signal also permits a more robust and less subjective analysis of data in a fraction of the time required by previous analytic methods. This signal converter provides this capability inexpensively and requires no modification of either the imaging or data acquisition system.

  9. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  10. Velocity profiles and plug zones in a free surface viscoplastic flow : experimental study and comparison to shallow flow models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freydier, Perrine; Chambon, Guillaume; Naaim, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Rheological studies concerning natural muddy debris flows have shown that these materials can be modelled as non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluids. These complex flows are generally represented using models based on a depth-integrated approach (Shallow Water) that take into account closure terms depending on the shape of the velocity profile. But to date, there is poor knowledge about the shape of velocity profiles and the position of the interface between sheared and unsheared regions (plug) in these flows, especially in the vicinity of the front. In this research, the internal dynamics of a free-surface viscoplastic flow down an inclined channel is investigated and compared to the predictions of a Shallow Water model based on the lubrication approximation. Experiments are conducted in an inclined channel whose bottom is constituted by an upward-moving conveyor belt with controlled velocity, which allows generating and observing gravity-driven stationary surges in the laboratory frame. Carbopol microgel has been used as a homogeneous and transparent viscoplastic fluid. High-resolution measurements of velocity field is performed through optical velocimetry techniques both in the uniform zone and within the front zone where flow thickness is variable and where recirculation takes place. Specific analyses have been developed to determine the position of the plug within the surge. Flow height is accessible through image processing and ultrasonic sensors. Sufficiently far from the front, experimental results are shown to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions regarding the velocity profiles and the flow height evolution. In the vicinity of the front, however, analysis of measured velocity profiles shows an evolution of the plug different from that predicted by lubrication approximation. Accordingly, the free surface shape also deviates from the predictions of the classical Shallow Water model. These results highlight the necessity to take into account higher

  11. Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of butanol isomers-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xiaolei; Huang, Zuohua; Wu, Si; Li, Qianqian

    2010-12-15

    Laminar burning velocities and flame instabilities of the butanol-air premixed flames and its isomers are investigated using the spherically expanding flame with central ignition at initial temperature of 428 K and initial pressures of 0.10 MPa, 0.25 MPa, 0.50 MPa and 0.75 MPa. Laminar burning velocities and sensitivity factor of n-butanol-air mixtures are computed using a newly developed kinetic mechanism. Unstretched laminar burning velocity, adiabatic temperature, Lewis number, Markstein length, critical flame radius and Peclet number are obtained over a wide range of equivalence ratios. Effect of molecular structure on laminar burning velocity of the isomers of butanol is analyzed from the aspect of C-H bond dissociation energy. Study indicates that although adiabatic flame temperatures of the isomers of butanol are the same, laminar burning velocities give an obvious difference among the isomers of butanol. This indicates that molecular structure has a large influence on laminar burning velocities of the isomers of butanol. Branching (-CH3) will decrease laminar burning velocity. Hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atoms gives higher laminar burning velocity compared to that attaching to the inner carbon atoms. Calculated dissociation bond energies show that terminal C-H bonds have larger bond energies than that of inner C-H bonds. n-Butanol, no branching and with hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the terminal carbon atom, gives the largest laminar burning velocity. tert-Butanol, with highly branching and hydroxyl functional group (-OH) attaching to the inner carbon atom, gives the lowest laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocities of iso-butanol and sec-butanol are between those of n-butanol and tert-butanol. The instant of transition to cellularity is experimentally determined for the isomers of butanol and subsequently interpreted on the basis of hydrodynamic and diffusion-thermal instabilities. Little effect

  12. Live performance of male broilers subjected to constant or increasing air velocities at moderate temperatures with a high dew point.

    PubMed

    Dozier, W A; Lott, B D; Branton, S L

    2005-08-01

    This study examined the effects of varying air velocities vs. a constant air velocity with a cyclic temperature curve of 25-30-25 degrees C and a dew point of 23 degrees C on broilers from 28 to 49 d of age. Four replicate trials were conducted. In each trial, 742 male broilers were randomly allocated to 6 floor pens or 2 air velocity tunnels, with each tunnel consisting of 4 pens. Bird density, feeder, and waterer space were similar across all pens (53 birds/ pen; 0.07 m2/bird). The treatments were control (still air), constant air velocity of 120 m/min, and increasing air velocity (90 m/min from 28 to 35 d, 120 m/min from 36 to 42 d, and 180 m/min from 43 to 49 d). Birds grown in a still air environment gained less weight, consumed less feed, and converted feed less efficiently between 28 and 49 d than birds subjected to moving air (constant or increasing). Growth responses between the air velocity treatments were similar from 28 to 35 and 36 to 42 d of age. Increasing air velocity to 180 m/min improved (P < or = 0.02) the growth rate of broilers from 43 to 49 d of age over birds receiving an air velocity of 120 m/min, but the incidence of mortality was not affected. These results provide evidence that increasing air velocity from 120 to 180 m/min is beneficial to broilers weighing 2.5 kg or greater when exposed to moderate temperatures.

  13. Optimization and investigation of the effect of velocity distribution of air curtains on the performance of food refrigerated display cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, XueHong; Chang, ZhiJuan; Ma, QiuYang; Lu, YanLi; Yin, XueMei

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on improving the performance of the vertical open refrigerated display cabinets (VORDC) by optimizing the structure of deflector, which is affected by inlet velocity and velocity distribution of air curtains. The results show that the temperature of products located at the front and at the rear reduces as the increases of inlet velocity of air curtains. The increase of the inlet velocity of air curtains can strengthen the disturbance inside the VORDC, and also decrease the temperature of products inside the VORDC; the increase of the outer velocity of air curtain will exacerbate the disturbance outside the VORDC and decrease air curtain's performance. The present study can provide a theoretical foundation for the design of VORDC.

  14. The influence of bus stop on traffic flow with velocity-difference-separation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Pengjun; Wang, Wei; Ge, Hongxia

    2016-06-01

    Based on velocity-difference-separation model, the mixed traffic flow on two-lane road is investigated. For a fixed road length, the influence of bus and bus stops on traffic flow is studied with the increasing traffic density. Compared with the result without bus stops given by Li et al., a new traffic state is found, which is valuable for studying the impacts of public transport on urban traffic flow.

  15. Control-volume based Navier-Stokes equation solver valid at all flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.

    1989-01-01

    A control-volume based finite difference method to solve the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations is presented. A pressure correction equation valid at all flow velocities and a pressure staggered grid layout are used in the method. Example problems presented herein include: a developing laminar channel flow, developing laminar pipe flow, a lid-driven square cavity flow, a laminar flow through a 90-degree bent channel, a laminar polar cavity flow, and a turbulent supersonic flow over a compression ramp. A k-epsilon turbulence model supplemented with a near-wall turbulence model was used to solve the turbulent flow. It is shown that the method yields accurate computational results even when highly skewed, unequally spaced, curved grids are used. It is also shown that the method is strongly convergent for high Reynolds number flows.

  16. Independent control of drop size and velocity in microfluidic flow-focusing generators using variable temperature and flow rate.

    PubMed

    Stan, Claudiu A; Tang, Sindy K Y; Whitesides, George M

    2009-03-15

    This paper describes a method to control the volume and the velocity of drops generated in a flow-focusing device dynamically and independently. This method involves simultaneous tuning of the temperature of the nozzle of the device and of the flow rate of the continuous phase; the method requires a continuous phase liquid that has a viscosity that varies steeply with temperature. Increasing the temperature of the flow-focusing nozzle from 0 to 80 degrees C increased the volume of the drops by almost 2 orders of magnitude. Tuning both the temperature and the flow rate controlled the drop volume and the drop velocity independently; this feature is not possible in a basic flow-focusing device. This paper also demonstrates a procedure for identifying the range of possible drop volumes and drop velocities for a given flow-focusing device and shows how to generate drops with a specified volume and velocity within this range. This method is easy to implement in on-chip applications where thermal management is already incorporated in the system, such as DNA amplification using the polymerase chain reaction and nanoparticle synthesis.

  17. Relationship between velocity profile and ultrasound echogenicity in pulsatile blood flows.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile blood flows are easily found in the vessels of living organisms. Under pulsatile flow conditions, red blood cells (RBCs) are aggregated and dispersed repetitively. The phenomenon of RBC aggregation is an influential factor in hemorheological and hemodynamic properties. This study aims to investigate the relationship between velocity profile and RBC aggregation in pulsatile blood flows. A rat extracorporeal bypass model was adopted to generate a real pulsatile flow without changing the rheological properties. To check the stability of the experimental model, variations of the hemodynamic parameters were measured consecutively for 2 h. Ultrasound speckle images of the blood flow in the extracorporeal bypass loop were acquired using a 35-MHz ultrasound scanner. The velocity fields were measured by the speckle image velocimetry (SIV) method, in which the cross-correlation algorithm is applied to the speckle images. In addition, the RBC aggregation was estimated by analyzing the echogenicity distribution of the speckle images. The shape of the velocity profile was cyclically varied according to the cardiac cycle. This variation may be closely related to the variation of the echogenicity distribution in pulsatile flows. The simultaneous measurement of velocity and RBC aggregation would be useful for understanding the effects of the hemorheological features on the hemodynamic characteristics of pulsatile blood flows.

  18. Statistics of particle pair relative velocity in the homogeneous shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, P.; Picano, F.; Sardina, G.; Casciola, C. M.

    2012-02-01

    Small scale clustering of inertial particles and relative velocity of particle pairs have been fully characterized for statistically steady homogeneous isotropic flows. Depending on the particle Stokes relaxation time, the spatial distribution of the disperse phase results in a multi-scale manifold characterized by local particle concentration and voids and, because of finite inertia, the two nearby particles have high probability to exhibit large relative velocities. Both effects might explain the speed-up of particle collision rate in turbulent flows. Recently it has been shown that the large scale geometry of the flow plays a crucial role in organizing small scale particle clusters. For instance, a mean shear preferentially orients particle patterns. In this case, depending on the Stokes time, anisotropic clustering may occur even in the inertial range of scales where the turbulent fluctuations which drive the particles have already recovered isotropy. Here we consider the statistics of particle pair relative velocity in the homogeneous shear flow, the prototypical flow which manifests anisotropic clustering at small scales. We show that the mean shear, by imprinting anisotropy on the large scale velocity fluctuations, dramatically affects the particle relative velocity distribution even in the range of small scales where the anisotropic mechanisms of turbulent kinetic energy production are sub-dominant with respect to the inertial energy transfer which drives the carrier fluid velocity towards isotropy. We find that the particles’ populations which manifest strong anisotropy in their relative velocities are the same which exhibit small scale clustering. In contrast to any Kolmogorov-like picture of turbulent transport these phenomena may persist even below the smallest dissipative scales where the residual level of anisotropy may eventually blow-up. The observed anisotropy of particle relative velocity and spatial configuration is suggested to influence the

  19. Mass transfer from a sphere in an oscillating flow with zero mean velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drummond, Colin K.; Lyman, Frederic A.

    1990-01-01

    A pseudospectral numerical method is used for the solution of the Navier-Stokes and mass transport equations for a sphere in a sinusoidally oscillating flow with zero mean velocity. The flow is assumed laminar and axisymmetric about the sphere's polar axis. Oscillating flow results were obtained for Reynolds numbers (based on the free-stream oscillatory flow amplitude) between 1 and 150, and Strouhal numbers between 1 and 1000. Sherwood numbers were computed and their dependency on the flow frequency and amplitude discussed. An assessment of the validity of the quasi-steady assumption for mass transfer is based on these results.

  20. Dynamics of autoignitive DME/air coflow flames in oscillating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Sili; Zhao, Peng; Mueller, Michael; Law, Chung

    2016-11-01

    The structure and dynamics of laminar nonpremixed dimethyl ether (DME)/air coflow flames were investigated at elevated temperatures and pressures, conditions at which autoignition times become competitive with flame times. Computations with detailed chemistry were performed for DME and heated coflow air at 30 atm with uniform but sinusoidally oscillating inlet velocities. These unsteady cases were compared with steady flames to elucidate the effect of oscillation frequency on the flame dynamics. In the oscillating reacting flow, periodic but hysteretic transition occurs between a multibrachial autoignition front that locates downstream at high inlet velocity and a tribrachial flame that locates upstream at low inlet velocity. The finite induction time for autoignition results in this hysteretic behavior, which diminishes at lower oscillation frequency as there is more time for chemistry to respond to the hydrodynamic changes and consequently approach steady state.

  1. Assessment of left ventricular function by indices derived from aortic flow velocity.

    PubMed Central

    Kolettis, M; Jenkins, B S; Webb-Peploe, M M

    1976-01-01

    The velocity and acceleration of aortic blood flow were measured by means of a catheter velocity probe in 40 patients during routine diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Ten different variables were derived from the aortic velocity measurements, and their ability to discriminate between good and bad left ventricular (LV) function was tested. By means of eight conventional indices of LV function derived from pressure, mean flow, and quantitative cineangiography, the patients were divided into 3 groups: group 1, good LV function; group 2, moderate LV function; group 3, poor LV function. Aortic peak velocity and maximal acceleration correlated well with stroke volume and were thus indices of LV pump function. Aortic peak velocity also showed a significant correlation with LV stroke work. Both aortic peak velocity and maximal acceleration failed to discriminate between the three groups of patients, and correlated poorly with conventional indices of LV function. The mean values of stroke volume differed significantly between groups 1 and 2, and between groups 1 and 3, and also correlated better with the conventional functional indices. The best discrimination between normal and abnormal LV function was provided by dividing stroke volume by maximal acceleration, but stroke volume divided by peak velocity discriminated better than stroke volume alone. Stroke volume divided by maximal acceleration also gave more significant individual correlations with the conventional functional indices than did any other variable derived from aortic velocity. PMID:1252292

  2. Ultrasonic velocity profiling rheometry based on a widened circular Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiratori, Takahisa; Tasaka, Yuji; Oishi, Yoshihiko; Murai, Yuichi

    2015-08-01

    We propose a new rheometry for characterizing the rheological properties of fluids. The technique produces flow curves, which represent the relationship between the fluid shear rate and shear stress. Flow curves are obtained by measuring the circumferential velocity distribution of tested fluids in a circular Couette system, using an ultrasonic velocity profiling technique. By adopting a widened gap of concentric cylinders, a designed range of the shear rate is obtained so that velocity profile measurement along a single line directly acquires flow curves. To reduce the effect of ultrasonic noise on resultant flow curves, several fitting functions and variable transforms are examined to best approximate the velocity profile without introducing a priori rheological models. Silicone oil, polyacrylamide solution, and yogurt were used to evaluate the applicability of this technique. These substances are purposely targeted as examples of Newtonian fluids, shear thinning fluids, and opaque fluids with unknown rheological properties, respectively. We find that fourth-order Chebyshev polynomials provide the most accurate representation of flow curves in the context of model-free rheometry enabled by ultrasonic velocity profiling.

  3. Microgravity flame spread over thick solids in low velocity opposed flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuangfeng; Zhu, Feng

    2016-07-01

    Motivated primarily by fire safety of spacecraft, a renewed interest in microgravity flame spread over solid materials has arisen. With few exceptions, however, research on microgravity flame spread has been focused on thermally thin fuels due to the constraint on available test time. In this study, two sets of experiments are conducted to examine the flame spread and extinction behavior over thick PMMA in simulated and actual microgravity environments. The low-gravity flame spread environment is produced by a narrow channel apparatus in normal gravity. Extinction limits using flow velocity and oxygen concentration as coordinates are presented, and flame spread rates are determined as a function of the velocity and oxygen concentration of the gas flow. The microgravity experiments are also performed with varying low-velocity flow and varying ambient oxygen concentration. The important observations include flame behavior and appearance as a function of oxygen concentration and flow velocity, temperature variation in gas and solid phases, and flame spread rate. A comparison between simulated and actual microgravity data is made, and general agreement is found. Based on the experimental observations, mechanisms for flame spread and extinction in low velocity opposed flows are discussed.

  4. The Godunov Method for Calculating Multidimensional Flows of a One-Velocity Multicomponent Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surov, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    Computational formulas of the Godunov method are given for the equations of a generalized-equilibrium model of a heterogeneous medium on a curvilinear grid; with the use of this method, the problems of interaction of air shock waves with bubbles of various gases are investigated. Flow of a gas-liquid mixture in a nozzle mouthpiece is considered. The Prandtl-Meyer flow of a water-air mixture is calculated and compared with a self-similar solution.

  5. Velocity surveys in a turbine stator annular-cascade facility using laser Doppler techniques. [flow measurement and flow characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Seasholtz, R. G.; Mclallin, K. L.

    1976-01-01

    A laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) was used to determine the flow conditions downstream of an annular cascade of stator blades operating at an exit critical velocity ratio of 0.87. Two modes of LDV operation (continuous scan and discrete point) were investigated. Conventional pressure probe measurements were also made for comparison with the LDV results. Biasing errors that occur in the LDV measurement of velocity components were also studied. In addition, the effect of pressure probe blockage on the flow conditions was determined with the LDV. Photographs and descriptions of the test equipment used are given.

  6. Quantification of velocity reduction after flow diverter placement in intracranial aneurysm: An ex vivo study with 3D printed replicas.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeff R; Klucznik, Richard; Diaz, Orlando; Zhang, Y Jonathan; Britz, Gavin W; Grossman, Robert G; Karmonik, Christof

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast MRI (pcMRI) was used to measure flow before and after placement of a flow diverter (n = 3). Decreases from 18% to 31% in flow velocity were seen in the inflow jet of the aneurysms. Flow patterns were also compared. It was observed that the gross aneurysmal flow patterns were maintained after flow diverter placement despite decreased fluid velocities. All measurements were carried out in 3D printed aneurysm replicas.

  7. Techniques for measurement of velocity in liquid-metal MHD flows

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Picologlou, B.F.; Dauzvardis, P.V.; Bailey, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Three instruments for measuring local velocities in liquid-metal MHD experiments for fusion blanket applications are being evaluated. The devices are used in room-temperature NaK experiments to measure three-dimensional flow field patterns anticipated in complex blanket geometries. Hot film anemometry, a standard technique in ordinary fluids, is being used, as well as two developmental devices. One is called the Liquid Metal Electromagnetic Velocity Instrument (LEVI), and performs essentially as a local dc electromagnetic flow meter. The third device, a Thermal Transient Anemometer (TTA) is a rugged, yet relatively simple device, which measures local velocity through the mechanism of convective heat transfer, in some ways similar to hot-film anemometry. Results are presented showing the kinds of data collected this far with each instrument. Measurements include both local velocity measurements and some preliminary frequency analyses of the fluctuating signals from both a hot-film sensor and the LEVI device.

  8. Techniques for measurement of velocity in liquid-metal MHD flows

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Picologlou, B.F.; Dauzvardis, P.V.; Bailey, J.L.

    1986-11-01

    Three instruments for measuring local velocities in liquid-metal MHD experiments for fusion blanket applications are being evaluated. The devices are used in room-temperature NaK experiments to measure three-dimensional flow field patterns anticipated in complex blanket geometries. Hot film anemometry, a standard technique in ordinary fluids, is being used, as well as two developmental devices. One is called the Liquid Metal Electromagnetic Velocity Instrument (LEVI), and performs essentially as a local DC electromagnetic flow meter. The third device, a Thermal Transient Anemometer (TTA) is a rugged, yet relatively simple device, which measures local velocity through the mechanism of convective heat transfer, in some ways similar to hot-film anemometry. Results are presented showing the kinds of data collected thus far with each instrument. Measurements include both local velocity measurements and some preliminary frequency analyses of the fluctuating signals from both a hot-film sensor and the LEVI device.

  9. A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Forman; Williams, Forman A; Grcar, Joseph F

    2008-06-30

    Very lean hydrogen-air mixtures experience strong diffusive-thermal types of cellular instabilities that tend to increase the laminar burning velocity above the value that applies to steady, planar laminar flames that are homogeneous in transverse directions. Flame balls constitute an extreme limit of evolution of cellular flames. To account qualitatively for the ultimate effect of diffusive-thermal instability, a model is proposed in which the flame is a steadily propagating, planar, hexagonal, close-packed array of flame balls, each burning as if it were an isolated, stationary, ideal flame ball in an infinite, quiescent atmosphere. An expression for the laminar burning velocity is derived from this model, which theoretically may provide an upper limit for the experimental burning velocity.

  10. Measurements of Flat-Flame Velocities of Diethyl Ether in Air

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Fiona; Metcalfe, Wayne K.; Dirrenberger, Patricia; Herbinet, Olivier; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Curran, Henry J.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents new adiabatic laminar burning velocities of diethyl ether in air, measured on a flat-flame burner using the heat flux method. The experimental pressure was 1 atm and temperatures of the fresh gas mixture ranged from 298 to 398 K. Flame velocities were recorded at equivalence ratios from 0.55 to 1.60, for which stabilization of the flame was possible. The maximum laminar burning velocity was found at an equivalence ratio of 1.10 or 1.15 at different temperatures. These results are compared with experimental and computational data reported in the literature. The data reported in this study deviate significantly from previous experimental results and are well-predicted by a previously reported chemical kinetic mechanism. PMID:23710107

  11. Investigation of Ultrasound-Measured Flow Velocity, Flow Rate and Wall Shear Rate in Radial and Ulnar Arteries Using Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Xia, Chunming; Stephen, Gandy; Khan, Faisel; Corner, George A; Hoskins, Peter R; Huang, Zhihong

    2017-02-21

    Parameters of blood flow measured by ultrasound in radial and ulnar arteries, such as flow velocity, flow rate and wall shear rate, are widely used in clinical practice and clinical research. Investigation of these measurements is useful for evaluating accuracy and providing knowledge of error sources. A method for simulating the spectral Doppler ultrasound measurement process was developed with computational fluid dynamics providing flow-field data. Specific scanning factors were adjusted to investigate their influence on estimation of the maximum velocity waveform, and flow rate and wall shear rate were derived using the Womersley equation. The overestimation in maximum velocity increases greatly (peak systolic from about 10% to 30%, time-averaged from about 30% to 50%) when the beam-vessel angle is changed from 30° to 70°. The Womersley equation was able to estimate flow rate in both arteries with less than 3% error, but performed better in the radial artery (2.3% overestimation) than the ulnar artery (15.4% underestimation) in estimating wall shear rate. It is concluded that measurements of flow parameters in the radial and ulnar arteries with clinical ultrasound scanners are prone to clinically significant errors.

  12. Velocity-pressure integrated versus penalty finite element methods for high Reynolds number flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook

    1988-01-01

    Velocity-pressure integrated and consistent penalty finite element computations of high Reynolds number, laminar flows are presented. In both of the methods, the pressure has been interpolated using linear shape functions for a triangular element. The triangular element is contained inside the bi-quadratic isoparametric element. It has been reported previously that the pressure interpolation method, when used in the velocity-pressure integrated method, yielded accurate computational results for high Reynolds number flows. It is shown that use of the same pressure interpolation method in the consistent penalty finite element method yielded accurate velocity and pressure fields which were comparable to those obtained using the velocity-pressure integrated method. Accuracy of the two finite element methods has been demonstrated by comparing the computational results with available experimental data and/or fine-grid finite difference computational results. Advantages and disadvantages of the two methods are discussed on the basis of accuracy and convergence nature. Example problems considered include a lid-driven cavity flow for Reynolds number of 10,000, a laminar backward-facing step flow, a laminar flow through a nest of cylinders, and a channel flow with an internal blockage. A finite element computer program (NSFLOW/P) for the 2-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is also presented.

  13. Inflow velocities of cold flows streaming into massive galaxies at high redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Ceverino, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    We study the velocities of the accretion along streams from the cosmic web into massive galaxies at high redshift with the help of three different suites of AMR hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. The results are compared to free-fall velocities and to the sound speeds of the hot ambient medium. The sound speed of the hot ambient medium is calculated using two different methods to determine the medium's temperature. We find that the simulated cold stream velocities are in violent disagreement with the corresponding free-fall profiles. The sound speed is a better albeit not always correct description of the cold flows' velocity. Using these calculations as a first order approximation for the gas inflow velocities vinflow = 0.9 vvir is given. We conclude from the hydrodynamical simulations as our main result that the velocity profiles for the cold streams are constant with radius. These constant inflow velocities seem to have a `parabola-like' dependency on the host halo mass in units of the virial velocity that peaks at Mvir = 1012 M⊙ and we also propose that the best-fitting functional form for the dependency of the inflow velocity on the redshift is a square root power-law relation: v_inflow ∝ √{z + 1} v_vir.

  14. Vortex Formation in a High Speed Dust Flow with Large Velocity Shear in RF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, Satoru; Gohda, Takuma

    2008-09-07

    We have investigated a rotation of a dust cloud disc with strong velocity shear in a radio frequency (RF) plasma. The flow pattern of the dusts was evaluated by the Navier Stokes Equation with shear viscosity due to the Coulomb interactions. We have clarified dynamic behaviors of the dusts and observed generation of micro-vortices around rotational center, when the velocity shear is enhanced.

  15. Laser filamentation induced air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-04-22

    We numerically simulated the air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber induced by femtosecond laser filaments for different chopping rates. A two dimensional model was employed, where the laser filaments were treated as a heat flux source. The simulated patterns of flow fields and maximum velocity of updraft compare well with the experimental results for the chopping rates of 1, 5, 15 and 150 Hz. A quantitative inconsistency appears between simulated and experimental maximum velocity of updraft for 1 kHz repetition rate although a similar pattern of flow field is obtained, and the possible reasons were analyzed. Based on the present simulated results, the experimental observation of more water condensation/snow at higher chopping rate can be explained. These results indicate that the specific way of laser filament heating plays a significant role in the laser-induced motion of air flow, and at the same time, our previous conclusion of air flow having an important effect on water condensation/snow is confirmed.

  16. In-vivo visualization of melanoma tumor microvessels and blood flow velocity changes accompanying tumor growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroki; Hachiga, Tadashi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Akiguchi, Shunsuke

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate that using micro multipoint laser Doppler velocimetry (μ-MLDV) for noninvasive in-vivo imaging of blood vessels is useful for diagnosing malignant melanomas by comparison with visual diagnosis by dermoscopy. The blood flow velocity in microvessels varied during growth of melanomas transplanted in mouse ears. Mouse ears were observed by μ-MLDV up to 16 days after transplantation. The blood flow velocity in the tumor increased with increasing time and reached maximum of 4.5 mm/s at 9 days, which is more than twice that prior to transplantation. After 12 days, when the lesion had grown to an area of 6.6 mm2, we observed the formation of new blood vessels in the tumor. Finally, when the lesion had an area of 18 mm2 after 16 days, the flow velocity in the tumor decreased to approximately 3.2 mm/s.

  17. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  18. Experimental and numerical investigations on reliability of air barrier on oil containment in flowing water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinshu; Xu, Zhenfeng; Xu, Song; Xie, Sensen; Wu, Haoxiao; Yang, Zhenbo; Liu, Xueqiang

    2015-06-15

    Air barriers have been recently developed and employed as a new type of oil containment boom. This paper presents systematic investigations on the reliability of air barriers on oil containments with the involvement of flowing water, which represents the commonly-seen shearing current in reality, by using both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. Both the numerical and experimental investigations are carried out in a model scale. In the investigations, a submerged pipe with apertures is installed near the bottom of a tank to generate the air bubbles forming the air curtain; and, the shearing water flow is introduced by a narrow inlet near the mean free surface. The effects of the aperture configurations (including the size and the spacing of the aperture) and the location of the pipe on the effectiveness of the air barrier on preventing oil spreading are discussed in details with consideration of different air discharges and velocities of the flowing water. The research outcome provides a foundation for evaluating and/or improve the reliability of a air barrier on preventing spilled oil from further spreading.

  19. Ground water flow velocity in the bank of the Columbia River, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, S.

    1995-12-01

    To properly characterize the transport of contaminants from the sediments beneath the Hanford Site into the Columbia River, a suite of In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors was deployed to accurately characterize the hydrologic regime in the banks of the river. The three dimensional flow velocity was recorded on an hourly basis from mid May to mid July, 1994 and for one week in September. The first data collection interval coincided with the seasonal high water level in the river while the second interval reflected conditions during relatively low seasonal river stage. Two flow sensors located approximately 50 feet from the river recorded flow directions which correlated very well with river stage, both on seasonal and diurnal time scales. During time intervals characterized by falling river stage, the flow sensors recorded flow toward the river while flow away from the river was recorded during times of rising river stage. The flow sensor near the river in the Hanford Formation recorded a component of flow oriented vertically downward, probably reflecting the details of the hydrostratigraphy in close proximity to the probe. The flow sensor near the river in the Ringold Formation recorded an upward component of flow which dominated the horizontal components most of the time. The upward flow in the Ringold probably reflects regional groundwater flow into the river. The magnitudes of the flow velocities recorded by the flow sensors were lower than expected, probably as a result of drilling induced disturbance of the hydraulic properties of the sediments around the probes. The probes were installed with resonant sonic drilling which may have compacted the sediments immediately surrounding the probes, thereby reducing the hydraulic conductivity adjacent to the probes and diverting the groundwater flow away from the sensors.

  20. Analysis of Air Flow in the Ventilated Insulating Air Layer of the External Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katunská, Jana; Bullová, Iveta; Špaková, Miroslava

    2016-12-01

    The paper deals with problems of impact of air flow in ventilated insulating air layer of the external wall on behaviour of thermal-technical parameters of the proposed external structure (according principles of STN 73 0549, which is not valid now), by comparing them in the calculation according to the valid STN standards, where air flow in the ventilated air layer is not taken into account, as well as by comparing them with behavior of thermal-technical parameters in the proposal of sandwich external wall with the contact heat insulation system without air cavity.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Transient Development of Flame, Temperature and Velocity under Reduced Gravity in a Methane Air Diffusion Flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowal, Arup Jyoti; Mandal, Bijan Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A methane air co flow diffusion flame has been numerically simulated with the help of an in-house developed code at normal gravity, 0.5 G, and 0.0001 G (microgravity) for the study of transient behavior of the flame in terms of flame shape, temperature profile and velocity (streamlines). The study indicates that lower is the gravity level, the higher is the time of early transience. The flame developments during transience are marked by the formation of a secondary flamelet at different heights above the primary flame at all gravity levels. The development of temperature profile at microgravity takes a much longer time to stabilize than the flame development. At normal gravity and 0.5 G gravity level, streamlines, during transience, show intermediate vortices which are finally replaced by recirculation of ambient air from the exit plane. At microgravity, neither any vortex nor any recirculation at any stage is observed. Centerline temperature plots, at all gravity levels during transience, demonstrate a secondary peak at some instants as a consequence of the secondary flamelet formation. The centerline velocity at microgravity decreases gradually during transience, unlike at other two gravity levels where the fall is very sharp and is indicative of negligible buoyancy at microgravity.

  2. Measurements of laminar burning velocities for natural gas-hydrogen-air mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zuohua; Zhang, Yong; Zeng, Ke; Liu, Bing; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Deming

    2006-07-15

    Laminar flame characteristics of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames were studied in a constant-volume bomb at normal temperature and pressure. Laminar burning velocities and Markstein lengths were obtained at various ratios of hydrogen to natural gas (volume fraction from 0 to 100%) and equivalence ratios (f from 0.6 to 1.4). The influence of stretch rate on flame was also analyzed. The results show that, for lean mixture combustion, the flame radius increases with time but the increasing rate decreases with flame expansion for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, while at high hydrogen fractions, there exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time. For rich mixture combustion, the flame radius shows a slowly increasing rate at early stages of flame propagation and a quickly increasing rate at late stages of flame propagation for natural gas and for mixtures with low hydrogen fractions, and there also exists a linear correlation between flame radius and time for mixtures with high hydrogen fractions. Combustion at stoichiometric mixture demonstrates the linear relationship between flame radius and time for natural gas-air, hydrogen-air, and natural gas-hydrogen-air flames. Laminar burning velocities increase exponentially with the increase of hydrogen fraction in mixtures, while the Markstein length decreases and flame instability increases with the increase of hydrogen fractions in mixture. For a fixed hydrogen fraction, the Markstein number shows an increase and flame stability increases with the increase of equivalence ratios. Based on the experimental data, a formula for calculating the laminar burning velocities of natural gas-hydrogen-air flames is proposed. (author)

  3. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels. PMID:27377852

  4. In vivo label-free measurement of lymph flow velocity and volumetric flow rates using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Cedric; Meijer, Eelco F. J.; Nam, Ahhyun S.; Jones, Dennis; Bouma, Brett E.; Padera, Timothy P.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-07-01

    Direct in vivo imaging of lymph flow is key to understanding lymphatic system function in normal and disease states. Optical microscopy techniques provide the resolution required for these measurements, but existing optical techniques for measuring lymph flow require complex protocols and provide limited temporal resolution. Here, we describe a Doppler optical coherence tomography platform that allows direct, label-free quantification of lymph velocity and volumetric flow rates. We overcome the challenge of very low scattering by employing a Doppler algorithm that operates on low signal-to-noise measurements. We show that this technique can measure lymph velocity at sufficiently high temporal resolution to resolve the dynamic pulsatile flow in collecting lymphatic vessels.

  5. Field-tracing approach to determine flow velocity and hydraulic conductivity in saturated peat soils

    SciTech Connect

    Gafni, A.

    1986-01-01

    A tracing methodology based on the point dilution concept was developed to quantify groundwater velocities in saturated peat soils. Groundwater velocity was measured in four different peatlands. The steepest hydraulic gradient and the dominant direction of groundwater flow were determined for each peatland. The hydraulic conductivity (K) of selected peat layers was estimated from measured groundwater velocity and hydraulic gradient using Darcy's equation. The effective porosity of three peat layers was determined using the pressure plate technique. The estimated hydraulic parameters of one of the bags were further evaluated by analyzing a rainfall-runoff event that exhibited groundwater discharge.

  6. Apparatus for establishing flow of a fluid mass having a known velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, P.; Veikins, O.; Bate, E. R., Jr.; Jones, R. H. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An apparatus for establishing a flow of fluid mass, such as gas, having a known velocity is introduced. The apparatus is characterized by an hermetically sealed chamber conforming to a closed-loop configuration and including a throat and a plurality of axially displaceable pistons for sweeping through the throat a stream of gas including a core and an unsheared boundary layer. Within the throat there is a cylindrical coring body concentrically related to the throat for receiving the core, and a chamber surrounding the cylindrical body for drawing off the boundary layer, whereby the velocity of the core is liberated from the effects of the velocity of the boundary layer.

  7. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  8. Aspect angle dependence of the E region irregularity velocity at large flow angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, R. A.; Koustov, A. V.; Senior, A.; Uspensky, M.; Honary, F.; Dyson, P. L.

    2007-11-01

    We present the Doppler velocity observations of 1-m plasma waves in the auroral E region by the Scandinavian Twin Auroral Radar Experiment (STARE) Norway VHF coherent radar in the context of simultaneous and coincident measurements of electron and ion drift velocities determined by the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) tristatic radar facility. The measurements were performed in the afternoon sector (1500-2000 MLT) at seven locations along the STARE radar beam 2 with different values of the magnetic off-perpendicular (aspect) angle α between 0.48° and 2.63° and at large angles with respect to the electron background drift (θ = 55°-90°). It is demonstrated that the STARE line-of-sight velocity, normalized to the EISCAT-derived electron drift speed at large flow angles, exhibits a decrease with increasing aspect angle, and the rate of decrease is investigated as a function of the flow angle. We also compare the STARE velocity with the electron and ion drift velocity components along the STARE radar beam look direction and show that, at large aspect angles, the E region velocity is correlated (anticorrelated) with the ion (electron) drift velocity component. The results are discussed in the contexts of the linear fluid theory of the modified two-stream plasma instability and the theory of anomalous collisions.

  9. Assessment of blood volume flow in slightly curved arteries from a single velocity profile.

    PubMed

    Leguy, C A D; Bosboom, E M H; Hoeks, A P G; van de Vosse, F N

    2009-08-07

    Non-invasive estimation of arterial blood volume flow (BVF) has become a central issue in assessment of cardiovascular risk. Poiseuille and Womersley approaches are commonly used to assess the BVF from centerline velocity, but both methods neglect the influence of curvature. Based on the assumption that the velocity in curved tubes as function of the circumferential position for a given radial position can be approximated by a cosine, the BVF can also be estimated by averaging velocities at opposite radial positions, referred to as the cosine theta model (CTM). This study investigates the accuracy of BVF estimation in slightly curved arteries for BVF waveforms obtained in the brachial artery of 6 volunteers. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were used to compute the influence of curvature on velocity profiles. The BVF was then estimated from the simulation results with the CTM and methods based on Poiseuille, Womersley and using the center stream velocity and the velocity waveform at the position where the maximum velocity is observed, and compared to the prescribed BVF. The simulations show that the influence of curvature is strongest when the flow decelerates. For Poiseuille and Womersley, the time average BVF was underestimated by maximally 10.4% and 7.8% for a radius of curvature of 50 and 100 mm, respectively. The estimation error is lower for the CTM and equals 4.2% and 1.2% for a radius of curvature of 50 and 100mm, respectively. From this study, we can conclude that the velocity waveform at the position of the maximum rather than the center stream velocity waveform combined with the Womersley method should be chosen. The CTM improves current estimation techniques if in-vivo velocity distributions are available.

  10. Field-derived relationships for flow velocity and resistance in high-gradient streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Comiti, F.; Mao, L.; Wilcox, A.; Wohl, E.E.; Lenzi, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    We measured velocity and channel geometry in 10 reaches (bed gradient = 0.08-0.21) of a predominantly step-pool channel, the Rio Cordon, Italy, over a range of discharges (3-80% of the bankfull discharge). The resulting data were used to compute flow resistance. At-a-station hydraulic geometry relations indicate that in most reaches, the exponent describing the rate of velocity increases with discharge was between 0.48 and 0.6, which is within the range of published values for pool-riffle channels. The Rio Cordon data are also combined with published hydraulics data from step-pool streams to explore non-dimensional relationships between velocity and flow resistance and factors including unit discharge, channel gradient, and step geometry. Multiple regression analysis of this combined field dataset indicated that dimensionless unit discharge (q*) is the most important independent variable overall in explaining variations in velocity and flow resistance, followed by channel slope and the ratio of step height to step length. Empirical equations are provided both for dimensionless velocity and flow resistance, but prediction of the former variable appears more reliable. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerebral blood flow velocity declines before arterial pressure in patients with orthostatic vasovagal presyncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dan, Dan; Hoag, Jeffrey B.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.; Wood, Mark A.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Gilligan, David M.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied hemodynamic changes leading to orthostatic vasovagal presyncope to determine whether changes of cerebral artery blood flow velocity precede or follow reductions of arterial pressure. BACKGROUND: Some evidence suggests that disordered cerebral autoregulation contributes to the occurrence of orthostatic vasovagal syncope. We studied cerebral hemodynamics with transcranial Doppler recordings, and we closely examined the temporal sequence of changes of cerebral artery blood flow velocity and systemic arterial pressure in 15 patients who did or did not faint during passive 70 degrees head-up tilt. METHODS: We recorded photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, RR intervals (electrocardiogram) and middle cerebral artery blood flow velocities (mean, total, mean/RR interval; Gosling's pulsatility index; and cerebrovascular resistance [mean cerebral velocity/mean arterial pressure, MAP]). RESULTS: Eight men developed presyncope, and six men and one woman did not. Presyncopal patients reported light-headedness, diaphoresis, or a sensation of fatigue 155 s (range: 25 to 414 s) before any cerebral or systemic hemodynamic change. Average cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) changes (defined by an iterative linear regression algorithm) began 67 s (range: 9 to 198 s) before reductions of MAP. Cerebral and systemic hemodynamic measurements remained constant in nonsyncopal patients. CONCLUSIONS: Presyncopal symptoms and CBFV changes precede arterial pressure reductions in patients with orthostatic vasovagal syncope. Therefore, changes of cerebrovascular regulation may contribute to the occurrence of vasovagal reactions.

  12. Field-derived relationships for flow velocity and resistance in high-gradient streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comiti, Francesco; Mao, Luca; Wilcox, Andrew; Wohl, Ellen E.; Lenzi, Mario A.

    2007-06-01

    SummaryWe measured velocity and channel geometry in 10 reaches (bed gradient = 0.08-0.21) of a predominantly step-pool channel, the Rio Cordon, Italy, over a range of discharges (3-80% of the bankfull discharge). The resulting data were used to compute flow resistance. At-a-station hydraulic geometry relations indicate that in most reaches, the exponent describing the rate of velocity increases with discharge was between 0.48 and 0.6, which is within the range of published values for pool-riffle channels. The Rio Cordon data are also combined with published hydraulics data from step-pool streams to explore non-dimensional relationships between velocity and flow resistance and factors including unit discharge, channel gradient, and step geometry. Multiple regression analysis of this combined field dataset indicated that dimensionless unit discharge ( q∗) is the most important independent variable overall in explaining variations in velocity and flow resistance, followed by channel slope and the ratio of step height to step length. Empirical equations are provided both for dimensionless velocity and flow resistance, but prediction of the former variable appears more reliable.

  13. High-resolution OH LIF velocity measurement technique for high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klavuhn, K. G.; Gauba, G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique was developed for the quantitative study of velocity fields in steady, high-speed, reacting flows. A narrow-linewidth laser source was tuned through an isolated OH absorption line to measure the Doppler-shifted linecenter frequency relative to an iodine reference line. A counterpropagating beam approach was used to eliminate collisional impact shift effects. Pointwise measurements of velocity were made in a unique reacting underexpanded jet facility as an extensive calibration of the technique over a wide range of flow conditions. The extension of the technique to planar measurements is also discussed.

  14. Fiber optic flow velocity sensor based on an in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Libo; Yang, Jun; Liu, Zhihai

    2008-04-01

    A novel fiber optic flow velocity sensor based on a twin-core fiber Michelson interferometer has been proposed and demonstrated. The sensor only is a segment of twin-core fiber acting as cylinder cantilever beam. The force exerted on the cylinder by the flow of a fluid with unknown velocity bends the fiber, which corresponding to the shift of the phase of the twin-core in-fiber integrated Michelson interferometer. This twin-core fiber sensing technique could automatically compensate the variation of environmental temperature and pressure due to both arms of the interferometer would be affected equally by such changes.

  15. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity.

    PubMed

    Bugbee, B; Monje, O; Tanner, B

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  16. Quantifying energy and mass transfer in crop canopies: sensors for measurement of temperature and air velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugbee, B.; Monje, O.; Tanner, B.

    1996-01-01

    Here we report on the in situ performance of inexpensive, miniature sensors that have increased our ability to measure mass and energy fluxes from plant canopies in controlled environments: 1. Surface temperature. Canopy temperature measurements indicate changes in stomatal aperture and thus latent and sensible heat fluxes. Infrared transducers from two manufacturers (Exergen Corporation, Newton, MA; and Everest Interscience, Tucson, AZ, USA) have recently become available. Transducer accuracy matched that of a more expensive hand-held infrared thermometer. 2. Air velocity varies above and within plant canopies and is an important component in mass and energy transfer models. We tested commercially-available needle, heat-transfer anemometers (1 x 50 mm cylinder) that consist of a fine-wire thermocouple and a heater inside a hypodermic needle. The needle is heated and wind speed determined from the temperature rise above ambient. These sensors are particularly useful in measuring the low wind speeds found within plant canopies. 3. Accurate measurements of air temperature adjacent to plant leaves facilitates transport phenomena modeling. We quantified the effect of radiation and air velocity on temperature rise in thermocouples from 10 to 500 micrometers. At high radiation loads and low wind speeds, temperature errors were as large as 7 degrees C above air temperature.

  17. Tuning a physically-based model of the air-sea gas transfer velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, C. D.; Robinson, I. S.; Woolf, D. K.

    Air-sea gas transfer velocities are estimated for one year using a 1-D upper-ocean model (GOTM) and a modified version of the NOAA-COARE transfer velocity parameterization. Tuning parameters are evaluated with the aim of bringing the physically based NOAA-COARE parameterization in line with current estimates, based on simple wind-speed dependent models derived from bomb-radiocarbon inventories and deliberate tracer release experiments. We suggest that A = 1.3 and B = 1.0, for the sub-layer scaling parameter and the bubble mediated exchange, respectively, are consistent with the global average CO 2 transfer velocity k. Using these parameters and a simple 2nd order polynomial approximation, with respect to wind speed, we estimate a global annual average k for CO 2 of 16.4 ± 5.6 cm h -1 when using global mean winds of 6.89 m s -1 from the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1 1954-2000. The tuned model can be used to predict the transfer velocity of any gas, with appropriate treatment of the dependence on molecular properties including the strong solubility dependence of bubble-mediated transfer. For example, an initial estimate of the global average transfer velocity of DMS (a relatively soluble gas) is only 11.9 cm h -1 whilst for less soluble methane the estimate is 18.0 cm h -1.

  18. [Measurement of the blood flow velocity in the pulmonary arteries using the magnetic resonance technique].

    PubMed

    Gamroth, A H; Schad, L R; Wacker, C M; Gehling, U; Knopp, M V; Betsch, B; Clorius, J H; van Kaick, G

    1992-04-01

    MR blood velocity measurements were performed by the RACE technique in a plane perpendicular to the flow of the pulmonary arteries. MR findings were correlated with those of perfusion scintigraphy, Doppler US and right heart catheter (thermodilution). The ratio of MR blood flow measurements of right and left pulmonary arteries correlated well with the results of perfusion scintigraphy (RPA to LPA) and Doppler. Poor correlation was found when comparing MR blood flow measurements with right heart catheter since absolute flow measurements can be superimposed by neighboring blood vessels in complex anatomic situations.

  19. An indirect method of measuring gas- and particulate-phase velocities of shock-induced dusty-gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, James J.

    1992-03-01

    A method of indirectly measuring the temporally varying velocities of both the particulate and gas phases in the nonequilibrium region of a shock wave moving at constant speed in a dusty-gas mixture is described. This method is implemented by using experimental data from shock-induced air flows containing glass beads 40 microns in diameter in a dusty-gas shock-tube facility featuring a large horizontal channel 197 mm high by 76 mm wide with a special dust-injection device. Simultaneous measurements of the shock-front speed with time-of-arrival gauges, particulate concentration by light extinctiometry, and combined particulate concentration and gas density by beta-ray absorption are used in conjunction with two mass conservation laws to provide these indirect two-phase velocity measurements. Direct measurements of the particulate-phase velocity by laser-Doppler velocimetry are also presented for comparison, and the capability of the indirect velocity-measurement method is assessed.

  20. Assessment of blood flow velocity and pulsatility in cerebral perforating arteries with 7-T quantitative flow MRI.

    PubMed

    Bouvy, W H; Geurts, L J; Kuijf, H J; Luijten, P R; Kappelle, L J; Biessels, G J; Zwanenburg, J J M

    2016-09-01

    Thus far, blood flow velocity measurements with MRI have only been feasible in large cerebral blood vessels. High-field-strength MRI may now permit velocity measurements in much smaller arteries. The aim of this proof of principle study was to measure the blood flow velocity and pulsatility of cerebral perforating arteries with 7-T MRI. A two-dimensional (2D), single-slice quantitative flow (Qflow) sequence was used to measure blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycle in perforating arteries in the basal ganglia (BG) and semioval centre (CSO), from which a mean normalised pulsatility index (PI) per region was calculated (n = 6 human subjects, aged 23-29 years). The precision of the measurements was determined by repeated imaging and performance of a Bland-Altman analysis, and confounding effects of partial volume and noise on the measurements were simulated. The median number of arteries included was 14 in CSO and 19 in BG. In CSO, the average velocity per volunteer was in the range 0.5-1.0 cm/s and PI was 0.24-0.39. In BG, the average velocity was in the range 3.9-5.1 cm/s and PI was 0.51-0.62. Between repeated scans, the precision of the average, maximum and minimum velocity per vessel decreased with the size of the arteries, and was relatively low in CSO and BG compared with the M1 segment of the middle cerebral artery. The precision of PI per region was comparable with that of M1. The simulations proved that velocities can be measured in vessels with a diameter of more than 80 µm, but are underestimated as a result of partial volume effects, whilst pulsatility is overestimated. Blood flow velocity and pulsatility in cerebral perforating arteries have been measured directly in vivo for the first time, with moderate to good precision. This may be an interesting metric for the study of haemodynamic changes in aging and cerebral small vessel disease. © 2015 The Authors NMR in Biomedicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Velocity measurement of two-phase liquid-gas flow in a horizontal pipeline using gamma densitometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanus, R.; Zych, M.; Petryka, L.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents application of gamma-ray absorption method to liquid-gas flow investigation in a pipeline. In the described measurement two sealed 241Am radioactive sources and probes with NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals have been used. For the analysis of digital signals provided by detectors, a traditional cross-correlation function (CCF), and modified correlation methods based on the quotient of CCF and average magnitude difference function (AMDF), as well as the quotient of CCF, and average square difference function (ASDF) have been proposed. Exemplary results of the mean velocity determination of the gaseous phase transported by a liquid in the water-air mixture flow were demonstrated and the evaluation of its uncertainty have been presented.

  2. A Continuous-Flow Polymerase Chain Reaction Microchip With Regional Velocity Control

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shifeng; Fozdar, David Y.; Ali, Mehnaaz F.; Li, Hao; Shao, Dongbing; Vykoukal, Daynene M.; Vykoukal, Jody; Floriano, Pierre N.; Olsen, Michael; McDevitt, John T.; Gascoyne, Peter R.C.; Chen, Shaochen

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a continuous-flow polymerase chain reaction (PCR) microchip with a serpentine microchannel of varying width for “regional velocity control.” Varying the channel width by incorporating expanding and contracting conduits made it possible to control DNA sample velocities for the optimization of the exposure times of the sample to each temperature phase while minimizing the transitional periods during temperature transitions. A finite element analysis (FEA) and semi-analytical heat transfer model was used to determine the distances between the three heating assemblies that are responsible for creating the denaturation (96 °C), hybridization (60 °C), and extension (72 °C) temperature zones within the microchip. Predictions from the thermal FEA and semi-analytical model were compared with temperature measurements obtained from an infrared (IR) camera. Flow-field FEAs were also performed to predict the velocity distributions in the regions of the expanding and contracting conduits to study the effects of the microchannel geometry on flow recirculation and bubble nucleation. The flow fields were empirically studied using micro particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) to validate the flow-field FEA’s and to determine experimental velocities in each of the regions of different width. Successful amplification of a 90 base pair (bp) bacillus anthracis DNA fragment was achieved. PMID:19829760

  3. Hemodynamic correlates of late systolic flow velocity augmentation in the carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Lefferts, Wesley K; Augustine, Jacqueline A

    2013-01-01

    Background. The contour of the common carotid artery (CCA) blood flow velocity waveform changes with age; CCA flow velocity increases during late systole, and this may contribute to cerebrovascular disease. Late systolic flow velocity augmentation can be quantified using the flow augmentation index (FAIx). We examined hemodynamic correlates of FAIx to gain insight into determinants of CCA flow patterns. Methods. CCA Doppler ultrasound and wave intensity analysis (WIA) were used to assess regional hemodynamics in 18 young healthy men (age 22 ± 1 years). Forward waves (W 1) and backward waves (negative area, NA) were measured and used to calculate the reflection index (NA/W 1 = RIx). Additional parameters included W 2 which is a forward travelling expansion/decompression wave of myocardial origin that produces suction, CCA single-point pulse wave velocity (PWV) as a measure of arterial stiffness, and CCA pressure augmentation index (AIx). Results. Primary correlates of FAIx included W 2 (r = - 0.52, P < 0.05), logRIx (r = 0.56, P < 0.05), and AIx (r = 0.60, P < 0.05). FAIx was not associated with CCA stiffness (P > 0.05). Conclusions. FAIx is a complex ventricular-vascular coupling parameter that is associated with both increased expansion wave magnitude (increased suction from the left ventricle) and increased pressure from wave reflections.

  4. Effect of air flow on tubular solar still efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An experimental work was reported to estimate the increase in distillate yield for a compound parabolic concentrator-concentric tubular solar still (CPC-CTSS). The CPC dramatically increases the heating of the saline water. A novel idea was proposed to study the characteristic features of CPC for desalination to produce a large quantity of distillate yield. A rectangular basin of dimension 2 m × 0.025 m × 0.02 m was fabricated of copper and was placed at the focus of the CPC. This basin is covered by two cylindrical glass tubes of length 2 m with two different diameters of 0.02 m and 0.03 m. The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. Findings The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. Conclusions On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. PMID:23587020

  5. Correlation analysis of spatio-temporal images for estimating two-dimensional flow velocity field in a rotating flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kwonkyu; Kim, Seojun; Kim, Dongsu

    2015-10-01

    Flow velocity estimation in actual rivers using image processing technique has been highlighted for hydrometric communities in the last decades, and this technique is called Large Scale Particle Image Velocimetry (LSPIV). Although LSPIV has been successfully tested in many flow conditions, it has addressed several limitations estimating mean flow field because of difficult flow conditions such as rotating, lack of light and seeds, and noisy flow conditions. Recently, an alternative technique named STIV to use spatio-temporal images based on successively recorded images has been introduced to overcome the limitations of LSPIV. The STIV was successfully applied to obtain one-dimensional flow component in the river for estimating streamflow discharge, where the main flow direction is known. Using the 5th order of central difference scheme, the STIV directly calculated the mean angle of slopes which appeared as strips in the spatio-temporal images and has been proved to be more reliable and efficient for the discharge estimation as compared with the conventional LSPIV. However, yet it has not been sufficiently qualified to derive two-dimensional flow field in the complex flow, such as rotating or locally unsteady flow conditions. We deemed that it was because the strips in the given spatio-temporal images from not properly oriented for main flow direction are not narrow enough or clearly visible, thus the direct estimating strip slope could give erroneous results. Thereby, the STIV has been mainly applied for obtaining one-dimensional flow component. In this regard, we proposed an alternative algorithm to estimate the mean slope angle for enhancing the capability of the STIV, which used correlation coefficient between odd and even image splits from the given spatio-temporal image. This method was named CASTI (Correlation Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Image). This paper described the step-by-step procedure of the CASTI and validated its capability for estimating two

  6. Cerebral blood flow velocity in humans exposed to 24 h of head-down tilt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Murthy, G.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Breit, G. A.; Deroshia, C. W.; Hargens, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigates cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity in humans before, during, and after 24 h of 6 deg head-down tilt (HDT), which is a currently accepted experimental model to simulate microgravity. CBF velocity was measured by use of the transcranial Doppler technique in the right middle cerebral artery of eight healthy male subjects. Mean CBF velocity increased from the pre-HDT upright seated baseline value of 55.5 +/- 3.7 (SE) cm/s to 61.5 +/- 3.3 cm/s at 0.5 h of HDT, reached a peak value of 63.2 +/- 4.1 cm/s at 3 h of HDT, and remained significantly above the pre-HDT baseline for over 6 h of HDT. During upright seated recovery, mean CBF velocity decreased to 87 percent of the pre-HDT baseline value. Mean CBF velocity correlated well with calculated intracranial arterial pressure (IAP). As analyzed by linear regression, mean CBF velocity = 29.6 + 0.32IAP. These results suggest that HDT increases CBF velocity by increasing IAP during several hours after the onset of microgravity. Importantly, the decrease in CBF velocity after HDT may be responsible, in part, for the increased risk of syncope observed in subjects after prolonged bed rest and also in astronauts returning to Earth.

  7. The flow feature of transverse hydrogen jet in presence of micro air jets in supersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar Gerdroodbary, M.; Amini, Younes; Ganji, D. D.; Takam, ​M. Rahimi

    2017-03-01

    Scramjet is found to be the efficient method for the space shuttle. In this paper, numerical simulation is performed to investigate the fundamental flow physics of the interaction between an array of fuel jets and multi air jets in a supersonic transverse flow. Hydrogen as a fuel is released with a global equivalence ratio of 0.5 in presence of micro air jets on a flat plate into a Mach 4 crossflow. The fuel and air are injected through streamwise-aligned flush circular portholes. The hydrogen is injected through 4 holes with 7dj space when the air is injected in the interval of the hydrogen jets. The numerical simulation is performed by using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with Menter's Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence model. Both the number of air jets and jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio are varied in a parametric study. The interaction of the fuel and air jet in the supersonic flow present extremely complex feature of fuel and air jet. The results present various flow features depending upon the number and mass flow rate of micro air jets. These flow features were found to have significant effects on the penetration of hydrogen jets. A variation of the number of air jets, along with the jet-to-freestream total pressure ratio, induced a variety of flow structure in the downstream of the fuel jets.

  8. Evolution of a localized vortex in plane nonparallel viscous flows with constant velocity shear. I. Hyperbolic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukhman, I. G.

    2006-09-01

    The framework of the linear theory is employed to study the evolution of an initial compact vortical disturbance in unbounded plane nonparallel viscous incompressible flows with constant velocity gradients. Two types of such flows are known to be possible: hyperbolical and elliptical (as well as an intermediate case of the well-studied parallel Couette flow). The results presented here are obtained for a hyperbolical flow. (Results concerning the elliptical flow are to be issued in a separate publication.) This paper is a development of earlier work by R. R. Lagnado, N. Phan-Thien, and L. G. Leal [Phys. Fluids 27, 1094 (1984)] studying the stability of a hyperbolical flow relative to the simplest perturbations in the form of plane waves with a time-dependent wave vector. The dynamics of vortex intensity is investigated as well as the evolution of its geometrical form and orientation. The results are discussed in the context of the problem of hairpin vortex formation.

  9. Application of dual-focus fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to microfluidic flow-velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Arbour, Tyler J; Enderlein, Jörg

    2010-05-21

    Several methods exist to measure and map fluid velocities in microfluidic devices, which are vital to understanding properties on the micro- and nano-scale. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a method traditionally exploited for its ability to measure molecular diffusion coefficients. However, several reports during the past decade have shown that FCS can also be successfully used to measure precise flow rates in microfluidics with very high spatial resolution, making it a competitive alternative to other common flow-measurement methods. In 2007 we introduced a modified version of conventional FCS that overcomes many of the artifacts troubling the standard technique. Here we show how the advantages of this method, called dual-focus FCS, extend to flow measurements. To do so, we have measured the velocity flow profile along the cross-section of a square-bore microfluidic channel and compared the result to the theoretical prediction.

  10. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity in elite power athletes during maximal weight-lifting.

    PubMed

    Dickerman, R D; McConathy, W J; Smith, G H; East, J W; Rudder, L

    2000-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) has been shown to significantly increase during dynamic exercise (running) secondary to increases in cardiac output. Static exercise (weight-lifting) induces supraphysiological arterial pressures up to 450/380 mmHg, and thus may alter CBFV. Catastrophic brain injuries such as stroke, cerebral hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, retinal hemorrhage and retinal detachment have been associated with weight-lifting. A recent study has shown that intra-ocular pressure (IOP), which is an indirect measure of intracranial pressure, elevates to pathophysiologic levels during weight-lifting. Recent CBFV studies instituting Valsalva have demonstrated decreases in CBFV from 21%-52%. To date, no studies have examined CBFV during maximal weight-lifting to elucidate the cerebrovascular responses to extreme pressure alterations. We recruited nine elite power athletes, including a multi-world record holder in powerlifting, for a transcranial Doppler study of middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity at rest and during maximal weight-lifting. All subjects' resting blood flow velocities were within normal ranges (mean 64.4 +/- 9.5 cm sec2). Blood flow velocities were significantly (p < 0.0001) decreased in all subjects during maximal lifting (mean 48.4 +/- 10.1 cm sec2). Linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant inverse linear relationship in the net change of blood velocities from rest to maximal lift for each subject (r = 0.8585, p < 0.001). This study demonstrates that blood flow velocities are significantly decreased during heavy resistance training. The drop in CBFV during weight-lifting was significantly less than previous Valsalva studies, which likely reveals the cardiovascular, baroreflex, and cerebrovascular system adaptations occurring in these elite power athletes.

  11. Temperature distribution of air source heat pump barn with different air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, X.; Li, J. C.; Zhao, G. Q.

    2016-08-01

    There are two type of airflow form in tobacco barn, one is air rising, the other is air falling. They are different in the structure layout and working principle, which affect the tobacco barn in the distribution of temperature field and velocity distribution. In order to compare the temperature and air distribution of the two, thereby obtain a tobacco barn whose temperature field and velocity distribution are more uniform. Taking the air source heat pump tobacco barn as the investigated subject and establishing relevant mathematical model, the thermodynamics of the two type of curing barn was analysed and compared based on Fluent. Provide a reasonable evidence for chamber arrangement and selection of outlet for air source heat pump tobacco barn.

  12. Numerical validation of velocity gradient tensor particle tracking velocimetry for highly deformed flow fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Masa-aki; Murai, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Fujio

    2000-06-01

    Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) has recently been recognized as quite an effective engineering research tool for understanding multi-dimensional fluid flow structures. There are, however, still a number of unsettled problems in the practical use of PTV, i.e. the lack of generality of the PTV algorithm for various types of flows and the measurement uncertainty with respect to spatial resolution. The authors have developed a generalized PTV algorithm named the velocity gradient tensor (VGT) method in order to accurately track the tracer particles in a flow field with strong local deformation rates. The performance of the VGT method has already been examined for several simple flow fields, such as linear shearing and Taylor-Green vortex flows. In this paper, the applicability of the VGT method for complicated flows, which include a wide dynamic range in wavenumber, is quantitatively examined by simulation of Rankine vortex flows, Karman vortex-shedding flows around a rectangular cylinder and homogeneous turbulent flows, which are numerically solved by using the unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the VGT technique, using only two frames to estimate velocity, performs better than does the four-frame PTV technique and has a remarkably higher tracking performance than those of typical conventional PTV algorithms.

  13. Development of a Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Time-Resolved Gas Flow Velocity, Temperature, and Density Measurements in Aerodynamic Test Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2007-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure time-resolved gas velocity, temperature, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 32 kHz. A high power continuous-wave laser beam is focused at a point in an air flow field and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to the spectral analysis and detection equipment. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature and velocity of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Photomultiplier tubes operated in the photon counting mode allow high frequency sampling of the circular interference pattern to provide time-resolved flow property measurements. An acoustically driven nozzle flow is studied to validate velocity fluctuation measurements, and an asymmetric oscillating counterflow with unequal enthalpies is studied to validate the measurement of temperature fluctuations. Velocity fluctuations are compared with constant temperature anemometry measurements and temperature fluctuations are compared with constant current anemometry measurements at the same locations. Time-series and power spectra of the temperature and velocity measurements are presented. A numerical simulation of the light scattering and detection process was developed and compared with experimental data for future use as an experiment design tool.

  14. Piloted Ignition of Polypropylene/Glass Composites in a Forced Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Rich, D.; Lautenberger, C.; Stefanovich, A.; Metha, S.; Torero, J.; Yuan, Z.; Ross, H.

    2003-01-01

    The Forced Ignition and Spread Test (FIST) is being used to study the flammability characteristics of combustible materials in forced convective flows. The FIST methodology is based on the ASTM E-1321, Lateral Ignition and Flame Spread Test (LIFT) which is used to determine the ignition and flame spread characteristics of materials, and to produce 'Flammability Diagrams' of materials. The LIFT apparatus, however, relies on natural convection to bring air to the combustion zone and the fuel vapor to the pilot flame, and thus cannot describe conditions where the oxidizer flow velocity may change. The FIST on the other hand, by relying on a forced flow as the dominant transport mechanism, can be used to examine variable oxidizer flow characteristics, such as velocity, oxygen concentration, and turbulence intensity, and consequently has a wider applicability. Particularly important is its ability to determine the flammability characteristics of materials used in spacecraft since in the absence of gravity the only flow present is that forced by the HVAC of the space facility. In this paper, we report work on the use of the FIST approach on the piloted ignition of a blended polypropylene fiberglass (PP/GL) composite material exposed to an external radiant flux in a forced convective flow of air. The effect of glass concentration under varying external radiant fluxes is examined and compared qualitatively with theoretical predictions of the ignition process. The results are used to infer the effect of glass content on the fire safety characteristics of composites.

  15. Effects of light intensity light quality and air velocity on temperature in plant reproductive organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Hirai, H.

    Excess temperature increase in plant reproductive organs such as anthers and stigmata could cause fertility impediments and thus produce sterile seeds under artificial lighting conditions in closed plant growth facilities There is a possibility that the aberration was caused by an excess increase in temperatures of reproductive organs in Bioregenerative Life Support Systems under microgravity conditions in space The fundamental study was conducted to know the thermal situation of the plant reproductive organs as affected by light intensity light quality and air velocity on the earth and to estimate the excess temperature increase in the reproductive organs in closed plant growth facilities in space Thermal images of reproductive organs of rice and strawberry were captured using infrared thermography at an air temperature of 10 r C The temperatures in flowers at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under the lights from red LEDs white LEDs blue LEDs fluorescent lamps and incandescent lamps increased by 1 4 1 7 1 9 6 0 and 25 3 r C respectively for rice and by 2 8 3 4 4 1 7 8 and 43 4 r C respectively for strawberry The flower temperatures increased with increasing PPFD levels The temperatures in petals anthers and stigmas of strawberry at 300 mu mol m -2 s -1 PPFD under incandescent lamps increased by 32 7 29 0 and 26 6 r C respectively at 0 1 m s -1 air velocity and by 20 6 18 5 and 15 9 r C respectively at 0 8 m s -1 air velocity The temperatures of reproductive organs decreased with increasing

  16. Profiling river surface velocities and volume flow estimation with bistatic UHF RiverSonde radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.; Gartner, J.; ,

    2003-01-01

    From the velocity profiles across the river, estimates of total volume flow for the four methods were calculated based on a knowledge of the bottom depth vs position across the river. It was found that the flow comparisons for the American River were much closer, within 2% of each other among all of the methods. Sources of positional biases and anomalies in the RiverSonde measurement patterns along the river were identified and discussed.

  17. Experimental Studies of Low-Pressure Turbine Flows and Flow Control. Streamwise Pressure Profiles and Velocity Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes research performed in support of the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Low-Pressure Turbine (LPT) Flow Physics Program. The work was performed experimentally at the U.S. Naval Academy faculties. The geometry corresponded to "Pak B" LPT airfoil. The test section simulated LPT flow in a passage. Three experimental studies were performed: (a) Boundary layer measurements for ten baseline cases under high and low freestream turbulence conditions at five Reynolds numbers of 25,000, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000, and 300,000, based on passage exit velocity and suction surface wetted length; (b) Passive flow control studies with three thicknesses of two-dimensional bars, and two heights of three-dimensional circular cylinders with different spanwise separations, at same flow conditions as the 10 baseline cases; (c) Active flow control with oscillating synthetic (zero net mass flow) vortex generator jets, for one case with low freestream turbulence and a low Reynolds number of 25,000. The Passive flow control was successful at controlling the separation problem at low Reynolds numbers, with varying degrees of success from case to case and varying levels of impact at higher Reynolds numbers. The active flow control successfully eliminated the large separation problem for the low Reynolds number case. Very detailed data was acquired using hot-wire anemometry, including single and two velocity components, integral boundary layer quantities, turbulence statistics and spectra, turbulent shear stresses and their spectra, and intermittency, documenting transition, separation and reattachment. Models were constructed to correlate the results. The report includes a summary of the work performed and reprints of the publications describing the various studies.This report summarizes research performed in support of the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Low-Pressure Turbine (LPT) Flow Physics Program. The work was performed experimentally at the U.S. Naval Academy

  18. Colloid release and clogging in porous media: Effects of solution ionic strength and flow velocity.

    PubMed

    Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A; Vanderzalm, Joanne L; Patterson, Bradley M; Harris, Brett; Prommer, Henning

    2015-10-01

    The release and retention of in-situ colloids in aquifers play an important role in the sustainable operation of managed aquifer recharge (MAR) schemes. The processes of colloid release, retention, and associated permeability changes in consolidated aquifer sediments were studied by displacing native groundwater with reverse osmosis-treated (RO) water at various flow velocities. Significant amounts of colloid release occurred when: (i) the native groundwater was displaced by RO-water with a low ionic strength (IS), and (ii) the flow velocity was increased in a stepwise manner. The amount of colloid release and associated permeability reduction upon RO-water injection depended on the initial clay content of the core. The concentration of released colloids was relatively low and the permeability reduction was negligible for the core sample with a low clay content of about 1.3%. In contrast, core samples with about 6 and 7.5% clay content exhibited: (i) close to two orders of magnitude increase in effluent colloid concentration and (ii) more than 65% permeability reduction. Incremental improvement in the core permeability was achieved when the flow velocity increased, whereas a short flow interruption provided a considerable increase in the core permeability. This dependence of colloid release and permeability changes on flow velocity and colloid concentration was consistent with colloid retention and release at pore constrictions due to the mechanism of hydrodynamic bridging. A mathematical model was formulated to describe the processes of colloid release, transport, retention at pore constrictions, and subsequent permeability changes. Our experimental and modeling results indicated that only a small fraction of the in-situ colloids was released for any given change in the IS or flow velocity. Comparison of the fitted and experimentally measured effluent colloid concentrations and associated changes in the core permeability showed good agreement, indicating that the

  19. Quantifying local characteristics of velocity, aggregation and hematocrit of human erythrocytes in a microchannel flow.

    PubMed

    Kaliviotis, Efstathios; Dusting, Jonathan; Sherwood, Joseph M; Balabani, Stavroula

    2015-09-25

    The effect of erythrocyte aggregation on blood viscosity and microcirculatory flow is a poorly understood area of haemodynamics, especially with relevance to serious pathological conditions. Advances in microfluidics have made it possible to study the details of blood flow in the microscale, however, important issues such as the relationship between the local microstructure and local flow characteristics have not been investigated extensively. In the present study an experimental system involving simple brightfield microscopy has been successfully developed for simultaneous, time-resolved quantification of velocity fields and local aggregation of human red blood cells (RBC) in microchannels. RBCs were suspended in Dextran and phosphate buffer saline solutions for the control of aggregation. Local aggregation characteristics were investigated at bulk and local levels using statistical and edge-detection image processing techniques. A special case of aggregating flow in a microchannel, in which hematocrit gradients were present, was studied as a function of flowrate and time. The level of aggregation was found to strongly correlate with local variations in velocity in both the bulk flow and wall regions. The edge detection based analysis showed that near the side wall large aggregates are associated with regions corresponding to high local velocities and low local shear. On the contrary, in the bulk flow region large aggregates occurred in regions of low velocity and high erythrocyte concentration suggesting a combined effect of hematocrit and velocity distributions on local aggregation characteristics. The results of this study showed that using multiple methods for aggregation quantification, albeit empirical, could help towards a robust characterisation of the structural properties of the fluid.

  20. Effects of saline-water flow rate and air speed on leakage current in RTV coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Hackam, R.

    1995-10-01

    Room temperature vulcanizing (RTV) silicone rubber is increasingly being used to coat porcelain and glass insulators in order to improve their electrical performance in the presence of pollution and moisture. A study of the dependence of leakage current, pulse current count and total charge flowing across the surface of RTV on the flow rate of the saline water and on the compressed air pressure used to create the salt-fog is reported. The fog was directed at the insulating rods either from one or two sides. The RTV was fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane polymer, a filler of alumina trihydrate (ATH), a polymerization catalyst and fumed silica reinforcer, all dispersed in 1,1,1-trichloroethane solvent. The saline water flow rate was varied in the range 0.4 to 2.0 l/min. The compressed air pressure at the input of the fog nozzles was varied from 0.20 to 0.63 MPa. The air speed at the surface of the insulating rods was found to depend linearly on the air pressure measured at the inlet to the nozzles and varied in the range 3 to 14 km/hr. The leakage current increased with increasing flow rate and increasing air speed. This is attributed to the increased loss of hydrophobicity with a larger quantity of saline fog and a larger impact velocities of fog droplets interacting with the surface of the RTV coating.

  1. The effect of humidity on ionic wind velocity in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, She; Nobelen, J. C. P. Y.; Nijdam, S.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the evolution of portable electronics and LED lightning system, advances in air cooling technologies must also keep pace. Active cooling by ionic wind, which is usually generated by corona discharge, can greatly reduce the noise and lifetime issues compared to the mechanical fans. The wind is induced when a gas discharge is formed, and neutral molecules gain their energy by the momentum transfer of ion-neutral collisions. However, there is few discussion about the effect of gas composition such as humidity on the wind generation and the physical mechanism is not clear. In the experiment, a positive 5-20 kV DC voltage is applied to the needle-cylinder electrodes with separation of 20 mm. The ionic wind velocity is measured by hot wire anemometry. As the relative humidity (RH) in the ambient air increases, the velocity is found to be severely inhibited. The current is also measured between the cylinder electrode and earth. The results show that the DC component of corona current decreases when RH increases. Since both the discharge current and the ion mobility are reduced when RH increases, their combined effects determine the ionic wind velocity. This work is supported by STW project 13651.

  2. Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine Employing Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    The effects of air flow on fuel spray and flame formation in a high-speed compression-ignition engine have been investigated by means of the NACA combustion apparatus. The process was studied by examining high-speed motion pictures taken at the rate of 2,200 frames a second. The combustion chamber was of the flat-disk type used in previous experiments with this apparatus. The air flow was produced by a rectangular displacer mounted on top of the engine piston. Three fuel-injection nozzles were tested: a 0.020-inch single-orifice nozzle, a 6-orifice nozzle, and a slit nozzle. The air velocity within the combustion chamber was estimated to reach a value of 425 feet a second. The results show that in no case was the form of the fuel spray completely destroyed by the air jet although in some cases the direction of the spray was changed and the spray envelope was carried away by the moving air. The distribution of the fuel in the combustion chamber of a compression-ignition engine can be regulated to some extent by the design of the combustion chamber, by the design of the fuel-injection nozzle, and by the use of air flow.

  3. An Idea of Staged and Large Velocity Differential Secondary Air for Waterwall Erosion Protection and Oxygen Complementarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B. Q.; Zhang, X. H.

    A successful design of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler should have the highest combustion efficiency, economic operation, and optimum availability. There is a coupled phenomenon of an oxygen lean zone existing in the CFB boiler furnace which depresses combustion efficiency and particle (group) falling down faster and faster when it falls along the waterwall, abrading the tube metal effectively. A new secondary air design for the oxygen lean zone and erosion protection is conceived by using staged and large velocity differential secondary air. For example, a part of concentrate supplied secondary air has been divided into two parts: a low velocity part and a high velocity part. The low velocity part is used for rigid gas layer to reduce the particle falling velocity, and the high velocity part is used for oxygen supply. It is believed that 40˜6Om/s projecting air velocity could send new oxygen to at least half furnace depth in a short projecting lift as shown in calculation. In another view point, operational superficial gas velocity has an obvious effect on waterwall metal erosion, with a lower operation velocity having lower erosion.

  4. Some issues in the simulation of two-phase flows: The relative velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gräbel, J.; Hensel, S.; Ueberholz, P.; Zeidan, D.; Farber, P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we compare numerical approximations for solving the Riemann problem for a hyperbolic two-phase flow model in two-dimensional space. The model is based on mixture parameters of state where the relative velocity between the two-phase systems is taken into account. This relative velocity appears as a main discontinuous flow variable through the complete wave structure and cannot be recovered correctly by some numerical techniques when simulating the associated Riemann problem. Simulations are validated by comparing the results of the numerical calculation qualitatively with OpenFOAM software. Simulations also indicate that OpenFOAM is unable to resolve the relative velocity associated with the Riemann problem.

  5. Stabilization of traffic flow in optimal velocity model via delayed-feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanfei; Hu, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    Traffic jams may occur due to various reasons, such as traffic accidents, lane reductions and on-ramps. In order to suppress the traffic congestion in an optimal velocity traffic model without any driver's delay taken into account, a delayed-feedback control of both displacement and velocity differences is proposed in this study. By using the delay-independent stability criteria and the H∞-norm, the delayed-feedback control can be determined to stabilize the unstable traffic flow and suppress the traffic jam. The numerical case studies are given to demonstrate and verify the new control method. Furthermore, a comparison is made between the new control method and the method proposed by Konishi et al. [K. Konishi, M. Hirai, H. Kokame, Decentralized delayed-feedback control of an optimal velocity traffic model, Eur. Phys. J. B 15 (2000) 715-722]. The results show that the new control method makes the traffic flow more stable and improves the control performance.

  6. Effect of reed stalks on the flow velocity in a rectangular open canal in arid areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechri, Laid; Boutoutaou, Djamel; Saggaï, Sofiane; Saker, Mohamed Lakhdar

    2016-07-01

    The water velocity in an open canal is a critical factor in the sizing of drains intended for evacuation of excess water in agricultural soils. The study aims to examine, by experimental way, the effect of roughness that is due to the existence of reed stalks on the characteristics of the flows in a rectangular open canal intended to drain excess water. The tests have been done by varying the flow rate, the diameter of reed stalks and their density. The results of this research allowed taking out relations between the relative velocity and the relative density. These results also showed that, in an herbaceous open canal, the velocity is rather low than no herbaceous canal.

  7. Mean Flow Velocities and Mass Transport for Equatorially-Trapped Water Waves with an Underlying Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, David; Sastre-Gomez, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of the mean flow velocities, and related mass transport, which are induced by certain equatorially-trapped water waves. In particular, we examine a recently-derived exact and explicit solution to the geophysical governing equations in the {β}-plane approximation at the equator which incorporates a constant underlying current.

  8. Measuring local flow velocities and biofilm structure in biofilm systems with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    PubMed

    Manz, Bertram; Volke, Frank; Goll, Danile; Horn, Harald

    2003-11-20

    The characterization of substrate transport in the bulk phase and in the biofilm matrix is one of the problems which has to be solved for the verification of biofilm models. Additionally, the surface structure of biofilms has to be described with appropriate parameters. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the promising methods for the investigation of transport phenomena and structure in biofilm systems. The MRI technique allows the noninvasive determination of flow velocities and biofilm structures with a high resolution on the sub-millimeter scale. The presented investigations were carried out for defined heterotrophic biofilms which were cultivated in a tube reactor at a Reynolds number of 2000 and 8000 and a substrate load of 6 and 4 g/m2d glucose. Magnetic resonance imaging provides both structure data of the biofilm surface and flow velocities in the bulk phase and at the bulk/biofilm interface. It is shown that the surface roughness of the biofilms can be determined in one experiment for the complete cross section of the test tubes both under flow and stagnant conditions. Furthermore, the local shear stress was calculated from the measured velocity profiles. In the investigated biofilm systems the local shear stress at the biofilm surface was up to 3 times higher compared to the mean wall shear stress calculated on the base of the mean flow velocity.

  9. Method and apparatus for optical Doppler tomographic imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, John Stuart; Milner, Thomas Edward; Chen, Zhongping

    1999-01-01

    Optical Doppler tomography permits imaging of fluid flow velocity in highly scattering media. The tomography system combines Doppler velocimetry with high spatial resolution of partially coherent optical interferometry to measure fluid flow velocity at discrete spatial locations. Noninvasive in vivo imaging of blood flow dynamics and tissue structures with high spatial resolutions of the order of 2 to 10 microns is achieved in biological systems. The backscattered interference signals derived from the interferometer may be analyzed either through power spectrum determination to obtain the position and velocity of each particle in the fluid flow sample at each pixel, or the interference spectral density may be analyzed at each frequency in the spectrum to obtain the positions and velocities of the particles in a cross-section to which the interference spectral density corresponds. The realized resolutions of optical Doppler tomography allows noninvasive in vivo imaging of both blood microcirculation and tissue structure surrounding the vessel which has significance for biomedical research and clinical applications.

  10. Simulation of pulmonary air flow with a subject-specific boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A; Tawhai, Merryn H; Lin, Ching-Long

    2010-08-10

    We present a novel image-based technique to estimate a subject-specific boundary condition (BC) for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of pulmonary air flow. The information of regional ventilation for an individual is derived by registering two computed tomography (CT) lung datasets and then passed to the CT-resolved airways as the flow BC. The CFD simulations show that the proposed method predicts lobar volume changes consistent with direct image-measured metrics, whereas the other two traditional BCs (uniform velocity or uniform pressure) yield lobar volume changes and regional pressure differences inconsistent with observed physiology.

  11. Simulation of pulmonary air flow with a subject-specific boundary condition

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youbing; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel image-based technique to estimate a subject-specific boundary condition (BC) for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of pulmonary air flow. The information of regional ventilation for an individual is derived by registering two computed tomography (CT) lung datasets and then passed to the CT-resolved airways as the flow BC. The CFD simulations show that the proposed method predicts lobar volume changes consistent with direct image-measured metrics, whereas the other two traditional BCs (uniform velocity or uniform pressure) yield lobar volume changes and regional pressure differences inconsistent with observed physiology. PMID:20483412

  12. The influence of the arrangements of multi-sensor probe arrays on the accuracy of simultaneously measured velocity and velocity gradient-based statistics in turbulent shear flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukoslavčević, P. V.; Wallace, J. M.

    2013-06-01

    A highly resolved turbulent channel flow direct numerical simulation (DNS) with Re τ = 200 has been used to investigate the influence of the arrangements of the arrays (array configurations), within the sensing area of a multi-array hot-wire probe on the measurement accuracy of velocity and velocity gradient-based statistics. To eliminate all effects related to the sensor response and array characteristics (such as sensor dimensions, overheat ratio, thermal cross talk, number and orientations of the sensors and uniqueness range) so that this study could be focused solely on the effects of the array configurations (positions and separations), a concept of a perfect array was introduced, that is, one that can exactly and simultaneously measure all three velocity components at its center. The velocity component values, measured by these perfect arrays, are simply the DNS values computed at these points. Using these velocity components, the velocity and velocity gradient-based statistics were calculated assuming a linear velocity variation over the probes' sensing areas. The calculated values are compared to the DNS values for various array arrangements to study the influence of these arrangements on the measurement accuracy. Typical array configurations that previously have been used for physical probes were tested. It is demonstrated that the array arrangements strongly influence the accuracy of some of the velocity and velocity gradient-based statistics and that no single configuration exists, for a given spatial resolution, which gives the best accuracy for all of the statistics characterizing a turbulent shear flow.

  13. Groundwater flow velocity measurements in a sinkhole at the Weeks Island Strategic Petroleum Reserve Facility, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, S.; Gibson, J.

    1995-02-01

    In 1992, a sinkhole was discovered above a Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility at Weeks Island, Louisiana. The oil is stored in an old salt mine located within a salt dome. In order to assess the hydrologic significance of the sink hole, an In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor was deployed within a sand-filled conduit in the salt dome directly beneath the sinkhole. The flow sensor is a recently developed instrument which uses a thermal perturbation technique to measure the magnitude and direction of the full 3-dimensional groundwater flow velocity vector in saturated, permeable materials. The flow sensor measured substantial groundwater flow directed vertically downward into the salt dome. The data obtained with the flow sensor provided critical evidence which was instrumental in assessing the significance of the sinkhole in terms of the integrity of the oil storage facility.

  14. Optical Feedback Interferometry for Velocity Measurement of Parallel Liquid-Liquid Flows in a Microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E.; Perchoux, Julien; Loubière, Karine; Tronche, Clément; Prat, Laurent; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Optical feedback interferometry (OFI) is a compact sensing technique with recent implementation for flow measurements in microchannels. We propose implementing OFI for the analysis at the microscale of multiphase flows starting with the case of parallel flows of two immiscible fluids. The velocity profiles in each phase were measured and the interface location estimated for several operating conditions. To the authors knowledge, this sensing technique is applied here for the first time to multiphase flows. Theoretical profiles issued from a model based on the Couette viscous flow approximation reproduce fairly well the experimental results. The sensing system and the analysis presented here provide a new tool for studying more complex interactions between immiscible fluids (such as liquid droplets flowing in a microchannel). PMID:27527178

  15. Velocity and temperature field characteristics of water and air during natural convection heating in cans.

    PubMed

    Erdogdu, Ferruh; Tutar, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Presence of headspace during canning is required since an adequate amount allows forming vacuum during the process. Sealing technology may not totally eliminate all entrapped gases, and headspace might affect heat transfer. Not much attention has been given to solve this problem in computational studies, and cans, for example, were mostly assumed to be fully filled with product. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine velocity and temperature evolution of water and air in cans during heating to evaluate the relevance of headspace in the transport mechanism. For this purpose, canned water samples with a certain headspace were used, and required governing continuity, energy, and momentum equations were solved using a finite volume approach coupled with a volume of fluid element model. Simulation results correlated well with experimental results validating faster heating effects of headspace rather than insulation effects as reported in the literature. The organized velocity motions along the air-water interface were also shown. Practical Application: Canning is a universal and economic method for processing of food products, and presence of adequate headspace is required to form vacuum during sealing of the cans. Since sealing technology may not totally eliminate the entrapped gases, mainly air, headspace might affect heating rates in cans. This study demonstrated the increased heating rates in the presence of headspace in contrast with some studies in the literature. By applying the effect of headspace, required processing time for thermally processed foods can be reduced leading to more rapid processes and lower energy consumptions.

  16. Lid-driven cavity flow using a discrete velocity method for solving the Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekaran, Aarthi; Varghese, Philip; Estes, Samuel; Goldstein, David

    2016-11-01

    We extend the discrete velocity method for solving the Boltzmann equation previously used for one-dimensional problems to two spatial dimensions. The collision integral is computed using collisions between velocity classes selected randomly using a Monte Carlo method. Arbitrary post-collision velocities are mapped back onto the grid using a projection scheme which conserves mass, momentum, and energy. In addition, a variance reduction scheme is implemented to decrease noise and further reduce computational effort. The convection part of the equation is computed using first order upwind finite differences. We apply this discrete velocity scheme to the 2D lid-driven square cavity flow problem with Ar as the fluid medium and explore the effect of the additional flexibility available in this quasi-particle based stochastic method on the accuracy and noise level in the solutions obtained.

  17. Modeling velocity in gradient flows with coupled-map lattices with advection.

    PubMed

    Lind, Pedro G; Corte-Real, João; Gallas, Jason A C

    2002-07-01

    We introduce a simple model to investigate large scale behavior of gradient flows based on a lattice of coupled maps which, in addition to the usual diffusive term, incorporates advection, as an asymmetry in the coupling between nearest neighbors. This diffusive-advective model predicts traveling patterns to have velocities obeying the same scaling as wind velocities in the atmosphere, regarding the advective parameter as a sort of geostrophic wind. In addition, the velocity and wavelength of traveling wave solutions are studied. In general, due to the presence of advection, two regimes are identified: for strong diffusion the velocity varies linearly with advection, while for weak diffusion a power law is found with a characteristic exponent proportional to the diffusion.

  18. Blood flow velocity in the popliteal vein using transverse oscillation ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechsgaard, Thor; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Holbek, Simon; Lönn, Lars; Strandberg, Charlotte; Bækgaard, Niels; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    Chronic venous disease is a common condition leading to varicose veins, leg edema, post-thrombotic syndrome and venous ulcerations. Ultrasound (US) is the main modality for examination of venous disease. Color Doppler and occasionally spectral Doppler US (SDUS) are used for evaluation of the venous flow. Peak velocities measured by SDUS are rarely used in a clinical setting for evaluating chronic venous disease due to inadequate reproducibility mainly caused by the angle dependency of the estimate. However, estimations of blood velocities are of importance in characterizing venous disease. Transverse Oscillation US (TOUS), a non-invasive angle independent method, has been implemented on a commercial scanner. TOUS's advantage compared to SDUS is a more elaborate visualization of complex flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate, whether TOUS perform equal to SDUS for recording velocities in the veins of the lower limbs. Four volunteers were recruited for the study. A standardized flow was provoked with a cuff compression-decompression system placed around the lower leg. The average peak velocity in the popliteal vein of the four volunteers was 151.5 cm/s for SDUS and 105.9 cm/s for TOUS (p <0.001). The average of the peak velocity standard deviations (SD) were 17.0 cm/s for SDUS and 13.1 cm/s for TOUS (p <0.005). The study indicates that TOUS estimates lower peak velocity with improved SD when compared to SDUS. TOUS may be a tool for evaluation of venous disease providing quantitative measures for the evaluation of venous blood flow.

  19. Flow mechanism of Forchheimer's cubic equation in high-velocity radial gas flow through porous media. [High-velocity, high-pressure gas flow through porous media near the wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Ezeudembah; Dranchuk, P.M.

    1982-09-01

    Until recently, the visco-inertial flow equation, which is an adaptation of Forchheimer's quadratic equation, has been used to describe gas flow behavior at higher flow rates and pressures. The inability of this equation, in some cases, to fully describe high-velocity, high-pressure gas flow behavior, especially around the well bore, led to the consideration of other empirical equations. In this paper, formal derivation of Forchheimer's cubic equation is made by considering the kinetic energy equation of mean flow and dimensional relations for one-dimensional, linear, incompressible fluid flow. By the addition of the cubic term, this equation is regarded as a modified Forchheimer's quadratic equation which accounts for the flow rates obtained beyond the laminar flow condition. The cubic equation spans a wide range of flow rates and regimes, i.e. Darcy type, inertial type, and turbulent. For suitable use in gas flow studies, this equation has been adapted, modified, and corrected for the gas slippage effect. The physical basis of the cubic term has been established by using boundary layer theory to explain the high-velocity, high-pressure flow behavior through a porous path. Gamma, the main parameter in the cubic term, is directly related to a characteristic, dimensionless shape factor which is significant at higher flow rates. It is inversely related to viscosity, but has no dependence on the gas slippage coefficient in the higher flow regime.

  20. The respective roles of bulk friction and slip velocity during a granular mass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staron, Lydie

    2016-04-01

    Catastrophic granular mass flows form an important natural hazard. Mitigation has motivated numerous studies on the properties of natural granular flows, and in particular, their ability to travel long distances away from the release point. The mobility of granular flows is commonly characterised through the definition of rheological properties and effective friction. Yet, it is widely accepted that the description in term of effective friction may include various lubrication effects, softening at the base of the flow and large slip velocities being a most likely one. In this case, flow bulk properties may obliterate the flow boundary conditions. In this contribution, we investigate how disentangling bulk properties from boundary conditions may improve our understanding of the flow. Using discrete simulations, we induce increasing slip velocities in different flow configurations. We show that increased mobility may be achieved without changing bulk properties. The results are interpreted in terms of a Robin-Navier slip condition and implemented in a continuum Navier-Stokes solver. We quantify the respective role of rheological bulk properties and boundary conditions in the general behaviour of a transient mass flow. We show that omitting the description of boundary conditions leads to misinterpretation of the flow properties. The outcome is discussed in terms of models reliability. References P.-Y. Lagrée et al, The granular column collapse as a continuum: validity of a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes model with the mu(I) rheology, J. Fluid Mech. 686, 378-408 (2011) L. Staron and E. Lajeunesse, Understanding how the volume affects the mobility of dry debris flows, Geophys. Res. Lett. 36, L12402 (2009) L. Staron, Mobility of long-runout rock flows: a discrete numerical investigation, Geophys. J. Int. 172, 455-463 (2008)

  1. The air-liquid flow in a microfluidic airway tree.

    PubMed

    Song, Yu; Baudoin, Michael; Manneville, Paul; Baroud, Charles N

    2011-09-01

    Microfluidic techniques are employed to investigate air-liquid flows in the lung. A network of microchannels with five generations is made and used as a simplified model of a section of the pulmonary airway tree. Liquid plugs are injected into the network and pushed by a flow of air; they divide at every bifurcation until they reach the exits of the network. A resistance, associated with the presence of one plug in a given generation, is defined to establish a linear relation between the driving pressure and the total flow rate in the network. Based on this resistance, good predictions are obtained for the flow of two successive plugs in different generations. The total flow rate of a two-plug flow is found to depend not only on the driving pressure and lengths of the plugs, but also the initial distance between them. Furthermore, long range interactions between daughters of a dividing plug are observed and discussed, particularly when the plugs are flowing through the bifurcations. These interactions lead to different flow patterns for different forcing conditions: the flow develops symmetrically when subjected to constant pressure or high flow rate forcing, while a low flow rate driving yields an asymmetric flow.

  2. Experiments on confined turbulent jets in cross flow. [longitudinal and transverse distributions of velocity and temperature for jet flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamotani, Y.; Greber, I.

    1974-01-01

    Results are reported of experiments on the effects of an opposite wall on the characteristics of turbulent jets injected into a cross flow, for unheated and heated jets. Longitudinal and transverse distributions of velocity and temperature are presented for single and multiple circular jets, and trajectories are presented for two-dimensional jets. The opposite wall has relatively little effect on a single jet unless the ratio of jet to cross flow momentum flux is large enough for the jet to impinge on the opposite wall. For a row of jets aligned perpendicularly to the cross flow, the opposite wall exerts progressively larger influence as the spacing between jets decreases. Much of the effect of jet and wall proximity can be understood by considering the interaction of the vortex flow which is the major feature of the structure of a single jet in a cross flow. Smoke photographs are shown to elucidate some of the interaction patterns.

  3. Low power, constant-flow air pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Polito, M.D.; Albert, B.

    1994-01-01

    A rugged, yet small and lightweight constant-flow air pump system has been designed. Flow control is achieved using a novel approach which is three times more power efficient than previous designs. The resultant savings in battery size and weight makes these pumps ideal for sampling air on balloon platforms. The pump package includes meteorological sensors and an onboard computer that stores time and sensor data and turns the constant-flow pump circuit on/off. Some applications of these systems are also presented in this report.

  4. Use of optical edge and optical flow rate: Information in the perception and control of ground velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Walter W.; Awe, Cynthia A.

    1993-01-01

    Previous research (Denton, 1980; Larish & Flach, 1990; Owen, Wolpert, & Warren, 1984; Awe & Johnson, 1989) suggests that people will use one or both of two optical variables as information for the perception and/or regulation of ground velocity. The first variable, global optical flow rate (FR), reflects the angular optical speed, and is proportional to the observer's ground velocity scaled in altitude units, i.e. velocity divided by altitude. Therefore, flow rate is a reliable indicator of ground velocity only under the condition of constant altitude. The second variable, optical edge rate (ER), reflects ground velocity as the frequency at which the optically specified ground edges pass across some optical region. Therefore, edge rate is an accurate indicator of ground velocity when altitude varies, but not when texture density varies. Since both flow rate and edge rate can vary independently of forward ground velocity, accurate ground-velocity control may depend upon using the best optical variable.

  5. Acoustic oscillation phenomena in low-velocity steady flow with heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liburdy, J. A.; Wofford, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Thermally driven acoustic oscillations in low-velocity mean flows are investigated. A criterion is developed for marginal stability with respect to a fluid temperature increase; a cylindrical geometry is chosen for flow in a constant-area tube where any circumferential variation is neglected. The range of parameters of concern is limited to conditions resembling cryogenic storage designs proposed for long-term space missions; helium was chosen as the fluid in order to allow comparison with zero flow rate results in half-open tubes.

  6. Equations of motion for the variable mass flow-variable exhaust velocity rocket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tempelman, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    An equation of motion for a one dimensional rocket is derived as a function of the mass flow rate into the acceleration chamber and the velocity distribution along the chamber, thereby including the transient flow changes in the chamber. The derivation of the mass density requires the introduction of the special time coordinate. The equation of motion is derived from both classical force and momentum approaches and is shown to be consistent with the standard equation expressed in terms of flow parameters at the exit to the acceleration chamber.

  7. Design and Implementation of Automatic Air Flow Rate Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, A.; Saputra, C.; Munir, M. M.; Khairurrijal

    2016-08-01

    Venturimeter is an apparatus that can be used to measure the air flow rate. In this experiment we designed a venturimeter which equipped with a valve that is used to control the air flow rate. The difference of pressure between the cross sections was measured with the differential pressure sensor GA 100-015WD which can calculate the difference of pressures from 0 to 3737.33 Pa. A 42M048C Z36 stepper motor was used to control the valve. The precision of this motor rotation is about 0.15 °. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) was developed to monitor and set the value of flow rate then an 8-bit microcontroller was used to process the control system In this experiment- the venturimeter has been examined to get the optimal parameter of controller. The results show that the controller can set the stable output air flow rate.

  8. Effects of Wrist Posture and Fingertip Force on Median Nerve Blood Flow Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Katherine E.; Tat, Jimmy

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to assess nerve hypervascularization using high resolution ultrasonography to determine the effects of wrist posture and fingertip force on median nerve blood flow at the wrist in healthy participants and those experiencing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) symptoms. Methods. The median nerves of nine healthy participants and nine participants experiencing symptoms of CTS were evaluated using optimized ultrasonography in five wrist postures with and without a middle digit fingertip press (0, 6 N). Results. Both wrist posture and fingertip force had significant main effects on mean peak blood flow velocity. Blood flow velocity with a neutral wrist (2.87 cm/s) was significantly lower than flexed 30° (3.37 cm/s), flexed 15° (3.27 cm/s), and extended 30° (3.29 cm/s). Similarly, median nerve blood flow velocity was lower without force (2.81 cm/s) than with force (3.56 cm/s). A significant difference was not found between groups. Discussion. Vascular changes associated with CTS may be acutely induced by nonneutral wrist postures and fingertip force. This study represents an early evaluation of intraneural blood flow as a measure of nerve hypervascularization in response to occupational risk factors and advances our understanding of the vascular phenomena associated with peripheral nerve compression. PMID:28286771

  9. Velocity field measurements in gas phase internal flows by molecular tagging velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samouda, F.; Brandner, J. J.; Barrot, C.; Colin, S.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of the present work is to implement Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV) for the analysis of internal gas flows in mini-channels. A MTV experimental setup has been designed. Tagging and detecting steps are respectively insured by a UV laser and a CCD camera coupled to intensified relay optics. A specific channel with 1 × 5 mm2 rectangular cross section has been designed and equipped with integrated temperature sensors along its 20 cm length. It has been manufactured in PEEK (PolyEtherEther-Ketone) and Suprasil® optical windows have been integrated for the tagging access. Image processing allows extraction of velocity profiles for a pressure driven steady flow of argon through this channel. These profiles are compared to the theoretical profiles of laminar flows and the accuracy of the method is discussed. The MTV potential for the analysis of internal gaseous flows is commented on, with a discussion on perspectives for velocity measurement in rarefied flows and direct access to slip velocity at the walls.

  10. Impact of air velocity, temperature, humidity, and air on long-term voc emissions from building products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolkoff, Peder

    The emissions of two volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of concern from five building products (BPs) were measured in the field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) up to 250 d. The BPs (VOCs selected on the basis of abundance and low human odor thresholds) were: nylon carpet with latex backing (2-ethylhexanol, 4-phenylcyclohexene), PVC flooring (2-ethylhexanol, phenol), floor varnish on pretreated beechwood parquet (butyl acetate, N-methylpyrrolidone), sealant (hexane, dimethyloctanols), and waterborne wall paint on gypsum board (1,2-propandiol, Texanol). Ten different climate conditions were tested: four different air velocities from ca. 1 cm s -1 to ca. 9 cm s -1, three different temperatures (23, 35, and 60°C), two different relative humidities (0% and 50% RH), and pure nitrogen instead of clean air supply. Additionally, two sample specimen and two different batches were compared for repeatability and homogeneity. The VOCs were sampled on Tenax TA and determined by thermal desorption and gas chromatography (FID). Quantification was carried out by individual calibration of each VOC of concern. Concentration/time profiles of the selected VOCs (i.e. their concentration decay curves over time) in a standard room were used for comparison. Primary source emissions were not affected by the air velocity after a few days to any great extent. Both the temperature and relative humidity affected the emission rates, but depended strongly on the type of BP and type of VOC. Secondary (oxidative) source emissions were only observed for the PVC and for dimethyloctanols from the sealant. The time to reach a given concentration (emission rate) appears to be a good approach for future interlaboratory comparisons of BP's VOC emissions.

  11. Experimental measurement of velocity correlations for two microparticles in a plasma with ion flow.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Amit K; Goree, J

    2014-07-01

    Velocity correlations are measured in a dusty plasma with only two microparticles. These correlations allow a characterization of the oscillatory modes and an identification of the effects of ion wakes. Ion wake effects are isolated by comparing two experiments with the microparticles aligned parallel vs perpendicular to the ion flow. From records of microparticle velocities, the one- and two-particle distribution functions f(1) and f(2) are obtained, and the two-particle correlation function g(2) ≡ f(2)-f(1)f(1) is calculated. Comparing the two experiments, we find that motion is much more correlated when the microparticles are aligned with the ion flow and the character of the oscillatory modes depends on the ion flow direction due to the ion wake.

  12. The influence of the tangential velocity of inner rotating wall on axial velocity profile of flow through vertical annular pipe with rotating inner surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharf, Abdusalam M.; Jawan, Hosen A.; Almabsout, Fthi A.

    2014-03-01

    In the oil and gas industries, understanding the behaviour of a flow through an annulus gap in a vertical position, whose outer wall is stationary whilst the inner wall rotates, is a significantly important issue in drilling wells. The main emphasis is placed on experimental (using an available rig) and computational (employing CFD software) investigations into the effects of the rotation speed of the inner pipe on the axial velocity profiles. The measured axial velocity profiles, in the cases of low axial flow, show that the axial velocity is influenced by the rotation speed of the inner pipe in the region of almost 33% of the annulus near the inner pipe, and influenced inversely in the rest of the annulus. The position of the maximum axial velocity is shifted from the centre to be nearer the inner pipe, by increasing the rotation speed. However, in the case of higher flow, as the rotation speed increases, the axial velocity is reduced and the position of the maximum axial velocity is skewed towards the centre of the annulus. There is a reduction of the swirl velocity corresponding to the rise of the volumetric flow rate.

  13. Annular fuel and air co-flow premixer

    DOEpatents

    Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Melton, Patrick Benedict; York, William David

    2013-10-15

    Disclosed is a premixer for a combustor including an annular outer shell and an annular inner shell. The inner shell defines an inner flow channel inside of the inner shell and is located to define an outer flow channel between the outer shell and the inner shell. A fuel discharge annulus is located between the outer flow channel and the inner flow channel and is configured to inject a fuel flow into a mixing area in a direction substantially parallel to an outer airflow through the outer flow channel and an inner flow through the inner flow channel. Further disclosed are a combustor including a plurality of premixers and a method of premixing air and fuel in a combustor.

  14. Effect of low air velocities on thermal homeostasis and comfort during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beumer, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of different low air velocities in maintaining thermal comfort and homeostasis during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity was investigated. Five male subjects exercised on a treadmill for successive ten minute periods at 60, 71, and 83 percent of maximum oxygen consumption at each of four air velocities, 30, 50, 80, and 120 ft/min, at 22 C and 62 percent relative humidity. No consistent trends or statistically significant differences between air velocities were found in body weight loss, sweat accumulation, or changes in rectal, skin, and body temperatures. Occurrence of the smallest body weight loss at 120 ft/min, the largest sweat accumulation at 30 ft/min, and the smallest rise in rectal temperature and the greatest drop in skin temperature at 120 ft/min all suggested more efficient evaporative cooling at the highest velocity. Heat storage at all velocities was evidenced by increased rectal and body temperatures; skin temperatures declined or increased only slightly. Body and rectal temperature increases corresponded with increased perception of warmth and slight thermal discomfort as exercise progressed. At all air velocities, mean thermal perception never exceeded warm and mean discomfort, greatest at 30 ft/min, was categorized at worst as uncomfortable; sensation of thermal neutrality and comfort returned rapidly after cessation of exercise. Suggestions for further elucidation of the effects of low air velocities on thermal comfort and homeostasis include larger numbers of subjects, more extensive skin temperature measurements and more rigorous analysis of the data from this study.

  15. Velocity field of a round jet in a cross flow for various jet injection angles and velocity ratios. [Langley V/STOL tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fearn, R. L.; Weston, R. P.

    1979-01-01

    A subsonic round jet injected from a flat plate into a subsonic crosswind of the same temperature was investigated. Velocity and pressure measurements in planes perpendicular to the path of the jet were made for nominal jet injection angles of 45 deg, 60 deg, 75 deg, 90 deg, and 105 deg and for jet/cross flow velocity ratios of four and eight. The velocity measurements were obtained to infer the properties of the vortex pair associated with a jet in a cross flow. Jet centerline and vortex trajectories were determined and fit with an empirical equation that includes the effects of jet injection angle, jet core length, and jet/cross flow velocity ratios.

  16. Predicting flow in aortic dissection: comparison of computational model with PC-MRI velocity measurements.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Z; Juli, C; Wood, N B; Gibbs, R G J; Xu, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Aortic dissection is a life-threatening process in which the weakened wall develops a tear, causing separation of wall layers. The dissected layers separate the original true aortic lumen and a newly created false lumen. If untreated, the condition can be fatal. Flow rate in the false lumen is a key feature for false lumen patency, which has been regarded as one of the most important predictors of adverse early and later outcomes. Detailed flow analysis in the dissected aorta may assist vascular surgeons in making treatment decisions, but computational models to simulate flow in aortic dissections often involve several assumptions. The purpose of this study is to assess the computational models adopted in previous studies by comparison with in vivo velocity data obtained by means of phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). Aortic dissection geometry was reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, while PC-MRI velocity data were used to define inflow conditions and to provide distal velocity components for comparison with the simulation results. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation incorporated a laminar-turbulent transition model, which is necessary for adequate flow simulation in aortic conditions. Velocity contours from PC-MRI and CFD in the two lumens at the distal plane were compared at four representative time points in the pulse cycle. The computational model successfully captured the complex regions of flow reversal and recirculation qualitatively, although quantitative differences exist. With a rigid wall assumption and exclusion of arch branches, the CFD model over-predicted the false lumen flow rate by 25% at peak systole. Nevertheless, an overall good agreement was achieved, confirming the physiological relevance and validity of the computational model for type B aortic dissection with a relatively stiff dissection flap.

  17. Influence of flow velocity on motor behavior of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Libin; Lin, Chenggang; Sun, Jiamin; Kan, Rentao; Yang, Hongsheng

    2015-05-15

    The influence of flow velocity on the motor behavior of the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus was investigated in the laboratory. Cameras were used to record sea cucumber movements and behavior analysis software was used to measure the distance traveled, time spent, upstream or downstream of the start position and the speed of movements. In general, the mean velocity of A. japonicus was below 0.7mms(-1). The maximum velocity recorded for all the sea cucumbers tested was for a large individual (89.25±17.11g), at a flow rate of 4.6±0.5cms(-1). Medium sized (19.68±5.53g) and large individuals moved significantly faster than small individuals (2.65±1.24g) at the same flow rate. A. japonicus moved significantly faster when there was a moderate current (4.6±0.5cms(-1) and 14.7±0.3cms(-1)), compared with the fast flow rate (29.3±3.7cms(-1)) and when there was no flow (0cms(-1)). Sea cucumbers did not show positive rheotaxis in general, but did move in a downstream direction at faster current speeds. Large, medium and small sized individuals moved downstream at the fastest current speed tested, 29.3±3.7cms(-1). When there was no water flow, sea cucumbers tended to move in an irregular pattern. The movement patterns show that the sea cucumber, A. japonicus can move across the direction of flow, and can move both upstream and downstream along the direction of flow.

  18. Effect of flow velocity on phytoplankton biomass and composition in a freshwater lake.

    PubMed

    Li, Feipeng; Zhang, Haiping; Zhu, Yiping; Xiao, Yihua; Chen, Ling

    2013-03-01

    Water flow has been widely accepted as a target to suppress algae blooms. However, the effectiveness of the flow regulation is unclear due to lack of hard evidences to illuminate the direct cause-effect relationship between hydrodynamic forces and algae growth. In this study, a field observation at a freshwater lake was conducted weekly or biweekly from July 2007 to December 2009. Phytoplankton biomass and composition were investigated at flow velocities of 0.03m/s, 0.06m/s, 0.10m/s, 0.15m/s and 0.30m/s in field enclosure experiments. The results from the field observation indicated that phytoplankton biomass and spatial distribution largely depend on the flow condition. A strong negative correlation (R(2)=-0.618, n=222, P<0.001) was found between Chl-a concentration and flow velocity. The results of enclosure experiments showed that turbulent flow has the inhibition effect on phytoplankton biomass, but less impact on composition. The average Chl-a concentrations in the flowing enclosures were 20.3%-37.5% lower than that in their corresponding still water enclosures during the entire experiment period. Shear stress within pumps might have caused up to 10% of cell damage. The present study highlights that a universal critical velocity for suppressing algae growth probably does not exist in freshwater bodies, for each has its unique physical, chemical and ecological characteristics. It is therefore suggested that sufficient experiments should be conducted for each water body before a critical flow condition is applied to reduce the algae bloom occurrence.

  19. Test Data of Flow Field of Shuttle SRM Nozzle Joint with Bond Defects, Using Unheated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, Leroy M.; McAnally, James V.; Hengel, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The nozzle-to-case joint on the Shuttle SRM (as redesigned after the Challenger accident) features an adhesive sealant filling and bonding the joint, with a wiper O-ring to prevent the adhesive from reaching and disabling the closure O-ring. Flawless implementation of that joint design would ensure that hot, corrosive propellant combustion gases never reach the closure O-ring. However, understanding the flow field related to bonding defects is prudent. A comprehensive test program was conducted to quantify such flow fields and associated heating environments. A two-dimensional, full-scale model represented 65 inches of the nozzle joint, using unheated air as the test medium, in a blowdown mode. Geometry variations modeled RSRM assembly tolerances, and two types of bonding defects: pullaways and blowholes. A range of the magnitude of each type defect was tested. Also a range of operational parameters was tested, representative of the RSRM flow environment, including duplication of RSRM Mach and Reynolds numbers. Extensive instrumentation was provided to quantify pressures, heat rates, and velocities. The resulting data established that larger geometric defects cause larger pressure and larger heating, at the closure O-ring region. Velocity trends were not so straight-forward. Variations in assembly tolerances did not generally affect flow fields or heating. Operational parameters affected flow fields and heating as might be expected, increasing density or velocity increased heating. Complete details of this test effort are presented.

  20. An experimental validation of a turbulence model for air flow in a mining chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branny, M.; Karch, M.; Wodziak, W.; Jaszczur, M.; Nowak, R.; Szmyd, J. S.

    2014-08-01

    In copper mines, excavation chambers are ventilated by jet fans. A fan is installed at the inlet of the dead-end chamber, which is usually 20-30m long. The effectiveness of ventilation depends on the stream range generated by the fan. The velocity field generated by the supply air stream is fully three-dimensional and the flow is turbulent. Currently, the parameters of 3D air flows are determined using the CFD approach. This paper presents the results of experimental testing and numerical simulations of airflow in a laboratory model of a blind channel, aired by a forced ventilation system. The aim of the investigation is qualitative and quantitative verification of computer modelling data. The analysed layout is a geometrically re-scaled and simplified model of a real object. The geometrical scale of the physical model is 1:10. The model walls are smooth, the channel cross-section is rectangular. Measurements were performed for the average airflow velocity in the inlet duct equal 35.4m/s, which gives a Reynolds number of about 180 000. The components of the velocity vector were measured using the Particle Image Velocimetry approach. The numerical procedures presented in this paper use two turbulence models: the standard k-ɛ model and the Reynolds Stress model. The experimental results have been compared against the results of numerical simulations. In the investigated domain of flow - extending from the air inlet to the blind wall of the chamber - we can distinguish two zones with recirculating flows. The first, reaching a distance of about lm from the inlet is characterized by intense mixing of air. A second vortex is formed into a distance greater than lm from the inlet. Such an image of the velocity field results from both the measurements and calculations. Based on this study, we can conclude that the RSM model provides better predictions than the standard k-ɛ model. Good qualitative agreement is achieved between Reynolds Stress model predictions and measured

  1. Dynamics of Air Temperature, Velocity and Ammonia Emissions in Enclosed and Conventional Pig Housing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Song, J. I.; Park, K.-H.; Jeon, J. H.; Choi, H. L.; Barroga, A. J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the dynamics of air temperature and velocity under two different ventilation and housing systems during summer and winter in Korea. The NH3 concentration of both housing systems was also investigated in relation to the pig’s growth. The ventilation systems used were; negative pressure type for the enclosed pig house (EPH) and natural airflow for the conventional pig house (CPH). Against a highly fluctuating outdoor temperature, the EPH was able to maintain a stable temperature at 24.8 to 29.1°C during summer and 17.9 to 23.1°C during winter whilst the CPH had a wider temperature variance during summer at 24.7 to 32.3°C. However, the temperature fluctuation of the CPH during winter was almost the same with that of EPH at 14.5 to 18.2°C. The NH3 levels in the CPH ranged from 9.31 to 16.9 mg/L during summer and 5.1 to 19.7 mg/L during winter whilst that of the EPH pig house was 7.9 to 16.1 mg/L and 3.7 to 9.6 mg/L during summer and winter, respectively. These values were less than the critical ammonia level for pigs with the EPH maintaining a lower level than the CPH in both winter and summer. The air velocity at pig nose level in the EPH during summer was 0.23 m/s, enough to provide comfort because of the unique design of the inlet feature. However, no air movement was observed in almost all the lower portions of the CPH during winter because of the absence of an inlet feature. There was a significant improvement in weight gain and feed intake of pigs reared in the EPH compared to the CPH (p<0.05). These findings proved that despite the difference in the housing systems, a stable indoor temperature was necessary to minimize the impact of an avoidable and highly fluctuating outdoor temperature. The EPH consistently maintained an effective indoor airspeed irrespective of season; however the CPH had defective and stagnant air at pig nose level during winter. Characteristics of airflow direction and pattern were consistent relative to

  2. Groundwater flow, velocity, and age in a thick, fine-grained till unit in southeastern Wisconsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, W. W.; Bradbury, K. R.

    1992-03-01

    Piezometer nests were installed at study sites in each of five north-south-trending end moraines of the late Pleistocene Oak Creek Formation in southeastern Wisconsin. The formation is composed primarily of a fine-grained glacial diamicton (till) and laterally continuous and discontinuous, coarse-grained lake and meltwater stream sediment. It overlies the Silurian dolomite aquifer, which is a source of drinking water to rural areas. The average vertical linear velocity and age of ground water in the Oak Creek Formation were estimated by three methods: Darcy's Law, environmental isotopes including 3H, δ2H, δ18O, and 14C (dissolved inorganic carbon), and solute transport modeling of 18O. The F-1 and Metro sites in the Tinley moraine showed excellent agreement among the three estimates of vertical velocity and showed the lowest velocity values (0.3-0.5 cm year -1 downward), which suggests that diffusion controls vertical mass transport at these sites. Although the extrapolated maximum age of ground water is 35 000 years, ground water below 75 m at these sites is probably not older than 15 000 years, which is the maximum age of the formation. Estimates of velocity showed less agreement at study sites in the Lake Border moraine system to the east and ranged from about 0.2 to 20.7 cm year -1; maximum groundwater age could range from 213 to 6000 years. Higher and more variable velocities, perhaps owing to thinner and more heterogeneous sediment in these areas, suggest that diffusion may not dominate vertical mass transport. Heterogeneity and fractures may also promote the development of groundwater flow systems dominated by lateral flow. Because of the uncertainty about the nature of groundwater flow, velocity, and age in the formation east of the Tinley moraine, future waste-disposal activity in southeastern Wisconsin should be confined to the thickest parts of the Tinley moraine near the present F-1 and Metro sites.

  3. Groundwater flow, velocity, and age in a thick, fine-grained till unit in southeastern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpkins, W.W.; Bradbury, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Piezometer nests were installed at study sites in each of five north-south-trending end moraines of the late Pleistocene Oak Creek Formation in southeastern Wisconsin. The formation is composed primarily of a fine-grained glacial diamicton (till) and laterally continuous and discontinuous, coarse-grained lake and meltwater stream sediment. It overlies the Silurian dolomite aquifer, which is a source of drinking water to rural areas. The average vertical linear velocity and age of ground water in the Oak Creek Formation were estimated by three methods: Darcy's Law, environmental isotopes including 3H, ??2H, ??18O, and 14C (dissolved inorganic carbon), and solute transport modeling of 18O. The F-1 and Metro sites in the Tinley moraine showed excellent agreement among the three estimates of vertical velocity and showed the lowest velocity values (0.3-0.5 cm year-1 downward), which suggests that diffusion controls vertical mass transport at these sites. Although the extrapolated maximum age of ground water is 35 000 years, ground water below 75 m at these sites is probably not older than 15 000 years, which is the maximum age of the formation. Estimates of velocity showed less agreement at study sites in the Lake Border moraine system to the east and ranged from about 0.2 to 20.7 cm year-1; maximum groundwater age could range from 213 to 6000 years. Higher and more variable velocities, perhaps owing to thinner and more heterogeneous sediment in these areas, suggest that diffusion may not dominate vertical mass transport. Heterogeneity and fractures may also promote the development of groundwater flow systems dominated by lateral flow. Because of the uncertainty about the nature of groundwater flow, velocity, and age in the formation east of the Tinley moraine, future waste-disposal activity in southeastern Wisconsin should be confined to the thickest parts of the Tinley moraine near the present F-1 and Metro sites. ?? 1992.

  4. Line scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for three-dimensional microfluidic flow velocity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiaotao; Shi, Xianke; Korzh, Vladimir; Yu, Hanry; Wohland, Thorsten

    2009-03-01

    The flow direction of microfluidics in biological applications is not limited to two dimensions, but often extends to three dimensions. Currently there are optical methods available for the measurement of 3-D microfluidic flow vectors, but with low spatial resolution. Line scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) was proposed to determine flow directions in 2-D within microchannels and small blood vessels in our previous work. Importantly, its spatial resolution was demonstrated to be as good as 0.5 μm. In this work, we extend line scan FCS to the third dimension for the characterization of 3-D flow velocity vectors. The spatial resolution is close to the diffraction limit using a scan length of 0.5 μm in all three dimensions. The feasibility of line scan FCS for 3-D microfluidic flow is verified by measurements in microchannels and small blood vessels of zebrafish embryos.

  5. Velocity Vector Field Visualization of Flow in Liquid Acquisition Device Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Chao, David F.; Hall, Nancy R.; Zhang, Nengli

    2012-01-01

    A capillary flow liquid acquisition device (LAD) for cryogenic propellants has been developed and tested in NASA Glenn Research Center to meet the requirements of transferring cryogenic liquid propellants from storage tanks to an engine in reduced gravity environments. The prototypical mesh screen channel LAD was fabricated with a mesh screen, covering a rectangular flow channel with a cylindrical outlet tube, and was tested with liquid oxygen (LOX). In order to better understand the performance in various gravity environments and orientations at different liquid submersion depths of the screen channel LAD, a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of LOX flow through the LAD screen channel was undertaken. The resulting velocity vector field visualization for the flow in the channel has been used to reveal the gravity effects on the flow in the screen channel.

  6. Low Dimensional Tools for Flow-Structure Interaction Problems: Application to Micro Air Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, Ryan F.; Glauser, Mark N.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2003-01-01

    A low dimensional tool for flow-structure interaction problems based on Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) and modified Linear Stochastic Estimation (mLSE) has been proposed and was applied to a Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) wing. The method utilizes the dynamic strain measurements from the wing to estimate the POD expansion coefficients from which an estimation of the velocity in the wake can be obtained. For this experiment the MAV wing was set at five different angles of attack, from 0 deg to 20 deg. The tunnel velocities varied from 44 to 58 ft/sec with corresponding Reynolds numbers of 46,000 to 70,000. A stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to measure the wake of the MAV wing simultaneously with the signals from the twelve dynamic strain gauges mounted on the wing. With 20 out of 2400 POD modes, a reasonable estimation of the flow flow was observed. By increasing the number of POD modes, a better estimation of the flow field will occur. Utilizing the simultaneously sampled strain gauges and flow field measurements in conjunction with mLSE, an estimation of the flow field with lower energy modes is reasonable. With these results, the methodology for estimating the wake flow field from just dynamic strain gauges is validated.

  7. Anomalous Velocity Dependence of the Friction Coefficient of an Air Supported Pulley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crismani, Matteo; Nauenberg, Michael

    2009-11-01

    A standard undergraduate lab exercise to verify Newton's law, F = ma, is to measure the acceleration a of a glider of mass m suspended on an air track. In our experiment the glider is accelerated by a thin tape attached to the glider at one end, and to a weight of mass M at the other end. The weight hangs vertically via a pulley over which the tape is suspended by air pressure. In the absence of friction, the force pulling the glider is F = (M m/(M + m)g, where g is the acceleration of gravity. To the accuracy provided by the fast electronic timers (accurate to 1/10000 second) used in our experiment to measure the velocity and the acceleration of the glider, we verified that the friction due to the air track can be neglected. But we found that this is not the case for the friction due to the air pulley which adds a component -v/T to the force F on the glider, where T is the friction coefficient. We have measured the dependence of this coefficient on v, and found an excellent analytic fit to our data. This fit deviates considerable from the conventional assumption that 1/T is a constant and/or depends linearly on v.

  8. A comparison of measured and modeled velocity fields for a laminar flow in a porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. D.; Apte, S. V.; Liburdy, J. A.; Ziazi, R. M.; He, X.; Finn, J. R.; Patil, V. A.

    2015-11-01

    Obtaining highly-resolved velocity data from experimental measurements in porous media is a significant challenge. The goal of this work is to compare the velocity fields measured in a randomly-packed porous medium obtained from particle image velocimetry (PIV) with corresponding fields predicted from direct numerical simulation (DNS). Experimentally, the porous medium was comprised of 15 mm diameter spherical beads made of optical glass placed in a glass flow cell to create the packed bed. A solution of ammonium thiocyanate was refractive-index matched to the glass creating a medium that could be illuminated with a laser sheet without distortion. The bead center locations were quantified using the imaging system so that the geometry of the porous medium was known very accurately. Two-dimensional PIV data were collected and processed to provide high-resolution velocity fields at a single plane within the porous medium. A Cartesian-grid-based fictitious domain approach was adopted for the direct numerical simulation of flow through the same geometry as the experimental measurements and without any adjustable parameters. The uncertainties associated with characterization of the pore geometry, PIV measurements, and DNS predictions were all systematically quantified. Although uncertainties in bead position measurements led to minor discrepancies in the comparison of the velocity fields, the axial and normal velocity deviations exhibited normalized root mean squared deviations (NRMSD) of only 11.32% and 4.74%, respectively. The high fidelity of both the experimental and numerical methods have significant implications for understanding and even for engineering the micro-macro relationship in porous materials. The ability to measure and model sub-pore-scale flow features also has relevance to the development of upscaled models for flow in porous media, where physically reasonable closure models must be developed at the sub-pore scale. These results provide valuable data

  9. Effect of particle velocity fluctuations on the inertia coupling in two-phase flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drew, Donald A.

    1989-01-01

    Consistent forms for the interfacial force, the interfacial pressure, the Reynolds stresses and the particle stress have been derived for the inviscid, irrotational incompressible flow of fluid in a dilute suspension of spheres. The particles are assumed to have a velocity distribution, giving rise to an effective pressure and stress in the particle phase. The velocity fluctuations also contribute in the fluid Reynolds stress and in the (elastic) stress field inside the spheres. The relation of these constitutive equations to the force on an individual sphere is discussed.

  10. Evaluation of Kink Generation Rate and Step Flow Velocity on Si(111) during Wet Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasunuma, Ryu; Yamabe, Kikuo

    2013-11-01

    The rate of kink generation in ultralow dissolved-oxygen water (LOW) at a <11bar 2> oriented atomic step on a Si(111) surface was experimentally determined. By controlling the step length by adding SiO2 line patterns that prevent kink propagation across the patterns, it was found that step flow velocity was proportional to step length when the step was short. From the proportionality coefficient, the rate of kink generation was evaluated to be 800 cm-1 s-1. Furthermore, the velocity of kink propagation along a step was also evaluated as 40 nm/s.

  11. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  12. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  13. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  14. 40 CFR 86.313-79 - Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air flow measurement specifications... Procedures § 86.313-79 Air flow measurement specifications; diesel engines. (a) The air flow measurement method used must have a range large enough to accurately measure the air flow over the engine...

  15. Parametric study of fluid flow and heat transfer over louvered fins of air heat pump evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muszyński, Tomasz; Kozieł, Sławomir Marcin

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional numerical investigations of the fluid flow and heat transfer have been carried out for the laminar flow of the louvered fin-plate heat exchanger, designed to work as an air-source heat pump evaporator. The transferred heat and the pressure drop predicted by simulation have been compared with the corresponding experimental data taken from the literature. Two dimensional analyses of the louvered fins with varying geometry have been conducted. Simulations have been performed for different geometries with varying louver pitch, louver angle and different louver blade number. Constant inlet air temperature and varying velocity ranging from 2 to 8 m/s was assumed in the numerical experiments. The air-side performance is evaluated by calculating the temperature and the pressure drop ratio. Efficiency curves are obtained that can be used to select optimum louver geometry for the selected inlet parameters. A total of 363 different cases of various fin geometry for 7 different air velocities were investigated. The maximum heat transfer improvement interpreted in terms of the maximum efficiency has been obtained for the louver angle of 16 ° and the louver pitch of 1.35 mm. The presented results indicate that varying louver geometry might be a convenient way of enhancing performance of heat exchangers.

  16. Explaining the subpulse drift velocity of pulsar magnetosphere within the space-charge limited flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozova, Viktoriya S.; Ahmedov, Bobomurat J.; Zanotti, Olindo

    2014-10-01

    We try to explain the subpulse drift phenomena adopting the space-charge limited flow model and comparing the plasma drift velocity in the inner region of pulsar magnetospheres with the observed velocity of drifting subpulses. We apply the approach described in a recent paper of van Leeuwen & Timokhin, where it was shown that the standard estimation of the subpulse drift velocity through the total value of the scalar potential drop in the inner gap gives inaccurate results, while the exact expression relating the drift velocity to the gradient of the scalar potential should be used instead. After considering a selected sample of sources taken from the catalogue of Weltevrede et al. with coherently drifting subpulses and reasonably known observing geometry, we show that their subpulse drift velocities would correspond to the drift of the plasma located very close or above the pair formation front. Moreover, a detailed analysis of PSR B0826-34 and PSR B0818-41 reveals that the variation of the subpulse separation with the pulse longitude can be successfully explained by the dependence of the plasma drift velocity on the angular coordinates.

  17. Pilot model expansion tunnel test flow properties obtained from velocity, pressure, and probe measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, W. J.; Moore, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Velocity-profile, pitot-pressure, and supplemental probe measurements were made at the nozzle exist of an expansion tunnel (a modification to the Langley pilot model expansion tube) for a nozzle net condition of a nitrogen test sample with a velocity of 4.5 km/sec and a density 0.005 times the density of nitrogen at standard conditions, both with the nozzle initially immersed in a helium atmosphere and with the nozzle initially evacuated. The purpose of the report is to present the results of these measurements and some of the physical properties of the nitrogen test sample which can be inferred from the measured results. The main conclusions reached are that: the velocity profiles differ for two nozzle conditions; regions of the flow field can be found where the velocity is uniform to within 5 percent and constant for several hundred microseconds; the velocity of the nitrogen test sample is reduced due to passage through the nozzle; and the velocity profiles do not significantly reflect the large variations which occur in the inferred density profiles.

  18. Flow field velocity measurements for non-isothermal systems. [of chemically reactive flow inside fused silica CVD reactor vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. J.; Hyer, P. V.; Culotta, P. W.; Clark, I. O.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental techniques which can be potentially utilized to measure the gas velocity fields in nonisothermal CVD systems both in ground-based and space-based investigations are considered. The advantages and disadvantages of a three-component laser velocimetry (LV) system that was adapted specifically for quantitative determination of the mixed convective flows in a chamber for crystal growth and film formation by CVD are discussed. Data from a horizontal research CVD reactor indicate that current models for the effects of thermophoretic force are not adequate to predict the thermophoretic bias in arbitrary flow configurations. It is concluded that LV techniques are capable of characterizing the fluid dynamics of a CVD reactor at typical growth temperatures. Thermal effects are shown to dominate and stabilize the fluid dynamics of the reactor. Heating of the susceptor increases the gas velocities parallel to the face of a slanted susceptor by up to a factor of five.

  19. Equipment for Measuring Air Flow, Air Temperature, Relative Humidity, and Carbon Dioxide in Schools. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Bruce W.

    Information on equipment and techniques that school facility personnel may use to evaluate IAQ conditions are discussed. Focus is placed on the IAQ parameters of air flow, air temperature, relative humidity, as well as carbon dioxide and the equipment used to measure these factors. Reasons for measurement and for when the measurement of these…

  20. Real-time GPU implementation of transverse oscillation vector velocity flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradway, David Pierson; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Krebs, Andreas; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Kjær, Carsten Straso; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-03-01

    Rapid estimation of blood velocity and visualization of complex flow patterns are important for clinical use of diagnostic ultrasound. This paper presents real-time processing for two-dimensional (2-D) vector flow imaging which utilizes an off-the-shelf graphics processing unit (GPU). In this work, Open Computing Language (OpenCL) is used to estimate 2-D vector velocity flow in vivo in the carotid artery. Data are streamed live from a BK Medical 2202 Pro Focus UltraView Scanner to a workstation running a research interface software platform. Processing data from a 50 millisecond frame of a duplex vector flow acquisition takes 2.3 milliseconds seconds on an Advanced Micro Devices Radeon HD 7850 GPU card. The detected velocities are accurate to within the precision limit of the output format of the display routine. Because this tool was developed as a module external to the scanner's built-in processing, it enables new opportunities for prototyping novel algorithms, optimizing processing parameters, and accelerating the path from development lab to clinic.

  1. Measuring Sap-Flow Velocity at Low Power with a Single Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, B.; Glaser, S. D.

    2012-12-01

    The measurement of plant evapotranspiration under natural conditions provides information that is useful for real-time water management and understanding ecological services. It is common to use sap flow measurements to estimate ET. The common instruments to measure sap flow are unwieldy to install, consume large amounts of electrical energy, and involve a number of simplifying assumptions to transform from electrical input to heat to sap flow estimates. We present new instrumentation for an ET sensor that uses a single thermistor probe is used to implement a thermal pulse decay method to measure sap-flow velocity, which can then be converted to a volumetric flow-rate that is indicative of plant transpiration. The instrument makes use of the thermistor self-heating mode to rapidly heat the transducer isothermally. The temperature decay over time is directly proportional to sap-flow velocity. The method uses 2 milliamps to make a measurement so that a D-cell battery can supply a useful lifetime for an array of sensors. We show the results of device calibration in controlled laboratory conditions and in the field.

  2. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  3. Effect of airstream velocity on mean drop diameters of water sprays produced by pressure and air atomizing nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning radiometer was used to determine the effect of airstream velocity on the mean drop diameter of water sprays produced by pressure atomizing and air atomizing fuel nozzles used in previous combustion studies. Increasing airstream velocity from 23 to 53.4 meters per second reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 50 percent with both types of fuel nozzles. The use of a sonic cup attached to the tip of an air assist nozzle reduced the Sauter mean diameter by approximately 40 percent. Test conditions included airstream velocities of 23 to 53.4 meters per second at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  4. Air/water two-phase flow test tunnel for airfoil studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.

    1990-02-01

    A test tunnel for the study of airfoil performances under air/water two-phase flow condition has been designed and constructed. This facility will serve for a better understanding of the flow phenomena and characteristics of hydraulic machinery under gas/ liquid two-phase flow operating conditions. At the test section of the tunnel, a two-dimensional isolated airfoil or a cascade of airfoils is installed in a two-phase inlet flow with a uniform velocity (up to 10 m/s) and void fraction (up to 12%) distribution. The details of the tunnel structure and the measuring systems are described and the basic characteristics of the constructed tunnel are also given. As an example of the test results, void fraction distribution around a test airfoil is shown.

  5. Air/water two-phase flow test tunnel for airfoil studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, H.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.

    1994-01-01

    A test tunnel for the study of airfoil performances under air/water two-phase flow condition has been designed and constructed. This facility will serve for a better understanding of the flow phenomena and characteristics of hydraulic machinery under gas/ liquid two-phase flow operating conditions. At the test section of the tunnel, a two-dimensional isolated airfoil or a cascade of airfoils is installed in a two-phase inlet flow with a uniform velocity (up to 10 m/s) and void fraction (up to 12%) distribution. The details of the tunnel structure and the measuring systems are described and the basic characteristics of the constructed tunnel are also given. As an example of the test results, void fraction distribution around a test airfoil is shown.

  6. Determining the frequency, depth and velocity of preferential flow by high frequency soil moisture monitoring.

    PubMed

    Hardie, Marcus; Lisson, Shaun; Doyle, Richard; Cotching, William

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow in agricultural soils has been demonstrated to result in agrochemical mobilisation to shallow ground water. Land managers and environmental regulators need simple cost effective techniques for identifying soil - land use combinations in which preferential flow occurs. Existing techniques for identifying preferential flow have a range of limitations including; often being destructive, non in situ, small sampling volumes, or are subject to artificial boundary conditions. This study demonstrated that high frequency soil moisture monitoring using a multi-sensory capacitance probe mounted within a vertically rammed access tube, was able to determine the occurrence, depth, and wetting front velocity of preferential flow events following rainfall. Occurrence of preferential flow was not related to either rainfall intensity or rainfall amount, rather preferential flow occurred when antecedent soil moisture content was below 226 mm soil moisture storage (0-70 cm). Results indicate that high temporal frequency soil moisture monitoring may be used to identify soil type - land use combinations in which the presence of preferential flow increases the risk of shallow groundwater contamination by rapid transport of agrochemicals through the soil profile. However use of high frequency based soil moisture monitoring to determine agrochemical mobilisation risk may be limited by, inability to determine the volume of preferential flow, difficulty observing macropore flow at high antecedent soil moisture content, and creation of artificial voids during installation of access tubes in stony soils.

  7. Determining the frequency, depth and velocity of preferential flow by high frequency soil moisture monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardie, Marcus; Lisson, Shaun; Doyle, Richard; Cotching, William

    2013-01-01

    Preferential flow in agricultural soils has been demonstrated to result in agrochemical mobilisation to shallow ground water. Land managers and environmental regulators need simple cost effective techniques for identifying soil - land use combinations in which preferential flow occurs. Existing techniques for identifying preferential flow have a range of limitations including; often being destructive, non in situ, small sampling volumes, or are subject to artificial boundary conditions. This study demonstrated that high frequency soil moisture monitoring using a multi-sensory capacitance probe mounted within a vertically rammed access tube, was able to determine the occurrence, depth, and wetting front velocity of preferential flow events following rainfall. Occurrence of preferential flow was not related to either rainfall intensity or rainfall amount, rather preferential flow occurred when antecedent soil moisture content was below 226 mm soil moisture storage (0-70 cm). Results indicate that high temporal frequency soil moisture monitoring may be used to identify soil type - land use combinations in which the presence of preferential flow increases the risk of shallow groundwater contamination by rapid transport of agrochemicals through the soil profile. However use of high frequency based soil moisture monitoring to determine agrochemical mobilisation risk may be limited by, inability to determine the volume of preferential flow, difficulty observing macropore flow at high antecedent soil moisture content, and creation of artificial voids during installation of access tubes in stony soils.

  8. The measurement error analysis when a pitot probe is used in supersonic air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, XiWen; Hao, PengFei; Yao, ZhaoHui

    2011-04-01

    Pitot probes enable a simple and convenient way of measuring mean velocity in air flow. The contrastive numerical simulation between free supersonic airflow and pitot tube at different positions in supersonic air flow was performed using Navier-Stokes equations, the ENN scheme with time-dependent boundary conditions (TDBC) and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The physical experimental results including pitot pressure and shadowgraph are also presented. Numerical results coincide with the experimental data. The flow characteristics of the pitot probe on the supersonic flow structure show that the measurement gives actually the total pressure behind the detached shock wave by using the pitot probe to measure the total pressure. The measurement result of the distribution of the total pressure can still represent the real free jet flow. The similar features of the intersection and reflection of shock waves can be identified. The difference between the measurement results and the actual ones is smaller than 10%. When the pitot probe is used to measure the region of L=0-4 D, the measurement is smaller than the real one due to the increase of the shock wave strength. The difference becomes larger where the waves intersect. If the pitot probe is put at L=8 D-10 D, where the flow changes from supersonic to subsonic, the addition of the pitot probe turns the original supersonic flow region subsonic and causes bigger measurement errors.

  9. Simulation of 3-D Nonequilibrium Seeded Air Flow in the NASA-Ames MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D nonequilibrium seeded air flow in the NASA-Ames experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed us ing a 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime: The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. The algorithm has been extended in the present study to account for nonequilibrium seeded air flows. The electrical conductivity of the flow is determined using the program of Park. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the seeded flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  10. Formation of thermal flow fields and chemical transport in air and water by atmospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Tetsuji; Iwafuchi, Yutaka; Morfill, Gregor E.; Sato, Takehiko

    2011-05-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is a potential tool for medical purposes, e.g. disinfection/sterilization. In order for it to be effective and functional, it is crucial to understand the transport mechanism of chemically reactive species in air as well as in liquid. An atmospheric plasma discharge was produced between a platinum pin electrode and the surface of water. The thermal flow field of a cold atmospheric plasma as well as its chemical components was measured. A gas flow with a velocity of around 15 m s-1 to the water's surface was shown to be induced by the discharge. This air flow induced a circulating flow in the water from the discharge point at the water's surface because of friction. It was also demonstrated that the chemical components generated in air dissolved in water and the properties of the water changed. The reactive species were believed to be distributed mainly by convective transport in water, because the variation in the pH profile indicated by a methyl red solution resembled the induced flow pattern.

  11. Multiple critical velocities in oscillatory flow of superfluid 4He due to quartz tuning forks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoranzer, D.; Jackson, M. J.; Tsepelin, V.; Poole, M.; Woods, A. J.; Človečko, M.; Skrbek, L.

    2016-12-01

    We report recent investigations into the transition to turbulence in superfluid 4He, realized experimentally by measuring the drag forces acting on two custom-made quartz tuning forks with fundamental resonances at 6.5 kHz and 55.5 kHz, in the temperature range 10 mK to 2.17 K. In pure superfluid in the zero temperature limit, three distinct critical velocities were observed with both tuning forks. We discuss the significance of all critical velocities and associate the third critical velocity reported here with the development of large vortical structures in the flow, which thus starts to mimic turbulence in classical fluids. The interpretation of our results is directly linked to previous experimental work with oscillators such as tuning forks, grids, and vibrating wires, focusing on the behavior of purely superfluid 4He at very low temperatures.

  12. Stratified shear flow in an inclined duct: near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Jamie; Lefauve, Adrien; Dalziel, Stuart; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    We present results from a new experimental setup to study the exchange flow in an inclined square duct between two reservoirs containing fluids of different densities. This system can exhibit stratified shear wave motions, and has a distinct parameter threshold above which turbulence is triggered and progressively fills a larger fraction of the duct. To probe these intrinsically 3D flows, we introduce a new setup in which a traversing laser sheet allows us to obtain near-instantaneous 3D velocity and density fields. Three components of velocity are measured on successive 2D planes using stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) with density information obtained simultaneously using laser induced fluorescence (LIF). Supported by EPSRC Programme Grant EP/K034529/1 entitled "Mathematical Underpinnings of Stratified Turbulence".

  13. Simultaneous measurement of 3D zooplankton trajectories and surrounding fluid velocity field in complex flows.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Deepak; Gemmell, Brad J; Hallberg, Michael P; Longmire, Ellen K; Buskey, Edward J

    2015-11-01

    We describe an automated, volumetric particle image velocimetry (PIV) and tracking method that measures time-resolved, 3D zooplankton trajectories and surrounding volumetric fluid velocity fields simultaneously and non-intrusively. The method is demonstrated for groups of copepods flowing past a wall-mounted cylinder. We show that copepods execute escape responses when subjected to a strain rate threshold upstream of a cylinder, but the same threshold range elicits no escape responses in the turbulent wake downstream. The method was also used to document the instantaneous slip velocity of zooplankton and the resulting differences in trajectory between zooplankton and non-inertial fluid particles in the unsteady wake flow, showing the method's capability to quantify drift for both passive and motile organisms in turbulent environments. Applications of the method extend to any group of organisms interacting with the surrounding fluid environment, where organism location, larger-scale eddies and smaller-scale fluid deformation rates can all be tracked and analyzed.

  14. Improved flow visualization technique for quantitative velocity measurement in small test volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, G. R.; Marschall, E.; Esdorn, J. H.

    1985-02-01

    A flow visualization technique which utilized a photochromic dye in solution was introduced by Popovich and Hummel in 1967. The dye was activated along narrow trace lines by passing sharply focused beams from an ultraviolet light source through the solution. The movement of the dye traces were recorded by high-speed cinematography and velocities were found from analysis of the resulting pictures. Two variations to this basic method are described. These permit more accurate velocity measurements to be made in certain liquid systems where test volumes are small or near physical barriers, and where the flow is two dimensional or is time dependent. Manufacture of a suitable dye and construction of an inexpensive pulse laser which may be used as an ultraviolet light source are discussed.

  15. Methods to improve pressure, temperature and velocity accuracies of filtered Rayleigh scattering measurements in gaseous flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, Ulrich; Burow, Eike; Stockhausen, Guido; Willert, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Frequency scanning filtered Rayleigh scattering is able to simultaneously provide time-averaged measurements of pressure, temperature and velocity in gaseous flows. By extending the underlying mathematical model, a robust alternative to existing approaches is introduced. Present and proposed model functions are then characterized during a detailed uncertainty analysis. Deviations between the analytical solution of a jet flow experiment and measured results could be related to laser-induced background radiation as well as the Rayleigh scattering’s spectral distribution. In applying a background correction method and by replacing the standard lineshape model by an empirical formulation, detrimental effects on pressure, temperature and velocity accuracies could be reduced below 15 hPa, 2.5 K and 2.7 m s-1.

  16. Absent or reversed end diastolic flow velocity in the umbilical artery and necrotising enterocolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Malcolm, G; Ellwood, D; Devonald, K; Beilby, R; Henderson-Smart, D

    1991-01-01

    Absent or reversed end diastolic flow (AREDF) velocities in the umbilical artery were identified in 25 high risk pregnancies. In six pregnancies the fetus was abnormal and all but one of these ended in perinatal death. Of the 19 morphologically normal fetuses, three died in utero and there were four neonatal or infant deaths. The mortality rate was 48% for all pregnancies and 37% for those with morphologically normal fetuses. There was a highly significant increased risk for the development of necrotising enterocolitis in these morphologically normal fetuses with AREDF (53%) compared with controls (6%) who did have umbilical artery end diastolic flow velocities in fetal life. There were no significant differences between the matched pairs for parameters of neonatal outcome chosen to reflect neonatal morbidity. These findings demonstrate the close association between AREDF and necrotising enterocolitis that appears to be independent of other variables such as degree of growth retardation, prematurity, and perinatal asphyxia. PMID:1863128

  17. Interchange and Flow Velocity Shear Instabilities in the Presence of Finite Larmor Radius Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikov, V.; Kim, T.; Mishin, E.; Genoni, T.; Rose, D.; Mehlhorn, T.

    2014-09-01

    Ionospheric irregularities cause scintillations of electromagnetic signals that can severely affect navigation and transionospheric communication, in particular during Equatorial Plasma Bubbles (EPBs) events. However, the existing ionospheric models do not describe density irregularities with typical scales of several ion Larmor radii that affect UHF and L bands. These irregularities can be produced in the process of nonlinear evolution of interchange or flow velocity shear instabilities. The model of nonlinear development of these instabilities based on two-fluid hydrodynamic description with inclusion of finite Larmor radius effects will be presented. The derived nonlinear equations will be numerically solved by using the code Flute, which was originally developed for High Energy Density applications and modified to describe interchange and flow velocity shear instabilities in the ionosphere. The high-resolution simulations will be driven by the ambient conditions corresponding to the AFRL C/NOFS satellite low-resolution data during EPBs.

  18. Humic acid transport in saturated porous media: influence of flow velocity and influent concentration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Du, Lina; Horton, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of humic acids (HAs) in porous media can provide important and practical evidence needed for accurate prediction of organic/inorganic contaminant transport in different environmental media and interfaces. A series of column transport experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport of HA in different porous media at different flow velocities and influent HA concentrations. Low flow velocity and influent concentration were found to favor the adsorption and deposition of HA onto sand grains packed into columns and to give higher equilibrium distribution coefficients and deposition rate coefficients, which resulted in an increased fraction of HA being retained in columns. Consequently, retardation factors were increased and the transport of HA through the columns was delayed. These results suggest that the transport of HA in porous media is primarily controlled by the attachment of HA to the solid matrix. Accordingly, this attachment should be considered in studies of HA behavior in porous media.

  19. Axial flow reversal and its significance in air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Das, A.; Yin, D.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years the potential of air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) flotation for fine coal cleaning has been demonstrated both in pilot plant testing and in a plant-site demonstration program. Further improvements in the ASH technology will depend, to some extent, on improved understanding of the complex multiphase fluid flow. Froth transport plays a very important role in determining the efficiency of fine coal cleaning by ASH flotation. It should be noted that the surface of zero axial velocity is of particular significance in froth transport because the location of this surface actually accounts for the amount of froth being transported to the overflow. In this regard, the axial flow reversal has been examined based on specially designed tracer experiments. On the basis of these experimental results, modeling efforts were made to characterize the flow pattern in the ASH. The theoretical predictions based on turbulent fluid dynamic considerations were found to describe experimental observations regarding the surface of zero axial velocity. These results that define the surface of zero axial velocity together with froth phase features established from X-ray CT measurements provide an excellent description of the flow characteristics in ASH flotation and explain the effect of various process variables, such as dimensionless area (A*), dimensionless flowrate (Q*), inlet pressure, percent solids, etc., on flotation recovery. On this basis it is expected that further advances in the design and operation of the ASH system can be made, leading to more efficient use of the ASH technology for fine coal cleaning.

  20. Combustion and Flammability Characteristics of Solids at Microgravity in very Small Velocity Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez-Tarifa, C.; Rodriguez, M.

    1999-01-01

    Fires still remain as one of the most important safety risks in manned spacecraft. This problem will become even more important in long endurance non orbital flights in which maintenance will be non existing or very difficult. The basic process of a fire is the combustion of a solid at microgravity conditions in O2/N2 mixtures. Although a large number of research programs have been carried out on this problem, especially on flame spreading, several aspects of these processes are not yet well understood. It may be mentioned, for example, the temperature and characteristic of low emissivity flames in the visual range that take place in some conditions at microgravity; and there exists a lack of knowledge on the influence of key parameters, such as convective flow velocities of the order of magnitude of typical oxygen diffusion velocities. The "Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidodinamica" of the "Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Aeronauticos" is conducting a research program on the combustion of solids at reduced gravity conditions within O2/N2 mixtures. The material utilized has been polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in the form of rectangular slabs and hollow cylinders. The main parameters of the process have been small convective flow velocities (including velocity angle with the direction of the spreading flame) and oxygen concentration. Some results have also been obtained on the influence of material thickness and gas pressure.

  1. Slip velocity and stresses in granular Poiseuille flow via event-driven simulation.

    PubMed

    Chikkadi, Vijayakumar; Alam, Meheboob

    2009-08-01

    Event-driven simulations of inelastic smooth hard disks are used to probe the slip velocity and rheology in gravity-driven granular Poiseuille flow. It is shown that both the slip velocity (U(w)) and its gradient (dU(w)/dy) depend crucially on the mean density, wall roughness, and inelastic dissipation. While the gradient of slip velocity follows a single power-law relation with Knudsen number, the variation in U(w) with Kn shows three distinct regimes in terms of Knudsen number. An interesting possibility of Knudsen-number-dependent specularity coefficient emerges from a comparison of our results with a first-order transport theory for the slip velocity. Simulation results on stresses are compared with kinetic-theory predictions, with reasonable agreement of our data in the quasielastic limit. The deviation of simulations from theory increases with increasing dissipation which is tied to the increasing magnitude of the first normal stress difference (N(1)) that shows interesting nonmonotonic behavior with density. As in simple shear flow, there is a sign change of N(1) at some critical density and its collisional component and the related collisional anisotropy are responsible for this sign reversal.

  2. Satellite Angular Velocity Estimation Based on Star Images and Optical Flow Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Accardo, Domenico; Grassi, Michele

    2013-01-01

    An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components. PMID:24072023

  3. Satellite angular velocity estimation based on star images and optical flow techniques.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Rufino, Giancarlo; Accardo, Domenico; Grassi, Michele

    2013-09-25

    An optical flow-based technique is proposed to estimate spacecraft angular velocity based on sequences of star-field images. It does not require star identification and can be thus used to also deliver angular rate information when attitude determination is not possible, as during platform de tumbling or slewing. Region-based optical flow calculation is carried out on successive star images preprocessed to remove background. Sensor calibration parameters, Poisson equation, and a least-squares method are then used to estimate the angular velocity vector components in the sensor rotating frame. A theoretical error budget is developed to estimate the expected angular rate accuracy as a function of camera parameters and star distribution in the field of view. The effectiveness of the proposed technique is tested by using star field scenes generated by a hardware-in-the-loop testing facility and acquired by a commercial-off-the shelf camera sensor. Simulated cases comprise rotations at different rates. Experimental results are presented which are consistent with theoretical estimates. In particular, very accurate angular velocity estimates are generated at lower slew rates, while in all cases the achievable accuracy in the estimation of the angular velocity component along boresight is about one order of magnitude worse than the other two components.

  4. Optical Air Flow Measurements in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Jentink, Henk W.

    2004-01-01

    This document has been written to assist the flight-test engineer and researcher in using optical flow measurements in flight applications. The emphasis is on describing tradeoffs in system design to provide desired measurement performance as currently understood. Optical system components are discussed with examples that illustrate the issues. The document concludes with descriptions of optical measurement systems designed for a variety of applications including aeronautics research, airspeed measurement, and turbulence hazard detection. Theoretical discussion is minimized, but numerous references are provided to supply ample opportunity for the reader to understand the theoretical underpinning of optical concepts.

  5. A comparison of flow velocities measured using an impact-pressure probe and electron time of flight in a supersonic flow. Implications for electron thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostefaoui, T.; Rebrion-Rowe, C.; Travers, D.; Rowe, B. R.

    2000-04-01

    The bulk velocity of electrons in a burst of plasma created in a uniform supersonic flow by a pulsed electron beam has been measured by a time-of-flight technique using a Langmuir probe. This velocity is compared with the neutral-species bulk velocity deduced from impact-pressure measurements. This comparison allows a determination of an upper limit of the electron drift velocity to be made, which in turn shows that electrons are well thermalized in the flow. Therefore this kind of flowing supersonic afterglow can be used for electron-attachment studies at very low temperatures.

  6. Cerebral blood flow velocity during and after sustained isometric skeletal muscle contractions in man.

    PubMed

    Imms, F J; Russo, F; Iyawe, V I; Segal, M B

    1998-04-01

    1. Twenty-seven young subjects used their right hand to perform sustained, isometric contractions at 40% of maximum for 2 min while lying supine. 2. During the last 30 s of exercise, mean arterial blood pressure increased by 38 +/- 4 mmHg (mean +/- S.E.M.) and heart rate by 27 +/- 2 beats/min. 3. Nineteen of the subjects respired eucapnically during exercise, increasing ventilation by 4.1 +/- 0.5 litres/min. Eight subjects hyperventilated (7.1-19.6 litres/min) and decreased end-tidal PCO2 by 8.2 to 15.1 mmHg during the last minute of exercise. 4. In the eucapnic subjects mean flow velocity in the right (i.e. contralateral to the activated cortex) middle cerebral artery increased by 11.4 +/- 1.0 cm/s, a change of 17%, during the contraction. This represents an increase in volume flow to the territory of this vessel, but an increase in global flow to the brain cannot be inferred. 5. In the eight subjects who hyperventilated during exercise, there was no rise of flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery, and in some subjects there was a fall during the first 2 min of recovery. These findings suggest that if subjects hyperventilate during handgrip exercise there could be a fall in volume flow to many regions of the brain during and after the exercise.

  7. Pointwise decay of stationary rotational viscous incompressible flows with nonzero velocity at infinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuring, Paul; Kračmar, Stanislav; Nečasová, Šárka

    We consider a stationary viscous incompressible flow around a translating and rotating body. Optimal rates of decay are derived for the velocity and its gradient, on the basis of a representation formula involving a fundamental solution constructed by R.B. Guenther and E.A. Thomann [The fundamental solution of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations for spinning bodies in three spatial dimensions - time dependent case, J. Math. Fluid Mech. 8 (2006) 77-98], for a linearized system.

  8. Cross-correlation based time delay estimation for turbulent flow velocity measurements: Statistical considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, Balazs; Bencze, Attila; Zoletnik, Sandor; Veres, Gabor; Por, Gabor

    2011-12-15

    Time delay estimation methods (TDE) are well-known techniques to investigate poloidal flows in hot magnetized plasmas through the propagation properties of turbulent structures in the medium. One of these methods is based on the estimation of the time lag at which the cross-correlation function (CCF) estimation reaches its maximum value. The uncertainty of the peak location refers to the smallest determinable flow velocity modulation, and therefore the standard deviation of the time delay imposes important limitation to the measurements. In this article, the relative standard deviation of the CCF estimation and the standard deviation of its peak location are calculated analytically using a simple model of turbulent signals. This model assumes independent (non interacting) overlapping events (coherent structures) with randomly distributed spatio-temporal origins moving with background flow. The result of our calculations is the derivation of a general formula for the CCF variance, which is valid not exclusively in the high event density limit, but also for arbitrary event densities. Our formula reproduces the well known expression for high event densities previously published in the literature. In this paper we also present a derivation of the variance of time delay estimation that turns out to be inversely proportional to the applied time window. The derived formulas were tested in real plasma measurements. The calculations are an extension of the earlier work of Bencze and Zoletnik [Phys. Plasmas 12, 052323 (2005)] where the autocorrelation-width technique was developed. Additionally, we show that velocities calculated by a TDE method possess a broadband noise which originates from this variance, its power spectral density cannot be decreased by worsening the time resolution and can be coherent with noises of other velocity measurements where the same turbulent structures are used. This noise should not be confused with the impact of zero mean frequency zonal flow

  9. Visualizing flow fields using acoustic Doppler current profilers and the Velocity Mapping Toolbox

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide examples of how the U.S. Geological Survey is using acoustic Doppler current profilers for much more than routine discharge measurements. These instruments are capable of mapping complex three-dimensional flow fields within rivers, lakes, and estuaries. Using the Velocity Mapping Toolbox to process the ADCP data allows detailed visualization of the data, providing valuable information for a range of studies and applications.

  10. Low velocity opposed-flow frame spread in a transport-controlled environment DARTFire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Jeff; Thomas, Pete; Chao, Ruian; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Tang, TI; Altenkirch, Robert A.; Olson, Sandra L.

    1995-01-01

    The overall objectives of the DARTFire project are to uncover the underlying physics and increase understanding of the mechanisms that cause flames to propagate over solid fuels against a low velocity of oxidizer flow in a low-gravity environment. Specific objectives are (1) to analyze experimentally observed flame shapes, measured gas-phase field variables, spread rates, radiative characteristics, and solid-phase regression rates for comparison with previously developed model prediction capability that will be continually extended, and (2) to investigate the transition from ignition to either flame propagation or extinction in order to determine the characteristics of those environments that lead to flame evolution. To meet the objectives, a series of sounding rocket experiments has been designed to exercise several of the dimensional, controllable variables that affect the flame spread process over PMMA in microgravity, i.e., the opposing flow velocity (1-20 cm/s), the external radiant flux directed to the fuel surface (0-2 W/cm(exp 2)), and the oxygen concentration of the environment (35-70%). Because radiative heat transfer is critical to these microgravity flame spread experiments, radiant heating is imposed, and radiant heat loss will be measured. These are the first attempts at such an experimental control and measurement in microgravity. Other firsts associated with the experiment are (1) the control of the low velocity, opposed flow, which is of the same order as diffusive velocities and Stefan flows; (2) state-of-the-art quantitative flame imaging for species-specific emissions (both infrared and ultraviolet) in addition to novel intensified array imaging to obtain a color image of the very dim, low-gravity flames.

  11. Velocity-vorticity formulation of three-dimensional, steady, viscous, incompressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Meir, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    In this work we discuss some aspects of the velocity-vorticity formulation of three-dimensional, steady, viscous, incompressible flows. We describe reasonable boundary conditions that should be imposed on the vorticity and a compatibility condition that the vorticity must satisfy. This formulation may give rise to efficient numerical algorithms for approximating solutions of the Stokes problem, which in turn yields an iterative method for approximating solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations.

  12. Computational simulation of temperature and velocity distribution in human upper respiratory airway during inhalation of hot air.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi-Ardakani, V; Taeibi-Rahni, M; Salimi, M R; Ahmadi, G

    2016-03-01

    The present study provides an accurate simulation of velocity and temperature distributions of inhalation thermal injury in a human upper airway, including vestibule, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx, oropharynx, larynx, and upper part of main bronchus. To this end, a series of CT scan images, taken from an adult woman, was used to construct a three dimensional model. The airway walls temperature was adjusted according to existing in vivo temperature measurements. Also, in order to cover all breathing activities, five different breathing flow rates (10, 15, 20, 30, and 40 l/min) and different ambient air temperatures (100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 °C) were studied. Different flow regimes, including laminar, transitional, and turbulence were considered and the simulations were validated using reliable experimental data. The results show that nostrils, vestibule, and nasal cavity are damaged more than other part of airway. Finally, In order to obtain the heat flux through the walls, correlations for Nusselt number for each individual parts of airway (vestibule, main upper airway, nasopharynx etc.,) are proposed.

  13. Airway blood flow response to dry air hyperventilation in sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, G.H.; Baile, E.M.; Pare, P.D.

    1986-03-01

    Airway blood flow (Qaw) may be important in conditioning inspired air. To determine the effect of eucapneic dry air hyperventilation (hv) on Qaw in sheep the authors studied 7 anesthetized open-chest sheep after 25 min. of warm dry air hv. During each period of hv the authors have recorded vascular pressures, cardiac output (CO), and tracheal mucosal and inspired air temperature. Using a modification of the reference flow technique radiolabelled microspheres were injected into the left atrium to make separate measurements after humid air and dry air hv. In 4 animals a snare around the left main pulmonary artery was used following microsphere injection to prevent recirculation (entry into L lung of microspheres from the pulmonary artery). Qaw to the trachea and L lung as measured and Qaw for the R lung was estimated. After the final injection the sheep were killed and bronchi (Br) and lungs removed. Qaw (trachea plus L lung plus R lung) in 4 sheep increased from a mean of 30.8 to 67.0 ml/min. Airway mucosal temp. decreased from 39/sup 0/ to 33/sup 0/C. The authors conclude that dry air hv cools airway mucosa and increases Qaw in sheep.

  14. Wave Structure and Velocity Profiles in Downwards Gas-Liquid Annular Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zadrazil, Ivan; Hewitt, Geoff; Matar, Omar; Markides, Christos

    2012-11-01

    A downwards flow of gas in the core of a vertical pipe, and of liquid in the annulus between the pipe wall and the gas phase is referred to as a ``downwards annular flow'' (DAF). DAFs are conventionally described in terms of short-lived, small-amplitude ``ripples,'' and large-amplitude, high-speed ``disturbances.'' We use a combination of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF), Particle Image and Tracking Velocimetry (PIV, PTV) to study DAFs. We demonstrate through these techniques that the liquid films become progressively more complex with increasing liquid Reynolds number (ReL), while a similar increase of complexity is observed for increasing gas Reynolds number (ReG). Disturbance waves are observed for low and high ReL, and ripples for intermediate ReL. Additionally, a high degree of rolling breakdown of disturbance waves is observed in falling films at the highest ReL, which is a source of bubble entrainment into the film body. Our results will comprise: (i) statistical data on film thickness, and (ii) wave frequency, velocity, wavelength. In addition, a qualitative (e.g. re-circulation zones) and quantitative (e.g. mean/rms velocity profiles) velocity characterisation of the film flows will be presented.

  15. A direct numerical simulation study on the mean velocity characteristics in turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    Fully developed incompressible turbulent pipe flow at bulk-velocity- and pipe-diameter-based Reynolds number ReD=44000 was simulated with second-order finite-difference methods on 630 million grid points. The corresponding Kn number R+, based on pipe radius R, is 1142, and the computational domain length is 15R. The computed mean flow statistics agree well with Princeton Superpipe data at ReD=41727 and at ReD=74000. Second-order turbulence statistics show good agreement with experimental data at ReD=38000. Near the wall the gradient of ln/line{u}_{z}(+) with respect to ln(1r)+ 0.4. For 5300 < ReD < 44000, bulk-velocity-normalized mean velocity defect profiles from the present DNS and from previous experiments collapse within the same radial range of 1r < 0.7. Flow visualizations and two-point correlations reveal large-scale structures with comparable near-wall azimuthal dimensions at ReD=44000 and 5300 when measured in wall units. When normalized in outer units, streamwise coherence and azimuthal dimension of the large-scale structures in the pipe core away from the wall are also comparable at these two Reynolds numbers.

  16. Study of water flow velocities in irrigation canals in Iraq and their mathematical analysis

    PubMed Central

    de Araoz, Joaquin

    1962-01-01

    Water velocity is an important physical factor in the conditioning of streams and canals as habitats for the intermediate snail host of bilharziasis. Ecologists in most of the bilharziasis endemic areas have studied the resistance of these molluscs to the disturbing action of water motion. However, the complex nature of water flow through natural and man-made courses makes it very difficult to determine accurately the limiting range of water velocity that allows the settlement and development of snail colonies in a watercourse, and results are therefore still inconclusive. This paper describes the procedure employed in and the results obtained from a study designed to elucidate the water flow phenomenon through analysis of the relative variations of water velocity at any point of the cross-section of the canal. From this study it was possible to derive a simplified method for measuring the rate of water flow in earth canals that may be of wide application in snail control by the use of molluscicides. PMID:13884110

  17. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Blood Flow Velocity and Vessel Size

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hee-Kyung; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Cho, Sung-Hyoun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Interferential current electrical stimulation alters blood flow velocity and vessel size. We aimed to investigate the changes in the autonomic nervous system depending on electrical stimulation parameters. Forty-five healthy adult male and female subjects were studied. Bipolar adhesive pad electrodes were used to stimulate the autonomic nervous system at the thoracic vertebrae 1-4 levels for 20 min. Using Doppler ultrasonography, blood flow was measured to determine velocity and vessel size before, immediately after, and 30 min after electrical stimulation. Changes in blood flow velocity were significantly different immediately and 30 min after stimulation. The interaction between intervention periods and groups was significantly different between the exercise and pain stimulation groups immediately after stimulation (p<0.05). The vessel size was significantly different before and 30 min after stimulation (p<0.05). Imbalances in the sympathetic nervous system, which regulates balance throughout the body, may present with various symptoms. Therefore, in the clinical practice, the parameters of electrical stimulation should be selectively applied in accordance with various conditions and changes in form.

  18. Influence of moderate Joule heating on electroosmotic flow velocity, retention, and efficiency in capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guofang; Tallarek, Ulrich; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Zhang, Yukui

    2004-07-30

    The influence of Joule heating on electroosmotic flow velocity, the retention factor of neutral analytes, and separation efficiency in capillary electrochromatography was investigated theoretically and experimentally. A plot of electrical current against the applied electrical field strength was used to evaluate the Joule heating effect. When the mobile phase concentration of Tris buffer exceeded 5.0 mM in the studied capillary electrochromatography systems using particulate and monolithic columns (with an accompanying power level of heat dissipation higher than 0.35 W/m), the Joule heating effect became clearly noticeable. Theoretical models for describing the variation of electroosmotic flow velocity with increasing applied field strength and the change of retention factors for neutral analytes with electrical field strength at higher Tris buffer concentrations were analyzed to explain consequences of Joule heating in capillary electrochromatography. Qualitative agreement between experimental data and implications of the theoretical model analysis was observed. The decrease of separation efficiency in capillary electrochromatography with macroporous octadecylsilica particles at high buffer concentration can be also attributed to Joule heating mainly via the increased axial diffusion of the analyte molecules and dispersion of solute bands by a nonuniform electroosmotic flow profile over the column cross-section. However, within a moderate temperature range, the contribution of the macroscopic velocity profile in the column arising from radial temperature gradients is insignificant.

  19. Cerebral blood flow velocity and cranial fluid volume decrease during +Gz acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawai, Y.; Puma, S. C.; Hargens, A. R.; Murthy, G.; Warkander, D.; Lundgren, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) velocity and cranial fluid volume, which is defined as the total volume of intra- and extracranial fluid, were measured using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and rheoencephalography, respectively, in humans during graded increase of +Gz acceleration (onset rate: 0.1 G/s) without straining maneuvers. Gz acceleration was terminated when subjects' vision decreased to an angle of less than or equal to 60 degrees, which was defined as the physiological end point. In five subjects, mean CBF velocity decreased 48% from a baseline value of 59.4 +/- 11.2 cm/s to 31.0 +/- 5.6 cm/s (p<0.01) with initial loss of peripheral vision at 5.7 +/- 0.9 Gz. On the other hand, systolic CBF velocity did not change significantly during increasing +Gz acceleration. Cranial impedance, which is proportional to loss of cranial fluid volume, increased by 2.0 +/- 0.8% above the baseline value at the physiological end point (p<0.05). Both the decrease of CBF velocity and the increase of cranial impedance correlated significantly with Gz. These results suggest that +Gz acceleration without straining maneuvers decreases CBF velocity to half normal and probably causes a caudal fluid shift from both intra- and extracranial tissues.

  20. A clinical study on velocity patterns of pulmonary venous flow in canine heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Wakao, Y; Takahashi, M

    2000-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated methods of determining the velocity patterns of pulmonary venous flow (PVF) in dogs and then investigated the relationship of the patterns to cardiac functions in heartworm disease (HD) by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). The results revealed that there was a good correlation between PVF patterns determined by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and TTE in animals lying on their left sides. The measurement of S and D wave velocities (PVS and PVD) by TTE was shown to allow clinical determination of the velocity patterns of PVF in dogs. The HD groups showed significant increases in PVS and PVD, and S and D wave time-velocity integrals (S-TVI and D-TVI) of the right cranial lobe PVF, when compared with the normal group, as determined by TTE (P<0.05). In contrast, the HD groups produced significant decreases in PVD and D-TVI of the right caudal lobe PVF compared with the normal group (P<0.05), and a significant increase in the ratio of S-TVI to (S-TVI + D-TVI) (P<0.05). It is, therefore, suggested that measurement of the velocity patterns of the right cranial and caudal lobe PVF could be one method of assessing the stages of obstructive lesions in the pulmonary artery.

  1. Linearized stationary incompressible flow around rotating and translating bodies: Asymptotic profile of the velocity gradient and decay estimate of the second derivatives of the velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deuring, Paul; Kračmar, Stanislav; Nečasová, Šárka

    We consider a system arising by linearization of a model for stationary viscous incompressible flow around a translating and rotating body. An asymptotic profile of the gradient of the velocity is derived. The leading term of the profile involves derivatives of a fundamental solution constructed by R.B. Guenther and E.A. Thomann (2006) [23], for the system in question. In addition, we establish decay estimates of the second derivatives of the velocity.

  2. Experimental Analysis of Air Flows in Bronchial Airway Models in the Cases of Natural Breathing and HFOV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won-Je; Kawahashi, Masaaki; Hirahara, Hiroyuki

    The mechanism of gas transfer, flow pattern and diffusion in respiratory air flow at the end zone of human lung, especially in bronchial and alveoli, has not been clarified in detail. Recently, it is known that high frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is an effective treatment for respiratory distress syndrome. However, the frequency effect on ventilation in relation to the gas transfer efficiency at the end zone of lungs has not been investigated. The velocity profile of oscillatory air flow in bronchial tube is one of the fundamental factors to consider the frequency effect. In this paper, velocity profiles of oscillatory flows in micro scale models of bronchial airway with single- and multi-bifurcation have been investigated for different frequencies corresponding to resting breathing and HFOV by using micro Particle Image Velocimetry (micro PIV). The temporal changes of velocity profiles were reconstructed by phase-averaged velocity maps obtained by micro PIV measurements, and the effect of frequency on the velocity profile in bronchial models has been discussed.

  3. Cerebral blood flow velocity during mental activation: interpretation with different models of the passive pressure-velocity relationship.

    PubMed

    Panerai, Ronney B; Moody, Michelle; Eames, Penelope J; Potter, John F

    2005-12-01

    The passive relationship between arterial blood pressure (ABP) and cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) has been expressed by a single parameter [cerebrovascular resistance (CVR)] or, alternatively, by a two-parameter model, comprising a resistance element [resistance-area product (RAP)] and a critical closing pressure (CrCP). We tested the hypothesis that the RAP+CrCP model can provide a more consistent interpretation to CBFV responses induced by mental activation tasks than the CVR model. Continuous recordings of CBFV [bilateral, middle cerebral artery (MCA)], ABP, ECG, and end-tidal CO(2) (EtCO(2)) were performed in 13 right-handed healthy subjects (aged 21-43 yr), in the seated position, at rest and during 10 repeated presentations of a word generation and a constructional puzzle paradigm that are known to induce differential cortical activation. Due to its small relative change, the CBFV response can be broken down into standardized subcomponents describing the relative contributions of ABP, CVR, RAP, and CrCP. At rest and during activation, the RAP+CrCP model suggested that RAP might reflect myogenic activity in response to the ABP transient, whereas CrCP was more indicative of metabolic control. These different influences were not reflected by the CVR model, which indicated a predominantly metabolic response. Repeated-measures multi-way ANOVA showed that CrCP (P = 0.025), RAP (P = 0.046), and CVR (P = 0.002) changed significantly during activation. CrCP also had a significant effect of paradigm (P = 0.045) but not hemispheric dominance. Both RAP (P = 0.039) and CVR (P = 0.0008) had significant effects of hemispheric dominance but were not sensitive to the different paradigms. Subcomponent analysis can help with the interpretation of CBFV responses to mental activation, which were found to be dependent on the underlying model of the passive ABP-CBFV relationship.

  4. Onsite survey on the mechanism of passive aeration and air flow path in a semi-aerobic landfill.

    PubMed

    Matsuto, Toshihiko; Zhang, Xin; Matsuo, Takayuki; Yamada, Shuhei

    2015-02-01

    The semi-aerobic landfill is a widely accepted landfill concept in Japan because it promotes stabilization of leachates and waste via passive aeration without using any type of mechanical equipment. Ambient air is thought to be supplied to the landfill through a perforated pipe network made of leachate collection pipe laid along the bottom and a vertically erected gas vent. However, its underlying air flow path and driving forces are unclear because empirical data from real-world landfills is inadequate. The objective of this study is to establish scientific evidence about the aeration mechanisms and air flow path by an on-site survey of a full-scale, semi-aerobic landfill. First, all passive vents located in the landfill were monitored with respect to temperature level and gas velocity in different seasons. We found a linear correlation between the outflow rate and gas temperature, suggesting that air flow is driven by a buoyancy force caused by the temperature difference between waste in the landfill and the ambient temperature. Some vents located near the landfill bottom acted as air inflow vents. Second, we conducted a tracer test to determine the air flow path between two vents, by injecting tracer gas from an air sucking vent. The resulting slowly increasing gas concentration at the neighboring vent suggested that fresh air flow passes through the waste layer toward the gas vents from leachate collection pipes, as well as directly flowing through the pipe network. Third, we monitored the temperature of gas flowing out of a vent at night. Since the temperature drop of the gas was much smaller than that of the environment, the air collected at the gas vents was estimated to flow mostly through the waste layer, i.e., the semi-aerobic landfill has considerable aeration ability under the appropriate conditions.

  5. Simulation Analysis of Air Flow and Turbulence Statistics in a Rib Grit Roughened Duct

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, I. I.; Denizopoulou, A. C.; Ntinas, G. K.; Fragos, V. P.

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of variable artificial roughness patterns on a surface is an effective technique to enhance the rate of heat transfer to fluid flow in the ducts of solar air heaters. Different geometries of roughness elements investigated have demonstrated the pivotal role that vortices and associated turbulence have on the heat transfer characteristics of solar air heater ducts by increasing the convective heat transfer coefficient. In this paper we investigate the two-dimensional, turbulent, unsteady flow around rectangular ribs of variable aspect ratios by directly solving the transient Navier-Stokes and continuity equations using the finite elements method. Flow characteristics and several aspects of turbulent flow are presented and discussed including velocity components and statistics of turbulence. The results reveal the impact that different rib lengths have on the computed mean quantities and turbulence statistics of the flow. The computed turbulence parameters show a clear tendency to diminish downstream with increasing rib length. Furthermore, the applied numerical method is capable of capturing small-scale flow structures resulting from the direct solution of Navier-Stokes and continuity equations. PMID:25057511

  6. Computing Isentropic Flow Properties of Air/R-134a Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Ray

    2006-01-01

    MACHRK is a computer program that calculates isentropic flow properties of mixtures of air and refrigerant R-134a (tetrafluoroethane), which are used in transonic aerodynamic testing in a wind tunnel at Langley Research Center. Given the total temperature, total pressure, static pressure, and mole fraction of R-134a in a mixture, MACHRK calculates the Mach number and the following associated flow properties: dynamic pressure, velocity, density, static temperature, speed of sound, viscosity, ratio of specific heats, Reynolds number, and Prandtl number. Real-gas effects are taken into account by treating the gases comprising the mixture as both thermally and calorically imperfect. The Redlich-Kwong equation of state for mixtures and the constant-pressure ideal heat-capacity equation for the mixture are used in combination with the departure- function approach of thermodynamics to obtain the equations for computing the flow properties. In addition to the aforementioned calculations for air/R-134a mixtures, a research version of MACHRK can perform the corresponding calculations for mixtures of air and R-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) and for air/SF6 mixtures. [R-12 was replaced by R-134a because of environmental concerns. SF6 has been considered for use in increasing the Reynolds-number range.

  7. Ice-flow reorganization in West Antarctica 2.5 kyr ago dated using radar-derived englacial flow velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingslake, Jonathan; Martín, Carlos; Arthern, Robert J.; Corr, Hugh F. J.; King, Edward C.

    2016-09-01

    We date a recent ice-flow reorganization of an ice divide in the Weddell Sea Sector, West Antarctica, using a novel combination of inverse methods and ice-penetrating radars. We invert for two-dimensional ice flow within an ice divide from data collected with a phase-sensitive ice-penetrating radar while accounting for the effect of firn on radar propagation and ice flow. By comparing isochronal layers simulated using radar-derived flow velocities with internal layers observed with an impulse radar, we show that the divide's internal structure is not in a steady state but underwent a disturbance, potentially implying a regional ice-flow reorganization, 2.5 (1.8-2.9) kyr B.P. Our data are consistent with slow ice flow in this location before the reorganization and the ice divide subsequently remaining stationary. These findings increase our knowledge of the glacial history of a region that lacks dated constraints on late-Holocene ice-sheet retreat and provides a key target for models that reconstruct and predict ice-sheet behavior.

  8. Flow visualization and quantitative velocity and pressure measurements in simulated single and double brush seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, M. J.; Canacci, V. A.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    A method to visualize and characterize the complex flow fields in simulated single and double brush seals is presented. The brush seal configuration was tested in a gravity fed water tunnel and a pump driven pressurized oil tunnel. Visualization of the flow field revealed regions that are characteristically river jetting, vortical, crossflow and exist upstream, downstream or within the seal. Such flows are especially engendered by variations in fiber void that are spatial and temporal and affect changes in seal leakage and stability. While the effects of interface motion and cylindrical configuration have not been considered herein, it is believed that the observed flow fields and pressure drop patterns characterize flow phenomenology in brush seals. The axial pressure profiles upstream, across and downstream of the brush have been measured under a variety of inlet pressure conditions and the ensuing pressure maps are presented and discussed. Through the application of the Full Flow Field Tracking method developed by the authors, the flow patterns and the accompanying fluid velocities inside the brush were non-intrusively determined and graphically reconstructed.

  9. The effects of velocity difference changes with memory on the dynamics characteristics and fuel economy of traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shaowei; Zhao, Xiangmo; Xu, Zhigang; Zhang, Licheng

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of velocity difference changes with memory in the intelligent transportation environment on the dynamics and fuel consumptions of traffic flow, we first investigate the linkage between velocity difference changes with memory and car-following behaviors with the measured data in cities, and then propose an improved cooperative car-following model considering multiple velocity difference changes with memory in the cooperative adaptive cruise control strategy, finally carry out several numerical simulations under the periodic boundary condition and at signalized intersections to explore how velocity difference changes with memory affect car's velocity, velocity fluctuation, acceleration and fuel consumptions in the intelligent transportation environment. The results show that velocity difference changes with memory have obvious effects on car-following behaviors, that the improved cooperative car-following model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, that the stability and fuel economy of traffic flow simulated by the improved car-following model with velocity difference changes with memory is obviously superior to those without velocity difference changes, and that taking velocity difference changes with memory into account in designing the advanced adaptive cruise control strategy can significantly improve the stability and fuel economy of traffic flow.

  10. Effects of CO2/N2 dilution on laminar burning velocity of stoichiometric DME-air mixture at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Abdul Naseer; Juhany, Khalid A; Kumar, Sudarshan; Kishore, V Ratna; Mohammad, Akram

    2017-03-21

    The laminar burning velocity of CO2/N2 diluted stoichiometric dimethyl ether (DME) air mixtures is determined experimentally at atmospheric pressure and elevated mixture temperatures using a mesoscale high aspect-ratio diverging channel with inlet dimensions of 25mm×2mm. In this method, planar flames at different initial temperatures (Tu) were stabilized inside the channel using an external electric heater. The magnitude of burning velocities was acquired by measuring the flame position and initial temperature. The mass conservation of the mixture entering the inlet and the stationary planar flame front is applied to obtain the laminar burning velocity. Laminar burning velocity at different initial mixture temperatures is plotted with temperature ratio (Tu/Tu,o), where a reference temperature (Tu,o) of 300K is used. Enhancement in the laminar burning velocity is observed with mixture temperature for DME-air mixtures with CO2 and N2 dilutions. A significant decrease in the burning velocity and slight increase in temperature exponent of the stoichiometric DME-air mixture was observed with dilution at same temperatures. The addition of CO2 has profound influence when compared to N2 addition on both burning velocity and temperature exponent.

  11. Evolutionary Concepts for Decentralized Air Traffic Flow Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Milton; Kolitz, Stephan; Milner, Joseph; Odoni, Amedeo

    1997-01-01

    Alternative concepts for modifying the policies and procedures under which the air traffic flow management system operates are described, and an approach to the evaluation of those concepts is discussed. Here, air traffic flow management includes all activities related to the management of the flow of aircraft and related system resources from 'block to block.' The alternative concepts represent stages in the evolution from the current system, in which air traffic management decision making is largely centralized within the FAA, to a more decentralized approach wherein the airlines and other airspace users collaborate in air traffic management decision making with the FAA. The emphasis in the discussion is on a viable medium-term partially decentralized scenario representing a phase of this evolution that is consistent with the decision-making approaches embodied in proposed Free Flight concepts for air traffic management. System-level metrics for analyzing and evaluating the various alternatives are defined, and a simulation testbed developed to generate values for those metrics is described. The fundamental issue of modeling airline behavior in decentralized environments is also raised, and an example of such a model, which deals with the preservation of flight bank integrity in hub airports, is presented.

  12. Thermohydraulic analysis of the cooling air flow in a rack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natusch, Andreas; Huchler, Markus

    Manned space laboratories like the US Space Station Freedom or the European COLUMBUS APM are equipped with so-called racks for subsystem and payload accommodation. An important resource is air for cooling the unit internal heat sources, the avionics air. Each unit inside the rack must be supplied with sufficient amount of air to cool down the unit to the allowable maximum temperature. In the course of the COLUMBUS Environmental Control and Life Support Subsystem (ECLSS) project, a thermohydraulic mathematical model (THMM) of a representative COLUMBUS rack was developed to analyze and optimize the distribution of avionic air inside this rack. A sensitivity and accuracy study was performed to determine the accuracy range of the calculated avionics flow rate distribution to the units. These calculations were then compared to measurement results gained in a rack airflow distribution test, which was performed with an equipped COLUMBUS subsystem rack to show the pressure distribution inside the rack. In addition to that cold flow study, the influence of the avionics air heating due to the unit dissipations on the airflow distribution and the cooling tenmperature was investigated in a detailed warm flow analysis.

  13. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, R.F.

    1987-11-24

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs. 4 figs.

  14. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs.

  15. Analysis of possible improvement of acceleration of a high-velocity air-breathing flying vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goonko, Yu. P.; Mazhul, I. I.

    2008-09-01

    Results of parametric calculations of the total aeropropulsive characteristics and characteristics of acceleration of a small-scale high-velocity flying vehicle with an air-breathing engine are presented. Integral parameters of acceleration from the flight Mach number M∞ = 4 to M∞ = 7 are determined, namely, the time required fuel stock, and range. A schematic configuration of the vehicle is considered, which allows studying the basic parameters, such as the forebody shape, the angles of surfaces of compression of the stream captured by the inlet, angles of external aerodynamic surfaces of the airframe, relative planform area of the wing panels, and relative area of the nozzle cross section. A comparative estimate of the effect of these parameters shows that it is possible to improve the characteristics of acceleration of vehicles of the type considered.

  16. Orientation and related buoyancy effects in low-velocity flow boiling.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman; Schultz, William W; Liu, Quanyi; Keller, Robert B

    2009-04-01

    This work is an extension of experimental results reported previously, which might provide design guidance for approximating certain aspects of the flow boiling process in microgravity but taking place in Earth gravity. In that research the buoyancy effects on the bubble dynamics were minimized by the imposition of a liquid velocity parallel to a flat heater surface in the inverted horizontal position, or nearly horizontal (within +/-5 degrees ), thus holding the heated liquid and vapor formed close to the heater surface. For the fluid used, liquid velocities in the range U= 5-10 cm/s were judged to be critical for changes in the behavior of the flow boiling process. Using the hydraulic diameter of the rectangular duct used, with the heater surface embedded in one side, this velocity range gives rise to flow Reynolds numbers on the order of 4400-8800. It was subsequently judged to be of interest to extend the range of orientation of the flat heater surface relative to gravity to the full circular range of 0-360 degrees, in increments of 45 degrees, and the results of this work are presented here. A solid massive copper heater with a gold-plated boiling heat transfer surface 19 x 38 mm in size, previously used for critical heat flux measurements with boiling, provided a near-uniform surface temperature. Only steady measurements of heat flux and surface temperature were possible with the copper heater. R-113 was the fluid used; the velocity was varied over the interval of 4-28 cm/s; bulk liquid subcooling was varied over 5-11 degrees C; and heat flux varied over 0-10 w/cm(2).

  17. Water velocity, turbulence, and migration rate of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the free-flowing and impounded Snake River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Kock, Tobias J.; Haskell, Craig A.; Connor, William P.; Steinhorst, R. Kirk

    2009-01-01

    We studied the migratory behavior of subyearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in free-flowing and impounded reaches of the Snake River to evaluate the hypothesis that velocity and turbulence are the primary causal mechanisms of downstream migration. The hypothesis states that impoundment reduces velocity and turbulence and alters the migratory behavior of juvenile Chinook salmon as a result of their reduced perception of these cues. At a constant flow (m3 /s), both velocity (km/d) and turbulence (the SD of velocity) decreased from riverine to impounded habitat as cross-sectional areas increased. We found evidence for the hypothesis that subyearling Chinook salmon perceive velocity and turbulence cues and respond to these cues by varying their behavior. The percentage of the subyearlings that moved faster than the average current speed decreased as fish made the transition from riverine reaches with high velocities and turbulence to upper reservoir reaches with low velocities and turbulence but increased to riverine levels again as the fish moved further down in the reservoir, where velocity and turbulence remained low. The migration rate (km/d) decreased in accordance with longitudinal reductions in velocity and turbulence, as predicted by the hypothesis. The variation in migration rate was better explained by a repeatedmeasures regression model containing velocity (Akaike’s information criterion ¼ 1,769.0) than a model containing flow (2,232.6). We conclude that subyearling fall Chinook salmon respond to changes in water velocity and turbulence, which work together to affect the migration rate.

  18. On the Divergence of the Velocity Vector in Real-Gas Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical study was performed addressing the degree of applicability or inapplicability, to a real gas, of the occasionally stated belief that for an ideal gas, incompressibility is synonymous with a zero or very low Mach number. The measure of compressibility used in this study is the magnitude of the divergence of the flow velocity vector [V(bar) (raised dot) u (where u is the flow velocity)]. The study involves a mathematical derivation that begins with the governing equations of flow and involves consideration of equations of state, thermodynamics, and fluxes of heat, mass, and the affected molecular species. The derivation leads to an equation for the volume integral of (V(bar) (raised dot) u)(sup 2) that indicates contributions of several thermodynamic, hydrodynamic, and species-flux effects to compressibility and reveals differences between real and ideal gases. An analysis of the equation leads to the conclusion that for a real gas, incompressibility is not synonymous with zero or very small Mach number. Therefore, it is further concluded, the contributions to compressibility revealed by the derived equation should be taken into account in simulations of real-gas flows.

  19. Habitat availability vs. flow rate for the Pecos River, Part 1 : Depth and velocity availability.

    SciTech Connect

    James, Scott Carlton; Schaub, Edward F.; Jepsen, Richard Alan; Roberts, Jesse Daniel

    2004-02-01

    The waters of the Pecos River in New Mexico must be delivered to three primary users: (1) The Pecos River Compact: each year a percentage of water from natural river flow must be delivered to Texas; (2) Agriculture: Carlsbad Irrigation District has a storage and diversion right and Fort Sumner Irrigation District has a direct flow diversion right; and, (3) Endangered Species Act: an as yet unspecified amount of water is to support Pecos Bluntnose Shiner Minnow habitat within and along the Pecos River. Currently, the United States Department of Interior Bureau of Reclamation, the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, and the United States Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service are studying the Pecos Bluntnose Shiner Minnow habitat preference. Preliminary work by Fish and Wildlife personnel in the critical habitat suggest that water depth and water velocity are key parameters defining minnow habitat preference. However, river flows that provide adequate preferred habitat to support this species have yet to be determined. Because there is a limited amount of water in the Pecos River and its reservoirs, it is critical to allocate water efficiently such that habitat is maintained, while honoring commitments to agriculture and to the Pecos River Compact. This study identifies the relationship between Pecos River flow rates in cubic feet per second (cfs) and water depth and water velocity.

  20. Development of a laser speckle imaging system for measuring relative blood flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael S. D.; Packulak, Ernie F.; Sowa, Michael G.

    2006-09-01

    Determining the viability of damaged or surgically reconstructed tissue is critical in most plastic and reconstructive surgery procedures. Information about tissue blood flow in the region in question can make this determination much easier. Laser speckle imaging (LSI) is one technique that could potentially aid in making this determination. LSI is a non-contact full-field imaging technique with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Tissue is illuminated with diffuse red laser light and the spatial and/or temporal statistics of the resulting speckle pattern can be used to calculate relative flow velocities. We have developed a LSI system that produces relative velocity blood flow images. Bench tests of the system indicate that it may be used to distinguish between normal, decreased, and increased blood flow states of a human finger. The system has also been used to take some initial laboratory measurements using an animal model - an epigastric free flap on a rat. Preliminary results indicate that the method may be used to distinguish states of venous or arterial occlusion from unoccluded states of the skin flap. While further experimentation is necessary, these initial results indicate that LSI could be a useful aid to the plastic surgeon for assessing tissue viability.