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Sample records for air fluorescence technique

  1. Comparison of Air Fluorescence and Ionization Measurements of E.M. Shower Depth Profiles: Test of a UHECR Detector Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.; Cao, Z.; Huentemeyer, P.; Jui, C.C.H.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J.; Maestas, M.; Smith, J.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R.W.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, S.; Chen, P.; Field, Clive; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Ng, J.S.T.; Odian, A.; Reil, K.; Vincke, H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC /Montana U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.

    2005-10-07

    Measurements are reported on the fluorescence of air as a function of depth in electromagnetic showers initiated by bunches of 28.5 GeV electrons. The light yield is compared with the expected and observed depth profiles of ionization in the showers. It validates the use of atmospheric fluorescence profiles in measuring ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  2. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown. PMID:19079454

  3. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  4. Interference techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet

    We developed a set of interference-based optical microscopy techniques to study biological structures through nanometer-scale axial localization of fluorescent biomarkers. Spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM) utilizes interference of direct and reflected waves emitted from fluorescent molecules in the vicinity of planar reflectors to reveal the axial position of the molecules. A comprehensive calculation algorithm based on Green's function formalism is presented to verify the validity of approximations used in a far-field approach that describes the emission of fluorescent markers near interfaces. Using the validated model, theoretical limits of axial localization were determined with emphasis given to numerical aperture (NA) dependence of localization uncertainty. SSFM was experimentally demonstrated in conformational analysis of nucleoproteins. In particular, interaction between surface-tethered 75-mer double strand DNA and integration host factor (IHF) protein was probed on Si-SiO2 substrates by determining the axial position of fluorescent labels attached to the free ends of DNA molecules. Despite its sub-nanometer precision axial localization capability, SSFM lacks high lateral resolution due to the low-NA requirement for planar reflectors. We developed a second technique, 4Pi-SSFM, which improves the lateral resolution of a conventional SSFM system by an order of magnitude while achieving nanometer-scale axial localization precision. Using two opposing high-NA objectives, fluorescence signal is interferometrically collected and spectral interference pattern is recorded. Axial position of emitters is found from analysis of the spectra. The 4Pi-SSFM technique was experimentally demonstrated by determining the surface profiles of fabricated glass surfaces and outer membranes of Shigella, a type of Gram-negative bacteria. A further discussion is presented to localize surface O antigen, which is an important oligosaccharide structure in the

  5. Fluorescence Lifetime Techniques in Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of time-resolved (lifetime) fluorescence techniques used in biomedical diagnostics. In particular, we review the development of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) instrumentation and associated methodologies which allows for in vivo characterization and diagnosis of biological tissues. Emphasis is placed on the translational research potential of these techniques and on evaluating whether intrinsic fluorescence signals provide useful contrast for the diagnosis of human diseases including cancer (gastrointestinal tract, lung, head and neck, and brain), skin and eye diseases, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:22273730

  6. A fluorescent antibody technique for identification of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonies.

    PubMed

    Schuller, W; Lehmkuhl, H D; Switzer, W P

    1976-04-01

    Fluorescent antibody staining of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonies is difficult because the colonies wash from the agar. Airdrying of the colonies grown on solid medium-overlayed glass microscope slides fixed the colonies in place, so that fluorescent antibody stain could be readily accomplished. Apparent loss or alteration of antigenicity did not result from the air-drying process. The technique is useful for the identification of M hyopneumoniae isolates.

  7. A pulsed electron-photon fluorescence diagnostic technique for temperature and specie concentration measurement at points in relatively dense, unseedded air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntz, E. P.; Kunc, J. A.; Erwin, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis is presented on the use of the fluorescence stimulated by combined pulsed electron and photon beams for the study of gas flows up to densities equivalent to an altitude of about 20 km (number density of about 3 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm). The electron beam acts as a pump, requiring no seed gas, to provide a localized concentration of ions or excited state neutrals that can be probed by saturation optical pulses. A short pulse (10ns) electron beam can be used by itself to provide effectively quench-free emission up to number densities of around 10 to the 18th/cm, but is is difficult to maintain satisfactory spatial resolution at this high density. The use of a nearly simultaneous strong optical pulse increases the flexibility of the diagnostic technique, permitting use at densities greater than 10 to the 18th/cu cm with good spatial resolution. The use of flash X-ray sources combined with optical probing also appears promising for densities above 10 to the 19th/cu cm.

  8. Measurement of Fluorescence Spectra from Ambient Aerosol Particles Using Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, F.; Kanaya, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Moteki, N.; Takegawa, N.

    2011-12-01

    To obtain the information of composition of organic aerosol particles in atmosphere, we developed an instrument using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. To measure the fluorescence from a particle, we employed two lasers. Scattering light signal derived from a single particle upon crossing the 635nm-CW laser triggers the 266nm-pulsed laser to excite the particle. Fluorescence from the particle in the wavelength range 300-600nm is spectrally dispersed by a grating spectrometer and then detected by a 32-Ch photo-multiplier tube(PMT). The aerosol stream is surrounded by a coaxial sheath air flow and delivered to the optical chamber at atmospheric pressure. Using PSL particles with known sizes, we made a calibration curve to estimate particle size from scattering light intensity. With the current setup of the instrument we are able to detect both scattering and fluorescence from particles whose diameters are larger than 0.5um. Our system was able to differentiate particles composed of mono-aromatic species (e.g. Tryptophan) from those of Riboflavin, by their different fluorescence wavelengths. Also, measurements of fluorescence spectra of ambient particles were demonstrated in our campus in Yokosuka city, facing Tokyo bay in Japan. We obtained several types of florescence spectra in the 8 hours. Classification of the measured fluorescence spectra will be discussed in the presentation.

  9. Visual air quality simulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molenar, John V.; Malm, William C.; Johnson, Christopher E.

    Visual air quality is primarily a human perceptual phenomenon beginning with the transfer of image-forming information through an illuminated, scattering and absorbing atmosphere. Visibility, especially the visual appearance of industrial emissions or the degradation of a scenic view, is the principal atmospheric characteristic through which humans perceive air pollution, and is more sensitive to changing pollution levels than any other air pollution effect. Every attempt to quantify economic costs and benefits of air pollution has indicated that good visibility is a highly valued and desired environmental condition. Measurement programs can at best approximate the state of the ambient atmosphere at a few points in a scenic vista viewed by an observer. To fully understand the visual effect of various changes in the concentration and distribution of optically important atmospheric pollutants requires the use of aerosol and radiative transfer models. Communication of the output of these models to scientists, decision makers and the public is best done by applying modern image-processing systems to generate synthetic images representing the modeled air quality conditions. This combination of modeling techniques has been under development for the past 15 yr. Initially, visual air quality simulations were limited by a lack of computational power to simplified models depicting Gaussian plumes or uniform haze conditions. Recent explosive growth in low cost, high powered computer technology has allowed the development of sophisticated aerosol and radiative transfer models that incorporate realistic terrain, multiple scattering, non-uniform illumination, varying spatial distribution, concentration and optical properties of atmospheric constituents, and relative humidity effects on aerosol scattering properties. This paper discusses these improved models and image-processing techniques in detail. Results addressing uniform and non-uniform layered haze conditions in both

  10. Fluorescence Techniques to Study Lipid Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Schwille, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Biological research has always tremendously benefited from the development of key methodology. In fact, it was the advent of microscopy that shaped our understanding of cells as the fundamental units of life. Microscopic techniques are still central to the elucidation of biological units and processes, but equally important are methods that allow access to the dimension of time, to investigate the dynamics of molecular functions and interactions. Here, fluorescence spectroscopy with its sensitivity to access the single-molecule level, and its large temporal resolution, has been opening up fully new perspectives for cell biology. Here we summarize the key fluorescent techniques used to study cellular dynamics, with the focus on lipid and membrane systems. PMID:21669985

  11. Multispectral fluorescence imaging techniques for nondestructive food safety inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lefcourt, Alan M.; Chen, Yud-Ren

    2004-03-01

    The use of spectral sensing has gained acceptance as a rapid means for nondestructive inspection of postharvest food produce. Current technologies generally use color or a single wavelength camera technology. The applicability and sensitivity of these techniques can be expanded through the use of multiple wavelengths. Reflectance in the Vis/NIR is the prevalent spectral technique. Fluorescence, compared to reflectance, is regarded as a more sensitive technique due to its dynamic responses to subtle changes in biological entities. Our laboratory has been exploring fluorescence as a potential means for detection of quality and wholesomeness of food products. Applications of fluorescence sensing require an understanding of the spectral characteristics emanating from constituents and potential contaminants. A number of factors affecting fluorescence emission characteristics are discussed. Because of relatively low fluorescence quantum yield from biological samples, a system with a powerful pulse light source such as a laser coupled with a gated detection device is used to harvest fluorescence, in the presence of ambient light. Several fluorescence sensor platforms developed in our laboratory, including hyperspectral imaging, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and steady-state fluorescence imaging systems with multispectral capabilities are presented. We demonstrate the potential uses of recently developed fluorescence imaging platforms in food safety inspection of apples contaminated with animal feces.

  12. Survey of air cargo forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlthan, A. R.; Vermuri, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    Forecasting techniques currently in use in estimating or predicting the demand for air cargo in various markets are discussed with emphasis on the fundamentals of the different forecasting approaches. References to specific studies are cited when appropriate. The effectiveness of current methods is evaluated and several prospects for future activities or approaches are suggested. Appendices contain summary type analyses of about 50 specific publications on forecasting, and selected bibliographies on air cargo forecasting, air passenger demand forecasting, and general demand and modalsplit modeling.

  13. Insect monitoring with fluorescence lidar techniques: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Guan, Zuguang; Wellenreuther, Maren; Svanberg, Sune

    2009-10-20

    We investigate the possibilities of light detection and ranging (lidar) techniques to study migration of the damselfly species Calopteryx splendens and C. virgo. Laboratory and testing-range measurements at a distance of 60 m were performed using dried, mounted damselfly specimens. Laboratory measurements, including color photography in polarized light and spectroscopy of reflectance and induced fluorescence, reveal that damselflies exhibit reflectance and fluorescence properties that are closely tied to the generation of structural color. Lidar studies on C. splendens of both genders show that gender can be remotely determined, especially for specimens that were marked with Coumarin 102 and Rhodamine 6G dyes. The results obtained in this study will be useful for future field experiments, and provide guidelines for studying damselflies in their natural habitat using lidar to survey the air above the river surface. The findings will be applicable for many other insect species and should, therefore, bring new insights into migration and movement patterns of insects in general. PMID:19844299

  14. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration fields near air bubble surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sabita; Duke, Steve R.

    2000-09-01

    This article describes a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for measuring dissolved oxygen concentration gradients in water near the surface of an air bubble. Air bubbles are created at the tip of a needle in a rectangular bubble column filled with water that contains pyrenebutyric acid (PBA). The fluorescence of the PBA is induced by a planar pulse of nitrogen laser light. Oxygen transferring from the air bubble to the deoxygenated water quenches the fluorescence of the PBA. Images of the instantaneous and two-dimensional fluorescence field are obtained by a UV-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Quenching of fluorescence intensity is determined at each pixel in the CCD image to measure dissolved oxygen concentration. Two-dimensional concentration fields are presented for a series of measurements of oxygen transfer from 1.6 mm bubbles suspended on the tip of a needle in a quiescent fluid. The images show the spatially varying concentration profiles, gradients, and boundary layer thicknesses at positions around the bubble surfaces. These direct and local measurements of concentration behavior within the mass transfer boundary layer show the potential of this LIF technique for the development of general and mechanistic models for oxygen transport across the air-water interface.

  15. Characterization of DNAPL Using Fluorescence Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.; Nave, S.E.

    1998-03-01

    Dense non aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants, comprised of chlorinated aliphatic compounds, are a major source of groundwater contamination at the Savannah River Site (SRS). To successfully remediate a site contaminated by DNAPLs, it is imperative that the slowly dissolving, non-aqueous phase source be found and removed. There are few technologies that can successfully and consistently detect DNAPLs in the subsurface either directly or by inferred measurements. Because of the use of chlorinated solvents to remove petroleum-based cutting oils and lubricants at SRS (and other manufacturing sites) in degreasing operations, waste solvents may contain small amounts of the oils and lubricants. This mixture will fluoresce when excited by light of wavelengths capable of being transmitted over optical fiber. Samples of DNAPL from the A/M area of SRS were analyzed to assess the possibilities of contaminant detection by fluorescence spectroscopy. The DNAPL sample exhibited a strong, distinct fluorescent spectrum when exposed to an appropriate excitation wavelength. A cone penetrometer-based, laser induced fluorescent system may be capable of providing direct detection of DNAPLs in the subsurface based on these results.

  16. Ambient air contamination: Characterization and detection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nulton, C. P.; Silvus, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to characterize and detect sources of ambient air contamination are described. Chemical techniques to identify indoor contaminants are outlined, they include gas chromatography, or colorimetric detection. Organics generated from indoor materials at ambient conditions and upon combustion are characterized. Piezoelectric quartz crystals are used as precision frequency determining elements in electronic oscillators.

  17. Techniques for Forecasting Air Passenger Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneja, N.

    1972-01-01

    The basic techniques of forecasting the air passenger traffic are outlined. These techniques can be broadly classified into four categories: judgmental, time-series analysis, market analysis and analytical. The differences between these methods exist, in part, due to the degree of formalization of the forecasting procedure. Emphasis is placed on describing the analytical method.

  18. Fluorescent spectroscopy, a technique for characterizing surface films

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.; Devonald, David H.

    1973-01-01

    A relationship is established between fluorescent spectra obtained by using a light path through the liquid solution and the fluorescent spectra obtained by a direct reading of surface reflection (remote sensing). A brief review of quantum fundamentals provides the necessary information to conclude that "see-through" and reflectance spectra are identical in wavelength response. Many floating films contain fluorescent materials; thus fluorescent spectroscopic techniques were used to obtain the fluorescent spectra of lube oil, crude oil, andlignosulfonie acid in an effort to detect, identify, and quantify these representative fluorescent materials in water solutions. For each material tested the emission maximum was established. The emission maximum was then held constant while the absorption spectrum was recorded and the absorption maximum established. The complete spectral curves are presented.

  19. Research review: Indoor air quality control techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.

    1986-10-01

    Techniques for controlling the concentration of radon, formaldehyde, and combustion products in the indoor air are reviewed. The most effective techniques, which are generally based on limiting or reducing indoor pollutant source strengths, can decrease indoor pollutant concentrations by a factor of 3 to 10. Unless the initial ventilation rate is unusually low, it is difficult to reduce indoor pollutant concentrations more than approximately 50% by increasing the ventilation rate of an entire building. However, the efficiency of indoor pollutant control by ventilation can be enhanced through the use of local exhaust ventilation near concentrated sources of pollutants, by minimizing short circuiting of air from supply to exhaust when pollutant sources are dispersed and, in some situations, by promoting a displacement flow of air and pollutants toward the exhaust. Active air cleaning is also examined briefly. Filtration and electrostatic air cleaning for removal of particles from the indoor air are the most practical and effective currently available techniques of air cleaning. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  1. Cerenkov Events Seen by The TALE Air Fluorescence Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuzayyad, T.; Zundel, Z.; Smith, J. D.; Thomas, S. B.; Ivanov, D.; Mathews, J. N.; Jui, C. C. H.; Thomson, G.

    2014-03-01

    The Telescope Array Low-Energy Extension (TALE) is designed to study cosmic rays at energies above 30 PeV. The TALE FD is comprised of 10 telescopes covering the elevation range 31-58° and 14 telescopes with elevation coverage of 3-31°. A subset of the shower events recorded by TALE are ones for which the Cerenkov light produced by the shower particles dominates the total observed light signal. We have investigated the feasibility of using these events for cosmic rays measurements. With this data, the low energy reach of the TALE detector can be extended down to ~ 5 PeV. The use of the Cerenkov events collected by an FD represents a new approach to the measurement of cosmic rays at energies above the knee and below 100 PeV. By leveraging a detector built for the purpose of observing cosmic rays at higher energies, this technique adds to the capability of the detector and provides a cost effective way to view an energy region that has thus far been inaccessible to Air Fluorescence detectors. We will report on a first measurement by TALE of the cosmic rays energy spectrum in the energy range of 5 - 100 PeV. Since we are using a newly deployed detector, and we are looking at a new type of event, this result is very preliminary.

  2. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  3. Compressed Air/Vacuum Transportation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Shyamal

    2011-03-01

    General theory of compressed air/vacuum transportation will be presented. In this transportation, a vehicle (such as an automobile or a rail car) is powered either by compressed air or by air at near vacuum pressure. Four version of such transportation is feasible. In all versions, a ``c-shaped'' plastic or ceramic pipe lies buried a few inches under the ground surface. This pipe carries compressed air or air at near vacuum pressure. In type I transportation, a vehicle draws compressed air (or vacuum) from this buried pipe. Using turbine or reciprocating air cylinder, mechanical power is generated from compressed air (or from vacuum). This mechanical power transferred to the wheels of an automobile (or a rail car) drives the vehicle. In type II-IV transportation techniques, a horizontal force is generated inside the plastic (or ceramic) pipe. A set of vertical and horizontal steel bars is used to transmit this force to the automobile on the road (or to a rail car on rail track). The proposed transportation system has following merits: virtually accident free; highly energy efficient; pollution free and it will not contribute to carbon dioxide emission. Some developmental work on this transportation will be needed before it can be used by the traveling public. The entire transportation system could be computer controlled.

  4. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (acat) Inspection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Yost, W. T.

    2008-02-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of +/-6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  5. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) Inspection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph; Winfree, William P.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of plus or minus 6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  6. Control Techniques for Particulate Air Pollutants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a comprehensive review of the approaches commonly recommended for controlling the sources of particulate air pollution. Not all possible combinations of control techniques that might bring about more stringent control of each individual source are reviewed. The many agricultural, commercial, domestic, industrial, and municipal…

  7. Evaluation of Flat Microchannel Plate Photomultipliers for Use in a Portable Air Fluorescence Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzvi, S.; Martin, J.

    2003-07-01

    Future applications of the air fluorescence technique will require robust, portable detectors, versatile enough to be deployed in remote areas with little infrastructure. One such experiment is the Gamma Ray and Neutron Decay Scan of the Galaxy (GRaNDScan), which proposes to survey the EeV sky by observation of γ and cosmic ray air showers in the southern hemisphere. To view a 30° field at or exceeding a resolution of 1° , GRaNDScan will employ a lensless Schmidt optical system, with the light-sensitive element in each detector consisting of a spherical surface of tiled photomultipliers. Currently, the BURLE 85001 micro channel plate photomultiplier (MCP PMT), a low profile device appropriate for tiling, is the primary candidate for these cameras. In this paper, we discuss the preliminary design of the GRaNDScan optics, the basic characteristics of the 85001 photomultiplier, and the suitability of this device for use in a portable air fluorescence detector.

  8. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  9. Measurement of air-fluorescence-light yield induced by an electromagnetic shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MACFLY Collaboration; Colin, P.; Chukanov, A.; Grebenyuk, V.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Onofre, A.; Porokhovoi, S.; Sabirov, B.; Tkatchev, L.

    2009-01-01

    For most of the ultra-high-energy cosmic ray (UHECR) experiments and projects (HiRes, AUGER, TA, JEM-EUSO, TUS, …), the detection technique of extensive air showers is based, at least, on the measurement of the air-fluorescence-induced signal. The knowledge of the fluorescence-light yield (FLY) is of paramount importance for the UHECR energy reconstruction. The MACFLY experiment was designed to perform absolute measurements of the air FLY and to study its properties. Here, we report the result of measurement of dry-air FLY induced by 50 GeV electromagnetic showers as a function of the shower age and as a function of the pressure. The experiment was performed at CERN using a SPS-electron-test-beam line. The result shows the air FLY is proportional to the energy deposited in air (Ed). The ratio FLY/Ed and its pressure dependence remain constant independently of shower age, and more generally, independently of the excitation source used (single-electron track or air shower).

  10. Diagnosis of colon cancer using frequency domain fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinish, U. S.; Gulati, P.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Seah, L. K.

    2007-03-01

    Early detection and treatment of colon cancer has been associated with better disease prognosis. Conventional and reported optical techniques have limitations in detecting early stages of colon cancer growth. In this paper, a homodyne signal processing assisted frequency domain (FD) fluorescence imaging methodology is proposed for the early diagnosis of colon cancer. Simulated phantom tissues representing the biopsy samples at different stages of colon cancer growth are prepared and used for the imaging study. Selective imaging of healthy and diseased sites simulated in the samples was achieved even for fluorescence emissions having close lifetimes and wavelength values. Possible extension of the methodology for in vivo investigations is also discussed.

  11. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2006-11-15

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom.

  12. Air pollution monitoring by advanced spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Hodgeson, J A; McClenny, W A; Hanst, P L

    1973-10-19

    The monitoring requirements related to air pollution are many and varied. The molecules of concern differ greatly in their chemical and physical properties, in the nature of their environment, and in their concentration ranges. Furthermore, the application may have specific requirements such as rapid response time, ultrasensitivity, multipollutant capability, or capability for remote measurements. For these reasons, no single spectroscopic technique appears to offer a panacea for all monitoring needs. Instead we have attempted to demonstrate in the above discussion that, regardless of the difficulty and complexity of the monitoring problems, spectroscopy offers many tools by which such problems may be solved.

  13. Probing Endoplasmic Reticulum Dynamics using Fluorescence Imaging and Photobleaching Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey; Snapp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    This UNIT describes approaches and tools for studying the dynamics and organization of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes and proteins in living cells using commercially available widefield and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). It has been long appreciated that the ER plays a number of key roles in secretory protein biogenesis, calcium regulation, and lipid synthesis. However, study of these processes has been often restricted to biochemical assays that average the behaviors of millions of lysed cells or to imaging static fixed cells. Now, with new fluorescent protein reporter tools, highly sensitive commercial microscopes, and photobleaching techniques, it is possible to interrogate the behaviors of ER proteins, membranes, and stress pathways in single cells with exquisite spatial and temporal resolution. The ER presents a unique set of imaging challenges including the high mobility of ER membranes, a diverse range of dynamic ER structures, and the influence of post-translational modifications on fluorescent protein reporters. Solutions to these challenges are described and considerations for performing photobleaching assays, especially Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss in Photobleaching (FLIP) for ER proteins will be discussed. In addition, ER reporters and ER-specific pharmacologic compounds are presented with a focus on misfolded secretory protein stress and the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). PMID:24510787

  14. Doppler-free Yb spectroscopy with the fluorescence spot technique

    SciTech Connect

    Nizamani, Altaf H.; McLoughlin, James J.; Hensinger, Winfried K.

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate a simple technique to measure the resonant frequency of the 398.9-nm {sup 1}S{sub 0}{leftrightarrow}{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition for the different Yb isotopes. The technique, which works by observing and aligning fluorescence spots, has enabled us to measure transition frequencies and isotope shifts with an accuracy of 60 MHz. We provide wavelength measurements for the transition that differ from previously published work. Our technique also allows for the determination of Doppler-shifted transition frequencies for photoionization experiments when the atomic beam and the laser beam are not perpendicular and furthermore allows us to determine the average velocity of the atoms along the direction of the atomic beam.

  15. Fluorescence Techniques Using Dehydroergosterol to Study Cholesterol Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Huang, Huan; Gallegos, Adalberto M.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Cholesterol itself has very few structural/chemical features suitable for real-time imaging in living cells. Thus, the advent of dehydroergosterol [ergosta-5,7,9(11),22-tetraen-3β-ol, DHE] the fluorescent sterol most structurally and functionally similar to cholesterol to date, has proven to be a major asset for real-time probing/elucidating the sterol environment and intracellular sterol trafficking in living organisms. DHE is a naturally-occurring, fluorescent sterol analog that faithfully mimics many of the properties of cholesterol. Because these properties are very sensitive to sterol structure and degradation, such studies require the use of extremely pure (>98%) quantities of fluorescent sterol. DHE is readily bound by cholesterol-binding proteins, is incorporated into lipoproteins (from the diet of animals or by exchange in vitro), and for real-time imaging studies is easily incorporated into cultured cells where it co-distributes with endogenous sterol. Incorporation from an ethanolic stock solution to cell culture media is effective, but this process forms an aqueous dispersion of dehydroergosterol crystals which can result in endocytic cellular uptake and distribution into lysosomes which is problematic in imaging DHE at the plasma membrane of living cells. In contrast, monomeric DHE can be incorporated from unilamellar vesicles by exchange/fusion with the plasma membrane or from DHE-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (DHE-MβCD) complexes by exchange with the plasma membrane. Both of the latter techniques can deliver large quantities of monomeric dehydroergosterol with significant distribution into the plasma membrane. The properties and behavior of DHE in protein-binding, lipoproteins, model membranes, biological membranes, lipid rafts/caveolae, and real-time imaging in living cells indicate that this naturally-occurring fluorescent sterol is a useful mimic for probing the properties of cholesterol in these systems. PMID:18536950

  16. Evaluation of the reasons why freshly appearing citrus peel fluorescence during automatic inspection by fluorescent imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momin, Md. Abdul; Kondo, Naoshi; Kuramoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Shiigi, Tomoo; Ninomiya, Kazunori

    2011-07-01

    Defective unshu oranges (Citrus reticulate Blanco var. unshu) were sorted based on fluorescent imaging technique in a commercial packinghouse but fresh appearing unshu were rejected due to fluorescence appearing on their peel. We studied the various visible patterns based on colour, fluorescence and microscopic images, where even areas of the peel that are not obviously damaged can have fluorescence, to provide a categorization of fluorescence reasons. The categorization corresponded to: 1) hole and flow; 2) influenced by damaged or rotten fruits that have released peel oil onto it; 3) immature or poor peel quality; 4) whitish fluorescence due to agro-chemicals and 5) variation of the growing season. The identification of such patterns of fluorescence might be useful for citrus grading industry to take some initiatives to make the entire automated system more efficient.

  17. An air fluorescence imaging system for the detection of radiological contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inrig, Elizabeth; Erhardt, Lorne; Koslowsky, Vernon; Andrews, Bob; Ing, Harry; Dick, Michael; Forget, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    On-site detection and measurement of the activity and extent of alpha (α) contamination presents a significant challenge to radiation detection personnel. Due to the short range of these particles, conventional detection techniques involve bringing a probe within a few centimetres of the suspect area. Performing a thorough survey of an area is a time consuming, painstaking, and potentially dangerous task, as personnel may be exposed to harmful radiation. Conventional detectors may have fragile Mylar windows which are highly prone to breakage. The instrumentation under development employs a novel approach: instead of detecting the radiation directly, it detects radiation-induced air fluorescence surrounding the contaminated area. Optical imaging is used to determine the spatial extent of the contamination, providing a much more rapid, accurate and robust tool for in-situ contamination measurements. A mobile, near-field, wide-angle, fast optical system has been designed and constructed to detect and image this radiation-induced air fluorescence. It incorporates large-area position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes, UV filters, a specially constructed fast electronic shutter, and an aspherical phase mask to significantly increase the instrument's depth-of-field. First tests indicate that a 0.3 μCi α source can be detected in less than 10 seconds at a standoff distance of 1.5 meters.

  18. Autonomous unmanned air vehicles (UAV) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming-Kai; Lee, Ting N.

    2007-04-01

    The UAVs (Unmanned Air Vehicles) have great potentials in different civilian applications, such as oil pipeline surveillance, precision farming, forest fire fighting (yearly), search and rescue, boarder patrol, etc. The related industries of UAVs can create billions of dollars for each year. However, the road block of adopting UAVs is that it is against FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and ATC (Air Traffic Control) regulations. In this paper, we have reviewed the latest technologies and researches on UAV navigation and obstacle avoidance. We have purposed a system design of Jittering Mosaic Image Processing (JMIP) with stereo vision and optical flow to fulfill the functionalities of autonomous UAVs.

  19. Identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in suspended particulate matter by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Homdutt; Jain, V. K.; Khan, Zahid H.

    2007-09-01

    The synchronous fluorescence (SF) technique has been used in the identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from air particulate sample in an urban environment of Delhi, Jawaharlal Nehru University. Suspended particulate matter samples of 24 h duration were collected on glass fiber filter papers. PAHs were extracted from the filter papers using dichloromethane (DCM) + hexane with ultrasonication method. Qualitative measurements of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were carried out using the SF technique at various wavelength intervals (Δ λ). Due to the difference in chemical structure, each PAH gives specific characteristic spectrum for each Δ λ. Following PAHs were detected in our measurement: benz(a)anthracene (BaA), pyrene (Pyr), chrysene (Chry), fluoranthene (Flan), phenanthrene (Phen), and benz(ghi)perylene (BghiP). This is in agreement with our earlier work for determination of these PAHs using gas chromatography (GC). The seasonal variation of the PAHs was found to be maximum in winter and minimum during the monsoon.

  20. HANDBOOK: CONTROL TECHNIQUES FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This manual is a revision of the first (1986) edition of the Handbook: Control Technologies for Hazardous Air Pollutants, which incorporated information from numerous sources into a single, self-contained reference source focusing on the design and cost of VOC and partic...

  1. Atmospheric ammonia measurement using a VUV/photo-fragmentation laser-induced fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Schendel, J S; Stickel, R E; Vandijk, C A; Sandholm, S T; Davis, D D; Bradshaw, J D

    1990-11-20

    Vacuum ultraviolet/photofragmentation laser-induced fluorescence has been demonstrated to be a highly specific and sensitive method for the quantitative measurement of atmospheric ammonia (NH(3)). The fluorescence detected in this approach results from the two 193-nm photon photofragmentation step NH(3)?NH(2)? NH(b(1)Sigma(+)) followed by the excitation of the NH(b(1)Sigma(+)) NH(c(1)Pi) transition via a 450-nm photon with final emission being observed from the NH(c(1) Pi) NH(a(1)Delta) transition at 325 nm. Limits of detection for the instrumentpresented here are < 10 pptv and < 4 pptv for 1- and 5-min integration periods, respectively, in ambient sampling conditions. The technique is free from interferences and system performance does not significantly degrade in adverse sampling conditions (i.e., rain, fog, clouds, haze, etc.). Spectroscopic selectivity in the NH(b(1)Sigma(+))?NH(c(1)Pi) transition is sufficient to resolve (15)NH(3) and (14)NH(3) contributions for use in atmospheric tracer studies. Average ammonia measurements at Stone Mountain, GA, ranged from approximately 110 pptv for air temperatures <5 degrees C to approximately 240 pptv for air temperatures >/=<5 degrees C over the period from Dec. 1987 to the end of Apr. 1988.

  2. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ISOPRENE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses gas chromatographic techniques for measuring isoprene in air. Such measurement basically consists of three parts: (1) collection of sufficient sample volume for representative and accurate quantitation, (2) separation (if necessary) of isoprene from interfer...

  3. Measurement of Pressure Dependent Fluorescence Yield of Air: Calibration Factor for UHECR Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.W.; Burt, G.W.; Cao, Z.; Chang, F.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Chen, C.W.; Chen, P.; Field, C.; Findlay, J.; Huntemeyer, Petra; Huang, M.A.; Hwang, W.-Y.P.; Iverson, R.; Jones, B.F.; Jui, C.C.H.; Kirn, M.; Lin, G.-L.; Loh, E.C.; Maestas, M.M.; Manago, N.; Martens, K.; /Montana U. /Utah U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2005-07-06

    In a test experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the fluorescence yield of 28.5 GeV electrons in air and nitrogen was measured. The measured photon yields between 300 and 400 nm at 1 atm and 29 C are Y(760 Torr){sup air} = 4.42 {+-} 0.73 and Y(760 Torr){sup N{sub 2}} = 29.2 {+-} 4.8 photons per electron per meter. Assuming that the fluorescence yield is proportional to the energy deposition of a charged particle traveling through air, good agreement with measurements at lower particle energies is observed.

  4. Periodic Evolution of a Xe I Population in an Oscillatory Discharge Captured Through Time-Synchronized Laser Induced Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2014-10-01

    We track the evolution of the Xe I 6 s '[ 1 / 2 ] 1 - 6 p '[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (834.68 nm air) transition lineshape in a plasma discharge oscillating at 60 Hz. Two time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence techniques based on phase sensitive detection of the fluorescence signal are demonstrated, yielding consistent results. One approach used previously involves a sample-and-hold procedure that collects fluorescence signal at a particular phase in the oscillation period and holds the average value until the following sample. The second method is based on fast switching of the fluorescence signal; only the signal collected inside the acquisition gate is sent to a lock-in amplifier for processing. Both methods rely on modulating the exciting laser beam and the latter permits operation at a much higher frequency range with reduced spectral noise density. The maximum observed peak fluorescence intensity occurs at low discharge currents, although the peak intensity drops to zero at zero discharge current. The peak intensity also decreases at the discharge current maximum. Time-varying properties of the xenon neutrals are extracted from a lineshape analysis. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  5. Predictive Techniques for Spacecraft Cabin Air Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Cromes, Scott D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) proceeds, predictive techniques are used to determine the best approach for handling a variety of cabin air quality challenges. These techniques use equipment offgassing data collected from each ISS module before flight to characterize the trace chemical contaminant load. Combined with crew metabolic loads, these data serve as input to a predictive model for assessing the capability of the onboard atmosphere revitalization systems to handle the overall trace contaminant load as station assembly progresses. The techniques for predicting in-flight air quality are summarized along with results from early ISS mission analyses. Results from groundbased analyses of in-flight air quality samples are compared to the predictions to demonstrate the technique's relative conservatism.

  6. Measurement of air and nitrogen fluorescence light yields induced by electron beam for UHECR experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, P.; Chukanov, A.; Grebenyuk, V.; Naumov, D.; Nédélec, P.; Nefedov, Y.; Onofre, A.; Porokhovoi, S.; Sabirov, B.; Tkatchev, L.; Macfly Collaboration

    2007-06-01

    Most of the Ultra High Energy Cosmic Ray (UHECR) experiments and projects (HiRes, AUGER, TA, EUSO, TUS, etc.) use air fluorescence to detect and measure extensive air showers (EAS). The precise knowledge of the Fluorescence Light Yield (FLY) is of paramount importance for the reconstruction of UHECR. The MACFLY—Measurement of Air Cherenkov and Fluorescence Light Yield—experiment has been designed to perform such FLY measurements. In this paper we will present the results of FLY in the 290-440 nm wavelength range for dry air and pure nitrogen, both excited by electrons with energy of 1.5 MeV, 20 GeV and 50 GeV. The experiment uses a 90Sr radioactive source for low energy measurement and a CERN SPS e - beam for high energy. We find that the FLY is proportional to the deposited energy ( Ed) in the gas and we show that the air fluorescence properties remain constant independently of the electron energy. At the reference point: atmospheric dry air at 1013 hPa and 23 °C, the ratio FLY/ Ed = 17.6 photon/MeV with a systematic error of 13.2%.

  7. Agricultural pest monitoring using fluorescence lidar techniques. Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, L.; Guan, Z. G.; Zhou, H. J.; Lv, J.; Zhu, Z. R.; Cheng, J. A.; Chen, F. J.; Löfstedt, C.; Svanberg, S.; Somesfalean, G.

    2012-03-01

    The fluorescence of different types of planthopper ( Hemiptera) and moth ( Lepidoptera), which constitute important Chinese agricultural pests, was investigated both in situ in a laboratory setting and remotely using a fluorescence light detection and ranging (lidar) system operating at a range of about 50 m. The natural autofluorescence of different species, as well as the fluorescence from insects that had been dusted with fluorescent dye powder for identification were studied. Autofluorescence spectra of both moths and planthoppers show a maximum intensity peak around 450 nm. Bleaching upon long-time laser illumination was modest and did not affect the shape of the spectrum. A single dyed rice planthopper, a few mm in size, could be detected at 50 m distance by using the fluorescence lidar system. By employing various marking dyes, different types of agricultural pest could be determined. We suggest that lidar may be used in studies of migration and movement of pest insects, including studies of their behavior in the vicinity of pheromone traps and in pheromone-treated fields.

  8. Registering plant dysfunction in artificial biosystems through fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolova, Alexandra; Krumov, Alexandar; Vassilev, Vesselin

    Humanity ambitions in space exploration and long-term men-operated space missions evoke an increasing interest to artificial ecosystem researches. Advanced studies of plant biosystems provoke development of new innovative technologies for plant cultivation in man-made environment. Closed ecosystems of different types and structure are now used for space horticulture, cultivation of genetically modified species, bio-products for pharmacies and industry etc. New technologies are required to monitor and control basic parameters of future bioregenerative life support system, especially of plants photosynthetic activity as the most fundamental biological process. Authors propose a conception for a non-invasive control of plant physiological status in closed biosystem through spatial registration of chlorophyll fluorescence. This approach allows an early detection of stress impact on plants, reveal the dynamic and direction of the negative influence and the level of plant stress. Technical requirements for obtaining plant fluorescence images are examined in close relation with plant illumination conditions. Problems related with optimised plant illumination are discussed. Examples of fluorescence images of healthy and stressed plants demonstrate the sensibility and rapidity of signal changes caused by plant dysfunction. Proposed conception could be used for developing new technical solutions in autocontrolled bio-support systems, based on real time analysis of fluorescence images.

  9. Using Fluorescent Dyes to Demonstrate Solution-Mixing Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmaefsky, Brian; Shmaefsky, Mary Jo

    1994-01-01

    Describes a demonstration using a variety of clear solutions in which the instructor asks students whether the solutions appear homogeneous or inadequately mixed. The solutions are then induced to fluoresce with ultraviolet light to provide visible evidence of homogeneity or nonhomogeneity. (PR)

  10. Study of air-induced paper discolorations by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriana; Figueira, Francisca; Pessanha, Sofia; Nielsen, Ingelise; Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2010-02-01

    Air-induced paper discoloration is described as being different from other discoloration morphologies. It seems to be the result of prolonged exposure to air in a humid and polluted environment without appropriate protecting coverage. In this work, three folios from the same eighteenth century book, presenting three degrees of discoloration and opacity and subjected to different environmental conditions, were examined and compared. Samples were analyzed and compared by three different instrumental techniques, mid-infrared spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical and physical changes were confirmed from the data collected by these techniques. The absence of the secondary amide band characteristic of proteins in the infrared spectra of the two discolored folios, accompanied by the appearance and increase of white mineral-like deposits visible in the SEM micrographs, support the idea that oxidation reactions occurred and that these two folios were subjected to more severe degradation hazard. PMID:20149275

  11. Preparation and application of new fluorescein-labeled fumonisins B1 in fluorescence polarization analysis technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To prepare a new fluorescent tracer against common mycotoxins such as fumonisin B1 in order to replace 6-(4,6-Dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (6-DTAF), an expensive marker, and to develop a technique for quick detection of fumonisin B1 based on the principle of fluorescence polarizati...

  12. UV-fluorescence spectroscopic technique in the diagnosis of breast, ovarian, uterus, and cervix cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bidyut B.; Glassman, Wenling S.; Alfano, Robert R.; Cleary, Joseph; Prudente, R.; Celmer, Edward J.; Lubicz, Stephanie

    1991-06-01

    Malignant breast tumors can be separated from benign and normal tissues using uv-fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Using the same method one can also distinguish cancerous tissues from noncancerous ones in case of cervix, uterus and ovary.

  13. Detection of Biomass in New York City Aerosols: Light Scattering and Optical Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebauer, M.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Xu, M.; Rudolph, E.; Steiner, J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy is an ideal method for detecting bacteria and spores in real time. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy examination of New York City aerosols is used to quantify the mass of bacteria spores present in air masses collected at 14 liters/minute onto silica fiber filters, and on silica fiber ribbons using an Environmental Beta Attenuation Monitor manufactured by MetOne Instruments configured for the PM2.5 fraction. Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a molecule found primarily in bacterial spores, is the most characteristic component of spores in trial experiments on over 200 collected aerosol samples. DPA is extracted from the spores using a heat bath and chelated with Terbium. The DPA:Tb is detected by measuring its characteristic fluorescence with emission bands at 490, 545 and 585 nm for 270 nm excitation. Light scattering also measures the size distribution for a number of a variety of bacteria - Bacillus subtilis (rod shaped), Staphylococcus aureus (spherical) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (short rods) establishing that optical techniques satisfactorily distinguish populations based on their variable morphology. Size and morphology are obtained by applying a variation of the Gaussian Ray Approximation theory of anomalous diffraction theory to an analysis of the transmission spectra in the range of 0.4 to 1.0 microns. In test experiments, the refractive index of the inner spore core of Bacillus subtilis decreases from 1.51 to 1.39 while the spore radius enlarges from 0.38 to 0.6 micrometers. Optical determinations are verified by oil-immersion techniques and by scanning electron microscope measurements. Characterization of spores, germinating spore materials, and bacteria is considered vital to tracing bacteria in the environment, for the development of life-detection systems for planetary exploration, monitoring pathogens in environmental systems, and for the preparation of anti-terrorism strategies.

  14. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments. PBAPs can thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurement data and techniques for PBAPs in natural environments at high time- and size resolution are, however, sparse, and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in southwestern Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of a waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with a ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behavior, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night, when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each was correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multimodal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging, and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent

  15. Air Quality Forecasting through Different Statistical and Artificial Intelligence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D.; Goyal, P.

    2014-12-01

    Urban air pollution forecasting has emerged as an acute problem in recent years because there are sever environmental degradation due to increase in harmful air pollutants in the ambient atmosphere. In this study, there are different types of statistical as well as artificial intelligence techniques are used for forecasting and analysis of air pollution over Delhi urban area. These techniques are principle component analysis (PCA), multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) and the forecasting are observed in good agreement with the observed concentrations through Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) at different locations in Delhi. But such methods suffers from disadvantages like they provide limited accuracy as they are unable to predict the extreme points i.e. the pollution maximum and minimum cut-offs cannot be determined using such approach. Also, such methods are inefficient approach for better output forecasting. But with the advancement in technology and research, an alternative to the above traditional methods has been proposed i.e. the coupling of statistical techniques with artificial Intelligence (AI) can be used for forecasting purposes. The coupling of PCA, ANN and fuzzy logic is used for forecasting of air pollutant over Delhi urban area. The statistical measures e.g., correlation coefficient (R), normalized mean square error (NMSE), fractional bias (FB) and index of agreement (IOA) of the proposed model are observed in better agreement with the all other models. Hence, the coupling of statistical and artificial intelligence can be use for the forecasting of air pollutant over urban area.

  16. Review of fluorescence guided surgery visualization and overlay techniques

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Dsouza, Alisha V.; Davis, Scott C.; Olson, Jonathan D.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    In fluorescence guided surgery, data visualization represents a critical step between signal capture and display needed for clinical decisions informed by that signal. The diversity of methods for displaying surgical images are reviewed, and a particular focus is placed on electronically detected and visualized signals, as required for near-infrared or low concentration tracers. Factors driving the choices such as human perception, the need for rapid decision making in a surgical environment, and biases induced by display choices are outlined. Five practical suggestions are outlined for optimal display orientation, color map, transparency/alpha function, dynamic range compression, and color perception check. PMID:26504628

  17. Review of fluorescence guided surgery visualization and overlay techniques.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Jonathan T; Dsouza, Alisha V; Davis, Scott C; Olson, Jonathan D; Paulsen, Keith D; Roberts, David W; Pogue, Brian W

    2015-10-01

    In fluorescence guided surgery, data visualization represents a critical step between signal capture and display needed for clinical decisions informed by that signal. The diversity of methods for displaying surgical images are reviewed, and a particular focus is placed on electronically detected and visualized signals, as required for near-infrared or low concentration tracers. Factors driving the choices such as human perception, the need for rapid decision making in a surgical environment, and biases induced by display choices are outlined. Five practical suggestions are outlined for optimal display orientation, color map, transparency/alpha function, dynamic range compression, and color perception check.

  18. Estimating pH at the Air/Water Interface with a Confocal Fluorescence Microscope.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiya; Imanishi, Yasushi; Harata, Akira

    2015-01-01

    One way to determine the pH at the air/water interface with a confocal fluorescence microscope has been proposed. The relation between the pH at the air/water interface and that in a bulk solution has been formulated in connection with the adsorption equilibrium and the dissociation equilibrium of the dye adsorbed. Rhodamine B (RhB) is used as a surface-active fluorescent pH probe. The corrected fluorescence spectrum of RhB molecules at the air/water interface with the surface density of 1.0 nmol m(-2) level shows pH-dependent shifts representing an acid-base equilibrium. Two ways to determine the unknown acid-base equilibrium constant of RhB molecules at the air/water interface have been discussed. With surface-tension measurements, the adsorption properties, maximum surface density, and adsorption equilibrium constants were estimated for both cationic and zwitterionic forms of RhB molecules at the air/water interface.

  19. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments, may thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei, and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurements of PBAP in natural environments taken at high time- and size- resolution are, however, sparse and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in south western Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of the waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behaviour, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each were correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multi-modal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent particles

  20. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  1. Fluorescence techniques used to measure interactions between hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and epidermal growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Kathawala, Mustafa H; Khoo, Stella P K; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Zhao, Xinxin; Say Chye Loo, Joachim; Ahmed, Sohail; Woei Ng, Kee

    2015-01-01

    The potential applications of nanomaterials in therapeutics are immense and to fully explore this potential, it is important to understand the interaction of nanoparticles with cellular components. To examine the interaction between nanoparticles and cell membrane receptors, this report describes the use of advanced fluorescence techniques to measure interactions between hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles and epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), as a model system. FITC-labelled HA nanoparticles and monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP)-conjugated EGFRs expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) were generated and their interaction measured using acceptor photobleaching-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (AP-FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET). Results confirmed that hydroxyapatite nanoparticles not only interacted with EGFR but also attenuated downstream EGFR signalling, possibly by hindering normal dimerization of EGFR. Furthermore, the extent of signal attenuation suggested correlation with specific surface area of the nanoparticles, whereby greater specific surface area resulted in greater downstream signal attenuation. This novel demonstration establishes fluorescence techniques as a viable method to study nanoparticle interactions with proteins such as cell surface receptors. The approach described herein can be extended to study interactions between any fluorescently labelled nanoparticle-biomolecule pair.

  2. New approaches to the analysis of complex samples using fluorescence lifetime techniques and organized media

    SciTech Connect

    Hertz, P.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a highly sensitive and selective tool for the analysis of complex systems. In order to investigate the efficacy of several steady state and dynamic techniques for the analysis of complex systems, this work focuses on two types of complex, multicomponent samples: petrolatums and coal liquids. It is shown in these studies dynamic, fluorescence lifetime-based measurements provide enhanced discrimination between complex petrolatum samples. Additionally, improved quantitative analysis of multicomponent systems is demonstrated via incorporation of organized media in coal liquid samples. This research provides the first systematic studies of (1) multifrequency phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for dynamic fluorescence spectral fingerprinting of complex samples, and (2) the incorporation of bile salt micellar media to improve accuracy and sensitivity for characterization of complex systems. In the petroleum studies, phase-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy is used to combine spectral and lifetime information through the measurement of phase-resolved fluorescence intensity. The intensity is collected as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths, angular modulation frequency, and detector phase angle. This multidimensional information enhances the ability to distinguish between complex samples with similar spectral characteristics. Examination of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors from factor analysis of phase-resolved and steady state excitation-emission matrices, using chemometric methods of data analysis, confirms that phase-resolved fluorescence techniques offer improved discrimination between complex samples as compared with conventional steady state methods.

  3. Tracing Ambient Air Geochemistry using a Modified X-Ray Fluorescence Filter Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J. C.; Rudolph, E.; Wrice, T.

    2002-12-01

    Modifications of x-ray fluorescence counting procedures enable tracing of aerosol dispersals related to weather fronts and local weather phenomena. Improved X-ray fluorescence methods for bulk aerosols deposited under positive air pressure conditions onto Millipore filters at 80 liters/hour enable the tracing of geological samples in periods down to one hour. Vacuum-plating aliquots of USGS standards onto 0.2 micron polycarbonate and quartz Millipore filters create standards with a shelf life of several months. The analytical system permits detection of light oxides, such as silica to 10 ppm, and heavy elements, such as iron to 0.5 ppm. These collections allow discriminations to be drawn between dominantly geological, silica-enriched air mass and dominantly iron-enriched air of possible industrial origin. These ambient air collections at 120 feet elevation at City College are used to create possible distinctions in air masses related to points of origin. Splits of aerosol examined by neutron activation and coupled plasma emission spectroscopy agree with x-ray fluorescence methods to within analytical error. Aerosol flux conditions are monitored for speciation using direct examination by scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analytical capability plus aerosol physical properties by sun photometry. The latter provides bulk optical transmission at six major wavelengths and estimates for bulk aerosol size properties. Preliminary data show positive photometry links with iron-aerosols with a correlation coefficient with southwesterly wind-driven conditions of seventy percent over a four hour monitoring period. Aerosol flux comparisons with heavy metal populations, Ba, Rb, Zr, La show uniform distributions with iron- and silica-enriched populations indicating a pervasive background condition in the ambient air mass over New York City.

  4. Air fluorescence efficiency measurements for AIRWATCH based mission: Experimental set-up

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, B.; Catalano, O.; Celi, F.; Fazio, G.; Giarrusso, S.; La Rosa, G.; Mangano, A.; Bonanno, G.; Cosentino, R.; Di Benedetto, R.; Scuderi, S.; Richiusa, G.; Gregorio, A.

    1998-06-15

    In the framework of the AIRWATCH project we present an experimental set-up to measure the efficiency of the UV fluorescence production of the air using hard X-ray stimulus. The measures will be carried out at different pressure and temperature to emulate the same condition of the upper layers of the atmosphere where X-ray and gamma ray photons of Gamma Ray Bursts are absorbed.

  5. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E.; Börgardts, M.; Müller, T. J. J.; Grünzweig, C.; Lehmann, E.

    2015-09-15

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied.

  6. Uncertainty in mapping urban air quality using crowdsourcing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Castell, Nuria; Lahoz, William; Bartonova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Small and low-cost sensors measuring various air pollutants have become available in recent years owing to advances in sensor technology. Such sensors have significant potential for improving high-resolution mapping of air quality in the urban environment as they can be deployed in comparatively large numbers and therefore are able to provide information at unprecedented spatial detail. However, such sensor devices are subject to significant and currently little understood uncertainties that affect their usability. Not only do these devices exhibit random errors and biases of occasionally substantial magnitudes, but these errors may also shift over time. In addition, there often tends to be significant inter-sensor variability even when supposedly identical sensors from the same manufacturer are used. We need to quantify accurately these uncertainties to make proper use of the information they provide. Furthermore, when making use of the data and producing derived products such as maps, the measurement uncertainties that propagate throughout the analysis need to be clearly communicated to the scientific and non-scientific users of the map products. Based on recent experiences within the EU-funded projects CITI-SENSE and hackAIR we discuss the uncertainties along the entire processing chain when using crowdsourcing techniques for mapping urban air quality. Starting with the uncertainties exhibited by the sensors themselves, we present ways of quantifying the error characteristics of a network of low-cost microsensors and show suitable statistical metrics for summarizing them. Subsequently, we briefly present a data-fusion-based method for mapping air quality in the urban environment and illustrate how we propagate the uncertainties of the individual sensors throughout the mapping system, resulting in detailed maps that document the pixel-level uncertainty for each concentration field. Finally, we present methods for communicating the resulting spatial uncertainty

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions generated by a corona discharge in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Konthasinghe, Kumarasiri; Fitzmorris, Kristin; Peiris, Manoj; Hopkins, Adam J; Petrak, Benjamin; Killinger, Dennis K; Muller, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions via the B(2)Σu(+)-X(2)Σg(+) band system in the near-ultraviolet. The ions were generated continuously by a plasma glow discharge in low pressure N2 and by a corona discharge in ambient air. The fluorescence decay time was found to rapidly decrease with increasing pressure leading to an extrapolated decay rate of ≍10(10) s(-1) at atmospheric pressure. In spite of this quenching, we were able to observe laser induced fluorescence in ambient air by means of a time-gated spectral measurement. In the process of comparing the emission signal with that of N2 spontaneous Raman scattering, ion concentrations in ambient air of order 10(8-)10(10) cm(-3) were determined. With moderate increases in laser power and collection efficiency, ion concentrations of less than 10(6) cm(-3) may be measurable, potentially enabling applications in atmospheric standoff detection of ionizing radiation from hazardous radioactive sources. PMID:26414524

  8. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  9. Implementation of Satellite Techniques in the Air Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellner, Andrzej; Jafernik, Henryk

    2016-06-01

    The article shows process of the implementation satellite systems in Polish aviation which contributed to accomplishment Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) concept. Since 1991 authors have introduced Satellite Navigation Equipment in Polish Air Forces. The studies and researches provide to the Polish Air Force alternative approaches, modernize their navigation and landing systems and achieve compatibility with systems of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Acquired experience, conducted military tests and obtained results enabled to take up work scientifically - research in the environment of the civil aviation. Therefore in 2008 there has been launched cooperation with Polish Air Navigation Services Agency (PANSA). Thanks to cooperation, there have been compiled and fulfilled three fundamental international projects: EGNOS APV MIELEC (EGNOS Introduction in European Eastern Region - APV Mielec), HEDGE (Helicopters Deploy GNSS in Europe), SHERPA (Support ad-Hoc to Eastern Region Pre-operational in GNSS). The successful completion of these projects enabled implementation 21 procedures of the RNAV GNSS final approach at Polish airports, contributing to the implementation of PBN in Poland as well as ICAO resolution A37-11. Results of conducted research which served for the implementation of satellite techniques in the air transport constitute the meaning of this material.

  10. First principles calculations of air fluorescence efficiencies with comparisons to measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Colman, J. J.

    2004-01-01

    The fluorescence efficiencies used in calculating the optical emissions produced by energetic particles and penetrating radiation in air are derived for the most part from the measurements, of Davidson and O'neil, Mitchell and Hartman. These efficiencies were obtained from experiments conducted at various air pressures and in the absence of an applied electric field. In this paper we describe detailed 4.5 dimensional (two spatial dimensions and 2.5 phase space dimensions) kinetic calculations for the electron distribution function resulting from the injection of energetic electrons into air at various pressures. We choose beam parameters and dimensions that are directly relevant to the original Davidson and O'Neil experiments. From the electron distribution function and measured excitation cross-sections we then compute the optical efficiencies for a large number of nitrogen and oxygen lines across the electromagnetic spectrum from 320.0 nm to 800.0 nm. A comparison with various measurements is presented. We also present results from simulations with an applied electric field. The computed fluorescence efficiencies can be used to determine the optical emissions associated with high-altitude discharges driven by runaway air breakdown and results are discussed in a separate poster. We have also recalculated optical emission rates that are applicable to discharges dominated by. conventional breakdown for comparison with Taranenko et al. These rates are also used in our self-consistent sprite simulations.

  11. Direct fluorescent antibody technique for the detection of bacterial kidney disease in paraffin-embedded tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochiai, T.; Yasutake, W.T.; Gould, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was successfully used to detect the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), Renibacterium salmoninarum, in Bouin's solution flexed and paraffinembedded egg and tissue sections. This method is superior to gram stain and may be particularly useful in detecting the BKD organism in fish with low-grade infection.

  12. Determination of total proton release in purple membrane suspension by umbelliferone fluorescence quenching technique.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S; Singh, A K

    1992-06-01

    A technique for determining total proton release from purple membrane suspension under steady illumination has been described. Illuminated purple membrane is found to quench the fluorescence life-time of umbelliferone indicating the release of protons in the medium. Besides the "stoichiometric" release of protons from bacteriorhodopsin, there seems to be release of protons from sources other than protonated retinylidene Schiff base moiety also.

  13. Study of air pollution plumes with imaging techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Setzer, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    This work examines the possibilities of atmospheric dispersion studies through the use of small scale images of air pollution plumes, particularly through the use of Landsat imagery. The major points are: 1) A historical description of the uses of imaging techniques in atmospheric and plume dispersion studies. 2) A review of dispersion theories used with smoke and air pollution photography. 3) A study of a plume (up to 200 km) spreading over the ocean and visible in Landsat images is developed. Sixteen cases of this plume indicated that its shape and length depend mainly on the wind speed. Long plumes were characteristic of winds stronger than 5 m/s and spread within an angle of 5/sup 0/ to 7.5/sup 0/. An association with Reynolds' (1983) experiments is made in spite of a difference of six orders of magnitude between the length of the plumes in these two works. Pasquill's (1961) horizontal dispersion coefficients were within an expected variation when compared to the values measured from the images. Nevertheless, this variation is associated with limitations in the dispersion equation and in the dispersion coefficients. 4) A study of Landsat multi-spectral data showed that plumes over water have their own spectral signature and that they can be located with an unsupervised classification technique (Cluster). 5) The remote sensing of plumes is suggested as a viable tool for environmental problems such as acid rain and long-range transport of air pollutants. The use of existing (as well as future) satellite images is a virtually unexplored source of data for environmental studies.

  14. A highly fluorescent simultaneous azo dye technique for demonstration of nonspecific alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Ziomek, C A; Lepire, M L; Torres, I

    1990-03-01

    We describe a fluorescent histochemical technique for detection of nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (APase) in cells. The technique utilizes standard azo dye chemistry with naphthol AS-MX phosphate as substrate and fast red TR as the diazonium salt. The reaction product is a highly fluorescent red precipitate. Pre-implantation mouse embryos were used to establish optimal fixation and staining protocols and the specificity and sensitivity of the method. Fixation was in 4% paraformaldehyde for 1 hr, as glutaraldehyde induced autofluorescence of the cells. Maximal discriminable staining was detected after 15-20 min in the stain solution. The stain solution itself proved to be non-fluorescent, thus allowing visual observation of the progress of the staining reaction by fluorescence microscopy in its presence. To test the specificity of this fluorescent APase stain, a variety of cell types of known APase reactivity were stained by this protocol. Mouse lymphocytes and STO fibroblasts were negative, whereas F9 teratocarcinoma cells, intestinal epithelial cells, and rat fetal primordial germ cells were all found to be highly positive for APase activity, in agreement with published results on APase localization in these cells.

  15. Studies on the effect of mobile phone radiation on DNA using laser induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnu, K.; Nithyaja, B.; Pradeep, C.; Sujith, R.; Mohanan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2011-11-01

    In the present study we have investigated the effect of mobile phone radiation on deoxyribonucleic acid by using fluorescence technique. Absorption spectra shows increase in absorption of DNA after exposure to radiation from mobile phone with different SAR values and microwave frequency which give information about unwinding of the DNA double strand. Fluorescence intensity of dye doped DNA solution is getting reduced suggesting that the absorbed energy is used for unwinding of double strand of DNA after irradiating with microwave radiation. Unwinding of the DNA is very sensitive to power of the microwave radiation.

  16. Technique for measurement of fluorescence lifetime by use of stroboscopic excitation and continuous-wave detection.

    PubMed

    Matthews, D R; Summers, H D; Njoh, K; Errington, R J; Smith, P J; Barber, P; Ameer-Beg, S; Vojnovic, B

    2006-03-20

    A study of the practicality a simple technique for obtaining time-domain information that uses continuous wave detection of fluorescence is presented. We show that this technique has potential for use in assays for which a change in the lifetime of an indicator occurs in reaction to an analyte, in fluorescence resonance energy transfer, for example, and could be particularly important when one is carrying out such measurements in the scaled-down environment of a lab on a chip (biochip). A rate-equation model is presented that allows an objective analysis to be made of the relative importance of the key measurement parameters: optical saturation of the fluorophore and period of the excitation pulse. An experimental demonstration of the technique that uses a cuvette-based analysis of a carbocyanine dye and for which the excitation source is a 650 nm wavelength, self-pulsing AlGaInP laser diode is compared with the model.

  17. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  18. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  19. Fluorescence measurements for evaluating the application of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2010-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of cuvette-contained laser dye mixtures are made for evaluation of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments. Nine mixtures of Coumarin 500 and Rhodamine 610 are analyzed, as well as the pure dyes. For each sample, the cuvette is positioned on a two-axis translation stage to allow the interrogation at different spatial locations, allowing the examination of both primary (absorption of the laser light) and secondary (absorption of the fluorescence) inner filter effects. In addition to these expected inner filter effects, we find evidence that a portion of the absorbed fluorescence is re-emitted. A total of 688 spectra are acquired for the evaluation of multivariate analysis approaches to account for nonlinear effects.

  20. Detection of Bhanja virus in cell cultures by fluorescent antibody technique.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M C; Ramoni, C

    1975-06-26

    The multiplication of Bhanja virus in CV-1 cells was studied both by staining the viral antigens with the FA technique and measuring the light intensity emitted by the fluorescent cells with a photomultiplier and by the simultaneous titration of intracellular and extracellular virus. The fluorescence appeared at 3 hrs post adsorption in the form of very small granules in the cytoplasm of the infected cells. Percentage of cells containing viral antigens reached its maximum at 18 hrs post adsorption. Later on the fluorescence slowly decreased. The virus in infected cells was demonstrated 9 hrs post adsorption and maximum titre was reached 48 hrs post adsorption. The cell sheet remained apparently normal and no sign of cytopathic effect was observed until 36 hrs post adsorption.

  1. Field Observations of Bioaerosols: What We've Learned from Fluorescence, Genetic, and Microscopic Techniques (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Després, V. R.; Elbert, W.; Sinha, B.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere, influencing atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei (CCN, IN). Primary biogenic aerosol particles (PBAP) such as pollen, fungal spores, and bacteria are emitted directly from the biosphere to the atmosphere. Microscopic investigations have shown that PBAP account for up to ~30% of fine and up to ~70% of coarse particulate matter in rural and rain forest air, and the estimates of PBA emissions range from ~60 Tg a-1 of fine particles up to ~1000 Tg a-1 of total particulate matter. Fungal spores account for a large proportion of PBA with typical number and mass concentrations of ~104 m-3 and ~1 μg m-3 in continental boundary layer air and estimated global emissions of the order of ~50 Tg a-1 and 200 m-2 s-1, respectively [1]. The actual abundance, variability and diversity of PBAP are still poorly understood and quantified, however. By measuring fluorescence at excitation and emission wavelengths specific to viable cells, online techniques with time resolution of minutes are able to detect fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP), which represent a lower limit for the actual abundance of coarse (> 1 μm) PBAP [2]. Continuous sampling (1 - 4 months) was performed at various locations including pristine rain forest, rural and polluted urban sites. Each study exhibited a similar average particle number distribution dominated by a peak at ~3 μm, with coarse FBAP concentrations of the order of ~5x104 m-3 and ~1 μg m-3. Recent advances in the DNA analysis and molecular genetic characterization of aerosol filter samples yield new information about the sources and composition of PBA and provide new insight into regional and global

  2. Techniques for fluorescence detection of protoporphyrin IX in skin cancers associated with photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rollakanti, Kishore R.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that uses a specific photosensitizing agent, molecular oxygen, and light of a particular wavelength to kill cells targeted by the therapy. Topically administered aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is widely used to effectively treat cancerous and precancerous skin lesions, resulting in targeted tissue damage and little to no scarring. The targeting aspect of the treatment arises from the fact that ALA is preferentially converted into protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in neoplastic cells. To monitor the amount of PpIX in tissues, techniques have been developed to measure PpIX-specific fluorescence, which provides information useful for monitoring the abundance and location of the photosensitizer before and during the illumination phase of PDT. This review summarizes the current state of these fluorescence detection techniques. Non-invasive devices are available for point measurements, or for wide-field optical imaging, to enable monitoring of PpIX in superficial tissues. To gain access to information at greater tissue depths, multi-modal techniques are being developed which combine fluorescent measurements with ultrasound or optical coherence tomography, or with microscopic techniques such as confocal or multiphoton approaches. The tools available at present, and newer devices under development, offer the promise of better enabling clinicians to inform and guide PDT treatment planning, thereby optimizing therapeutic outcomes for patients. PMID:25599015

  3. Application of X-ray fluorescence analytical techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Ščančar, Janez; Jaćimović, Radojko; Simčič, Jurij; Pelicon, Primož; Budnar, Miloš; Jeran, Zvonka; Pongrac, Paula; Regvar, Marjana; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina

    2008-11-01

    Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that employs the use of higher plants for the clean-up of contaminated environments. Progress in the field is however handicapped by limited knowledge of the biological processes involved in plant metal uptake, translocation, tolerance and plant-microbe-soil interactions; therefore a better understanding of the basic biological mechanisms involved in plant/microbe/soil/contaminant interactions would allow further optimization of phytoremediation technologies. In view of the needs of global environmental protection, it is important that in phytoremediation and plant biology studies the analytical procedures for elemental determination in plant tissues and soil should be fast and cheap, with simple sample preparation, and of adequate accuracy and reproducibility. The aim of this study was therefore to present the main characteristics, sample preparation protocols and applications of X-ray fluorescence-based analytical techniques (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—EDXRF, total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—TXRF and micro-proton induced X-ray emission—micro-PIXE). Element concentrations in plant leaves from metal polluted and non-polluted sites, as well as standard reference materials, were analyzed by the mentioned techniques, and additionally by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The results were compared and critically evaluated in order to assess the performance and capability of X-ray fluorescence-based techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies. It is the EDXRF, which is recommended as suitable to be used in the analyses of a large number of samples, because it is multi-elemental, requires only simple preparation of sample material, and it is analytically comparable to the most frequently used instrumental chemical techniques. The TXRF is compatible to FAAS in sample preparation, but relative to AAS it is fast

  4. Determination of nitro polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in air and diesel particulate matter using liquid chromatography with electrochemical and fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    MacCrehan, W.A.; May, W.E.; Yang, S.D.; Benner, B.A. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Three different approaches to the liquid chromatographic detection of nitro polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in air and diesel particulate extracts are presented, based on differential pulse (LCDPD) and amperometric (LCEC) electrochemical detection and fluorescence detection following online reduction to the amine (LCFI). The particulate extraction/fractionation procedure for each detection approach is discussed. The operational advantages of oxygen removal with a platinum oxygen scrubber (all three types of detection), the use of modulated pulse detection, and wavelength-programmed fluorescence detection are explored. 1-Nitropyrene is determined in Standard Reference Material (SRM) 1650 diesel particulate matter and in several other round robin samples by all three methods. Results are compared to those obtained by other techniques (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry) and by other laboratories (LCFI). Additionally, 2-nitrofluorene, 9-nitroanthracene, 7-nitrobenz(a)anthracene, and 6-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene are determined in SRM 1650 by LCFI. The detection limits for 1-nitropyrene (expressed as picograms) are 5200 (LCDPD), 60 (LCEC), and 10 (LCFI).

  5. Controlling Air Pollution; A Primer on Stationary Source Control Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corman, Rena

    This companion document to "Air Pollution Primer" is written for the nonexpert in air pollution; however, it does assume a familiarity with air pollution problems. This work is oriented toward providing the reader with knowledge about current and proposed air quality legislation and knowledge about available technology to meet these standards for…

  6. Fluorescence particle detector for real-time quantification of viable organisms in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luoma, Greg; Cherrier, Pierre P.; Piccioni, Marc; Tanton, Carol; Herz, Steve; DeFreez, Richard K.; Potter, Michael; Girvin, Kenneth L.; Whitney, Ronald

    2002-02-01

    The ability to detect viable organisms in air in real time is important in a number of applications. Detecting high levels of airborne organisms in hospitals can prevent post-operative infections and the spread of diseases. Monitoring levels of airborne viable organisms in pharmaceutical facilities can ensure safe production of drugs or vaccines. Monitoring airborne bacterial levels in meat processing plants can help to prevent contamination of food products. Monitoring the level of airborne organisms in bio-containment facilities can ensure that proper procedures are being followed. Finally, detecting viable organisms in real time is a key to defending against biological agent attacks. This presentation describes the development and performance of a detector, based on fluorescence particle counting technology, where an ultraviolet laser is used to count particles by light scattering and elicit fluorescence from specific biomolecules found only in living organisms. The resulting detector can specifically detect airborne particles containing living organisms from among the large majority of other particles normally present in air. Efforts to develop the core sensor technology, focusing on integrating an UV laser with a specially designed particle-counting cell will be highlighted. The hardware/software used to capture the information from the sensor, provide an alarm in the presence of an unusual biological aerosol content will also be described. Finally, results from experiments to test the performance of the detector will be presented.

  7. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Novel analytical techniques for coal liquefaction: Fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-10-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using fluorescence and reflectance microscopy techniques for the examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. Resid, as defined here, is the 850{degrees}F{sup +} portion of the process stream, and includes soluble organics, insoluble organics and ash. The technique can be used to determine the degree of hydrogenation and the presence of multiple phases occurring within a resid sample. It can also be used to infer resid reactivity. The technique is rapid, requiring less than one hour for sample preparation and examination, and thus has apparent usefulness for process monitoring. Additionally, the technique can distinguish differences in samples produced under various process conditions. It can, therefore, be considered a potentially useful technique for the process developer. Further development and application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified based on these results.

  8. Evaluation of a fluorescent lectin-based staining technique for some acidophilic mining bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, D.J.; Bruhn, D.F.; Miller, K.S.; Stoner, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    A fluorescence-labeled wheat germ agglutinin staining technique was modified and found to be effective for staining gram-positive, acidophilic mining bacteria. Bacteria identified by others as being gram positive through 16S rRNA sequence analyses, yet clustering near the divergence of that group, stained weakly. Gram-negative bacteria did not stain. Background staining of environmental samples was negligible, and pyrite and soil particles in the samples did not interfere with the staining procedure.

  9. The Fluorescent-Oil Film Method and Other Techniques for Boundary-Layer Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loving, Donald L.; Katzoff, S.

    1959-01-01

    A flow-visualization technique, known as the fluorescent-oil film method, has been developed which appears to be generally simpler and to require less experience and development of technique than previously published methods. The method is especially adapted to use in the large high-powered wind tunnels which require considerable time to reach the desired test conditions. The method consists of smearing a film of fluorescent oil over a surface and observing where the thickness is affected by the shearing action of the boundary layer. These films are detected and identified, and their relative thicknesses are determined by use of ultraviolet light. Examples are given of the use of this technique. Other methods that show promise in the study of boundary-layer conditions are described. These methods include the use of a temperature-sensitive fluorescent paint and the use of a radiometer that is sensitive to the heat radiation from a surface. Some attention is also given to methods that can be used with a spray apparatus in front of the test model.

  10. Application of grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence technique to discriminate and quantify implanted solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Kitts, K.; Choi, Y.; Eng, P. J.; Ghose, S. K.; Sutton, S. R.; Rout, B.

    2009-03-15

    NASA launched the Genesis return mission to obtain pristine solar wind samples in order to better understand solar wind mechanics, solar physics, and solar system evolution. Unfortunately, the probe crash-landed shattering the collector plates necessitating the application of a grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence technique. This nondestructive methodology differentiates the terrestrial contamination from the low concentration implanted solar wind. Using this technique, the elemental depth distribution is obtained resulting in the determination of absolute solar wind elemental abundance. We describe this application and present the solar wind Fe concentration determination as an example.

  11. Technique for real-time tissue characterization based on scanning multispectral fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy (ms-TRFS)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Gorpas, Dimitris; Yankelevich, Diego; Marcu, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel technique for continuous acquisition, processing and display of fluorescence lifetimes enabling real-time tissue diagnosis through a single hand held or biopsy fiber-optic probe. A scanning multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (ms-TRFS) with self-adjustable photon detection range was developed to account for the dynamic changes of fluorescence intensity typically encountered in clinical application. A fast algorithm was implemented in the ms-TRFS software platform, providing up to 15 Hz continuous display of fluorescence lifetime values. Potential applications of this technique, including biopsy guidance, and surgical margins delineation were demonstrated in proof-of-concept experiments. Current results showed accurate display of fluorescence lifetimes values and discrimination of distinct fluorescence markers and tissue types in real-time (< 100 ms per data point). PMID:25798320

  12. Monitoring changes in sponge cakes during aging by front face fluorescence spectroscopy and instrumental techniques.

    PubMed

    Botosoa, Eliot Patrick; Chénè, Christine; Karoui, Romdhane

    2013-03-20

    In the present study, sponge cakes, produced at the pilot scale, were monitored during aging (i.e., 1, 3, 6, 9, 16, and 20 days) by three different analytical techniques. For the texture analyzer, the hardness and elasticity of crumb cakes were found to significantly increase and decrease, respectively, throughout aging. Color parameters (L*, a*, and b*) showed only slight change throughout aging, and a high correlation (R(2) = 0.88) was observed between the whiteness and the yellowness. Tryptophan fluorescence spectra (excitation, 290 nm; emission, 305-490 nm) recorded on cakes exhibited three maxima located at 382, 435, and 467 nm that were attributed to maximum emission of tryptophan (382 nm) and fluorescent Maillard reaction products (435 and 467 nm). The principal component analysis (PCA) applied to the tryptophan spectra allowed a clear discrimination of cakes aged for 1, 3, and 6 days from those aged for 9, 16, and 20 days. Finally, canonical correlation analysis (CCA) performed on the textural and tryptophan fluorescence spectral data sets showed that the two groups of variables were highly correlated because the squared canonical coefficients for canonical variates were 0.99, indicating that cake texture determined at the macroscopic level by texture analyzer is a reflection of its structure at the molecular level determined by fluorescence spectroscopy.

  13. Review of Fluorescence-Based Velocimetry Techniques to Study High-Speed Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Criag; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews five laser-induced fluorescence-based velocimetry techniques that have been used to study high-speed compressible flows at NASA Langley Research Center. The techniques discussed in this paper include nitric oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV), nitrogen dioxide photodissociation (NO2-to-NO) MTV, and NO and atomic oxygen (O-atom) Doppler-shift-based velocimetry. Measurements of both single-component and two-component velocity have been performed using these techniques. This paper details the specific application and experiment for which each technique has been used, the facility in which the experiment was performed, the experimental setup, sample results, and a discussion of the lessons learned from each experiment.

  14. Advanced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy Techniques for the Investigation of Peptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Neil R.

    The ubiquitous cross beta sheet peptide motif is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative diseases while at the same time offers remarkable potential for constructing isomorphic high-performance bionanomaterials. Despite an emerging understanding of the complex folding landscape of cross beta structures in determining disease etiology and final structure, we lack knowledge of the critical initial stages of nucleation and growth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding of these key stages in the cross-beta nucleation and growth pathways using cutting-edge microscopy techniques. In addition, I present a new combined time-resolved fluorescence analysis technique with the potential to advance our current understanding of subtle molecular level interactions that play a pivotal role in peptide self-assembly. Using the central nucleating core of Alzheimer's Amyloid-beta protein, Abeta(16 22), as a model system, utilizing electron, time-resolved, and non-linear microscopy, I capture the initial and transient nucleation stages of peptide assembly into the cross beta motif. In addition, I have characterized the nucleation pathway, from monomer to paracrystalline nanotubes in terms of morphology and fluorescence lifetime, corroborating the predicted desolvation process that occurs prior to cross-beta nucleation. Concurrently, I have identified unique heterogeneous cross beta domains contained within individual nanotube structures, which have potential bionanomaterials applications. Finally, I describe a combined fluorescence theory and analysis technique that dramatically increases the sensitivity of current time-resolved techniques. Together these studies demonstrate the potential for advanced microscopy techniques in the identification and characterization of the cross-beta folding pathway, which will further our understanding of both amyloidogenesis and bionanomaterials.

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy: a powerful technique for the noninvasive characterization of artwork.

    PubMed

    Romani, Aldo; Clementi, Catia; Miliani, Costanza; Favaro, Gianna

    2010-06-15

    After electronic excitation by ultraviolet or visible radiation, atoms and molecules can undergo thermal or radiative deactivation processes before relaxing to the ground state. They can emit photons with longer wavelengths than the incoming exciting radiation, that is, they can fluoresce in the UV-vis-near-infrared (NIR) range. The study of fluorescence relaxation processes is one of the experimental bases on which modern theories of atomic and molecular structure are founded. Over the past few decades, technological improvements in both optics and electronics have greatly expanded fluorimetric applications, particularly in analytical fields, because of the high sensitivity and specificity afforded by the methods. Using fluorimetry in the study and conservation of cultural heritage is a recent innovation. In this Account, we briefly summarize the use of fluorescence-based techniques in examining the constituent materials of a work of art in a noninvasive manner. Many chemical components in artwork, especially those of an organic nature, are fluorescent materials, which can be reliably used for both diagnostic and conservative purposes. We begin by examining fluorimetry in the laboratory setting, considering the organic dyes and inorganic pigments that are commonly studied. For a number of reasons, works of art often cannot be moved into laboratories, so we continue with a discussion of portable instruments and a variety of successful "field applications" of fluorimetry to works of cultural heritage. These examples include studies of mural paintings, canvas paintings, tapestries, and parchments. We conclude by examining recent advances in treating the data that are generated in fluorescence studies. These new perspectives are focused on the spectral shape and lifetime of the emitted radiation. Recent developments have provided the opportunity to use various spectroscopic techniques on an increasing number of objects, as well as the ability to fully characterize

  16. Quantitative comparison of multiframe data association techniques for particle tracking in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smal, Ihor; Meijering, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Biological studies of intracellular dynamic processes commonly require motion analysis of large numbers of particles in live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy imaging data. Many particle tracking methods have been developed in the past years as a first step toward fully automating this task and enabling high-throughput data processing. Two crucial aspects of any particle tracking method are the detection of relevant particles in the image frames and their linking or association from frame to frame to reconstruct the trajectories. The performance of detection techniques as well as specific combinations of detection and linking techniques for particle tracking have been extensively evaluated in recent studies. Comprehensive evaluations of linking techniques per se, on the other hand, are lacking in the literature. Here we present the results of a quantitative comparison of data association techniques for solving the linking problem in biological particle tracking applications. Nine multiframe and two more traditional two-frame techniques are evaluated as a function of the level of missing and spurious detections in various scenarios. The results indicate that linking techniques are generally more negatively affected by missing detections than by spurious detections. If misdetections can be avoided, there appears to be no need to use sophisticated multiframe linking techniques. However, in the practically likely case of imperfect detections, the latter are a safer choice. Our study provides users and developers with novel information to select the right linking technique for their applications, given a detection technique of known quality.

  17. The small contribution of molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation to the air-fluorescence yield of cosmic ray shower particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Samarai, Imen; Deligny, Olivier; Rosado, Jaime

    2016-10-01

    A small contribution of molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation to the air-fluorescence yield in the UV range is estimated based on an approach previously developed in the framework of the radio-detection of showers in the gigahertz frequency range. First, this approach is shown to provide an estimate of the main contribution of the fluorescence yield due to the de-excitation of the C 3Πu electronic level of nitrogen molecules to the B 3Πg one amounting to Y[ 337 ] =(6.05 ± 1.50) MeV-1 at 800 hPa pressure and 293 K temperature conditions, which compares well to previous dedicated works and to experimental results. Then, under the same pressure and temperature conditions, the fluorescence yield induced by molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation is found to be Y[330-400]MBR = 0.10 MeV-1 in the wavelength range of interest for the air-fluorescence detectors used to detect extensive air showers induced in the atmosphere by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. This means that out of ≃175 photons with wavelength between 330 and 400 nm detected by fluorescence detectors, one of them has been produced by molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation. Although small, this contribution is not negligible in regards to the total budget of systematic uncertainties when considering the absolute energy scale of fluorescence detectors.

  18. A new LigaSure technique for the formation of segmental plane by intravenous indocyanine green fluorescence during thoracoscopic anatomical segmentectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dejima, Hitoshi; Mizumo, Tetsuya; Sakakura, Noriaki; Sakao, Yukinori

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to present a new approach to the formation of a segmental plane by LigaSure (Covidien, Mansfield, MA, USA) with indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence system during thoracoscopic segmentectomy. Methods This was a consecutive study that compared 12 patients who underwent a new LigaSure technique (LT) for segmental plane formation during thoracoscopic anatomical segmentectomy with 38 patients who underwent conventional methods using the staple technique (ST). Eleven patients were followed up more than 3 months after discharge. Results The mean age of the patients was 66 years in the LT group and 67 years in ST. The mean duration for the formation of segmental plane and the mean number of staples was 22.8 min and 1.8 per surgery, respectively, in the LT group; and 16.2 min and 3.4 per surgery, respectively, in ST. No patient had a prolonged air leak (PAL) of more than 7 days. Minor air leak was identified early in two and was delayed in one. Two-thirds of patients with early minor air leak had low index of prolonged air leak (IPAL) score. There was no air leak in the patients with high IPAL score. Eventually, we deduced that the cause of the minor air leak was a technical problem. Conclusions In the formation of segmental plane during thoracoscopic segmentectomy, a combination of ICG fluorescence and LigaSure may be beneficial for patients. As a new operative instrument, LT constitutes, in our opinion, a feasible and easy alternative to other thoracoscopic techniques. PMID:27293839

  19. A robust X-ray fluorescence technique for multielemental analysis of solid samples.

    PubMed

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, Nikolaos; Foteinis, Spyros; Paigniotaki, Katherine; Papadogiannakis, Minos

    2016-02-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) quantitation software programs are widely used for analyzing environmental samples due to their versatility but at the expense of accuracy. In this work, we propose an accurate, robust, and versatile technique for multielemental X-ray fluorescence analytical applications, by spiking solid matrices with standard solutions. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-certified soil standards were spiked with standard solutions, mixed well, desiccated, and analyzed by an energy dispersive XRF. Homogenous targets were produced and low error calibration curves, for the added and not added, neighboring, elements, were obtained. With the addition of few elements, the technique provides reliable multielemental analysis, even for concentrations of the order of milligram per kilogram (ppm). When results were compared to the ones obtained from XRF commercial quantitation software programs, which are widely used in environmental monitoring and assessment applications, they were found to fit certified values better. Moreover, in all examined cases, results were reliable. Hence, this technique can also be used to overcome difficulties associated with interlaboratory consistency and for cross-validating results. The technique was applied to samples with an environmental interest, collected from a ship/boat repainting area. Increased copper, zinc, and lead loads were observed (284, 270, and 688 mg/kg maximum concentrations in soil, respectively), due to vessels being paint stripped and repainted.

  20. Shot noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; Davis, L. I., Jr.; Guo, C.; James, J. V.; Kakos, S.; Morris, P. T.; Wang, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Nearly shot-noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence is reported. A LIDAR configuration is used to excite fluorescence in a large volume and a narrow-bandwidth interference filter provides spectral discrimination. This arrangement alleviates the effect of ozone interference and facilitates image processing at relatively close distances. The detection limit is determined mainly by the shot-noise of the solar background. Ground-based measurements in Dearborn indicate a detection limit of better than 1 x 10 to the 6th power OH/cubic cm over a forty-minute acquisition period. Under favorable conditions, a comparable detection limit was also observed for airborne measurements.

  1. Effect of Clouds on Apertures of Space-based Air Fluorescence Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolsky, P.; Krizmanic, J.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based ultra-high-energy cosmic ray detectors observe fluorescence light from extensive air showers produced by these particles in the troposphere. Clouds can scatter and absorb this light and produce systematic errors in energy determination and spectrum normalization. We study the possibility of using IR remote sensing data from MODIS and GOES satellites to delimit clear areas of the atmosphere. The efficiency for detecting ultra-high-energy cosmic rays whose showers do not intersect clouds is determined for real, night-time cloud scenes. We use the MODIS SST cloud mask product to define clear pixels for cloud scenes along the equator and use the OWL Monte Carlo to generate showers in the cloud scenes. We find the efficiency for cloud-free showers with closest approach of three pixels to a cloudy pixel is 6.5% exclusive of other factors. We conclude that defining a totally cloud-free aperture reduces the sensitivity of space-based fluorescence detectors to unacceptably small levels.

  2. Fluorescence dilution technique for measurement of albumin reflection coefficient in isolated glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fan; Chen, Chun Cheng Andy; Zhang, Jin; Schreck, Carlos M N; Roman, Eric A; Williams, Jan M; Hirata, Takashi; Sharma, Mukut; Beard, Daniel A; Savin, Virginia J; Roman, Richard J

    2015-12-15

    This study describes a high-throughput fluorescence dilution technique to measure the albumin reflection coefficient (σAlb) of isolated glomeruli. Rats were injected with FITC-dextran 250 (75 mg/kg), and the glomeruli were isolated in a 6% BSA solution. Changes in the fluorescence of the glomerulus due to water influx in response to an imposed oncotic gradient was used to determine σAlb. Adjustment of the albumin concentration of the bath from 6 to 5, 4, 3, and 2% produced a 10, 25, 35, and 50% decrease in the fluorescence of the glomeruli. Pretreatment of glomeruli with protamine sulfate (2 mg/ml) or TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) decreased σAlb from 1 to 0.54 and 0.48, respectively. Water and solute movement were modeled using Kedem-Katchalsky equations, and the measured responses closely fit the predicted behavior, indicating that loss of albumin by solvent drag or diffusion is negligible compared with the movement of water. We also found that σAlb was reduced by 17% in fawn hooded hypertensive rats, 33% in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, 26% in streptozotocin-treated diabetic Dahl SS rats, and 21% in 6-mo old type II diabetic nephropathy rats relative to control Sprague-Dawley rats. The changes in glomerular permeability to albumin were correlated with the degree of proteinuria in these strains. These findings indicate that the fluorescence dilution technique can be used to measure σAlb in populations of isolated glomeruli and provides a means to assess the development of glomerular injury in hypertensive and diabetic models.

  3. Air exchange effectiveness in office buildings: Measurement techniques and results

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.

    1992-07-01

    We define two air exchange effectiveness parameters which indicate the extent of short circuiting, mixing, or displacement air flow in an entire building, the air diffusion effectiveness which indicates the air flow pattern locally, and the normalized local age of air. After describing two tracer gas procedures for measuring these parameters, we discuss assumptions inherent in the data analysis that are often violated in large office buildings. To obtain valuable data, careful selection of buildings for measurements and assessments to determine if operating conditions are reasonably consistent with the assumptions are necessary. Multiple factors, in addition to the air flow pattern in the occupied space, can affect measurement results, consequently, the interpretation of measurements is not straightforward. We summarize the results of measurements in several office buildings and in a research laboratory. Almost all measurements indicate that the extent of both short circuiting and displacement flow is small. A moderate amount of short circuiting is evident from a few measurements in rooms with heated supply air. Ages of air and their reciprocals (local ventilation rates) often vary substantially between rooms, probably because of room-to-room variation in the rate of air supply. For future research, we suggest assessments of measurement accuracy, development of measurement approaches that may be practically applied for a broader range of buildings, and a greater focus on pollutant removal efficiencies.

  4. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  5. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  6. Passive focusing techniques for piezoelectric air-coupled ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, Tomás E; Camacho, Jorge; Fritsch, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel passive focusing system for Air-Coupled Ultrasonic (ACU) piezoelectric transducers which is inspired by the Newtonian-Cassegrain (NC) telescope concept. It consist of a primary spherical mirror with an output hole and a flat secondary mirror, normal to the propagation axis, that is the transducer surface itself. The device is modeled and acoustic field is calculated showing a collimated beam with a symmetrical focus. A prototype according to this design is built and tested with an ACU piezoelectric transducer with center frequency at 400 kHz, high-sensitivity, wideband and 25 mm diameter flat aperture. The acoustic field is measured and compared with calculations. The presented prototype exhibit a 1.5 mm focus width and a collimated beam up to 15 mm off the output hole. In addition, the performance of this novel design is compared, both theoretically and experimentally, with two techniques used before for electrostatic transducers: the Fresnel Zone Plate - FZP and the off-axis parabolic or spherical mirror. The proposed NC arrangement has a coaxial design, which eases the transducers positioning and use in many applications, and is less bulky than off-axis mirrors. Unlike in off-axis mirrors, it is now possible to use a spherical primary mirror with minimum aberrations. FZP provides a more compact solution and is easy to build, but presents some background noise due to interference of waves diffracted at out of focus regions. By contrast, off-axis parabolic mirrors provide a well defined focus and are free from background noise, although they are bulky and more difficult to build. Spherical mirrors are more easily built, but this yields a non symmetric beam and a poorly defined focus. PMID:26799129

  7. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  8. Oxygen diffusion into multiwalled carbon nanotube doped polystrene latex films using fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Yargı, Onder; Uğur, Saziye; Pekcan, Onder

    2013-05-01

    This study examines the oxygen diffusion into polystyrene (PS) latex/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) nanocomposite films (PS/MWNT) consisting of various amounts of MWNT via steady state fluorescence technique (SSF). PS/MWNT films were prepared from the mixture of MWNT and pyrene (P)-labeled PS latexes at various compositions at room temperature. These films were then annealed at 170 °C above glass transition (Tg) temperature of PS. Fluorescence quenching measurements were performed for each film separately to evaluate the effect of MWNT content on oxygen diffusion. The Stern-Volmer equation for fluorescence quenching is combined with Fick's law for diffusion to derive the mathematical expressions. Diffusion coefficients (D) were produced and found to be increased from 1.1 × 10(-12) to 41 × 10(-12) cm(2)s(-1) with increasing MWNT content. This increase was explained via the existence of large amounts of pores in composite films which facilitate oxygen penetration into the structure. PMID:23334487

  9. Validation and evaluation of a novel time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Durot, C J; Gallimore, A D; Smith, T B

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel technique to measure time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence signals in plasma sources that have a relatively constant Fourier spectrum of oscillations in steady-state operation, but are not periodically pulsed, e.g., Hall thrusters. The technique uses laser modulation of the order of MHz and recovers signal via a combination of band-pass filtering, phase-sensitive detection, and averaging over estimated transfer functions calculated for many different cycles of the oscillation. Periodic discharge current oscillations were imposed on a hollow cathode. Measurements were validated by comparison with independent measurements from a lock-in amplifier and by comparing the results of the transfer function average to an independent analysis technique triggering averaging over many oscillation cycles in the time domain. The performance of the new technique is analyzed and compared to prior techniques, and it is shown that this new technique has a niche in measurements where the analog photomultiplier signal has a nonwhite noise spectral density and cycles of oscillation are not sufficiently repeatable to allow for reliable triggering or a meaningful average waveform in the time domain.

  10. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  11. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  12. Plant responses to reduced air pressure: advanced techniques and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daunicht, H.-J.; Brinkjans, H. J.

    1996-01-01

    Knowledge on air pressure impacts on plant processes and growth is essential for understanding responses to altitude and for comprehending the way of action of aerial gasses in general, and is of potential importance for life support systems in space. Our research on reduced air pressure was extended by help of a new set-up comprising two constantly ventilated chambers (283 L each), allowing pressure gradients of +/- 100 kPa. They provide favourable general growth conditions while maintaining all those factors constant or at desired levels which modify the action of air pressure, e.g. water vapour pressure deficit and air mass flow over the plants. Besides plant growth parameters, transpiration and CO_2 gas exchange are determined continuously. Results are presented on young tomato plants grown hydroponically, which had been treated with various combinations of air pressure (400 - 700 - 1000 hPa), CO_2 concentration and wind intensity for seven days. At the lowest pressure transpiration was enhanced considerably, and the plants became sturdier. On the other hand growth was retarded to a certain extent, attributable to secondary air pressure effects. Therefore, even greater limitations of plant productivity are expected after more extended periods of low pressure treatment.

  13. Average OH density in alternating current dielectric barrier discharge by laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongliang; Feng, Chunlei; Gao, Liang; Ding, Hongbin

    2015-10-01

    The average OH density in atmospheric He-H2O(0.4%) needle-plate dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was measured by the asynchronous laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and the fluctuation of OH radical density was measured simultaneously to prove that the average OH density can be obtained by the asynchronous LIF technique. The evolution of the average OH density in four different discharge patterns, namely, negative barrier corona discharge, glow discharge, multi glow discharge, and streamer discharge, was studied, and it was found that the average OH density has an observable increase from corona discharge to streamer discharge. The main mechanism of OH production in the four different discharge patterns was analyzed. It was shown that the main mechanism of OH production in negative barrier corona discharge is electron direct collision dissociation, whereas in the other three discharge patterns the He metastable Penning ionization is the main process.

  14. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  15. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J.; Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic oxygen number density [O] is measured in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Gas flow is fixed at 8 slpm, the RF power coupled into the plasma jet varied between 5 W and 20 W, and the resulting changes in atomic oxygen density measured. Photolysis of molecular oxygen is employed to allow in situ calibration of the TALIF system. During calibration, O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting oxygen atoms are achieved within the same laser pulse. The atomic oxygen density produced by photolysis is time varying and spatially non-uniform which needs to be corrected for to calibrate the TALIF system for measurement of atomic oxygen density in plasma. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I 0(t), wavelength, and focal spot size allows correction factors to be determined using a rate equation model. Atomic oxygen is used for calibration and measurement, so the laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power dependence region without affecting the calibration reliability as the laser power dependence will still be the same for both. The atomic O density results obtained are not directly benchmarked against other known density measurement techniques. The results show that the plasma jet atomic oxygen content increases as the RF power coupled into the plasma increases.

  16. Identification of scleractinian coral recruits using fluorescent censusing and DNA barcoding techniques.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Min; de Palmas, Stéphane; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Denis, Vianney; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of coral recruits has been problematic due to a lack of definitive morphological characters being available for higher taxonomic resolution. In this study, we tested whether fluorescent detection of coral recruits used in combinations of different DNA-barcoding markers (cytochrome oxidase I gene [COI], open reading frame [ORF], and nuclear Pax-C intron [PaxC]) could be useful for increasing the resolution of coral spat identification in ecological studies. One hundred and fifty settlement plates were emplaced at nine sites on the fringing reefs of Kenting National Park in southern Taiwan between April 2011 and September 2012. A total of 248 living coral spats and juveniles (with basal areas ranging from 0.21 to 134.57 mm(2)) were detected on the plates with the aid of fluorescent light and collected for molecular analyses. Using the COI DNA barcoding technique, 90.3% (224/248) of coral spats were successfully identified into six genera, including Acropora, Isopora, Montipora, Pocillopora, Porites, and Pavona. PaxC further separated I. cuneata and I. palifera of Isopora from Acropora, and ORF successfully identified the species of Pocillopora (except P. meandrina and P. eydouxi). Moreover, other cnidarian species such as actinarians, zoanthids, and Millepora species were visually found using fluorescence and identified by COI DNA barcoding. This combination of existing approaches greatly improved the taxonomic resolution of early coral life stages, which to date has been mainly limited to the family level based on skeletal identification. Overall, this study suggests important improvements for the identification of coral recruits in ecological studies. PMID:25211345

  17. Identification of Scleractinian Coral Recruits Using Fluorescent Censusing and DNA Barcoding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Min; de Palmas, Stéphane; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Denis, Vianney; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of coral recruits has been problematic due to a lack of definitive morphological characters being available for higher taxonomic resolution. In this study, we tested whether fluorescent detection of coral recruits used in combinations of different DNA-barcoding markers (cytochrome oxidase I gene [COI], open reading frame [ORF], and nuclear Pax-C intron [PaxC]) could be useful for increasing the resolution of coral spat identification in ecological studies. One hundred and fifty settlement plates were emplaced at nine sites on the fringing reefs of Kenting National Park in southern Taiwan between April 2011 and September 2012. A total of 248 living coral spats and juveniles (with basal areas ranging from 0.21 to 134.57 mm2) were detected on the plates with the aid of fluorescent light and collected for molecular analyses. Using the COI DNA barcoding technique, 90.3% (224/248) of coral spats were successfully identified into six genera, including Acropora, Isopora, Montipora, Pocillopora, Porites, and Pavona. PaxC further separated I. cuneata and I. palifera of Isopora from Acropora, and ORF successfully identified the species of Pocillopora (except P. meandrina and P. eydouxi). Moreover, other cnidarian species such as actinarians, zoanthids, and Millepora species were visually found using fluorescence and identified by COI DNA barcoding. This combination of existing approaches greatly improved the taxonomic resolution of early coral life stages, which to date has been mainly limited to the family level based on skeletal identification. Overall, this study suggests important improvements for the identification of coral recruits in ecological studies. PMID:25211345

  18. Development and Testing of an Air Fluorescence Imaging System for the Detection of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Inrig, Elizabeth; Koslowsky, Vern; Andrews, Bob; Dick, Michael; Forget, Patrick; Ing, Harry; Hugron, Roger; Wong, Larry

    2011-12-13

    Detection of radionuclides emitting short-range radiation, such as {alpha} and low-energy {beta} particles, has always presented a challenge, particularly when such radionuclides are dispersed over a wide area. In this situation, conventional detection methods require the area of interest to be surveyed using a fragile probe at very close range--a slow, error-prone, and potentially dangerous process that may take many hours for a single room. The instrument under development uses a novel approach by imaging radiation-induced fluorescence in the air surrounding a contaminated area, rather than detecting the radiation directly. A robust and portable system has been designed and built that will allow contaminated areas to be rapidly detected and delineated. The detector incorporates position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes, UV filters, a fast electronic shutter and an aspherical phase mask that significantly increases the depth-of-field. Preliminary tests have been conducted using sealed {sup 241}Am sources of varying activities and surface areas. The details of the instrument design will be described and the results of recent testing will be presented.

  19. Determination of proteins at nanogram levels by synchronous fluorescence scan technique with a novel composite nanoparticle as a fluorescence probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Guangfeng; Li, Ling; Xu, Fagong

    2004-09-01

    A novel composite nanoparticle has been prepared by an in situ polymerization method and applied as a protein fluorescence probe. The nano-CdS has been prepared, then the polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) was carried out by initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The surface of the composite nanoparticles was covered with abundant carboxylic groups (--COOH). The nanoparticles are water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. The synchronous fluorescence intensity of the composite nanoparticles is significantly increased in the presence of trace protein at pH 6.90. Based on this, a new synchronous fluorescence scan (SFS) analysis was developed for the determination of proteins including BSA, HSA, and human gamma-IgG. When Delta lambda = 280 nm, maximum synchronous fluorescence is produced at 290 nm. Under the optimum conditions, the response is linearly proportional to the concentration of proteins. The linear range is 0.1-10 microg ml(-1) for HSA, 0.09-8.0 microg ml(-1) for BSA, and 0.08-15 microg ml(-1) for human gamma-IgG, respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of the total protein in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results are satisfactory. PMID:15294230

  20. Determination of proteins at nanogram levels by synchronous fluorescence scan technique with a novel composite nanoparticle as a fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lun; Chen, Hongqi; Wang, Leyu; Wang, Guangfeng; Li, Ling; Xu, Fagong

    2004-09-01

    A novel composite nanoparticle has been prepared by an in situ polymerization method and applied as a protein fluorescence probe. The nano-CdS has been prepared, then the polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) was carried out by initiator potassium persulfate (KPS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The surface of the composite nanoparticles was covered with abundant carboxylic groups (COOH). The nanoparticles are water-soluble, stable, and biocompatible. The synchronous fluorescence intensity of the composite nanoparticles is significantly increased in the presence of trace protein at pH 6.90. Based on this, a new synchronous fluorescence scan (SFS) analysis was developed for the determination of proteins including BSA, HSA, and human γ-IgG. When Δ λ=280 nm, maximum synchronous fluorescence is produced at 290 nm. Under the optimum conditions, the response is linearly proportional to the concentration of proteins. The linear range is 0.1-10 μg ml -1 for HSA, 0.09-8.0 μg ml -1 for BSA, and 0.08-15 μg ml -1 for human γ-IgG, respectively. The method has been applied to the determination of the total protein in human serum samples collected from the hospital and the results are satisfactory.

  1. Fluorescence microscopy techniques for characterizing the microscale mechanical response of entangled actin networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Savanna; Falzone, Tobias; Robertson-Anderson, Rae

    2015-03-01

    Actin filaments are semiflexible polymers that display complex viscoelastic properties when entangled in networks. In order to characterize the molecular-level physical and mechanical properties of entangled actin networks it is important to know the in-network length distribution and the response of entangled filaments to local forcing. Here we describe two single-molecule microscopy protocols developed to investigate these properties. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy and ImageJ image analysis we have developed a protocol to accurately measure the in-network actin length distribution. To characterize the deformation of actin filaments in response to perturbation, we trap micron size beads embedded in the network with optical tweezers and propagate the beads through the entangled filaments while simultaneously recording images of fluorescent-labeled filaments in the network. A sparse number of labeled filaments dispersed throughout the network allow us to visualize the movement of individual filaments during perturbation. Analysis of images taken during forcing is carried out using a combination of vector mapping and skeletonization techniques to directly reveal the deformation and subsequent relaxation modes induced in entangled actin filaments by microscale strains. We also determine the dependence of deformation modes on the relative filament position relative to the strain.

  2. Monitoring changes in whiting (Merlangius merlangus) fillets stored under modified atmosphere packaging by front face fluorescence spectroscopy and instrumental techniques.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, Abdo; Karoui, Romdhane

    2016-06-01

    Quality assessment of whiting (Merlangius merlangus) fillets stored in normal air (control group) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP1: 50% N2/50% CO2 and MAP2: 80% N2/20% CO2) for up to 15 days at 4 °C was performed. The physico-chemical [pH, drip loss, moisture content, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide value (PV)], textural (i.e., hardness, fragility, gumminess, chewiness, springiness, cohesiveness), and color (i.e., L(∗), a(∗), b(∗)) parameters were determined. Front face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS) emission spectra were also scanned on the same samples with excitation set at 290 and 360 nm. The results indicated that MAP treatment, particularly MAP1 had an obvious preservative effect on fish quality by reducing pH value, TBARS and TVB-N contents, and retarding the softening of fish texture compared to control samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to physico-chemical and instrumental data sets showed a clear discrimination of fish samples according to both their storage time and condition. A complete (100%) of correct classification was obtained by the concatenation of spectral, physico-chemical, and instrumental data sets. The results demonstrated that storage under MAP can be recommended to improve quality of whiting fillets, which in turn, can be evaluated by FFFS as a rapid and non-destructive technique. PMID:26830598

  3. Development of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for visualizing CGMMV in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Shargil, D; Zemach, H; Belausov, E; Lachman, O; Kamenetsky, R; Dombrovsky, A

    2015-10-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), which belongs to the genus Tobamovirus, is a major pathogen of cucurbit crops grown indoors and in open fields. Currently, immunology (e.g., ELISA) and molecular amplification techniques (e.g., RT-PCR) are employed extensively for virus detection in plant tissues and commercial seed lots diagnostics. In this study, a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using oligonucleotides whose 5'-terminals were labeled with red cyanine 3 (Cy3) or green fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was developed for the visualization of the pathogen in situ. This simple and reliable method allows detection and localization of CGMMV in the vegetative and reproductive tissues of cucumber and melon. When this technique was applied in male flowers, anther tissues were found to be infected; whereas the pollen grains were found to be virus-free. These results have meaningful epidemiological implications for the management of CGMMV, particularly with regard to virus transfer via seed and the role of insects as CGMMV vectors.

  4. Analyzing abundance of mRNA molecules with a near-infrared fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Pan, Yan; Zhang, Beibei; Wang, Jinke

    2014-01-01

    This study describes a simple method for analyzing the abundance of mRNA molecules in a total DNA sample. Due to the dependence on the near-infrared fluorescence technique, this method is named near-infrared fluorescence gene expression detection (NIRF-GED). The procedure has three steps: (1) isolating total RNA from detected samples and reverse-transcription into cDNA with a biotin-labeled oligo dT; (2) hybridizing cDNA to oligonucleotide probes coupled to a 96-well microplate; and (3) detecting biotins with NIRF-labeled streptavidin. The method was evaluated by performing proof-in-concept detections of absolute and relative expressions of housekeeping and NF-κB target genes in HeLa cells. As a result, the absolute expression of three genes, Ccl20, Cxcl2, and Gapdh, in TNF-α-uninduced HeLa cells was determined with a standard curve constructed on the same microplate, and the relative expression of five genes, Ccl20, Cxcl2, Il-6, STAT5A, and Gapdh, in TNF-α-induced and -uninduced HeLa cells was measured by using NIRF-GED. The results were verified by quantitative PCR (qPCR) and DNA microarray detections. The biggest advantage of NIRF-GED over the current techniques lies in its independence of exponential or linear amplification of nucleic acids. Moreover, NIRF-GED also has several other benefits, including high sensitivity as low as several fmols, absolute quantification in the range of 9 to 147 fmols, low cDNA consumption similar to qPCR template, and the current medium throughput in 96-well microplate format and future high throughput in DNA microarray format. NIRF-GED thus provides a new tool for analyzing gene transcripts and other nucleic acid molecules. PMID:24317515

  5. Measurements of fluorescence yield of electrons in air under atmospheric conditions: A key parameter for energy of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Gorodetzky, P.; Blacksley, C.; Wicek, F.; Monard, H.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.

    2012-12-01

    The measurement of the fluorescence yield and its dependence on atmospheric properties such as pressure, temperature or pollutants, are essential to obtain a reliable measurement of the primary energy of cosmic rays. A new type of absolute measurement of the nitrogen fluorescence yield in the air will be performed at LAL using 3 items which will yield an unprecedented precision in all conditions of pressure, temperature, and pollutants. A 5 MeV electron beam will be provided by the new electron accelerator PHIL at LAL(Laboratoire de l'Accélérateur Linéaire, Univ Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay). This source will induce florescence yield inside an integrating sphere. The sphere will be surrounded by a spherical envelope to create a temperature controlled chamber (a Dewar). With this setup it will be possible to vary the temperature from -60 C to +40 C and the pressure from 1 to 0.01 atm. An output device on this sphere will be equipped with a set of optical fibers driving the fluorescence light to a Jobin-Yvon spectrometer equipped with an LN_{2} cooled CCD. The fluorescence spectrum in the 300-430 nm range will be accurately measured in steps of 0.1 nm resolution. A PMT equipped with a BG3 filter (the same as on JEM-EUSO) will be set on the sphere to measure the integrated yield. The expected precision of the yield should be better than 5%.

  6. Automated Proactive Techniques for Commissioning Air-Handling Units

    SciTech Connect

    Katipamula, Srinivas ); Brambley, Michael R. ); Luskay, Larry

    2003-08-30

    Many buildings today use sophisticated building automation systems (BASs) to manage a wide and varied range of building systems. Although the capabilities of the BASs seem to have increased over time, many buildings still are not properly commissioned, operated or maintained. Lack of or improper commissioning, the inability of the building operators to grasp the complex controls, and lack of proper maintenance leads to inefficient operations and reduced lifetimes of the equipment. If regularly scheduled manual maintenance or re-commissioning practices are adopted, they can be expensive and time consuming. Automated proactive commissioning and diagnostic technologies address two of the main barriers to commissioning: cost and schedules. Automated proactive continuous commissioning tools can reduce both the cost and time associated with commissioning, as well as enhance the persistence of commissioning fixes. In the long run, automation even offers the potential for automatically correcting problems by reconfiguring controls or changing control algorithms dynamically. This paper will discuss procedures and processes that can be used to automate and continuously commission the economizer operation and outdoor-air ventilation systems of an air-handling unit.

  7. Bias in air sampling techniques used to measure inhalation exposure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Harley, N H; Lippmann, M

    1984-03-01

    Factors have been evaluated which contribute to the lack of agreement between inhalation exposure estimates obtained by time-weighted averaging of samples taken with mini hi-volume samplers, and those measured by time integrating, low-volume, lapel mounted, personal monitors. Measurements made with real-time aerosol monitors on workers at a Be-Cu production furnace show that part of the discrepancy results from variability of the aerosol concentration within the breathing zone. Field studies of sampler inlet bias, the influences of the electrostatic fields around polystyrene filter holders, and resuspension of dust from work clothing, were done in three areas of a Be plant. No significant differences were found in Be air concentrations measured simultaneously by open and closed face cassettes, and "mini hi-volume" samplers mounted on a test stand. No significant influence on Be collection was detected between either positively or negatively charged monitors and charge neutralized control monitors. The effect of contaminated work clothing on dust collection by lapel mounted monitors is most important. Beryllium release from the fabrics affected air concentrations measured by fabric mounted monitors more than it affected concentrations measured by monitors positioned above the fabrics. The latter were placed 16 cm from the vertically mounted fabrics, to simulate the position of the nose or mouth. We conclude that dust resuspended from work clothing is the major source of the observed discrepancy between exposures estimated from lapel mounted samplers and time-weighted averages.

  8. Bias in air sampling techniques used to measure inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.; Harley, N.H.; Lippmann, M.

    1984-03-01

    Factors have been evaluated which contribute to the lack of agreement between inhalation exposure estimates obtained by time-weighted averaging of samples taken with mini hi-volume samplers, and those measured by time integrating, low-volume, lapel mounted, personal monitors. Measurements made with real-time aerosol monitors on workers at a Be-Cu production furnace show that part of the discrepancy results from variability of the aerosol concentration within the breathing zone. Field studies of sampler inlet bias, the influences of the electrostatic fields around polystyrene filter holders, and resuspension of dust from work clothing, were done in three areas of a Be plant. No significant differences were found in Be air concentrations measured simultaneously by open and closed face cassettes, and mini hi-volume samplers mounted on a test stand. No significant influence on Be collection was detected between either positively or negatively charged monitors and charge neutralized control monitors. The effect of contaminated work clothing on dust collection by lapel mounted monitors is most important. Beryllium release from the fabrics affected air concentrations measured by fabric mounted monitors more than it affected concentrations measured by monitors positioned above the fabrics. The latter were placed 16 cm from the vertically mounted fabrics, to simulate the position of the nose or mouth. The authors conclude that dust resuspended from work clothing is the major source of the observed discrepancy between exposures estimated from lapel mounted samplers and time-weighted averages.

  9. Evaluation of Urban Air Quality By Passive Sampling Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, T. V.; Miranda, A. I.; Duarte, S.; Lima, M. J.

    Aveiro is a flat small city in the centre of Portugal, close to the Atlantic coast. In the last two decades an intensive development of demographic, traffic and industry growth in the region was observed which was reflected on the air quality degrada- tion. In order to evaluate the urban air quality in Aveiro, a field-monitoring network by passive sampling with high space resolution was implemented. Twenty-four field places were distributed in a area of 3x3 Km2 and ozone and NO2 concentrations were measured. The site distribution density was higher in the centre, 250x250 m2 than in periphery where a 500x500 m2 grid was used. The selection of field places took into consideration the choice criteria recommendation by United Kingdom environmental authorities, and three tubes and a blank tube for each pollutant were used at each site. The sampling system was mounted at 3m from the ground usually profiting the street lampposts. Concerning NO2 acrylic tubes were used with 85 mm of length and an in- ternal diameter of 12mm, where in one of the extremities three steel grids impregnated with a solution of TEA were placed and fixed with a polyethylene end cup (Heal et al., 1999); PFA Teflon tube with 53 mm of length and 9 mm of internal diameter and three impregnated glass filters impregnated with DPE solution fixed by a teflon end cup was used for ozone sampling (Monn and Hargartner, 1990). The passive sampling method for ozone and nitrogen dioxide was compared with continuous measurements, but the amount of measurements wasnSt enough for an accurate calibration and validation of the method. Although this constraint the field observations (June to August 2001) for these two pollutants assign interesting information about the air quality in the urban area. A krigger method of interpolation (Surfer- Golden Software-2000) was applied to field data to obtain isolines distribution of NO2 and ozone concentration for the studied area. Even the used passive sampling method has many

  10. Multispectral fluorescence imaging technique for discrimination of cucumber (Cucumis Sativus) seed viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we developed a nondestructive method for discriminating viable cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seeds based on hyperspectral fluorescence imaging. The fluorescence spectra of cucumber seeds in the 420–700 nm range were extracted from hyperspectral fluorescence images obtained using 365 nm u...

  11. Research on the fluorescence emission from water vapor induced by femtosecond filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Jiang, Yuanfei; Li, Shuchang; Chen, Anmin; Li, Suyu; Jin, Mingxing

    2016-10-01

    Our experiments show that initial energy and humidity strongly influences the water vapor fluorescence induced by ultrashort intense femtosecond laser pulses. It is found that the fluorescence signal can be enhanced by both increasing the humidity in the case of fixed energy and increasing the pulse energy in the case of fixed humidity. In addition, water vapor fluorescence emission in the linear polarization is stronger than that in the circular polarization due to the higher dissociation efficiency of linearly polarized pulses. The mechanism of water vapor fluorescence emission during femtosecond filamentation is discussed based on the analysis of these phenomena.

  12. Global measurements of air pollution from satellites. [employing radiometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. L.; Bartle, E. R.; Griggs, M.; Hall, G. D.; Hesketh, W. D.; Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reichle, H.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual design of an FOV nadir radiometer was examined for its applicability to monitoring the radiation process in the atmosphere as it relates to aerosol behavior. The instrument employs a gas filter correlation technique and is suitable for transportation onboard satellite.

  13. MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANT BIOMARKERS WITH EXHALED BREATH TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has appeal as a noninvasive surrogate sample for lung-derived fluid. Additionally, EBC can be collected multiple times over the course of a study, unlike many other lung sampling techniques which can be performed fewer times. However validat...

  14. The Moss Techniques for Air Pollution Study in Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, S.; Marinov, A.; Frontasyeva, M.; Strelkova, L.; Yurukova, L.; Steinnes, E.

    2010-01-21

    The paper presents new results on atmospheric deposition of 41 elements in four areas of Bulgaria during the European moss survey in 2005. The results have been obtained by the moss biomonitoring technique. Ninety seven moss samples were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (ENAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS).

  15. APPLICATION OF STABLE ISOTOPE TECHNIQUES TO AIR POLLUTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope techniques provide a robust, yet under-utilized tool for examining pollutant effects on plant growth and ecosystem function. Here, we survey a range of mixing model, physiological and system level applications for documenting pollutant effects. Mixing model examp...

  16. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (λEX ∼ 280 nm, λEM ∼ 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  17. Light stress effect and by nitrogen deficiency in plants of Petiveria alliacea measured with two-chlorophyll-fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, H.; Oviedo, A.; Solarte, Efrain; Pena, E. J.

    2004-10-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence was studied in Petiveria alliacea plants exposed to different nitrogen concentrations and light radiation, the response was measured by two different forms; (1) measuring the photosynthetic efficiency with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometro (PAM) emitted by a 650 nm diode and (2) measuring the fluorescence spectra caused by high power 452 nm diode with a SD2000 spectrometer. It was found out that the photosynthetic efficiency decreased in the plants exposed to high radiance and low nitrogen. Two chlorophyll fluorescence peaks were observed on 684 nm and 739 nm, the intensities in this wavelengths are inversely related with the light radiance. The correlation between the FIR and photosynthetic efficiency was very strong (r2 = -0.809, p <<0.01) this let us conclude that the fluorescence spectral analysis induced by the diode (excitation at 452 nm) is an efficient technique to detect stress by high light intensity and nitrogen in P. Alliacea plants.

  18. Effect of κ-carrageenan on volume phase transition for polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel using the fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktaş, Demet Kaya

    2014-03-01

    Steady-state fluorescence (SSF) technique was employed for studying swelling of polyacrylamide (PAAm) gels with various content of κ-carrageenan ( κC). Disc shaped composite hydrogels were prepared by free-radical crosslinking copolymerization of acrylamide (AAm) with various amounts κC. N, N'-methylenebis (acrylamide) (BIS) and ammonium persulfate (APS) were used as crosslinker and initiator, respectively. Pyranine was introduced as a fluorescence probe. Fluorescence intensity of pyranine was monitored during in situ swelling processes of composite gels. It was observed that fluorescence intensity values decreased as swelling is proceeded. Li-Tanaka equation was used to determine the swelling time constants, τ and cooperative diffusion coefficients, D from intensity variations during the swelling processes. It was shown that swelling time constants, τ decreased and diffusion coefficients, D increased as the κC content in the composites are increased.

  19. Temperature imaging in low-pressure flames using diode laser two-line atomic fluorescence employing a novel indium seeding technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggren, Jesper; Burns, Iain S.; Sahlberg, Anna-Lena; Aldén, Marcus; Li, Zhongshan

    2016-03-01

    The use of diode lasers for spatially resolved temperature imaging is demonstrated in low-pressure premixed methane-air flames using two-line atomic fluorescence of seeded indium atoms. This work features the advantages of using compact diode lasers as the excitation sources with the benefits of two-dimensional planar imaging, which is normally only performed with high-power pulsed lasers. A versatile and reliable seeding technique with minimal impact on flame properties is used to introduce indium atoms into the combustion environment for a wide range of flame equivalence ratios. A spatial resolution of around 210 µm for this calibration-free thermometry technique is achieved for three equivalence ratios at a pressure of 50 mbar in a laminar flat flame.

  20. A comparison of the HTO air sampling techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.T.; Carfayno, D.G.; Farmer, B.M.; Lacy, V.C.; Yanko, W.H.

    1985-09-01

    Monsanto Research Corporation, a Department of Energy contractor, monitors for tritium oxide as an integral part of the routine environmental surveillance program. The glycol bubbler method has been used at Mound since 1971 instead of the silica gel collection techniques used at many other DOE facilities. With the glycol bubbler method, ethylene glycol is used to collect water vapor for the HTO analysis. Data from both methods are compared and the advantages of the glycol bubbler method are presented.

  1. Technique for air bubble management during endothelial keratoplasty in eyes after penetrating glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Banitt, Michael; Arrieta-Quintero, Esdras; Parel, Jean-Marie; Fantes, Francisco

    2011-02-01

    Our purpose was to develop a technique for maintaining air within the anterior chamber during endothelial keratoplasty in eyes that have previously undergone trabeculectomy or a glaucoma drainage implant. Whole human globes and rabbits underwent penetrating glaucoma surgery to develop the technique. Without the aid of any additional device or manipulation, continuing to inject air into the anterior chamber as it escapes through the sclerostomy or tube eventually fills the subconjunctival space and allows for back pressure. This allows for a full anterior chamber air fill and brief elevation of intraocular pressure. We employed this overfilling technique on 3 patients with previous incisional glaucoma surgery to perform successful Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty without complication. We recommend using the overfilling technique when performing Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty surgery in eyes with previous penetrating glaucoma surgery because it is a simple technique without the need for pre- or postoperative manipulation.

  2. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  3. New developments of X-ray fluorescence imaging techniques in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Matsuno, Tsuyoshi; Takimoto, Yuki; Yamanashi, Masaki; Kometani, Noritsugu; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kato, Shuichi; Yamada, Takashi; Shoji, Takashi; Kawahara, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established analytical technique with a long research history. Many applications have been reported in various fields, such as in the environmental, archeological, biological, and forensic sciences as well as in industry. This is because XRF has a unique advantage of being a nondestructive analytical tool with good precision for quantitative analysis. Recent advances in XRF analysis have been realized by the development of new x-ray optics and x-ray detectors. Advanced x-ray focusing optics enables the making of a micro x-ray beam, leading to micro-XRF analysis and XRF imaging. A confocal micro-XRF technique has been applied for the visualization of elemental distributions inside the samples. This technique was applied for liquid samples and for monitoring chemical reactions such as the metal corrosion of steel samples in the NaCl solutions. In addition, a principal component analysis was applied for reducing the background intensity in XRF spectra obtained during XRF mapping, leading to improved spatial resolution of confocal micro-XRF images. In parallel, the authors have proposed a wavelength dispersive XRF (WD-XRF) imaging spectrometer for a fast elemental imaging. A new two dimensional x-ray detector, the Pilatus detector was applied for WD-XRF imaging. Fast XRF imaging in 1 s or even less was demonstrated for Euro coins and industrial samples. In this review paper, these recent advances in laboratory-based XRF imaging, especially in a laboratory setting, will be introduced.

  4. Novel air-injection technique to locate the medial cut end of lacerated canaliculus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingqian; Li, Yonghao; Long, Chongde; Wang, Zhonghao; Liang, Xuanwei; Ge, Jian; Wang, Zhichong

    2013-12-01

    Locating the medial cut end of the severed canaliculus is the most difficult aspect of canalicular repair, especially in patients with more medial laceration, severe oedema, persistent errhysis and a narrow canaliculus. Irrigation is a widely used technique to identify the cut end; however, we found that air injected through the intact canaliculus with a straight needle failed to reflux when the common canaliculus or lacrimal sac was not blocked. We describe a simple, safe and efficient air-injection technique to identify the medial cut edge of a lacerated canaliculus. In this method, we initially submersed the medial canthus under normal saline, then injected filtered air through the intact canaliculus using a side port stainless steel probe with a closed round tip. The tip was designed to block the common canaliculus to form a relatively closed system. The efficiency of this novel air-injection technique was equivalent to the traditional technique but does not require the cooperation of the patient to blow air. Using this technique, the medial cut end was successfully identified by locating the air-bubble exit within minutes in 19 cases of mono-canalicular laceration without any complication.

  5. Air leakage characteristics and weatherization techniques for low-income housing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grot, R.A.; Clark, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Data are presented on the air leakage characteristics of approximately 250 dwellings occupied by low-income households in 14 cities, in all major climatic zones of the United States. Two types of measurements were used: a tracer-gas decay technique using air sample bags, which was developed at the National Bureau of Standards to measure natural air infiltration; and a fan depressurization test that measures induced air exchange rates. The data presented here show that for this group of dwellings natural air infiltration rates are distributed approximately lognormally. The induced air exchange rates are a measure of the tightness of building envelopes. There is little correlation between the natural air infiltration rates and the induced air exchange rates in these dwellings, unless the buildings are divided into classes of similar buildings. The use of fan depressurization as a diagnostic tool to assist weatherization crews in tightening buildings is discussed. Preliminary estimates are presented of the reduction in induced air exchange rates that may be achieved by applying building weatherization techniques.

  6. Measurement of resistance to solute transport across surfactant-laden interfaces using a Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, Edward P.; Nivaggioli, Thierry; Hatton, T. Alan

    1994-01-01

    A noninvasive fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique is under development to measure interfacial transport in two phase systems without disturbing the interface. The concentration profiles of a probe solute are measured in both sides of the interface by argon-ion laser, and the system relaxation is then monitored by a microscope-mounted CCD camera.

  7. Characterization of urban air pollution by total reflection X-ray fluorescence*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Martina

    2004-08-01

    Besides photochemical smog, particulate air pollution is a constantly growing problem in urban areas. The particulate matter present in pollution events contains often toxic or health impacting elements and is responsible for low visibility, might be triggering respiratory diseases like asthma, and can play an important role in formation or duration of smog events. To characterize particulate pollution in two different cities, samples were taken during intensive field campaigns in Chicago, IL, in 2002 and Phoenix, AZ, in 2001. Both cities experience regularly photochemical smog events as well as particulate pollution, but show very different meteorological and topographical conditions. Therefore it is expected that the particulate composition varies significantly, providing information about different pollution forms. Sampling took place in both cases at elevated locations and had a temporal resolution of 1.5 h and 1 h, respectively. The samples were analyzed by total reflection X-ray fluorescence after digestion of the filter matrix. As expected the elemental composition of particulate matter varied between both cities substantially with Phoenix showing a higher abundance of crustal elements, and Chicago enrichment in anthropogenically produced ones. In both cities diurnal patterns were found, exerting maxima in the morning and minima in the early afternoon. The diurnal pattern was much more regularly and also more strongly pronounced in Phoenix. Phoenix's valley location permits for a more stable nocturnal boundary layer to build up during the night thus trapping particulates efficiently during this time, until mixing occurs in the early morning hours and the residual layer lifts. In Chicago, the diurnal variation was less extreme, but another pattern determines the situation with the lake breeze. The lake breeze corresponds to a shift in wind direction towards the east, i.e. from Lake Michigan during the late morning. It was found that certain elemental species

  8. Residual Stress Relaxation and Stiffness-Confinement Effects in Polymer Films: Characterization by Non-Contact Ellipsometry and Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Shadid; Torkelson, John

    2015-03-01

    The relaxation of residual stresses in spin-coated polymer films is characterized using two optical techniques: ellipsometry and fluorescence. Both techniques show that residual stresses relax over hours at several tens of degrees above the film glass transition temperature (Tg). Ellipsometry shows that thickness can increase or decrease during residual stress relaxation depending on thermal history of the film. However, the presence or relaxation of stresses has no measurable effect on Tg as measured by ellipsometry. We have adapted the well-known sensitivity of the pyrene dye fluorescence spectral shape to local environment polarity in order to characterize stress relaxation and to monitor stiffness-confinement effects. The spectral shape of the pyrene fluorescence spectrum shows similar stress relaxation regardless of whether relaxation is accompanied by increases or decreases in film thickness. Fluorescence also indicates that single-layer polystyrene films supported on silica stiffen with decreasing nanoscale thickness. For the first time, stiffness gradients as a function of distance from interfaces are demonstrated using pyrene label fluorescence in conjunction with multilayer films.

  9. Multi-scale and Multi-modal Analysis of Metamorphic Rocks Coupling Fluorescence and TXM Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Andrade, V. J. D.; Gursoy, D.; Wojcik, M.; DeCarlo, F.; Ganne, J.; Dubacq, B.

    2014-12-01

    Rocks are commonly polycrystalline systems presenting multi-scale chemical and structural heterogeneities inherited from crystallization processes or successive metamorphic events. Through different applications on metamorphic rocks involving fluorescence microprobes and full-field spectroscopy, one will illustrate how spatially resolved analytical techniques allow rock compositional variations to be related to large-scale geodynamic processes. Those examples also stress the importance of multi-modality instruments with zoom-in capability to study samples from mm to several μm large fields of view, with micrometer down to sub-100 nanometer spatial resolutions. In this perspective, imaging capabilities offered by the new ultra-bright diffraction limited synchrotron sources will be described based on experimental data. At last, the new hard X-ray Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM) at Sector 32 of the APS at Argonne National Laboratory, performing nano computed tomography with in situ capabilities will be presented. The instrument benefit from several R&D key activities like the fabrication of new zone plates in the framework of the Multi-Bend Achromat Lattice (MBA) upgrade at APS, or the development of powerful tomography reconstruction algorithms able to operate with a limited number of projections.

  10. Disentangling who is who during rhizosphere acidification in root interactions: combining fluorescence with optode techniques.

    PubMed

    Faget, Marc; Blossfeld, Stephan; von Gillhaussen, Philipp; Schurr, Ulrich; Temperton, Vicky M

    2013-01-01

    Plant-soil interactions can strongly influence root growth in plants. There is now increasing evidence that root-root interactions can also influence root growth, affecting architecture and root traits such as lateral root formation. Both when species grow alone or in interaction with others, root systems are in turn affected by as well as affect rhizosphere pH. Changes in soil pH have knock-on effects on nutrient availability. A limitation until recently has been the inability to assign species identity to different roots in soil. Combining the planar optode technique with fluorescent plants enables us to distinguish between plant species grown in natural soil and in parallel study pH dynamics in a non-invasive way at the same region of interest (ROI). We measured pH in the rhizosphere of maize and bean in rhizotrons in a climate chamber, with ROIs on roots in proximity to the roots of the other species as well as not-close to the other species. We found clear dynamic changes of pH over time and differences between the two species in rhizosphere acidification. Interestingly, when roots of the two species were interacting, the degree of acidification or alkalization compared to bulk soil was less strong then when roots were not growing in the vicinity of the other species. This cutting-edge approach can help provide a better understanding of plant-plant and plant-soil interactions.

  11. Disentangling who is who during rhizosphere acidification in root interactions: combining fluorescence with optode techniques.

    PubMed

    Faget, Marc; Blossfeld, Stephan; von Gillhaussen, Philipp; Schurr, Ulrich; Temperton, Vicky M

    2013-01-01

    Plant-soil interactions can strongly influence root growth in plants. There is now increasing evidence that root-root interactions can also influence root growth, affecting architecture and root traits such as lateral root formation. Both when species grow alone or in interaction with others, root systems are in turn affected by as well as affect rhizosphere pH. Changes in soil pH have knock-on effects on nutrient availability. A limitation until recently has been the inability to assign species identity to different roots in soil. Combining the planar optode technique with fluorescent plants enables us to distinguish between plant species grown in natural soil and in parallel study pH dynamics in a non-invasive way at the same region of interest (ROI). We measured pH in the rhizosphere of maize and bean in rhizotrons in a climate chamber, with ROIs on roots in proximity to the roots of the other species as well as not-close to the other species. We found clear dynamic changes of pH over time and differences between the two species in rhizosphere acidification. Interestingly, when roots of the two species were interacting, the degree of acidification or alkalization compared to bulk soil was less strong then when roots were not growing in the vicinity of the other species. This cutting-edge approach can help provide a better understanding of plant-plant and plant-soil interactions. PMID:24137168

  12. Measurement Of Atmospheric Peroxy Radicals By Chemical Conversion And Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, X.; Naik, C.; Mao, J.; Harder, H.; Martinez, M.; Lesher, R.; Brune, W. H.

    2005-12-01

    A new method for measuring atmospheric peroxy radicals is described based on chemical conversion and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Peroxy radicals are quantitatively converted into hydroperoxyl radicals (HO2) by the reactions with NO in a low-pressure reactor. The produced HO2 is then detected with an LIF instrument. The characterization and response of this instrument has been evaluated through the laboratory experiments as well as numeric simulations. Relative responses of different organic groups of peroxy radicals to HO2 were measured and the conversion coefficients agree generally well with the model calculations. The dependence of conversion coefficients on different experiment conditions was investigated. For HO2, the LIF signal is calibrated with an HO2 source produced by the photolysis of H2O via a low-pressure mercury lamp. Field measurements of peroxy radicals using this method were conducted at a rural site and preliminary results are presented. The estimated accuracy of the derived HOxROx concentrations is about 40% with a 2σ confidence level. Typical detection limit is about 0.2 pptv for 1-minute averaging times.

  13. Determination of damages of photosynthetic metabolism caused by herbicides using a delayed fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingrui; Xing, Da; Zhou, Xiaoming; Li, Qiang

    2007-11-01

    The structure and function of chloroplast in plant can be affected by herbicide, resulting in the decrease in photosynthetic capacity. The photosystem II (PSII) in plants is considered to be the primary site where light-induced delayed fluorescence (DF) is produced. In this study, a simple analytical model of DF has been developed to diagnose the damages of photosynthesis caused by herbicides based on the charge recombination theory. Using a home-made portable DF detection system, we have studied the effects of two different kinds of herbicides on decay kinetics of DF in soybean (Glycine max (L.), Jinghuang No. 3). Current investigations have demonstrated that the analytic equation of DF decay dynamics we proposed here can accurately determine the extent of damage of herbicides to photosynthetic metabolism and truly reflect the mechanism and site about which herbicides inhibit photosynthetic electron transport chain. Therefore, the decay kinetics of DF with proper calibration may provide a promisingly new and practical means for pharmacological analysis of herbicides and damage-diagnosis of photosynthetic metabolism. The DF technique could be potentially useful for detecting the effects of herbicide on plant performance in vivo and screening new generation of promising herbicides with low toxicity and superhigh efficiency.

  14. A Phase Shift Demodulation Technique: Verification and Application in Fluorescence Phase Based Oxygen Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chuanwu; Chang, Jun; Wang, Fupeng; Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Cunguang; Wang, Pengpeng

    2016-06-01

    A phase shift demodulation technique based on subtraction capable of measuring 0.03 phase degree limit between sinusoidal signals is presented in this paper. A self-gain module and a practical subtracter act the kernel parts of the phase shift demodulation system. Electric signals in different phases are used to verify the performance of the system. In addition, a new designed optical source, laser fiber differential source (LFDS), capable of generating mini phase is used to further verify the system reliability. R-square of 0.99997 in electric signals and R-square of 0.99877 in LFDS are achieved, and 0.03 degree measurement limit is realized in experiments. Furthermore, the phase shift demodulation system is applied to the fluorescence phase based oxygen sensors to realize the fundamental function. The experimental results reveal that a good repetition and better than 0.02% oxygen concentration measurement accuracy are realized. In addition, the phase shift demodulation system can be easily integrated to other applications.

  15. Novel live imaging techniques of cellular functions and in vivo tumors based on precise design of small molecule-based 'activatable' fluorescence probes.

    PubMed

    Urano, Yasuteru

    2012-12-01

    Recently established rational design strategies for novel fluorescence probes, especially those based on photoinduced electron transfer and spirocyclization were reviewed. Based on these design strategies, various novel fluorescence probes were successfully developed including those for reactive oxygen species, reporter enzymes. Furthermore, in vivo cancer imaging techniques based on rationally designed activatable probes such as cancer-specific antibodies tagged with acidic-pH activatable fluorescence probes and peptidase activatable fluorescence probes were also discussed.

  16. Herbal Extract Incorporated Nanofiber Fabricated by an Electrospinning Technique and its Application to Antimicrobial Air Filtration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongan; Yang, Byeong Joon; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-18

    Recently, with the increased attention to indoor air quality, antimicrobial air filtration techniques have been studied widely to inactivate hazardous airborne microorganisms effectively. In this study, we demonstrate herbal extract incorporated (HEI) nanofibers synthesized by an electrospinning technique and their application to antimicrobial air filtration. As an antimicrobial herbal material, an ethanolic extract of Sophora flavescens, which exhibits great antibacterial activity against pathogens, was mixed with the polymer solution for the electrospinning process. We measured various characteristics of the synthesized HEI nanofibers, such as fiber morphology, fiber size distribution, and thermal stability. For application of the electrospun HEI nanofibers, we made highly effective air filters with 99.99% filtration efficiency and 99.98% antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis. The pressure drop across the HEI nanofiber air filter was 4.75 mmH2O at a face air velocity of 1.79 cm/s. These results will facilitate the implementation of electrospun HEI nanofiber techniques to control air quality and protect against hazardous airborne microorganisms.

  17. Herbal Extract Incorporated Nanofiber Fabricated by an Electrospinning Technique and its Application to Antimicrobial Air Filtration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongan; Yang, Byeong Joon; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-18

    Recently, with the increased attention to indoor air quality, antimicrobial air filtration techniques have been studied widely to inactivate hazardous airborne microorganisms effectively. In this study, we demonstrate herbal extract incorporated (HEI) nanofibers synthesized by an electrospinning technique and their application to antimicrobial air filtration. As an antimicrobial herbal material, an ethanolic extract of Sophora flavescens, which exhibits great antibacterial activity against pathogens, was mixed with the polymer solution for the electrospinning process. We measured various characteristics of the synthesized HEI nanofibers, such as fiber morphology, fiber size distribution, and thermal stability. For application of the electrospun HEI nanofibers, we made highly effective air filters with 99.99% filtration efficiency and 99.98% antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis. The pressure drop across the HEI nanofiber air filter was 4.75 mmH2O at a face air velocity of 1.79 cm/s. These results will facilitate the implementation of electrospun HEI nanofiber techniques to control air quality and protect against hazardous airborne microorganisms. PMID:26505783

  18. Relationship of conventional and fluorescent microscopic technique to assess in vitro semen quality status of Murrah buffalo males

    PubMed Central

    Shivahre, P. R; Gupta, A. K; Panmei, A; Yadav, B. R; Bhakat, M; Mohanty, T. K; Kumaresan, A; Kumar, V; Dash, S. K; Singh, S

    2015-01-01

    In vitro fertility assessment using fluorescent technique is a better predictor of fertility status of bulls as compared to traditional semen quality assessment techniques, therefore, the study was planned to assess in vitro fertility status of bulls based on conventional and fluorescent techniques. Seventy-three ejaculates were collected from 12 Murrah buffalo bulls maintained at Artificial Breeding Research Centre, NDRI, Karnal, India for the experiment and subjected to statistical analysis using SYSTAT. The mean values of ejaculate volume (ml), mass activity, individual motility (%), sperm concentration (millions/ml), live sperm (%), total abnormalities (%), HOST (%) and acrosomal integrity (%) were 2.70 ± 0.28, 2.8 ± 0.14, 63.8 ± 2.16, 1749.7 ± 122.24, 77.3 ± 2.48, 6.2 ± 0.51, 75.1 ± 1.81 and 84.5 ± 2.26, respectively. The repeatability estimates were significant (P<0.05) for ejaculate volume (0.34 ± 0.137), acrosomal integrity (0.29 ± 0.134) and live percentage (0.28 ± 0.133), indicating sufficient bull to bull variation for the parameters. The mean values of seminal attributes of fluorescent based criteria of CMA3 (Chromomycin A3), SYBR-PI and FITC-PNA (fluorescent isothiocynate-conjugated peanut agglutinin) were 5.25 ± 0.41, 67.91 ± 1.24 and 82.00 ± 1.25 percent, respectively. Bulls were ranked on the basis of expected producing ability (EPA) for semen characteristics assessed by conventional and fluorescent criteria. Rank correlations were found to be significant for FITC with most of the parameters evaluated by conventional methods. In conclusion, among the conventional criteria, individual motility (%) revealed ranking of bulls almost similar to that of fluorescent criteria. PMID:27175204

  19. Method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.; Fletcher, Douglas G.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainties in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 percent, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  20. A method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations due to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high-speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature and density measurements can be less than 2 and 3 percent, respectively, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon-statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  1. Method for measuring temperatures and densities in hypersonic wind tunnel air flows using laser-induced O(2) fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Laufer, G; McKenzie, R L; Fletcher, D G

    1990-11-20

    Laser-induced fluorescence in oxygen, in combination with Raman scattering, is shown to be an accurate means by which temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence can be measured in air flows associated with high speed wind tunnels. For temperatures above 60 K and densities above 0.01 amagat, the uncertainties in the temperature and density measurements can be <2%, if the signal uncertainties are dominated by photon statistical noise. The measurements are unaffected by collisional quenching and can be achieved with laser fluences for which nonlinear effects are insignificant. Temperature measurements using laser-induced fluorescence alone have been demonstrated at known densities in the range of low temperatures and densities which are expected in a hypersonic wind tunnel.

  2. A study of the Interaction Between Cetirizine and Plasma Membrane of Eosinophils, Neutrophils, Platelets and Lymphocytes using A fluorescence Technique

    PubMed Central

    Oggiano, N.; Giorgi, P. L.; Rihoux, J-P.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of cetirizine on plasma membrane fluidity and heterogeneity of human eosinophils, neutrophils, platelets and lymphocytes was investigated using a fluorescence technique. Membrane fluidity and heterogeneity were studied by measuring the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence decay of 1-(4- trimethylammonium-phenyl)-6-phenyl-1, 3, 5-hexatriene (TMA-DPH) incorporated in the membrane. The results demonstrate that cetirizine (1 μg/ml) induced a significant increase in the Hpid order in the exterior part of the membrane and a decrease in membrane heterogeneity in eosinophils, neutrophils and platelets. Moreover, cetirizine blocked the PAF induced changes in membrane fluidity in these cells. Cetirizine did not influence significantly the plasma membrane of lymphocytes. These data may partially explain the effect ofcetirizine on inflammatory cell activities. PMID:18472948

  3. Detection of illicit drugs with the technique of spectral fluorescence signatures (SFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poryvkina, Larisa; Babichenko, Sergey

    2010-10-01

    The SFS technology has already proved its analytical capabilities in a variety of industrial and environmental tasks. Recently it has been introduced for forensic applications. The key features of the SFS method - measuring a 3-dimensional spectrum of fluorescence of the sample (intensity versus excitation and emission wavelengths) with following recognition of specific spectral patterns of SFS responsible for individual drugs - provide an effective tool for the analysis of untreated seized samples, without any separation of the substance of interest from its mixture with accompanying cutting agents and diluents as a preparatory step. In such approach the chemical analysis of the sample is substituted by the analysis of SFS matrix visualized as an optical image. The SFS technology of drug detection is realized by NarTest® NTX2000 analyzer, compact device intended to measure suspicious samples in liquid, solid and powder forms. It simplifies the detection process due to fully automated procedures of SFS measuring and integrated expert system for recognition of spectral patterns. Presently the expert system of NTX2000 is able to detect marijuana, cocaine, heroin, MDMA, amphetamine and methamphetamine with the detection limit down to 5% of the drug concentration in various mixtures. The numerous tests with street samples confirmed that the use of SFS method provides reliable results with high sensitivity and selectivity for identification of drugs of abuse. More than 3000 street samples of the aforesaid drugs were analyzed with NTX2000 during validation process, and the correspondence of SFS results and conclusions of standard forensic analyses with GC/MS techniques was in 99.4% cases.

  4. Interactions of dissolved humic substances with oppositely charged fluorescent dyes for tracer techniques.

    PubMed

    Hafuka, Akira; Ding, Qing; Yamamura, Hiroshi; Yamada, Koji; Satoh, Hisashi

    2015-11-15

    To investigate interactions between oppositely charged fluorescent dyes and dissolved humic substances, fluorescence quenching of fluorescein and rhodamine 6G with dissolved humic substances was performed. Binding coefficients were obtained by the Stern-Volmer equation. The fluorescence of rhodamine 6G was largely quenched by the addition of humic acid and a non-linear Stern-Volmer plot was obtained. This strong quenching may be caused by the electrostatic interaction between cationic rhodamine 6G and humic acid and strengthened by the hydrophobic repulsion. In contrast, the quenching and interactive effects of dissolved humic substances for fluorescein were relatively weak. PMID:26318652

  5. Determination of phosphorus in steel by the combined technique of laser induced breakdown spectrometry with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Hiroyuki; Hamada, Naoya; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2009-09-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) combined with laser induced fluorescence spectrometry (LIFS) has been applied for detection of trace-level phosphorus in steel. The plasma induced by irradiation of Nd:YAG laser pulse for ablation was illuminated by the 3rd harmonic of Ti:Sapphire laser tuned to one of the resonant lines for phosphorus in the wavelength region of 253-256 nm. An excitation line for phosphorus was selected to give the highest signal-to-noise ratio. Fluorescence signals, P213.62 and P214.91 nm, were observed with high selectivity at the contents as low as several tens µg g - 1 . Fluorescence intensities were in a good linear correlation with the contents. Fluorescence intensity ratio of a collisionally assisted line (213.62 nm) to a direct transition line (214.91 nm) was discussed in terms of the analytical conditions and experimental results were compared with a calculation based on rate equations. Since the fluorescence signal light in the wavelength range longer than 200 nm can be transmitted relatively easily, even through fiber optics of moderate length, LIBS/LIFS would be a versatile technique in on-site applications for the monitoring of phosphorus contents in steel.

  6. Evaluation of the photocatalytic activity of Ln3+-TiO2 nanomaterial using fluorescence technique for real wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saif, M.; Aboul-Fotouh, S. M. K.; El-Molla, S. A.; Ibrahim, M. M.; Ismail, L. F. M.

    2014-07-01

    Evaluation the photocatalytic activity of different Ln3+ modified TiO2 nanomaterials using fluorescence based technique has rarely been reported. In the present work, x mol Ln3+ modified TiO2 nanomaterials (Ln = Nd3+, Sm3+, Eu3+, Gd3+, Dy3+ and Er3+ ions; x = 0.005, 0.008, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03) were synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized using different advanced techniques. The photocatalytic efficiency of the modified TiO2 expressed in the charge carrier separation and rad OH radicals formation were assigned using TiO2 fluorescence quenching and fluorescence probe methods, respectively. The obtained fluorescence measurements confirm that doping treatment significantly decreases the electron-hole recombination probability in the obtained Ln3+/TiO2. Moreover, the rate of rad OH radicals formation is increased by doping. The highly active nanoparticles (0.02Gd3+/TiO2 and 0.01Eu3+/TiO2) were applied for industrial wastewater treatment using solar radiation as a renewable energy source.

  7. Evaluation of the photocatalytic activity of Ln3+-TiO2 nanomaterial using fluorescence technique for real wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Saif, M; Aboul-Fotouh, S M K; El-Molla, S A; Ibrahim, M M; Ismail, L F M

    2014-07-15

    Evaluation the photocatalytic activity of different Ln(3+) modified TiO2 nanomaterials using fluorescence based technique has rarely been reported. In the present work, xmol Ln(3+) modified TiO2 nanomaterials (Ln = Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Dy(3+) and Er(3+) ions; x = 0.005, 0.008, 0.01, 0.02 and 0.03) were synthesized by sol-gel method and characterized using different advanced techniques. The photocatalytic efficiency of the modified TiO2 expressed in the charge carrier separation and OH radicals formation were assigned using TiO2 fluorescence quenching and fluorescence probe methods, respectively. The obtained fluorescence measurements confirm that doping treatment significantly decreases the electron-hole recombination probability in the obtained Ln(3+)/TiO2. Moreover, the rate of OH radicals formation is increased by doping. The highly active nanoparticles (0.02Gd(3+)/TiO2 and 0.01Eu(3+)/TiO2) were applied for industrial wastewater treatment using solar radiation as a renewable energy source.

  8. Application of a fluorescence intensity ratio technique for the intrinsic determination of pH using an optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thotath, Bhadra; Nguyen, T. Hien; Zhang, Weiwei; Wren, Stephen P.; Baxter, Gregory W.; Sun, Tong; Collins, Stephen F.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2015-09-01

    An intensity ratio technique has been used for characterizing fluorescence spectra from novel coumarin dyes for pH sensing, in the range of 0.5 - 6, providing results that are independent of possible fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source, deterioration of the indicator and changes in optical coupling. The arrangement was determined to have a sensitivity of 25% per unit pH change (at a pH of 4).

  9. Improving flow and spillage characteristics of range hoods by using an inclined air-curtain technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong Fung; Nian, You-Cyun; Chen, Jia-Kun; Peng, Kuan-Lin

    2011-03-01

    The current study developed a new type of range hood, which was termed an 'inclined air-curtain range hood', in order to improve the flow and performance of the conventionally used wall-mounted range hood. The flow characteristics and oil mist spillages of air-curtain and conventional range hoods under the influences of both a mannequin presence and a simulated walk-by motion were experimentally examined. The study examined flow patterns by using a laser-light-sheet-assisted smoke-flow visualization technique and diagnosed spillages by using the tracer gas concentration test method. A mannequin presented in front of the conventional hood induced turbulent dispersion of oil mists toward the chest and nose of the mannequin owing to the complex interaction among the suction, wake, and wall effect, while the inclined air-curtain hood presented excellent hood performance by isolating the oil mists from the mannequin with an air curtain and therefore could reduce spillages out into the atmosphere and the mannequin's breathing zone. Both flow visualization and the tracer gas test indicated that the air-curtain hood had excellent 'robustness' over the conventional hood in resisting the influence of walk-by motion. The air-curtain technique could drastically improve the flow characteristics and performance of the range hood by consuming less energy.

  10. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  11. [Research on the 3D discrete fluorescence spectrum technique for differentiation of phytoplankton population].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shan-shan; Su, Rong-guo; Duan, Ya-li; Song, Zhi-jie; Wang, Xiu-lin

    2011-03-01

    The present research was targeted to develop a fluorescence analyser for phytoplankton population which uses a series of LEDs as the light source. So the 3D discrete fluorescence spectra with 12 excitation wavelengths (400, 430, 450, 460,470, 490, 500, 510, 525, 550, 570 and 590 nm) were determined by fluorescence spectrophotometer for 43 phytoplankton species. Then, the wavelet, Daubechies-7 (Db7), and Bayes Classifier were applied to extract the characteristics for each classes from the 3D discrete fluorescence spectra. Lastly, the fluorescence differentiation method for phytoplankton populations was established by multivariate linear regression and non-negative least squares, which could differentiate phytoplankton populations at the levels of both divisions and genus. This method was tested: for simulatively mixed samples(the dominant species accounted for 70%, 80%, 90% and 100% of the gross biomass, respectively) from 32 red tide algal species, and the correct discrimination rates at the level of genus were 67.5%, 75.8%, 81.4% and 79.4%, respectively. For simulatively mixed samples (the dominant divisions algae accounted for 50%, 75% and 100% of the gross biomass, respectively) from 43 algal species, the discrimination rates at the level of division were 95.2%, 99.7% and 91.9% with average relative content of 38.1%, 63.2% and 90.5%, respectively. PMID:21595229

  12. Will C-Laurdan dethrone Laurdan in fluorescent solvent relaxation techniques for lipid membrane studies?

    PubMed

    Barucha-Kraszewska, Justyna; Kraszewski, Sebastian; Ramseyer, Christophe

    2013-01-29

    Development of fluorescence methods involves the necessity of understanding the fluorescent probes behavior in their ground and excited states. In the case of biological membranes, the position of the dyes in the lipid bilayer and their response after excitation are necessary parameters to correctly analyze the experiments. In the present work, we focus on two fluorescent markers, Laurdan (6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthalene) and its derivative C-Laurdan (6-dodecanoyl-2-[N-methyl-N-(carboxymethyl)amino]naphthalene), recently proposed for lipid raft visualization [Kim, H. M.; et al. ChemBioChem 2007, 8, 553]. C-Laurdan, by the presence of an additional carboxyl group, has an advantage over Laurdan since it has a higher sensitivity to the membrane polarity at the lipid headgroup region and a higher water solubility. This theoretical study, based on quantum mechanical (QM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in a fully hydrated lipid membrane model, compare the equilibrium and dynamic properties of both probes taking into account their fluorescence lifetimes. C-Laurdan is found to be more stable than Laurdan in the headgroup region of the membrane and also much more aligned with the lipids. This study suggests that, besides the lipid raft imaging, the C-Laurdan marker can considerably extend the capabilities of fluorescent solvent relaxation method. PMID:23311388

  13. Measurements of NO2 in Maritime Atmosphere in Japan by Laser-Induced Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, J.; Kajii, Y.

    2001-12-01

    NO2 is one of the most important species in tropospheric photochemistry since it plays a key role as a precursor of ozone. Photostationary-state (PSS) between NO and NO2 is a critical factor for ozone production. It is essential to measure NO2 precisely at the level of pptv in the remote, background region. In this study, a compact and sensitive instrument for direct measurement of NO2 has been developed utilizing laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. For the purpose of simple, compact and stable measurement, the single wavelength excitation by a powerful Nd:YAG laser (532.1 nm, 6500 mW at 10 kHz) is adopted. As a result of improvement, the sensitivity, background signal, dark current and the limit of detection are 0.07 cps ppbv-1 mW-1, 70 cps and 4 pptv (60-s, S/N=1), respectively. These specifications suggest the LIF- NO2 instrument can be utilized to measure NO2 at the level of pptv. Two field observations have been successfully carried out under maritime conditions in Japan. The measurements were conducted in Okinawa Island for 10 days and in Rishiri Island for 18 days. The stability of the instrument was confirmed through these observations. In intercomparison with a chemiluminescence-based detector, excellent agreements between two instruments were shown. Thus, the LIF instrument is confirmed to be reasonable for measuring atmospheric NO2. Finally, PSS of NOx in Rishiri Island is considered. As a result, it is suggested that unidentified species such as halogen oxides can be important in the conversion process of NO to NO2. This additional conversion of NO to NO2 can increase the formation rate of nitric acid. In this case, the increase of formation rate can be estimated as 7 %. Consequently, the high-performance LIF instrument realizes precise consideration about NO2 in PSS of NOx. This compact, simple method is promising to be applied conveniently in remote regions over the world.

  14. Spatial and temporal air quality pattern recognition using environmetric techniques: a case study in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Syed Abdul Mutalib, Sharifah Norsukhairin; Juahir, Hafizan; Azid, Azman; Mohd Sharif, Sharifah; Latif, Mohd Talib; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Zain, Sharifuddin M; Dominick, Doreena

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to identify spatial and temporal patterns in the air quality at three selected Malaysian air monitoring stations based on an eleven-year database (January 2000-December 2010). Four statistical methods, Discriminant Analysis (DA), Hierarchical Agglomerative Cluster Analysis (HACA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), were selected to analyze the datasets of five air quality parameters, namely: SO2, NO2, O3, CO and particulate matter with a diameter size of below 10 μm (PM10). The three selected air monitoring stations share the characteristic of being located in highly urbanized areas and are surrounded by a number of industries. The DA results show that spatial characterizations allow successful discrimination between the three stations, while HACA shows the temporal pattern from the monthly and yearly factor analysis which correlates with severe haze episodes that have happened in this country at certain periods of time. The PCA results show that the major source of air pollution is mostly due to the combustion of fossil fuel in motor vehicles and industrial activities. The spatial pattern recognition (S-ANN) results show a better prediction performance in discriminating between the regions, with an excellent percentage of correct classification compared to DA. This study presents the necessity and usefulness of environmetric techniques for the interpretation of large datasets aiming to obtain better information about air quality patterns based on spatial and temporal characterizations at the selected air monitoring stations.

  15. Technique for measuring air flow and carbon dioxide flux in large, open-top chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.M.; Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.

    1993-10-01

    Open-Top Chambers (OTCs) are commonly used to evaluate the effect of CO{sub 2},O{sub 3}, and other trace gases on vegetation. This study developed and tested a new technique for measuring forced air flow and net CO{sub 2} flux from OTCs. Experiments were performed with a 4.5-m diam. OTC with a sealed floor and a specialized air delivery system. Air flow through the chamber was computed with the Bernoulli equation using measurements of the pressure differential between the air delivery ducts and the chamber interior. An independent measurement of air flow was made simultaneously to calibrate and verify the accuracy of the Bernoulli relationship. The CO{sub 2} flux density was calculated as the product of chamber air flow and the difference in CO{sub 2} concentration between the air entering and exhausting from the OTC (C{sub in}-C{sub out}). Accuracy was evaluated by releasing CO{sub 2} within the OTC at known rates. Data were collected with OTCs at ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} ({approx}700 {mu}mol{sup -1}). Results showed the Bernoulli equation, with a flow coefficient of 0.7, accurately measured air flow in the OTC within {+-}5% regardless of flow rate and air duct geometry. Experiments in ambient OTCs showed CO{sub 2} flux density ({mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}), computed from 2-min averages of air flow and C{sub in} - C{sub out,} was typically within {+-} 10% of actual flux, provided that the exit air velocity at the top of the OTC was greater than 0.6 m s{sup -1}. Obtaining the same accuracy in CO{sub 2}-enriched OTCs required a critical exit velocity near 1.2 m s{sup -1} to minimize the incursion of ambient air and prevent contamination of exit gas sample. When flux data were integrated over time to estimate daily CO{sub 2} flux ({mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), actual and measured values agreed to within {+-}2% for both ambient and CO{sub 2}-enriched chambers, suggesting that accurate measurements of daily net C exchange are possible with this technique.

  16. Modelling of Swelling by the Fluorescence Technique in Kappa Carrageenan Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tari, Ozlem; Pekcan, Onder

    2011-12-01

    Kappa (-κ) carrageenan gels prepared with various carrageenan concentrations in pure water were completely dried and then swelled in water vapor. Steady state fluorescence measurements were performed using a spectrometer equipped with temperature controller. Pyranine was embedded in κ-carrageenan gels as a fluorescence probe during gel preparation. The fluorescence intensity, I, increased exponentially as swelling time is increased for all gel samples. The increase in I was modelled using Li-Tanaka equation from which swelling time constants, τc and cooperative diffusion coefficients, Dc were determined. It was observed that Dc increased as the swelling temperature was increased. On the other hand at each temperature, it was seen that Dc decreased as kappa carrageenan concentration was increased. Activation energies for swelling were obtained and found to be 57.4, 58.3 and 62.73 kJ mol-1 for the gels with increasing amount of κ-carrageenan content.

  17. Laser induced fluorescence in algae: A new technique for remote detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E. J.; Hickman, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the absorption and fluorescence spectra were obtained for four various types of marine and fresh water algae using a pulsed N2/Ne dye laser as the source of excitation. The absorption maxima for the algae ranged from 420 to 675 nm, while their fluorescent spectra ranged from 580 to 685 nm. It appears feasible that various algal species can be identified by detection of their fluorescent signatures using a tunable laser as the excitation source. However, if one is concerned only with detection of chlorophyll a, the optimum excitation is approximately 600 + 50 nm while detection is at 685 nm. An analysis of both calculations and laboratory results indicates that it should be feasible to measure chlorophyll a in concentrations as low as 1.0 mg/m3 using a 100 kW peak pulsed laser from an altitude of 500 meters.

  18. Identification of somatomammotroph cells in lactating goats (Capra hircus) by fluorescence and immunogold techniques.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, J; Navarro, J A; Bernabé, A; Gómez, S; Garcés, B; Gómez, M A

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence and ultrastructural morphology of somatomammotroph cells, in the anterior pituitary tissue of the goat, is studied using fluorescence microscopic double staining and two methods of double immunogold staining combined with electron microscopy. Under the fluorescence microscope numerous monohormonal cells, either mammotroph cells (prolactin, PRL, cells) or somatotroph cells (growth hormone, GH, cells) are observed, but cells containing both hormones (somatomammotroph or SMT cells) are scarce. SMT cells do not differ ultrastructurally from monohormonal cells, and the cytoplasm contains two populations of granules, each reactive only for one of the antisera, either antisheep GH or antisheep PRL.

  19. Detecting the barium daughter in 136Xe 0-νββ decay using single-molecule fluorescence imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygren, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule fluorescent imaging may provide an avenue to efficiently detect the Ba++ daughter atom in the decay 136Xe → Ba + 2e-, and, unambiguously associate the birth point in space within the electron trajectories of the decay event. Chelation of doubly-charged alkaline earth elements such as calcium and barium by certain precursor molecules converts the resulting complex from a non-fluorescent to a fluorescent state. Repeated photo-excitation of a single fluorescent complex reveals both presence and location with high precision. This technique, widespread now in biochemistry, biophysics and biology, may permit a similar discriminating response in a large high-pressure xenon gas TPC for the Ba++ ion from xenon double-beta decay. The TPC measures the event time and energy of the two nascent electrons, as well as topology and position in 3-D from their trajectories in the gas. Measurement of the 2-D location of the molecular ion after arrival at the cathode plane permits an association of ion with the event. Demonstration of an efficient, highly specific detection of the barium daughter would provide a long-sought pathway to a background-free result in the search for this decay mode, of central importance for determining the nature of the neutrino.

  20. [Detection of hydroxyl radical in heterogeneous photo-Fenton system using the fluorescence technique and influencing factor study].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; You, Hong; Chen, Qi-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Chao

    2009-09-15

    The Fe2O3/TiO2/Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by using TiO2/Al2O3 as carrier and the heterogeneous photo-Fenton system was established in the three-phase fluidized bed. A fluorescence technique was developed for the determination of the hydroxyl radicals (*OH) from the heterogeneous photo-Fenton system, using coumarin as the fluorescence probe. In addition, four main factors, namely pH, H2O2 concentration, catalyst loading and UV light intensity, which could influence the concentration of OH produced during the reaction process, was also discussed. The fluorescence method using coumarin as the fluorescence probe was demonstrated to be capable of detecting *OH generated in heterogeneous photo-Fenton system with veracity and high reproducibility. It was also found that the *OH generated in heterogeneous photo-Fenton system conformed to the zero reaction dynamics in 30 min. Moreover, the pH, H2O2 concentration, catalyst loading and UV light intensity influenced the *OH generated during the reaction process.

  1. Remote sensing techniques from helicopter for water quality and air pollution control

    SciTech Connect

    Geraci, A.L.; Landolina, F.F.

    1996-11-01

    Aircraft remote sensing provides a number of benefits, allowing to vary the detection parameters, giving better resolution, and being little affected by weather conditions and no replaceable under emergency situations. Also as a part of projects funded by the Commission of the European Communities, through the Regional Government of Sicily, applications of remote sensing techniques were carried out from helicopter over selected study areas in Sicily, for water quality and air pollution control. In particular, remotely-sensed data were acquired, using LASER techniques and thermal infrared imagery, for the monitoring of water quality and the assessment of oil pollution. Furthermore, air quality was investigated, using LASER techniques and correlation spectroscopy. In a perspective of integration, the investigations carried out proved effective and useful, confirming the important role of the helicopter as monitoring platform for environmental remote sensing applications. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  2. Determination of rhenium in molybdenite by X-ray fluorescence. A combined chemical-spectrometric technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solt, M.W.; Wahlberg, J.S.; Myers, A.T.

    1969-01-01

    Rhenium in molybdenite is separated from molybdenum by distillation of rhenium heptoxide from a perchloric-sulphuric acid mixture. It is concentrated by precipitation of the sulphide and then determined by X-ray fluorescence. From 3 to 1000 ??g of rhenium can be measured with a precision generally within 2%. The procedure tolerates larger amounts of molybdenum than the usual colorimetric methods. ?? 1969.

  3. Fluorescence technique for on-line monitoring of state of hydrogen-producing microorganisms

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; Makarova, Valeriya; Tsygankov, Anatoly A.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2007-06-12

    In situ fluorescence method to monitor state of sulfur-deprived algal culture's ability to produce H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion, comprising: a) providing sulfur-deprived algal culture; b) illuminating culture; c) measuring onset of H.sub.2 percentage in produced gas phase at multiple times to ascertain point immediately after anerobiosis to obtain H.sub.2 data as function of time; and d) determining any abrupt change in three in situ fluorescence parameters; i) increase in F.sub.t (steady-state level of chlorophyll fluorescence in light adapted cells); ii) decrease in F.sub.m', (maximal saturating light induced fluorescence level in light adapted cells); and iii) decrease in .DELTA.F/F.sub.m'=(F.sub.m'-F.sub.t)/F.sub.m' (calculated photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) signaling full reduction of plastoquinone pool between PSII and PSI, which indicates start of anaerobic conditions that induces synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme for subsequent H.sub.2 production that signal oxidation of plastoquinone pool asmain factor to regulate H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion.

  4. Potential of Fluorescence Imaging Techniques To Monitor Mutagenic PAH Uptake by Microalga

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is one of the major environmental pollutants that causes mutagenesis and cancer. BaP has been shown to accumulate in phytoplankton and zooplankton. We have studied the localization and aggregation of BaP in Chlorella sp., a microalga that is one of the primary producers in the food chain, using fluorescence confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy with the phasor approach to characterize the location and the aggregation of BaP in the cell. Our results show that BaP accumulates in the lipid bodies of Chlorella sp. and that there is Förster resonance energy transfer between BaP and photosystems of Chlorella sp., indicating the close proximity of the two molecular systems. The lifetime of BaP fluorescence was measured to be 14 ns in N,N-dimethylformamide, an average of 7 ns in Bold’s basal medium, and 8 ns in Chlorella cells. Number and brightness analysis suggests that BaP does not aggregate inside Chlorella sp. (average brightness = 5.330), while it aggregates in the supernatant. In Chlorella grown in sediments spiked with BaP, in 12 h the BaP uptake could be visualized using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25020149

  5. Analysis of tincal ore waste by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfa, Orhan Murat; Üstündağ, Zafer; Özkırım, Ilknur; Kagan Kadıoğlu, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Etibank Borax Plant is located in Kırka-Eskişehir, Turkey. The borax waste from this plant was analyzed by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The standard addition method was used for the determination of the concentration of Al, Fe, Zn, Sn, and Ba. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  6. Drawing on air: input techniques for controlled 3D line illustration.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Daniel; Zeleznik, Robert; Laidlaw, David

    2007-01-01

    We present Drawing on Air, a haptic-aided input technique for drawing controlled 3D curves through space. Drawing on Air addresses a control problem with current 3D modeling approaches based on sweeping movement of the hands through the air. While artists praise the immediacy and intuitiveness of these systems, a lack of control makes it nearly impossible to create 3D form beyond quick design sketches or gesture drawings. Drawing on Air introduces two new strategies for more controlled 3D drawing: one-handed drag drawing and two-handed tape drawing. Both approaches have advantages for drawing certain types of curves. We describe a tangent preserving method for transitioning between the two techniques while drawing. Haptic-aided redrawing and line weight adjustment while drawing are also supported in both approaches. In a quantitative user study evaluation by illustrators, the one and two-handed techniques performed at roughly the same level, and both significantly outperformed freehand drawing and freehand drawing augmented with a haptic friction effect. We present the design and results of this experiment as well as user feedback from artists and 3D models created in a style of line illustration for challenging artistic and scientific subjects.

  7. Techniques of Fluorescence Cholangiography During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Better Delineation of the Bile Duct Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yoshiharu; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Tani, Keigo; Harada, Nobuhiro; Kaneko, Junichi; Saiura, Akio; Bandai, Yasutsugu; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the clinical and technical factors affecting the ability of fluorescence cholangiography (FC) using indocyanine green (ICG) to delineate the bile duct anatomy during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Application of FC during LC began after laparoscopic fluorescence imaging systems became commercially available. In 108 patients undergoing LC, FC was performed by preoperative intravenous injection of ICG (2.5 mg) during dissection of Calot's triangle, and clinical factors affecting the ability of FC to delineate the extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. Equipment-related factors associated with bile duct detectability were also assessed among 5 laparoscopic systems and 1 open fluorescence imaging system in ex vivo studies. FC delineated the confluence between the cystic duct and common hepatic duct (CyD–CHD) before and after dissection of Calot's triangle in 80 patients (74%) and 99 patients (92%), respectively. The interval between ICG injection and FC before dissection of Calot's triangle was significantly longer in the 80 patients in whom the CyD–CHD confluence was detected by fluorescence imaging before dissection (median, 90 min; range, 15–165 min) than in the remaining 28 patients in whom the confluence was undetectable (median, 47 min; range, 21–205 min; P < 0.01). The signal contrast on the fluorescence images of the bile duct samples was significantly different among the laparoscopic imaging systems and tended to decrease more steeply than those of the open imaging system as the target-laparoscope distance increased and porcine tissues covering the samples became thicker. FC is a simple navigation tool for obtaining a biliary roadmap to reach the “critical view of safety” during LC. Key factors for better bile duct identification by FC are administration of ICG as far in advance as possible before surgery, sufficient extension of connective tissues around the bile ducts, and placement of the tip of

  8. New twist on dating: radiocarbon dating techniques applied to air pollution studies

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.

    1981-05-01

    This paper deals with the problem of urban air pollution and to what extent it is caused by the burning of fossil fuels at factories or in cars, and to what extent it is due to the breathing processes of trees or the burning of natural fuels like wood. With the use of radiocarbon dating techniques the distinction between the pollutants can be made. The article describes the design of the gas proportional counter used to measure the extremely small samples of carbon in polluted air. (KRM)

  9. Combined immunofluorescence-DNA-fluorescence staining technique for enumeration of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in a population of acidophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Muyzer, G.; De Bruyn, A.; Schmedding, D.J.M.; Bos, P.; Westbroek, P.; Kuenen, G.J.

    1987-04-01

    An antiserum raised against whole cells of Thiobacillus ferroxidans was allowed to react with a variety of acidophilic and nonacidophilic bacteria in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Both experiments demonstrated that the antiserum was specific at the species level. This preparation was used to evaluate the role of T. ferroooxidans in the microbial desulfurization process. Leaching experiments were performed, and the numbers of T. ferrooxidans cells and other bacteria were estimated by using a combined immunofluorescence-DNA-fluorescence staining technique that was adapted for this purpose. Nonsterile coal samples inoculated with T. ferrooxidans yielded high concentrations of soluble iron after 16 days. After this period, however, T. ferrooxidans cells could no longer be detected by the immunofluorescence assay, whereas the DNA-fluorescence staining procedure demonstrated a large number of microorganisms on the coal particles. These results indicate that T. ferrooxidans is removed by competition with different acidophilic microorganisms that were originally present on the coal.

  10. Characterization of fresh and aged natural ingredients used in historical ointments by molecular spectroscopic techniques: IR, Raman and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Brambilla, L; Riedo, C; Baraldi, C; Nevin, A; Gamberini, M C; D'Andrea, C; Chiantore, O; Goidanich, S; Toniolo, L

    2011-10-01

    Natural organic materials used to prepare pharmaceutical mixtures including ointments and balsams have been characterized by a combined non-destructive spectroscopic analytical approach. Three classes of materials which include vegetable oils (olive, almond and palm tree), gums (Arabic and Tragacanth) and beeswax are considered in this study according to their widespread use reported in ancient recipes. Micro-FTIR, micro-Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies have been applied to fresh and mildly thermally aged samples. Vibrational characterization of these organic compounds is reported together with tabulated frequencies, highlighting all spectral features and changes in spectra which occur following artificial aging. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy has been shown to be particularly useful for the assessment of changes in oils after aging; spectral difference between Tragacanth and Arabic gum could be due to variations in origin and processing of raw materials. Analysis of these materials using non-destructive spectroscopic techniques provided important analytical information which could be used to guide further study.

  11. DNAzyme-based biosensor for Cu(2+) ion by combining hybridization chain reaction with fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Chen, Ling; Ou, Yidian; Wang, Zhenhua; Fu, Fengfu; Guo, Liangqia

    2016-08-01

    A novel signal amplification strategy based on Cu(2+)-dependent DNAzyme was developed for sensing Cu(2+) ion by combining hybridization chain reaction (HCR) with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. In the presence of Cu(2+) ion, the substrate strands of Cu(2+)-dependent DNAzyme immobilized on magnetic beads were specifically cleaved and released. The released strands initiated the HCR process of hairpin H1 and H2 labeled with FAM as the donor and TAMRA as the acceptor, respectively. Long nicked dsDNA structures were self-assembled to bring the donor and the acceptor in close proximity, resulting in a FRET process. The relative ratio of fluorescent intensities of the acceptor and donor was used to quantitatively detect Cu(2+) ion with a limit of detection of 0.5nmolL(-1). This proposed biosensor was applied to detect Cu(2+) ion in tap water with satisfactory results.

  12. Beyond radio-displacement techniques for Identification of CB1 Ligands: The First Application of a Fluorescence-quenching Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Agostino; Lembo, Francesca; Novellino, Ettore; Stornaiuolo, Mariano; Marinelli, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 Receptor (CB1) belongs to the GPCR family and it has been targeted, so far, for the discovery of drugs aimed at the treatment of neuropathic pain, nausea, vomit, and food intake disorders. Here, we present the development of the first fluorescent assay enabling the measurement of kinetic binding constants for CB1orthosteric ligands. The assay is based on the use of T1117, a fluorescent analogue of AM251. We prove that T1117 binds endogenous and recombinant CB1 receptors with nanomolar affinity. Moreover, T1117 binding to CB1 is sensitive to the allosteric ligand ORG27569 and thus it is applicable to the discovery of new allosteric drugs. The herein presented assay constitutes a sustainable valid alternative to the expensive and environmental impacting radiodisplacement techniques and paves the way for an easy, fast and cheap high-throughput drug screening toward CB1 for identification of new orthosteric and allosteric modulators. PMID:24441508

  13. Improved technique for evaluating oral free flaps by pinprick testing assisted by indocyanine green near-infrared fluorescence angiography.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Tetsuji; Masumoto, Kazuma; Uchiyama, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Yoshiko; Azuma, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yuji; Katou, Fuminori

    2014-10-01

    In head and neck surgery, free-flap reconstruction using a microvascular anastomosis is an indispensable option after tumor ablation. Because the success of free-flap reconstruction is enhanced by rapid identification and salvage of failing flaps, postoperative monitoring of free flaps is essential. We describe a new technique using indocyanine green (ICG) near-infrared angiography and pinprick testing to monitor intraoral free flaps. A solution of ICG (Diagnogreen, 5 ml) was intravenously injected, and scanning was performed with a near-infrared video camera system. Thirty seconds after ICG injection, a pinprick test was performed by placing a 24-gage needle through the dermis to the subcutaneous fat of the flap. Pinprick testing during ICG fluorescence imaging was performed in 30 patients. Flap perfusion was confirmed in all patients, and all flaps survived postoperatively. ICG fluorescence imaging demonstrated that flap perfusion was maintained.

  14. Structural investigation of nuclear RNP particles containing pre-mRNA by different fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Borissova, O F; Krichevskaya, A A; Samarina, O P

    1981-01-01

    Ethidium bromide (EB) adsorption isotherms on 30S nuclear RNP particles isolated from liver nuclei has revealed 6% of double-stranded regions in pre-mRNA (dsRNA). It has been established by measurements of the EB fluorescence polarization that the bulk of dsRNA regions in RNP is rigidly attached to RNP. They are longer than 45 degree A. The increase of NaCl concentration from 0.1 up to 0.4 M causes a significant loosening of dsRNA-protein bonds. As a result the dsRNA segments become more flexible. Measurements of energy transfer from fluorescamine (covalently bound to the protein) to EB (adsorbed on dsRNA) have yielded information about dsRNA location. The fact that absorbtion of exciting light by fluorescamine causes pronounced increase of EB fluorescence is consistent with the idea that helical regions of RNA are located outside the RNP particles. PMID:7220348

  15. Application of the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence technique to trace elements determination in tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, T.; Lartigue, J.; Zarazua, G.; Avila-Perez, P.; Navarrete, M.; Tejeda, S.

    2008-12-01

    Many studies have identified an important number of toxic elements along with organic carcinogen molecules and radioactive isotopes in tobacco. In this work we have analyzed by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence 9 brands of cigarettes being manufactured and distributed in the Mexican market. Two National Institute of Standards and Technology standards and a blank were equally treated at the same time. Results show the presence of some toxic elements such as Pb and Ni. These results are compared with available data for some foreign brands, while their implications for health are discussed. It can be confirmed that the Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence method provides precise (reproducible) and accuracy (trueness) data for 15 elements concentration in tobacco samples.

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of the fluorescent antibody technique for detection of infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ide, P R

    1978-01-01

    The specificity of a fluorescent conjugate to infectious laryngotracheitis virus was examined using chick trachea organ culture or tissue sections infected with other avian viruses (adenovirus, infectious bronchitis, poxvirus, reovirus, Newcastle disease virus, Marek's disease virus, avian encephalomyelitis and infectious bursal agent) or Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Confirmation of virus replication in these preparations was obtained by either 1) demonstration of virus titre increase or 2) demonstration of fluorescence when using the homologous conjugate. Once either of these criteria had been satisfied, negative results with the infectious laryngotracheitis conjugate were taken to indicate that the conjugate would not present false positive results in differentiated cells infected with these heterologous viruses. The spectrum of reactivity of the infectious laryngotracheitis conjugate was then examined on organ cultures infected with several infectious laryngotracheitis isolates from across Canada. Finally, the conjugate was applied to experimental and natural cases of infectious laryngotracheitis and its efficiency was compared to routine virus isolation methods. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:206327

  17. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for contaminant screening of leafy greens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoyoung

    2014-05-01

    The production of contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is needed to reduce foodborne illnesses and related costs. Leafy greens grown in the field can be susceptible to fecal matter contamination from uncontrolled livestock and wild animals entering the field. Pathogenic bacteria can be transferred via fecal matter and several outbreaks of E.coli O157:H7 have been associated with the consumption of leafy greens. This study examines the use of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis to detect fecal contamination on Spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea). Hyperspectral fluorescence images from 464 to 800 nm were captured; ultraviolet excitation was supplied by two LED-based line light sources at 370 nm. Key wavelengths and algorithms useful for a contaminant screening optical imaging device were identified and developed, respectively. A non-invasive screening device has the potential to reduce the harmful consequences of foodborne illnesses.

  18. Characterization of microenvironment polarity and solvent accessibility of polysilsesquioxane xerogels by the fluorescent probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, K.J.; Zhu, H.D.; Loy, D.A.

    1995-05-01

    Poly (1, 4 bis(triethoxysilyl)benzene) (PTESB), a representative of a new type of organic-inorganic hybrid polysilsesquioxane material, was characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy for both microenvironmental polarity and solvent accessibility. A dansyl fluorescent molecule was incorporated into the bulk as well as onto the surface of both PTESB and silica materials. Information about the microenvironment polarity and accessibility of PTESB to various organic solvents was determined and compared to that of silica gel. This study found that both the bulk and surface of PTESB are less polar than that of the silica material. The silica material is accessible to polar solvents and water, while YMB is accessible to polar solvents but not to water. The hydrophobicity of PTESB differentiates these new materials from silica gel.

  19. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  20. Photon and neutron interrogation techniques for chemical explosives detection in air cargo: A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Runkle, Robert C.; White, Timothy A.; Miller, Erin A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.; Collins, Brian A.

    2009-05-21

    Scanning cargo transported via aircraft ("air cargo") for explosive threats is a problem that, at present, lacks a comprehensive technical solution. While explosives detection in the baggage-scanning domain has a rich history that sheds light on potential solutions for air cargo, baggage scanning differs in several ways and thus one cannot look to the present array of technologies. Some contemporary solutions, like trace analysis, are not readily applied to cargo due to sampling challenges while the larger geometry of air cargo makes others less effective. This review article examines an array of interrogation techniques using photons and neutrons as incident particles. We first present a summary of the signatures and observables explosives provide and review how they have been exploited in baggage scanning. Following this is a description of the challenges posed by the air cargo application space. After considering interrogation sources, methods focused on transmission imaging, sub-surface examination and elemental characterization are described. It is our goal to shed light on the technical promise of each method while largely deferring questions that revolve around footprint, safety and conduct of operations. Our overarching intent is that a comprehensive understanding of potential techniques will foster development of a comprehensive solution.

  1. A Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) Technique for the Measurement of Solute Transport Across Surfactant-Laden Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, Edward P.; Hatton, T. Alan

    1996-01-01

    The technique of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) has been applied to the measurement of interfacial transport in two-phase systems. FRAP exploits the loss of fluorescence exhibited by certain fluorophores when over-stimulated (photobleached), so that a two-phase system, originally at equilibrium, can be perturbed without disturbing the interface by strong light from an argon-ion laser and its recovery monitored by a microscope-mounted CCD camera as it relaxes to a new equilibrium. During this relaxation, the concentration profiles of the probe solute are measured on both sides of the interface as a function of time, yielding information about the transport characteristics of the system. To minimize the size of the meniscus between the two phases, a photolithography technique is used to selectively treat the glass walls of the cell in which the phases are contained. This allows concentration measurements to be made very close to the interface and increases the sensitivity of the FRAP technique.

  2. Sol-gel particle growth studied using fluorescence anisotropy: An alternative to scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birch, David J. S.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2000-08-01

    The aggregation of silica particles during hydrogel polymerization has been observed in situ with angstrom resolution using the combined fluorescence anisotropy decay of solvated and bound dye. Primary particles of mean hydrodynamic radius ~1.5 nm are found to be present within 20 min of mixing sodium silicate solution and sulfuric acid. Clustering then occurs during siloxane polymerization to produce after ~30 h secondary particles with a mean radius up to ~4.5 nm at a growth rate that depends on silicate concentration and time to microgelation tg. Subsequent condensation to ~4 nm radius occurs within 1 week as particle syneresis dominates.

  3. Fluorescence techniques as suitable methods to discriminate wheat genotypes under drought and high-temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balota, Maria; Sowinska, Malgorzata; Buschmann, Claus; Lichtenthaler, Hartmut K.; Heisel, Francine; Babani, Fardbardha

    1999-05-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Fv/Fo and Fd/Fs (equals Rfd690), related to the quantum conversion capacity at dark-adapted and light-adapted state of the photosynthetic apparatus respectively, have been evaluated as possible indicators of drought and heat tolerance in winter wheat. The measurements were carried out on primary leaves of 8-day old seedlings. Rfd values decreased in 8 days by 20% (p less than or equal to 0.01) only under severe water limitation and for the drought susceptible genotype. The photosynthetic apparatus was more sensitive to high temperature with both ratios, Fv/Fo and Rfd690, showing mean decrease (p less than or equal to 0.001) of 27% and 43%, respectively, in 5 days at 35 degrees Celsius. The susceptible cultivars decreased of up to 42% and 65% and the drought and heat tolerant genotypes only 7% and 12% for Fv/Fo and Rfd690, respectively. The Fv/Fo ratio correlated well (p less than or equal to 0.05 and p less than or equal to 0.01) with seedling responses to oxidative and osmotic stresses. The Rfd690-values correlated better with all physiological parameters considered and with the deviations from linear regression of drought susceptibility index DSI (r equals -0.84, p less than or equal to 0.01) on yield potential showing the highest potential to predict drought and heat tolerance. In addition the blue, green, red and far-red fluorescence have been determined using a laser-induced-fluorescence imaging system in entire seedlings of wheat and triticale grown under optimal laboratory conditions. The ratios F690/F740 and F440/F520 correlated well (p less than or equal to 0.05) with the total chlorophyll content (detected by the SPAD-chlorophyll-meter) and the specific leaf dry weight (SLDW) showing the potential of the both fluorescence ratios to discriminate genetic differences between cultivars for these leaf structural sources of water use efficiency (WUE) improvement.

  4. Multimodal in vivo imaging of oral cancer using fluorescence lifetime, photoacoustic and ultrasound techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fatakdawala, Hussain; Poti, Shannon; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Bec, Julien; Liu, Jing; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Tinling, Steven P.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marcu, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This work reports a multimodal system for label-free tissue diagnosis combining fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm), ultrasound backscatter microscopy (UBM), and photoacoustic imaging (PAI). This system provides complementary biochemical, structural and functional features allowing for enhanced in vivo detection of oral carcinoma. Results from a hamster oral carcinoma model (normal, precancer and carcinoma) are presented demonstrating the ability of FLIm to delineate biochemical composition at the tissue surface, UBM and related radiofrequency parameters to identify disruptions in the tissue microarchitecture and PAI to map optical absorption associated with specific tissue morphology and physiology. PMID:24049693

  5. A guide to accurate measurement of diffusion using fluorescence correlation techniques with blinking quantum dot nanoparticle labels.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Alexia I; Kolin, David L; Heinze, Katrin G; Hebert, Benedict; Wiseman, Paul W

    2008-06-14

    Fluctuation-based fluorescence correlation techniques are widely used to study dynamics of fluorophore labeled biomolecules in cells. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have been developed as bright and photostable fluorescent probes for various biological applications. However, the fluorescence intermittency of QDs, commonly referred to as "blinking", is believed to complicate quantitative correlation spectroscopy measurements of transport properties, as it is an additional source of fluctuations that contribute on a wide range of time scales. The QD blinking fluctuations obey power-law distributions so there is no single characteristic fluctuation time for this phenomenon. Consequently, it is highly challenging to separate fluorescence blinking fluctuations from those due to transport dynamics. Here, we quantify the bias introduced by QD blinking in transport measurements made using fluctuation methods. Using computer simulated image time series of diffusing point emitters with set "on" and "off" time emission characteristics, we show that blinking results in a systematic overestimation of the diffusion coefficients measured with correlation analysis when a simple diffusion model is used to fit the time correlation decays. The relative error depends on the inherent blinking power-law statistics, the sampling rate relative to the characteristic diffusion time and blinking times, and the total number of images in the time series. This systematic error can be significant; moreover, it can often go unnoticed in common transport model fits of experimental data. We propose an alternative fitting model that incorporates blinking and improves the accuracy of the recovered diffusion coefficients. We also show how to completely eliminate the bias by applying k-space image correlation spectroscopy, which completely separates the diffusion and blinking dynamics, and allows the simultaneous recovery of accurate diffusion coefficients and QD blinking probability distribution

  6. Methyl Radical Imaging in Methane-Air Flames Using Laser Photofragmentation-Induced Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Xiaofeng; Yao, Mingfa; Li, Zhongshan

    2015-10-01

    Imaging detection of methyl radicals has been performed in laminar premixed methane-air flames at atmospheric pressure. A nanosecond Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd : YAG) laser was employed to provide the fifth-harmonic-generated 212.8 nm laser beam. The intense ultraviolet (UV) laser pulse was sent through the flame front to photodissociate the methyl (CH3) radicals in the reaction zone of the flames stabilized on a piloted jet flame burner. The emission spectra from the photodissociated fragments were collected using an imaging spectrometer with the flame-front structure spatially resolved. Combining the spatial and spectral information, we recognized that the emission from the (A-X) methine (CH) transitions located at 431 nm was generated from the CH3 photolysis and could be used to visualize the distribution of CH3 radicals. With proper filtering, the high-power UV laser (around 15 mJ/pulse) provided by the compact Nd : YAG laser makes it possible to visualize CH3 distribution naturally generated in the reaction zone of laminar methane-air premixed flames. PMID:26449808

  7. The importance of humin in soil characterisation: A study on Amazonian soils using different fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Amanda Maria; Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Mounier, Stephane; Montes, Célia Regina; Milori, Débora Marcondes Bastos Pereira

    2015-12-15

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is a complex mixture of molecules with different physicochemical properties, with humic substances (HS) being the main component as it represents around 20-50% of SOM structure. Soil of the Amazon region is considered one of the larger carbon pools of the world; thus, studies of the humic fractions are important for understanding the dynamics of organic matter (OM) in these soils. The aim of this study was to use laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and a combination of excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence with Parallel Factor Analysis (CP/PARAFAC) to assess the characteristics of humin (HU) extracted from Amazonian soils. The results obtained using LIFS showed that there was an increasing gradient of humification degree with depth, the deeper horizon presenting a higher amount of aromatic groups in the structure of HU. From the EEM, the contribution of two fluorophores with similar behaviour in the structures of HU and whole soil was assessed. Additionally, the results showed that the HU fraction might represent a larger fraction of SOM than previously thought: about 80-93% of some Amazon soils. Therefore, HU is an important humic fraction, thus indicating its role in environmental analysis, mainly in soil analysis. PMID:26282749

  8. Systemic circulation and bone recruitment of osteoclast precursors tracked by using fluorescent imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Manato; Kikuta, Junichi; Klauschen, Frederick; Chino, Takenao; Kobayashi, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Hisataka; Tamai, Katsuto; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Kanagawa, Osami; Tomura, Michio; Ishii, Masaru

    2013-01-15

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing polykaryons differentiated from monocyte/macrophage-lineage hematopoietic precursors. It remains unclear whether osteoclasts originate from circulating blood monocytes or from bone tissue-resident precursors. To address this question, we combined two different experimental procedures: 1) shared blood circulation "parabiosis" with fluorescently labeled osteoclast precursors, and 2) photoconversion-based cell tracking with a Kikume Green-Red protein (KikGR). In parabiosis, CX(3)CR1-EGFP knock-in mice in which osteoclast precursors were labeled with EGFP were surgically connected with wild-type mice to establish a shared circulation. Mature EGFP(+) osteoclasts were found in the bones of the wild-type mice, indicating the mobilization of EGFP(+) osteoclast precursors into bones from systemic circulation. Receptor activator for NF-κB ligand stimulation increased the number of EGFP(+) osteoclasts in wild-type mice, suggesting that this mobilization depends on the bone resorption state. Additionally, KikGR(+) monocytes (including osteoclast precursors) in the spleen were exposed to violet light, and 2 d later we detected photoconverted "red" KikGR(+) osteoclasts along the bone surfaces. These results indicate that circulating monocytes from the spleen entered the bone spaces and differentiated into mature osteoclasts during a certain period. The current study used fluorescence-based methods clearly to demonstrate that osteoclasts can be generated from circulating monocytes once they home to bone tissues.

  9. Scanning near-field optical/atomic force microscopy for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy of biomaterials in air and liquid: Observation of recombinant Escherichia coli with gene coding to green fluorescent protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Chiba, Norio; Ataka, Tatsuaki; Iwabuchi, Shinichiro; Nagatani, Naoki; Tamiya, Eiichi; Fujihira, Masamichi

    1996-11-01

    We have developed a system of scanning near-field optical/atomic force microscopy (SNOM/AFM) for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy of biomaterials in air and liquid. SNOM/AFM uses a bent optical fiber simultaneously as a dynamic force AFM cantilever and a SNOM probe. Optical resolution of SNOM images shows about 50 nm in an illumination mode for a standard sample of a patterned chromium layer of 20 nm thickness on a quartz glass plate. The SNOM/AFM system contains a photon counting system and polychrometer/ICCD (intensified charge coupled device) system for observation of the fluorescence image and spectrograph of micro areas, respectively. The gene coding to green fluorescence protein (GFP) was cloned in recombinant Escherichia coli (E. coli). Topography, fluorescence image and spectrograph of recombinant E. coli by SNOM/AFM showed a difference in fluorescence in individual E. coli. Fluorescence activity of GFP can thus be used as a convenient indicator of transformation. SNOM/AFM is also applicable to observe immobilized E. coli on a glass plate in water with a liquid chamber and may allow the viewing of observation of floating organisms.

  10. Use of Modern Chemical Protein Synthesis and Advanced Fluorescent Assay Techniques to Experimentally Validate the Functional Annotation of Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Stephen

    2012-07-20

    The objective of this research program was to prototype methods for the chemical synthesis of predicted protein molecules in annotated microbial genomes. High throughput chemical methods were to be used to make large numbers of predicted proteins and protein domains, based on microbial genome sequences. Microscale chemical synthesis methods for the parallel preparation of peptide-thioester building blocks were developed; these peptide segments are used for the parallel chemical synthesis of proteins and protein domains. Ultimately, it is envisaged that these synthetic molecules would be ‘printed’ in spatially addressable arrays. The unique ability of total synthesis to precision label protein molecules with dyes and with chemical or biochemical ‘tags’ can be used to facilitate novel assay technologies adapted from state-of-the art single molecule fluorescence detection techniques. In the future, in conjunction with modern laboratory automation this integrated set of techniques will enable high throughput experimental validation of the functional annotation of microbial genomes.

  11. Non-destructive analysis of didymium and praseodymium molybdate crystals using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. K.; Joseph, Daisy; Pandita, Sanjay; Kotru, P. N.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of didymium (Di) and praseodymium molybdate crystals were carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The assigned empirical chemical formulae of the composites were tested and verified by the EDXRF technique by estimating experimental major elemental concentration ratios. On the Basis of these ratios, the established formulae for some of the composite materials have been verified and suggestions made for their refinement. Non-destructive technique used in this analysis enables to retain the original crystal samples and makes rapid simultaneous scan of major elements such as La, Pr, Ned and Mo as well as impurities such as Ce. Absence of samarium(Sm) in the spectrum during analysis of didymium molybdate crystals indicated an incomplete growth of mixed rare earth single crystal. These crystals (e.g.,Di) are shown to be of modified stoichiometry with Ce as trace impurity.

  12. Characterization of uranium bearing material using x-ray fluorescence and direct gamma-rays measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujaini, M.; Chankow, N.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Hamid, N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Uranium ore can be easily detected due to various gamma-ray energies emitted from uranium daughters particularly from 238U daughters such as 214Bi, 214Pb and 226Ra. After uranium is extracted from uranium ore, only low energy gamma-rays emitted from 235U may be detected if the detector is placed in close contact to the specimen. In this research, identification and characterization of uranium bearing materials is experimentally investigated using direct measurement of gamma-rays from 235U in combination with the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. Measurement of gamma-rays can be conducted by using high purity germanium (HPGe) detector or cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector while a 57Coradioisotope-excited XRF spectrometer using CdTe detector is used for elemental analysis. The proposed technique was tested with various uranium bearing specimens containing natural, depleted and enriched uranium in both metallic and powder forms.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of optically levitated aerosol: a technique to quantitatively map the viscosity of suspended aerosol particles.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, C; Hosny, N A; Tong, H; Seville, P C; Gallimore, P J; Davidson, N M; Athanasiadis, A; Botchway, S W; Ward, A D; Kalberer, M; Kuimova, M K; Pope, F D

    2016-08-21

    We describe a technique to measure the viscosity of stably levitated single micron-sized aerosol particles. Particle levitation allows the aerosol phase to be probed in the absence of potentially artefact-causing surfaces. To achieve this feat, we combined two laser based techniques: optical trapping for aerosol particle levitation, using a counter-propagating laser beam configuration, and fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of molecular rotors for the measurement of viscosity within the particle. Unlike other techniques used to measure aerosol particle viscosity, this allows for the non-destructive probing of viscosity of aerosol particles without interference from surfaces. The well-described viscosity of sucrose aerosol, under a range of relative humidity conditions, is used to validate the technique. Furthermore we investigate a pharmaceutically-relevant mixture of sodium chloride and salbutamol sulphate under humidities representative of in vivo drug inhalation. Finally, we provide a methodology for incorporating molecular rotors into already levitated particles, thereby making the FLIM/optical trapping technique applicable to real world aerosol systems, such as atmospheric aerosols and those generated by pharmaceutical inhalers. PMID:27430158

  14. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P.; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG. PMID:23935422

  15. Passive dosimetry as an alternative technique to dynamic enrichment of organic pollutants of indoor air.

    PubMed

    Zabiegała, B; Przyjazny, A; Namieśnik, J

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of indoor air was carried out in 20 apartments, 3 offices, and 3 laboratories in the Tricity area in Poland with reference to concentrations of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as benzene, toluene, butyl acetate, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, styrene, and m-dichlorobenzene. The time dependence of concentrations of selected VOCs in a newly erected building was studied. Two different techniques were used for the isolation and preconcentration of analytes from air samples: a passive method employing a home-made permeation-type passive sampler and a dynamic method based on a sorption tube. In both cases, activated charcoal was used as a sorption medium (trap packing). The sorption tube was used to validate the results obtained by the passive method, as well. In the majority of dwellings examined, the concentrations of air pollutants were relatively low and did not exceed the MAC values. No significant differences were observed between MAC concentrations determined by using the passive or the dynamic method of air sampling. The results obtained by both sampling methods were characterized by similar precision.

  16. Experimental studies of active and passive flow control techniques applied in a twin air-intake.

    PubMed

    Paul, Akshoy Ranjan; Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG.

  17. Use of x-ray fluorescence and diffraction techniques in studying ancient ceramics of Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunaratne, B. S. B.

    2012-07-01

    Ceramics were produced for centuries in Sri Lanka for various purposes. Ancient ceramic articles such as pottery, bricks, tiles, sewer pipes, etc, were made from naturally occurring raw materials. Use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in characterizing of two ancient ceramic samples from two different archaeological sites in Sri Lanka is presented. The information obtained in this manner is used to figure out the ancient ceramic technology, particularly to learn about the raw materials used, the source of raw materials, processing parameters such as firing temperature or binders used in ceramic production. This information then can be used to explore the archaeometric background such as the nature and extent of cultural and technological interaction between different periods of history in Sri Lanka.

  18. Studies of cytochrome c-551 unfolding using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques.

    PubMed

    Sil, Pallabi; Paul, Simanta Sarani; Silvio, Eva Di; Travaglini-Allocatelli, Carlo; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, we have studied the equilibrium unfolding transitions of cytochrome c from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (cytc551), a small bacterial protein. Similar to eukaryotic cytochrome c, cytc551 folds sequentially, although significant differences exist in the order of folding units (foldons). There are two regions of cytc551 (N-terminal helix with residue number 3 to 10 and the loop 2 region containing residues 34 to 45), in which no foldon unit could be assigned. In addition, the helix containing the Cys-X-X-Cys-His motif, adjacent to the N-terminal helix (residue number 3 to 10), shows unexplained ultra-fast collapse. To obtain further insights, we have studied cytc551 site-directed mutants using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and molecular dynamics simulation. We have found out that cytc551 unfolds through the formation of a fluorescently dark intermediate state and the amplitude of the dark component depends on the position of labeling. We have utilized this position dependence to propose a shape change model during the unfolding of cytc551. The present results show that the N-terminal helix remains in a collapsed position even in the completely unfolded state and this helix may act as a rigid support to guide the folding of its adjacent helix. This rigid support may be responsible for the ultra-fast collapse of the adjacent helix region, which occurs during the initial events of folding. The present results also show that the C-terminal end of loop 2 traverses a large distance during unfolding compared to the N-terminal end, which justifies the observed flexibility of the loop 2 region. PMID:27538920

  19. Characterization of Air Plane Soot Surrogates using Raman spectroscopy and laser ablation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazallon, Bertrand; Ortega, Ismael Kenneth; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Pirim, Claire; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. Aircraft exhaust plumes contain species (gases and soot particles) produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Soot particles emitted by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied for many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. The reasons behind these discrepancies reside in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g., with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths) and ablation techniques (Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particle surrogates produced from a CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios). They are produced as analogues of air-plane soot collected at different engine regimes (PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan) simulating a landing and take-off (LTO) cycle (MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/)) [6]. The spectral parameters of the first-order Raman bands of these soot samples are analyzed using a de-convolution approach described by Sadezky et al. (2005) [5]. A systematic Raman analysis is carried out to select a number of parameters (laser wavelength, irradiance at sample, exposure time) that will alter the sample and the

  20. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

    PubMed

    Olson, M S; Tillman, F D; Choi, J W; Smith, J A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10(-14) to 10(-9) m2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3 x 10(-13) m2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8 x 10(-10) m2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2 x 10(-9) to 1.5 x 10(-9) m2, and ranged from 3.6 x 10(-9) to 6.8 x 10(-9) m2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0 x 10(-14) m2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3 x 10(-14) m2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit

  1. Techniques for Following Labeled Cells In Vivo: Use of X/Y FISH, Techniques to Optimize Fluorescent Detection, and Beta-Galactosidase Detection

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Michael; Schumacher, Michael; Zavros, Yana

    2016-01-01

    The redistribution and trafficking patterns of cells to different anatomic sites throughout the body is important during cancer development and metastasis. Interest in the origin and fate of gastric cancer stem cells has recently arisen, as it may explain the underlying mechanism of cancer development. The ability to monitor the migration patterns of cancer stem cells is imperative to understanding the functional changes associated with the migration and proliferation of these cells. Here we detail a collection of techniques that include fluorescent in vivo imaging, X/Y FISH, and beta-galactosidase detection that are used for following labeled cells in vivo after adoptive transfer or transplant of donor cells for identifying the migration and engraftment of donor cells within the recipient. PMID:23015508

  2. Structuration in the Interface of Direct and Reversed Micelles of Sucrose Esters, Studied by Fluorescent Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Catalina; Ortega, Anakenna; Sanchez, Susana A.; Morales, Javier; Gunther, German

    2015-01-01

    Background Reactors found in nature can be described as micro-heterogeneous systems, where media involved in each micro-environment can behave in a markedly different way compared with the properties of the bulk solution. The presence of water molecules in micro-organized assemblies is of paramount importance for many chemical processes, ranging from biology to environmental science. Self-organized molecular assembled systems are frequently used to study dynamics of water molecules because are the simplest models mimicking biological membranes. The hydrogen bonds between sucrose and water molecules are described to be stronger (or more extensive) than the ones between water molecules themselves. In this work, we studied the capability of sucrose moiety, attached to alkyl chains of different length, as a surface blocking agent at the water-interface and we compared its properties with those of polyethylenglycol, a well-known agent used for this purposes. Published studies in this topic mainly refer to the micellization process and the stability of mixed surfactant systems using glycosides. We are interested in the effect induced by the presence of sucrose monoesters at the interface (direct and reverse micelles) and at the palisade (mixtures with Triton X-100). We believe that the different functional group (ester), the position of alkyl chain (6-O) and the huge capability of sucrose to interact with water will dramatically change the water structuration at the interface and at the palisade, generating new possibilities for technological applications of these systems. Results Our time resolved and steady state fluorescence experiments in pure SEs micelles show that sucrose moieties are able to interact with a high number of water molecules promoting water structuration and increased viscosity. These results also indicate that the barrier formed by sucrose moieties on the surface of pure micelles is more effective than the polyoxyethylene palisade of Triton X-100

  3. Fluorescence Techniques for Measuring Kinetics of Specific Binding of Hormone to Cell Surface Receptors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellen, Edward Herbert

    This thesis presents theoretical calculations and technical advances relevant to total internal reflection/ fluorescence photobleaching recovery (tir/fpr), and results from experiments using tir/fpr to measure the dissociation rate constant of epidermal growth factor (egf) hormone interacting with its receptor molecule on A431 cells. The classical electromagnetic calculations describe fluorescence emission from fluorophores near an interface (possibly metal coated). It is well known that an interface alters the emission properties of nearby fluorophores. Most previous classical calculations model the fluorophore as a fixed-amplitude dipole oscillator. However, for fluorophores under steady illumination, a fixed-power dipole is more appropriate. This modification corresponds to normalizing the fixed-amplitude dipole's intensity by its total dissipated power. The results for the fixed-power model differ nontrivially from the fixed-amplitude model. The observation-angle -dependent intensity as a function of the fluorophore's orientation and distance from the surface is calculated. General expressions are derived for the emission power as observed through a circular-aperture collection system located on either side of the interface. A system for maintaining long-term focus of samples under high-magnification quantitative observation in an epi-illumination optical microscope is described. Focus -dependent changes in the backreflection of an off-axis HeNe laser generate negative feedback signals which drive a dc motor coupled to the fine-focus knob of the microscope. This system has several advantages: (1) it is compatible and nonobstructive with concurrent data acqusition of sample intensities; (2) it requires no alteration of the sample, stage, or objective; (3) it monitors the position of sample areas very near to those under observation; (4) it is inexpensive. The system can hold a glass coverslip sample to within 0.5 μm of its preset focus position. Prismless tir

  4. A Rapid, Fluorescence-Based Field Screening Technique for Organic Species in Soil and Water Matrices.

    PubMed

    Russell, Amber L; Martin, David P; Cuddy, Michael F; Bednar, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Real-time detection of hydrocarbon contaminants in the environment presents analytical challenges because traditional laboratory-based techniques are cumbersome and not readily field portable. In the current work, a method for rapid and semi-quantitative detection of organic contaminants, primarily crude oil, in natural water and soil matrices has been developed. Detection limits in the parts per million and parts per billion were accomplished when using visual and digital detection methods, respectively. The extraction technique was modified from standard methodologies used for hydrocarbon analysis and provides a straight-forward separation technique that can remove interference from complex natural constituents. For water samples this method is semi-quantitative, with recoveries ranging from 70 % to 130 %, while measurements of soil samples are more qualitative due to lower extraction efficiencies related to the limitations of field-deployable procedures.

  5. A borax fusion technique for quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Van Willigen, J H; Kruidhof, H; Dahmen, E A

    1971-04-01

    A borax fusion technique to cast glass discs for quantitative X-ray analysis is described in detail. The method is based on the "nonwetting" properties of a Pt/Au alloy towards molten borax, on the favourable composition of the flux and finally on the favourable form of the casting mould. The critical points of the technique are stressed, resulting in a method which could be carried out successfully by inexperienced workers. In general the method compares favourably in speed and accuracy with wet-chemical methods.

  6. In vivo monitoring of toxic metals: assessment of neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    To date, cadmium, lead, aluminum, and mercury have been measured in vivo in humans. The possibilities of monitoring other toxic metals have also been demonstrated, but no human studies have been performed. Neutron activation analysis appears to be most suitable for Cd and Al measurements, while x-ray fluorescence is ideally suited for measurement of lead in superficial bone. Filtered neutron beams and polarized x-ray sources are being developed which will improve in vivo detection limits. Even so, several of the current facilities are already suitable for use in epidemiological studies of selected populations with suspected long-term low-level ''environmental'' exposures. Evaluation and diagnosis of patients presenting with general clinical symptoms attributable to possible toxic metal exposure may be assisted by in vivo examination. Continued in vivo monitoring of industrial workers, especially follow-up measurements, will provide the first direct assessment of changes in body burden and a direct measure of the biological life-times of these metals in humans. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A comparison of hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging techniques for detection of contaminants on leafy greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensuring the supply of safe, contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is of importance to consumers, suppliers and governments worldwide. In this study, three hyperspectral imaging (HSI) configurations coupled with two multivariate image analysis techniques are compared for detection of fecal con...

  8. Analysis of caspase3 activation in ChanSu-induced apoptosis of ASTC-a-1 cells by fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Chen, Tongsheng; Wang, Longxiang; Wang, Huiying

    2008-02-01

    ChanSu(CS), a traditional Chinese medicine, is composed of many chemical compoments. It is isolated from the dried white secretion of the auricular and skin glands of toads, and it has been widely used for treating the heart diseases and other systemic illnesses. However, it is difficult to judge antitumor effect of agents derived from ChanSu and the underlying mechanism of ChanSu inducing cell apoptosis is still unclear. This report was performed to explore the inhibitory effect and mechanism of ChanSu on human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1). Fluorescence emission spectra and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) were used to study the caspase-3 activation during the ChanSu-induced human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cell apoptosis. CCK-8 was used to assay the inhibition of ChanSu on the cell viability. The cells expressing stably with SCAT3 was used to examine if caspase-3 was activated by ChanSu using acceptor photobleaching technique. Our data showed that treatment of ASTC-a-1 cell with ChanSu resulted in the inhibition of viability and induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner and the SCAT3 was almost cleaved 24 h after ChanSu treatment, implying that ChanSu induced cell apoptosis via a caspase-3-dependent death pathway. Our findings extend the knowledge about the cellular signaling mechanisms mediating ChanSu-induced apoptosis.

  9. Incentive Motivation Techniques Evaluation in Air Force Technical Training. Final Report for Period June 1971-April 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Robert D.; And Others

    The report describes an 18-month research project at Chanute Air Force Base, Illinois, designed to evaluate the effectiveness of inceptive motivation techniques in Air Force technical training. The first phase of the research identified incentives. The findings were used in the second phase of the research which made these incentives contingent on…

  10. Evaluation of a portable X-ray fluorescence instrument for the determination of lead in workplace air samples.

    PubMed

    Morley, J C; Clark, C S; Deddens, J A; Ashley, K; Roda, S

    1999-05-01

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations for worker exposure to lead specify worker protection levels based upon airborne concentrations of lead dust. The rapid, on-site determination of lead in air filter samples using a portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument with an attachment to hold the filter would expedite the exposure assessment process and facilitate compliance with the OSHA standards. A total of 65 lead in air filter samples were collected at bridge blasting lead-abatement projects using closed-faced, 37-mm cassettes with pre-loaded 0.8 micron pore size mixed cellulose ester membrane filters. The lead loading range of the data set was 0.1-1514.6 micrograms (micrograms) of lead/sample. Samples were initially analyzed with a field portable XRF (NITON 700) using an experimental non-destructive XRF method. Samples were subsequently analyzed using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7105 (Graphite Furnace AA) as a reference analytical method. The paired data were not normally distributed; therefore, the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for statistical analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between data from the field portable XRF method and the NIOSH method (p-value = 0.72). Linear regression of the data resulted in a slope of 0.959, a y-intercept of 5.20 micrograms, and an r2 of 0.985. The XRF limit of detection and limit of quantitation were determined to be 6.2 and 17 micrograms of lead/sample, respectively. The XRF method accuracy was +/- 16.4% (7.1%-27%, 90% confidence interval). The data presented in this study indicate that field-portable XRF can be used for the analysis of lead air filter samples over the range of 17 to 1500 micrograms of lead/sample. The practicing industrial hygienist can use field-portable XRF to produce a rapid, on-site determination of lead exposure that can immediately be communicated to workers and help identify appropriate levels

  11. Cutaneous tumors in vivo investigations using fluorescence and diffuse reflectance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Nikolova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    In the recent years, there has been growing interest in the common use of laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) and reflectance spectroscopy (RS) to differentiate disease from normal surrounding tissue - so called optical biopsy method. Painless, instant diagnoses from optical biopsies will soon be a reality. These forms of optical diagnoses are preferable to the removal of several square millimeters of tissue surface - common in traditional biopsies - followed by delays while samples are sent for clinical analysis. The goal of this work was investigation of cutaneous benign and malignant lesions by the methods of LIAFS and RS. A nitrogen laser at 337 nm was applied for the needs of autofluorescence excitation. Broad-spectrum halogen lamp (from 400 to 900 nm) was applied for diffuse reflectance measurements. An associated microspectrometer detected in vivo the fluorescence and reflectance signals from human skin. The main spectral features of benign lesions - compound nevus, dysplastic nevi, heamangioma and basal cell papilloma and malignant lesions - pigmented, amelanotic and secondary malignant melanoma, as well as basal cell carcinoma are discussed and their possible origins are indicated. Spectra from healthy skin areas near to the lesion were detected to be used posteriori to reveal changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra. Influence of the main skin pigments on the spectra detected is discussed and evaluation of possibilities for differentiation between malignant and benign lesions is made based on their spectral properties. This research shows that non-invasive and high-sensitive in vivo detection by means of appropriate light sources and detectors should be possible, related to real-time determination of existing pathological conditions.

  12. Early diagnosis of tongue malignancy using laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Unnikrishnan V., K.; Ongole, Ravikiran; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2015-07-01

    Oral cancer together with pharyngeal cancer is the sixth most common malignancy reported worldwide and one with high mortality ratio among all malignancies [1]. Worldwide 450,000 new cases are estimated in 2014[2]. About 90% are a type of cancer called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC of the tongue is the most common oral malignancy accounting for approximately 40% of all oral carcinomas. One of the important factors for successful therapy of any malignancy is early diagnosis. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis, lack of reliable diagnostic methods for early detection leading to delay in therapy is an important factor responsible for the increase in the mortality rate in various types of cancers. Spectroscopy techniques are extremely sensitive for the analysis of biochemical changes in cellular systems. These techniques can provide a valuable information on alterations that occur during the development of cancer. This is especially important in oral cancer, where "tumor detection is complicated by a tendency towards field cancerization, leading to multi-centric lesions" and "current techniques detect malignant change too late" [3], and "biopsies are not representative of the whole premalignant lesion". [4

  13. Monitoring of bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/acyclovir system using fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tao; Li, Yongjun; Ni, Fenge; Zhang, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Cytotoxic gene therapy mediated by gene transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene followed by acyclovir (ACV) treatment has been reported to inhibit malignant tumor growth in a variety of studies. The magnitude of "bystander effect" is an essential factor for this anti-tumor approach in vivo. However, the mechanism by which HSV-tk/ACV brings "bystander effect" is poorly understood. In this report, the plasmid CD3 (ECFP-CRS-DsRed) and TK-GFP were transferred to the human adenoid cystic carcinoma line ACC-M cell line. The CD3-expressing cells apoptosis was monitored using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. First, CD3 and TK-GFP co-expressing ACC-M cells apoptosis was monitored using FRET technique. The apoptosis was induced by ACV and initiated by caspase3. The FRET efficient was remarkably decreased and then disappeared during cellular apoptosis, which indicated that the TK-GFP expressing ACC-M cells apoptosis, induced by ACV, was via a caspase3-dependent pathway. Secondly, CD3 and TK-GFP mixed expressing ACC-M cells apoptosis, induced by ACV, were monitored using FRET technique. The apoptotic phenomena appeared in the CD3-expressing ACC-M cells. The results show that HSV-tk/ACV system killed ACC-M cells using its bystander effect. These results confirm that HSV-tk/ACV system is potential for cancer gene therapy.

  14. Effects of an air-layer-subdivision technique on the sound transmission through a single plate.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Masahiro; Kugo, Hajime; Shimizu, Takafumi; Takahashi, Daiji

    2008-02-01

    Many studies on the sound transmission through a single plate have been carried out theoretically and experimentally. The transmission-loss characteristics, in general, follow mass law. Therefore, increasing mass of a plate is a fundamental measure to improve the insulation performance. This method, however, has limitations and might not be a reasonable alternative in current standards. Furthermore, the transmission loss at the critical frequency of coincidence is deteriorated significantly even if the mass is rather large. In this paper, the effect of the air-layer-subdivision technique is studied in detail from the viewpoint of the sound transmission problem of a single plate. An analytical model of an infinite single plate with a subdivided layer is considered and the improvement of the transmission loss is estimated. The limitations of the technique are clarified with some parametric studies. In order to validate the predictions, an experiment was carried out. The transmission loss of a glass board with the air layer subdivided by acryl partitions was measured in the experiment. They were in good agreement with the theoretical ones near and above the coincidence. PMID:18247887

  15. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy: A powerful technique for elucidating rovibronic structure in electronic transitions of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Alexander, Ula N.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate the power of high resolution, two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) spectroscopy for observing rovibronic transitions of polyatomic molecules. The technique involves scanning a tunable laser over absorption features in the electronic spectrum while monitoring a segment, in our case 100 cm-1 wide, of the dispersed fluorescence spectrum. 2D-LIF images separate features that overlap in the usual laser induced fluorescence spectrum. The technique is illustrated by application to the S1-S0 transition in fluorobenzene. Images of room temperature samples show that overlap of rotational contours by sequence band structure is minimized with 2D-LIF allowing a much larger range of rotational transitions to be observed and high precision rotational constants to be extracted. A significant advantage of 2D-LIF imaging is that the rotational contours separate into their constituent branches and these can be targeted to determine the three rotational constants individually. The rotational constants determined are an order of magnitude more precise than those extracted from the analysis of the rotational contour and we find the previously determined values to be in error by as much as 5% [G. H. Kirby, Mol. Phys. 19, 289 (1970), 10.1080/00268977000101291]. Comparison with earlier ab initio calculations of the S0 and S1 geometries [I. Pugliesi, N. M. Tonge, and M. C. R. Cockett, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104303 (2008), 10.1063/1.2970092] reveals that the CCSD/6-311G** and RI-CC2/def2-TZVPP levels of theory predict the rotational constants, and hence geometries, with comparable accuracy. Two ground state Fermi resonances were identified by the distinctive patterns that such resonances produce in the images. 2D-LIF imaging is demonstrated to be a sensitive method capable of detecting weak spectral features, particularly those that are otherwise hidden beneath stronger bands. The sensitivity is demonstrated by observation of the three isotopomers of fluorobenzene

  16. Scattering through fruits during ripening: laser speckle technique correlated to biochemical and fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Rana; Pellen, Fabrice; Magné, Christian; Le Jeune, Bernard; Le Brun, Guy; Abboud, Marie

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports monitoring fruits maturation using speckle technique. Performed measurements aim the assessing of biological inner fruit variation effect on the speckle image. We show that the speckle grain size is both affected by the glucose level inside the fruits and by the chlorophyll content. Moreover, the determination of circular polarization degree and circular grain size indicate that a Rayleigh diffusion regime gradually becomes predominant in fruits. Principal component analysis is used to highlight high correlation between results and strengthen the establishment of speckle as a novel non invasive method to monitor fruits ripening. PMID:23188354

  17. Light screening in lichen cortices can be quantified by chlorophyll fluorescence techniques for both reflecting and absorbing pigments.

    PubMed

    Solhaug, Knut Asbjørn; Larsson, Per; Gauslaa, Yngvar

    2010-04-01

    Lichens, representing mutualistic symbioses between photobionts and mycobionts, often accumulate high concentrations of secondary compounds synthesized by the fungal partner. Light screening is one function for cortical compounds being deposited as crystals outside fungal hyphae. These compounds can non-destructively be extracted by 100% acetone from air-dry living thalli. Extraction of atranorin from Physcia aipolia changed the lichen colour from pale grey to green in the hydrated state, whereas acetone-rinsed and control thalli were all pale grey when dry. Removal of parietin from Xanthoria parietina changed the colour of desiccated thalli from orange to grey. Colour changes were quantified by reflectance measurements. By a new chlorophyll fluorescence method, screening was assessed as the decrease in incident irradiance (PAR) necessary to reach identical effective quantum yields of PSII (Phi(PSII)) in acetone-rinsed and control thalli. Thereby, we estimated a screening efficiency due to cortical atranorin crystals at 61, 38, and 40% of blue, green and red light, respectively, whereas parietin screened 81, 27 and 1% of these wavelength ranges. Removal of atranorin caused similar levels of increased photoinhibition for P. aipolia in blue, green and red light, whereas parietin-deficient thalli of X. parietina exhibited increased photoinhibition with decreasing wavelengths. Atranorin possibly prevents water from entering the spaces between the hyphae in the cortex. The air-filled cavities with white atranorin crystals reflect excess light, whereas the yellow compound parietin absorbs excess light. Thereby, both atranorin and parietin play significant photoprotective roles for symbiotic green algae, but with compound-specific screening mechanisms. PMID:20135325

  18. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  19. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  20. Determination of aflatoxins in air samples of refuse-derived fuel by thin-layer chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence spectrometric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bicking, M.K.L.; Kniseley, R.N.; Svec, H.J.

    1983-02-01

    An analytical method is described which allows determination of aflatoxins in a complex matrix. An apparatus has been developed that quantitates fluorescent compounds on thin-layer chromatography plates. A nitrogen laser excitation source produces a detection limit of 10 pg for four aflatoxins. Aflatoxin B1 has been found at levels up to 17 ppb in solid samples collected from the air at a plant which produces refuse-derived fuel. 7 figures, 1 table.

  1. A simple technique for evacuating air bubbles with scum from the bladder dome during transurethral resection of bladder tumor.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Hideki; Moriyama, Shingo; Chiba, Koji; Noro, Akira

    2014-12-01

    Air bubbles floating in the bladder dome during transurethral resection of a bladder tumor can interfere with the resection, causing intravesical explosion and increasing the potential risk of tumor cell reimplantation. We describe a simple and effective technique for evacuating air bubbles from the bladder dome using routine resectoscopes. First, the beak of the resectoscope is positioned near the air bubble in the bladder dome. Second, the drainage channel of the resectoscope is closed. Third, the irrigation tube is detached from the irrigation channel, and then the channel is opened. Subsequently, the air bubble with entangled scum will be retrogradely aspirated from the beak of the resectoscope to the irrigation channel. Reversing the direction of the water stream enables evacuation of the air bubble with the scum under direct vision. This simple and effective technique may assist surgeons and ensure the safety of patients during a transurethral procedure. PMID:25562002

  2. Identification and quantification of cooling water biofilms using fluorescent staining and ATP monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chalut, J.; Cairns, J.; Korkorian, N.

    1994-12-31

    Biofilm formation can create corrosion problems in industrial water systems. Control of biofilms is achieved most effectively when the mechanism of formation is understood. The use of traditional microbiological analyses such as plate counts and dipslides to analyze deposits provides insufficient information about viable cell content and their role in deposit formation. The ATP assay, a newer technology, is more useful but only measures total living biomass. In order to assess the potential for biofouling in cooling water systems, novel staining and monitoring techniques have been developed. Staining technology allows characterization and assessment of biofilm composition. This staining methodology is used to complement ATP analysis of field samples. Case histories are used to illustrate the benefits of this approach. Case histories included a textile manufacturing plant, an oil refinery, and a pulp and paper mill.

  3. Europium Uptake and Partitioning in Oat (Avena sativa) Roots as studied By Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Confocal Microscopy Profiling Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, Robert J.; Wang, Zheming; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2003-11-15

    The uptake of Eu3+ by elongating oat plant roots was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence lifetime measurement, as well as laser excitation time-resolved confocal fluorescence profiling technique. The results of this work indicated that the initial uptake of Eu(III) by oat root was most evident within the apical meristem of the root just proximal to the root cap. Distribution of assimilated Eu(III) within the roots differentiation and elongation zone was non-uniform. Higher concentrations were observed within the vascular cylinder, specifically in the phloem and developing xylem parenchyma. Elevated levels of the metal were also observed in the root hairs of the mature root. The concentration of assimilated Eu3+ dropped sharply from the apical meristem to the differentiation and elongation zone and then gradually decreased as the distance from the root cap increased. Fluorescence spectroscopic characteristics of the assimilated Eu3+ suggested that the Eu3+ exists a s inner-sphere mononuclear complexes inside the root. This work has also demonstrated the effectiveness of a time-resolved Eu3+ fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence profiling techniques for the in vivo, real-time study of metal[Eu3+] accumulation by a functioning intact plant root. This approach can prove valuable for basic and applied studies in plant nutrition and environmental uptake of actinide radionuclides.

  4. From air to rubber: New techniques for measuring and replicating mouthpieces, bocals, and bores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, Leonardo

    2002-11-01

    The history of musical instruments comprises a long genealogy of models and prototypes that results from a combination of copying existing specimens with the change in constructive parameters, and the addition of new devices. In making wind instruments, several techniques have been traditionally employed for extracting the external and internal dimensions of toneholes, air columns, bells, and mouthpieces. In the twentieth century, methods such as pulse reflectometry, x-ray, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound imaging have been made available for bore measurement. Advantages and drawbacks of the existing methods are discussed and a new method is presented that makes use of the injection and coating of silicon rubber, for accurate molding of the instrument. This technique is harmless to all traditional materials, being indicated also for measurements of historical instruments. The paper presents dimensional data obtained from clarinet and saxophone mouthpieces. A set of replicas of top quality clarinet and saxophone mouthpieces, trombone bocals, and flute headjoints is shown, with comparative acoustical and performance analyses. The application of such techniques for historical and modern instrument analysis, restoration, and manufacturing is proposed.

  5. A preliminary study of air-pollution measurement by active remote-sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. L.; Proctor, E. K.; Gasiorek, L. S.; Liston, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollutants are identified, and the needs for their measurement from satellites and aircraft are discussed. An assessment is made of the properties of these pollutants and of the normal atmosphere, including interactions with light of various wavelengths and the resulting effects on transmission and scattering of optical signals. The possible methods for active remote measurement are described; the relative performance capabilities of double-ended and single-ended systems are compared qualitatively; and the capabilities of the several single-ended or backscattering techniques are compared quantitatively. The differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is shown to be superior to the other backscattering techniques. The lidar system parameters and their relationships to the environmental factors and the properties of pollutants are examined in detail. A computer program that models both the atmosphere (including pollutants) and the lidar system is described. The performance capabilities of present and future lidar components are assessed, and projections are made of prospective measurement capabilities for future lidar systems. Following a discussion of some important operational factors that affect both the design and measurement capabilities of airborne and satellite-based lidar systems, the extensive analytical results obtained through more than 1000 individual cases analyzed with the aid of the computer program are summarized and discussed. The conclusions are presented. Recommendations are also made for additional studies to investigate cases that could not be explored adequately during this study.

  6. Using chemical, microbial and fluorescence techniques to understand contaminant sources and pathways to wetlands in a conservation site.

    PubMed

    Rhymes, J; Jones, L; Lapworth, D J; White, D; Fenner, N; McDonald, J E; Perkins, T L

    2015-04-01

    Nutrients and faecal contaminants can enter wetland systems in a number of ways, with both biological and potentially human-health implications. In this study we used a combination of inorganic chemistry, dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence and Escherichia coli and total coliform (TC) count techniques to study the sources and multiple pathways of contamination affecting a designated sand dune site of international conservation importance, surrounded by agricultural land. Analysis of stream samples, groundwater and dune slack wetlands revealed multiple input pathways. These included riverbank seepage, runoff events and percolation of nutrients from adjacent pasture into the groundwater, as well as some on-site sources. The combined techniques showed that off-site nutrient inputs into the sand dune system were primarily from fertilisers, revealed by high nitrate concentrations, and relatively low tryptophan-like fulvic-like ratios<0.4Ramanunits (R.U.). The E. coli and TC counts recorded across the site confirm a relatively minor source of bacterial and nutrient inputs from on-site grazers. Attenuation of the nutrient concentrations in streams, in groundwater and in run-off inputs occurs within the site, restoring healthier groundwater nutrient concentrations showing that contaminant filtration by the sand dunes provides a valuable ecosystem service. However, previous studies show that this input of nutrients has a clear adverse ecological impact.

  7. Development of a measurement technique for ion distribution in an extended nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kazoe, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuma; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2011-11-01

    Ion behavior confined in extended nanospace (10(1)-10(3) nm) is important for nanofluidics and nanochemistry with dominant surface effects. In this paper, we developed a new measurement technique of ion distribution in the nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to achieve a spatial resolution of 87 nm higher than the diffraction limit. Fluorescein was used for ratiometric measurement of pH with two excitation wavelengths. The pH profile in a 2D nanochannel of 410 nm width and 405 nm depth was successfully measured at an uncertainty of 0.05. The excess protons, showing lower pH than the bulk, nonuniformly distributed in the nanochannel to cancel the negative charge of glass wall, especially when the electric double layer is thick compared to the channel size. The present study first revealed the ion distribution near the surface or in the nanochannel, which is directly related to the electric double layer. In addition, the obtained proton distribution is important to understand the nanoscale water structure between single molecules and continuum phase. This technique will greatly contribute to understanding the basic science in nanoscale and interfacial dynamics, which are strongly required to develop novel miniaturized systems for biochemical analysis and further applications.

  8. Spatial and temporal single-cell volume estimation by a fluorescence imaging technique with application to astrocytes in primary culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibi, Siamak; Allansson, Louise; Gustavsson, Tomas; Blomstrand, Fredrik; Hansson, Elisabeth; Olsson, Torsten

    1999-05-01

    Cell volume changes are often associated with important physiological and pathological processes in the cell. These changes may be the means by which the cell interacts with its surrounding. Astroglial cells change their volume and shape under several circumstances that affect the central nervous system. Following an incidence of brain damage, such as a stroke or a traumatic brain injury, one of the first events seen is swelling of the astroglial cells. In order to study this and other similar phenomena, it is desirable to develop technical instrumentation and analysis methods capable of detecting and characterizing dynamic cell shape changes in a quantitative and robust way. We have developed a technique to monitor and to quantify the spatial and temporal volume changes in a single cell in primary culture. The technique is based on two- and three-dimensional fluorescence imaging. The temporal information is obtained from a sequence of microscope images, which are analyzed in real time. The spatial data is collected in a sequence of images from the microscope, which is automatically focused up and down through the specimen. The analysis of spatial data is performed off-line and consists of photobleaching compensation, focus restoration, filtering, segmentation and spatial volume estimation.

  9. Studying gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with laser-induced fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherdantsev, Andrey; Hann, David; Azzopardi, Barry

    2013-11-01

    High-speed LIF-technique is applied to study gas-sheared liquid film in horizontal rectangular duct with 161 mm width. Instantaneous distributions of film thickness resolved in both longitudinal and transverse coordinates were obtained with a frequency of 10 kHz and spatial resolution from 0.125 mm to 0.04 mm. Processes of generation of fast and slow ripples by disturbance waves are the same as described in literature for downwards annular pipe flow. Disturbance waves are often localized by transverse coordinate and may have curved or slanted fronts. Fast ripples, covering disturbance waves, are typically horseshoe-shaped and placed in staggered order. Their characteristic transverse size is of order 1 cm and it decreases with gas velocity. Entrainment of liquid from film surface can also be visualized. Mechanisms of ripple disruption, known as ``bag break-up'' and ``ligament break-up,'' were observed. Both mechanisms may occur on the same disturbance waves. Various scenarios of droplet deposition on the liquid film are observed, including the impact, slow sinking and bouncing, characterized by different outcome of secondary droplets or entrapped bubbles. Number and size of bubbles increase greatly inside the disturbance waves. Both quantities increase with gas and liquid flow rates. EPSRC Programme Grant MEMPHIS (EP/K003976/1), and Roll-Royce UTC (Nottingham, for access to flow facility).

  10. In vivo effects of focused shock waves on tumor tissue visualized by fluorescence staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Lukes, Petr; Zeman, Jan; Horak, Vratislav; Hoffer, Petr; Pouckova, Pavla; Holubova, Monika; Hosseini, S Hamid R; Akiyama, Hidenori; Sunka, Pavel; Benes, Jiri

    2015-06-01

    Shock waves can cause significant cytotoxic effects in tumor cells and tissues both in vitro and in vivo. However, understanding the mechanisms of shock wave interaction with tissues is limited. We have studied in vivo effects of focused shock waves induced in the syngeneic sarcoma tumor model using the TUNEL assay, immunohistochemical detection of caspase-3 and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Shock waves were produced by a multichannel pulsed-electrohydraulic discharge generator with a cylindrical ceramic-coated electrode. In tumors treated with shock waves, a large area of damaged tissue was detected which was clearly differentiated from intact tissue. Localization and a cone-shaped region of tissue damage visualized by TUNEL reaction apparently correlated with the conical shape and direction of shock wave propagation determined by high-speed shadowgraphy. A strong TUNEL reaction of nuclei and nucleus fragments in tissue exposed to shock waves suggested apoptosis in this destroyed tumor area. However, specificity of the TUNEL technique to apoptotic cells is ambiguous and other apoptotic markers (caspase-3) that we used in our study did not confirmed this observation. Thus, the generated fragments of nuclei gave rise to a false TUNEL reaction not associated with apoptosis. Mechanical stress from high overpressure shock wave was likely the dominant pathway of tumor damage.

  11. Macroscopic optical imaging technique for wide-field estimation of fluorescence depth in optically turbid media for application in brain tumor surgical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kolste, Kolbein K.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Valdés, Pablo A.; Jermyn, Michael; Wilson, Brian C.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A diffuse imaging method is presented that enables wide-field estimation of the depth of fluorescent molecular markers in turbid media by quantifying the deformation of the detected fluorescence spectra due to the wavelength-dependent light attenuation by overlying tissue. This is achieved by measuring the ratio of the fluorescence at two wavelengths in combination with normalization techniques based on diffuse reflectance measurements to evaluate tissue attenuation variations for different depths. It is demonstrated that fluorescence topography can be achieved up to a 5 mm depth using a near-infrared dye with millimeter depth accuracy in turbid media having optical properties representative of normal brain tissue. Wide-field depth estimates are made using optical technology integrated onto a commercial surgical microscope, making this approach feasible for real-world applications. PMID:25652704

  12. [Techniques of on-line monitoring volatile organic compounds in ambient air with optical spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Du, Zhen-Hui; Zhai, Ya-Qiong; Li, Jin-Yi; Hu, Bo

    2009-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are harmful gaseous pollutants in the ambient air. The techniques of on-line monitoring VOCs are very significant for environment protection. Until now, there is no single technology that can meet all the needs of monitoring various VOCs. The characteristics and present situation of several optical methods, which can be applied to on-line monitoring VOCs, including non dispersive infrared (NDIR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and laser spectroscopy were reviewed. Comparison was completed between the national standard methods and spectroscopic method for measuring VOCs. The main analysis was focused on the status and trends of tuning diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology. PMID:20210131

  13. Mapping air pollution using Earth observation techniques for cultural heritage sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapiou, Athos; Nisantzi, Argyro; Lysandrou, Vasiliki; Mamouri, Rodanthi; Alexakis, Dimitrios D.; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Sarris, Apostolos; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.

    2013-08-01

    Air pollutants, together with climatic parameters, are of major importance for the deterioration of cultural heritage monuments. Atmospheric pollution is widely recognized as one of the major anthropogenic threats to architectural cultural heritage, in particular when associated with water absorption phenomena. Atmospheric particle deposition on surfaces of Monuments (of cultural heritage interest) may cause an aesthetic impact induced by a series of chemical reactions. Therefore there is a need for systematic monitoring and mapping of air pollution for areas where important archaeological sites and monuments are found. observation techniques, such as the use of satellite image for the retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT), are ideal for this purpose. In this paper, all important monuments of the Paphos District, listed by the Department of Antiquities of Cyprus, have been mapped using Geographical Information Systems. Several recent (2012) MODIS satellite images (both Aqua and Terra) have been used to extract the AOT values in this area. Multi-temporal analysis was performed to identify areas of high risk where AOT values are considered to be high. In situ observations have been also carried out to verify the results.

  14. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  15. Multi-sensor fusion techniques for state estimation of micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavanik, Daniel; Hardt-Stremayr, Alexander; Gremillion, Gregory; Weiss, Stephan; Nothwang, William

    2016-05-01

    Aggressive flight of micro air vehicles (MAVs) in unstructured, GPS-denied environments poses unique challenges for estimation of vehicle pose and velocity due to the noise, delay, and drift in individual sensor measurements. Maneuvering flight at speeds in excess of 5 m/s poses additional challenges even for active range sensors; in the case of LIDAR, an assembled scan of the vehicles environment will in most cases be obsolete by the time it is processed. Multi-sensor fusion techniques which combine inertial measurements with passive vision techniques and/or LIDAR have achieved breakthroughs in the ability to maintain accurate state estimates without the use of external positioning sensors. In this paper, we survey algorithmic approaches to exploiting sensors with a wide range of nonlinear dynamics using filter and bundle-adjustment based approaches for state estimation and optimal control. From this foundation, we propose a biologically-inspired framework for incorporating the human operator in the loop as a privileged sensor in a combined human/autonomy paradigm.

  16. High-Contrast Fluorescence Microscopy for a Biomolecular Analysis Based on Polarization Techniques Using an Optical Interference Mirror Slide

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy with an improved contrast for fluorescence images is developed using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide, which can enhance the fluorescence from a fluorophore as a result of the double interference of the excitation light and emission light. To improve the contrast of a fluorescence image using an OIM slide, a linearly-polarized excitation light was employed, and the fluorescence emission polarized perpendicular to the polarization of the excitation light was detected. The image contrast with this optical system was improved 110-fold for rhodamine B spotted on the OIM, in comparison with a glass slide using a general fluorescence microscopy optical system. Moreover, a 24-fold improvement of the image contrast was achieved for the detection of Cy3-labeled streptavidin bound to immobilize biotin. PMID:25587437

  17. A blue fluorescent labeling technique utilizing micro- and nanoparticles for tracking in LIVE/DEAD® stained pathogenic biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Burkholderia cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Ernst, Julia; Lautenschläger, Christian; Pletz, Mathias W; Fischer, Dagmar; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that target and treat biofilms are widely applied to bacterial cultures using popular live/dead staining techniques with mostly red or green fluorescent markers (eg, with SYTO® 9, propidium iodide, fluorescein). Therefore, visualizing drugs or micro- and nanoparticulate delivery systems to analyze their distribution and effects in biofilms requires a third fluorescent dye that does not interfere with the properties of the live/dead markers. The present study establishes and evaluates a model for tracking polymeric particles in fluorescently stained biological material. To this end, poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based micro- and nanoparticles were used as well-established model systems, which, because of their favorable safety profiles, are expected to play important future roles with regard to drug delivery via inhalation. PLGA was covalently and stably labeled with 7-amino-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid (AMCA), after which blue fluorescent poly(ethylene glycol)-block-PLGA (PEG-PLGA) particles were prepared using a mixture of fluorescent AMCA-PLGA and PEG-PLGA. Because chitosan is known to reduce negative surface charge, blue fluorescent PEG-PLGA-particles with chitosan were also prepared. These micro- and nanoparticles were physicochemically characterized and could be clearly distinguished from live/dead stained bacteria in biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:26917959

  18. A blue fluorescent labeling technique utilizing micro- and nanoparticles for tracking in LIVE/DEAD® stained pathogenic biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Burkholderia cepacia.

    PubMed

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Ernst, Julia; Lautenschläger, Christian; Pletz, Mathias W; Fischer, Dagmar; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that target and treat biofilms are widely applied to bacterial cultures using popular live/dead staining techniques with mostly red or green fluorescent markers (eg, with SYTO(®) 9, propidium iodide, fluorescein). Therefore, visualizing drugs or micro- and nanoparticulate delivery systems to analyze their distribution and effects in biofilms requires a third fluorescent dye that does not interfere with the properties of the live/dead markers. The present study establishes and evaluates a model for tracking polymeric particles in fluorescently stained biological material. To this end, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based micro- and nanoparticles were used as well-established model systems, which, because of their favorable safety profiles, are expected to play important future roles with regard to drug delivery via inhalation. PLGA was covalently and stably labeled with 7-amino-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid (AMCA), after which blue fluorescent poly(ethylene glycol)-block-PLGA (PEG-PLGA) particles were prepared using a mixture of fluorescent AMCA-PLGA and PEG-PLGA. Because chitosan is known to reduce negative surface charge, blue fluorescent PEG-PLGA-particles with chitosan were also prepared. These micro- and nanoparticles were physicochemically characterized and could be clearly distinguished from live/dead stained bacteria in biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:26917959

  19. Detection of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy based on the Laguerre deconvolution technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, J. A.; Fang, Q.; Papaioannou, T.; Qiao, J. H.; Fishbein, M. C.; Beseth, B.; Dorafshar, A. H.; Reil, T.; Baker, D.; Freischlag, J.; Marcu, L.

    2006-02-01

    This study introduces new methods of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) data analysis for tissue characterization. These analytical methods were applied for the detection of atherosclerotic vulnerable plaques. Upon pulsed nitrogen laser (337 nm, 1 ns) excitation, TR-LIFS measurements were obtained from carotid atherosclerotic plaque specimens (57 endarteroctomy patients) at 492 distinct areas. The emission was both spectrally- (360-600 nm range at 5 nm interval) and temporally- (0.3 ns resolution) resolved using a prototype clinically compatible fiber-optic catheter TR-LIFS apparatus. The TR-LIFS measurements were subsequently analyzed using a standard multiexponential deconvolution and a recently introduced Laguerre deconvolution technique. Based on their histopathology, the lesions were classified as early (thin intima), fibrotic (collagen-rich intima), and high-risk (thin cap over necrotic core and/or inflamed intima). Stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) was applied for lesion classification. Normalized spectral intensity values and Laguerre expansion coefficients (LEC) at discrete emission wavelengths (390, 450, 500 and 550 nm) were used as features for classification. The Laguerre based SLDA classifier provided discrimination of high-risk lesions with high sensitivity (SE>81%) and specificity (SP>95%). Based on these findings, we believe that TR-LIFS information derived from the Laguerre expansion coefficients can provide a valuable additional dimension for the diagnosis of high-risk vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques.

  20. Health risk assessment of chlorobenzenes in the air of residential houses using probabilistic techniques.

    PubMed

    Djohan, Djohan; Yu, Jimmy; Connell, Des; Christensen, Elizabeth

    2007-10-01

    A human health risk assessment was performed to evaluate the risks due to chlorobenzenes in the air of residential houses. Chlorobenzenes found in the air in the toilets, rooms, and outdoors of three houses in Brisbane, Australia, were sampled by trapping on Tenax TA and analyzed using an automated thermal desorption (ATD)-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method. Concentrations of 1,4-dichlorobenzene (1,4-DCB) in the rooms, toilets, and outdoors were used as the exposure concentrations (E), while those in the toilets (microg/m3) were used as the high-exposure concentrations (HE). The exposure concentrations were transformed into exposure doses (EXD(E) and EXD(HE)). Dose-response data from the literature for a range of adverse effects in animals were obtained and exposure doses were expressed as human equivalent dose (HED). The HED values were higher than the EXD(E) and EXD(HE) values for all adverse effects, and a hazard quotient was calculated that indicated a low level of risk with the high-exposure environment. The lifetime average daily doses (LADDs) for a wide range of adverse effects observed in human case studies were estimated and compared to the doses in the high-exposure (HE) situation. Using the Monte Carlo simulation technique the probabilities of risk quotients higher than unity ranged from 0.02 to 0.26. This evaluation indicated that 1,4-DCB posed low risks to general residents; however, for individuals with susceptible characteristics and exposure to elevated 1,4-DCB, the probability of adverse responses was moderate to high.

  1. Laser-induced fluorescence of green plants. I - A technique for the remote detection of plant stress and species differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Wood, F. M., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Newcomb, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of green plants was evaluated as a means of remotely detecting plant stress and determining plant type. Corn and soybeans were used as representatives of monocots and dicots, respectively, in these studies. The fluorescence spectra of several plant pigments was excited with a nitrogen laser emitting at 337 nm. Intact leaves from corn and soybeans also fluoresced using the nitrogen laser. The two plant species exhibited fluorescence spectra which had three maxima in common at 440, 690, and 740 nm. However, the relative intensities of these maxima were distinctly different for the two species. Soybeans had an additional slight maxima at 525 nm. Potassium deficiency in corn caused an increase in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. Simulated water stress in soybeans resulted in increased fluorescence at 440, 525, 690, and 740 nm. The inhibition of photosynthesis in soybeans by 3-(3-4-dichlorophenyl)-1-1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) gave incresed fluorescence primarily at 690 and 740 nm. Chlorosis as occurring in senescent soybean leaves caused a decrease in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of plants offer the potential for remotely detecting certain types of stress condition and also for differentiating plant species.

  2. Doppler ultrasound surveillance in deep tunneling compressed-air work with Trimix breathing: bounce dive technique compared to saturation-excursion technique.

    PubMed

    Vellinga, T P van Rees; Sterk, W; de Boer, A G E M; van der Beek, A J; Verhoeven, A C; van Dijk, F J H

    2008-01-01

    The Western Scheldt Tunneling Project in The Netherlands provided a unique opportunity to evaluate two deep-diving techniques with Doppler ultrasound surveillance. Divers used the bounce diving techniques for repair and maintenance of the TBM. The tunnel boring machine jammed at its deepest depth. As a result the work time was not sufficient. The saturation diving technique was developed and permitted longer work time at great depth. Thirty-one divers were involved in this project. Twenty-three divers were examined using Doppler ultrasound. Data analysis addressed 52 exposures to Trimix at 4.6-4.8 bar gauge using the bounce technique and 354 exposures to Trimix at 4.0-6.9 bar gauge on saturation excursions. No decompression incidents occurred with either technique during the described phase of the project. Doppler ultrasound revealed that the bubble loads assessed in both techniques were generally low. We find out, that despite longer working hours, shorter decompression times and larger physical workloads, the saturation-excursion technique was associated with significant lower bubble grades than in the bounce technique using Doppler Ultrasound. We conclude that the saturation-excursion technique with Trimix is a good option for deep and long exposures in caisson work. The Doppler technique proved valuable, and it should be incorporated in future compressed-air work. PMID:19175196

  3. Doppler ultrasound surveillance in deep tunneling compressed-air work with Trimix breathing: bounce dive technique compared to saturation-excursion technique.

    PubMed

    Vellinga, T P van Rees; Sterk, W; de Boer, A G E M; van der Beek, A J; Verhoeven, A C; van Dijk, F J H

    2008-01-01

    The Western Scheldt Tunneling Project in The Netherlands provided a unique opportunity to evaluate two deep-diving techniques with Doppler ultrasound surveillance. Divers used the bounce diving techniques for repair and maintenance of the TBM. The tunnel boring machine jammed at its deepest depth. As a result the work time was not sufficient. The saturation diving technique was developed and permitted longer work time at great depth. Thirty-one divers were involved in this project. Twenty-three divers were examined using Doppler ultrasound. Data analysis addressed 52 exposures to Trimix at 4.6-4.8 bar gauge using the bounce technique and 354 exposures to Trimix at 4.0-6.9 bar gauge on saturation excursions. No decompression incidents occurred with either technique during the described phase of the project. Doppler ultrasound revealed that the bubble loads assessed in both techniques were generally low. We find out, that despite longer working hours, shorter decompression times and larger physical workloads, the saturation-excursion technique was associated with significant lower bubble grades than in the bounce technique using Doppler Ultrasound. We conclude that the saturation-excursion technique with Trimix is a good option for deep and long exposures in caisson work. The Doppler technique proved valuable, and it should be incorporated in future compressed-air work.

  4. Application of cell-surface engineering for visualization of yeast in bread dough: development of a fluorescent bio-imaging technique in the mixing process of dough.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tatsuro; Shiraga, Seizaburo; Araki, Tetsuya; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Yamada, Masaharu; Takeya, Koji; Sagara, Yasuyuki

    2009-07-01

    Cell-surface engineering (Ueda et al., 2000) has been applied to develop a novel technique to visualize yeast in bread dough. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was bonded to the surface of yeast cells, and 0.5% EGFP yeasts were mixed into the dough samples at four different mixing stages. The samples were placed on a cryostat at -30 degrees C and sliced at 10 microm. The sliced samples were observed at an excitation wavelength of 480 nm and a fluorescent wavelength of 520 nm. The results indicated that the combination of the EGFP-displayed yeasts, rapid freezing, and cryo-sectioning made it possible to visualize 2-D distribution of yeast in bread dough to the extent that the EGFP yeasts could be clearly distinguished from the auto-fluorescent background of bread dough. PMID:19584550

  5. A combination of air and fluid drilling technique for zones of lost circulation in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, S.L.; Niederhofer, J.D.; Beavers, W.M.

    1986-02-01

    Structural geologic information available for the coal-bearing formations in the Black Warrior basin documents the occurrence of numerous fault and fracture zones. A combination air/fluid drilling technique may be advantageous to coalbed-methane operations in this and other areas with similar hydrologic and geologic conditions. The authors successfully used this technique recently on coalbed-methane wells in Tuscaloosa County, AL.

  6. Investigation of Essential Element Distribution in the Equine Metacarpophalangeal Joint using a Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaabar, Wejdan; Gundogdu, O.; Tzaphlidou, M.; Janousch, M.; Attenburrow, D.; Bradley, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    In articular cartilage, Ca, P, K and S are among some of the well known co-factors of the metalloproteinases enzymatic family, the latter playing a pivotal role in the growth and degeneration of the collagenous bone-cartilage interface of articulating joints. Current study forms part of a larger investigation concerning the distribution of these and other key elements in such media. For the purpose of evaluating these low atomic number elements (Z⩽20), use was made of the capabilities of the LUCIA Station, located at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Using an incident radiation energy of 4.06 keV, a synchrotron radiation micro x-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF) technique was applied in examining the distribution of the essential elements Ca, P, K and S in the bone-cartilage interface of both healthy and diseased (osteoarthritic) areas of an equine metacarpophalangeal joint. The SR-μXRF mappings and line profile patterns have revealed remarkable changes in both the pattern and absolute distributions of these elements, agreeing with the findings of others. The elemental presence shown in the individual area scans encompassing the lesion each reflect the visibly abraded outer surface of the cartilage and change in shape of the bone surface. One of the area scans for the bone-cartilage interface shows a marked change in both the pattern and absolute elemental presence for all three elements compared to that observed at two other scan sites. The observation of change in bone cartilage composition around the surface of the articulating joint is thought to be novel, the variation being almost certainly due to the differing weight-bearing role of the subchondral bone at each location.

  7. Investigation of Essential Element Distribution in the Equine Metacarpophalangeal Joint using a Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kaabar, Wejdan; Gundogdu, O.; Attenburrow, D.; Bradley, D. A.; Tzaphlidou, M.; Janousch, M.

    2008-05-20

    In articular cartilage, Ca, P, K and S are among some of the well known co-factors of the metalloproteinases enzymatic family, the latter playing a pivotal role in the growth and degeneration of the collagenous bone-cartilage interface of articulating joints. Current study forms part of a larger investigation concerning the distribution of these and other key elements in such media. For the purpose of evaluating these low atomic number elements (Z{<=}20), use was made of the capabilities of the LUCIA Station, located at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Using an incident radiation energy of 4.06 keV, a synchrotron radiation micro x-ray fluorescence (SR-{mu}XRF) technique was applied in examining the distribution of the essential elements Ca, P, K and S in the bone-cartilage interface of both healthy and diseased (osteoarthritic) areas of an equine metacarpophalangeal joint. The SR-{mu}XRF mappings and line profile patterns have revealed remarkable changes in both the pattern and absolute distributions of these elements, agreeing with the findings of others. The elemental presence shown in the individual area scans encompassing the lesion each reflect the visibly abraded outer surface of the cartilage and change in shape of the bone surface. One of the area scans for the bone-cartilage interface shows a marked change in both the pattern and absolute elemental presence for all three elements compared to that observed at two other scan sites. The observation of change in bone cartilage composition around the surface of the articulating joint is thought to be novel, the variation being almost certainly due to the differing weight-bearing role of the subchondral bone at each locati0008.

  8. An empirical technique for estimating near-surface air temperature trends in central Greenland from SSM/I brightness temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Shuman, C.A.; Alley, R.B.; Anandakrishnan, S.; Stearns, C.R.

    1995-02-01

    In central Greenland, near-surface air temperatures can be estimated from long-term satellite passive microwave brightness temperatures supported by limited air-temperature data from automatic weather stations. In this region, brightness temperature depends on snow emissivity, which varies slowly over time, and on snow temperature, which varies more rapidly and is controlled by air temperature. The air temperature and brightness temperature data define an emissivity trend which can be modeled as an annual sinusoid. An air temperature trend can then be derived from the brightness temperature and modeled emissivity information. The estimated air temperature values represent an integrated near-surface value that defines the overall temperature trend at the Greenland Summit. The modeled emissivity cycle allows daily-average air temperatures to be estimated across significant gaps in weather station records, as well as quality control of their temperature data. The technique also generates annual trends of emissivity which can be used to evaluate radiative transfer models of microwave emissivity from dry firn.

  9. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-15

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging.

  10. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-01

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging.

  11. Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Imaging in the Surgical Management of an Iatrogenic Lymphatic Fistula: Description of a Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Papadia, Andrea; Imboden, Sara; Mohr, Stefan; Lanz, Susanne; Nirgianakis, Konstantinos; Mueller, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of laparoscopic surgical management of an iatrogenic lymphorrhea using indocyanine green (ICG). A case of a patient who developed recurrent symptomatic lymphorrhea after laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy for an early stage cervical cancer is presented. Intraoperative bipedal interdigital subcutaneous injection of ICG exactly localized the disrupted lymphatic duct on fluorescence imaging performed with a near-infrared laparoscopic fluorescent optic device, thus allowing a successful surgical repair.

  12. Quantification of OH and HO2 radicals during the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons by Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique

    PubMed Central

    Blocquet, Marion; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Amedro, Damien; Herbinet, Olivier; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Fittschen, Christa

    2013-01-01

    •OH and •HO2 radicals are known to be the key species in the development of ignition. A direct measurement of these radicals under low-temperature oxidation conditions (T = 550–1,000 K) has been achieved by coupling a technique named fluorescence assay by gas expansion, an experimental technique designed for the quantification of these radicals in the free atmosphere, to a jet-stirred reactor, an experimental device designed for the study of low-temperature combustion chemistry. Calibration allows conversion of relative fluorescence signals to absolute mole fractions. Such radical mole fraction profiles will serve as a benchmark for testing chemical models developed to improve the understanding of combustion processes. PMID:24277836

  13. A Preliminary Study on Sinus Fungus Ball with MicroCT and X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zidong; Zhang, Kai; Huang, Wanxia; Yuan, Qingxi

    2016-01-01

    Background Sinus fungus ball, an accumulation of fungal dense concretions, is a common disease in practice, and might cause fatal complications or lead to death once converted into invasive type. Early preoperative diagnosis of this disease can lead to appropriate treatment for patients and prevent multiple surgical procedures. Up to now, the diagnostic criteria of sinus fungus ball have been defined and computed tomography (CT) scan was considered as a valuable preoperative diagnostic tool. However, the sensitivity of clinical CT is only about 62%. Thus, investigating the factors which influence sensitivity is necessary for clinical CT to be a more valuable preoperative diagnosis tool. Furthermore, CT scan usually presents micro-calcifications or spots with metallic density in sinus fungus ball. Previous literatures show that there are some metallic elements such as calcium and zinc in fungus ball, and they concluded that endodontic treatment has a strong correlation with the development of maxillary sinus fungus ball and zinc ion was an exogenous risk factor. But the pathogenesis of sinus fungus ball still remains unclear because fungus ball can also develop in other non-maxillary sinuses or the maxillary sinus without root canal treatment. Is zinc ion the endogenous factor? Study on this point might be also helpful for investigating the pathogenesis of sinus fungus ball. In this paper, we tried to investigate the factors which influence the sensitivity of clinical CT by imaging sinus fungus ball with microCT. The origin of zinc ion was also studied through elements test for different fungal ball samples using x-ray fluorescence technique. Methods Specimens including fungal ball material and sinus mucosa from patients confirmed by pathological findings were extracted after surgery. All fungal ball specimens came from sphenoid sinus, ethmoidal sinus and maxillary sinus with or without previous endodontic treatment respectively. All of them were imaged by micro

  14. Physics and Fluorescence Detection of Cosmic Ray Air Showers with Energies Between 10^16.5 eV and 10^19 eV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zundel, Zachary

    2012-10-01

    The Telescope Array (TA) Experiment has been observing cosmic ray air showers at energies above 10^18 eV since 2008. The TA detectors include fluorescence telescopes that look between 3and 33in elevation and a surface array consisting of 507 plastic scintillators layed out on a 1.2km square grid. The TA collaboration is currently installing fluorescence telescopes that look between 33and 59in elevation and starting the construction of a graded infill array of surface detectors spaced at 400m and 600m. With these upgrades, the physics threshold of TA will be lowered to 10^16.5 eV. The TA Low Energy Extension (TALE) will explore the energy regime corresponding to that of the LHC in center-of-mass frame. This is also the range where the transition from galactic to extra- galactic cosmic ray flux is suspected to occur. We will give a brief overview of the physics of TALE, and report on the progress of the new fluorescence telescopes.

  15. APPLICATION OF BIAS AND ADJUSTMENT TECHNIQUES TO THE ETA-CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current air quality forecast system, based on linking NOAA's Eta meteorological model with EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, consistently overpredicts surface ozone concentrations, but simulates its day-to-day variability quite well. The ability of bias cor...

  16. A simple semi-empirical technique for apportioning the impact of roadways on air quality in an urban neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangasinghe, M. A.; Dirks, K. N.; Singhal, N.; Costello, S. B.; Longley, I.; Salmond, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    Air pollution from the transport sector has a marked effect on human health, so isolating the pollutant contribution from a roadway is important in understanding its impact on the local neighbourhood. This paper proposes a novel technique based on a semi-empirical air pollution model to quantify the impact from a roadway on the air quality of a local neighbourhood using ambient records of a single air pollution monitor. We demonstrate the proposed technique using a case study, in which we quantify the contribution from a major highway with respect to the local background concentration in Auckland, New Zealand. Comparing the diurnal variation of the model-separated background contribution with real measurements from a site upwind of the highway shows that the model estimates are reliable. Amongst all of the pollutants considered, the best estimations of the background were achieved for nitrogen oxides. Although the multi-pronged approach worked well for predominantly vehicle-related pollutants, it could not be used effectively to isolate emissions of PM10 due to the complex and less predictable influence of natural sources (such as marine aerosols). The proposed approach is useful in situations where ambient records from an upwind background station are not available (as required by other techniques) and is potentially transferable to situations such as intersections and arterial roads. Applying this technique to longer time series could help to understand the changes in pollutant concentrations from the road and background sources for different emission scenarios, for different years or seasons. Modelling results also show the potential of such a hybrid semi-empirical models to contribute to our understanding of the physical parameters determining air quality and to validate emissions inventory data.

  17. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique.

    PubMed

    Battista, L; Sciuto, S A; Scorza, A

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (18.0 l∕min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (±18.0 l∕min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono

  18. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2013-03-15

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of {+-}3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s ({+-}18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed

  19. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10-4 m3/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10-4 m3/s (±18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono-directional configuration, the

  20. Measurement techniques investigated for detection of hydrogen chloride gas in ambient air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Nine basic techniques are discussed, ranging from concentration (parts per million) to dosage only (parts per million-seconds) measurement techniques. Data for each technique include lower detection limit, response time, instrument status, and in some cases, specificity. Several techniques discussed can detect ambient hydrogen chloride concentrations below 1 part per million with a response time of seconds.

  1. Comparing phototoxicity during the development of a zebrafish craniofacial bone using confocal and light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J; Delaurier, April; Kimmel, Charles B; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-12-01

    The combination of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and three-dimensional imaging enables cell-type-specific studies of embryogenesis. Light sheet microscopy, in which fluorescence excitation is provided by a plane of laser light, is an appealing approach to live imaging due to its high speed and efficient use of photons. While the advantages of rapid imaging are apparent from recent work, the importance of low light levels to studies of development is not well established. We examine the zebrafish opercle, a craniofacial bone that exhibits pronounced shape changes at early developmental stages, using both spinning disk confocal and light sheet microscopies of fluorescent osteoblast cells. We find normal and aberrant opercle morphologies for specimens imaged with short time intervals using light sheet and spinning disk confocal microscopies, respectively, under equivalent exposure conditions over developmentally-relevant time scales. Quantification of shapes reveals that the differently imaged specimens travel along distinct trajectories in morphological space.

  2. Comparing phototoxicity during the development of a zebrafish craniofacial bone using confocal and light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J; Delaurier, April; Kimmel, Charles B; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-12-01

    The combination of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and three-dimensional imaging enables cell-type-specific studies of embryogenesis. Light sheet microscopy, in which fluorescence excitation is provided by a plane of laser light, is an appealing approach to live imaging due to its high speed and efficient use of photons. While the advantages of rapid imaging are apparent from recent work, the importance of low light levels to studies of development is not well established. We examine the zebrafish opercle, a craniofacial bone that exhibits pronounced shape changes at early developmental stages, using both spinning disk confocal and light sheet microscopies of fluorescent osteoblast cells. We find normal and aberrant opercle morphologies for specimens imaged with short time intervals using light sheet and spinning disk confocal microscopies, respectively, under equivalent exposure conditions over developmentally-relevant time scales. Quantification of shapes reveals that the differently imaged specimens travel along distinct trajectories in morphological space. PMID:23242824

  3. A Novel Technique to Treat Air Leak Following Lobectomy: Intrapleural Infusion of Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinou, Froso; Potaris, Konstantinos; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.; Tsipas, Panteleimon; Karagkiouzis, Grigorios; Konstantinou, Marios

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent air leak following pulmonary lobectomy can be very difficult to treat and results in prolonged hospitalization. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a new method of postoperative air leak management using intrapleurally infused fresh frozen plasma via the chest tube. Material/Methods Between June 2008 and June 2014, we retrospectively reviewed 98 consecutive patients who underwent lobectomy for lung cancer and postoperatively developed persistent air leak treated with intrapleural instillation of fresh frozen plasma. Results The study identified 89 men and 9 women, with a median age of 65.5 years (range 48–77 years), with persistent postoperative air leak. Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma was successful in stopping air leaks in 90 patients (92%) within 24 hours, and in 96 patients (98%) within 48 hours, following resumption of the procedure. In the remaining 2, air leak ceased at 14 and 19 days. Conclusions Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma is a safe, inexpensive, and remarkably effective method for treatment of persistent air leak following lobectomy for lung cancer. PMID:27079644

  4. In vivo fluorescence imaging of lysosomes: a potential technique to follow dye accumulation in the context of PDT?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Mordon, Serge R.; Soulie-Begu, Sylvie

    1995-03-01

    Lysosomes and intracellular acidic compartments seem to play an important role in the context of PDT. Some photosensitizers are localized in the lysosomes of tumor-associated macrophages. Liposomes, which are lysosomotropic drug carriers, are used to deliver photosensitizers in tumors. Liposomes are taken up by the liver cells after intravenous injection. Intracellular pathway and liposomes localization in the different liver cells require sacrifice of the animals, cell separation, and observation by electronic microscopy. Little is known about liposomes kinetic uptake by the acidic intracellular compartments in vivo. We propose in this study a new method to follow liposomes uptake in the liver in vivo using a fluorescent pH-sensitive probe. We have already demonstrated the ability of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging using a pH-dependent probe to monitor pH in living tissues. As pH of lysosome is very low, the kinetic of liposome uptake in this intracellular acidic compartment is followed by monitoring the pH of the whole liver in vivo and ex vivo. Liposomes-encapsulated carboxyfluorescein are prepared by the sonication procedure. Carboxyfluorescein is used at high concentration (100 mM) in order to quench its fluorescence. Liposomes are injected to Wistar rats into the peinil vein. After laparotomy, fluorescence spectra and images are recorded during two hours. Results show a rapid fluorescence increase followed by a slow phase of fluorescence decrease. pH decreases from physiological value to 6.0. After sacrifice and flush with cold saline solution, pH of liver ex vivo is found to be 5.0 - 5.5. These data show a rapid clearance of released dye and an uptake of liposomes by the liver cells and, as liposomes penetrate in the acidic compartment, dye is released from liposomes and is delivered in lysosomes leading to the decrease of pH.

  5. The Refuelable Zinc-air Battery: Alternative Techniques for Zinc and Electrolyte Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J F; Krueger, R

    2006-01-19

    An investigation was conducted into alternative techniques for zinc and electrolyte regeneration and reuse in the refuelable zinc/air battery that was developed by LLNL and previously tested on a moving electric bus using cut wire. Mossy zinc was electrodeposited onto a bipolar array of inclined Ni plates with an energy consumption of 1.8 kWh/kg. Using a H{sub 2}-depolarized anode, zinc was deposited at 0.6 V (0.8 kA/m{sup 2}); the open circuit voltage was 0.45 V. Three types of fuel pellets were tested and compared with results for 0.75 mm cut wire: spheres produced in a spouted bed (UCB); coarse powder produced by gas-atomization (Noranda); and irregular pellets produced by chopping 1-mm plates of compacted zinc fines (Eagle-Picher, Inc.). All three types transported within the cell. The coarse powder fed continuously from hopper to cell, as did the compacted pellets (< 0.83 mm). Large particles (> 0.83 mm; Eagle-Picher and UCB) failed to feed from hopper into cell, being held up in the 2.5 mm wide channel connecting hopper to cell. Increasing channel width to {approx}3.5 mm should allow all three types to be used. Energy losses were determined for shorting of cells during refueling. The shorting currents between adjacent hoppers through zinc particle bridges were determined using both coarse powder and chopped compressed zinc plates. A physical model was developed allowing scaling our results for electrode polarization and bed resistance Shorting was found to consume < 0.02% of the capacity of the cell and to dissipate {approx}0.2 W/cell of heat. Corrosion rates were determined for cut wire in contact with current collector materials and battery-produced ZnO-saturated electrolyte. The rates were 1.7% of cell capacity per month at ambient temperatures; and 0.08% of capacity for 12 hours at 57 C. The total energy conversion efficiency for zinc recovery using the hydrogen was estimated at 34% (natural gas to battery terminals)--comparable to fuel cells. Producing

  6. [Quality of interior air: biological contaminants and their effects on health; bioaerosols and gathering techniques].

    PubMed

    Bălan, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    Indoor Air Quality: biological contaminants and health effects; airborne organisms and sampling instruments. Biological contaminants include bacteria, molds, viruses, animal dander and cat saliva, house dust, mites, cockroaches and pollen. Symptoms of health problems caused by biological pollutants include sneezing, watery eyes, coughing, shortness of breath, dizziness, lethargy, fevers. Children, elderly people with breathing problems, allergies and lung diseases are particularly susceptible to disease-causing biological agents in the indoor air. It is convenient to consider microbiological samplers for collecting organisms in air as falling into several broad categories. Many popular microbiological air samplers use the principle of impaction to trap the organisms by impacting them directly on to agar. Further distinct groups are the impingers, which operate by impinging organisms into liquid. PMID:18441954

  7. A technique for the local measurement of air kerma rate from small Caesium-137 sources.

    PubMed

    Aukett, R J

    1991-10-01

    A method is described in which a Farmer ionization chamber is used for the direct measurement of the air kerma rate in air from small spherical Caesium-137 sources at distances of 35 to 70 mm. The calibration factor and corrections for source and ion chamber geometry are examined. For quality assurance purposes, the results obtained are in sufficient agreement with other methods of calibration.

  8. Fluorescence Based Primer Extension Technique to Determine Transcriptional Starting Points and Cleavage Sites of RNases In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Christopher F.; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence based primer extension (FPE) is a molecular method to determine transcriptional starting points or processing sites of RNA molecules. This is achieved by reverse transcription of the RNA of interest using specific fluorescently labeled primers and subsequent analysis of the resulting cDNA fragments by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Simultaneously, a traditional Sanger sequencing reaction is run on the gel to map the ends of the cDNA fragments to their exact corresponding bases. In contrast to 5'-RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends), where the product must be cloned and multiple candidates sequenced, the bulk of cDNA fragments generated by primer extension can be simultaneously detected in one gel run. In addition, the whole procedure (from reverse transcription to final analysis of the results) can be completed in one working day. By using fluorescently labeled primers, the use of hazardous radioactive isotope labeled reagents can be avoided and processing times are reduced as products can be detected during the electrophoresis procedure. In the following protocol, we describe an in vivo fluorescent primer extension method to reliably and rapidly detect the 5' ends of RNAs to deduce transcriptional starting points and RNA processing sites (e.g., by toxin-antitoxin system components) in S. aureus, E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:25406941

  9. Molecular beacons: trial of a fluorescence-based solution hybridization technique for ecological studies with ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, P; Pell, A N; Krause, D O

    1997-01-01

    Molecular beacons are fluorescent probes developed for solution rather than membrane hybridization. We have investigated the utility of these probes to study rumen microbial ecology. Two cellulolytic species, Ruminococcus albus and Fibrobacter succinogenes, were tested. Membrane and solution hybridizations gave similar results in competition experiments with cocultures of R. albus 8 and F. succinogenes S85. PMID:9055429

  10. Measurement of Bluetongue Virus Binding to a Mammalian Cell Surface Receptor by an In Situ Immune Fluorescent Staining Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A quantifiable in situ immune fluorescent assay (IFA) was developed to measure bluetongue virus (BTV) binding to mammalian cells. The utility of the assay was demonstrated with both Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells. Since heparin sulfate (HS) has been ...

  11. A Technique for Determining the Nozzle-Flow Properties of Air in an Equilibrium, Nonequilibrium, or Frozen State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayman, Lovick O.; Stewart, Roger B.

    1961-01-01

    One of the problems associated with the development of high-enthalpy hypersonic test facilities hos been the determination of nozzle flow properties. This note presents a technique for determining the flow properties of air in an equilibrium, non-equilibrium, or frozen state using two test section measurements. A knowledge of two stagnation properties is required before the technique can be applied. The stagnation pressure can be measured, and reference 1 offers a method for determining stagnation enthalpy. Results of the calculations using the method of reference 1 are presented in reference 2 in a chart (chart 21) which can be readily used to determine the stagnation enthalpy from measurements of stagnation pressure, mass flow of air through the tunnel, and throat diameter.

  12. Dielectric controlled excited state relaxation pathways of a representative push-pull stilbene: a mechanistic study using femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Shahnawaz; Sen, Pratik

    2013-02-28

    Femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique was employed to reinvestigate the intriguing dependence of fluorescence quantum yield of trans-4-dimethylamino-4(')-nitrostilbene (DNS) on dielectric properties of the media. In polar solvents, such as methanol and acetonitrile, the two time components of the fluorescence transients were assigned to intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) dynamics and to the depletion of the ICT state to the ground state via internal conversion along the torsional coordinate of nitro moiety. The viscosity independence of the first time component indicates the absence of any torsional coordinate in the charge transfer process. In slightly polar solvent (carbon tetrachloride) the fluorescence transients show a triple exponential behavior. The first time component was assigned to the formation of the ICT state on a 2 ps time scale. Second time component was assigned to the relaxation of the ICT state via two torsion controlled channels. First channel involves the torsional motion about the central double bond leading to the trans-cis isomerization via a conical intersection or avoided crossing. The other channel contributing to the depopulation of ICT state involves the torsional coordinates of dimethylanilino and∕or nitrophenyl moieties and leads to the formation of a conformationally relaxed state, which subsequently relaxes back to the ground state radiatively, and is responsible for the high fluorescence quantum yield of DNS in slightly polar solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, toluene, etc. The excited singlet state which is having a dominant π-π∗ character may also decay via intersystem crossing to the n-π∗ triplet manifold and thus accounts for the observed triplet yield of the molecule in slightly polar solvents. PMID:23464152

  13. Development of steady-state electrical-heating fluorescence-sensing (SEF) technique for thermal characterization of one dimensional (1D) structures by employing graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiang; Li, Changzheng; Yue, Yanan; Xie, Danmei; Xue, Meixin; Hu, Niansu

    2016-11-01

    A fluorescence signal has been demonstrated as an effective implement for micro/nanoscale temperature measurement which can be realized by either direct fluorescence excitation from materials or by employing nanoparticles as sensors. In this work, a steady-state electrical-heating fluorescence-sensing (SEF) technique is developed for the thermal characterization of one-dimensional (1D) materials. In this method, the sample is suspended between two electrodes and applied with steady-state Joule heating. The temperature response of the sample is monitored by collecting a simultaneous fluorescence signal from the sample itself or nanoparticles uniformly attached on it. According to the 1D heat conduction model, a linear temperature dependence of heating powers is obtained, thus the thermal conductivity of the sample can be readily determined. In this work, a standard platinum wire is selected to measure its thermal conductivity to validate this technique. Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are employed as the fluorescence agent for temperature sensing. Parallel measurement by using the transient electro-thermal (TET) technique demonstrates that a small dose of GQDs has negligible influence on the intrinsic thermal property of platinum wire. This SEF technique can be applied in two ways: for samples with a fluorescence excitation capability, this method can be implemented directly; for others with weak or no fluorescence excitation, a very small portion of nanoparticles with excellent fluorescence excitation can be used for temperature probing and thermophysical property measurement.

  14. Analyses of Clay Mineralogy of some Southeastern Nigeria Soils using X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igwe, C.; Stahr, K.

    2009-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of soil mineralogy helps in understanding the soil forming processes, the chemical constituent and the general characteristics of the soil. We used x-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence techniques (XRF) to analyse the clay mineralogy and soil chemical properties of varieties of soils within south-eastern Nigeria. The XRD involved both powder and oriented clay analyses. The aim was to determine the clay minerals in both whole sample (fine-earth fraction) and the oriented clays. Soils analysed were from floodplain of alluvial deposits to upland soils derived from shale and sandstone geological formation. The XRD patterns of the clay fraction from selected soils indicate that they are well-defined diffractions at 0.72 nm indicating kaolinite as the dominant clay mineral. Kaolinites are mainly the alumina-silicate clays with 1:1 octahedral and tetrahedral relationship. The 2:1 clay minerals present were illite at 1.0 nm for soils formed on the shale formations, interlayer vermiculite (IV) occurred at 1.4 nm again for soils on shales while smectite was observed especially in floodplain soils at 1.8 nm in those soils. The presence of smectite where it occurred, showed that diffraction peaks found between 1.0 and 1.4 nm in Mg-saturated samples shifted to 1.8 nm after the samples were solvated with glycerol, indicating the presence of smectite in various quantities in the soils. The presence of the 1:1 and 2:1 minerals can be used as a basis for grouping of the soils into expanding and non expanding soils. This grouping is very significant in all activities aimed at managing the soils for sustainable productivity. The energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analyses of the clays confirm the dominance of Si and Al in the soils. In some of the soils EDX showed the presence of K and Fe as being one of the prominent elemental components of the clay minerals. The geochemical properties of the soils as shown by XRF were dominated by the SiO2, Al2O3 and the Fe2O3

  15. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  16. Comparative studies of metal air pollution by atomic spectrometry techniques and biomonitoring with moss and lichens.

    PubMed

    State, Gabriel; Popescu, Ion V; Radulescu, Cristiana; Macris, Cristina; Stihi, Claudia; Gheboianu, Anca; Dulama, Ioana; Niţescu, Ovidiu

    2012-09-01

    Our study was dedicated to the analysis of air pollution level with metals in Dambovita County, Romania; maps of the concentration distributions for air pollutants were drawn; statistical analysis includes calculation of the background concentrations and the contamination factors. The highest values of the contamination factor CF is 63.1 ± 6.63 for mosses samples and 33.12 ± 3.96 for lichens and it indicates extreme contaminations in the surroundings of steel works and an electric plant. The comparison of the distribution maps for Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations enables the identification of the pollution sources, the limits of areas with very high levels of pollution, the comparison of the concentration gradients in some areas and the influence of woodlands on the spread of pollutants through the air.

  17. Aquatic and terrestrial optical measurements - laser induced fluorescence technique (ATOM-LIFT): Summer 1997 field measurement campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrey, James E., III; Cecchi, Giovanna; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Kim, Moon S.; Bazzani, Marco; Corp, Lawrence A.

    1998-07-01

    A joint IROE-CNR, NASA/GSFC, and USDA/ARS measurement campaign was conducted in Italy for a three week period in July, 1997. The campaign was split into two parts: the first part for aquatic vegetation studies and the second part for terrestrial vegetation studies. The main objective of the campaign was to study optical properties of intact plant material as it relates to photosynthetic activity of living vegetation. The aquatic studies were carried out at an aquarium-laboratory in the seashore city of Livorno on the West coast of Italy. The investigations involved an important sea grass species that is native to the Mediterranean Sea. The terrestrial studies were carried out Northeast of the Town of St. Stefano di Cadore (Belluno), Italy. Measurements were taken in a wooded site at an Italian Department of Forestry Station on species of natural alpine vegetation. Instrumentation available for the studies were the Italian Fluorescence Light Detection And Ranging (FLIDAR) System, the NASA/USDA Fluorescence Imaging System (FIS), the Perkin Elmer Spectrofluorometer and LI-COR 6400 infrared gas exchange analyzer for photosynthesis measurements. Preliminary evaluations, analysis, and summaries were made by personnel from both Italian and United Sates groups on data collected during the measurement campaign. The joint Italian/American data collection effort with Aquatic and Terrestrial Optical Measurements produced a range of data for characterizing the relationships between fluorescence and the photosynthetic potentials of vegetative scenes.

  18. Comparing phototoxicity during the development of a zebrafish craniofacial bone using confocal and light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J.; DeLaurier, April; Kimmel, Charles B.; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-01-01

    The combination of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and three-dimensional imaging enables cell-type-specific studies of embryogenesis. Light sheet microscopy, in which fluorescence excitation is provided by a plane of laser light, is an appealing approach to live imaging due to its high speed and efficient use of photons. While the advantages of rapid imaging are apparent from recent work, the importance of low light levels to studies of development is not well established. We examine the zebrafish opercle, a craniofacial bone that exhibits pronounced shape changes at early developmental stages, using both spinning disk confocal and light sheet microscopies of fluorescent osteoblast cells. We find normal and aberrant opercle morphologies for specimens imaged with short time intervals using light sheet and spinning disk confocal microscopies, respectively, under equivalent exposure conditions over developmentally-relevant time scales. Quantification of shapes reveals that the differently imaged specimens travel along distinct trajectories in morphological space. (A) Schematic: Light sheet microscopy of zebrafish embryos. Opercle-forming osteoblasts following twenty-four hours of (B) light sheet imaging, showing normal growth, and (C) spinning disk confocal imaging, showing aberrant growth. PMID:23242824

  19. Fluorescence photon migration techniques for the on-farm measurement of somatic cell count in fresh cow's milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, Geoffrey; Kuennemeyer, Rainer; Claycomb, Rod W.

    2005-04-01

    Currently, the state of the art of mastitis detection in dairy cows is the laboratory-based measurement of somatic cell count (SCC), which is time consuming and expensive. Alternative, rapid, and reliable on-farm measurement methods are required for effective farm management. We have investigated whether fluorescence lifetime measurements can determine SCC in fresh, unprocessed milk. The method is based on the change in fluorescence lifetime of ethidium bromide when it binds to DNA from the somatic cells. Milk samples were obtained from a Fullwood Merlin Automated Milking System and analysed within a twenty-four hour period, over which the SCC does not change appreciably. For reference, the milk samples were also sent to a testing laboratory where the SCC was determined by traditional methods. The results show that we can quantify SCC using the fluorescence photon migration method from a lower bound of 4x105 cells mL-1 to an upper bound of 1 x 107 cells mL-1. The upper bound is due to the reference method used while the cause of the lower boundary is unknown, yet.

  20. 78 FR 34306 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). See 69 FR 23858. The bi-state Charlotte Area includes six... Area on November 28, 2011, at 76 FR 72844. Section 182(b)(2) of the CAA requires states to adopt RACT... their SIPs, RACT rules for stationary sources of VOC that are covered by the CTG. See 78 FR 15895....

  1. Fast hybrid CPU- and GPU-based CT reconstruction algorithm using air skipping technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghun; Lee, Ho; Shin, Yeong Gil

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a fast hybrid CPU- and GPU-based CT reconstruction algorithm to reduce the amount of back-projection operation using air skipping involving polygon clipping. The algorithm easily and rapidly selects air areas that have significantly higher contrast in each projection image by applying K-means clustering method on CPU, and then generates boundary tables for verifying valid region using segmented air areas. Based on these boundary tables of each projection image, clipped polygon that indicates active region when back-projection operation is performed on GPU is determined on each volume slice. This polygon clipping process makes it possible to use smaller number of voxels to be back-projected, which leads to a faster GPU-based reconstruction method. This approach has been applied to a clinical data set and Shepp-Logan phantom data sets having various ratio of air region for quantitative and qualitative comparison and analysis of our and conventional GPU-based reconstruction methods. The algorithm has been proved to reduce computational time to half without losing any diagnostic information, compared to conventional GPU-based approaches.

  2. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 10: Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-04-12

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program. The report provides information to home owners who want to make their existing homes more energy efficient by sealing leaks in the building envelope (ceiling, walls, and floors) that let in drafts and let conditioned air escape. The report provides descriptions of 19 key areas of the home where air sealing can improve home performance and energy efficiency. The report includes suggestions on how to find a qualified weatherization or home performance contractor, what to expect in a home energy audit, opportune times for performing air sealing, and what safety and health concerns to be aware of. The report describes some basic building science concepts and topics related to air sealing including ventilation, diagnostic tools, and code requirements. The report will be available for free download from the DOE Building America website. It is a suitable consumer education tool for home performance and weatherization contractors to share with customers to describe the process and value of home energy retrofits.

  3. 77 FR 45307 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: Georgia; Control Techniques...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... ambient air quality standards (NAAQS). See 69 FR 23858. The Atlanta Area includes the following 20..., Paulding and Rockdale. See 56 FR 56694 (November 6, 1991). As such, major sources in the 13-county 1-hour....'' See 44 FR 53761, (September 17, 1979). Each CTG includes a ``presumptive norm'' or ``presumptive...

  4. 75 FR 59180 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... Technique Guidelines for Paper, Film, and Foil Coatings AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... adopting the requirements of EPA's Control Technique Guidelines (CTG) for paper, film, and foil coatings..., Film, and Foil Coatings,'' that is located in the ``Rules and Regulations'' section of this...

  5. A comparison of X-ray fluorescence and wet chemical analysis of air filter samples from a scrap lead smelting operation.

    PubMed

    Harper, Martin; Hallmark, Timothy S; Andrew, Michael E; Bird, Aaron J

    2004-10-01

    Personal and area air samples were taken at a scrap lead smelter operation in a bullet manufacturing facility. Samples were taken using the 37-mm styrene-acrylonitrile closed-face filter cassette (CFC, the current US standard device for lead sampling), the 37-mm GSP or "cone" sampler, the 25-mm Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable sampler, and the 25-mm Button sampler (developed at the University of Cincinnati). Polyvinylchloride filters were used for sampling. The filters were pre- and post-weighed, and analyzed for lead content using a field-portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer. The filters were then extracted with dilute nitric acid in an ultrasonic extraction bath and the solutions were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. The 25-mm filters were analyzed using a single XRF reading, while three readings on different parts of the filter were taken from the 37-mm filters. The single reading from the 25-mm filters was adjusted for the nominal area of the filter to obtain the mass loading, while the three readings from the 37-mm filters were inserted into two different algorithms for calculating the mass loadings, and the algorithms were compared. The IOM sampler was designed for material collected in the body of the sampler to be part of the collected sample as well as that on the filter. Therefore, the IOM sampler cassettes were rinsed separately to determine if wall-loss corrections were necessary. All four samplers gave very good correlations between the two analytical methods above the limit of detection of the XRF procedure. The limit of detection for the 25-mm filters (5 microg) was lower than for the 37-mm filters (10 microg). The percentage of XRF results that were within 25% of the corresponding ICP results was evaluated. In addition, the bias from linear regression was estimated. Linear regression for the Button sampler and the IOM sampler using single readings and the GSP using all tested techniques

  6. In-die ultrasonic and off-line air-coupled monitoring and characterization techniques for drug tablets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, J. D.; Kowalczyk, B. R.; Hancock, B. C.; Kaul, G.; Akseli, I.; Cetinkaya, C.

    2012-05-01

    Mechanical integrity and properties of drug tablets may adversely affect their therapeutic and structural functions. An embedded ultrasound monitoring system for tablet mechanical property monitoring during compaction and a non-contact/non-destructive off-line air-coupled technique for determining the mechanical properties of coated drug tablets are presented. In the compaction monitoring system, the change of ToF and the reflection coefficient for the upper-punch surface interface as a function of compaction pressure has been studied. In the air-coupled measurement approach, air-coupled excitation and laser interferometric detection are utilized and their effectiveness in characterizing the mechanical properties of a drug tablet by examining its vibrational resonance frequencies is demonstrated. An iterative computational procedure based on the finite element method and Newton's method is developed to extract the mechanical properties of the coated tablet from a subset of its measured resonance frequencies. The mechanical properties characterized by this technique are compared to those obtained by a contact ultrasonic method.

  7. Combination of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Staining Techniques for Cell Viability and Accumulation of PHA and polyP in Microorganisms in Complex Microbial Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) can be combined with a number of staining techniques to reveal the relationships between the microorganisms and their function in complex microbial systems with a single-cell resolution. In this chapter, we have focused on staining methods for intracellular storage compounds (polyhydroxyalkanoates, polyphosphate) and a measure for cell viability, reduction of the tetrazolium-based redox stain CTC. These protocols are optimized for the study of microorganisms in waste-water treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), but they may also be used with minor modifications in many other ecosystems.

  8. Determination of tungsten in tantalum-tungsten alloy by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using fusion, thin layer, and pressed powder pellet techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lunfu; Zou, Deshuang; Dai, Yichun; Tang, Guangping

    2015-08-01

    A method is described for the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) determination of tungsten in tantalum-tungsten alloy over the range of 10.5%-13.5%. The sample was prepared by three methods, namely, borate fusion, filter paper disk, and pressed powder pellet, respectively. We compared the feature of the three methods of specimen preparation and found that filter paper disk method was the most suitable technique for specimen preparation. Furthermore, the results were compared with those given by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and the relative standard deviation was less than 2%, which could meet the requirement of this application.

  9. Fast fabrication of copper nanowire transparent electrodes by a high intensity pulsed light sintering technique in air.

    PubMed

    Ding, Su; Jiu, Jinting; Tian, Yanhong; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-12-14

    Copper nanowire transparent electrodes have received increasing interest due to the low price and nearly equal electrical conductivity compared with other TEs based on silver nanowires and indium tin oxide (ITO). However, a post-treatment at high temperature in an inert atmosphere or a vacuum environment was necessary to improve the conductivity of Cu NW TEs due to the easy oxidation of copper in air atmosphere, which greatly cancelled out the low price advantage of Cu NWs. Here, a high intensity pulsed light technique was introduced to sinter and simultaneously deoxygenate these Cu NWs into a highly conductive network at room temperature in air. The strong light absorption capacity of Cu NWs enabled the welding of the nanowires at contact spots, as well as the removal of the thin layer of residual organic compounds, oxides and hydroxide of copper even in air. The Cu NW TE with a sheet resistance of 22.9 Ohm sq(-1) and a transparency of 81.8% at 550 nm has been successfully fabricated within only 6 milliseconds exposure treatment, which is superior to other films treated at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. The HIPL process was simple, convenient and fast to fabricate easily oxidized Cu NW TEs in large scale in an air atmosphere, which will largely extend the application of cheap Cu NW TEs.

  10. Fast fabrication of copper nanowire transparent electrodes by a high intensity pulsed light sintering technique in air.

    PubMed

    Ding, Su; Jiu, Jinting; Tian, Yanhong; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-12-14

    Copper nanowire transparent electrodes have received increasing interest due to the low price and nearly equal electrical conductivity compared with other TEs based on silver nanowires and indium tin oxide (ITO). However, a post-treatment at high temperature in an inert atmosphere or a vacuum environment was necessary to improve the conductivity of Cu NW TEs due to the easy oxidation of copper in air atmosphere, which greatly cancelled out the low price advantage of Cu NWs. Here, a high intensity pulsed light technique was introduced to sinter and simultaneously deoxygenate these Cu NWs into a highly conductive network at room temperature in air. The strong light absorption capacity of Cu NWs enabled the welding of the nanowires at contact spots, as well as the removal of the thin layer of residual organic compounds, oxides and hydroxide of copper even in air. The Cu NW TE with a sheet resistance of 22.9 Ohm sq(-1) and a transparency of 81.8% at 550 nm has been successfully fabricated within only 6 milliseconds exposure treatment, which is superior to other films treated at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. The HIPL process was simple, convenient and fast to fabricate easily oxidized Cu NW TEs in large scale in an air atmosphere, which will largely extend the application of cheap Cu NW TEs. PMID:26536570

  11. Topical delivery enhancement with multilamellar liposomes into pilosebaceous units: I. In vitro evaluation using fluorescent techniques with the hamster ear model.

    PubMed

    Lieb, L M; Ramachandran, C; Egbaria, K; Weiner, N

    1992-07-01

    Evidence suggesting liposomal delivery into the pilosebaceous unit of the male Syrian hamster ear membrane was found using two fluorescent techniques, quantitative fluorescence microscopy (QFM), and a scraping method where the various tissue strata of treated skin are analyzed using fluorescence spectrophotometry. Whole ears were mounted on Franz diffusion cells and treated for 24 h with 40 microliters of the following test formulations, each containing approximately 100 micrograms/ml carboxyfluorescein (CF): i) multilamellar phosphatidylcholine: cholesterol: phosphatidylserine liposomes; ii) HEPES buffer (pH, 7.4); iii) 5% propylene glycol; iv) 10% ethanol; v) 0.05% sodium lauryl sulfate; and vi) a suspension of the same lipids used to form the liposomes that were not processed so as to produce a bilayer configuration. Topical application of the liposomally based formulation resulted in a significantly higher accumulation of CF in the pilosebaceous units than the application of any of the other non-liposomal formulations. There was excellent correlation between the two analytical methods used to determine CF deposition into the sebaceous glands. PMID:1607674

  12. Portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy as a rapid screening technique for analysis of TiO2 and ZnO in sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Lim, Jin-Hee; Quevedo, Ivan R.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Linder, Sean W.

    2016-02-01

    This investigation reports a rapid and simple screening technique for the quantification of titanium and zinc in commercial sunscreens using portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (pXRF). A highly evolved technique, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was chosen as a comparative technique to pXRF, and a good correlation (r2 > 0.995) with acceptable variations (≤ 25%) in results between both techniques was observed. Analytical figures of merit such as detection limit, quantitation limit, and linear range of the method are reported for the pXRF technique. This method has a good linearity (r2 > 0.995) for the analysis of titanium (Ti) in the range of 0.4-14.23 wt%, and zinc (Zn) in the range of 1.0-23.90 wt%. However, most commercial sunscreens contain organic ingredients, and these ingredients are known to cause matrix effects. The development of appropriate matrix matched working standards to obtain the calibration curve was found to be a major challenge for the pXRF measurements. In this study, we have overcome the matrix effect by using metal-free commercial sunscreens as a dispersing media for the preparation of working standards. An easy extension of this unique methodology for preparing working standards in different matrices was also reported. This method is simple, rapid, and cost-effective and, in comparison to conventional techniques (e.g., ICP-MS), did not generate toxic wastes during sample analysis.

  13. Comparison of thermal advection measurements by clear-air radar and radiosonde techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Crochet, M.; Rougier, G.; Bazile, G. Meteorologie Nationale, Trappes )

    1990-10-01

    Vertical profiles of the horizontal wind have been measured every 4 min by a clear-air radar (stratospheric-troposphere radar), and vertical profiles of temperature have been obtained every 2 hours by three radiosonde soundings in the same zone in Brittany during the Mesoscale Frontal Dynamics Project FRONTS 87 campaign. Radar thermal advection is deduced from the thermal wind equation using the measured real horizontal wind instead of the geostrophic wind. Radiosonde thermal advection is determined directly from the sounding station data sets of temperature gradients and also approximately from the thermodynamic equation by the temperature tendency. These approximations, applied during a frontal passage, show the same general features and magnitude of the thermal advection, giving a preliminary but encouraging conclusion for a possible real-time utilization of clear-air radars to monitor thermal advection and to identify its characteristic features. 6 refs.

  14. Development of simulation techniques suitable for the analysis of air traffic control situations and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A terminal area simulation is described which permits analysis and synthesis of current and advanced air traffic management system configurations including ground and airborne instrumentation and new and modified aircraft characteristics. Ground elements in the simulation include navigation aids, surveillance radars, communication links, air-route structuring, ATC procedures, airport geometries and runway handling constraints. Airborne elements include traffic samples with individual aircraft performance and operating characteristics and aircraft navigation equipment. The simulation also contains algorithms for conflict detection, conflict resolution, sequencing and pilot-controller data links. The simulation model is used to determine the sensitivities of terminal area traffic flow, safety and congestion to aircraft performance characteristics, avionics systems, and other ATC elements.

  15. The study of in vivo x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique for gadolinium (Gd) measurements in human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; Nie, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    An in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source, for the detection of gadolinium has been investigated. Gd is of interest because of the extensive use of Gd-based contrast agents in MR imaging. A human simulating bone phantom set has been developed. The phantoms were doped with seven concentrations of Gd. Additional elements important for in vivo x-ray fluorescence, Na, Cl and Ca, were also included to create an overall elemental composition consistent with the Reference Man. A new 5 GBq 109Cd source was purchased to improve the source activity in comparison to the previous study (0.17 GBq). The previously published minimum detection limit (MDL) for Gd phantom measurements using KXRF system was 3.3 ppm. In this study the minimum detection limit for bare bone phantoms was found to reduce the MDL to 0.8, a factor of 4.1. The previous published data used only three layers of plastic as soft tissue equivalent materials and found the MDL of 4–4.8 ppm. In this study we have used the plastic with more realistic thicknesses to simulate a soft tissue at tibia. The detection limits for phantoms with Lucite as a tissue equivalent, using a new source, was determined to be 1.81 to 3.47 ppm (μg Gd per gram phantom). Our next study would be testing an in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source on human volunteers who went through MR imaging and were injected by Gd.

  16. The study of in vivo x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique for gadolinium (Gd) measurements in human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; Nie, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    An in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source, for the detection of gadolinium has been investigated. Gd is of interest because of the extensive use of Gd-based contrast agents in MR imaging. A human simulating bone phantom set has been developed. The phantoms were doped with seven concentrations of Gd. Additional elements important for in vivo x-ray fluorescence, Na, Cl and Ca, were also included to create an overall elemental composition consistent with the Reference Man. A new 5 GBq 109Cd source was purchased to improve the source activity in comparison to the previous study (0.17 GBq). The previously published minimum detection limit (MDL) for Gd phantom measurements using KXRF system was 3.3 ppm. In this study the minimum detection limit for bare bone phantoms was found to reduce the MDL to 0.8, a factor of 4.1. The previous published data used only three layers of plastic as soft tissue equivalent materials and found the MDL of 4-4.8 ppm. In this study we have used the plastic with more realistic thicknesses to simulate a soft tissue at tibia. The detection limits for phantoms with Lucite as a tissue equivalent, using a new source, was determined to be 1.81 to 3.47 ppm (μg Gd per gram phantom). Our next study would be testing an in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source on human volunteers who went through MR imaging and were injected by Gd.

  17. A detection method of vegetable oils in edible blended oil based on three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Tian

    2016-12-01

    Edible blended vegetable oils are made from two or more refined oils. Blended oils can provide a wider range of essential fatty acids than single vegetable oils, which helps support good nutrition. Nutritional components in blended oils are related to the type and content of vegetable oils used, and a new, more accurate, method is proposed to identify and quantify the vegetable oils present using cluster analysis and a Quasi-Monte Carlo integral. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra were obtained at 250-400nm (excitation) and 260-750nm (emission). Mixtures of sunflower, soybean and peanut oils were used as typical examples to validate the effectiveness of the method.

  18. Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Heredia Rivera, Birmania; Gerardo Rodriguez, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter accumulated on car engine air-filters (CAFs) was examined in order to investigate the potential use of these devices as efficient samplers for collecting street level air that people are exposed to. The morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of a variety of particles were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The particulate matter accumulated by the CAFs was studied in two categories; the first was of removed particles by friction, and the second consisted of particles retained on the filters. Larger particles with a diameter of 74–10 µm were observed in the first category. In the second one, the detected particles had a diameter between 16 and 0.7 µm. These particles exhibited different morphologies and composition, indicating mostly a soil origin. The elemental composition revealed the presence of three groups: mineral (clay and asphalt), metallic (mainly Fe), and biological particles (vegetal and animal debris). The palynological analysis showed the presence of pollen grains associated with urban plants. These results suggest that CAFs capture a mixture of atmospheric particles, which can be analyzed in order to monitor urban air. Thus, the continuous availability of large numbers of filters and the retroactivity associated to the car routes suggest that these CAFs are very useful for studying the high traffic zones within a city. PMID:27706087

  19. Making sense of crowdsourced observations: Data fusion techniques for real-time mapping of urban air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Castell, Nuria; Vogt, Matthias; Lahoz, William; Bartonova, Alena

    2015-04-01

    With an ever-increasing amount of environmental observations available through crowdsourcing, one of the major emerging challenges is how to best make sense of the vast amount of collected observations and how to provide citizens and other end-users with a relevant value-added product. Regarding air quality, a high-density network of low-cost sensors provided by crowdsourcing has significant potential for improving spatial mapping in general and in urban areas in particular. However, most datasets of observations made within a crowdsourcing framework contain substantial data gaps and the observations are generally point measurements, which are only representative of a relatively small area. This poses a significant challenge for mapping applications. One way to overcome these issues is to combine the crowdsourced data with spatially continuous data from a model. We present a novel data fusion-based technique for combining real-time crowdsourced observations with model output that allows to provide highly detailed, up-to-date maps of urban air quality. The EU-funded CITI-SENSE project is deploying a dense network of low-cost sensors measuring air quality in eight cities around Europe. These crowdsourced observations are used for mapping urban quality in real-time by fusing them with data obtained from statistical or deterministic air quality models. Data fusion techniques allow for combining observations with model data in a mathematically objective way and therefore provide a means of adding value to both the observations and the model. The observations are improved by filling spatio-temporal gaps in the data and the model is improved by constraining it with observations. The model further provides detailed spatial patterns in areas where no observations are available. As such, data fusion of observations from high-density low-cost sensor networks together with models can contribute to significantly improving urban-scale air quality mapping. The data fusion

  20. Application of cytoplasmic Ca2+ fluorescence imaging techniques to study the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine ginseng extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Heming; Liu, Songhao

    2009-11-01

    The exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine offers advantages including good efficiency and smaller side-effects, however, the exact mechanisms have not been classified. A lot of literatures indicated the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations of skeletal muscle cells increased significantly during exercise-induced fatigue. This study is aimed to establish a rat skeletal muscle cell model of exercise-induced fatigue. We applied cytoplasmic Ca2+ fluorescence imaging techniques to study the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine ginseng extract. In our research, the muscle tissues from the newborn 3 days rats were taken out and digested into cells. The cells were randomly divided into the ginseng extract group and the control group. The cells from the two groups were cultured in the medium respectively added 2mg/ml ginseng extract and 2mg/ml D-hanks solution. After differentiating into myotubes, the two groups of cells treated with a fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM were put on the confocal microscope and the fluorescence intensity of cells pre- and post- stimulation with dexamethasone were detected. It was found that cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations of the two groups of cells both increased post-stimulation, however, the increasing amplitude of fluorescence intensity of the ginseng extract group was significantly lower than that of the control group. In conclusion, stimulating the cells with dexamethasone is a kind of workable cell models of exercise-induced fatigue, and the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by ginseng extract may be connected to regulatating cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations.

  1. Pellet coating by air suspension technique using a mini-model coating unit.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, M; Pal, T K; Jayakumar, M

    2003-09-01

    Air suspension coating is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry, as an attractive alternative to pan coating in that it can successfully coat small particles, pellets and tablets irrespective of size or shape with a wide variety of coating materials. The commercially available air suspension coating equipments require at least one kilogram of material for optimum efficiency of their working. Therefore, it is felt that there is a potential need for a small, compact air suspension coating instrument, which can work with gram quantities of material. The main objective of the present work is to design and evaluate a laboratory model top spray air suspension coating instrument. The performance of the instrument was evaluated for both, drug loading on to non-pareil pellets and coating of drug-loaded pellets. Terbutaline sulphate was selected as model drug, while Surelease (aqueous polymeric dispersion of ethyl cellulose) as representative coating material. The drug loading efficiency of the instrument was found to be around 82% with a pellet load of 10 g. The drug loading efficiency was found to be satisfactory and reproducible. Scanning electron micrographs of coated pellets indicated that coating was homogenous and uniform around the pellets. The maximum deviations observed in the in vitro drug release studies were +/- 2.7397% of the mean percent quantity of drug released, which is low enough for the coating to be considered uniform and reproducible. Reproducibility of the coating process was further confirmed by determining the 95% confidence interval for average difference in cumulative percentage drug release between two runs of each batch, which was found to be less than 5% set as the maximum allowable difference. The release data obtained were found to show best fit with first order kinetic model. A significant influence of coating thickness on the drug release rate was observed. From the results and observations of this work, it may be concluded that the

  2. Recent developments in the analysis of air samples by luminescence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1981-01-01

    A report is presented on recent developments in luminescence analysis of atmospheric samples using two simple luminescence methods, the synchronous excitation and the room temperature phosphorescence (RPT) techniques. Samples extracted from high-volume samplers can be analyzed for their content of certain polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds using these two spectroscopic methods. The RPT technique also provides a novel approach for direct detection of PNA vapors collected on filter paper.

  3. Analysis of indoor air pollutants checklist using environmetric technique for health risk assessment of sick building complaint in nonindustrial workplace

    PubMed Central

    Syazwan, AI; Rafee, B Mohd; Juahir, Hafizan; Azman, AZF; Nizar, AM; Izwyn, Z; Syahidatussyakirah, K; Muhaimin, AA; Yunos, MA Syafiq; Anita, AR; Hanafiah, J Muhamad; Shaharuddin, MS; Ibthisham, A Mohd; Hasmadi, I Mohd; Azhar, MN Mohamad; Azizan, HS; Zulfadhli, I; Othman, J; Rozalini, M; Kamarul, FT

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To analyze and characterize a multidisciplinary, integrated indoor air quality checklist for evaluating the health risk of building occupants in a nonindustrial workplace setting. Design A cross-sectional study based on a participatory occupational health program conducted by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (Malaysia) and Universiti Putra Malaysia. Method A modified version of the indoor environmental checklist published by the Department of Occupational Health and Safety, based on the literature and discussion with occupational health and safety professionals, was used in the evaluation process. Summated scores were given according to the cluster analysis and principal component analysis in the characterization of risk. Environmetric techniques was used to classify the risk of variables in the checklist. Identification of the possible source of item pollutants was also evaluated from a semiquantitative approach. Result Hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis resulted in the grouping of factorial components into three clusters (high complaint, moderate-high complaint, moderate complaint), which were further analyzed by discriminant analysis. From this, 15 major variables that influence indoor air quality were determined. Principal component analysis of each cluster revealed that the main factors influencing the high complaint group were fungal-related problems, chemical indoor dispersion, detergent, renovation, thermal comfort, and location of fresh air intake. The moderate-high complaint group showed significant high loading on ventilation, air filters, and smoking-related activities. The moderate complaint group showed high loading on dampness, odor, and thermal comfort. Conclusion This semiquantitative assessment, which graded risk from low to high based on the intensity of the problem, shows promising and reliable results. It should be used as an important tool in the preliminary assessment of indoor air quality and as a

  4. Determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) by application of online 77 K fluorescence spectroscopy and a sweeping technique in micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ching; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2002-10-16

    The principal advantage of the use of Shopl'skii effect (low temperature spectrum) is that spectral sharpening occurs both in absorption and emission. However, thus far using the technique of capillary electrophoresis/low temperature fluorescence spectroscopy (CE/LTFS) either at 77 or 4.2 K remains difficult to obtain an on-line spectrum, if the analyte is present at low concentration. This paper examines the feasibility of combining the techniques of online concentration and CE/LTFS to identify LSD and related compounds in urine at 77 K. To improve sensitivity, sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) and cation-selective exhaustive injection-sweep-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CSEI-sweep-MEKC) were used for on-line concentration which resulted in detection limits of approximately 20 approximately 60 ppt, respectively.

  5. Technique for determination of accurate heat capacities of volatile, powdered, or air-sensitive samples using relaxation calorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriott, Robert A.; Stancescu, Maria; Kennedy, Catherine A.; White, Mary Anne

    2006-09-01

    We introduce a four-step technique for the accurate determination of the heat capacity of volatile or air-sensitive samples using relaxation calorimetry. The samples are encapsulated in a hermetically sealed differential scanning calorimetry pan, in which there is an internal layer of Apiezon N grease to assist thermal relaxation. Using the Quantum Design physical property measurement system to investigate benzoic acid and copper standards, we find that this method can lead to heat capacity determinations accurate to ±2% over the temperature range of 1-300K, even for very small samples (e.g., <10mg and contributing ca. 20% to the total heat capacity).

  6. Laser Scanning–Based Tissue Autofluorescence/Fluorescence Imaging (LS-TAFI), a New Technique for Analysis of Microanatomy in Whole-Mount Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hidetoshi; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Bhat, Ramray; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Seiki, Motoharu; Bissell, Mina J.

    2012-01-01

    Intact organ structure is essential in maintaining tissue specificity and cellular differentiation. Small physiological or genetic variations lead to changes in microanatomy that, if persistent, could have functional consequences and may easily be masked by the heterogeneity of tissue anatomy. Current imaging techniques rely on histological, two-dimensional sections requiring sample manipulation that are essentially two dimensional. We have developed a method for three-dimensional imaging of whole-mount, unsectioned mammalian tissues to elucidate subtle and detailed micro- and macroanatomies in adult organs and embryos. We analyzed intact or dissected organ whole mounts with laser scanning–based tissue autofluorescence/fluorescence imaging (LS-TAFI). We obtained clear visualization of microstructures within murine mammary glands and mammary tumors and other organs without the use of immunostaining and without probes or fluorescent reporter genes. Combining autofluorescence with reflected light signals from chromophore-stained tissues allowed identification of individual cells within three-dimensional structures of whole-mounted organs. This technique could be useful for rapid diagnosis of human clinical samples and possibly the effect of subtle variations such as low dose radiation. PMID:22542846

  7. Bioaerosol DNA Extraction Technique from Air Filters Collected from Marine and Freshwater Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, M.; Crandall, S. G.; Barnes, A.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Bioaerosols are composed of microorganisms suspended in air. Among these organisms include bacteria, fungi, virus, and protists. Microbes introduced into the atmosphere can drift, primarily by wind, into natural environments different from their point of origin. Although bioaerosols can impact atmospheric dynamics as well as the ecology and biogeochemistry of terrestrial systems, very little is known about the composition of bioaerosols collected from marine and freshwater environments. The first step to determine composition of airborne microbes is to successfully extract environmental DNA from air filters. We asked 1) can DNA be extracted from quartz (SiO2) air filters? and 2) how can we optimize the DNA yield for downstream metagenomic sequencing? Aerosol filters were collected and archived on a weekly basis from aquatic sites (USA, Bermuda, Israel) over the course of 10 years. We successfully extracted DNA from a subsample of ~ 20 filters. We modified a DNA extraction protocol (Qiagen) by adding a beadbeating step to mechanically shear cell walls in order to optimize our DNA product. We quantified our DNA yield using a spectrophotometer (Nanodrop 1000). Results indicate that DNA can indeed be extracted from quartz filters. The additional beadbeating step helped increase our yield - up to twice as much DNA product was obtained compared to when this step was omitted. Moreover, bioaerosol DNA content does vary across time. For instance, the DNA extracted from filters from Lake Tahoe, USA collected near the end of June decreased from 9.9 ng/μL in 2007 to 3.8 ng/μL in 2008. Further next-generation sequencing analysis of our extracted DNA will be performed to determine the composition of these microbes. We will also model the meteorological and chemical factors that are good predictors for microbial composition for our samples over time and space.

  8. Injectant mole-fraction imaging in compressible mixing flows using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Abbitt, John D., III; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for imaging the injectant mole-fraction distribution in nonreacting compressible mixing flow fields. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, is induced by a broadband argon-ion laser and collected using an intensified charge-injection-device array camera. The technique eliminates the thermodynamic dependence of the iodine fluorescence in the compressible flow field by taking the ratio of two images collected with identical thermodynamic flow conditions but different iodine seeding conditions.

  9. Pattern recognition techniques for visualizing the biotropic waveform of air temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozheredov, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that long periods of adverse weather have a negative effect on the human cardiovascular system. A number of studies have set a lower limit of around 5 days for the duration of these periods. However, the specific features of the negative dynamics of the main weather characteristics—air temperature and atmospheric pressure—remained open. To address this problem, the present paper proposes a conjunctive method of the theory of pattern recognition. It is shown that this method approaches a globally optimal (in the sense of recognition errors) Neumann critical region and can be used to solve various problems in heliobiology. To illustrate the efficiency of this method, we show that some quickly relaxing short sequences of temperature and pressure time series (the so-called temperature waves and waves of atmospheric pressure changes) increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases and can lead to serious organic lesions (particularly myocardial infarction). It is established that the temperature waves and waves of atmospheric pressure changes increase the average morbidity rate of myocardial infarction by 90% and 110%, respectively. Atmospheric pressure turned out to be a more biotropic factor than air temperature.

  10. A detection method of vegetable oils in edible blended oil based on three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Tian

    2016-12-01

    Edible blended vegetable oils are made from two or more refined oils. Blended oils can provide a wider range of essential fatty acids than single vegetable oils, which helps support good nutrition. Nutritional components in blended oils are related to the type and content of vegetable oils used, and a new, more accurate, method is proposed to identify and quantify the vegetable oils present using cluster analysis and a Quasi-Monte Carlo integral. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra were obtained at 250-400nm (excitation) and 260-750nm (emission). Mixtures of sunflower, soybean and peanut oils were used as typical examples to validate the effectiveness of the method. PMID:27374508

  11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques (FISH) to detect changes in CYP19a gene expression of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber; Zhang, Xiaowei; Newsted, John L.; Jones, Paul D.; Au, Doris; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P. Hecker, Markus

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive in situ hybridization methodology using fluorescence-labeled riboprobes (FISH) that allows for the evaluation of gene expression profiles simultaneously in multiple target tissues of whole fish sections of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). To date FISH methods have been limited in their application due to autofluorescence of tissues, fixatives or other components of the hybridization procedure. An optimized FISH method, based on confocal fluorescence microscopy was developed to reduce the autofluorescence signal. Because of its tissue- and gender-specific expression and relevance in studies of endocrine disruption, gonadal aromatase (CYP19a) was used as a model gene. The in situ hybridization (ISH) system was validated in a test exposure with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole. The optimized FISH method revealed tissue-specific expression of the CYP19a gene. Furthermore, the assay could differentiate the abundance of CYP19a mRNA among cell types. Expression of CYP19a was primarily associated with early stage oocytes, and expression gradually decreased with increasing maturation. No expression of CYP19a mRNA was observed in other tissues such as brain, liver, or testes. Fadrozole (100 {mu}g/L) caused up-regulation of CYP19a expression, a trend that was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on excised tissues. In a combination approach with gonad histology, it could be shown that the increase in CYP19a expression as measured by RT-PCR on a whole tissue basis was due to a combination of both increases in numbers of CYP19a-containing cells and an increase in the amount of CYP19a mRNA present in the cells.

  12. A Centrifuge-Based Technique for Dry Extraction of Air for Ice Core Studies of Carbon Dioxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, A. M.; Brook, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    High resolution CO2 data from the Law Dome ice core document an abrupt ~10 ppm drop in CO2 at about 1600 AD (MacFarling Meure et al., Geophys. Res Lett., v. 33, L14810), which has been attributed to changes in human activities. CO2 measurements in ice cores are difficult, however, making verification of this feature an important task. We are undertaking a high-resolution study of CO2 between 1400 and 1800 AD in the WAIS Divide (Antarctica) ice core with a new dry extraction technique. The need for a dry extraction technique as opposed to a melt-refreeze technique in studies of CO2 from ice cores arises because of the well-documented artifacts in CO2 imposed by the presence of liquid water. Three dry-extraction methods have been employed by previous workers to measure CO2: needle-crushing method, ball-bearings method, and cheese-grater method (B. Stauffer, in: Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science, p. 1181, Elsevier 2007). Each has limitations, and we propose a simpler dry extraction technique, based on a large-capacity refrigerated centrifuge (the "centrifuge technique"), which eliminates the need to employ cryogenic temperatures to collect extracted gas and is more compatible with high sample throughput. The technique is now being tested on ~25-gram WAIS Divide samples in conjunction with CO2 measurements with a gas chromatograph. The technique employs a Beckman J- 6B centrifuge, in which evacuated stainless steel flask is placed: the flask has a weight inside positioned directly over a tall-standing piece of ice whose cross-section is small compared to that of the flask. Upon acceleration to 3000 rpm the weight moves down and presses the ice sample into a thin tablet covering flask's bottom, yielding the air extraction efficiency of ~80%. Preliminary tests suggest that precision and accuracy can be achieved at the level of ~1 ppm once the system is fine-tuned.

  13. A Comprehensive Technique for Forecasting University Enrollment, Instructional Workloads and Funding Levels. AIR Forum 1980 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasher, William F.; And Others

    Analytical techniques developed by the University of Texas at Austin to deal with problems of forecasting future enrollments, instructional workloads, and funding levels are considered. In order to project university enrollments, Texas public high school graduates were projected. In-migration rates were separated from survival rates,…

  14. Use of High Resolution Mobile Monitoring Techniques to Assess Near-Road Air Quality Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a description of the techniques used to develop and conduct effective mobile monitoring studies. It also provides a summary of mobile monitoring assessment studies that have been used to assess near-road concentrations and the variability of pollutant l...

  15. 75 FR 59084 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... Technique Guidelines for Paper, Film, and Foil Coatings AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from paper, film, and foil coatings. Specifically, Maryland is..., Film, and Foil Coatings. These amendments will reduce VOC emissions from this source category....

  16. Use of High Resolution Mobile Monitoring Techniques to Assess Near Road Air Quality Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a description of the techniques used to develop and conduct effective mobile monitoring studies. It also provides a summary of mobile monitoring assessment studies that have been used to assess near-road concentrations and the variability of pollutant l...

  17. Investigation on pretreatment of centrifugal mother liquid produced in the production of polyvinyl chloride by air-Fenton technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingying; Hua, Xiuyi; Ge, Rui; Guo, Aitong; Guo, Zhiyong; Dong, Deming; Sun, Wentian

    2013-08-01

    Centrifugal mother liquid (CML) is one of the main sources of wastewater produced during the production of polyvinyl chloride in chlor-alkali industry. CML is a typical poorly biodegradable organic wastewater, containing many kinds of refractory pollutants. Specifically, it contains dissolved refractory polymers, especially polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), which can pass though the biotreatment processes and clog the membranes used for further treatment. In this study, to ensure the CML applicable to biotreatment and membrane treatment, a novel efficient and mild technique, air-Fenton treatment, was employed as a pretreatment technique to improve biodegradability of the CML and to break down the polymers in the CML. Firstly, the technique was optimized for the CML treatment by optimizing the main parameters, including the dosage of ferrous sulfate, initial pH of the wastewater, [H2O2]/[Fe(2+)], aeration rate, reaction time, and temperature, based on removal efficiency of COD and PVA from the CML. Then, the optimized technique was tested and evaluated. The results indicated that under the optimized conditions, the air-Fenton treatment could remove 66, 98, and 55 % of the COD, PVA, and TOC, respectively, from the CML. After the treatment, biodegradability of the wastewater increased significantly (BOD/COD increased from 0.31 to 0.68), and almost all of the PVA polymers were removed or broken down. Meanwhile, concentration of the remaining iron ions, which were added during the treatment, was also quite low (only 2.9 mg/L). Furthermore, most of the suspended materials and ammonia nitrogen, and some of the phosphorus in the wastewater were removed simultaneously.

  18. Investigation on pretreatment of centrifugal mother liquid produced in the production of polyvinyl chloride by air-Fenton technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingying; Hua, Xiuyi; Ge, Rui; Guo, Aitong; Guo, Zhiyong; Dong, Deming; Sun, Wentian

    2013-08-01

    Centrifugal mother liquid (CML) is one of the main sources of wastewater produced during the production of polyvinyl chloride in chlor-alkali industry. CML is a typical poorly biodegradable organic wastewater, containing many kinds of refractory pollutants. Specifically, it contains dissolved refractory polymers, especially polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), which can pass though the biotreatment processes and clog the membranes used for further treatment. In this study, to ensure the CML applicable to biotreatment and membrane treatment, a novel efficient and mild technique, air-Fenton treatment, was employed as a pretreatment technique to improve biodegradability of the CML and to break down the polymers in the CML. Firstly, the technique was optimized for the CML treatment by optimizing the main parameters, including the dosage of ferrous sulfate, initial pH of the wastewater, [H2O2]/[Fe(2+)], aeration rate, reaction time, and temperature, based on removal efficiency of COD and PVA from the CML. Then, the optimized technique was tested and evaluated. The results indicated that under the optimized conditions, the air-Fenton treatment could remove 66, 98, and 55 % of the COD, PVA, and TOC, respectively, from the CML. After the treatment, biodegradability of the wastewater increased significantly (BOD/COD increased from 0.31 to 0.68), and almost all of the PVA polymers were removed or broken down. Meanwhile, concentration of the remaining iron ions, which were added during the treatment, was also quite low (only 2.9 mg/L). Furthermore, most of the suspended materials and ammonia nitrogen, and some of the phosphorus in the wastewater were removed simultaneously. PMID:23471777

  19. Novel sample preparation technique with needle-type micro-extraction device for volatile organic compounds in indoor air samples.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Ikuo; Mizuguchi, Ayako; Fujimura, Koji; Kawakubo, Susumu; Saito, Yoshihiro

    2012-10-01

    A novel needle-type sample preparation device was developed for the effective preconcentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air before gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. To develop a device for extracting a wide range of VOCs typically found in indoor air, several types of particulate sorbents were tested as the extraction medium in the needle-type extraction device. To determine the content of these VOCs, air samples were collected for 30min with the packed sorbent(s) in the extraction needle, and the extracted VOCs were thermally desorbed in a GC injection port by the direct insertion of the needle. A double-bed sorbent consisting of a needle packed with divinylbenzene and activated carbon particles exhibited excellent extraction and desorption performance and adequate extraction capacity for all the investigated VOCs. The results also clearly demonstrated that the proposed sample preparation method is a more rapid, simpler extraction/desorption technique than traditional sample preparation methods. PMID:22975183

  20. A novel Fast Gas Chromatography based technique for higher time resolution measurements of speciated monoterpenes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic emissions supply the largest fraction of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the biosphere to the atmospheric boundary layer, and typically comprise a complex mixture of reactive terpenes. Due to this chemical complexity, achieving comprehensive measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) in air within a satisfactory time resolution is analytically challenging. To address this, we have developed a novel, fully automated Fast Gas Chromatography (Fast-GC) based technique to provide higher time resolution monitoring of monoterpenes (and selected other C9-C15 terpenes) during plant emission studies and in ambient air. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a Fast-GC based separation technique to achieve quantification of terpenes in air. Three chromatography methods have been developed for atmospheric terpene analysis under different sampling scenarios. Each method facilitates chromatographic separation of selected BVOC within a significantly reduced analysis time compared to conventional GC methods, whilst maintaining the ability to quantify individual monoterpene structural isomers. Using this approach, the C10-C15 BVOC composition of single plant emissions may be characterised within a ~ 14 min analysis time. Moreover, in situ quantification of 12 monoterpenes in unpolluted ambient air may be achieved within an ~ 11 min chromatographic separation time (increasing to ~ 19 min when simultaneous quantification of multiple oxygenated C9-C10 terpenoids is required, and/or when concentrations of anthropogenic VOC are significant). This corresponds to a two- to fivefold increase in measurement frequency compared to conventional GC methods. Here we outline the technical details and analytical capability of this chromatographic approach, and present the first in situ Fast-GC observations of 6 monoterpenes and the oxygenated BVOC linalool in ambient air. During this field deployment within a suburban forest ~ 30 km west of central Tokyo, Japan, the

  1. Photomultiplier tube selection for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array of the Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Maomao; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yingtao; Cao, Zhen; Zhang, Shoushan; Wang, Chong; Bi, Baiyang

    2016-05-01

    For the purpose of selecting the most suitable photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) for the Wide Field of view Cherenkov/fluorescence Telescope Array (WFCTA), we have performed extensive tests on seven models of 25.4 mm PMTs: Hamamatsu R1924A and R7899, Beijing Hamamatsu CR303, CR332A and CR364, and HZC Photonics XP3102 and XP3182. A dedicated test system has been developed to measure the PMT characteristics such as single photo-electron spectrum, gain, linearity, and spatial uniformity of anode output. The XP3182 and CR364 (R7899) tubes both meet the pivotal requirement due to their superior pulse linearity. The PMT test system, techniques used for these measurements, and their results are also reported.

  2. Application of ion chemistry and the SIFT technique to the quantitative analysis of trace gases in air and on breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    Our major objective in this paper is to describe a new method we have developed for the analysis of trace gases at partial pressures down to the ppb level in atmospheric air, with special emphasis on the detection and quantification of trace gases on human breath. It involves the use of our selected ion flow tube (Sift) technique which we previously developed and used extensively for the study of gas phase ionic reactions occurring in ionized media such as the terrestrial atmosphere and interstellar gas clouds. Before discussing this analytical technique we describe the results of our very recent Sift and flowing afterglow (FA) studies of the reactions of the H3O+ and OH- ions, of their hydrates H3O+(H2O)1,2,3 and OH- (H2O)1,2, and of NO+ and O2+, with several hydrocarbons and oxygen-bearing organic molecules, studies that are very relevant to our trace gas analytical studies. Then follows a detailed discussion of the application of our Sift technique to trace gas analysis, after which we present some results obtained for the analyses of laboratory air, the breath of a healthy non-smoking person, the breath of a person who regularly smokes cigarettes, the complex vapours emitted by banana and onion, and the molecules present in a butane/air flame. We show how the quantitative analysis of breath can be achieved from only a single exhalation and in real time (the time response of the instrument is only about 20 ms). We also show how the time variation of breath gases over long time periods can be followed, using the decay of ethanol on the breath after the ingestion of distilled liquor as an example, yet simultaneously following several other trace gases including acetone and isoprene which are very easily detected on the breath of all individuals because of their relatively high partial pressures (typically 100 to 1000 ppb). The breath of a smoker is richer in complex molecules, some nitrogen containing organics apparently being very evident at the 5 to 50 ppb level

  3. Testing an advanced satellite technique for dust detection as a decision support system for the air quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Femiano, Rossella; Marchese, Francesco; Sannazzaro, Filomena; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio; Di Muro, Ersilia; Divietri, Mariella; Crisci, Anna Maria; Lovallo, Michele; Mangiamele, Lucia; Vaccaro, Maria Pia; Palma, Achille

    2014-05-01

    In order to correctly apply the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE), local Authorities are often requested to discriminate the possible origin (natural/anthropic) of anomalous concentration of pollutants in the air (art.20 Directive 2008/50/CE). In this framework, it's been focused on PM10 and PM2,5 concentrations and sources. In fact, depending on their origin, appropriate counter-measures can be taken devoted to prevent their production (e.g. by traffic restriction) or simply to reduce their impact on citizen health (e.g. information campaigns). In this context suitable satellite techniques can be used in order to identify natural sources (particularly Saharan dust, but also volcanic ash or forest fire smoke) that can be responsible of over-threshold concentration of PM10/2,5 in populated areas. In the framework of the NIBS (Networking and Internationalization of Basilicata Space Technologies) project, funded by the Basilicata Region within the ERDF 2007-2013 program, the School of Engineering of University of Basilicata, the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis of National Research Council (IMAA-CNR) and the Regional Agency for the Protection of the Environment of Basilicata Region (ARPAB) have started a collaboration devoted to assess the potential of the use of advanced satellite techniques for Saharan dust events identification to support ARPAB activities related to the application of the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE) in Basilicata region. In such a joint activity, the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) approach has been assessed and tested as a decision support system for monitoring and evaluating air quality at local and regional level. In particular, RST-DUST products, derived by processing high temporal resolution data provided by SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) sensor on board Meteosat Second Generation platforms, have been analysed together with PM10 measurements performed by the ground

  4. The application of remote sensing techniques for air pollution analysis and climate change on Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palve, S. N.; Nemade, P. D., Dr.; Ghude, S. D., Dr.

    2016-06-01

    India is home to an extraordinary variety of climatic regions, ranging from tropical in the south to temperate and alpine in the Himalayan north, where elevated regions receive sustained winter snowfall. The subcontinent is characterized by high levels of air pollution due to intensively developing industries and mass fuel consumption for domestic purposes. The main tropospheric pollutants (O3, NO2, CO, formaldehyde (HCHO) and SO2) and two major greenhouse gases (tropospheric O3 and methane (CH4)) and important parameters of aerosols, which play a key role in climate change and affecting on the overall well-being of subcontinent residents. In light of considering these facts this paper aims to investigate possible impact of air pollutants over the climate change on Indian subcontinent. Satellite derived column aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a cost effective way to monitor and study aerosols distribution and effects over a long time period. AOD is found to be increasing rapidly since 2000 in summer season that may cause adverse effect to the agricultural crops and also to the human health. Increased aerosol loading may likely affect the rainfall which is responsible for the observed drought conditions over the Indian subcontinent. Carbon monoxide is emitted into the atmosphere by biomass burning activities and India is the second largest contributor of CO emissions in Asia. The MOPITT CO retrievals at 850 hPa show large CO emission from the IG region. The development of convective activity associated with the ASM leads to large scale vertical transport of the boundary layer CO from the Indian region into the upper troposphere. TCO over the Indian subcontinent during 2007 has a systematic and gradual variation, spatial as well as temporal. Higher amount of TCO in the northern latitudes and simultaneous lower TCO at near equatorial latitudes indicates depletion of ozone near the equator and accumulation at higher latitudes within the subcontinent. In addition, changes

  5. Demonstration of a stabilized alumina/ethanol colloidal dispersion technique for seeding high temperature air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.; Wernet, Judith H.

    1995-01-01

    Laser anemometry enables the measurement of complex flow fields via the light scattered from small particles entrained in the flow. In the study of turbomachinery, refractory seed materials are required for seeding the flow due to the high temperatures encountered. In this work we present a pH stabilization technique commonly employed in ceramic processing to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized, produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. Other metal oxide powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined. Laser anemometry measurements obtained using the new seeding technique are compared to measurements obtained using Polystyrene Latex (PSL) spheres as the seed material.

  6. Fluorescent protein tagging of endogenous protein in brain neurons using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in and in utero electroporation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mori, Takuma; Kurihara, Taiga; Kawase, Shiori; Koike, Rie; Satoga, Michiru; Cao, Xueshan; Li, Xue; Yanagawa, Toru; Sakurai, Takayuki; Shindo, Takayuki; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is a powerful technique for studying gene functions. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knock-in has recently been applied to various cells and organisms. Here, we successfully knocked in an EGFP coding sequence at the site immediately after the first ATG codon of the β-actin gene in neurons in the brain by the combined use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and in utero electroporation technique, resulting in the expression of the EGFP-tagged β-actin protein in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. We detected EGFP fluorescence signals in the soma and neurites of EGFP knock-in neurons. These signals were particularly abundant in the head of dendritic spines, corresponding to the localization of the endogenous β-actin protein. EGFP knock-in neurons showed no detectable changes in spine density and basic electrophysiological properties. In contrast, exogenously overexpressed EGFP-β-actin showed increased spine density and EPSC frequency, and changed resting membrane potential. Thus, our technique provides a potential tool to elucidate the localization of various endogenous proteins in neurons by epitope tagging without altering neuronal and synaptic functions. This technique can be also useful for introducing a specific mutation into genes to study the function of proteins and genomic elements in brain neurons. PMID:27782168

  7. UPb ages of zircon rims: A new analytical method using the air-abrasion technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Winegarden, D.L.; Walter, M.

    1990-01-01

    We present a new technique for directly dating, by conventional techniques, the rims of zircons. Several circumstances, such as a xenocrystic or inherited component in igneous zircon and metamorphic overgrowths on igneous cores, can result in grains with physically distinct age components. Pneumatic abrasion has been previously shown by Krogh to remove overgrowths and damaged areas of zircon, leaving more resistant and isotopically less disturbed parts available for analysis. A new abrader design, which is capable of very gently grinding only tips and interfacial edges of even needle-like grains, permits easy collection of abraded material for dating. Five examples demonstrate the utility of the "dust-collecting" technique, including two studies that compare conventional, ion microprobe and abrader data. Common Pb may be strongly concentrated in the outermost zones of many zircons and this Pb is not easily removed by leaching (even in weak HF). Thus, the benefit of removing only the outermost zones (and avoiding mixing of age components) is somewhat compromised by the much higher common Pb contents which result in less precise age determinations. A very brief abrasion to remove the high common Pb zones prior to collection of material for dating is selected. ?? 1990.

  8. Detection of Legionella species in reclaimed water and air with the EnviroAmp Legionella PCR kit and direct fluorescent antibody staining.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, C J; Bonilla, G F; Roll, B; Paszko-Kolva, C; Sangermano, L R; Fujioka, R S

    1995-01-01

    Reclaimed water is an important resource for areas with inadequate water supplies. However, there have been few studies on the variety of microorganisms found in this type of water, since typically reclaimed water is examined only for the presence of coliform bacteria. Many microorganisms, including the legionellae, are known to be more resistant to chlorine than are coliform bacteria. Previously, we detected > 10(3) Legionella cells per ml in primary and secondary sewage effluents and observed no significant reduction in population numbers throughout the treatment process. In this study, we detected Legionella spp. in chlorinated effluent by using an EnviroAmp Legionella PCR kit and direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) staining. However, we were not able to isolate Legionella spp. from either natural or seeded reclaimed water samples. This suggests that the Legionella spp. detected by the PCR and DFA methods may be injured or viable but nonculturable after exposure to the high residual chlorine levels typically found in this type of water source. The numbers of coliform bacteria were low (< 2 cells per 100 ml) in most reclaimed water samples and were not correlated with the presence or absence of Legionella spp. We also collected air samples from above a secondary aeration basin and analyzed them by using the PCR, DFA, and plate culture methods. Legionella spp. were detected in the air obtained from above the secondary basin with all three methods. We concluded that the PCR was superior to the culture and DFA methods for detecting Legionella spp. in environmental water samples. PMID:7574578

  9. Application of the fluorescent-antibody technique to the study of a methanogenic bacterium in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Strayer, R F; Tiedje, J M

    1978-01-01

    Fluorescent antibody (FA) was prepared for a methanogenic bacterium isolated from Wintergreen Lake pelagic sediment. The isolate resembles Methanobacterium formicicum. The FA did not cross-react with 9 other methanogens, including M. formicicum strains, or 24 heterotrophs, 18 of which had been isolated from Wintergreen Lake sediment. FA-reacting methanogens were detected in heat-fixed smears of several different lake sediments and anaerobic sewage sludge. Pretreatment of all samples with either rhodamine-conjugated geletin or bovine serum albumin adequately controlled nonspecific absorption of the FA. Autofluorescent particles were observed in the sediment samples but, with experience, they could easily be distinguished from FA-reacting bacteria. FA direct counts of the specific methanogen in Wintergreen Lake sediments were made on four different sampling dates and compared with five-tube most-probable-number estimates of the total methanogenic population that was present in the same samples. The FA counts ranged from 3.1 X 10(6) to 1.4 X 10(7)/g of dry sediment. The highest most-probable-number estimates were at least an order ofmagnitude lower.

  10. Fluorescence Visual Detection of Herbal Product Substitutions at Terminal Herbal Markets by CCP-based FRET technique

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Guang; Jin, Yan; Liu, Libing; Zhao, Yuyang; Huang, Luqi

    2016-01-01

    Inaccurate labeling of materials used in herbal products may compromise the therapeutic efficacy and may pose a threat to medicinal safety. In this paper, a rapid (within 3 h), sensitive and visual colorimetric method for identifying substitutions in terminal market products was developed using cationic conjugated polymer-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (CCP-based FRET). Chinese medicinal materials with similar morphology and chemical composition were clearly distinguished by the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping method. Assays using CCP-based FRET technology showed a high frequency of adulterants in Lu-Rong (52.83%) and Chuan-Bei-Mu (67.8%) decoction pieces, and patented Chinese drugs (71.4%, 5/7) containing Chuan-Bei-Mu ingredients were detected in the terminal herbal market. In comparison with DNA sequencing, this protocol simplifies procedures by eliminating the cumbersome workups and sophisticated instruments, and only a trace amount of DNA is required. The CCP-based method is particularly attractive because it can detect adulterants in admixture samples with high sensitivity. Therefore, the CCP-based detection system shows great potential for routine terminal market checks and drug safety controls. PMID:27765955

  11. Assessment of serum selenium levels in 2-month-old sucking calves using total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoso, M. C.; Ceccato, D.; Moschini, G.; Bernardini, D.; Testoni, S.; Torboli, A.; Valdes, M.

    2001-11-01

    The assessment of selenium status of livestock plays an important role in the production of medicine since low serum Se levels influence disease resistance in ruminants. It has been proved that Se deficiency may cause muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy and even death. Serum level has been widely used to evaluate the Se short-term status in animals since there is a good association between serum Se level and the dietary intake of the element over a wide range. The purpose of this work was to determine the Se serum concentration in a population of 78 sucking 2-month-old calves, in order to corroborate a clinical diagnosis of severe deficiency status. The samples were analyzed by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) at the ITAL STRUCTURES Research Laboratory. The results obtained from the serum samples presented Se concentrations varying from 10 to 66 ng/ml. The comparison between the obtained values and the expected serum selenium values (60-80 ng/ml), confirmed a mild to severe deficiency status in the investigated population.

  12. Investigation of high-contrast velocity selective optical pumping resonance at the cycling transition of Cs using fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Saswati; Ray, Biswajit; Ghosh, Pradip Narayan; Cartaleva, Stefka; Slavov, Dimitar

    2015-12-01

    A high contrast (∼48%) Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonance at the closed transition Fg=4→Fe=5 of Cs-D2 line is obtained in the fluorescence signal under co-propagating pump-probe configuration. We use a 5.2 μm cell operating at reduced temperature (∼55 °C) and the intensity of the pump-laser is kept lower than that of the probe-laser. The observed sharp narrow structure is suitable for side-arms frequency-locking of the cooling- (i.e. probe-) laser in a cold atom experiment, with possibility for "-Γ" to "-4Γ" red-detuning and "+Γ" to "+10Γ" blue-detuning using the standard properties of the commercially available electronics. We have developed a theoretical model corresponding to the thin cell, incorporating the atomic time-of-flight dependent optical pumping decay rate to describe the dimensional anisotropy of the thin cell. The model shows good qualitative agreement with the observation and simulates as well the cases of cells with smaller thickness. It also describes correctly the temperature dependence of the line broadening and shows the potential for further optimization and red-shift detuning above "-4Γ". It may be of interest for further development of miniaturized modules, like the recently developed portable small magneto-optical traps.

  13. Direct observation of oil consumption mechanisms in a production spark ignition engine using fluorescence techniques. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lusted, R.M.

    1994-05-01

    The oil consumption characteristics of a four cylinder, normally aspirated spark-ignition engine were investigated for different piston ring end-gap configurations. A radiotracer was used to perform direct measurement of the oil consumption while Laser-induced Fluorescence (LIF) was used to perform the oil film thickness measurements for consumption predictions using the 'Puddle Theory of Oil Consumption,' which relates oil consumption to second land film thickness and reverse flow through top ring gap. The consumption data was evaluated to determine the impact of top ring end-gap azimuthal location on oil consumption. The film thickness data was used to evaluate the extent to which the oil Puddle Theory predicts variations seen in the actual oil consumption. A tritium radiotracer oil consumption measurement system with an accuracy of 94.6% was designed and constructed. This was used to perform direct measurements of the test engine oil consumption in two different test matrices. The first evaluated a piston ring configuration with the rings free to rotate. The second evaluated configurations with the top ring and second piston rings pinned to fix the azimuthal location of the end-gap; the azimuth of the top ring was varied. In the second test matrix, the oil film thickness on the piston's second land was measured, and predictions were made on the basis of that measurement.

  14. Rapid Detection and Identification of Streptococcus Iniae Using a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is among the major pathogens of a large number of fish species cultured in fresh and marine recirculating and net pen production systems . The traditional plate culture technique to detect and identify S. iniae is time consuming and may be problematic due to phenotypic variations...

  15. Portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy as a rapid screening technique for analysis of TiO2 and ZnO in sunscreens

    PubMed Central

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Lim, Jin-Hee; Quevedo, Ivan R.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Linder, Sean W.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation reports a rapid and simple screening technique for the quantification of titanium and zinc in commercial sunscreens using portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (pXRF). A highly evolved technique, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was chosen as a comparative technique to pXRF, and a good correlation (r2 > 0.995) with acceptable variations (≤25%) in results between both techniques was observed. Analytical figures of merit such as detection limit, quantitation limit, and linear range of the method are reported for the pXRF technique. This method has a good linearity (r2 > 0.995) for the analysis of titanium (Ti) in the range of 0.4–14.23 wt%, and zinc (Zn) in the range of 1.0–23.90 wt%. However, most commercial sunscreens contain organic ingredients, and these ingredients are known to cause matrix effects. The development of appropriate matrix matched working standards to obtain the calibration curve was found to be a major challenge for the pXRF measurements. In this study, we have overcome the matrix effect by using metal-free commercial sunscreens as a dispersing media for the preparation of working standards. An easy extension of this unique methodology for preparing working standards in different matrices was also reported. This method is simple, rapid, and cost-effective and, in comparison to conventional techniques (e.g., ICP-MS), did not generate toxic wastes during sample analysis. PMID:27076699

  16. Adaptive critic learning techniques for engine torque and air-fuel ratio control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Javaherian, Hossein; Kovalenko, Olesia; Huang, Ting

    2008-08-01

    A new approach for engine calibration and control is proposed. In this paper, we present our research results on the implementation of adaptive critic designs for self-learning control of automotive engines. A class of adaptive critic designs that can be classified as (model-free) action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming is used in this research project. The goals of the present learning control design for automotive engines include improved performance, reduced emissions, and maintained optimum performance under various operating conditions. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we developed a neural network model of the engine and neural network controllers based on the idea of approximate dynamic programming to achieve optimal control. We have developed and simulated self-learning neural network controllers for both engine torque (TRQ) and exhaust air-fuel ratio (AFR) control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values. For both control problems, excellent neural network controller transient performance has been achieved.

  17. Continuous Monitoring of Specific mRNA Expression Responses with a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based DNA Nano-tweezer Technique That Does Not Require Gene Recombination.

    PubMed

    Shigeto, Hajime; Nakatsuka, Keisuke; Ikeda, Takeshi; Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Funabashi, Hisakage

    2016-08-16

    This letter discusses the feasibility of continuously monitoring specific mRNA expression responses in a living cell with a probe structured as a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based DNA nano-tweezer (DNA-NT). The FRET-based DNA-NT, self-assembled from three single-stranded DNAs, alters its structure from an open state to a closed state in recognition of a target mRNA, resulting in the closing of the distal relation of previously modified FRET-paired fluorescent dyes and generating a FRET signal. The expressions of glucose transporters (GLUT) 1 and 4 in a mouse hepato-carcinoma (Hepa 1-6 cells) were selected as the target model. Live-cell imaging analysis of Hepa 1-6 cells with both FRET-based DNA-NTs indicated that the behaviors of the FRET signals integrated in each individual cell were similar to those measured with the conventional mass analysis technique of semiquantitative real-time (RT) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From these results, it is concluded that continuous monitoring of gene expression response without gene recombination is feasible with a FRET-based DNA-NT, even in a single cell manner. PMID:27458920

  18. Development of a new Laser Photofragmentation/Fluorescent Assay by Gas Expansion (LP/FAGE) technique for the quantification of tropospheric nitrous acid (HONO) at low parts-per-trillion mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, L. H.; Lew, M.; Bottorff, B.; Berke, A.; Raff, J. D.; Stevens, P. S.; Dusanter, S.

    2013-12-01

    Determining the full oxidative capacity of the atmosphere is vital to understanding the production of secondary pollutants such as ozone and secondary organic aerosols and for regulating the lifetime of pollutants leading to climate change. The hydroxyl radical is the primary oxidant of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the troposphere. Nocturnal nitrous acid (HONO) is an important radical reservoir species and releases OH upon photolysis the next morning. In addition, recent studies have indicated higher than expected mixing ratios of HONO in the daytime. As daytime HONO mixing ratios usually maximize at only a couple hundred part-per-trillion, it is important to have a technique that is accurate, sensitive, and precise. Here we outline an instrumental technique called Laser Photofragmention/Fluorescent Assay by Gas Expansion (LP/FAGE). Ambient air is drawn through an inlet composed of a 1' diameter metal disk with a 0.025' cylindrically bored hole where it undergoes expansion into a cell held at ~3 torr. Fiber coupled laser emission (YILF: 355 nm, 2.2 W) induces photofragmentation of HONO to OH and NO whereby the OH is quantified by the FAGE technique using a fiber coupled 308 nm (6 mW) laser emission. The 355 nm and 308 nm emission are single pass, collinear, and separated only by the time delay of the pulses. To differentiate ambient OH from HONO-generated-OH, a shutter is used to block the 355 nm laser emission for a given period of time. Fluorescence from OH vs. fluorescence from interfering species can be differentiated by scanning on and off a specific rovibronic feature in the OH absorbance spectra. In this presentation we outline the instrumental technique, including its calibration in which effluent from an HCl permeation device is humidified and passed over a bed of sodium nitrate coated glass beads. The calibrator output is varied from 1 to several tens of parts-per-billions (ppb) and is detected using a chemiluminescence NOx analyzer. The

  19. Application of a data-driven monitoring technique to diagnose air leaks in an automotive diesel engine: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antory, David

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a case study of the application of a data-driven monitoring technique to diagnose air leaks in an automotive diesel engine. Using measurement signals taken from the sensors/actuators which are present in a modern automotive vehicle, a data-driven diagnostic model is built for condition monitoring purposes. Detailed investigations have shown that measured signals taken from the experimental test-bed often contain redundant information and noise due to the nature of the process. In order to deliver a clear interpretation of these measured signals, they therefore need to undergo a 'compression' and an 'extraction' stage in the modelling process. It is at this stage that the proposed data-driven monitoring technique plays a significant role by taking only the important information of the original measured signals for fault diagnosis purposes. The status of the engine's performance is then monitored using this diagnostic model. This condition monitoring process involves two separate stages of fault detection and root-cause diagnosis. The effectiveness of this diagnostic model was validated using an experimental automotive 1.9 L four-cylinder diesel engine embedded in a chassis dynamometer in an engine test-bed. Two joint diagnostics plots were used to provide an accurate and sensitive fault detection process. Using the proposed model, small air leaks in the inlet manifold plenum chamber with a diameter size of 2-6 mm were accurately detected. Further analyses using contribution to T2 and Q statistics show the effect of these air leaks on fuel consumption. It was later discovered that these air leaks may contribute to emissions fault. In comparison to the existing model-based approaches, the proposed method has several benefits: (i) it makes no simplifying assumptions, as the model is built entirely from the measured signals; (ii) it is simple and straight-forward; (iii) there is no additional hardware required for modelling; (iv) it is a time and

  20. Laboratory evaluation of a field-portable sealed source X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for determination of metals in air filter samples.

    PubMed

    Lawryk, Nicholas J; Feng, H Amy; Chen, Bean T

    2009-07-01

    Recent advances in field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP XRF) spectrometer technology have made it a potentially valuable screening tool for the industrial hygienist to estimate worker exposures to airborne metals. Although recent studies have shown that FP XRF technology may be better suited for qualitative or semiquantitative analysis of airborne lead in the workplace, these studies have not extensively addressed its ability to measure other elements. This study involved a laboratory-based evaluation of a representative model FP XRF spectrometer to measure elements commonly encountered in workplace settings that may be collected on air sample filter media, including chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc. The evaluation included assessments of (1) response intensity with respect to location on the probe window, (2) limits of detection for five different filter media, (3) limits of detection as a function of analysis time, and (4) bias, precision, and accuracy estimates. Teflon, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, and mixed cellulose ester filter media all had similarly low limits of detection for the set of elements examined. Limits of detection, bias, and precision generally improved with increasing analysis time. Bias, precision, and accuracy estimates generally improved with increasing element concentration. Accuracy estimates met the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion for nearly all the element and concentration combinations. Based on these results, FP XRF spectrometry shows potential to be useful in the assessment of worker inhalation exposures to other metals in addition to lead. PMID:19387888

  1. Laboratory evaluation of a field-portable sealed source X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for determination of metals in air filter samples.

    PubMed

    Lawryk, Nicholas J; Feng, H Amy; Chen, Bean T

    2009-07-01

    Recent advances in field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP XRF) spectrometer technology have made it a potentially valuable screening tool for the industrial hygienist to estimate worker exposures to airborne metals. Although recent studies have shown that FP XRF technology may be better suited for qualitative or semiquantitative analysis of airborne lead in the workplace, these studies have not extensively addressed its ability to measure other elements. This study involved a laboratory-based evaluation of a representative model FP XRF spectrometer to measure elements commonly encountered in workplace settings that may be collected on air sample filter media, including chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc. The evaluation included assessments of (1) response intensity with respect to location on the probe window, (2) limits of detection for five different filter media, (3) limits of detection as a function of analysis time, and (4) bias, precision, and accuracy estimates. Teflon, polyvinyl chloride, polypropylene, and mixed cellulose ester filter media all had similarly low limits of detection for the set of elements examined. Limits of detection, bias, and precision generally improved with increasing analysis time. Bias, precision, and accuracy estimates generally improved with increasing element concentration. Accuracy estimates met the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health criterion for nearly all the element and concentration combinations. Based on these results, FP XRF spectrometry shows potential to be useful in the assessment of worker inhalation exposures to other metals in addition to lead.

  2. Quantitative measurements of one-dimensional OH absolute concentration profiles in a methane/air flat flame by bi-directional laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xin; Yang, Zhen; Peng, Jiang-Bo; Zhang, Lei; Ma, Yu-Fei; Yang, Chao-Bo; Li, Xiao-Hui; Sun, Rui

    2015-11-01

    The one-dimensional (1D) spatial distributions of OH absolute concentration in methane/air laminar premixed flat flame under different equivalence ratios at atmospheric pressure are investigated by using bi-directional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection scheme combined with the direct absorption spectroscopy. The effective peak absorption cross section and the average temperature at a height of 2 mm above the burner are obtained by exciting absorption on the Q1(8) rotational line in the A2Σ+ (ʋ‧ = 0) ← X2Π (ʋ″ = 0) at 309.240 nm. The measured values are 1.86×10-15 cm2 and 1719 K, respectively. Spatial filtering and frequency filtering methods of reducing noise are used to deal with the experimental data, and the smoothing effects are also compared using the two methods. The spatial distribution regularities of OH concentration are obtained with the equivalence ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.3. The spatial resolution of the measured result is 84 μm. Finally, a comparison is made between the experimental result of this paper and other relevant study results. Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Projects of China (Grant No. 2012YQ040164), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61275127 and 91441130), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M560262), and the Postdoctoral Fellowship in Heilongjiang Province, China (Grant No. LBH-Z14074).

  3. On-line identification of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in tablets using a combination of a sweeping technique and micellar electrokinetic chromatography/77 K fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ching; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2003-03-01

    This work describes a novel method for the accurate determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in tablets. A technique involving sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) was used for the initial on-line concentration and separation, after which a cryogenic molecular fluorescence experiment was performed at 77 K. Using this approach, not only the separation of LSD from the tablet extract was achieved, but on-line spectra were readily distinguishable and could be unambiguously assigned. The results are in agreement with analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thus, this method, which was found to be accurate, sensitive and rapid, has the potential for use as a reliable complementary method to GC-MS in such analyses.

  4. Determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in mouse blood by capillary electrophoresis/ fluorescence spectroscopy with sweeping techniques in micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ching; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Chou, Shiu-Huey; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2003-03-01

    The separation and on-line concentration of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in mouse blood was achieved by means of capillary electrophoresis/fluorescence spectroscopy using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the surfactant. Techniques involving on-line sample concentration, including sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) and cation-selective exhaustive injection-sweep-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CSEI-sweep-MEKC) were applied; the optimum on-line concentration and separation conditions were determined. In the analysis of an actual sample, LSD was found in a blood sample from a test mouse (0.1 mg LSD fed to a 20 g mouse; approximately 1/10 to the value of LD(50)). As a result, 120 and 30 ng/mL of LSD was detected at 20 and 60 min, respectively, after ingestion of the doses.

  5. Proton induced monochromatic X-rays: A technique for solving interference problems in X-ray fluorescence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydas, A. G.; Paradellis, T.

    1999-06-01

    With PIXE and EDXRF techniques excellent sensitivities for most of the elements in a wide range of matrix sample compositions can be obtained. Despite this, in some cases, strong interferences originating from the presence in the matrix of an element with high concentration, can limit these sensitivities considerably. A combination of the above techniques, PIXE and XRF, seems to be the most efficient solution to this problem. By choosing the primary target properly, protons can produce an intense, almost monoenergetic exciting X-ray radiation, which in several cases selectively excites the elements of interest in the sample and overcomes the production of X-rays of the element dominating the matrix. The application of this technique to specific interference problems, either in the characterization of thin films deposited onto various substrates (YBaCuO film onto LaAlO3 crystal and a MgF2 film onto a SiO2 matrix) or in the determination of trace elements in a high Z thick matrix (copper) is discussed.

  6. Planar Sauter Mean Diameter measurements in liquid centered swirl coaxial injector using Laser Induced Fluorescence, Mie scattering and laser diffraction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kamalakannan; Banda, Manoj Venkata Krishna; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-06-01

    An experimental technique is carried out to demonstrate the measurement of planar Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD or D32) distribution in a liquid centered swirl coaxial injector (LCSC) using simultaneous measurements of Mie scattering, Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) and Laser diffraction technique (LDT). Here water is used as the test fluid with addition of optimized quantities of the organic dye (Rhodamine 6 g) for PLIF measurements. Experiments are carried out at three experimental conditions with momentum flux ratios of 6.25, 12.14, and 19.95 respectively. Experiments are carried out to study the effect of dye concentration in LDT. LDT (line of sight) is corrected for multiple scattering effects. The SMD distribution obtained from Liquid Sheet Drop Sizing (LSDS) technique is calibrated using LDT (Malvern particle analyzer) that utilizes the principle of diffraction; the results obtained from both the methods are compared and analyzed using the respective histograms. The variations in the distribution of droplet diameter along the axial and radial locations in the spray field are also studied in detail.

  7. Application of the radioisotope excited X-ray fluorescence technique in charge optimization during thermite smelting of Fe-Ni, Fe-cr, and Fe-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, I.G.; Joseph, D.; Lal, M.; Bose, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    A wide range of ferroalloys are used to facilitate the addition of different alloying elements to molten steel. High-carbon ferroalloys are produced on a tonnage basis by carbothermic smelting in an electric furnace, and an aluminothermic route is generally adopted for small scale production of low-carbon varieties. The physicochemical principles of carbothermy and aluminothermy have been well documented in the literature. However, limited technical data are reported on the production of individual ferroalloys of low-carbon varieties from their selected resources. The authors demonstrate her the application of an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique in meeting the analytical requirements of a thermite smelting campaign, carried out with the aim of preparing low-carbon-low-nitrogen Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr, and Fe-Ti alloys from indigenously available nickel bearing spent catalyst, mineral chromite, and ilmenite/rutile, respectively. They have chosen the EDXRF technique to meet the analytical requirements because of its capability to analyze samples of ore, minerals, a metal, and alloys in different forms, such as powder, sponge, as-smelted, or as-cast, to obtain rapid multielement analyses with ease. Rapid analyses of thermite feed and product by this technique have aided in the appropriate alterations of the charge constitutents to obtain optimum charge consumption.

  8. Temperature effect on thin lipid film elasticity and phase separation: insights from Langmuir monolayer and fluorescence microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattari, Z.; Maghrabi, M.; Al-Abdullah, T.

    2015-07-01

    Langmuir monolayer pressure isotherms and compressibility modulus measurements of phospholipid mixtures in several Langmuir monolayer systems at the air/water interface were investigated in this study. The ultimate aim was to carry out a comparison of the elasticity modulus for monolayers with different mixtures of l,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), l,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and chicken egg yolk sphingomyelin (eSM), in the presence/absence of cholesterol (Chol). In particular, we were able to propose that the leading force beyond the phase separation into liquid expanded (LE-) and liquid condensed (LC-) phases emerges from the increasing barrier to incorporate DOPC molecules into a highly ordered LC-phase. In addition, our findings suggest that DOPC lipid molecules have a priority to incorporate in a disordered LE-phase, while DPPC and eSM prefer the ordered one. Also, Chol seems to split almost equally into both phases, indicating that Chol has no priority for either phase and there are no particular interactions between Chol and saturated lipid molecules.

  9. Techniques to assess cross-border air pollution and application to a US-Mexico border region.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, S; Shadwick, D S; Smith, L A; Somerville, M C; Dean, K E; Bowser, J J

    2001-08-10

    A year-long assessment of cross-border air pollution was conducted in the eastmost section of the US-Mexico border region, known as the Lower Rio Grande Valley, in South Texas. Measurements were conducted on the US side and included fine particle mass (PM2.5) and elemental composition, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and meteorology. Wind sector analyses of chemical tracers and diagnostic ratios, in addition to principal component analysis (PCA), were initially applied to assess cross-border and overall air shed influences. Linear-angular correlation statistics [Biometrika, 63, (1976), 403-405] and nonparametric multiple comparisons between wind sectors were computed with the particle element data using principal component scores from PCA to determine the direction of source classes. Findings suggest crustal particles and salts carried or stirred by sea breeze winds from a southerly and southeasterly direction from the Gulf of Mexico heavily influenced the elemental composition of the particulate samples. Pair-wise comparisons of wind directions for the principal component scores suggest possible oil combustion influences from utilities or boilers coming from the south and possible coal combustion influences from the north and northwest. The techniques discussed can provide a methodology to assess future ambient levels and cross-border influences in the Valley as conditions change. PMID:11516137

  10. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  11. Techniques to assess cross-border air pollution and application to a US-Mexico border region.

    PubMed

    Mukerjee, S; Shadwick, D S; Smith, L A; Somerville, M C; Dean, K E; Bowser, J J

    2001-08-10

    A year-long assessment of cross-border air pollution was conducted in the eastmost section of the US-Mexico border region, known as the Lower Rio Grande Valley, in South Texas. Measurements were conducted on the US side and included fine particle mass (PM2.5) and elemental composition, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and meteorology. Wind sector analyses of chemical tracers and diagnostic ratios, in addition to principal component analysis (PCA), were initially applied to assess cross-border and overall air shed influences. Linear-angular correlation statistics [Biometrika, 63, (1976), 403-405] and nonparametric multiple comparisons between wind sectors were computed with the particle element data using principal component scores from PCA to determine the direction of source classes. Findings suggest crustal particles and salts carried or stirred by sea breeze winds from a southerly and southeasterly direction from the Gulf of Mexico heavily influenced the elemental composition of the particulate samples. Pair-wise comparisons of wind directions for the principal component scores suggest possible oil combustion influences from utilities or boilers coming from the south and possible coal combustion influences from the north and northwest. The techniques discussed can provide a methodology to assess future ambient levels and cross-border influences in the Valley as conditions change.

  12. Investigating Early/Middle Bronze Age copper and bronze axes by micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and neutron imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Elin; Pereira, Marco A. Stanojev; Lopes, Filipa; Marques, José G.; Santos, Joana P.; Araújo, M. Fátima; Silva, Rui J. C.; Senna-Martinez, João C.

    2016-08-01

    Micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) analysis and neutron imaging techniques, namely 2D radiography and 3D tomography, have been applied for the study of four metal axes from the Early/Middle Bronze Age in Western Iberia, a period characterized by a metallurgical change in the use of copper to bronze. Micro-XRF analysis has shown that one of the axes was produced in copper with some arsenic while the other three were produced in a copper-tin alloy (bronze) with variable tin contents and some arsenic and lead. Neutron radiography and tomography were applied to study internal heterogeneities of the axes in a non-invasive way since the specificities of neutron interaction with matter allow a suitable penetration of these relatively thick copper-based objects when compared to the use of a conventional X-ray radiography. Neutron imaging allowed the visualization of internal fissures and pores and the evaluation of their distribution, size and shape. Relevant information for the reconstruction of ancient manufacturing techniques was gathered, revealing that one ax was produced with the mold in an angle of ≈ 25°, probably to facilitate gas escape during metal pouring. Also, information regarding physical weaknesses of the axes was collected, providing relevant data for their conservation. The combination of these non-destructive techniques allowed the evaluation of the metal composition and the internal structure of the axes. Micro-XRF allowed the distinction among copper and bronze axes, and provided data about the composition of early bronzes for which data is scarce. The neutron imaging study allowed for the first time the visualization of internal heterogeneities in early bronze axes, namely pores and large voids, providing relevant information for the reconstruction of ancient manufacturing techniques and raising pertinent information regarding physical weaknesses of these types of objects.

  13. An accurate air temperature measurement system based on an envelope pulsed ultrasonic time-of-flight technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y S; Huang, Y P; Huang, K N; Young, M S

    2007-11-01

    A new microcomputer based air temperature measurement system is presented. An accurate temperature measurement is derived from the measurement of sound velocity by using an ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) technique. The study proposes a novel algorithm that combines both amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) to get the TOF measurement. The proposed system uses the AM and PM envelope square waveform (APESW) to reduce the error caused by inertia delay. The APESW ultrasonic driving waveform causes an envelope zero and phase inversion phenomenon in the relative waveform of the receiver. To accurately achieve a TOF measurement, the phase inversion phenomenon was used to sufficiently identify the measurement pulse in the received waveform. Additionally, a counter clock technique was combined to compute the phase shifts of the last incomplete cycle for TOF. The presented system can obtain 0.1% TOF resolution for the period corresponding to the 40 kHz frequency ultrasonic wave. Consequently, with the integration of a humidity compensation algorithm, a highly accurate and high resolution temperature measurement can be achieved using the accurate TOF measurement. Experimental results indicate that the combined standard uncertainty of the temperature measurement is approximately 0.39 degrees C. The main advantages of this system are high resolution measurements, narrow bandwidth requirements, and ease of implementation.

  14. A bead-based fluorescence immunosensing technique enabled by the integration of Förster resonance energy transfer and optoelectrokinetic concentration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jhih-Cheng; Ku, Hu-Yao; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Chuang, Han-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Bead-based immunosensing has been growing as a promising technology in the point-of-care diagnostics due to great flexibility. For dilute samples, functionalized particles can be used to collect dispersed analytes and act as carriers for particle manipulation. To realize rapid and visual immunosensing, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used herein to ensure only the diabetic biomarker, lipocalin 1, to be detected. The measurement was made in an aqueous droplet sandwiched between two parallel plate electrodes. With an electric field and a focused laser beam applying on the microchip simultaneously, the immunocomplexes in the droplet were further concentrated to enhance the FRET fluorescent signal. The optoelectrokinetic technique, termed rapid electrokinetic patterning (REP), has been proven to be excellent in dynamic and programmable particle manipulation. Therefore, the detection can be complete within several tens of seconds. The lower detection limit of the REP-enabled bead-based diagnosis reached nearly 5 nM. The combinative use of FRET and the optoelectrokinetic technique for the bead-based immunosensing enables a rapid measure to diagnose early stage diseases and dilute analytes. PMID:26865906

  15. Bench-Top Antigen Detection Technique that Utilizes Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes which Emit and Absorb Light in the Near Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaljay-Spence, Vanessa A.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the development of a bench-top technique to detect antigens in fluids. The technique involves the use of near infrared NIR fluorescent dyes conjugated to antibodies, centrifugation, nanofilters, and spectrometry. The system used to detect the antigens utilizes a spectrometer, fiber optic cables, NIR laser, and laptop computer thus making it portable and ideally suited for desk top analysis. Using IgM as an antigen and the secondary antibody, anti-IgM conjugated to the near infrared dye, IRDye (trademark) 800, for detection, we show that nanofiltration can efficiently and specifically separate antibody-antigen complexes in solution and that the complexes can be detected by a spectrometer and software using NIR laser excitation at 778 nm and NIR dye offset emission at 804 nm. The peak power detected at 778 nm for the excitation emission and at 804 nm for the offset emission is 879 pW (-60.06 dBm) and 35.7 pW (-74.5 dBm), respectively.

  16. Does free-air carbon dioxide enrichment affect photochemical energy use by evergreen trees in different seasons? A chlorophyll fluorescence study of mature loblolly pine

    SciTech Connect

    Hymus, G.J.; Ellsworth, D.S.; Baker, N.R.; Long, S.P.

    1999-08-01

    Previous studies of the effects of growth at elevated CO{sup 2} on energy partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus have produced conflicting results. The hypothesis was developed and tested that elevated CO{sub 2} increases photochemical energy use when there is a high demand for assimilates and decreases usage when demand is low. Modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence and leaf gas exchange were measured on needles at the tope of a mature, 12-m loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.l) forest. Trees were exposed to ambient CO{sub 2} or ambient plus 20 Pa CO{sub 2} using free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment. During April and August, periods of shoot growth, light-saturated photo-synthesis and linear electron transport were increased by elevated CO{sub 2}. In November, when growth had ceased but temperatures were still moderate, CO{sub 2} treatment had no significant effect on linear electron transport. In February, when low temperatures were likely to inhibit translocation, CO{sub 2} treatment caused a significant decrease in linear electron transport. This coincided with a slower recovery of the maximum photosystem II efficiency on transfer of needles to the shade, indicating that growth in elevated CO{sub 2} induced a more persistent photoinhibition. Both the summer increase and the winter decrease in linear electron transport in elevated CO{sub 2} resulted from a change in photochemical quenching, not in the efficiency of energy transfer within the photosystem II antenna. There was no evidence of any effect of CO{sub 2} on photochemical energy sinks other than carbon metabolism. Their results suggest that elevated CO{sub 2} may increase the effects of winter stress on evergreen foliage.

  17. Structure of a methanol/air coaxial reacting spray near the stabilization region by OH fluorescence imaging and two-component phase-Doppler interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, P.J.; Cessou, A.; Stepowski, D. , 230 - Mont-Saint-Aignan . URA CORIA); Edwards, C.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence and two component phase-Doppler interferometry have been used to study the reaction zone structure near the stabilization region of a coaxial methanol/air spray flame. The configuration of the experiment was chosen to simulate the atomizer geometry, surface tension and Weber number of a single coaxial hydrogen/oxygen rocket injector. The measurements are made in a water-cooled, optically-accessible confinement chamber at a pressure of 1 atm. Data are reported for two operating conditions, one yielding a flame length of approximately 1 meter, the other, half that value. Both the Weber number (characterizing the atomization process) and the Reynolds number (characterizing the gas phase mixing process) vary between the two cases, but the data suggest that it is the Weber number which has the dominant effect. In both cases OH imaging shows that the reaction zone is confined to a narrow region, with the OH field being similar in appearance to that of a single-phase turbulent mixing-controlled (diffusion) flame. Size-classified mean velocity vectors derived from the phase-Doppler data show striking differences in the flow pattern for low and high Stokes number droplets. Droplets 10 {mu}m in diameter and below (Stokes number less than 10) appear to follow the recirculating eddies that provide flame stabilization. Increasing the Weber number by a factor of 2.5 decreased the Sauter mean diameter of the spray by as much as one-third, and the arithmetic mean diameter by as much as one-half. We believe that it is this decrease in the spray droplet diameter that is primarily responsible for the very different flame length in the two cases.

  18. Structure of a methanol/air coaxial reacting spray near the stabilization region by OH fluorescence imaging and two-component phase-Doppler interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Goix, P.J.; Cessou, A.; Stepowski, D.; Edwards, C.F.

    1991-12-31

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence and two component phase-Doppler interferometry have been used to study the reaction zone structure near the stabilization region of a coaxial methanol/air spray flame. The configuration of the experiment was chosen to simulate the atomizer geometry, surface tension and Weber number of a single coaxial hydrogen/oxygen rocket injector. The measurements are made in a water-cooled, optically-accessible confinement chamber at a pressure of 1 atm. Data are reported for two operating conditions, one yielding a flame length of approximately 1 meter, the other, half that value. Both the Weber number (characterizing the atomization process) and the Reynolds number (characterizing the gas phase mixing process) vary between the two cases, but the data suggest that it is the Weber number which has the dominant effect. In both cases OH imaging shows that the reaction zone is confined to a narrow region, with the OH field being similar in appearance to that of a single-phase turbulent mixing-controlled (diffusion) flame. Size-classified mean velocity vectors derived from the phase-Doppler data show striking differences in the flow pattern for low and high Stokes number droplets. Droplets 10 {mu}m in diameter and below (Stokes number less than 10) appear to follow the recirculating eddies that provide flame stabilization. Increasing the Weber number by a factor of 2.5 decreased the Sauter mean diameter of the spray by as much as one-third, and the arithmetic mean diameter by as much as one-half. We believe that it is this decrease in the spray droplet diameter that is primarily responsible for the very different flame length in the two cases.

  19. Development of a two photon/laser induced fluorescence technique for the detection of atmospheric OH radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John

    1990-01-01

    The development of a new mid-IR laser source was the primary goal. Backward propagating stimulated D2 Raman frequency down conversion of a commercially available 1.06 micron Nd:YAG laser was shown to generate an efficient source of 1.56 micron radiation with near diffraction limited beam quality. The efficient generation of a 2.9 micron laser source was also achieved using backward propagating CH4 Raman frequency down conversion of the 1.56 micron pump. Slightly higher efficiencies were obtained for frequency down conversion of the 1.06 micron Nd:YAG using the H2 Raman shift yielding a near diffraction limited source in the 200 mJ range at 1.9 micron. Similar conversion efficiencies are anticipated as a result of extending the wavelength coverage of recently available Ti:sapphire pulse laser to not only cover the 740 to 860 nm fundamental wavelength range but also the .95 to 1.15 and 1.06 to 1.33 micron range using D2 and H2, respectively. The anticipated sensitivity of a TP-LIF OH sensor using this mid-IR source would give signal limited detection of 1.4 x 10(exp 5) OH/cu cm under boundary layer conditions and 5.5 x 10(exp 4) OH/cu cm under free troposphere sampling conditions for a five minute signal integration period. This level of performance coupled with the techniques non-perturbing nature and freedom from both interferences and background would allow reliable tropospheric OH measurement to be obtained under virtually any ambient condition of current interest, including interstitial and sampling.

  20. Monte Carlo fluorescence microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Alexander X.; Hofmann, Matthias C.; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows real-time monitoring of optical molecular probes for disease characterization, drug development, and tissue regeneration. However, when a biological sample is thicker than 1 mm, intense scattering of light would significantly degrade the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence microtomography technique that utilizes the Monte Carlo method to image fluorescence reporters in thick biological samples. This approach is based on an l0-regularized tomography model and provides an excellent solution. Our studies on biomimetic tissue scaffolds have demonstrated that the proposed approach is capable of localizing and quantifying the distribution of optical molecular probe accurately and reliably.

  1. Statistical Entry, Descent, and Landing Flight Reconstruction with Flush Air Data System Observations using Inertial Navigation and Monte Carlo Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, Rafael Andres

    A method is introduced to consider flush air data system (FADS) pressures using a technique based on inertial navigation to reconstruct the trajectory of an atmospheric entry vehicle. The approach augments the recently-developed Inertial Navigation Statistical Trajectory and Atmosphere Reconstruction (INSTAR), which is an extension of inertial navigation that provides statistical uncertainties by utilizing Monte Carlo dispersion techniques and is an alternative to traditional statistical approaches to entry, descent, and landing trajectory and atmosphere reconstruction. The method is demonstrated using flight data from the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry vehicle, which contained an inertial measurement unit and a flush air data system called the Mars Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS). An MSL trajectory and atmosphere solution that was updated using landing site location in INSTAR is first presented. This solution and corresponding uncertainties, which were obtained from Monte Carlo dispersions, are then used in a minimum variance algorithm to obtain aerodynamic estimates and uncertainties from the MEADS observations. MEADS-derived axial force coefficient and freestream density estimates and uncertainties are also derived from the minimum variance solutions independent of the axial force coefficients derived from computation fluid dynamics (CFD), which have relatively high a priori uncertainty. Results from probabilistic analyses of the solutions are also presented. This dissertation also introduces a method to consider correlated CFD uncertainties in INSTAR. From a priori CFD uncertainties, CFD force and pressure coefficients are dispersed in a Monte Carlo sense and carried over into the reconstructions. An analysis of the subsequent effects on the trajectory, atmosphere, and aerodynamic estimates and statistics is presented. Trajectory, atmospheric, and aerodynamic estimates compare favorably to extended Kalman filter solutions obtained by the MSL

  2. A Comparison of Statistical Techniques for Combining Modeled and Observed Concentrations to Create High-Resolution Ozone Air Quality Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality surfaces representing pollutant concentrations across space and time are needed for many applications, including tracking trends and relating air quality to human and ecosystem health. The spatial and temporal characteristics of these surfaces may reveal new informat...

  3. Tuneable Diode Laser for measuring CO2 and CO air concentration on New Zealand volcanoes: An emerging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazot, A.; Christenson, B. W.

    2012-12-01

    A new technique, called Open-Path laser, has been used for monitoring of CO2 degassing in volcanic areas in New Zealand. The purpose of these surveys is to have a better knowledge in the spatial and temporal dynamics of CO2 degassing in the atmosphere. CO2 is less reactive than other volcanic gases. CO is present in lesser amounts in volcanic gases but the CO/CO2 ratio is a good indicator of the redox conditions at depth because a change in the ratio can be related to a new input of magma in the volcanic system. This presentation introduces the new laser based technique for future volcanic gas surveillance at Ruapehu volcano, New Zealand. Frequent mild to moderate explosive eruptions have occurred in historical time from the crater lake of Ruapehu with the last hydrothermal eruption occurring in September 2007. The pH of the lake is around 1.1 with lake temperatures ranging from 10 to 60 oC. CO2 emission measurements have been made since 2003 from an airborne platform at a constant distance from the summit and the data were processed using the plume contouring method. The total CO2 emission rate varies from not detectable to 2200 t/day. We here show new results from a measurement campaign conduced 23 May, 2012 over the Ruapehu Crater lake and show how paths are reduced to CO2 values. The values are then compared to long term measurements obtained on the airborne platform. This technique has been also used on another New Zealand volcano, Tongariro which showed volcano seismic unrest beginning in mid-July 2012. The last eruption at the Tongariro volcano was from Te Maari craters in 1897 with reported ash fall as far as Napier 115 km away from the volcano. In response to this activity, we conducted a range of geochemical sampling including, spring sampling and soil gas measurements. In addition, we tested the Tuneable Diode Laser to measure CO2 air concentration. The new method may prove useful for geochemical gas surveillance in combination with the geodetic and

  4. Super resolution fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bo; Bates, Mark; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Achieving a spatial resolution that is not limited by the diffraction of light, recent developments of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy techniques allow the observation of many biological structures not resolvable in conventional fluorescence microscopy. New advances in these techniques now give them the ability to image three-dimensional (3D) structures, measure interactions by multicolor colocalization, and record dynamic processes in living cells at the nanometer scale. It is anticipated that super-resolution fluorescence microscopy will become a widely used tool for cell and tissue imaging to provide previously unobserved details of biological structures and processes. PMID:19489737

  5. Remote Sensing of Chlorophyll Fluorescence by the Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Morgan, F., II; Demajistre, R.; Cook, B. D.; Corp, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the amount of fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or Fraunhofer lines in the reflected solar spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is designed and constructed specifically for airborne and groundbased ChlF measurements using the line fill-in ChlF measurement technique. In this paper, we will present the design of this triple etalon Fabry-Perot imaging instrument and the results of its vegetation fluorescence measurements obtained from the ground in the laboratory and from a NASA Langley King Air during our 2014 airborne campaign over vegetated targets in North Carolina and Virginia.

  6. Nonlinear torque and air-to-fuel ratio control of spark ignition engines using neuro-sliding mode techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting; Javaherian, Hossein; Liu, Derong

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the calibration and control of spark ignition engines using a combination of neural networks and sliding mode control technique. Two parallel neural networks are utilized to realize a neuro-sliding mode control (NSLMC) for self-learning control of automotive engines. The equivalent control and the corrective control terms are the outputs of the neural networks. Instead of using error backpropagation algorithm, the network weights of equivalent control are updated using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Moreover, a new approach is utilized to update the gain of corrective control. Both modifications of the NSLMC are aimed at improving the transient performance and speed of convergence. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we built neural network models for the engine torque (TRQ) and the air-to-fuel ratio (AFR) dynamics and developed NSLMC controllers to achieve tracking control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values under various operating conditions. From simulation studies, the feasibility and efficiency of the approach are illustrated. For both control problems, excellent tracking performance has been achieved.

  7. The Inter-Mammary Sticky Roll: A Novel Technique for Securing a Doppler Ultrasonic Probe to the Precordium for Venous Air Embolism Detection.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Dieppa, David R; Wali, Arvin R; Gabel, Brandon C; Khalessi, Alexander A; Sang U, Hoi; Drummond, John C

    2016-01-01

    Venous air embolism is a devastating and potentially life-threatening complication that can occur during neurosurgical procedures. We report the development and use of the "inter-mammary sticky roll," a technique to reliably secure a precordial Doppler ultrasonic probe to the chest wall during neurosurgical cases that require lateral decubitus positioning. We have found that this noninvasive technique is safe, and effectively facilitates a constant Doppler signal with no additional risk to the patient. PMID:27625905

  8. The Inter-Mammary Sticky Roll: A Novel Technique for Securing a Doppler Ultrasonic Probe to the Precordium for Venous Air Embolism Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Arvin R; Gabel, Brandon C; Khalessi, Alexander A; Sang U, Hoi; Drummond, John C

    2016-01-01

    Venous air embolism is a devastating and potentially life-threatening complication that can occur during neurosurgical procedures. We report the development and use of the “inter-mammary sticky roll,” a technique to reliably secure a precordial Doppler ultrasonic probe to the chest wall during neurosurgical cases that require lateral decubitus positioning. We have found that this noninvasive technique is safe, and effectively facilitates a constant Doppler signal with no additional risk to the patient. PMID:27625905

  9. Determination of mercury species by the diffusive gradient in thin film technique and liquid chromatography--atomic fluorescence spectrometry after microwave extraction.

    PubMed

    Pelcová, Pavlína; Dočekalová, Hana; Kleckerová, Andrea

    2015-03-25

    A diffusive gradient in thin films technique (DGT) was combined with liquid chromatography (LC) and cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV-AFS) for the simultaneous quantification of four mercury species (Hg(2+), CH3Hg(+), C2H5Hg(+), and C6H5Hg(+)). After diffusion through an agarose diffusive layer, the mercury species were accumulated in resin gels containing thiol-functionalized ion-exchange resins (Duolite GT73, and Ambersep GT74). A microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) in the presence of 6M HCl and 5 M HCl (55 °C, 15 min) was used for isolation of mercury species from Ambersep and Duolite resin gels, respectively. The extraction efficiency was higher than 95.0% (RSD 3.5%). The mercury species were separated with a mobile phase containing 6.2% methanol+0.05% 2-mercaptoethanol+0.02 M ammonium acetate with a stepwise increase of methanol content up to 80% in the 16th min on a Zorbax C18 reverse phase column. The LODs of DGT-MAE-LC-CV-AFS method were 38 ng L(-1) for CH3Hg(+), 13 ng L(-1) for Hg(2+), 34 ng L(-1) for C2H5Hg(+) and 30 ng L(-1) for C6H5Hg(+) for 24 h DGT accumulation at 25 °C.

  10. Advanced combined application of micro-X-ray diffraction/micro-X-ray fluorescence with conventional techniques for the identification of pictorial materials from Baroque Andalusia paintings.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L K; Montalbani, S; Chiavari, G; Cotte, M; Solé, V A; Bueno, J; Duran, A; Justo, A; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2009-11-15

    The process of investigating paintings includes the identification of materials to solve technical and historical art questions, to aid in the deduction of the original appearance, and in the establishment of the chemical and physical conditions for adequate restoration and conservation. In particular, we have focused on the identification of several samples taken from six famous canvases painted by Pedro Atanasio Bocanegra, who created a very special collection depicting the life of San Ignacio, which is located in the church of San Justo y Pastor of Granada, Spain. The characterization of the inorganic and organic compounds of the textiles, preparation layers, and pictorial layers have been carried out using an XRD diffractometer, SEM observations, EDX spectrometry, FT-IR spectrometry (both in reflection and transmission mode), pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and synchrotron-based micro-X-ray techniques. In this work, the advantages over conventional X-ray diffraction of using combined synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence in the identification of multi-layer paintings is demonstrated. PMID:19782194

  11. Masking Agents Evaluation for Lead Determination by Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Technique: Effect of KI, L-Cysteine, and 1,10-Phenanthroline

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Blanca G.; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Hydride generation (HG) of lead technique presents interferences from foreign ions of complex matrix samples. In order to minimize these interferences, the effect of masking agents such as KI, L-cysteine, and 1,10-phenanthroline was studied in the absence and in the presence of selected interfering species (As, Cr, Cu, and Fe). Different modes of addition of masking agents were accomplished, that is, to either sample or KBH4 reducing solution. The lead determinations were performed using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system coupled to HG and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The linearity of calibration curves (1–10 μg Pb L−1) was not affected by the addition of the masking agents. The use of KI in the reducing solution diminished interferences from concentrations of As and Cu, while 1,10-phenanthroline showed a positive effect on the interference by As. Moreover, Cr and Cu appeared to be the most serious interfering ions for plumbane (PbH4), because they drastically reduced the analytical signal of lead. Fe did not present any interference under the employed experimental conditions, even at high levels. The accuracy was established through the analysis of certified reference material (i.e., BCR-610, groundwater) using KI as masking agent. The detection limit reached by FIA-HG-AFS proposed methodology was 0.03 μg Pb L−1. PMID:27148365

  12. On the distribution of uranium in hair: Non-destructive analysis using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelsson, A.; Eriksson, M.; Pettersson, H. B. L.

    2015-06-01

    In the present study the distribution of uranium in single human hair shafts has been evaluated using two synchrotron radiation (SR) based micro X-ray fluorescence techniques; SR μ-XRF and confocal SR μ-XRF. The hair shafts originated from persons that have been exposed to elevated uranium concentrations. Two different groups have been studied, i) workers at a nuclear fuel fabrication factory, exposed mainly by inhalation and ii) owners of drilled bedrock wells exposed by ingestion of water. The measurements were carried out on the FLUO beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility ANKA, Karlsruhe. The experiment was optimized to detect U with a beam size of 6.8 μm × 3 μm beam focus allowing detection down to ppb levels of U in 10 s (SR μ-XRF setup) and 70 s (SR confocal μ-XRF setup) measurements. It was found that the uranium was present in a 10-15 μm peripheral layer of the hair shafts for both groups studied. Furthermore, potential external hair contamination was studied by scanning of unwashed hair shafts from the workers. Sites of very high uranium signal were identified as particles containing uranium. Such particles, were also seen in complementary analyses using variable pressure electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (ESEM-EDX). However, the particles were not visible in washed hair shafts. These findings can further increase the understanding of uranium excretion in hair and its potential use as a biomonitor.

  13. Use of portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) in vivo as an alternative technique for the assessment of iron levels in patients with thalassemia and hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Estevam, Marcelo; Appoloni, Carlos Roberto

    2013-02-01

    This work investigated the viability of the portable x-ray fluorescence (PXRF) technique as a means of measuring iron levels in patients suffering from thalassemia major (beta-thalassemia) and hereditary hemochromatosis (HH or Haemochromatosis) or other iron-overload conditions. Measurements were conducted at the University Hospital Blood Center and in the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics at the State University of Londrina, Brazil. One thalassemia major patient and four healthy people were grouped. A PXRF system consisting of a Pu x-ray source and a SiPIN diode detector was used for measurements in vivo on the hand of each patient. The measuring system was calibrated with phantoms of aqueous solution doped with 15 to 150 ppm of iron. The duration of each measurement was 50 s. The detection limit (LLD) reached for iron was 13 ppm. The radiation dose on the skin was 10 mSv. The thalassemia patient presented 74 ± 6 ppm of iron, whereas the healthy people presented an average of 53 ± 5 ppm of iron. The results are in accord with the literature, which shows iron levels in the skin to be between 15 - 60 ppm for healthy people and between 70 - 150 ppm for thalassemia major patients. This work concluded that it is viable to apply the XRF methodology to follow thalassemia major and HH patients.

  14. Investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA hybridization by means of 2-D fluorescence spectroscopy and soft/hard modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Sara; Kompany-Zareh, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Reversible hybridization reaction plays a key role in fundamental biological processes, in many laboratory techniques, and also in DNA based sensing devices. Comprehensive investigation of this process is, therefore, essential for the development of more sophisticated applications. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the hybridization reaction, as a second order process, are systematically investigated with the aid of the soft and hard chemometric methods. Labeling two complementary 21 mer DNA single strands with FAM and Texas red fluorophores, enabled recording of the florescence excitation-emission matrices during the experiments which led to three-way data sets. The presence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in excitation and emission modes and the closure in concentration mode, made the three-way data arrays rank deficient. To acquire primary chemical information, restricted Tucker3 as a soft method was employed. Herein a model-based method, hard restricted trilinear decomposition, is introduced for in depth analysis of rank deficient three-way data sets. By employing proposed hard method, the nonlinear model parameters as well as the correct profiles could be estimated. In addition, a simple constraint is presented to extract chemically reasonable output profiles regarding the core elements of restricted Tucker3 model.

  15. Characterizing the compositional variation of dissolved organic matter over hydrophobicity and polarity using fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis and two-dimensional correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Su, Ben-Sheng; Qu, Zhen; He, Xiao-Song; Song, Ying-Hao; Jia, Li-Min

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) obtained from three leachates with different landfill ages was fractionated, and its compositional variation based on hydrophobicity and polarity was characterized by synchronous fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and two-dimensional correlation technique. The results showed that the bulk DOM and its fractions were comprised of tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances. Tyrosine-like matter was dominant in the young leachate DOM and its fractions, while tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances were the main components in the intermediate and old leachate DOMs and their fractions. Tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances varied concurrently with the hydrophobicity and polarity. However, the change ratio of these substances was different for the three leachates. Tyrosine-like matter, humic-like materials, and fulvic-like substances were the most sensitive to the hydrophobicity and polarity in the young, intermediate, and old leachates, respectively. Such an integrated approach jointly enhances the characterization of the hydrophobicity- and polarity-dependent DOM fractions and provides a promising way to elucidate the environmental behaviors of different DOM species.

  16. Application of the wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique to determine soil fluorine with consideration of iron content in the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Jinsung; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Yoon, Hye-On; Seo, Jungju

    The suitability of the wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) technique for the quantitative analysis of fluorine in soil was assessed in this study. Fluorine standards for WD-XRF calibration with soil matrices consisting of SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, and CaO were prepared by varying the concentrations of CaF2 as a source of fluorine. Based on the standard calibration, the limits of detection and quantification were calculated as 812 and 2690 mg-F/kg-solid (or 1.62 and 5.39 mg-F in absolute mass term), respectively. In addition, the fluorine intensities of the standard samples with high iron content increased significantly compared to those with low iron content. Because of proximity between F-Kα and Fe-Lα line, the higher iron content preferably helped increase background fluorine intensities. As a means to compensate for the iron interference effect in fluorine analysis, the correction factor (CF) (0.0045) was derived based on the slope ratios between the measured X-ray intensity at the Bragg angle of 43.174° and iron content in the standard sample. The soil fluorine concentration determined by WD-XRF after the CF adjustment exhibited a significantly high correlation with that of the classical alkali fusion-ISE analysis. These findings clearly demonstrated that the WD-XRF technique is reliable enough to allow an easy, precise, and rapid quantitative determination of fluorine in a solid sample (such as iron-bound soil) compared to conventional methods.

  17. Air pollution source identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for air pollution source identification are reviewed, and some results obtained with them are evaluated. Described techniques include remote sensing from satellites and aircraft, on-site monitoring, and the use of injected tracers and pollutants themselves as tracers. The use of a large number of trace elements in ambient airborne particulate matter as a practical means of identifying sources is discussed in detail. Sampling and analysis techniques are described, and it is shown that elemental constituents can be related to specific source types such as those found in the earth's crust and those associated with specific industries. Source identification sytems are noted which utilize charged particle X-ray fluorescence analysis of original field data.

  18. Fluorescent reporter methods.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Harald

    2006-01-01

    The identification and cloning of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) from jellyfish marks the beginning of a new era of fluorescent reporters. In Caenorhabditis elegans, genetically encoded markers like the fluorescent proteins of the GFP family became the reporter of choice for gene expression studies and protein localization. The small size and transparency of the worm allows the visualization of in vivo dynamics, which increases the number of potential applications for fluorescent reporters tremendously. In combination with subcellular tags, GFP can be used to label subcellular structures like synapses allowing novel approaches to study developmental processes like synapse formation. Other fluorescent labels like small organic dyes, which are in widespread use in cell culture systems, are rarely used in C. elegans owing to difficulties in applying these labels through the impenetrable cuticle or eggshell of the animal. A notable exception is the use of lipophilic dyes, which are taken up by certain sensory neurons in the intact animal and can be introduced into the embryo after puncturing of the egg shell. This chapter covers the use of fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins in C. elegans. Emphasis is placed on microscopic techniques including wide field and confocal microscopy as well as time-lapse recordings. The use of fluorescent proteins as transgenic markers and image processing of fluorescence images are briefly discussed.

  19. Planar temperature measurement in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced iodine fluorescence technique that is suitable for the planar measurement of temperature in cold nonreacting compressible air flows is investigated analytically and demonstrated in a known flow field. The technique is based on the temperature dependence of the broadband fluorescence from iodine excited by the 514-nm line of an argon-ion laser. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 245 K were measured in the calibration flow field. This technique makes complete, spatially resolved surveys of temperature practical in highly three-dimensional, low-temperature compressible flows.

  20. Dual-Mode Combined Infra Red and Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Technique for Real-Time Industrial Process Control with Special Reference to the Food Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallav, P.; Hutchins, D. A.; Diamond, G. G.; Gan, T. H.; Hellyer, J. E.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the use of air-coupled ultrasound and Near Infra red (NIR) as complimentary techniques for food quality assessment. A major study has been performed, in collaboration with four industrial food companies, to investigate the use of air-coupled ultrasound and NIR to both detect foreign bodies, and to measure certain parameters of interest, such as the amount of a certain additive. The research has demonstrated that air-coupled ultrasound can be used in on-line situations, measuring food materials such as chocolate and cheese. It is also capable of performing measurements on moving sealed metal cans containing food, and is able to detect foreign bodies with the top removed, as encountered just before sealing. NIR has been used as a complimentary technique to test food materials where propagation of air-coupled ultrasound was found to be difficult. This could be due to the presence of air pockets within the food material, as in the case of bread dough.

  1. Concurrent use of flow cytometry and fluorescence in-situ hybridization techniques for detecting faulty meiosis in a human sperm sample.

    PubMed

    Weissenberg, R; Aviram, A; Golan, R; Lewin, L M; Levron, J; Madgar, I; Dor, J; Barkai, G; Goldman, B

    1998-01-01

    Routine semen analysis in an infertile patient revealed severe teratospermia associated with malformation of head and tail in 100% of the sperm cells. Flow cytometry and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) were shown to supplement routine semen analysis by providing information on the sperm chromatin. Using flow cytometry, propidium iodide-stained spermatozoa from the same sperm sample were compared with a normal reference pool, and with human lymphocytes. The results point to a population of diploid sperm cells rather than to mature haploid spermatozoa. Numerical chromosomal abnormalities of the spermatozoa were subsequently evaluated using FISH. A total of 1000 sperm cells were scored for X and Y chromosomes, and an additional 1128 sperm cells for chromosome 18. Aneuploidy of chromosomes X and Y was revealed in 96.9% of the cells and of chromosome 18 in 90.3% of the cells. Non-disjunction of chromosome X and Y in meiosis I and II occurred in 54.8 and 2.7% of the sperm cells respectively. Non-disjunction in both meiosis I and II occurred in 39.4% of the sperm cells. A normal haploid pattern for chromosomes X and Y was observed in only 3.1%, and for chromosome 18 in 9.7%, of the cells. Using three colour FISH for the sex chromosomes and for chromosome 18, diploidy was demonstrated in 19.4% of 500 sperm cells and aneuploidy in virtually all sperm cells (99.2%). The use of flow cytometry and FISH in cases where genetic and developmental chromatin abnormalities are suspected is a valuable adjunct to other available techniques, and can guide the clinicians to decide which samples are unsuitable for intracytoplasmic injection.

  2. Stage-dependency of apoptosis and the blood-testis barrier in the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias): cadmium-induced changes as assessed by vital fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    McClusky, Leon M

    2006-09-01

    Naturally occurring heavy metals and synthetic compounds are potentially harmful for testicular function but evidence linking heavy metal exposure to reduced semen parameters is inconclusive. Elucidation of the exact stage at which the toxicant interferes with spermatogenesis is difficult because the various germ cell stages may have different sensitivities to any given toxicant, germ cell development is influenced by supporting testicular somatic cells and the presence of inter-Sertoli cell tight junctions create a blood-testis barrier, sequestering meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells in a special microenvironment. Sharks such as Squalus acanthias provide a suitable model for studying aspects of vertebrate spermatogenosis because of their unique features: spermatogenesis takes place within spermatocysts and relies mainly on Sertoli cells for somatic cell support; spermatocysts are linearly arranged in a maturational order across the diameter of the elongated testis; spermatocysts containing germ cells at different stages of development are topographically separated, resulting in visible zonation in testicular cross sections. We have used the vital dye acridine orange and a novel fluorescence staining technique to study this model to determine (1) the efficacy of these methods in assays of apoptosis and blood-testis barrier function, (2) the sensitivity of the various spermatogonial generations in Squalus to cadmium (as an illustrative spermatotoxicant) and (3) the way that cadmium might affect more mature spermatogenic stages and other physiological processes in the testis. Our results show that cadmium targets early spermatogenic stages, where it specifically activates a cell death program in susceptible (mature) spermatogonial clones, and negatively affects blood-testis barrier function. Since other parameters are relatively unaffected by cadmium, the effects of this toxicant on apoptosis are presumably process-specific and not attributable to general toxicity

  3. Assessment of marine and urban-industrial environments influence on built heritage sandstone using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and complementary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Héctor; García-Galan, Javier; Maguregui, Maite; Marcaida, Iker; García-Florentino, Cristina; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-09-01

    The sandstone used in the construction of the tower of La Galea Fortress (Getxo, north of Spain) shows a very bad conservation state and a high percentage of sandstone has been lost. The fortress is located just on a cliff and close to the sea, and it experiments the direct influence of marine aerosol and also the impact of acid gases (SOx and NOx) coming from the surrounding industry and maritime traffic. This environment seems to be very harmful for the preservation of the sandstone used in it, promoting different pathologies (disintegration, alveolization, cracking or erosion blistering, salts crystallization on the pores, efflorescences etc.). In this work, a multianalytical methodology based on a preliminary in-situ screening of the affected sandstone using a handheld energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (HH-ED-XRF) and a subsequent characterization of extracted sample in the laboratory using elemental (μ-ED-XRF, Scanning Electron Microscope coupled to an X-Max Energy-Dispersive (SEM-EDS) and Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) and molecular techniques (micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD)) was applied in order to characterize the original composition of this kind of stone and related deterioration products. With the whole methodology, it was possible to assess that the sandstone contain a notable percentage of calcite. The sulfation and nitration of this carbonate detected in the stone led to the dissolution process of the sandstone, promoting the observed material loss. Additionally, the presence of salts related with the influence of marine aerosol confirms that this kind of environment have influence on the conservation state of the sandstone building.

  4. Novel one-step headspace dynamic in-syringe liquid phase derivatization-extraction technique for the determination of aqueous aliphatic amines by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Sarangapani; Shih, Hou-Kung; Chen, Ying-Fang; Hsiech, Chunming; Ponnusamy, Vinoth Kumar; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2013-06-28

    A novel one-step headspace (HS) dynamic in-syringe (DIS) based liquid-phase derivatization-extraction (LPDE) technique has been developed for the selective determination of two short-chain aliphatic amines (SCAAs) in aqueous samples using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection (FLD). Methylamine (MA) and dimethylamine (DMA) were selected as model compounds of SCAAs. In this method, a micro-syringe pre-filled with derivatizing reagent solution (9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate) in the barrel was applied to achieve the simultaneous derivatization and extraction of two methylamines evolved from alkalized aqueous samples through the automated reciprocated movements of syringe plunger. After the derivatization-extraction process, the derivatized phase was directly injected into HPLC-FLD for analysis. Parameters influencing the evolution of methylamines and the HS-DIS-LPDE efficiency, including sample pH and temperature, sampling time, as well as the composition of derivatization reagent, reaction temperature, and frequency of reciprocated plunger movements, were thoroughly examined and optimized. Under optimal conditions, detections were linear in the range of 25-500μgL(-1) for MA and DMA with correlation coefficients all above 0.995. The limits of detection (based on S/N=3) were 5 and 19ngmL(-1) for MA and DMA, respectively. The applicability of the developed method was demonstrated for the determination of MA and DMA in real water samples without any prior cleanup of the sample. The present method provides a simple, selective, automated, low cost and eco-friendly procedure to determine aliphatic amines in aqueous samples. PMID:23591526

  5. Comparison of two fluorescent antibody techniques (FATS) for detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of spawning chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; McKibben, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Two versions of the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) were compared for detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid samples from naturally infected spawning chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. For the membrane filtration-FAT (MF-FAT), trypsin-treated samples were passed through 0.2 ??m polycarbonate filters to concentrate bacteria for direct enumeration by immunofluorescence microscopy. For the smear-FAT (S-FAT), samples were centrifuged at 8800 x g for 10 min and the pelleted material was smeared on slides for immunofluorescence staining Detected prevalences of Renibacterium salmoninarum were 1.8 to 3.4 times higher by the MF-FAT than by the S-FAT: differences were significant at p ??? 0.0002. The S-FAT consistently detected R. salmoninarum only in samples with calculated bacterial concentrations ??? 2.4 x 103 cells ml-1 by MF-FAT testing. Increasing the area examined on a filter or slide from 50 to 100 microscope fields at 1000x magnification resulted in the detection of a maximum of 4% additional positive samples by the MF-FAT and 7% additional positive samples by the S-FAT. In individual samples for which bacterial counts were obtained by both the MF-FAT and the S-FAT, the counts averaged from 47 times (??30 SD) to 175 times (??165 SD) higher by the MF-FAT. Centrifugation of samples at 10000 x g for 10 min resulted in a 4-fold increase in mean bacterial counts by the S-FAT compared with a 10-min centrifugation at 2000 x g, but the highest calculated bacterial concentration obtained by S-FAT testing was more than 6-fold lower than that obtained for the same sample by MF-FAT testing. Because of its greater sensitivity, the MF-FAT is preferable to the S-FAT for use in critical situations requiring the detection of low numbers of R. salmoninarum.

  6. Possibilities and limitations of fluorescence in situ hybridization technique in retrospective detection of low dose radiation exposure in post-chernobyl human cohorts.

    PubMed

    Maznyk, N A; Vinnikov, V A

    2005-01-01

    Cytogenetic analysis using the fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) technique was performed late time after the Chernobyl accident in groups of liquidators, evacuees from 30 km exclusive zone, residents of radioactively contaminated areas and control donors age-matched to exposed persons. Stable and unstable chromosome type exchanges were recorded using a hybrid conventional-PAINT nomenclature. The mean yield of stable chromosome exchanges in liquidators did not correlate with registered radiation doses but had a clear negative dependence on the duration of liquidators' staying in Chernobyl zone, that was in a good agreement with early data based on conventional dicentrics plus rings analysis. The overspontaneous excess for stable chromosome exchange level appeared to be higher in evacuees 16-40 years old than that of senior persons, whereas no age-dependent difference occurred for initially induced dicentrics plus rings yields in this cohort. The stable chromosome exchange yield, as well as combined yield of dicentrics plus rings and potentially unstable incomplete translocations in residents of radioactively contaminated areas showed a reasonable positive correlation with levels of 137Cs contamination. The observed yields of stable chromosome exchanges in all three exposed groups appeared to be somewhat lower than those of expected from unstable exchange-based doses which were referred to an in vitro dose response of stable exchanges outcome in human lymphocytes. Thus, FISH analysis can be successfully applied for qualitative cytogenetic indication of past and chronic radiation exposure to low doses but further refinement of FISH-based system for quantitative dose assessment is still required. Some practical approaches of solving this task are discussed.

  7. Effect of polarization and geometric factors on quantitative laser-induced fluorescence- to-Raman intensity ratios of water samples and a new calibration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Killinger, Dennis K.

    2003-09-01

    A 266-nm laser-induced fluorescence system was used to study the effect of polarization of the excitation source and geometry of the collection optics on the ratio of the signal from a fluorescence standard, quinine sulfate, and the Raman scatter from water. Although the ratio is sometimes considered to be a constant and is used for intersystem comparisons, our studies showed that the Raman signal and, thus, the ratio can vary by a factor of up to 3.6. These experimental values agree with previous studies by others involving gas and flame Raman spectroscopy and suggest a new calibration method for intersystem comparison of different fluorescence systems.

  8. Analysis of coal-derived products and environmental systems by synchronous fluorescence and room temperature phosphorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Gammage, R. B.

    1980-01-01

    Two simple room temperature techniques, synchronous fluorescence and phosphorescence, were utilized to determine the polynuclear aromatic (PNA) compounds in various complex systems including synthetic multicomponent mixtures and real-life samples such as workplace air particulate extracts and coal-derived samples. The results demonstrate that as many as a dozen PNA compounds can be identified and quantified by these two analytical methods.

  9. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  10. Standoff alpha radiation detection via excited state absorption of air

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jimmy; Yin, Stuart Shizhuo; Brenizer, Jack; Hui, Rongqing

    2013-06-24

    A standoff alpha radiation detection technique based on the physical mechanism of excited state absorption of air molecules was explored and is presented in this paper. Instead of directly detecting the radiation via measuring the intensity of radiation induced air fluorescence, the radiation is detected via the excited state absorption of alpha radiation excited/ionized air molecules. Both theoretical analyses and experimental verifications were conducted. The experimental results confirmed that the radiation could be detected via excited state absorption of radiation excited/ionized air molecules at a 10 m standoff distance, which was consistent with the theoretical analyses.

  11. Controlling Air Traffic (Simulated) in the Presence of Automation (CATS PAu) 1995: A Study of Measurement Techniques for Situation Awareness in Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Jennifer R.

    1995-01-01

    As automated systems proliferate in aviation systems, human operators are taking on less and less of an active role in the jobs they once performed, often reducing what should be important jobs to tasks barely more complex than monitoring machines. When operators are forced into these roles, they risk slipping into hazardous states of awareness, which can lead to reduced skills, lack of vigilance, and the inability to react quickly and competently when there is a machine failure. Using Air Traffic Control (ATC) as a model, the present study developed tools for conducting tests focusing on levels of automation as they relate to situation awareness. Subjects participated in a two-and-a-half hour experiment that consisted of a training period followed by a simulation of air traffic control similar to the system presently used by the FAA, then an additional simulation employing automated assistance. Through an iterative design process utilizing numerous revisions and three experimental sessions, several measures for situational awareness in a simulated Air Traffic Control System were developed and are prepared for use in future experiments.

  12. Effect of Controlled Deposition of ZnS Shell on the Photostability of CdTe Quantum Dots as Studied by Conventional Fluorescence and FCS Techniques.

    PubMed

    Patra, Satyajit; Seth, Sudipta; Samanta, Anunay

    2015-12-21

    The effect of one and two monolayers of ZnS shells on the photostability of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in aqueous and nonaqueous media has been studied by monitoring the fluorescence behavior of the QDs under ensemble and single-molecule conditions. ZnS capping of the CdTe QDs leads to significant enhancement of the fluorescence brightness of these QDs. Considerable enhancement of the photostability of the shell-protected QDs, including the suppression of photoactivation, is also observed. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements reveal an increase in the number of particles undergoing reversible fluorescent on-off transitions in the volume under observation with increasing excitation power; this effect is found to be more pronounced in the case of core-only QDs than for core-shell QDs. PMID:26432977

  13. SU-E-P-15: Technique Factor Modulation and Reference Plane Air Kerma Rates in Response to Simulated Patient Thickness Variations for a Sample of Current Generation Fluoroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, K; Rakowski, J; Dong, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. Methods: A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and spectral filtration over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within a default abdomen or body imaging protocol. Results: The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. Some vendors have made hardware advances increasing the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes; this was evident in the acquisition air kerma rates. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ copper filtration in the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Conclusion: Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and provides opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. The enhanced radiation output capabilities of some of the fluoroscopes may, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these higher output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Therefore, all parties involved in imaging, including the clinical team, medical physicists, and imaging vendors, must work

  14. Fluorescence Recovery after Merging a Droplet to Measure the Two-dimensional Diffusion of a Phospholipid Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Dae-Woong; Kim, KyuHan; Choi, Myung Chul; Choi, Siyoung Q.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new method to measure the lateral diffusivity of a surfactant monolayer at the fluid-fluid interface, called fluorescence recovery after merging (FRAM). FRAM adopts the same principles as the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, especially for measuring fluorescence recovery after bleaching a specific area, but FRAM uses a drop coalescence instead of photobleaching dye molecules to induce a chemical potential gradient of dye molecules. Our technique has several advantages over FRAP: it only requires a fluorescence microscope rather than a confocal microscope equipped with high power lasers; it is essentially free from the selection of fluorescence dyes; and it has far more freedom to define the measured diffusion area. Furthermore, FRAM potentially provides a route for studying the mixing or inter-diffusion of two different surfactants, when the monolayers at a surface of droplet and at a flat air/water interface are prepared with different species, independently. PMID:26556128

  15. Fluorescence Recovery after Merging a Droplet to Measure the Two-dimensional Diffusion of a Phospholipid Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dae-Woong; Kim, KyuHan; Choi, Myung Chul; Choi, Siyoung Q

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new method to measure the lateral diffusivity of a surfactant monolayer at the fluid-fluid interface, called fluorescence recovery after merging (FRAM). FRAM adopts the same principles as the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, especially for measuring fluorescence recovery after bleaching a specific area, but FRAM uses a drop coalescence instead of photobleaching dye molecules to induce a chemical potential gradient of dye molecules. Our technique has several advantages over FRAP: it only requires a fluorescence microscope rather than a confocal microscope equipped with high power lasers; it is essentially free from the selection of fluorescence dyes; and it has far more freedom to define the measured diffusion area. Furthermore, FRAM potentially provides a route for studying the mixing or inter-diffusion of two different surfactants, when the monolayers at a surface of droplet and at a flat air/water interface are prepared with different species, independently. PMID:26556128

  16. Excessive Labeling Technique Provides a Highly Sensitive Fluorescent Probe for Real-time Monitoring of Biodegradation of Biopolymer Pharmaceuticals in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Terekhov, S. S.; Smirnov, I. V.; Shamborant, O. G.; Zenkova, M. A.; Chernolovskaya, E. L.; Gladkikh, D. V.; Murashev, A. N.; Dyachenko, I. A.; Knorre, V. D.; Belogurov, A. A.; Ponomarenko, N. A.; Deyev, S. M.; Vlasov, V. V.; Gabibov, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant proteins represent a large sector of the biopharma market. Determination of the main elimination pathways raises the opportunities to significantly increase their half-lives in vivo. However, evaluation of biodegradation of pharmaceutical biopolymers performed in the course of pre-clinical studies is frequently complicated. Noninvasive pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies in living organism are possible using proteins conjugated with near-infrared dyes. In the present study we designed a highly efficient probe based on fluorescent dye self-quenching for monitoring of in vivo biodegradation of recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase. The maximum enhancement of integral fluorescence in response to degradation of an intravenously administered enzyme was observed 6 h after injection. Importantly, excessive butyrylcholinesterase labeling with fluorescent dye results in significant changes in the pharmacokinetic properties of the obtained conjugate. This fact must be taken into consideration during future pharmacokinetic studies using in vivo bioimaging. PMID:25558395

  17. TECHNIQUES TO ASSESS CROSS-BORDER AIR POLLUTION AND APPLICATION TO A U.S.-MEXICO BORDER REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A year-long assessment of cross-border air pollution was conducted in the eastmost section of the US-Mexico border region, known as the Lower Rio Grande Valley, in South Texas. Measurements were conducted on the US side and included fine particle mass (PM2.5) and elemental com...

  18. Development of a Mobile Tracer Correlation Techniques for Assessment of Air Emissions from Landfills and Other Area Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved understanding of air emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water ponds, open-source processing, and agricultural operations is a topic of increasing environmental importance. In many cases, the size of the area source, coupled with spatial-heteroge...

  19. LIF measurements of oxygen concentration gradients along flat and wavy air-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Philip T., Jr.; Duke, Steve R.

    Instantaneous spatially-varying measurements of concentration gradients occurring during aeration for flat, stagnant air-water interfaces and for interfaces with mechanically-generated waves are presented. Measurements were obtained in a laboratory wave tank using a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique that images planar oxygen concentration fields near air-water interfaces. Pulsed nitrogen laser light focused to a thin sheet induces the fluorescence of pyrene butyric acid (in micromolar concentration) in deoxygenated water. The PBA fluorescence is quenched by dissolved oxygen. A high-resolution CCD camera images in two dimensions the intensities of the fluorescence field, providing spatial measurements of oxygen concentration with magnification of 7 μm per pixel. The concentration fields, gradients, and boundary layer thicknesses along the flat and wavy air-water interfaces are quantified and compared to previous measurements associated with sheared gas-liquid interfaces and with wind-generated waves.

  20. Fourth-derivative synchronous spectrofluorimetry and HPLC with fluorescence detection as two analytical techniques for the simultaneous determination of itopride and domperidone.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fawzia; Nasr, Jenny Jeehan

    2016-02-01

    Two simple, rapid and sensitive methods, namely, fourth-derivative synchronous spectrofluorimetry (method I) and HPLC with fluorescence detection (method II) were developed for the simultaneous analysis of a binary mixture of itopride HCl (ITP) and domperidone (DOM) without prior separation. The first method was based on measuring the fourth derivative of the synchronous fluorescence spectra of the two drugs at Δλ = 40 nm in methanol. The different experimental parameters affecting the synchronous fluorescence of the studied drugs were carefully optimized. Chromatographic separation was performed in < 6.0 min using a RP C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm particle size) with fluorescence detection at 344 nm after excitation at 285 nm. A mobile phase composed of a mixture of 0.02 M phosphate buffer with acetonitrile in a ratio of 55 : 45, pH 4.5, was used at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. Linearity ranges were found to be 0.1-2 µg/mL for ITP in both methods, whereas those for DOM were found to be 0.08-2 and 0.05-1.5 µg/mL in methods I and II, respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in synthetic mixtures and laboratory-prepared tablets.

  1. In situ investigation of the surface silvering of late Roman coins by combined use of high energy broad-beam and low energy micro-beam X-ray fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F. P.; Garraffo, S.; Pappalardo, L.; Rizzo, F.

    2012-07-01

    The compositional analysis of archeological metals performed with the X-ray Fluorescence technique (XRF) provides information on the ancient technology. One of the most interesting case-study concerns the techniques used by Romans for silvering the surface of coins. Different metallurgical processes have been suggested in previous studies. Recently the investigation has been addressed to the mercury-silvering and to its possible use in the mass-production of coins minted during the late period (after 294 AD). In the present paper the non-destructive investigation of the silvering process used for manufacturing the Roman nummi - the important typology of coin introduced by Diocletian in his monetary reform - is approached by the combined use of the standard X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and the low energy micro-X-Ray Fluorescence (LE-μXRF) portable methods. The research was focused on the systematic determination of the mercury presence in a large number of samples and on its correlation with silver in the surface of the coins. 1041 Roman nummi belonging to the Misurata Treasure were analyzed in situ, at the Leptis Magna Museum (Al Khums, Libya). The treasure, composed of about 108 thousand silvered coins, gives the unique opportunity to study the Roman coinage in a wide interval of time (about 40 years in the period 294-333 AD) and in almost all the imperial mints operating in the Roman world.

  2. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Farquar, G; Leif, R

    2009-07-15

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  3. Identifying the Drivers and Occurrence of Historical and Future Extreme Air-quality Events in the United States Using Advanced Statistical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, W. C.; Heald, C. L.; Cooley, D. S.; Russell, B. T.

    2013-12-01

    Episodes of air-quality extremes are known to be heavily influenced by meteorological conditions, but traditional statistical analysis techniques focused on means and standard deviations may not capture important relationships at the tails of these two respective distributions. Using quantile regression (QR) and extreme value theory (EVT), methodologies specifically developed to examine the behavior of heavy-tailed phenomena, we analyze extremes in the multi-decadal record of ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the United States. We investigate observations from the Air Quality System (AQS) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) networks for connections to meteorological drivers, as provided by the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) product. Through regional characterization by quantile behavior and EVT modeling of the meteorological covariates most responsible for extreme levels of O3 and PM2.5, we estimate pollutant exceedance frequencies and uncertainties in the United States under current and projected future climates, highlighting those meteorological covariates and interactions whose influence on air-quality extremes differs most significantly from the behavior of the bulk of the distribution. As current policy may be influenced by air-quality projections, we then compare these estimated frequencies to those produced by NCAR's Community Earth System Model (CESM) identifying regions, covariates, and species whose extreme behavior may not be adequately captured by current models.

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopy of anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Kühni, M.; Guibert, P.

    2014-06-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence of anisole as tracer of isooctane at an excitation wavelength of 266 nm was investigated for conditions relevant to rapid compression machine studies and for more general application of internal combustion engines regarding temperature, pressure, and ambient gas composition. An optically accessible high pressure and high temperature chamber was operated by using different ambient gases (Ar, N2, CO2, air, and gas mixtures). Fluorescence experiments were investigated at a large range of pressure and temperature (0.2-4 MPa and 473-823 K). Anisole fluorescence quantum yield decreases strongly with temperature for every considered ambient gas, due to efficient radiative mechanisms of intersystem crossing. Concerning the pressure effect, the fluorescence signal decreases with increasing pressure, because increasing the collisional rate leads to more important non-radiative collisional relaxation. The quenching effect is strongly efficient in oxygen, with a fluorescence evolution described by Stern-Volmer relation. The dependence of anisole fluorescence versus thermodynamic parameters suggests the use of this tracer for temperature imaging in specific conditions detailed in this paper. The calibration procedure for temperature measurements is established for the single-excitation wavelength and two-color detection technique.

  5. Measurements of Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence at 685 nm by Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, F.; Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Corp, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or solar Fraunhofer lines in the reflected spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is a triple etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer designed and optimized specifically for the ChlF sensing from an airborne platform using this line fill-in technique. In this paper, we will present the results of APFS ChlF measurements obtained from a NASA Langley King Air during two airborne campaigns (12/12 in 2014 and 5/20 in 2015) over various land, river, and vegetated targets in Virginia during stressed and growth seasons.

  6. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  7. Fate of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting as studied by two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy in combination with multiple fluorescence labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ping; Shen, Qi-Rong; Yu, Guang-Hui; Ran, Wei; Xu, Yang-Chun

    2012-02-01

    Detailed knowledge of the molecular events during composting is important in improving the efficiency of this process. By combining two-dimensional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) correlation spectroscopy and multiple fluorescent labeling, it was possible to study the degradation of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting. Two-dimensional FTIR correlation spectroscopy provided structural information and was used to deconvolute overlapping bands found in the compost FTIR spectra. The degradation of biopolymers in rapeseed meal and wheat bran composts followed the sequence: cellulose, heteropolysaccharides, and proteins. Fluorescent labeling suggested that cellulose formed an intact network-like structure and the other biopolymers were embedded in the core of this structure. The sequence of degradation of biopolymers during composting was related to their distribution patterns.

  8. Fate of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting as studied by two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy in combination with multiple fluorescence labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ping; Shen, Qi-Rong; Yu, Guang-Hui; Ran, Wei; Xu, Yang-Chun

    2012-02-01

    Detailed knowledge of the molecular events during composting is important in improving the efficiency of this process. By combining two-dimensional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) correlation spectroscopy and multiple fluorescent labeling, it was possible to study the degradation of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting. Two-dimensional FTIR correlation spectroscopy provided structural information and was used to deconvolute overlapping bands found in the compost FTIR spectra. The degradation of biopolymers in rapeseed meal and wheat bran composts followed the sequence: cellulose, heteropolysaccharides, and proteins. Fluorescent labeling suggested that cellulose formed an intact network-like structure and the other biopolymers were embedded in the core of this structure. The sequence of degradation of biopolymers during composting was related to their distribution patterns. PMID:22182472

  9. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  10. Detailed modeling and laser-induced fluorescence imaging of nitric oxide in a NH(i)-seeded non-premixed methane/air flame

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Glarborg, Peter; Jensen, Anker D.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the formation of NO in laminar, nitrogen diluted methane diffusion flames that are seeded with ammonia in the fuel stream. We have performed numerical simulations with detailed chemistry as well as laser-induced fluorescence imaging measurements for a range of ammonia injection rates. For comparison with the experimental data, synthetic LIF images are calculated based on the numerical data accounting for temperature and fluorescence quenching effects. We demonstrate good agreement between measurements and computations. The LIF corrections inferred from the simulation are then used to calculate absolute NO mole fractions from the measured signal.The NO formation in both doped and undoped flames occurs in the flame sheet. In the undoped flame, four different mechanisms including thermal and prompt NO appear to contribute to NO formation. As the NH3 seeding level increases, fuel-NO becomes the dominant mechanism and N2 shifts from being a net reactant to being a net product. Nitric oxide in the undoped flame as well as in the core region of the doped flames are underpredicted by the model; we attribute this mainly to inaccuracies in the NO recycling chemistry on the fuel-rich side of the flame sheet.

  11. Effect of He-Ne laser irradiation on erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes of children in vitro as studied by the intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotovskaya, Anna V.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Ulaschik, Vladimir S.; Mostovnikov, Vasili A.

    2000-11-01

    In recent years the treatment of blood with low intensity laser irradiation has become popular in a variety of clinical applications due to its anti-inflammatory, biostimulative and immune-stimulatory effects etc. Despite of wide using of laser blood irradiation in the pediatric practice there is lack of information concerning the sensitivity of children blood cells to laser irradiation. At present study the influence of the He-Ne laser irradiation on the lipid physico-chemical state in lymphocytes and isolated erythrocyte membranes of 8-16 years old children using lipophilic fluorescence probe pyrene was investigated in vitro. It was shown that fluorescence parameters of pyrene incorporated into erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes after laser irradiation ((lambda) equals 630nm) at dose of 24 J/cm2 at t equals 18 +/- 2 (degree)C were unchanged. The intensity of intrinsic protein UV-fluorescence ((lambda)ex equals 297 nm, (lambda)em equals 332 nm) of lymphocytes exposed to the same irradiation was decreased insignificantly. The obtained data indicate that He-Ne laser irradiation at the above dose does not affect the lipid microviscosity of erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes.

  12. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  13. The History of Ground-Based Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Astrophysics with the Atmospheric Air Cherenkov Telescope Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2013-06-01

    In the recent two decades the ground-based technique of imaging atmosphericescopes has established itself as a powerful new discipline in science. As of today some ˜ 150 sources of gamma rays of very different types, of both galactic and extragalactic origin, have been discovered due to this technique. The study of these sources is providing clues to many basic questions in astrophysics, astro-particle physics, physics of cosmic rays and cosmology. The current generation of telescopes, despite the young age of the technique, offers a solid performance. The technique is still maturing, leading to the next generation large instrument known under the name Cherenkov Telescope Array. The latter's sensitivity will be an order of magnitude higher than that of the currently best instruments VERITAS, H.E.S.S. and MAGIC. This article is devoted to outlining the milestones in a long history that step-by-step have given shape to this technique and have brought about today's successful source marathon.

  14. Investigation of Techniques to Improve Continuous Air Monitors Under Conditions of High Dust Loading in Environmental Settings

    SciTech Connect

    Suilou Huang; Stephen D. Schery; John C. Rodgers

    2002-07-23

    A number of DOE facilities, such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), use alpha-particle environmental continuous air monitors (ECAMs) to monitor air for unwanted releases of radioactive aerosols containing such materials as plutonium and uranium. High sensitivity, ease of operation, and lack of false alarms are all important for ECAMs. The object of the project was to conduct investigations to improve operation of ECAMs, particularly under conditions where a lot of nonradioactive dust may be deposited on the filters (conditions of high dust loading). The presence of such dust may increase the frequency with which filters must be changed and can lead to an increased incidence of false alarms due to deteriorated energy resolution and response specificity to the radionuclides of interest. A major finding of the investigation, not previously documented, was that under many conditions thick layers of underlying nonradioactive dust do not decrease energy resolution and specificity for target radionuclides if the radioactive aerosol arrives as a sudden thin burst deposit, as commonly occurs in the early-warning alarm mode. As a result, operators of ECAMs may not need to change filters as often as previously thought and have data upon which to base more reliable operating procedures.

  15. A comparative study on total reflection X-ray fluorescence determination of low atomic number elements in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using different excitation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, N. L.; Kanrar, Buddhadev; Aggarwal, S. K.; Wobrauschek, Peter; Rauwolf, M.; Streli, Christina

    2014-09-01

    A comparison of trace element determinations of low atomic number (Z) elements Na, Mg, Al, P, K and Ca in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using W Lβ1, Mo Kα and Cr Kα excitations has been made. For Mo Kα and W Lβ1 excitations a Si (Li) detector with beryllium window was used and measurements were performed in air and helium atmospheres. For Cr Kα excitation, a Si (Li) detector with an ultra thin polymer window (UTW) was used and measurements were made in vacuum and air atmospheres. The sensitivities of the elemental X-ray lines were determined using TXRF spectra of standard solutions and processing them by IAEA QXAS program. The elemental concentrations of the elements in other solutions were determined using their TXRF spectra and pre-determined sensitivity values. The study suggests that, using the above experimental set up, Mo Kα excitation is not suited for trace determination of low atomic number element. Excitation by WLβ1 and helium atmosphere, the spectrometer can be used for the determination of elements with Z = 15 (P) and above with fairly good detection limits whereas Cr Kα excitation with ultra thin polymer window and vacuum atmosphere is good for the elements having Z = 11 (Na) and above. The detection limits using this set up vary from 7048 pg for Na to 83 pg for Ti.

  16. Single-cell analysis of dihydroartemisinin-induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated caspase-8 activation and mitochondrial pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells using fluorescence imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Li

    2010-07-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a front-line antimalarial herbal compound, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activity with low toxicity. We have previously reported that DHA induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. However, the cellular target and molecular mechanism of DHA-induced apoptosis is still poorly defined. We use confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching techniques to explore the roles of DHA-elicited reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the DHA-induced Bcl-2 family proteins activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase cascade, and cell death. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that DHA induced ROS-mediated apoptosis. Confocal imaging analysis in a single living cell and Western blot assay showed that DHA triggered ROS-dependent Bax translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, alteration of mitochondrial morphology, cytochrome c release, caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 activation, indicating the coexistence of ROS-mediated mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time that DHA induces cell apoptosis by triggering ROS-mediated caspase-8/Bid activation and the mitochondrial pathway, which provides some novel insights into the application of DHA as a potential anticancer drug and a new therapeutic strategy by targeting ROS signaling in lung adenocarcinoma therapy in the future.

  17. Fluorescence axial nanotomography with plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Cade, Nicholas I; Fruhwirth, Gilbert O; Krasavin, Alexey V; Ng, Tony; Richards, David

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel imaging technique with super-resolution axial sensitivity, exploiting the changes in fluorescence lifetime above a plasmonic substrate. Using conventional confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging, we show that it is possible to deliver down to 6 nm axial position sensitivity of fluorophores in whole biological cell imaging. We employ this technique to map the topography of the cellular membrane, and demonstrate its application in an investigation of receptor-mediated endocytosis in carcinoma cells.

  18. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  19. Improved technique for fluorescence in situ hybridisation analysis of isolated nuclei from archival, B5 or formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Schurter, M J; LeBrun, D P; Harrison, K J

    2002-04-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) is an effective method to detect chromosomal alterations in a variety of tissue types, including archived paraffin wax embedded specimens fixed in B5 or formalin. However, precipitating fixatives such as B5 have been known to produce unsatisfactory results in comparison with formalin when used for FISH. This study describes an effective nuclear isolation and FISH procedure for B5 and formalin fixed tissue, optimising the nuclear isolation step and nuclei pretreatments using tonsil and mantle cell lymphoma specimens. The protocol presented can be used to isolate nuclei and perform FISH on B5 or formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded samples from a variety of tissue types.

  20. Evaluation of a technique to measure tropospheric hydroxyl radicals using an aqueous phase salicylic acid scrubbing solution, HPLCseparation and fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, R. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Harris, G. W.

    2003-04-01

    A novel method for monitoring gas phase hydroxyl radicals was examined using a liquid-phase salicylic acid solution to trap tropospheric OH. Quantification occurred following HPLC seperaration and fluorescence detection of one of the products, 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid. Although the sensitivity was sufficient to measure typical daytime OH concentrations, the method was hindered by a number of interferences. While most of these were identified and eliminated, an interference from methylperoxy radicals was discovered that could not be removed. The validity of previous reports of OH detection using this method is therefore brought into question.

  1. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  2. A technique for automatic tubing occlusion in response to air bubble detection when using a centrifugal pump.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, A W; Hargadine, W L; Lambert, G S; Long, A C

    1990-01-01

    A double acting pneumatically powered cylinder, energized by an electrically activated solenoid valve, is used to occlude the outflow line from a Bio-Medicus (a) constrained vortex pump. The cylinder is mounted on a tubing guide that is fastened to a pole clamp. A Sarns (b) air bubble detector, placed on the pump inflow line is used to provide the signal to activate the solenoid valve. The outflow occluder is capable of 100% occlusion of 3/8 x 3/32 inch Tygon tubing up to pressures of 2586 mmHg. The occluder system is able to work with many types of bubble detectors and is applicable to any form of non-occlusive pump.

  3. Techniques of low technology sampling of air pollution by metals: a comparison of concentrations and map patterns.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, O L; Gailey, F A

    1987-07-01

    During a 17 month survey of air pollution in the town of Armadale, central Scotland, the concentrations of some metals (iron, manganese, zinc, lead, copper, chrome, nickel, cadmium, and cobalt) were measured in seven types of low technology sampler--four indigenous and three transplanted--at 47 sites. The geographical patterns of the concentrations in the samplers were compared on two types of map. For most metals, sites with high concentrations were present close to the foundry and also in the north of the town. The differences between the patterns of pollution shown by the various types of sampler probably reflected differing mechanisms for collection and different affinities for various sizes and types of metal particle.

  4. Microstructural study of as sprayed and heat treated Ni3Al coatings deposited by air plasma spraying technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Rauf, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    Air plasma spraying system was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI 321 steel samples. After plasma spraying the coatings were heat treated at different temperatures i.e. 500 °C to 800 °C for 10 to 100 hours. The characterization tools such as, X-Ray diffraction analysis, optical and scanning electron microscopy were used. By comparing the XRD scan data of as sprayed and heat treated coating, it was observed that the formation of NiO increases drastically with time and temperature. Due to the formation of NiO, hardness was also enhanced. The oxidation behavior was observed by using optical microscope and when it was studied that the oxidation was increasing with time and temperature. Further, the SEM tool was utilized to study the detail microstructural behavior such as shrinkage cavity and oxide particles. The other phases like alumina and spinel phases were determined by using Energy dispersive spectrometer method.

  5. Entrainment Heat Flux Computed with Lidar and Wavelet Technique in Buenos Aires During Last Chaitén Volcano Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawelko, Ezequiel Eduardo; Salvador, Jacobo Omar; Ristori, Pablo Roberto; Pallotta, Juan Vicente; Otero, Lidia Ana; Quel, Eduardo Jaime

    2016-06-01

    At Lidar Division of CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET) a multiwavelength Raman-Rayleigh lidar optimized to measure the atmospheric boundary layer is being operated. This instrument is used for monitoring important aerosol intrusion events in Buenos Aires, such as the arrival of volcanic ashes from the Chaitén volcano eruption on May 2008. That was the first monitoring of volcanic ash with lidar in Argentina. In this event several volcanic ash plumes with high aerosol optical thickness were detected in the free atmosphere, affecting the visibility, surface radiation and therefore, the ABL evolution. In this work, the impact of ashes in entrainment flux ratio is studied. This parameter is obtained from the atmospheric boundary layer height and entrainment zone thickness using algorithms based on covariance wavelet transform.

  6. Effects of air annealing on CdS quantum dots thin film grown at room temperature by CBD technique intended for photosensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Shaheed U.; Desale, Dipalee J.; Siddiqui, Farha Y.; Ghosh, Arindam; Birajadar, Ravikiran B.; Ghule, Anil V.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of different intensities (40, 60 100 and 200 W) of light on CdS quantum dots thin film annealed at 350 °C indicating enhancement in (a) photo-current and (b) photosensitivity. Highlights: ► The preparation of CdS nanodot thin film at room temperature by M-CBD technique. ► Study of air annealing on prepared CdS nanodots thin film. ► The optimized annealing temperature for CdS nanodot thin film is 350 °C. ► Modified CdS thin films can be used in photosensor application. -- Abstract: CdS quantum dots thin-films have been deposited onto the glass substrate at room temperature using modified chemical bath deposition technique. The prepared thin films were further annealed in air atmosphere at 150, 250 and 350 °C for 1 h and subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, electrical resistivity and I–V system. The modifications observed in morphology and opto-electrical properties of the thin films are presented.

  7. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si -Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; et al

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research andmore » Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.« less

  8. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si-Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wofsy, Steve C.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Kort, Eric A.; Fischer, Marc L.; Trainer, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. We estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.

  9. Application of the ultrasonic technique and high-speed filming for the study of the structure of air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, R.D.M.; Venturini, O.J.; Tanahashi, E.I.; Neves, F. Jr.; Franca, F.A.

    2009-10-15

    Multiphase flows are very common in industry, oftentimes involving very harsh environments and fluids. Accordingly, there is a need to determine the dispersed phase holdup using noninvasive fast responding techniques; besides, knowledge of the flow structure is essential for the assessment of the transport processes involved. The ultrasonic technique fulfills these requirements and could have the capability to provide the information required. In this paper, the potential of the ultrasonic technique for application to two-phase flows was investigated by checking acoustic attenuation data against experimental data on the void fraction and flow topology of vertical, upward, air-water bubbly flows in the zero to 15% void fraction range. The ultrasonic apparatus consisted of one emitter/receiver transducer and three other receivers at different positions along the pipe circumference; simultaneous high-speed motion pictures of the flow patterns were made at 250 and 1000 fps. The attenuation data for all sensors exhibited a systematic interrelated behavior with void fraction, thereby testifying to the capability of the ultrasonic technique to measure the dispersed phase holdup. From the motion pictures, basic gas phase structures and different flows patterns were identified that corroborated several features of the acoustic attenuation data. Finally, the acoustic wave transit time was also investigated as a function of void fraction. (author)

  10. Techniques used for the analysis of oculometer eye-scanning data obtained from an air traffic control display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Daniel J.; Burdette, Daniel W.; Capron, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The methodology and techniques used to collect and analyze look-point position data from a real-time ATC display-format comparison experiment are documented. That study compared the delivery precision and controller workload of three final approach spacing aid display formats. Using an oculometer, controller lookpoint position data were collected, associated with gaze objects (e.g., moving aircraft) on the ATC display, and analyzed to determine eye-scan behavior. The equipment involved and algorithms for saving, synchronizing with the ATC simulation output, and filtering the data are described. Target (gaze object) and cross-check scanning identification algorithms are also presented. Data tables are provided of total dwell times, average dwell times, and cross-check scans. Flow charts, block diagrams, file record descriptors, and source code are included. The techniques and data presented are intended to benefit researchers in other studies that incorporate non-stationary gaze objects and oculometer equipment.

  11. Two-dimensional imaging of molecular hydrogen in H2-air diffusion flames using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, W.; Kumar, V.; Glesk, I.; Miles, R.; Diskin, G.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a tunable ArF laser at 193.26 nm to record simultaneous single-laser-shot, planar images of molecular hydrogen and hot oxygen in a turbulent H2-air diffusion flame. Excitation spectra of fuel and oxidant-rich flame zones confirm a partial overlap of the two-photon H2 and single-photon O2 Schumann-Runge absorption bands. UV Rayleigh scattering images of flame structure and estimated detection limits for the H2 two-photon imaging are also presented.

  12. Photophysical behavior in spread monolayers. Dansyl fluorescence as a probe for polarity at the air-water interface. [N-(5-(dimethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonyl)dihexadecylamine

    SciTech Connect

    Grieser, F.; Thistlethwaite, P.; Urquhart, R.; Patterson, L.K.

    1987-09-24

    The emission spectrum of N-(5-(dimethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonyl)dihexadecylamine (dansyldihexadecylamine) in monolayers at the air-water interface has been studied. In some cases sudden shifts in the dansyl emission can be correlated with particular features of the surface pressure-area isotherms. These spectral shifts can be explained in terms of a change in the conformation of the head group on the surface and with aggregation of the dansyldihexadecylamine. In other cases the dansyl emission shows a blue shift with increasing compression that can be associated with reduced head-group hydration.

  13. Enhanced light collection in fluorescence microscopy using self-assembled micro-reflectors

    PubMed Central

    Göröcs, Zoltán; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optical system is directly linked to the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, which creates detection challenges for low-NA, wide-field and high-throughput imaging systems. Here we demonstrate a method to increase the light collection efficiency from micron-scale fluorescent objects using self-assembled vapor-condensed polyethylene glycol droplets, which act as micro-reflectors for fluorescent light. Around each fluorescent particle, a liquid meniscus is formed that increases the excitation efficiency and redirects part of the laterally-emitted fluorescent light towards the detector due to internal reflections at the liquid-air interface of the meniscus. The three-dimensional shape of this micro-reflector can be tuned as a function of time, vapor temperature, and substrate contact angle, providing us optimized SNR performance for fluorescent detection. Based on these self-assembled micro-reflectors, we experimentally demonstrate ~2.5-3 fold enhancement of the fluorescent signal from 2-10 μm sized particles. A theoretical explanation of the formation rate and shapes of these micro-reflectors is presented, along with a ray tracing model of their optical performance. This method can be used as a sample preparation technique for consumer electronics-based microscopy and sensing tools, thus increasing the sensitivity of low-NA systems that image fluorescent micro-objects. PMID:26083081

  14. Enhanced light collection in fluorescence microscopy using self-assembled micro-reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göröcs, Zoltán; McLeod, Euan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2015-06-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the optical system is directly linked to the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective, which creates detection challenges for low-NA, wide-field and high-throughput imaging systems. Here we demonstrate a method to increase the light collection efficiency from micron-scale fluorescent objects using self-assembled vapor-condensed polyethylene glycol droplets, which act as micro-reflectors for fluorescent light. Around each fluorescent particle, a liquid meniscus is formed that increases the excitation efficiency and redirects part of the laterally-emitted fluorescent light towards the detector due to internal reflections at the liquid-air interface of the meniscus. The three-dimensional shape of this micro-reflector can be tuned as a function of time, vapor temperature, and substrate contact angle, providing us optimized SNR performance for fluorescent detection. Based on these self-assembled micro-reflectors, we experimentally demonstrate ~2.5-3 fold enhancement of the fluorescent signal from 2-10 μm sized particles. A theoretical explanation of the formation rate and shapes of these micro-reflectors is presented, along with a ray tracing model of their optical performance. This method can be used as a sample preparation technique for consumer electronics-based microscopy and sensing tools, thus increasing the sensitivity of low-NA systems that image fluorescent micro-objects.

  15. A comparison of X-ray fluorescence and wet chemical analysis for lead on air filters from different personal samplers used in a bronze foundry.

    PubMed

    Harper, Martin; Pacolay, Bruce; Andrew, Michael E

    2005-06-01

    Portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) technology may provide faster turn-around without compromising accuracy when assessing personal exposures to metals such as lead, but it has only been tested in limited field environments. This study is part of a series, where different sampler types are used to collect airborne lead in different environments for presentation to a portable XRF analyzer. In this case personal samples were taken at a bronze foundry where lead is added to an alloy of copper, zinc and iron to improve casting, using the closed-face 37 mm cassette, the 37 mm GSP or "cone" sampler, the 25 mm Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) inhalable sampler, the 25 mm Button sampler, and the open-face 25 mm cassette. Mixed cellulose-ester filters were used in all samplers. Following XRF analysis the samples were extracted with acid and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP). For lead, all five samplers gave correlations (r(2)) greater than 0.9 between the two analytical methods over the entire range of found lead mass, which encompassed both the action level and the permissible exposure limit enforced in the USA by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). However, a correction was required to adjust linear regression trendlines to give a 1 : 1 correlation for the average of three readings across the GSP sampler, and a similar correction was required for the single readings from the IOM sampler and the 25 mm filter cassette. The bias possibly is due to interference from other metals, possibly copper which can absorb the fluorescent radiation of lead. In the case of the Button sampler, the bias is larger, indicating a further source of error, perhaps due to the thickness of the deposit. However, in all cases, correction of the lead results did not greatly affect the overall percentage of samples where the XRF result was within 25% of the ICP result, although it did improve the overall accuracy of the results. The

  16. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si -Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wofsy, Steve C.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Kort, Eric A.; Fischer, Marc L.; Trainer, Michael

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.

  17. Climatology of Vertical Air Motion During Rainfall in Niamey, Niger and Black Forest, Germany using an Innovative Cloud Radar Retrieval Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, E. P.; Giangrande, S. E.; Kollias, P.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has deployed its ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to collect continuous measurements in several climatologically distinct locations, including a year-long stay in Niamey, Niger and eight months in Germany's Black Forest. The AMF includes a vertically pointing 95 GHz cloud radar, a tool of choice for profiling non-precipitating clouds at high spatial and temporal resolutions, but commonly considered poorly suited to the quantitative study of precipitation, due in large part to attenuation. However, an innovative technique first explored by Lhermitte in the late 1980s, and subsequently by others, sidesteps much of the quantitative uncertainty imposed by attenuation by exploiting non-Rayleigh resonance effects of scattering from raindrops at 95 GHz. Given a modest range of suitable drop sizes, non-Rayleigh resonances appear as distinct peaks and valleys in Doppler spectra, which once identified, can be directly mapped to known drop sizes by Mie theory. Although attenuation in rain at 95 GHz is substantial, key to the technique is that all non-Rayleigh peaks and valleys in a given Doppler spectrum are affected equally, preserving their relative positions and magnitudes (barring feature extinction). Vertical air motion is retrieved very accurately by taking the difference between the measured Doppler velocity of a resonance feature (usually the first valley) and the known terminal velocity of its associated drop size. We have achieved promising retrieval accuracies at spatial and temporal resolutions of 30 meters and 2 seconds. Here we present lessons learned when the retrieval technique is automated and applied to measurements taken in rain over the full durations of the Niamey and Black Forest AMF deployments, comparing vertical air velocity patterns of monsoonal precipitation over the African desert with those of the orographically influenced precipitation in Germany's mountains.

  18. Modeling of experimental treatment of acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-containing water using corona discharge technique.

    PubMed

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Sano, Noriaki; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2006-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-contaminated water were experimentally treated using corona discharge reactions and gas absorption in a single water-film column. Mathematical modeling of the combined treatment was developed in this work. Efficient removal of the gaseous acetaldehyde was achieved while the corona discharge reactions produced short-lived species such as O and O- as well as ozone. Direct contact of the radicals and ions with water was known to produce aqueous OH radical, which contributes to the decomposition of organic contaminants: phenol, absorbed acetaldehyde, and intermediate byproducts in the water. The influence of initial phenol concentration ranging from 15 to 50 mg L(-1) and that of influent acetaldehyde ranging from 0 to 200 ppm were experimentally investigated and used to build the math model. The maximum energetic efficiency of TOC, phenol, and acetaldehyde were obtained at 25.6 x 10(-9) mol carbon J(-1), 25.0 x 10(-9) mol phenol J(-1), and 2.0 x 10(-9) mol acetaldehyde J(-1), respectively. The predictions for the decomposition of acetaldehyde, phenol, and their intermediates were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:16568779

  19. In vitro characterization of a controlled-release chlorpheniramine maleate delivery system prepared by the air-suspension technique.

    PubMed

    Mathir, Z M; Dangor, C M; Govender, T; Chetty, D J

    1997-01-01

    Non-pareil cores were spray-coated with a chlorpheniramine maleate (an alkylamine antihistamine) layer and a Eudragit NE30D overcoat in a Wurster air-suspension apparatus. In vitro dissolution studies demonstrated that drug release was a function of polymer membrane thickness. Polyethylene glycol 6000, as a hydrophillic additive, increased the in vitro release of chlorpheniramine maleate from the pellets. Pellets coated with 8.30% Eudragit NE30D, 0.50% talc and 1.00% polyethylene glycol 6000 were found to display desirable controlled release characteristics for chlorpheniramine maleate over the 8-h testing period, which were also comparable with that of Dykatuss capsules. The controlled release pellets exhibited first-order release characteristics for chlorpheniramine maleate. Reproducibility of the manufacturing conditions employed in the study were confirmed thus ensuring reproducibility of drug release characteristics between batches of chlorpheniramine maleate pellets. Drug release from the pellets was shown to be independent of the dissolution method and medium used. Pellets displayed no significant change in drug release characteristics relative to the initial drug release data when stored for 12 weeks at room temperature (20 +/- 2 degrees C) and for 8 weeks at a low temperature (5 +/- 1 degrees C). However, pellets stored at 37 degrees C with 80% relative humidity and at 40 +/- 2 degrees C showed a slower in vitro drug release after 8-week storage and therefore failed to maintain their initial drug release profile.

  20. Determination of nitrogen dioxide in ambient air by use of a passive sampling technique and triethanolamine as absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Krochmal, D.; Gorski, L. )

    1991-03-01

    The effects of temperature, humidity, and storage on a diffusive sampler were tested by use of the Amaya-Sugiura method, modified previously. Several materials were used as carriers for triethanolamine in the sampler. The mass of NO{sub 2} absorbed in the sampler was determined spectrophotometrically as nitrite by using Saltzman solution. The collection efficiency of the sampler was lower than that calculated from Fick's law of diffusion due to significant contribution of liquid phase in the overall sampler diffusive resistance. This resulted in an increase of the mass of NO{sub 2} absorbed in the sampler by ca. 20% per 10{degree}C of temperature growth and by ca. 25% when the relative humidity rose from 0 to 100%. Dependence of concentration of TEA solution in the sampler on the relative humidity of the air was noted. The relative precision of the method characterized by RSD was 10%; the detection limit of NO{sub 2} was 10 {mu}g/m{sup 3} for a 24-h exposure.

  1. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. We present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source. We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4-6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. These quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.

  2. Evaluation of real-time techniques to measure hydrogen peroxide in air at the permissible exposure limit.

    PubMed

    Puskar, M A; Plese, M R

    1996-09-01

    The major occupational concern from bio-decontamination of equipment using vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VHP) generation systems is potential operator exposure outside the protective barrier from possible VHP leaks or accidental releases from the sealed piece of equipment during decontamination. For this reason, different real time monitoring techniques were evaluated to determine their ability to accurately measure VHP at concentrations ranging from 0.5 ppm to 5 ppm. The results of this laboratory evaluation suggest that two of the four methods evaluated (the ion mobility spectrometer [IMS] and Polytron) will approximate the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health +/- 25% accuracy requirements for measuring the concentration of VHP at and near the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limit of 1.0 ppm. Over the range of 0.5 ppm to 5.1 ppm VHP, the IMS had an approximate pooled method accuracy of +/- 21%, while the Polytron had a pooled method accuracy of +/- 22%. However, both instruments had false readings when exposed to nominal concentrations of methanol, bleach, and sulfur dioxide. The two additional VHP monitoring techniques evaluated (the single point monitor [SPM] and Draeger tube) were unable to accurately measure the concentration of VHP when the relative humidity was below 20%.

  3. Millefiori glasswork technique in the Migration Period: Investigation of beads with the use of nondestructive X-ray fluorescence micro-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hložek, M.; Trojek, T.

    2015-11-01

    This article shows how a non-destructive X-ray fluorescence micro-analysis enabled us to describe the elemental composition and the production technology of a unique millefiori bead that was found in a burial ground in Kyjov (Hodonin district, Czech Republic) dating back to the Migration Period. This graveyard includes more than 250 graves belonging to the Germanic Lombard tribe that were carefully explored in 2010. Only a few Langobardic burial grounds have been revealed in the Moravia until now. This burial ground is therefore a remarkable find, to which particular attention has been paid. The main aim of our project was to provide a proper description of the production technology for the millefiori bead.

  4. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

  5. Highlights of the optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Patterson, G H

    2011-07-01

    The development of super-resolution microscopy techniques using molecular localization, such as photoactivated localization microscopy, fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy with independent running acquisition and many others, has heightened interest in molecules that will be grouped here into a category referred to as 'optical highlighter' fluorescent proteins. This review will survey many of the advances in development of fluorescent proteins for optically highlighting sub-populations of fluorescently labelled molecules.

  6. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  7. Supercapacitor electrode based on mixtures of graphene/graphite and carbon nanotubes fabricated using a new dynamic air-brush deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondavalli, P.; Delfaure, C.; Pribat, D.; Legagneux, P.

    2013-09-01

    This contribution deals with the fabrication of electrode and supercapacitor cell using a new dynamic air-brush deposition technique. This method allows to achieve extremely (ou highly) uniform mats with finely tuned thickness and weight in a completely reproducible way. Using this deposition technique, we have analyzed the effect of mixture of CNTs and graphene/graphite on the electrode and cell properties (energy, power and capacitance). using a mixture of 75% of graphene/graphite and 25% of CNTs we increased the power by a factor 2.5 compared to bare CNTs based electrodes. We also analyzed the effect of the weight firstly on the capacitance and specific energy and then on the specific power. We were able to reach a specific power of 200kW/Kg and a specific energy of 9.1Wh/Kg with an electrode having a surface of 2cm2 and a weight of 0.25mg composed by 50% of CNTs and graphene/graphite (using a common aqueous electrolyte). using our deposition technique we are able to achieve supercapacitors with ad-hoc characteristics simply modulating the weight and the concentration of the mixture in a completely reproducible way.

  8. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  9. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chen-Ting; Sergienko, Eduard A

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence-based detection techniques are popular in high throughput screening due to sensitivity and cost-effectiveness. Four commonly used techniques exist, each with distinct characteristics. Fluorescence intensity assays are the simplest to run, but suffer the most from signal interference. Fluorescence polarization assays show less interference from the compounds or the instrument, but require a design that results in change of fluorophore-containing moiety size and usually have narrow assay signal window. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is commonly used for detecting protein-protein interactions and is constrained not by the sizes of binding partners, but rather by the distance between fluorophores. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET), an advanced modification of FRET approach utilizes special fluorophores with long-lived fluorescence and earns its place near the top of fluorescent techniques list by its performance and robustness, characterized by larger assay window and minimized compound spectral interference. TR-FRET technology can be applied in biochemical or cell-based in vitro assays with ease. It is commonly used to detect modulation of protein-protein interactions and in detection of products of biochemical reactions and cellular activities. PMID:27316992

  10. The effect of the atmospheric condition on the extensive air shower analysis at the Telescope Array experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tokuno, H.; Kakimoto, F.; Tomida, T.

    2011-09-22

    The accuracies in determination of air shower parameters such as longitudinal profiles or primary energies with the fluorescence detection technique are strongly dependent on atmospheric conditions of the molecular and aerosol components. Moreover, air fluorescence photon yield depends on the atmospheric density, and the transparency of the air for fluorescence photons depends on the atmospheric conditions from EAS to FDs. In this paper, we describe the atmospheric monitoring system in the Telescope Array (TA experiment), and the impact of the atmospheric conditions in air shower reconstructions. The systematic uncertainties of the determination of the primary cosmic ray energies and of the measurement of depth of maximum development (X{sub max}) of EASs due to atmospheric variance are evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation.

  11. The synchronous fluorescence spectra character of hypocrellin B with type I collagen under irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jucheng; Yan, Heping; Yang, Mengting; Feng, Yongzhen; Huang, Yun; Li, Lingmei; Liu, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The synchronous fluorescence (SF) technique can provide some useful information with the endogenous fluorophores in complex systems. The SF technique has been used in the characterization of the type I collagen in PBS solution (pH=7.4) and the photo-reaction of hypocrellin B (HB) with type I collagen in solution irradiation with the 475 nm light under saturated by oxygen, air and nitrogen respectively. The SF spectra show the peaks attribute to tyrosine residues (275 nm) and pyridinoline cross-link (325 nm) in collagen. The photo-induced reaction with HB causing the fluorescence quenching but no wavelength shift, this suggests the photo-reaction don't changing the microenvironment of PYD cross-link. The fluorescence quenching rate is faster than others when the solution saturated by oxygen. The results imply that the photo-induced reaction is oxygen dependence.

  12. Analysis of a waste-minimization program for nonhazardous solid wastes utilizing source-reduction and recycling techniques and its application to Air Force installations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, B.G.

    1991-09-01

    This nation has fallen victim to its own excessive behavior and has created an overabundance of trash, referred to in this thesis as Nonhazardous Solid Waste (NSW). This situation has created environmental and health problems that can no longer be ignored. All types of communities are affected including Air Force installations. Unfortunately, the AF does not currently have a long term waste management policy or program regarding NHSW minimization. This research concentrates on the application of a NHSW minimization program for AF installations using the two most preferred methods, source reduction and recycling. The development of a comprehensive waste minimization program using the techniques described is the most effective and efficient way to decrease the solid waste burden. The construction and implementation of these programs is not easy, especially for an organization as complex and diverse as the AF. However, the payoffs from a well planned and executed program far outweigh any costs.

  13. Combined fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheslavskiy, V. I.; Neubauer, A.; Bukowiecki, R.; Dinter, F.; Becker, W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a lifetime imaging technique that simultaneously records the fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime images in confocal laser scanning systems. It is based on modulating a high-frequency pulsed laser synchronously with the pixel clock of the scanner, and recording the fluorescence and phosphorescence signals by multidimensional time-correlated single photon counting board. We demonstrate our technique on the recording of the fluorescence/phosphorescence lifetime images of human embryonic kidney cells at different environmental conditions.

  14. X-ray fluorescence (conventional and 3D) and scanning electron microscopy for the investigation of Portuguese polychrome glazed ceramics: Advances in the knowledge of the manufacturing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilherme, A.; Coroado, J.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Lühl, L.; Wolff, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2011-05-01

    This work shows the first analytical results obtained by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) (conventional and 3D) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive System (SEM-EDS) on original Portuguese ceramic pieces produced between the 16th and 18th centuries in Coimbra and Lisbon. Experts distinguished these productions based only on the color, texture and brightness, which originates mislabeling in some cases. Thanks to lateral and spatial resolution in the micrometer regime, the results obtained with μ-XRF were essential in determining the glaze and pigment thicknesses by monitoring the profile of the most abundant element in each "layer". Furthermore, the dissemination of these elements throughout the glaze is different depending on the glaze composition, firing temperature and on the pigment itself. Hence, the crucial point of this investigation was to analyze and understand the interfaces color/glaze and glaze/ceramic support. Together with the XRF results, images captured by SEM and the corresponding semi-quantitative EDS data revealed different manufacturing processes used by the two production centers. Different capture modes were suitable to distinguish different crystals from the minerals that confer the color of the pigments used and to enhance the fact that some of them are very well spread through the glassy matrix, sustaining the theory of an evolved and careful procedure in the manufacturing process of the glaze.

  15. Determination of dopant concentration in co-deposited organic thin films by using RBS and X-ray fluorescence combined techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Y. A.; Gravina, E. G.; Barbosa, M. D.; Machado, R.; Quirino, W. G.; Legnani, C.; Cremona, M.

    2013-10-01

    Organic light emitting diodes using phosphorescent dyes (PHOLEDs) have excellent performance and an internal quantum efficiency approaching 100%. To maximize performance, PHOLED devices use a conductive organic host material with a phosphorescent guest that is sufficiently dispersed to avoid concentration quenching. One of the most widely used organic compounds, green phosphorescent fac-tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium, or [Ir(ppy)3], can be used to produce PHOLEDs with very high external quantum efficiency by doping host material at different nominal concentrations. In this study, a methodology to accurately establish dopant concentration in co-deposited organic layers is proposed and discussed. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) analyses were performed in co-deposited organic thin films and then combined to provide an accurate methodology. [Ir(ppy)3] was used at different concentrations in two different hosts - 2,7-bis(9-carbazolyl)-9,9-spirobifluorene (Spiro2-CBP) and copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) - to test the proposed methodology. As Cu peak is easily detected by RBS, the CuPc host was chosen for calibration purposes, allowing more accurate determination of [Ir(ppy)3] concentration. A linear correlation between the RBS and the XRF measurement data was found allowing the drawing up of a calibration chart used to determine the [Ir(ppy)3] mass content in co-deposited films.

  16. Characterization of a two-dimensional temperature field within a rapid compression machine using a toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Camille; Sotton, Julien; Mura, Arnaud; Bellenoue, Marc

    2009-12-01

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process is an advanced operating mode for automotive engines. The self-ignition mechanisms that occur within the combustion chamber exhibit extreme temperature dependence. Therefore, the thorough understanding of corresponding phenomena requires the use of diagnostic methods featuring a sufficient thermal sensitivity, applicable in severe conditions similar to those encountered within engines. In this respect, toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is applied to the inert compression flow generated within an optical rapid compression machine (RCM). A relatively simple diagnostic system is retained: a single wavelength excitation device (266 nm) and a single (filtered) collection system. This diagnostic system is associated with an image processing strategy specifically adapted to RCM devices. Despite the severe conditions under consideration (40 bar, 700-950 K), the method allows us to obtain relatively large two-dimensional temperature fields that display a level of description seldom achieved in such devices. In particular the temperature gradients, which play a crucial role in HCCI combustion processes, can be estimated. The present experimental results confirm the good reliability and accuracy of the method. The information gathered with this toluene PLIF method puts in evidence its high potentialities for the study of aero-thermal-reactive processes as they take place in real engine conditions. The retained strategy also brings new possibilities of non-intrusive analysis for flows practically encountered within industrial devices.

  17. Pressure mapping for sphere and half-sphere enhanced diamond anvil cells using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Liu, L. L.; Cai, Z.; Shu, J.

    2015-12-01

    The measurement for equation of state (EoS) of materials under pressure conditions above 200 GPa is a long-standing challenging subject. Recently, second stage anvil, which was loaded inside the diamond anvil cell (DAC), had been reported by various groups. This method could generate pressure over 300 GPa, or above 600 GPa from the EoS measurement of Re metal between the tiny anvil or 2 half-spheres. Several alternative approaches, using ruby balls, or glassy carbon, or diamond, with single sphere, 2 half-spheres, or multi spheres geometry inside DAC, were tested. The NIST X-ray powder standard, ZnO was selected as pressure marker. Focused ion beam (FIB) was used to cut the half-sphere from diamond anvil top directly to avoid the difficulty of alignment. The synchrotron x-ray diffraction with fine beam size down to 100 nm using zone plate set-up was used to map the pressure gradient at the sphere or half-sphere zone inside DAC. The pressure could be boosted at center of sphere by up to 10 - 70 GPa at about 200 GPa conditions. From broken anvils, trace element analysis using fine focusing synchrotron x-ray fluorescence method revealed the potential anvil damage from FIB cutting the diamond anvil tip, which might decrease the strength of anvils. Fine touch from FIB cutting at final stage using low ion beam current is suggested.

  18. Determination of coumarin anticoagulant rodenticide residues in animal tissue by high-performance liquid chromatography. I. Fluorescence detection using post-column techniques.

    PubMed

    Hunter, K

    1983-11-18

    A multi-residue method was developed for the determination of the rodenticides warfarin, coumatetralyl, bromadiolone, difenacoum and brodifacoum in animal tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Extracts were cleaned-up by gel permeation chromatography on Bio-Beads SX-3 and residues determined by normal and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using post-column pH-switching, with chloroform -sec.-butylamine and borate buffer (pH 10.4) respectively, to maximise the native fluorimetric responses. Confirmation of identification was possible by re-chromatographing extracts in the absence of the post-column reagent. Chloroform-acetone (1:1) was significantly better than chloroform for the extraction of residues of these rodenticides from liver tissues. Recoveries from spiked liver tissue were generally greater than 90% at levels of 0.05-1 mg kg-1. Detection limits in animal tissues of 0.002 mg kg-1 for coumatetratyl, difenacoum and brodifacoum, 0.01 mg kg-1 for bromadiolone and 0.02 mg kg-1 for warfarin and could be routinely achieved. PMID:6655019

  19. Quantitative analysis of human remains from 18(th)-19(th) centuries using X-ray fluorescence techniques: The mysterious high content of mercury in hair.

    PubMed

    Pessanha, Sofia; Carvalho, Marta; Carvalho, Maria Luisa; Dias, António

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the unusual concentration of mercury in the hair of an individual buried in the 18th to mid-19th centuries and the comparison with the elemental composition of other remains from the same individual. Two energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) setups, one with tri-axial geometry and the second one with micro-beam capabilities and a vacuum system, for light elements detection, have been used. Quantitative evaluation of the obtained spectra were made by fundamental parameters and winAXIL program by compare mode method. The levels of Hg in the hair of buried samples presented a concentration over 5% (w/w), a significantly lower presence of this element in the cranium, and no Hg in the remaining organs. Furthermore, there was no evidence of Hg in the burial soil, which has been also analyzed. From this result, we could conclude that the possibility of post-mortem contamination from the burial surroundings is very unlikely. The obtained results are indicative of the apparent use of a mercury-based compound for medical purposes, most likely lice infestation.

  20. Measurements of He metastable atom density profile in front of substrate in ECR plasma flow by laser-induced fluorescence technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, H.; Takiyama, K.; Oda, T.

    1998-10-01

    Metastable atoms of rare gases affect on the etching processes and the radical formation processes in a reactive plasma because of their high internal energy. Fundamental understanding is required of the creation and annihilation mechanisms of the metastable atoms in the plasma, especially in the boundary region between plasma and substrate. We have measured spatial profile of He metastable (2^1S) atom density in plasma flow from an ECR plasma source by polarized laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy [1]. It has been shown that the metastable atoms near the outlet of the plasma flow are created by collisional-radiative processes. However, the remarkable decrease near the substrate placed in the downstream has not been clearly understood. Observation of the polarized LIF due to forbidden excitation is made with high spatial resolution in the vicinity of the substrate to obtain the detailed density profile. Based on these results, possible annihilation mechanism of the metastable atoms will be briefly discussed. [1] H. Toyota et al.; Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 36 (1997) 4670.

  1. Analysis of spatial distribution characteristics of dissolved organic matter in typical greenhouse soil of northern China using three dimensional fluorescence spectra technique and parallel factor analysis model.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hong-wei; Lei, Hong-jun; Han, Yu-ping; Xi, Bei-dou; He, Xiao-song; Xu, Qi-gong; Li, Dan

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the soil DOM characteristics in the vegetable greenhouse with a long-term of cultivation. Results showed that the soil DOM mainly consisted of three components, fulvic acid-like (C1), humic acid-like (C2) and protein-like (C3), with C1 as the majority one. The distribution of DOM in space was also studied. In vertical direction, C1 and C2 decreased significantly with the increase in soil depth, while C3 component decreased after increased. The humification coefficient decreased fast from 0-20 to 30-40 cm, and then increased from 30-40 to 40-50 cm. In the horizontal direction, the level of C2 component varied greatly in space, while that of C1 component changed little, and that of C3 component fell in between the above two. The change in the humification degree of each soil layer significantly varied spatially. Humification process of soil organic matter mainly occurred in the surface soil layer. In addition, the humification degree in space also changed significantly. The new ideas of this study are: (1) Analyze the composition and spatial heterogeneity of soil DOM in the vegetable greenhouse; (2) Use three dimensional fluorescence spectra technology and parallel factor analysis model successfully to quantify the components of soil DOM, which provides a new method for the soil DOM analysis. PMID:25358168

  2. Integration of novel low-cost colorimetric, laser photometric, and visual fluorescent techniques for rapid identification of falsified medicines in resource-poor areas: application to artemether-lumefantrine.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael D; Hostetler, Dana M; Nettey, Henry; Swamidoss, Isabel; Ranieri, Nicola; Newton, Paul N

    2015-06-01

    The availability of falsified antimalarial drugs can be reduced with effective drug regulatory agencies and proper enforcement. Fundamental to these agencies taking action, rapid identification must be made as soon as they appear in the market place. Since falsified antimalarials occur mostly in developing countries, performing drug analysis presents itself with unique challenges. A fundamental factor in choosing a useful technique is affordability and simplicity. Therefore, we suggest a three-tiered drug evaluation strategy for identifying a falsified drug in resource-poor areas. Tier I is a simple comparison of a tablet's weight and dimensions with official specifications. Tier II uses inexpensive photometric devices (laser and fluorescence) to evaluate a tablet. Suspicious samples from Tier I and II assessments are then subjected to a colorimetric assay for active ingredients identification and quantification. In this article, we evaluate a novel colorimetric assay for the simultaneous assessment of both lumefantrine and artemether in co-formulated Coartem™ tablets, and integrate the method with two novel, low-cost, fluorescence and laser photometric devices. Image analysis software is used for the assessments. Although artemether-lumefantrine is used as an example, the strategy may be adapted to other medicines.

  3. Oral treatment of rodents with insecticides for control of sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and the fluorescent tracer technique (FTT) as a tool to evaluate potential sand fly control methods.

    PubMed

    Mascari, T M; Clark, J; Gordon, S; Mitchell, M A; Rowton, E D; Stout, R; Foil, L D

    2011-03-01

    In laboratory studies, insecticides (diflubenzuron, novaluron, methoprene and, pyriproxyfen) that have been incorporated into rodent diets were effective as feed-throughs against sand fly larvae. Novaluron also was effective against sand fly larvae at low concentrations and under simulated field conditions. Ivermectin has been shown to be effective as a systemic insecticide, killing 100% of blood-feeding sand flies for up to seven d after rodents were treated. The fluorescent tracer technique (FTT) is the use of certain fluorescent dyes (rhodamine B or uranine O) as feed-through transtadial biomarkers for phlebotomine sand flies, systemic biomarkers for blood-feeding sand flies, and permanent markers for nectar-feeding sand flies. The results of these laboratory studies provide proof of concept for the FTT and indicate that the FTT could be used to delineate specific foci with rodent/sand fly associations that would be susceptible to control by using feed-through or systemic insecticides, or foci where insecticide-treated sugar baits could be used against sand flies.

  4. Integration of Novel Low-Cost Colorimetric, Laser Photometric, and Visual Fluorescent Techniques for Rapid Identification of Falsified Medicines in Resource-Poor Areas: Application to Artemether–Lumefantrine

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael D.; Hostetler, Dana M.; Nettey, Henry; Swamidoss, Isabel; Ranieri, Nicola; Newton, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of falsified antimalarial drugs can be reduced with effective drug regulatory agencies and proper enforcement. Fundamental to these agencies taking action, rapid identification must be made as soon as they appear in the market place. Since falsified antimalarials occur mostly in developing countries, performing drug analysis presents itself with unique challenges. A fundamental factor in choosing a useful technique is affordability and simplicity. Therefore, we suggest a three-tiered drug evaluation strategy for identifying a falsified drug in resource-poor areas. Tier I is a simple comparison of a tablet's weight and dimensions with official specifications. Tier II uses inexpensive photometric devices (laser and fluorescence) to evaluate a tablet. Suspicious samples from Tier I and II assessments are then subjected to a colorimetric assay for active ingredients identification and quantification. In this article, we evaluate a novel colorimetric assay for the simultaneous assessment of both lumefantrine and artemether in co-formulated Coartem™ tablets, and integrate the method with two novel, low-cost, fluorescence and laser photometric devices. Image analysis software is used for the assessments. Although artemether–lumefantrine is used as an example, the strategy may be adapted to other medicines. PMID:25897066

  5. Integration of novel low-cost colorimetric, laser photometric, and visual fluorescent techniques for rapid identification of falsified medicines in resource-poor areas: application to artemether-lumefantrine.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael D; Hostetler, Dana M; Nettey, Henry; Swamidoss, Isabel; Ranieri, Nicola; Newton, Paul N

    2015-06-01

    The availability of falsified antimalarial drugs can be reduced with effective drug regulatory agencies and proper enforcement. Fundamental to these agencies taking action, rapid identification must be made as soon as they appear in the market place. Since falsified antimalarials occur mostly in developing countries, performing drug analysis presents itself with unique challenges. A fundamental factor in choosing a useful technique is affordability and simplicity. Therefore, we suggest a three-tiered drug evaluation strategy for identifying a falsified drug in resource-poor areas. Tier I is a simple comparison of a tablet's weight and dimensions with official specifications. Tier II uses inexpensive photometric devices (laser and fluorescence) to evaluate a tablet. Suspicious samples from Tier I and II assessments are then subjected to a colorimetric assay for active ingredients identification and quantification. In this article, we evaluate a novel colorimetric assay for the simultaneous assessment of both lumefantrine and artemether in co-formulated Coartem™ tablets, and integrate the method with two novel, low-cost, fluorescence and laser photometric devices. Image analysis software is used for the assessments. Although artemether-lumefantrine is used as an example, the strategy may be adapted to other medicines. PMID:25897066

  6. An adaptive dual-optimal path-planning technique for unmanned air vehicles with application to solar-regenerative high altitude long endurance flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, Clifford A.

    2009-12-01

    A multi-objective technique for Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) path and trajectory autonomy generation, through task allocation and sensor fusion has been developed. The Dual-Optimal Path-Planning (D-O.P-P.) Technique generates on-line adaptive flight paths for UAVs based on available flight windows and environmental influenced objectives. The environmental influenced optimal condition, known as the driver' determines the condition, within a downstream virtual window of possible vehicle destinations and orientation built from the UAV kinematics. The intermittent results are pursued by a dynamic optimization technique to determine the flight path. This sequential optimization technique is a multi-objective optimization procedure consisting of two goals, without requiring additional information to combine the conflicting objectives into a single-objective. An example case-study and additional applications are developed and the results are discussed; including the application to the field of Solar Regenerative (SR) High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) UAV flight. Harnessing solar energy has recently been adapted for use on high altitude UAV platforms. An aircraft that uses solar panels and powered by the sun during the day and through the night by SR systems, in principle could sustain flight for weeks or months. The requirements and limitations of solar powered flight were determined. The SR-HALE UAV platform geometry and flight characteristics were selected from an existing aircraft that has demonstrated the capability for sustained flight through flight tests. The goals were to maintain continual Situational Awareness (SA) over a case-study selected Area of Interest (AOI) and existing UAV power and surveillance systems. This was done for still wind and constant wind conditions at altitude along with variations in latitude. The characteristics of solar flux and the dependence on the surface location and orientation were established along with fixed flight maneuvers for

  7. Ultrasensitive analysis of lysergic acid diethylamide and its C-8 isomer in hair by capillary zone electrophoresis in combination with a stacking technique and laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Airado-Rodríguez, Diego; Cruces-Blanco, Carmen; García-Campaña, Ana M

    2015-03-25

    This article deals with the development and validation of a novel capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with laser induced fluorescence detection method for the analysis of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its isomer iso-LSD in hair samples. The separation of both analytes has been achieved in less than 13 min in a 72-cm effective length capillary with 75-μm internal diameter. As running buffer 25 mM citrate, pH 6.0 has been employed and separation temperature and voltage of 20 °C and 13 kV respectively, were applied. Field amplified sample injection (FASI) has been employed for on-line sample preconcentration, using ultrapure water containing 117 μM H3PO4 as optimum injection medium. Injection voltage and time have been optimized by means of experimental design, obtaining values of 7 kV and 15s, respectively. Methylergonovine has been employed as internal standard in order to compensate irreproducibility from electrokinetic injection. The analytical method has been applied to hair samples, previous extraction of the target analytes by ultrasound assisted solid-liquid extraction at 40 °C for 2.5 h, employing acetonitrile as extracting solvent. Linear responses were found for LSD and iso-LSD in matrix-matched calibrations from around 0.400 up to 50.0 pg mg(-1). LODs (3 S/N) in the order of 0.100 pg mg(-1) were calculated for both analytes, obtaining satisfactory recovery percentages for this kind of sample.

  8. Ultrasensitive analysis of lysergic acid diethylamide and its C-8 isomer in hair by capillary zone electrophoresis in combination with a stacking technique and laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Airado-Rodríguez, Diego; Cruces-Blanco, Carmen; García-Campaña, Ana M

    2015-03-25

    This article deals with the development and validation of a novel capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with laser induced fluorescence detection method for the analysis of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its isomer iso-LSD in hair samples. The separation of both analytes has been achieved in less than 13 min in a 72-cm effective length capillary with 75-μm internal diameter. As running buffer 25 mM citrate, pH 6.0 has been employed and separation temperature and voltage of 20 °C and 13 kV respectively, were applied. Field amplified sample injection (FASI) has been employed for on-line sample preconcentration, using ultrapure water containing 117 μM H3PO4 as optimum injection medium. Injection voltage and time have been optimized by means of experimental design, obtaining values of 7 kV and 15s, respectively. Methylergonovine has been employed as internal standard in order to compensate irreproducibility from electrokinetic injection. The analytical method has been applied to hair samples, previous extraction of the target analytes by ultrasound assisted solid-liquid extraction at 40 °C for 2.5 h, employing acetonitrile as extracting solvent. Linear responses were found for LSD and iso-LSD in matrix-matched calibrations from around 0.400 up to 50.0 pg mg(-1). LODs (3 S/N) in the order of 0.100 pg mg(-1) were calculated for both analytes, obtaining satisfactory recovery percentages for this kind of sample. PMID:25732697

  9. Determination of elemental distribution in green micro-algae using synchrotron radiation nano X-ray fluorescence (SR-nXRF) and electron microscopy techniques--subcellular localization and quantitative imaging of silver and cobalt uptake by Coccomyxa actinabiotis.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, T; Farhi, E; Boisson, A-M; Vial, J; Cloetens, P; Bohic, S; Rivasseau, C

    2014-02-01

    The newly discovered unicellular micro-alga Coccomyxa actinabiotis proves to be highly radio-tolerant and strongly concentrates radionuclides, as well as large amounts of toxic metals. This study helps in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the accumulation and detoxification of silver and cobalt. Elemental distribution inside Coccomyxa actinabiotis cells was determined using synchrotron nano X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at the ID22 nano fluorescence imaging beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The high resolution and high sensitivity of this technique enabled the assessment of elemental associations and exclusions in subcellular micro-algae compartments. A quantitative treatment of the scans was implemented to yield absolute concentrations of each endogenous and exogenous element with a spatial resolution of 100 nm and compared to the macroscopic content in cobalt and silver determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The nano X-ray fluorescence imaging was complemented by transmission electron microscopy coupled to X-ray microanalysis (TEM-EDS), yielding differential silver distribution in the cell wall, cytosol, nucleus, chloroplast and mitochondria with unique resolution. The analysis of endogenous elements in control cells revealed that iron had a unique distribution; zinc, potassium, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate had their maxima co-localized in the same area; and sulfur, copper and chlorine were almost homogeneously distributed among the whole cell. The subcellular distribution and quantification of cobalt and silver in micro-alga, assessed after controlled exposure to various concentrations, revealed that exogenous metals were mainly sequestered inside the cell rather than on mucilage or the cell wall, with preferential compartmentalization. Cobalt was homogeneously distributed outside of the chloroplast. Silver was localized in the cytosol at low concentration and in the whole cell excluding the

  10. Determination of elemental distribution in green micro-algae using synchrotron radiation nano X-ray fluorescence (SR-nXRF) and electron microscopy techniques--subcellular localization and quantitative imaging of silver and cobalt uptake by Coccomyxa actinabiotis.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, T; Farhi, E; Boisson, A-M; Vial, J; Cloetens, P; Bohic, S; Rivasseau, C

    2014-02-01

    The newly discovered unicellular micro-alga Coccomyxa actinabiotis proves to be highly radio-tolerant and strongly concentrates radionuclides, as well as large amounts of toxic metals. This study helps in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the accumulation and detoxification of silver and cobalt. Elemental distribution inside Coccomyxa actinabiotis cells was determined using synchrotron nano X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at the ID22 nano fluorescence imaging beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The high resolution and high sensitivity of this technique enabled the assessment of elemental associations and exclusions in subcellular micro-algae compartments. A quantitative treatment of the scans was implemented to yield absolute concentrations of each endogenous and exogenous element with a spatial resolution of 100 nm and compared to the macroscopic content in cobalt and silver determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The nano X-ray fluorescence imaging was complemented by transmission electron microscopy coupled to X-ray microanalysis (TEM-EDS), yielding differential silver distribution in the cell wall, cytosol, nucleus, chloroplast and mitochondria with unique resolution. The analysis of endogenous elements in control cells revealed that iron had a unique distribution; zinc, potassium, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate had their maxima co-localized in the same area; and sulfur, copper and chlorine were almost homogeneously distributed among the whole cell. The subcellular distribution and quantification of cobalt and silver in micro-alga, assessed after controlled exposure to various concentrations, revealed that exogenous metals were mainly sequestered inside the cell rather than on mucilage or the cell wall, with preferential compartmentalization. Cobalt was homogeneously distributed outside of the chloroplast. Silver was localized in the cytosol at low concentration and in the whole cell excluding the

  11. Optimal fluorescence waveband determination for detecting defect cherry tomatoes using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defect cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface, and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-...

  12. Fluorescence Detection of Cosmic Ray Air Showers between 10^16.5 eV and 10^19 eV with the Telescope Array Low Energy Extension (TALE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, J. N.; Zundel, Z.; Jui, C. C. H.; Smith, J. D.; Thomas, S. B.; Ivanov, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Telescope Array Experiment has been observing cosmic ray air showers at energies above 10^18 eV since 2008. TA operates three Fluorescence Detector (FD) sites, with telescopes that observe 3-31 deg in elevation. The FD sites are located at the periphery of a surface array of 507 scintillation counters covering 700 km^2, with 1.2km spacing. The TA Collaboration is in the process of building a low-energy extension at its Middle drum FD site. Ten new telescopes will observe between 33 and 51 degrees in elevation. A graded ground array of between 400 and 600m will be placed in front of the TALE FD. We have already observed multi-telescope cosmic ray events as well as the scattered light from the central laser (CLF). By 4/2013, all ten telescopes will have been commissioned and the first 35 scintillator counters will have been deployment by helicopter. With these upgrades, the physics threshold of TA will be lowered to 10^16.5 eV. The TA Low Energy Extension (TALE) will explore the energy regime corresponding to that of the LHC in center-of-mass frame. This is also the range where the transition from galactic to extra- galactic cosmic ray flux is suspected to occur. We will give a brief overview of the physics, and report on the progress of TALE.

  13. Fluorescent standards for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belko, N.; Kavalenka, S.; Samtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving technique for treatment of various oncological diseases. This method employs photosensitizers - species that lead to death of tumor cells after the photoactivation. For further development and novel applications of photodynamic therapy new photosensitizers are required. After synthesis of a new photosensitizer it is important to know its concentration in different biological tissues after its administration and distribution. The concentration is frequently measured by the extraction method, which has some disadvantages, e.g. it requires many biological test subjects that are euthanized during the measurement. We propose to measure the photosensitizer concentration in tissue by its fluorescence. For this purpose fluorescent standards were developed. The standards are robust and simple to produce; their fluorescence signal does not change with time. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent standards seems to depend linearly on the dye concentration. A set of standards thus allow the calibration of a spectrometer. Finally, the photosensitizer concentration can be determined by the fluorescence intensity after comparing the corresponding spectrum with spectra of the set of fluorescent standards. A biological test subject is not euthanized during this kind of experiment. We hope this more humane technique can be used in future instead of the extraction method.

  14. Calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors and the effect on measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gookin, Ben

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a high-energy cosmic ray observatory located in Malargue, Mendoza, Argentina. It is used to probe the highest energy particles in the Universe, with energies greater than 1018 eV, which strike the Earth constantly. The observatory uses two techniques to observe the air shower initiated by a cosmic ray: a surface detector composed of an array of more than 1600 water Cherenkov tanks covering 3000 km2, and 27 nitrogen fluorescence telescopes overlooking this array. The Cherenkov detectors run all the time and therefore have high statistics on the air showers. The fluorescence detectors run only on clear moonless nights, but observe the longitudinal development of the air shower and make a calorimetric measure of its energy. The energy measurement from the the fluorescence detectors is used to cross calibrate the surface detectors, and makes the measurements made by the Auger Observatory surface detector highly model-independent. The calibration of the fluorescence detectors is then of the utmost importance to the measurements of the Observatory. Described here are the methods of the absolute and multi-wavelength calibration of the fluorescence detectors, and improvements in each leading to a reduction in calibration uncertainties to 4% and 3.5%, respectively. Also presented here are the effects of introducing a new, and more detailed, multi-wavelength calibration on the fluorescence detector energy estimation and the depth of the air shower maximum measurement, leading to a change of 1+-0.03% in the absolute energy scale at 1018 eV, and a negligible change in the measurement on shower maximum.

  15. Comparison of conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization technique for detection of Listeria spp. in ground beef, turkey, and chicken breast fillets in İzmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Ayse Handan

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of Listeria species in refrigerated fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef was evaluated, comparing the conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH uses hybridization of a nucleic acid sequence target of a microorganism with a specific DNA probe labeled with a fluorochrome and imaging by a fluorescence microscope. First, Listeria was inoculated in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, or ground beef, and the applicability of the FISH method was evaluated. Second, Listeria was detected in fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef by culture and FISH methods. Listeria was isolated from 27 (37.4%) of 216 samples by the standard culture method, whereas FISH detected 25 (24.7%) preenriched samples. Of these isolates, 17 (63%) were L. innocua, 6 (22%) L. welshimeri, and 4 (14.8%) L. seeligeri. Overall, the prevalences of Listeria spp. found with the conventional culture method in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef were 9.7, 6.9, and 20.8%, whereas with the FISH technique these values were 11.1, 6.9, and 16.7%, respectively. The molecular FISH technique appears to be a cheap, sensitive, and time-efficient procedure that could be used for routine detection of Listeria spp. in meat. This study showed that retail raw meats are potentially contaminated with Listeria spp. and are, thus, vehicles for transmitting diseases caused by foodborne pathogens, underlining the need for increased precautions, such as implementation of hazard analysis and critical control points and consumer food safety education.

  16. Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ben; Ewart, Paul; Wang, Xiaowei; Stone, Richard; Ma, Hongrui; Walmsley, Harold; Cracknell, Roger; Stevens, Robert; Richardson, David; Fu, Huiyu; Wallace, Stan

    2010-10-15

    A study of in-cylinder fuel-air mixing distributions in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine is reported using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. A multi-component fuel synthesised from three pairs of components chosen to simulate light, medium and heavy fractions was seeded with one of three tracers, each chosen to co-evaporate with and thus follow one of the fractions, in order to account for differential volatility of such components in typical gasoline fuels. In order to make quantitative measurements of fuel-air ratio from PLIF images, initial calibration was by recording PLIF images of homogeneous fuel-air mixtures under similar conditions of in-cylinder temperature and pressure using a re-circulation loop and a motored engine. This calibration method was found to be affected by two significant factors. Firstly, calibration was affected by variation of signal collection efficiency arising from build-up of absorbing deposits on the windows during firing cycles, which are not present under motored conditions. Secondly, the effects of residual exhaust gas present in the firing engine were not accounted for using a calibration loop with a motored engine. In order to account for these factors a novel method of PLIF calibration is presented whereby 'bookend' calibration measurements for each tracer separately are performed under firing conditions, utilising injection into a large upstream heated plenum to promote the formation of homogeneous in-cylinder mixtures. These calibration datasets contain sufficient information to not only characterise the quantum efficiency of each tracer during a typical engine cycle, but also monitor imaging efficiency, and, importantly, account for the impact of exhaust gas residuals (EGR). By use of this method EGR is identified as a significant factor in quantitative PLIF for fuel mixing diagnostics in firing engines. The effects of cyclic variation in fuel concentration on burn rate are analysed for different

  17. Determination of the rate coefficients for the reactions IO + NO2 + M (air) --> IONO2 + M and O(3P) + NO2 --> O2 + NO using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Terry J; Blitz, Mark A; Heard, Dwayne E

    2006-06-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy via excitation of the A2pi(3/2) <-- X2pi(3/2) (2,0) band at 445 nm was used to monitor IO in the presence of NO2 following its generation in the reactions O(3P) + CF3I and O(3P) + I2. Both photolysis of O3 (248 nm) and NO2 (351 nm) were used to initiate the production of IO. The rate coefficients for the thermolecular reaction IO + NO2 + M --> IONO2 + M were measured in air, N2, and O2 over the range P = 18-760 Torr, covering typical tropospheric conditions, and were found to be in the falloff region. No dependence of k1 upon bath gas identity was observed, and in general, the results are in good agreement with recent determinations. Using a Troe broadening factor of F(B) = 0.4, the falloff parameters k0(1) = (9.5 +/- 1.6) x 10(-31) cm6 molecule(-2) s(-1) and k(infinity)(1) = (1.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) were determined at 294 K. The temporal profile of IO at elevated temperatures was used to investigate the thermal stability of the product, IONO2, but no evidence was observed for the regeneration of IO, consistent with recent calculations for the IO-NO2 bond strength being approximately 100 kJ mol(-1). Previous modeling studies of iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer that utilize values of k1 measured in N2 are hence validated by these results conducted in air. The rate coefficient for the reaction O(3P) + NO2 --> O2 + NO at 294 K and in 100 Torr of air was determined to be k2 = (9.3 +/- 0.9) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), in good agreement with recommended values. All uncertainties are quoted at the 95% confidence limit.

  18. Fiber optic oxygen sensor using fluorescence quenching for aviation industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, Allen

    2010-04-01

    Comprised of heavier hydrocarbon components, jet fuel is much less volatile, with Jet A having a flash point of approximately 100°F and JP-4 having a flash point of approximately 0°F. In contrast, straight-run gasoline has a flash point of approximately -40°F. The flash point is the minimum temperature where a liquid fuel can generate enough vapor to form a flammable mixture with air. If the temperature is below the flash point there isn't enough fuel evaporating to form a flammable fuel-air mixture. Since jet fuel and gasoline have similar flammable concentration limits, gasoline must produce much more vapor at a given temperature to have such a low flash point; hence gasoline is much more volatile than jet fuel. In this paper we explore Fluorescence Technology as applied to the design and development of O2 sensors that can be used for this application and discuss the various test and measurement techniques used to estimate the O2 gas concentration. We compare the various intensity based approaches and contrast them with the frequency domain techniques that measure phase to extract fluorescent lifetimes. The various inerting fuel tank requirements are explained and finally a novel compact measurement system using that uses the frequency heterodyning cross correlation technique that can be used for various applications is described in detail while the benefits are explored together with some test data collected.

  19. Fiber optic oxygen sensor using fluorescence quenching for aerospace application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, Allen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we explore Fluorescence Technology as applied to the design and development of O2 sensors that can be used for aerospace application and discuss the various test and measurement techniques used to estimate the O2 gas concentration. Jet fuel comprised of heavier hydrocarbon components is much less volatile, than jet fuel having a flash point of approximately 37° C and JP-4 having a flash point of approximately -17° C. In contrast, straight-run gasoline has a flash point of approximately -40°C. The flash point is the minimum temperature where a liquid fuel can generate enough vapor to form a flammable mixture with air. If the temperature is below the flash point there isn't enough fuel evaporating to form a flammable fuel-air mixture. Since jet fuel and gasoline have similar flammable concentration limits, gasoline must produce much more vapor at a given temperature to have such a low flash point; hence gasoline is much more volatile than jet fuel. We compare the various intensity based approaches and contrast them with the frequency domain techniques that measure phase to extract fluorescent lifetimes. An innovate compact measurement system using the frequency heterodyning cross correlation technique that can be used for various applications is described in detail while the benefits are explored together with some test data collected. The various inerting fuel tank requirements are explained.

  20. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1996-07-01

    A family of sensors is presented with fluorescence decay-time measurements used as the sensing technique. The concept is to take a single fluorophore with a suitably long fluorescence decay time as the basic building block for numerous different sensors. Analyte recognition can be performed by different functional groups that are necessary for selective interaction with the analyte. To achieve this, the principle of excited-state electron transfer is applied with pyrene as the fluorophore. Therefore the same instrumentation based on a small, ambient air-nitrogen laser and solid-state electronics can be used to measure different analytes, for example, oxygen, pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, ammonium, lead, cadmium, zinc, and phosphate.