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Sample records for air fluorescence technique

  1. Nitrogen fluorescence in air for observing extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keilhauer, B.; Bohacova, M.; Fraga, M.; Matthews, J.; Sakaki, N.; Tameda, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Ulrich, A.

    2013-06-01

    Extensive air showers initiate the fluorescence emissions from nitrogen molecules in air. The UV-light is emitted isotropically and can be used for observing the longitudinal development of extensive air showers in the atmosphere over tenth of kilometers. This measurement technique is well-established since it is exploited for many decades by several cosmic ray experiments. However, a fundamental aspect of the air shower analyses is the description of the fluorescence emission in dependence on varying atmospheric conditions. Different fluorescence yields affect directly the energy scaling of air shower reconstruction. In order to explore the various details of the nitrogen fluorescence emission in air, a few experimental groups have been performing dedicated measurements over the last decade. Most of the measurements are now finished. These experimental groups have been discussing their techniques and results in a series of Air Fluorescence Workshops commenced in 2002. At the 8th Air Fluorescence Workshop 2011, it was suggested to develop a common way of describing the nitrogen fluorescence for application to air shower observations. Here, first analyses for a common treatment of the major dependences of the emission procedure are presented. Aspects like the contributions at different wavelengths, the dependence on pressure as it is decreasing with increasing altitude in the atmosphere, the temperature dependence, in particular that of the collisional cross sections between molecules involved, and the collisional de-excitation by water vapor are discussed.

  2. Tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence measurement technique for quantitative fuel/air-ratio measurements in a hydrogen internal combustion engine.

    PubMed

    Blotevogel, Thomas; Hartmann, Matthias; Rottengruber, Hermann; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-12-10

    A measurement technique for the quantitative investigation of mixture formation processes in hydrogen internal combustion engines (ICEs) has been developed using tracer-based laser-induced fluorescence (TLIF). This technique can be employed to fired and motored engine operation. The quantitative TLIF fuel/air-ratio results have been verified by means of linear Raman scattering measurements. Exemplary results of the simultaneous investigation of mixture formation and combustion obtained at an optical accessible hydrogen ICE are shown.

  3. Interference techniques in fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet

    We developed a set of interference-based optical microscopy techniques to study biological structures through nanometer-scale axial localization of fluorescent biomarkers. Spectral self-interference fluorescence microscopy (SSFM) utilizes interference of direct and reflected waves emitted from fluorescent molecules in the vicinity of planar reflectors to reveal the axial position of the molecules. A comprehensive calculation algorithm based on Green's function formalism is presented to verify the validity of approximations used in a far-field approach that describes the emission of fluorescent markers near interfaces. Using the validated model, theoretical limits of axial localization were determined with emphasis given to numerical aperture (NA) dependence of localization uncertainty. SSFM was experimentally demonstrated in conformational analysis of nucleoproteins. In particular, interaction between surface-tethered 75-mer double strand DNA and integration host factor (IHF) protein was probed on Si-SiO2 substrates by determining the axial position of fluorescent labels attached to the free ends of DNA molecules. Despite its sub-nanometer precision axial localization capability, SSFM lacks high lateral resolution due to the low-NA requirement for planar reflectors. We developed a second technique, 4Pi-SSFM, which improves the lateral resolution of a conventional SSFM system by an order of magnitude while achieving nanometer-scale axial localization precision. Using two opposing high-NA objectives, fluorescence signal is interferometrically collected and spectral interference pattern is recorded. Axial position of emitters is found from analysis of the spectra. The 4Pi-SSFM technique was experimentally demonstrated by determining the surface profiles of fabricated glass surfaces and outer membranes of Shigella, a type of Gram-negative bacteria. A further discussion is presented to localize surface O antigen, which is an important oligosaccharide structure in the

  4. Note: A laser-flash photolysis and laser-induced fluorescence detection technique for measuring total HO2 reactivity in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Nakashima, Y.; Schoemaecker, C.; Fittschen, C.; Kajii, Y.

    2013-07-01

    A novel instrument for measuring total HO2 reactivity in the troposphere was successfully developed using a laser-flash photolysis and laser-induced fluorescence detection technique. Validation and testing were conducted through kinetic measurements of the reaction of HO2 radicals with NO2, and the results were found to be in good agreement with recent recommended values. The limit of detection (LOD) for HO2 loss rate measurement is achieved to be 0.024 s-1 (3σ) with 60 times decay integrations. An observation of ambient air was carried out in a suburb of Tokyo to test the practical use of the developed instrument and un-expected rapid HO2 loss rate has been observed.

  5. Fluorescence Lifetime Techniques in Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of time-resolved (lifetime) fluorescence techniques used in biomedical diagnostics. In particular, we review the development of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) instrumentation and associated methodologies which allows for in vivo characterization and diagnosis of biological tissues. Emphasis is placed on the translational research potential of these techniques and on evaluating whether intrinsic fluorescence signals provide useful contrast for the diagnosis of human diseases including cancer (gastrointestinal tract, lung, head and neck, and brain), skin and eye diseases, and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:22273730

  6. A pulsed electron-photon fluorescence diagnostic technique for temperature and specie concentration measurement at points in relatively dense, unseedded air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntz, E. P.; Kunc, J. A.; Erwin, D. A.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis is presented on the use of the fluorescence stimulated by combined pulsed electron and photon beams for the study of gas flows up to densities equivalent to an altitude of about 20 km (number density of about 3 x 10 to the 18th/cu cm). The electron beam acts as a pump, requiring no seed gas, to provide a localized concentration of ions or excited state neutrals that can be probed by saturation optical pulses. A short pulse (10ns) electron beam can be used by itself to provide effectively quench-free emission up to number densities of around 10 to the 18th/cm, but is is difficult to maintain satisfactory spatial resolution at this high density. The use of a nearly simultaneous strong optical pulse increases the flexibility of the diagnostic technique, permitting use at densities greater than 10 to the 18th/cu cm with good spatial resolution. The use of flash X-ray sources combined with optical probing also appears promising for densities above 10 to the 19th/cu cm.

  7. Clear air turbulence forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method to improve clear air turbulence (CAT) forecasting by more effectively using the currently operational rawinsonde (RW) system is discussed. The method is called the Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency (DRT) technique. The technique does not attempt to use the RW as a direct detector of the turbulent motion or even of the CAT mechanism structure but rather senses the synoptic scale centers of action which provide the energy to the CAT mechanism at the mesoscale level. The DRT algorithm is deterministic rather than statistical in nature, using the hydrodynamic equations (equations of motion) relevant to the synoptic scale. However, interpretation, by necessity, is probabilistic. What is most important with respect to its operational implementation is that this method uses the same input data as currently used by the operational National Meteorological Center prognostic models.

  8. Fluorescent probes and fluorescence (microscopy) techniques--illuminating biological and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Drummen, Gregor P C

    2012-11-28

    Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  9. Survey of air cargo forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlthan, A. R.; Vermuri, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    Forecasting techniques currently in use in estimating or predicting the demand for air cargo in various markets are discussed with emphasis on the fundamentals of the different forecasting approaches. References to specific studies are cited when appropriate. The effectiveness of current methods is evaluated and several prospects for future activities or approaches are suggested. Appendices contain summary type analyses of about 50 specific publications on forecasting, and selected bibliographies on air cargo forecasting, air passenger demand forecasting, and general demand and modalsplit modeling.

  10. Biologic fluorescence decay characteristics: determination by Laguerre expansion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Wendy J.; Maarek, Jean-Michel I.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1996-04-01

    Fluorescence decay characteristics are used to identify biologic fluorophores and to characterize interactions with the fluorophore environment. In many studies, fluorescence lifetimes are assessed by iterative reconvolution techniques. We investigated the use of a new approach: the Laguerre expansion of kernels technique (Marmarelis, V.Z., Ann. Biomed., Eng. 1993; 21, 573-589) which yields the fluorescence impulse response function by least- squares fitting of a discrete-time Laguerre functions expansion. Nitrogen (4 ns FWHM) and excimer (120 ns FWHM) laser pulses were used to excite the fluorescence of an anthracene and of type II collagen powder. After filtering (monochromator) and detection (MCP-PMT), the fluorescence response was digitized (digital storage oscilloscope) and transferred to a personal computer. Input and output data were deconvolved by the Laguerre expansion technique to compute the impulse response function which was then fitted to a multiexponential function for determination of the decay constants. A single exponential (time constant: 4.24 ns) best approximated the fluorescence decay of anthracene, whereas the Type II collagen response was best approximated by a double exponential (time constants: 2.24 and 9.92 ns) in agreement with previously reported data. The results of the Laguerre expansion technique were compared to the least-squares iterative reconvolution technique. The Laguerre expansion technique appeared computationally efficient and robust to experimental noise in the data. Furthermore, the proposed method does not impose a set multiexponential form to the decay.

  11. Laser induced fluorescence technique for environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utkin, Andrei B.; Felizardo, Rui; Gameiro, Carla; Matos, Ana R.; Cartaxana, Paulo

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the development of laser induced fluorescence sensors and their application in the evaluation of water pollution and physiological status of higher plants and algae. The sensors were built on the basis of reliable and robust solid-state Nd:YAG lasers. They demonstrated good efficiency in: i) detecting and characterizing oil spills and dissolved organic matter; ii) evaluating the impact of stress on higher plants (cork oak, maritime pine, and genetically modified Arabidopsis); iii) tracking biomass changes in intertidal microphytobenthos; and iv) mapping macroalgal communities in the Tagus Estuary.

  12. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  13. Techniques for Forecasting Air Passenger Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taneja, N.

    1972-01-01

    The basic techniques of forecasting the air passenger traffic are outlined. These techniques can be broadly classified into four categories: judgmental, time-series analysis, market analysis and analytical. The differences between these methods exist, in part, due to the degree of formalization of the forecasting procedure. Emphasis is placed on describing the analytical method.

  14. Ambient air contamination: Characterization and detection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nulton, C. P.; Silvus, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to characterize and detect sources of ambient air contamination are described. Chemical techniques to identify indoor contaminants are outlined, they include gas chromatography, or colorimetric detection. Organics generated from indoor materials at ambient conditions and upon combustion are characterized. Piezoelectric quartz crystals are used as precision frequency determining elements in electronic oscillators.

  15. Research review: Indoor air quality control techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.

    1986-10-01

    Techniques for controlling the concentration of radon, formaldehyde, and combustion products in the indoor air are reviewed. The most effective techniques, which are generally based on limiting or reducing indoor pollutant source strengths, can decrease indoor pollutant concentrations by a factor of 3 to 10. Unless the initial ventilation rate is unusually low, it is difficult to reduce indoor pollutant concentrations more than approximately 50% by increasing the ventilation rate of an entire building. However, the efficiency of indoor pollutant control by ventilation can be enhanced through the use of local exhaust ventilation near concentrated sources of pollutants, by minimizing short circuiting of air from supply to exhaust when pollutant sources are dispersed and, in some situations, by promoting a displacement flow of air and pollutants toward the exhaust. Active air cleaning is also examined briefly. Filtration and electrostatic air cleaning for removal of particles from the indoor air are the most practical and effective currently available techniques of air cleaning. 49 refs., 7 figs.

  16. Fluorescence sensing techniques for vegetation assessment.

    PubMed

    Corp, Lawrence A; Middleton, Elizabeth M; McMurtrey, James E; Campbell, Petya K Entcheva; Butcher, L Maryn

    2006-02-10

    Active fluorescence (F) sensing systems have long been suggested as a means to identify species composition and determine physiological status of plants. Passive F systems for large-scale remote assessment of vegetation will undoubtedly rely on solar-induced F (SIF), and this information could potentially be obtained from the Fraunhofer line depth (FLD) principle. However, understanding the relationships between the information and knowledge gained from active and passive systems remains to be addressed. Here we present an approach in which actively induced F spectral data are used to simulate and project the magnitude of SIF that can be expected from near-ground observations within selected solar Fraunhofer line regions. Comparisons among vegetative species and nitrogen (N) supply treatments were made with three F approaches: the passive FLD principle applied to telluric oxygen (O2) bands from field-acquired canopy reflectance spectra, simulated SIF from actively induced laboratory emission spectra of leaves at a series of solar Fraunhofer lines ranging from 422 to 758 nm, and examination of two dual-F excitation algorithms developed from laboratory data. From these analyses we infer that SIF from whole-plant canopies can be simulated by use of laboratory data from active systems on individual leaves and that SIF has application for the large-scale assessment of vegetation.

  17. Compressed Air/Vacuum Transportation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, Shyamal

    2011-03-01

    General theory of compressed air/vacuum transportation will be presented. In this transportation, a vehicle (such as an automobile or a rail car) is powered either by compressed air or by air at near vacuum pressure. Four version of such transportation is feasible. In all versions, a ``c-shaped'' plastic or ceramic pipe lies buried a few inches under the ground surface. This pipe carries compressed air or air at near vacuum pressure. In type I transportation, a vehicle draws compressed air (or vacuum) from this buried pipe. Using turbine or reciprocating air cylinder, mechanical power is generated from compressed air (or from vacuum). This mechanical power transferred to the wheels of an automobile (or a rail car) drives the vehicle. In type II-IV transportation techniques, a horizontal force is generated inside the plastic (or ceramic) pipe. A set of vertical and horizontal steel bars is used to transmit this force to the automobile on the road (or to a rail car on rail track). The proposed transportation system has following merits: virtually accident free; highly energy efficient; pollution free and it will not contribute to carbon dioxide emission. Some developmental work on this transportation will be needed before it can be used by the traveling public. The entire transportation system could be computer controlled.

  18. Pulse train fluorescence technique for measuring triplet state dynamics.

    PubMed

    De Boni, Leonardo; Franzen, Paulo L; Gonçalves, Pablo J; Borissevitch, Iouri E; Misoguti, Lino; Mendonça, Cleber R; Zilio, Sergio C

    2011-05-23

    We report on a method to study the dynamics of triplet formation based on the fluorescence signal produced by a pulse train. Basically, the pulse train acts as sequential pump-probe pulses that precisely map the excited-state dynamics in the long time scale. This allows characterizing those processes that affect the population evolution of the first excited singlet state, whose decay gives rise to the fluorescence. The technique was proven to be valuable to measure parameters of triplet formation in organic molecules. Additionally, this single beam technique has the advantages of simplicity, low noise and background-free signal detection.

  19. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (acat) Inspection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, J. N.; Winfree, W. P.; Yost, W. T.

    2008-02-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of +/-6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  20. Air Coupled Acoustic Thermography (ACAT) Inspection Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph; Winfree, William P.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The scope of this effort is to determine the viability of a new heating technique using a noncontact acoustic excitation source. Because of low coupling between air and the structure, a synchronous detection method is employed. Any reduction in the out of plane stiffness improves the acoustic coupling efficiency and as a result, defective areas have an increase in temperature relative to the surrounding area. Hence a new measurement system, based on air-coupled acoustic energy and synchronous detection is presented. An analytical model of a clamped circular plate is given, experimentally tested, and verified. Repeatability confirms the technique with a measurement uncertainty of plus or minus 6.2 percent. The range of frequencies used was 800-2,000 Hertz. Acoustic excitation and consequent thermal detection of flaws in a helicopter blade is examined and results indicate that air coupled acoustic excitation enables the detection of core damage in sandwich honeycomb structures.

  1. Control Techniques for Particulate Air Pollutants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a comprehensive review of the approaches commonly recommended for controlling the sources of particulate air pollution. Not all possible combinations of control techniques that might bring about more stringent control of each individual source are reviewed. The many agricultural, commercial, domestic, industrial, and municipal…

  2. Air fluorescence detection of large air showers below the horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halverson, P.; Bowen, T.

    1985-01-01

    In the interest of exploring the cosmic ray spectrum at energies greater than 10 to the 18th power eV, where flux rates at the Earth's surface drop below 100 yr(-1) km(-2) sr(-1), cosmic ray physicists have been forced to construct ever larger detectors in order to collect useful amounts of data in reasonable lengths of time. At present, the ultimate example of this trend is the Fly's Eye system in Utah, which uses the atmosphere around an array of skyward-looking photomultiplier tubes. The air acts as a scintillator to give detecting areas as large as 5000 square kilometers sr (for highest energy events). This experiment has revealed structure (and a possible cutoff) in the ultra-high energy region above 10 o the 19th power eV. The success of the Fly's Eye experiment provides impetus for continuing the development of larger detectors to make accessible even higher energies. However, due to the rapidly falling flux, a tenfold increase in observable energy would call for a hundredfold increase in the detecting area. But, the cost of expanding the Fly's Eye detecting area will approximately scale linearly with area. It is for these reasons that the authors have proposed a new approach to using the atmosphere as a scintillator; one which will require fewer photomultipliers, less hardware (thus being less extensive), yet will provide position and shower size information.

  3. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  4. A New Technique for Sampling Firn Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perron, F. E.; Dibb, J. E.; Albert, M. R.

    2004-12-01

    The discovery and subsequent interest in photochemical interactions between the polar snowpack and the atmosphere has spawned interest in reliable methods of measuring chemical concentrations in interstitial air. Consistent sampling of the interstitial air in the snowpack had been problematic due to great chemical differences possible from sampling different layers in the snow and the difficulties in acquiring a sample that could serve multiple investigators at the same time. This paper describes a new air sampling device that was developed to solve many of the sampling problems. This new system allows multiple simultaneous chemical analysis of air contained in the pore spaces of the arctic snowpack at unlimited increments from depths of 0 to 150 cm. The three major components are a 4 ft diameter highly UV transmittent acrylic "hood" with a 10 cm rim, a 10 cm diameter casing barrel, and an air probe head. These components operate along with a variety of sub-components that supplement the sampling process. The technique provides for a common sample collection, use for a variety of gases to be sampled, it eliminates short circuit air sampling, provides undisturbed snow for in-situ sampling at multiple sample depths in the same location. The design is discussed and possible extension as a platform for other sensors is described.

  5. Processive cytoskeletal motors studied with single-molecule fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Belyy, Vladislav; Yildiz, Ahmet

    2014-10-01

    Processive cytoskeletal motors from the myosin, kinesin, and dynein families walk on actin filaments and microtubules to drive cellular transport and organization in eukaryotic cells. These remarkable molecular machines are able to take hundreds of successive steps at speeds of up to several microns per second, allowing them to effectively move vesicles and organelles throughout the cytoplasm. Here, we focus on single-molecule fluorescence techniques and discuss their wide-ranging applications to the field of cytoskeletal motor research. We cover both traditional fluorescence and sub-diffraction imaging of motors, providing examples of how fluorescence data can be used to measure biophysical parameters of motors such as coordination, stepping mechanism, gating, and processivity. We also outline some remaining challenges in the field and suggest future directions.

  6. Detection of Ionizing Radiation using Solar Blind Air Fluorescence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    14 16 Figure 1.2: Geant4 simulation of the solar blind photon flux from 1010 decays of Am241 viewed by a 40 cm diameter detector at a distance of 10 m...discharges and other sources, sufficiently low that it will not interfere with the operation of a solar blind radiological detector ? UNCLASSIFIED iii DSTO...Figures 1.2 through 1.4 show simulated solar blind photon air fluorescence emission from common radiological sources (Am240,Cs137 and Sr90). In each

  7. DAPI staining and fluorescence microscopy techniques for phytoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Nancy M; Arismendi, Nolberto L

    2013-01-01

    The 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) stain technique is a simple method that was developed for confirming the presence of phytoplasmas in hand-cut or freezing microtome sections of infected tissues. DAPI binds AT-rich DNA preferentially, so that phytoplasmas, localized among phloem cells, can be visualized in a fluorescence microscope. The procedure is quick, easy to use, inexpensive, and can be used as a preliminary or quantitative method to detect or quantify phytoplasma-like bodies in infected plants.

  8. Fluorescence Techniques Using Dehydroergosterol to Study Cholesterol Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Huang, Huan; Gallegos, Adalberto M.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2008-01-01

    Cholesterol itself has very few structural/chemical features suitable for real-time imaging in living cells. Thus, the advent of dehydroergosterol [ergosta-5,7,9(11),22-tetraen-3β-ol, DHE] the fluorescent sterol most structurally and functionally similar to cholesterol to date, has proven to be a major asset for real-time probing/elucidating the sterol environment and intracellular sterol trafficking in living organisms. DHE is a naturally-occurring, fluorescent sterol analog that faithfully mimics many of the properties of cholesterol. Because these properties are very sensitive to sterol structure and degradation, such studies require the use of extremely pure (>98%) quantities of fluorescent sterol. DHE is readily bound by cholesterol-binding proteins, is incorporated into lipoproteins (from the diet of animals or by exchange in vitro), and for real-time imaging studies is easily incorporated into cultured cells where it co-distributes with endogenous sterol. Incorporation from an ethanolic stock solution to cell culture media is effective, but this process forms an aqueous dispersion of dehydroergosterol crystals which can result in endocytic cellular uptake and distribution into lysosomes which is problematic in imaging DHE at the plasma membrane of living cells. In contrast, monomeric DHE can be incorporated from unilamellar vesicles by exchange/fusion with the plasma membrane or from DHE-methyl-β-cyclodextrin (DHE-MβCD) complexes by exchange with the plasma membrane. Both of the latter techniques can deliver large quantities of monomeric dehydroergosterol with significant distribution into the plasma membrane. The properties and behavior of DHE in protein-binding, lipoproteins, model membranes, biological membranes, lipid rafts/caveolae, and real-time imaging in living cells indicate that this naturally-occurring fluorescent sterol is a useful mimic for probing the properties of cholesterol in these systems. PMID:18536950

  9. Enumeration of semen leucocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridisation technique

    PubMed Central

    Conte, R A; Luke, S; Verma, R S

    1995-01-01

    Aim—To determine whether the fluorescent in situ hybridisation technique (FISH) using a total human DNA genomic probe can be used to enumerate semen leucocytes. Methods—Semen samples from five donors were subjected to a mild KC1 solution. These samples were then biotin labelled under FISH conditions using a total human DNA genomic probe and the leucocyte counts were determined. To check the accuracy of the technique a monoclonal antibody against the common leucocyte antigen CD45 [KC56(T-200)] served as a control. An isotypic control for [KC56(T-200)], the immunoglobulin [MsIgG1], served as a secondary control. Results—Semen leucocytes stained by the FISH technique were easily detected because of their distinct bright yellow colour, while the sperm cells were red. The leucocyte count ranged from 0·5 to 4·9 × 106 per ml of semen. KC56(T-200) and its isotypic control MsIgG1, which served as control for the FISH technique, accurately identified 94% and 97% of the semen leucocytes of a control donor, respectively. Conclusions—The FISH technique using a total human DNA probe can accurately and effectively enumerate the overall leucocyte population in semen. Images PMID:16696031

  10. Evaluation of the reasons why freshly appearing citrus peel fluorescence during automatic inspection by fluorescent imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momin, Md. Abdul; Kondo, Naoshi; Kuramoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Shiigi, Tomoo; Ninomiya, Kazunori

    2011-07-01

    Defective unshu oranges (Citrus reticulate Blanco var. unshu) were sorted based on fluorescent imaging technique in a commercial packinghouse but fresh appearing unshu were rejected due to fluorescence appearing on their peel. We studied the various visible patterns based on colour, fluorescence and microscopic images, where even areas of the peel that are not obviously damaged can have fluorescence, to provide a categorization of fluorescence reasons. The categorization corresponded to: 1) hole and flow; 2) influenced by damaged or rotten fruits that have released peel oil onto it; 3) immature or poor peel quality; 4) whitish fluorescence due to agro-chemicals and 5) variation of the growing season. The identification of such patterns of fluorescence might be useful for citrus grading industry to take some initiatives to make the entire automated system more efficient.

  11. Revisiting the mechanism of nitrogen fluorescence emission induced by femtosecond filament in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suyu; Jiang, Yuanfei; Chen, Anmin; He, Lanhai; Liu, Dunli; Jin, Mingxing

    2017-03-01

    The backward propagating and side emitted fluorescence during the femtosecond filamentation in air is experimentally investigated in this paper. By comparing the fluorescence emission in the circular and linear polarization states, we find that in the shorter focal length case, the direct ionization of N 2 greatly affects the fluorescence emission behaviors: the fluorescence from N2 + and N 2 is always stronger in the linear and circular polarization cases, respectively. Based on the observation, the emission mechanism of nitrogen fluorescence emission induced by a femtosecond filament is discussed.

  12. Autonomous unmanned air vehicles (UAV) techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming-Kai; Lee, Ting N.

    2007-04-01

    The UAVs (Unmanned Air Vehicles) have great potentials in different civilian applications, such as oil pipeline surveillance, precision farming, forest fire fighting (yearly), search and rescue, boarder patrol, etc. The related industries of UAVs can create billions of dollars for each year. However, the road block of adopting UAVs is that it is against FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and ATC (Air Traffic Control) regulations. In this paper, we have reviewed the latest technologies and researches on UAV navigation and obstacle avoidance. We have purposed a system design of Jittering Mosaic Image Processing (JMIP) with stereo vision and optical flow to fulfill the functionalities of autonomous UAVs.

  13. Periodic Evolution of a Xe I Population in an Oscillatory Discharge Captured Through Time-Synchronized Laser Induced Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2014-10-01

    We track the evolution of the Xe I 6 s '[ 1 / 2 ] 1 - 6 p '[ 3 / 2 ] 2 (834.68 nm air) transition lineshape in a plasma discharge oscillating at 60 Hz. Two time-synchronized laser induced fluorescence techniques based on phase sensitive detection of the fluorescence signal are demonstrated, yielding consistent results. One approach used previously involves a sample-and-hold procedure that collects fluorescence signal at a particular phase in the oscillation period and holds the average value until the following sample. The second method is based on fast switching of the fluorescence signal; only the signal collected inside the acquisition gate is sent to a lock-in amplifier for processing. Both methods rely on modulating the exciting laser beam and the latter permits operation at a much higher frequency range with reduced spectral noise density. The maximum observed peak fluorescence intensity occurs at low discharge currents, although the peak intensity drops to zero at zero discharge current. The peak intensity also decreases at the discharge current maximum. Time-varying properties of the xenon neutrals are extracted from a lineshape analysis. This work is sponsored by the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. CVY acknowledges support from the DOE NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  14. Insect monitoring with fluorescence lidar techniques: field experiments.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zuguang; Brydegaard, Mikkel; Lundin, Patrik; Wellenreuther, Maren; Runemark, Anna; Svensson, Erik I; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-09-20

    Results from field experiments using a fluorescence lidar system to monitor movements of insects are reported. Measurements over a river surface were made at distances between 100 and 300 m, detecting, in particular, damselflies entering the 355 nm pulsed laser beam. The lidar system recorded the depolarized elastic backscattering and two broad bands of laser-induced fluorescence, with the separation wavelength at 500 nm. Captured species, dusted with characteristic fluorescent dye powders, could be followed spatially and temporally after release. Implications for ecological research are discussed.

  15. Measurement of Pressure Dependent Fluorescence Yield of Air: Calibration Factor for UHECR Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.W.; Burt, G.W.; Cao, Z.; Chang, F.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Chen, C.W.; Chen, P.; Field, C.; Findlay, J.; Huntemeyer, Petra; Huang, M.A.; Hwang, W.-Y.P.; Iverson, R.; Jones, B.F.; Jui, C.C.H.; Kirn, M.; Lin, G.-L.; Loh, E.C.; Maestas, M.M.; Manago, N.; Martens, K.; /Montana U. /Utah U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2005-07-06

    In a test experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the fluorescence yield of 28.5 GeV electrons in air and nitrogen was measured. The measured photon yields between 300 and 400 nm at 1 atm and 29 C are Y(760 Torr){sup air} = 4.42 {+-} 0.73 and Y(760 Torr){sup N{sub 2}} = 29.2 {+-} 4.8 photons per electron per meter. Assuming that the fluorescence yield is proportional to the energy deposition of a charged particle traveling through air, good agreement with measurements at lower particle energies is observed.

  16. Standoff detection: classification of biological aerosols using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Anita; Duschek, Frank; Fischbach, Thomas; Pargmann, Carsten; Aleksejev, Valeri; Poryvkina, Larisa; Sobolev, Innokenti; Babichenko, Sergey; Handke, Jürgen

    2014-05-01

    The challenges of detecting hazardous biological materials are manifold: Such material has to be discriminated from other substances in various natural surroundings. The detection sensitivity should be extremely high. As living material may reproduce itself, already one single bacterium may represent a high risk. Of course, identification should be quite fast with a low false alarm rate. Up to now, there is no single technique to solve this problem. Point sensors may collect material and identify it, but the problems of fast identification and especially of appropriate positioning of local collectors are sophisticated. On the other hand, laser based standoff detection may instantaneously provide the information of some accidental spillage of material by detecting the generated thin cloud. LIF technique may classify but hardly identify the substance. A solution can be the use of LIF technique in a first step to collect primary data and - if necessary- followed by utilizing these data for an optimized positioning of point sensors. We perform studies on an open air laser test range at distances between 20 and 135 m applying LIF technique to detect and classify aerosols. In order to employ LIF capability, we use a laser source emitting two wavelengths alternatively, 280 and 355 nm, respectively. Moreover, the time dependence of fluorescence spectra is recorded by a gated intensified CCD camera. Signal processing is performed by dedicated software for spectral pattern recognition. The direct comparison of all results leads to a basic classification of the various compounds.

  17. Agricultural pest monitoring using fluorescence lidar techniques. Feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, L.; Guan, Z. G.; Zhou, H. J.; Lv, J.; Zhu, Z. R.; Cheng, J. A.; Chen, F. J.; Löfstedt, C.; Svanberg, S.; Somesfalean, G.

    2012-03-01

    The fluorescence of different types of planthopper ( Hemiptera) and moth ( Lepidoptera), which constitute important Chinese agricultural pests, was investigated both in situ in a laboratory setting and remotely using a fluorescence light detection and ranging (lidar) system operating at a range of about 50 m. The natural autofluorescence of different species, as well as the fluorescence from insects that had been dusted with fluorescent dye powder for identification were studied. Autofluorescence spectra of both moths and planthoppers show a maximum intensity peak around 450 nm. Bleaching upon long-time laser illumination was modest and did not affect the shape of the spectrum. A single dyed rice planthopper, a few mm in size, could be detected at 50 m distance by using the fluorescence lidar system. By employing various marking dyes, different types of agricultural pest could be determined. We suggest that lidar may be used in studies of migration and movement of pest insects, including studies of their behavior in the vicinity of pheromone traps and in pheromone-treated fields.

  18. Note: Flow mediated skin fluorescence--A novel technique for evaluation of cutaneous microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, L; Urbaniak, M; Jedrzejczak, B; Marcinek, A; Gebicki, J

    2016-03-01

    This note describes a newly developed technique for evaluation of cutaneous microcirculation. The technique called Flow Mediated Skin Fluorescence (FMSF) is based on monitoring of NADH fluorescence intensity emitted from the skin tissue cells of a forearm. The changes in fluorescence intensity as a function of time in response to blocking and releasing of blood flow in a forearm are used as a measure of oxygen transport with blood to the tissue, which directly correlates with the skin microcirculation status. Preliminary results collected for healthy volunteers and patients experiencing serious cardiovascular problems indicated a usefulness of FMSF technique for evaluation of health related perturbations in cutaneous microcirculation.

  19. Dynamic measurement of the height and volume of migrating cells by a novel fluorescence microscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Bottier, Céline; Gabella, Chiara; Vianay, Benoît; Buscemi, Lara; Sbalzarini, Ivo F; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B

    2011-11-21

    We propose a new technique to measure the volume of adherent migrating cells. The method is based on a negative staining where a fluorescent, non-cell-permeant dye is added to the extracellular medium. The specimen is observed with a conventional fluorescence microscope in a chamber of uniform height. Given that the fluorescence signal depends on the thickness of the emitting layer, the objects excluding the fluorescent dye (i.e., cells) appear dark, and the decrease of the fluorescent signal with respect to the background is expected to give information about the height and the volume of the object. Using a glass microfabricated pattern with steps of defined heights, we show that the drop in fluorescence intensity is indeed proportional to the height of the step and obtain calibration curves relating fluorescence intensity to height. The technique, termed the fluorescence displacement method, is further validated by comparing our measurements with the ones obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We apply our method to measure the real-time volume dynamics of migrating fish epidermal keratocytes subjected to osmotic stress. The fluorescence displacement technique allows fast and precise monitoring of cell height and volume, thus providing a valuable tool for characterizing the three-dimensional behaviour of migrating cells.

  20. Predictive Techniques for Spacecraft Cabin Air Quality Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.; Cromes, Scott D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    As assembly of the International Space Station (ISS) proceeds, predictive techniques are used to determine the best approach for handling a variety of cabin air quality challenges. These techniques use equipment offgassing data collected from each ISS module before flight to characterize the trace chemical contaminant load. Combined with crew metabolic loads, these data serve as input to a predictive model for assessing the capability of the onboard atmosphere revitalization systems to handle the overall trace contaminant load as station assembly progresses. The techniques for predicting in-flight air quality are summarized along with results from early ISS mission analyses. Results from groundbased analyses of in-flight air quality samples are compared to the predictions to demonstrate the technique's relative conservatism.

  1. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence — a tool to obtain information about different air masses and air pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, Martina

    2001-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols are solid particles dissolved in air and change their chemical composition frequently depending on various parameters. In order to identify regional air circulation atmospheric aerosol filter samples were taken at Loyola University Chicago's Lake Shore Campus during the months of July and August 2000 with sampling times ranging between 1 and 2 h. The samples were digested in a microwave oven and analyzed by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry. One diurnal variation comprising five consecutive sampling events was selected and discussed as well as 4 days experiencing different meteorology were compared to exemplify the variation in trace elemental concentration according to air mass movements and highlight the capability of total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis. It was found that due to changes in meteorological conditions particularly wind direction and wind speed, trace elemental compositions varied rapidly and could be used to distinguish between 'Lake Michigan air' and 'metropolitan Chicago air' on such short-term time scale like one hour. Back trajectory analysis was applied to support and corroborate the results. The outcome of this study clearly shows that total-reflection X-ray fluorescence is an optimal tool for analysis of atmospheric aerosols.

  2. Preparation and application of new fluorescein-labeled fumonisins B1 in fluorescence polarization analysis technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To prepare a new fluorescent tracer against common mycotoxins such as fumonisin B1 in order to replace 6-(4,6-Dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (6-DTAF), an expensive marker, and to develop a technique for quick detection of fumonisin B1 based on the principle of fluorescence polarizati...

  3. Detection of fecal residue on poultry carcasses by laser induced fluorescence imaging techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential use of laser-induced fluorescence imaging techniques was investigated for the detection of diluted fecal matters from various parts of the digestive tract, including colon, ceca, small intestine, and duodenum, on poultry carcasses. One of the challenges for using fluorescence imaging f...

  4. Detection of Biomass in New York City Aerosols: Light Scattering and Optical Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebauer, M.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Xu, M.; Rudolph, E.; Steiner, J.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy is an ideal method for detecting bacteria and spores in real time. Optical fluorescence spectroscopy examination of New York City aerosols is used to quantify the mass of bacteria spores present in air masses collected at 14 liters/minute onto silica fiber filters, and on silica fiber ribbons using an Environmental Beta Attenuation Monitor manufactured by MetOne Instruments configured for the PM2.5 fraction. Dipicolinic acid (DPA), a molecule found primarily in bacterial spores, is the most characteristic component of spores in trial experiments on over 200 collected aerosol samples. DPA is extracted from the spores using a heat bath and chelated with Terbium. The DPA:Tb is detected by measuring its characteristic fluorescence with emission bands at 490, 545 and 585 nm for 270 nm excitation. Light scattering also measures the size distribution for a number of a variety of bacteria - Bacillus subtilis (rod shaped), Staphylococcus aureus (spherical) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (short rods) establishing that optical techniques satisfactorily distinguish populations based on their variable morphology. Size and morphology are obtained by applying a variation of the Gaussian Ray Approximation theory of anomalous diffraction theory to an analysis of the transmission spectra in the range of 0.4 to 1.0 microns. In test experiments, the refractive index of the inner spore core of Bacillus subtilis decreases from 1.51 to 1.39 while the spore radius enlarges from 0.38 to 0.6 micrometers. Optical determinations are verified by oil-immersion techniques and by scanning electron microscope measurements. Characterization of spores, germinating spore materials, and bacteria is considered vital to tracing bacteria in the environment, for the development of life-detection systems for planetary exploration, monitoring pathogens in environmental systems, and for the preparation of anti-terrorism strategies.

  5. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-08-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments. PBAPs can thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurement data and techniques for PBAPs in natural environments at high time- and size resolution are, however, sparse, and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in southwestern Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of a waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with a ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behavior, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night, when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each was correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multimodal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging, and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent

  6. Techniques for modeling hazardous air pollutant emissions from landfills

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, R.J.; Vigil, S.A.; Melcer, H.

    1998-12-31

    The Environmental Protection Agency`s Landfill Air Estimation Model (LAEEM), combined with either the AP-42 or CAA landfill emission factors, provide a basis to predict air emissions, including hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), from municipal solid waste landfills. This paper presents alternative approaches for estimating HAP emissions from landfills. These approaches include analytical solutions and estimation techniques that account for convection, diffusion, and biodegradation of HAPs. Results from the modeling of a prototypical landfill are used as the basis for discussion with respect to LAEEM results

  7. Optical sensing of peroxide using ceria nanoparticles via fluorescence quenching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Nader; Samir, Effat; Gaballah, Soha; Salah, Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    This study introduces the application of ceria nanoparticles (NPs) as an optical sensor for peroxide using fluorescence quenching technique. Our synthesized ceria NPs have the ability to adsorb peroxides via its oxygen vacancies. Ceria NPs solution with added variable concentrations of hydrogen peroxides is exposed through near-UV excitation and the detected visible fluorescent emission is found to be at ˜520 nm. The fluorescent intensity peak is found to be reduced with increasing the peroxide concentrations due to static fluorescence quenching technique. The relative intensity change of the visible fluorescent emission has been reduced to more than 50% at added peroxide concentrations up to 10 wt. %. In order to increase ceria peroxides sensing sensitivity, lanthanide elements such as samarium (Sm) are used as ceria NPs dopant. This research work could be applied further in optical sensors of radicals in biomedical engineering and environmental monitoring.

  8. Review of fluorescence guided surgery visualization and overlay techniques

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Jonathan T.; Dsouza, Alisha V.; Davis, Scott C.; Olson, Jonathan D.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    In fluorescence guided surgery, data visualization represents a critical step between signal capture and display needed for clinical decisions informed by that signal. The diversity of methods for displaying surgical images are reviewed, and a particular focus is placed on electronically detected and visualized signals, as required for near-infrared or low concentration tracers. Factors driving the choices such as human perception, the need for rapid decision making in a surgical environment, and biases induced by display choices are outlined. Five practical suggestions are outlined for optimal display orientation, color map, transparency/alpha function, dynamic range compression, and color perception check. PMID:26504628

  9. Planar Rayleigh scattering and laser-induced fluorescence for visualization of a hot, Mach 2 annular air jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balla, R. Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    Planar Rayleigh scattering (PRS) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) were used to investigate the vitiated air component of a coaxial hydrogen/vitiated air nonpremixed turbulent jet flame that is ejected at a Mach number of 2. All experiments were performed with a xenon chloride tunable excimer laser. Planar information for both techniques was obtained using laser sheets 6 cm high, 5 cm wide, and 300 micron thick. In this flow field, the effective Rayleigh cross section of the components in the vitiated air was assumed to be independent of composition. Therefore, the PRS technique produced signals which were proportional to total density. When the flow field was assumed to be at a known and uniform pressure, the PRS signal data for the vitiated air could be converted to temperature information. Also, PLIF images were generated by probing the OH molecule. These images contain striation patterns attributed to small localized instantaneous temperature nonuniformities. The results from the PLIF and PRS techniques were used to show that this flow field contains a nongaseous component, most likely liquid water that can be reduced by increasing the settling chamber wall temperature.

  10. Tools and techniques to measure mitophagy using fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dolman, Nick J; Chambers, Kevin M; Mandavilli, Bhaskar; Batchelor, Robert H; Janes, Michael S

    2013-11-01

    Mitophagy is a specialized form of autophagy that removes damaged mitochondria, thereby maintaining efficient cellular metabolism and reducing cellular stress caused by aberrant oxidative bursts. Deficits in mitophagy underlie several diseases, and a substantial body of research has elucidated key steps in the pathways that lead to and execute autophagic clearance of mitochondria. Many of these studies employ fluorescence microscopy to visualize mitochondrial morphology, mass, and functional state. Studies in this area also examine colocalization/recruitment of accessory factors, components of the autophagic machinery and signaling molecules to mitochondria. In this review, we provide a brief summary of the current understanding about the processes involved in mitophagy followed by a discussion of probes commonly employed and important considerations of the methodologies to study and analyze mitophagy using fluorescence microscopy. Representative data, where appropriate, are provided to highlight the use of key probes to monitor mitophagy. The review will conclude with a consideration of new possibilities for mitophagy research and a discussion of recently developed technologies for this emerging area of cell biology.

  11. Air Quality Forecasting through Different Statistical and Artificial Intelligence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, D.; Goyal, P.

    2014-12-01

    Urban air pollution forecasting has emerged as an acute problem in recent years because there are sever environmental degradation due to increase in harmful air pollutants in the ambient atmosphere. In this study, there are different types of statistical as well as artificial intelligence techniques are used for forecasting and analysis of air pollution over Delhi urban area. These techniques are principle component analysis (PCA), multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural network (ANN) and the forecasting are observed in good agreement with the observed concentrations through Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) at different locations in Delhi. But such methods suffers from disadvantages like they provide limited accuracy as they are unable to predict the extreme points i.e. the pollution maximum and minimum cut-offs cannot be determined using such approach. Also, such methods are inefficient approach for better output forecasting. But with the advancement in technology and research, an alternative to the above traditional methods has been proposed i.e. the coupling of statistical techniques with artificial Intelligence (AI) can be used for forecasting purposes. The coupling of PCA, ANN and fuzzy logic is used for forecasting of air pollutant over Delhi urban area. The statistical measures e.g., correlation coefficient (R), normalized mean square error (NMSE), fractional bias (FB) and index of agreement (IOA) of the proposed model are observed in better agreement with the all other models. Hence, the coupling of statistical and artificial intelligence can be use for the forecasting of air pollutant over urban area.

  12. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively.

  13. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively. PMID:26089935

  14. Ambient measurements of biological aerosol particles near Killarney, Ireland: a comparison between real-time fluorescence and microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, D. A.; Huffman, J. A.; O'Connor, D. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöschl, U.; Sodeau, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) can contribute significantly to the coarse particle burden in many environments, may thus influence climate and precipitation systems as cloud nuclei, and can spread disease to humans, animals, and plants. Measurements of PBAP in natural environments taken at high time- and size- resolution are, however, sparse and so large uncertainties remain in the role that biological particles play in the Earth system. In this study two commercial real-time fluorescence particle sensors and a Sporewatch single-stage particle impactor were operated continuously from 2 August to 2 September 2010 at a rural sampling location in Killarney National Park in south western Ireland. A cascade impactor was operated periodically to collect size-resolved particles during exemplary periods. Here we report the first ambient comparison of the waveband integrated bioaerosol sensor (WIBS-4) with the ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) and also compare these real-time fluorescence techniques with results of fluorescence and optical microscopy of impacted samples. Both real-time instruments showed qualitatively similar behaviour, with increased fluorescent bioparticle concentrations at night when relative humidity was highest and temperature was lowest. The fluorescent particle number from the FL3 channel of the WIBS-4 and from the UV-APS were strongly correlated and dominated by a 3 μm mode in the particle size distribution. The WIBS FL2 channel exhibited particle modes at approx. 1 and 3 μm, and each were correlated with the concentration of fungal spores commonly observed in air samples collected at the site (ascospores, basidiospores, Ganoderma spp.). The WIBS FL1 channel exhibited variable multi-modal distributions turning into a broad featureless single mode after averaging and exhibited poor correlation with fungal spore concentrations, which may be due to the detection of bacterial and non-biological fluorescent particles

  15. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  16. Improvement of dynamic range of filter-less fluorescence sensor with body-biasing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwaki, Yu; Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Akita, Ippei; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2015-04-01

    Although fluorescence microscopy is an important technique in biomedical fields, the bulky equipment is disadvantageous in some situations. We have previously proposed a filter-less fluorescence sensor whose operation is based on the light absorption coefficient, which depends on the wavelength in a silicon substrate. In this sensor, the ratio of the excitation light intensity to the fluorescence intensity is as high as 400:1 upon optimizing the impurity concentration and the depth of the p-well region. To improve the dynamic range, herein we use a body-biasing technique to optimize the potential distribution of the sensing area to acquire sufficient photocurrent. Consequently, the dynamic range of the filter-less fluorescence sensor is improved to 800:1 with an 8 V substrate voltage.

  17. Optical sensing of peroxide using ceria nanoparticles via fluorescence quenching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, N.; Samir, E.; Gaballah, S.

    2016-04-01

    This study introduces the application of small ceria nanoparticles (NPs) as optical sensor for peroxide using fluorescence quenching technique. Our synthesized ceria nanoparticles have the ability to adsorb peroxides via its oxygen vacancies. Ceria nanoparticles (NPs) solution with added variable concentrations of hydrogen peroxides is exposed through near UV excitation and the detected visible fluorescent emission is found to be at 520nm, with reduced peak intensity peaks with increasing the peroxide concentrations due to static fluorescence quenching technique. The relative intensity change of the visible fluorescent emission has been reduced to more than 50% at added peroxide concentrations up to 10 wt.%. This research work could be applied further in optical sensors of radicals in biomedical engineering and environmental monitoring.

  18. Fluorescence techniques used to measure interactions between hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and epidermal growth factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Kathawala, Mustafa H; Khoo, Stella P K; Sudhaharan, Thankiah; Zhao, Xinxin; Say Chye Loo, Joachim; Ahmed, Sohail; Woei Ng, Kee

    2015-01-01

    The potential applications of nanomaterials in therapeutics are immense and to fully explore this potential, it is important to understand the interaction of nanoparticles with cellular components. To examine the interaction between nanoparticles and cell membrane receptors, this report describes the use of advanced fluorescence techniques to measure interactions between hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles and epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), as a model system. FITC-labelled HA nanoparticles and monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP)-conjugated EGFRs expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) were generated and their interaction measured using acceptor photobleaching-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (AP-FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET). Results confirmed that hydroxyapatite nanoparticles not only interacted with EGFR but also attenuated downstream EGFR signalling, possibly by hindering normal dimerization of EGFR. Furthermore, the extent of signal attenuation suggested correlation with specific surface area of the nanoparticles, whereby greater specific surface area resulted in greater downstream signal attenuation. This novel demonstration establishes fluorescence techniques as a viable method to study nanoparticle interactions with proteins such as cell surface receptors. The approach described herein can be extended to study interactions between any fluorescently labelled nanoparticle-biomolecule pair.

  19. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E.; Börgardts, M.; Müller, T. J. J.; Grünzweig, C.; Lehmann, E.

    2015-09-15

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied.

  20. Fluorescence light microscopy of pulmonary surfactant at the air-water interface of an air bubble of adjustable size.

    PubMed

    Knebel, D; Sieber, M; Reichelt, R; Galla, H-J; Amrein, M

    2002-07-01

    The structural dynamics of pulmonary surfactant was studied by epifluorescence light microscopy at the air-water interface of a bubble as a model close to nature for an alveolus. Small unilamellar vesicles of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol, a small amount of a fluorescent dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-analog, and surfactant-associated protein C were injected into the buffer solution. They aggregated to large clusters in the presence of Ca(2+) and adsorbed from these units to the interface. This gave rise to an interfacial film that eventually became fully condensed with dark, polygonal domains in a fluorescent matrix. When now the bubble size was increased or decreased, respectively, the film expanded or contracted. Upon expansion of the bubble, the dark areas became larger to the debit of the bright matrix and reversed upon contraction. We were able to observe single domains during the whole process. The film remained condensed, even when the interface was increased to twice its original size. From comparison with scanning force microscopy directly at the air-water interface, the fluorescent areas proved to be lipid bilayers associated with the (dark) monolayer. In the lung, such multilayer phase acts as a reservoir that guarantees a full molecular coverage of the alveolar interface during the breathing cycle and provides mechanical stability to the film.

  1. LIFES: Laser Induced Fluorescence and Environmental Sensing. [remote sensing technique for marine environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houston, W. R.; Stephenson, D. G.; Measures, R. M.

    1975-01-01

    A laboratory investigation has been conducted to evaluate the detection and identification capabilities of laser induced fluorescence as a remote sensing technique for the marine environment. The relative merits of fluorescence parameters including emission and excitation profiles, intensity and lifetime measurements are discussed in relation to the identification of specific targets of the marine environment including crude oils, refined petroleum products, fish oils and algae. Temporal profiles displaying the variation of lifetime with emission wavelength have proven to add a new dimension of specificity and simplicity to the technique.

  2. Time-autocorrelated two-photon counting technique for time-resolved fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borst, Walter L.; Liu, Lin-I.

    1999-01-01

    We describe a new instrumental technique for the excitation, acquisition, and analysis of fluorescence decays from a variety of substances, in the present case plastic scintillators. The fluorescence is excited by β particles from a radioactive source (100 μCi Sr-90). A random photon from the resulting fluorescence decay provides a trigger pulse to start a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), while another random photon from the same β-excitation event provides the stop pulse. The optical components and geometry for detecting these two photons, i.e., the two photomultipliers (PMT), the filters, and the pulse counting system, are identical. As a consequence, the measured fluorescence signal is the autocorrelation function of the fluorescence decay from the sample. A delay line of 50 ns is inserted between the "stop" signal PMT and the TAC so that those "stop" pulses which arrive before "start pulses" also are recorded. Thus the acquired fluorescence signal versus time is symmetric about the delay time and contains twice as many counts as without delay. We call the new technique the "time-autocorrelated two-photon counting technique" (TATPC) in distinction to the conventional "time-correlated single-photon counting technique" (TCSPC). We compared both techniques with the same equipment and scintillators, where in the TCSPC case, a β particle is used for the start of the TAC instead of a random photon in the TATPC technique. We find that under similar experimental circumstances, the signal count rate with TATPC is about 50 times larger than with TCSPC. The new method is well suited for obtaining fluorescence decay times from plastic scintillators, which we use in this article to exemplify the technique. More generally, β-particle excitation in combination with TATPC should prove useful for materials with high energy levels or band gaps, which cannot be excited with pulsed lasers in the visible region. The length of our excitation pulse is less than 20 ps and is

  3. Air fluorescence efficiency measurements for AIRWATCH based mission: Experimental set-up

    SciTech Connect

    Biondo, B.; Catalano, O.; Celi, F.; Fazio, G.; Giarrusso, S.; La Rosa, G.; Mangano, A.; Bonanno, G.; Cosentino, R.; Di Benedetto, R.; Scuderi, S.; Richiusa, G.; Gregorio, A.

    1998-06-15

    In the framework of the AIRWATCH project we present an experimental set-up to measure the efficiency of the UV fluorescence production of the air using hard X-ray stimulus. The measures will be carried out at different pressure and temperature to emulate the same condition of the upper layers of the atmosphere where X-ray and gamma ray photons of Gamma Ray Bursts are absorbed.

  4. Translational diffusion of probe molecules under high pressure: A study by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetti, Marco; Roger, Michel

    2013-02-01

    We present fluorescence recovery measurements after photobleaching performed under high pressure in liquids that fill square-section fused silica micro-capillaries. These micro-capillaries withstand pressure up to 2500 bar for a wall thickness of about 140 μm and fit easily on the microscope stage. This technique allows the translational diffusion coefficient of fluorescent molecules in liquids to be measured as a function of pressure. When the liquid sample is far from its glass transition the translational diffusive coefficient is in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein equation. As the glass transition is approached by further increasing the pressure, decoupling of the measured diffusion coefficient from the Stokes-Einstein relation is observed. These are the first measurements that combine the fluorescence recovery technique and high hydrostatic pressures. This experimental setup can also be used either with diamond or sapphire anvil cells in order to span a larger pressure range.

  5. Uncertainty in mapping urban air quality using crowdsourcing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Castell, Nuria; Lahoz, William; Bartonova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Small and low-cost sensors measuring various air pollutants have become available in recent years owing to advances in sensor technology. Such sensors have significant potential for improving high-resolution mapping of air quality in the urban environment as they can be deployed in comparatively large numbers and therefore are able to provide information at unprecedented spatial detail. However, such sensor devices are subject to significant and currently little understood uncertainties that affect their usability. Not only do these devices exhibit random errors and biases of occasionally substantial magnitudes, but these errors may also shift over time. In addition, there often tends to be significant inter-sensor variability even when supposedly identical sensors from the same manufacturer are used. We need to quantify accurately these uncertainties to make proper use of the information they provide. Furthermore, when making use of the data and producing derived products such as maps, the measurement uncertainties that propagate throughout the analysis need to be clearly communicated to the scientific and non-scientific users of the map products. Based on recent experiences within the EU-funded projects CITI-SENSE and hackAIR we discuss the uncertainties along the entire processing chain when using crowdsourcing techniques for mapping urban air quality. Starting with the uncertainties exhibited by the sensors themselves, we present ways of quantifying the error characteristics of a network of low-cost microsensors and show suitable statistical metrics for summarizing them. Subsequently, we briefly present a data-fusion-based method for mapping air quality in the urban environment and illustrate how we propagate the uncertainties of the individual sensors throughout the mapping system, resulting in detailed maps that document the pixel-level uncertainty for each concentration field. Finally, we present methods for communicating the resulting spatial uncertainty

  6. Nitric oxide density measurements in air and air/fuel nanosecond pulse discharges by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddi, M.; Jiang, N.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2009-04-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is used to measure absolute nitric oxide concentrations in air, methane-air and ethylene-air non-equilibrium plasmas, as a function of time after initiation of a single pulse, 20 kV peak voltage, 25 ns pulse duration discharge. A mixture of NO and nitrogen with known composition (4.18 ppm NO) is used for calibration. Peak NO density in air at 60 Torr, after a single pulse, is ~8 × 1012 cm-3 (~4.14 ppm) occurring at ~250 µs after the pulse, with decay time of ~16.5 ms. Peak NO atom mole fraction in a methane-air mixture with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5 is found to be approximately equal to that in air, with approximately the same rise and decay rate. In an ethylene-air mixture (also with equivalence ratio of phiv = 0.5), the rise and decay times are comparable to air and methane-air, but the peak NO concentration is reduced by a factor of approximately 2.5. Spontaneous emission measurements show that excited electronic states N2(C 3Π) and NO(A 2Σ) in air at P = 60 Torr decay within ~20 ns and ~1 µs, respectively. Kinetic modelling calculations incorporating air plasma kinetics complemented with the GRI Mech 3.0 hydrocarbon oxidation mechanism are compared with the experimental data using three different NO production mechanisms. It is found that NO concentration rise after the discharge pulse is much faster than predicted by Zel'dovich mechanism reactions, by two orders of magnitude, but much slower compared with reactions of electronically excited nitrogen atoms and molecules, also by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that processes involving long lifetime (~100 µs) metastable states, such as N2(X 1Σ,v) and O2(b 1Σ), formed by quenching of the metastable N2(A 3Σ) state by ground electronic state O2, may play a dominant role in NO formation. NO decay, in all cases, is found to be dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, NO + O → N + O2, as well as by conversion into NO2 in a reaction of NO with ozone.

  7. A flight investigation of oscillating air forces: Equipment and technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1975-01-01

    The equipment and techniques are described which are to be used in a project aimed at measuring oscillating air forces and dynamic aeroelastic response of a swept wing airplane at high subsonic speeds. Electro-hydraulic inertia type shakers installed in the wing tips will excite various elastic airplane modes while the related oscillating chordwise pressures at two spanwise wing stations and the wing mode shapes are recorded on magnetic tape. The data reduction technique, following the principle of a wattmeter harmonic analyzer employed by Bratt, Wight, and Tilly, utilizes magnetic tape and high speed electronic multipliers to record directly the real and imaginary components of oscillatory data signals relative to a simple harmonic reference signal. Through an extension of this technique an automatic flight-flutter-test data analyzer is suggested in which vector plots of mechanical admittance or impedance would be plotted during the flight test.

  8. Direct fluorescent antibody technique for the detection of bacterial kidney disease in paraffin-embedded tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochiai, T.; Yasutake, W.T.; Gould, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was successfully used to detect the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), Renibacterium salmoninarum, in Bouin's solution flexed and paraffinembedded egg and tissue sections. This method is superior to gram stain and may be particularly useful in detecting the BKD organism in fish with low-grade infection.

  9. 9 CFR 113.47 - Detection of extraneous viruses by the fluorescent antibody technique.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... fluorescent antibody technique. 113.47 Section 113.47 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... or in a filed Outline of Production for a product. (a) Monolayer cultures of cells (monolayers), at... shall be the “material under test.” (iii) One group of monolayers, that are of the same type of cells...

  10. 9 CFR 113.47 - Detection of extraneous viruses by the fluorescent antibody technique.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... fluorescent antibody technique. 113.47 Section 113.47 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... or in a filed Outline of Production for a product. (a) Monolayer cultures of cells (monolayers), at... shall be the “material under test.” (iii) One group of monolayers, that are of the same type of cells...

  11. 9 CFR 113.47 - Detection of extraneous viruses by the fluorescent antibody technique.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... fluorescent antibody technique. 113.47 Section 113.47 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... or in a filed Outline of Production for a product. (a) Monolayer cultures of cells (monolayers), at... shall be the “material under test.” (iii) One group of monolayers, that are of the same type of cells...

  12. 9 CFR 113.47 - Detection of extraneous viruses by the fluorescent antibody technique.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detection of extraneous viruses by the fluorescent antibody technique. 113.47 Section 113.47 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... or in a filed Outline of Production for a product. (a) Monolayer cultures of cells (monolayers),...

  13. Implementation of Satellite Techniques in the Air Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellner, Andrzej; Jafernik, Henryk

    2016-06-01

    The article shows process of the implementation satellite systems in Polish aviation which contributed to accomplishment Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) concept. Since 1991 authors have introduced Satellite Navigation Equipment in Polish Air Forces. The studies and researches provide to the Polish Air Force alternative approaches, modernize their navigation and landing systems and achieve compatibility with systems of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Acquired experience, conducted military tests and obtained results enabled to take up work scientifically - research in the environment of the civil aviation. Therefore in 2008 there has been launched cooperation with Polish Air Navigation Services Agency (PANSA). Thanks to cooperation, there have been compiled and fulfilled three fundamental international projects: EGNOS APV MIELEC (EGNOS Introduction in European Eastern Region - APV Mielec), HEDGE (Helicopters Deploy GNSS in Europe), SHERPA (Support ad-Hoc to Eastern Region Pre-operational in GNSS). The successful completion of these projects enabled implementation 21 procedures of the RNAV GNSS final approach at Polish airports, contributing to the implementation of PBN in Poland as well as ICAO resolution A37-11. Results of conducted research which served for the implementation of satellite techniques in the air transport constitute the meaning of this material.

  14. Fluorescence polarization of tetracycline derivatives as a technique for mapping nonmelanoma skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Yaroslavsky, Anna N; Salomatina, Elena V; Neel, Victor; Anderson, Rox; Flotte, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most common form of human cancer, often resulting in high morbidity. Low visual contrast of these tumors makes their delineation a challenging problem. Employing a linearly polarized monochromatic light source and a wide-field CCD camera, we have developed a technique for fluorescence polarization imaging of the nonmelanoma cancers stained using antibiotics from the tetracycline family. To determine the feasibility of the method, fluorescence polarization images of 86 thick, fresh cancer excisions were studied. We found that the level of endogenous fluorescence polarization was much lower than that of exogenous, and that the average values of fluorescence polarization of tetracycline derivatives were significantly higher in cancerous as compared to normal tissue. Out of 86 tumors [54 stained in demeclocycline (DMN) and 32 in tetracycline (TCN)], in 79 cases (51-DMN, 28-TCN) the location, size, and shape of the lesions were identified accurately. The results of this trial indicate that nonmelanoma skin tumors can be distinguished from healthy tissue based on the differences in exogenous fluorescence polarization of TCN and/or DMN. Therefore, the developed technique can provide an important new tool for image-guided cancer surgery.

  15. MRT letter: Auto-fluorescence by human alveolar macrophages after in vitro exposure to air pollution particles.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Sangani, Rahul G; Brighton, Luisa E; Carson, John L

    2010-06-01

    Macrophages from smokers demonstrate an increased auto-fluorescence. Similarly, auto-fluorescence follows in vitro exposure of macrophages to cigarette smoke condensate (i.e., the particulate fraction of cigarette smoke). The composition of particles in cigarette smoke can be comparable to air pollution particles. We tested the postulate that macrophages exposed to air pollution particles could demonstrate auto-fluorescence. Healthy nonsmoking and healthy smoking volunteers (both 18-40 years of age) underwent fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and alveolar macrophages isolated. Macrophages were incubated at 37 degrees C in 5% CO(2) with either PBS or 100 microg/mL particle for both 1 and 24 h. Particles included a residual oil fly ash, Mt. St. Helens volcanic ash, and ambient air particles collected from St. Louis, Missouri and Salt Lake City, Utah. At the end of incubation, 50 microL of the cell suspension was cytocentrifuged and examined at modes for viewing fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and rhodamine fluorescence. Both emission source air pollution particles demonstrated FITC and rhodamine auto-fluorescence at 1 and 24 h, but the signal following incubation of the macrophages with oil fly ash appeared greater. Similarly, the ambient particles were associated with auto-fluorescence by the alveolar macrophages and this appeared to be dose-dependent. We conclude that exposure of macrophages to air pollution particles can be associated with auto-fluorescence in the FITC and rhodamine modes.

  16. Molecular imaging with optics: primer and case for near-infrared fluorescence techniques in personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M; Rasmussen, John C

    2008-01-01

    We compare and contrast the development of optical molecular imaging techniques with nuclear medicine with a didactic emphasis for initiating readers into the field of molecular imaging. The nuclear imaging techniques of gamma scintigraphy, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography are first briefly reviewed. The molecular optical imaging techniques of bioluminescence and fluorescence using gene reporter/probes and gene reporters are described prior to introducing the governing factors of autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. The use of dual-labeled, near-infrared excitable and radio-labeled agents are described with comparative measurements between planar fluorescence and nuclear molecular imaging. The concept of time-independent and -dependent measurements is described with emphasis on integrating time-dependent measurements made in the frequency domain for 3-D tomography. Finally, we comment on the challenges and progress for translating near-infrared (NIR) molecular imaging agents for personalized medicine.

  17. Population inversion in fluorescing fragments of super-excited molecules inside an air filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    See-Leang, Chin; Huai-Liang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    An original idea is reviewed. When a molecule is pumped into a super-excited state, one of its decay channels is neutral dissociation. One or more of the neutral fragments will fluoresce. Hence, if a lower state of such fluorescing fragments was populated through other channels but with a lower probability, population inversion of the fluorescing fragments would be naturally realized. This idea seems to be validated, so far, by comparing published work on three hydrocarbon molecules, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, and water vapor, H2O. After super-excitation in a femtosecond laser filament in air mixed with these molecules, the fluorescence from the CH or OH fragments exhibits population inversion, i.e., amplified spontaneous emission was observed in the backscattering direction of the filament. Project supported by the Canada Research Chairs, the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), the FRQNT, the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB921300), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61235003), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China, and the Scientific Research Foundation for Returned Scholars, Ministry of Education of China.

  18. Remote sensing of OH in the atmosphere using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    The use of a laser-induced fluorescence technique for the sensitive measurement of the atmospheric hydroxyl radical is discussed. Results of laboratory studies of the fluorescence and other spectroscopic properties of OH which allow the calculation of OH concentrations from the returned signals for various altitudes, water vapor contents and temperatures are presented. The experimental setup used for airborne OH measurements is then described, with particular attention given to the use of a telescope for excitation and light collection in a coaxial configuration and the periodic tuning of the exciting radiation necessary to obtain an OH signal in the presence of strong solar and nonresonant fluorescence backgrounds. The best detection limit obtained to date with the system is noted to be about 700,000 OH/cu cm, and it is expected that, with planned improvements in detection and tuning schemes, limits in the neighborhood of 1,000,000 OH/cu cm will be achieved routinely.

  19. Fluorescence measurements for evaluating the application of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2010-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of cuvette-contained laser dye mixtures are made for evaluation of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments. Nine mixtures of Coumarin 500 and Rhodamine 610 are analyzed, as well as the pure dyes. For each sample, the cuvette is positioned on a two-axis translation stage to allow the interrogation at different spatial locations, allowing the examination of both primary (absorption of the laser light) and secondary (absorption of the fluorescence) inner filter effects. In addition to these expected inner filter effects, we find evidence that a portion of the absorbed fluorescence is re-emitted. A total of 688 spectra are acquired for the evaluation of multivariate analysis approaches to account for nonlinear effects.

  20. Field Observations of Bioaerosols: What We've Learned from Fluorescence, Genetic, and Microscopic Techniques (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, J. A.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Després, V. R.; Elbert, W.; Sinha, B.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic aerosols are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere, influencing atmospheric chemistry and physics, the biosphere, climate, and public health. They play an important role in the spread of biological organisms, and they can cause or enhance human, animal, and plant diseases. Moreover, they can initiate the formation of clouds and precipitation as cloud condensation and ice nuclei (CCN, IN). Primary biogenic aerosol particles (PBAP) such as pollen, fungal spores, and bacteria are emitted directly from the biosphere to the atmosphere. Microscopic investigations have shown that PBAP account for up to ~30% of fine and up to ~70% of coarse particulate matter in rural and rain forest air, and the estimates of PBA emissions range from ~60 Tg a-1 of fine particles up to ~1000 Tg a-1 of total particulate matter. Fungal spores account for a large proportion of PBA with typical number and mass concentrations of ~104 m-3 and ~1 μg m-3 in continental boundary layer air and estimated global emissions of the order of ~50 Tg a-1 and 200 m-2 s-1, respectively [1]. The actual abundance, variability and diversity of PBAP are still poorly understood and quantified, however. By measuring fluorescence at excitation and emission wavelengths specific to viable cells, online techniques with time resolution of minutes are able to detect fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP), which represent a lower limit for the actual abundance of coarse (> 1 μm) PBAP [2]. Continuous sampling (1 - 4 months) was performed at various locations including pristine rain forest, rural and polluted urban sites. Each study exhibited a similar average particle number distribution dominated by a peak at ~3 μm, with coarse FBAP concentrations of the order of ~5x104 m-3 and ~1 μg m-3. Recent advances in the DNA analysis and molecular genetic characterization of aerosol filter samples yield new information about the sources and composition of PBA and provide new insight into regional and global

  1. An objective isobaric/isentropic technique for upper air analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancuso, R. L.; Endlich, R. M.; Ehernberger, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    An objective meteorological analysis technique is presented whereby both horizontal and vertical upper air analyses are performed. The process used to interpolate grid-point values from the upper-air station data is the same as for grid points on both an isobaric surface and a vertical cross-sectional plane. The nearby data surrounding each grid point are used in the interpolation by means of an anisotropic weighting scheme, which is described. The interpolation for a grid-point potential temperature is performed isobarically; whereas wind, mixing-ratio, and pressure height values are interpolated from data that lie on the isentropic surface that passes through the grid point. Two versions (A and B) of the technique are evaluated by qualitatively comparing computer analyses with subjective handdrawn analyses. The objective products of version A generally have fair correspondence with the subjective analyses and with the station data, and depicted the structure of the upper fronts, tropopauses, and jet streams fairly well. The version B objective products correspond more closely to the subjective analyses, and show the same strong gradients across the upper front with only minor smoothing.

  2. Air data position-error calibration using state reconstruction techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, S. A.; Larson, T. J.; Ehernberger, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    During the highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT) flight test program recently completed at NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility, numerous problems were experienced in airspeed calibration. This necessitated the use of state reconstruction techniques to arrive at a position-error calibration. For the HiMAT aircraft, most of the calibration effort was expended on flights in which the air data pressure transducers were not performing accurately. Following discovery of this problem, the air data transducers of both aircraft were wrapped in heater blankets to correct the problem. Additional calibration flights were performed, and from the resulting data a satisfactory position-error calibration was obtained. This calibration and data obtained before installation of the heater blankets were used to develop an alternate calibration method. The alternate approach took advantage of high-quality inertial data that was readily available. A linearized Kalman filter (LKF) was used to reconstruct the aircraft's wind-relative trajectory; the trajectory was then used to separate transducer measurement errors from the aircraft position error. This calibration method is accurate and inexpensive. The LKF technique has an inherent advantage of requiring that no flight maneuvers be specially designed for airspeed calibrations. It is of particular use when the measurements of the wind-relative quantities are suspected to have transducer-related errors.

  3. An evolutionary outlook of air traffic flow management techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistan, Trevor; Gardi, Alessandro; Sabatini, Roberto; Ramasamy, Subramanian; Batuwangala, Eranga

    2017-01-01

    In recent years Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) has become pertinent even in regions without sustained overload conditions caused by dense traffic operations. Increasing traffic volumes in the face of constrained resources has created peak congestion at specific locations and times in many areas of the world. Increased environmental awareness and economic drivers have combined to create a resurgent interest in ATFM as evidenced by a spate of recent ATFM conferences and workshops mediated by official bodies such as ICAO, IATA, CANSO the FAA and Eurocontrol. Significant ATFM acquisitions in the last 5 years include South Africa, Australia and India. Singapore, Thailand and Korea are all expected to procure ATFM systems within a year while China is expected to develop a bespoke system. Asia-Pacific nations are particularly pro-active given the traffic growth projections for the region (by 2050 half of all air traffic will be to, from or within the Asia-Pacific region). National authorities now have access to recently published international standards to guide the development of national and regional operational concepts for ATFM, geared to Communications, Navigation, Surveillance/Air Traffic Management and Avionics (CNS+A) evolutions. This paper critically reviews the field to determine which ATFM research and development efforts hold the best promise for practical technological implementations, offering clear benefits both in terms of enhanced safety and efficiency in times of growing air traffic. An evolutionary approach is adopted starting from an ontology of current ATFM techniques and proceeding to identify the technological and regulatory evolutions required in the future CNS+A context, as the aviation industry moves forward with a clearer understanding of emerging operational needs, the geo-political realities of regional collaboration and the impending needs of global harmonisation.

  4. A new chromosome fluorescence banding technique combining DAPI staining with image analysis in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing Yu; She, Chao Wen; Hu, Zhong Li; Xiong, Zhi Yong; Liu, Li Hua; Song, Yun Chun

    2004-08-01

    In this study, a new chromosome fluorescence banding technique was developed in plants. The technique combined 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining with software analysis including three-dimensional imaging after deconvolution. Clear multiple and adjacent DAPI bands like G-bands were obtained by this technique in the tested species including Hordeum vulgare L., Oryza officinalis, Wall & Watt, Triticum aestivum L., Lilium brownii, Brown, and Vicia faba L. During mitotic metaphase, the numbers of bands for the haploid genomes of these species were about 185, 141, 309, 456 and 194, respectively. Reproducibility analysis demonstrated that banding patterns within a species were stable at the same mitotic stage and they could be used for identifying specific chromosomes and chromosome regions. The band number fluctuated: the earlier the mitotic stage, the greater the number of bands. The technique enables genes to be mapped onto specific band regions of the chromosomes by only one fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) step with no chemical banding treatments. In this study, the 45S and 5S rDNAs of some tested species were located on specific band regions of specific chromosomes and they were all positioned at the interbands with the new technique. Because no chemical banding treatment was used, the banding patterns displayed by the technique should reflect the natural conformational features of chromatin. Thus it could be expected that this technique should be suitable for all eukaryotes and would have widespread utility in chromosomal structure analysis and physical mapping of genes.

  5. A laser induced fluorescence technique for quantifying transient liquid fuel films utilising total internal reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Mario; Kay, Peter J.; Bowen, Phil J.; Gilchrist, Robert; Sapsford, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique to quantify the thickness and spatial distribution of transient liquid fuel films formed as a result of spray-wall interaction. The LIF technique relies on the principle that upon excitation by laser radiation the intensity of the fluorescent signal from a tracer like 3-pentanone is proportional to the film thickness. A binary solution of 10% (v/v) of 3-pentanone in iso-octane is used as a test fuel with a Nd:YAG laser as the excitation light source (utilising the fourth harmonic at wavelength 266 nm) and an intensified CCD camera is used to record the results as fluorescent images. The propagation of the excitation laser beam through the optical piston is carefully controlled by total internal reflection so that only the fuel film is excited and not the airborne droplets above the film, which had been previously shown to induce significant error. Other known sources of error are also carefully minimised. Calibrated temporally resolved benchmark results of a transient spray from a gasoline direct injector impinging on a flat quartz crown under atmospheric conditions are presented, with observations and discussion of the transient development of the fuel film. The calibrated measurements are consistent with previous studies of this event and demonstrate the applicability of the technique particularly for appraisal of CFD predictions. The potential utilisation of the technique under typical elevated ambient conditions is commented upon.

  6. Human platelet antigen genotyping using a fluorescent SSCP technique with an automatic sequencer.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, A; Jallu, V; Legros, Y; Kaplan, C

    1998-11-01

    The typing of human platelet antigens (HPA) can be useful in many clinical situations such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. The fluorescent-based single-strand conformation polymorphism (F-SSCP) technique is a fast and convenient way to perform HPA genotyping. Universal sequences from phage M13 were introduced at both ends of specific PCR-products by using 5'-tailed primers. A short second round of PCR with universal primers coupled to Cy-5 enabled the PCR-products to be fluorescently labelled. F-SSCP was performed by gel electrophoresis on an automated fluorescent DNA analyser. Genotyping of the three major HPA systems carried by the GP IIb-IIIa complex showed the F-SSCP technique to be accurate and reliable. A single gel procedure has been sufficient to detect HPA genetic polymorphisms tested to date. Neither restriction enzyme, radioactive material, nor any other hazardous chemicals such as ethidium bromide were required. This technique enabled us to genotype HPA-1, -3 and -4 alleles easily and to diagnose materno-fetal incompatibility in a rare alloantigenic system. F-SSCP is a promising technique for the detection of new mutations and/or DNA polymorphisms on a large scale.

  7. Techniques for fluorescence detection of protoporphyrin IX in skin cancers associated with photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rollakanti, Kishore R.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that uses a specific photosensitizing agent, molecular oxygen, and light of a particular wavelength to kill cells targeted by the therapy. Topically administered aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is widely used to effectively treat cancerous and precancerous skin lesions, resulting in targeted tissue damage and little to no scarring. The targeting aspect of the treatment arises from the fact that ALA is preferentially converted into protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in neoplastic cells. To monitor the amount of PpIX in tissues, techniques have been developed to measure PpIX-specific fluorescence, which provides information useful for monitoring the abundance and location of the photosensitizer before and during the illumination phase of PDT. This review summarizes the current state of these fluorescence detection techniques. Non-invasive devices are available for point measurements, or for wide-field optical imaging, to enable monitoring of PpIX in superficial tissues. To gain access to information at greater tissue depths, multi-modal techniques are being developed which combine fluorescent measurements with ultrasound or optical coherence tomography, or with microscopic techniques such as confocal or multiphoton approaches. The tools available at present, and newer devices under development, offer the promise of better enabling clinicians to inform and guide PDT treatment planning, thereby optimizing therapeutic outcomes for patients. PMID:25599015

  8. Temperature measurements in hypersonic air flows using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, Gabriel; Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation is reported of the use of laser-induced fluorescence on oxygen for the measurement of air temperature and its fluctuations owing to turbulence in hypersonic wind tunnel flows. The results show that for temperatures higher than 60 K and densities higher than 0.01 amagat, the uncertainty in the temperature measurement can be less than 2 percent if it is limited by photon-statistical noise. The measurement is unaffected by collisional quenching and, if the laser fluence is kept below 1.5 J/sq cm, it is also unaffected by nonlinear effects which are associated with depletion of the absorbing states.

  9. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  10. Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Novel analytical techniques for coal liquefaction: Fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-10-01

    This study demonstrated the feasibility of using fluorescence and reflectance microscopy techniques for the examination of distillation resid materials derived from direct coal liquefaction. Resid, as defined here, is the 850{degrees}F{sup +} portion of the process stream, and includes soluble organics, insoluble organics and ash. The technique can be used to determine the degree of hydrogenation and the presence of multiple phases occurring within a resid sample. It can also be used to infer resid reactivity. The technique is rapid, requiring less than one hour for sample preparation and examination, and thus has apparent usefulness for process monitoring. Additionally, the technique can distinguish differences in samples produced under various process conditions. It can, therefore, be considered a potentially useful technique for the process developer. Further development and application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified based on these results.

  11. Evaluation of a fluorescent lectin-based staining technique for some acidophilic mining bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Fife, D.J.; Bruhn, D.F.; Miller, K.S.; Stoner, D.L.

    2000-05-01

    A fluorescence-labeled wheat germ agglutinin staining technique was modified and found to be effective for staining gram-positive, acidophilic mining bacteria. Bacteria identified by others as being gram positive through 16S rRNA sequence analyses, yet clustering near the divergence of that group, stained weakly. Gram-negative bacteria did not stain. Background staining of environmental samples was negligible, and pyrite and soil particles in the samples did not interfere with the staining procedure.

  12. The Fluorescent-Oil Film Method and Other Techniques for Boundary-Layer Flow Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loving, Donald L.; Katzoff, S.

    1959-01-01

    A flow-visualization technique, known as the fluorescent-oil film method, has been developed which appears to be generally simpler and to require less experience and development of technique than previously published methods. The method is especially adapted to use in the large high-powered wind tunnels which require considerable time to reach the desired test conditions. The method consists of smearing a film of fluorescent oil over a surface and observing where the thickness is affected by the shearing action of the boundary layer. These films are detected and identified, and their relative thicknesses are determined by use of ultraviolet light. Examples are given of the use of this technique. Other methods that show promise in the study of boundary-layer conditions are described. These methods include the use of a temperature-sensitive fluorescent paint and the use of a radiometer that is sensitive to the heat radiation from a surface. Some attention is also given to methods that can be used with a spray apparatus in front of the test model.

  13. Fluorescence particle detector for real-time quantification of viable organisms in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luoma, Greg; Cherrier, Pierre P.; Piccioni, Marc; Tanton, Carol; Herz, Steve; DeFreez, Richard K.; Potter, Michael; Girvin, Kenneth L.; Whitney, Ronald

    2002-02-01

    The ability to detect viable organisms in air in real time is important in a number of applications. Detecting high levels of airborne organisms in hospitals can prevent post-operative infections and the spread of diseases. Monitoring levels of airborne viable organisms in pharmaceutical facilities can ensure safe production of drugs or vaccines. Monitoring airborne bacterial levels in meat processing plants can help to prevent contamination of food products. Monitoring the level of airborne organisms in bio-containment facilities can ensure that proper procedures are being followed. Finally, detecting viable organisms in real time is a key to defending against biological agent attacks. This presentation describes the development and performance of a detector, based on fluorescence particle counting technology, where an ultraviolet laser is used to count particles by light scattering and elicit fluorescence from specific biomolecules found only in living organisms. The resulting detector can specifically detect airborne particles containing living organisms from among the large majority of other particles normally present in air. Efforts to develop the core sensor technology, focusing on integrating an UV laser with a specially designed particle-counting cell will be highlighted. The hardware/software used to capture the information from the sensor, provide an alarm in the presence of an unusual biological aerosol content will also be described. Finally, results from experiments to test the performance of the detector will be presented.

  14. Application of the Fluorescent-Antibody Technique for the Detection of Sphaerotilus natans in Activated Sludge

    PubMed Central

    Howgrave-Graham, Alan R.; Steyn, Pieter L.

    1988-01-01

    Sphaerotilus natans, one of the most widely reported causes of bulking in activated sludge, can exist both within and outside of a sheath. It can easily be confused with similar activated sludge bacteria and thus can be overlooked when present in low numbers. Fluorescent antiserum was successfully prepared against the nonfilamentous form and was shown to be highly specific, showing no reaction with either pure cultures of similar filamentous bacteria or entirely unrelated organisms. It did, however, show a lack of strain specificity since it reacted with S. natans isolates from the Federal Republic of Germany and the United States and with filamentous bacteria in South African activated sludges. Fluorescent antibody is capable of penetrating the filaments of S. natans to stain the cells individually. The use of fluorescent antiserum in the identification of S. natans filaments obscured by activated sludge flocs and other suspended matter was simple since the cells stained brightly and could be observed through the less dense matter, while the use of other microscope techniques would be hampered by these obstructions. The use of fluorescent antibody will facilitate ecological studies of S. natans in activated sludge and other aqueous environments. Images PMID:16347588

  15. Technique for real-time tissue characterization based on scanning multispectral fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy (ms-TRFS)

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Gorpas, Dimitris; Yankelevich, Diego; Marcu, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel technique for continuous acquisition, processing and display of fluorescence lifetimes enabling real-time tissue diagnosis through a single hand held or biopsy fiber-optic probe. A scanning multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (ms-TRFS) with self-adjustable photon detection range was developed to account for the dynamic changes of fluorescence intensity typically encountered in clinical application. A fast algorithm was implemented in the ms-TRFS software platform, providing up to 15 Hz continuous display of fluorescence lifetime values. Potential applications of this technique, including biopsy guidance, and surgical margins delineation were demonstrated in proof-of-concept experiments. Current results showed accurate display of fluorescence lifetimes values and discrimination of distinct fluorescence markers and tissue types in real-time (< 100 ms per data point). PMID:25798320

  16. Review of Fluorescence-Based Velocimetry Techniques to Study High-Speed Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Criag; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews five laser-induced fluorescence-based velocimetry techniques that have been used to study high-speed compressible flows at NASA Langley Research Center. The techniques discussed in this paper include nitric oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV), nitrogen dioxide photodissociation (NO2-to-NO) MTV, and NO and atomic oxygen (O-atom) Doppler-shift-based velocimetry. Measurements of both single-component and two-component velocity have been performed using these techniques. This paper details the specific application and experiment for which each technique has been used, the facility in which the experiment was performed, the experimental setup, sample results, and a discussion of the lessons learned from each experiment.

  17. Advanced Time-Resolved Fluorescence Microscopy Techniques for the Investigation of Peptide Self-Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Neil R.

    The ubiquitous cross beta sheet peptide motif is implicated in numerous neurodegenerative diseases while at the same time offers remarkable potential for constructing isomorphic high-performance bionanomaterials. Despite an emerging understanding of the complex folding landscape of cross beta structures in determining disease etiology and final structure, we lack knowledge of the critical initial stages of nucleation and growth. In this dissertation, I advance our understanding of these key stages in the cross-beta nucleation and growth pathways using cutting-edge microscopy techniques. In addition, I present a new combined time-resolved fluorescence analysis technique with the potential to advance our current understanding of subtle molecular level interactions that play a pivotal role in peptide self-assembly. Using the central nucleating core of Alzheimer's Amyloid-beta protein, Abeta(16 22), as a model system, utilizing electron, time-resolved, and non-linear microscopy, I capture the initial and transient nucleation stages of peptide assembly into the cross beta motif. In addition, I have characterized the nucleation pathway, from monomer to paracrystalline nanotubes in terms of morphology and fluorescence lifetime, corroborating the predicted desolvation process that occurs prior to cross-beta nucleation. Concurrently, I have identified unique heterogeneous cross beta domains contained within individual nanotube structures, which have potential bionanomaterials applications. Finally, I describe a combined fluorescence theory and analysis technique that dramatically increases the sensitivity of current time-resolved techniques. Together these studies demonstrate the potential for advanced microscopy techniques in the identification and characterization of the cross-beta folding pathway, which will further our understanding of both amyloidogenesis and bionanomaterials.

  18. Quantitative comparison of multiframe data association techniques for particle tracking in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Smal, Ihor; Meijering, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Biological studies of intracellular dynamic processes commonly require motion analysis of large numbers of particles in live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy imaging data. Many particle tracking methods have been developed in the past years as a first step toward fully automating this task and enabling high-throughput data processing. Two crucial aspects of any particle tracking method are the detection of relevant particles in the image frames and their linking or association from frame to frame to reconstruct the trajectories. The performance of detection techniques as well as specific combinations of detection and linking techniques for particle tracking have been extensively evaluated in recent studies. Comprehensive evaluations of linking techniques per se, on the other hand, are lacking in the literature. Here we present the results of a quantitative comparison of data association techniques for solving the linking problem in biological particle tracking applications. Nine multiframe and two more traditional two-frame techniques are evaluated as a function of the level of missing and spurious detections in various scenarios. The results indicate that linking techniques are generally more negatively affected by missing detections than by spurious detections. If misdetections can be avoided, there appears to be no need to use sophisticated multiframe linking techniques. However, in the practically likely case of imperfect detections, the latter are a safer choice. Our study provides users and developers with novel information to select the right linking technique for their applications, given a detection technique of known quality.

  19. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, Jim; Gogna, Gurusharan; Daniels, Stephen

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is used to measure atomic oxygen number density [O] in an air Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ). A novel technique based on photolysis of O2 is used to calibrate the TALIF system ensuring the same species (O) is probed during calibration and measurement. As a result, laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power region without affecting calibration reliability as any high intensity saturation effects will be identical for calibration and experiment. Higher laser intensity gives stronger TALIF signals helping overcome weak TALIF signals often experienced at atmospheric pressure due to collisional quenching. O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting [O] are both achieved within the same laser pulse. The photolysis [O] is spatially non-uniform and time varying. To allow valid comparison with [O] in a plasma, spatial and temporal correction factors are required. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I0(t), and wavelength allows correction factors to be found using a rate equation model. The air flow into the jet was fixed and the RF power coupled into the system varied. The resulting [O] was found to increase with RF power.

  20. A robust X-ray fluorescence technique for multielemental analysis of solid samples.

    PubMed

    Kallithrakas-Kontos, Nikolaos; Foteinis, Spyros; Paigniotaki, Katherine; Papadogiannakis, Minos

    2016-02-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) quantitation software programs are widely used for analyzing environmental samples due to their versatility but at the expense of accuracy. In this work, we propose an accurate, robust, and versatile technique for multielemental X-ray fluorescence analytical applications, by spiking solid matrices with standard solutions. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)-certified soil standards were spiked with standard solutions, mixed well, desiccated, and analyzed by an energy dispersive XRF. Homogenous targets were produced and low error calibration curves, for the added and not added, neighboring, elements, were obtained. With the addition of few elements, the technique provides reliable multielemental analysis, even for concentrations of the order of milligram per kilogram (ppm). When results were compared to the ones obtained from XRF commercial quantitation software programs, which are widely used in environmental monitoring and assessment applications, they were found to fit certified values better. Moreover, in all examined cases, results were reliable. Hence, this technique can also be used to overcome difficulties associated with interlaboratory consistency and for cross-validating results. The technique was applied to samples with an environmental interest, collected from a ship/boat repainting area. Increased copper, zinc, and lead loads were observed (284, 270, and 688 mg/kg maximum concentrations in soil, respectively), due to vessels being paint stripped and repainted.

  1. Shot noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; Davis, L. I., Jr.; Guo, C.; James, J. V.; Kakos, S.; Morris, P. T.; Wang, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    Nearly shot-noise limited detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence is reported. A LIDAR configuration is used to excite fluorescence in a large volume and a narrow-bandwidth interference filter provides spectral discrimination. This arrangement alleviates the effect of ozone interference and facilitates image processing at relatively close distances. The detection limit is determined mainly by the shot-noise of the solar background. Ground-based measurements in Dearborn indicate a detection limit of better than 1 x 10 to the 6th power OH/cubic cm over a forty-minute acquisition period. Under favorable conditions, a comparable detection limit was also observed for airborne measurements.

  2. Application of the Fluorescent-Antibody Technique to an Ecological Study of Bacteria in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hill, I. R.; Gray, T. R. G.

    1967-01-01

    The fluorescent-antibody technique was used to identify cells and spores of Bacillus subtilis and cells of B. circulans from soil. From cells grown in three broth media of different nutrient status, i.e., a cold extracted soil medium (CSE), an unamended autoclaved soil extract (HSE), and nutrient broth (NB), antisera were produced with both quantitative and qualitative differences in antibody content. The specificities of antisera to two strains of each of the Bacillus species were determined. Antisera for B. subtilis O antigens were species-specific and showed no cross-reactions, whereas those for the B. circulans O antigens were strain-specific and in some cases showed cross-reactions with B. alvei. This cross-reaction was removed by absorption of the antiserum with B. alvei O antigen. Fluorescein isothiocyanate γ-globulin conjugates prepared from these antisera showed the same specificity reactions. A method for staining bacteria on soil particles was developed, by use of small staining troughs. By mounting stained soil particles on slides and irradiating them with transmitted and incident ultraviolet blue light, bacteria on both mineral and organic particles, taken directly from soil, could be observed. Fluorescent antibodies against cells grown in CSE gave brighter fluorescence of stained bacteria on soil particles than did fluorescent antibodies against cells grown in either HSE or NB. Colonies of both Bacillus species were generally small and localized. Spore antisera, though not rigorously tested for specificity, were used to identify spores of B. subtilis on soil particles. The uses and implications of the technique in soil bacteriology are discussed. Images PMID:4960897

  3. Fluorescence dilution technique for measurement of albumin reflection coefficient in isolated glomeruli

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Fan; Chen, Chun Cheng Andy; Zhang, Jin; Schreck, Carlos M. N.; Williams, Jan M.; Hirata, Takashi; Sharma, Mukut; Beard, Daniel A.; Savin, Virginia J.; Roman, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes a high-throughput fluorescence dilution technique to measure the albumin reflection coefficient (σAlb) of isolated glomeruli. Rats were injected with FITC-dextran 250 (75 mg/kg), and the glomeruli were isolated in a 6% BSA solution. Changes in the fluorescence of the glomerulus due to water influx in response to an imposed oncotic gradient was used to determine σAlb. Adjustment of the albumin concentration of the bath from 6 to 5, 4, 3, and 2% produced a 10, 25, 35, and 50% decrease in the fluorescence of the glomeruli. Pretreatment of glomeruli with protamine sulfate (2 mg/ml) or TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) decreased σAlb from 1 to 0.54 and 0.48, respectively. Water and solute movement were modeled using Kedem-Katchalsky equations, and the measured responses closely fit the predicted behavior, indicating that loss of albumin by solvent drag or diffusion is negligible compared with the movement of water. We also found that σAlb was reduced by 17% in fawn hooded hypertensive rats, 33% in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, 26% in streptozotocin-treated diabetic Dahl SS rats, and 21% in 6-mo old type II diabetic nephropathy rats relative to control Sprague-Dawley rats. The changes in glomerular permeability to albumin were correlated with the degree of proteinuria in these strains. These findings indicate that the fluorescence dilution technique can be used to measure σAlb in populations of isolated glomeruli and provides a means to assess the development of glomerular injury in hypertensive and diabetic models. PMID:26447220

  4. 78 FR 15895 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ..., Emission Control Standards, Monitoring and Recordkeeping and Air Quality Permit Procedures and are not... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques Guidelines and Reasonably Available Control Technology AGENCY: Environmental...

  5. The small contribution of molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation to the air-fluorescence yield of cosmic ray shower particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Samarai, Imen; Deligny, Olivier; Rosado, Jaime

    2016-10-01

    A small contribution of molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation to the air-fluorescence yield in the UV range is estimated based on an approach previously developed in the framework of the radio-detection of showers in the gigahertz frequency range. First, this approach is shown to provide an estimate of the main contribution of the fluorescence yield due to the de-excitation of the C 3Πu electronic level of nitrogen molecules to the B 3Πg one amounting to Y[ 337 ] =(6.05 ± 1.50) MeV-1 at 800 hPa pressure and 293 K temperature conditions, which compares well to previous dedicated works and to experimental results. Then, under the same pressure and temperature conditions, the fluorescence yield induced by molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation is found to be Y[330-400]MBR = 0.10 MeV-1 in the wavelength range of interest for the air-fluorescence detectors used to detect extensive air showers induced in the atmosphere by ultra-high energy cosmic rays. This means that out of ≃175 photons with wavelength between 330 and 400 nm detected by fluorescence detectors, one of them has been produced by molecular Bremsstrahlung radiation. Although small, this contribution is not negligible in regards to the total budget of systematic uncertainties when considering the absolute energy scale of fluorescence detectors.

  6. Probing the mechanisms of an air amplifier using a LTQ-FT-ICR-MS and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Muddiman, David C; Hawkridge, Adam M; Fedorov, A G

    2007-11-01

    We report the first quantitative assessment of electrosprayed droplet/ion focusing enabled by the use of a voltage-assisted air amplifier between an electrospray ionization emitter and a hybrid linear ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (ESI-LTQ-FT-ICR-MS). A solution of fluorescent dye was electrosprayed with a stainless steel mesh screen placed in front of the MS inlet capillary acting as a gas-permeable imaging plate for fluorescence spectroscopy. Without use of the air amplifier, no detectable FT-ICR signal was observed, as well as no detectable fluorescence on the screen upon imaging using a fluorescence scanner. When the air amplifier was turned ON while electrospraying the fluorescent dye, FT-ICR mass spectra with high signal to noise ratio were obtained with an average ion injection time of 21 ms for an AGC target value of 5 x 10(5). Imaging of the screen using a fluorescence scanner produced a distinct spot of cross-sectional area approximately 33.5 mm(2) in front of the MS inlet capillary. These experimental results provide direct evidence of aerodynamic focusing of electrosprayed droplets/ions enabled by an air amplifier, resulting in improved electrospray droplet/ion capture efficiency and reduced ion injection time. A second set of experiments was carried out to explore whether the air amplifier assists in desolvation. By electrospraying a mix of quaternary amines, ratios of increasingly hydrophobic molecules were obtained. Observation of the solvophobic effect associated with electrospray ionization resulted in a higher abundance of the hydrophobic molecule. This bias was eliminated when the air amplifier was turned ON and a response indicative of the respective component concentrations of the molecules in the bulk solution was observed.

  7. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  8. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  9. Temperature and density measurement by electron beam fluorescence technique in rocket experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurihara, J.; Oyama, K.-I.

    The Electron Beam Fluorescence (EBF) technique has been widely used in the field of rarefied gas dynamics for over 40 years and applied to measurements for a variety of gases and flow conditions in the laboratory experiment. The EBF technique uses a high-energy electron beam to excite a gas molecule by an inelastic collision with an electron. Spectrum of subsequent fluorescence by the excited molecule consists of many vibrational bands, and each band has a fine rotational structure. If the excitation-emission process is known precisely, the analysis of the vibrational-rotational band provides properties of the initial state of molecules. We applied the EBF technique to an in-situ measurement in the lower thermosphere and the vibrational temperature, the rotational temperature, and the number density of atmospheric molecular nitrogen between 100 - 150 km altitudes were observed by the sounding rocket experiment. Aerodynamic effects on the measurement caused by the rocket flight are corrected quantitatively using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The great advantage of this type of instrument is that temperature and density are observed simultaneously and the consistency between the two measurements can be checked assuming hydrostatic equilibrium.

  10. Planetary Surface Analysis Using Fast Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Combined Microscopic Raman, LIBS, and Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacksberg, J.; Rossman, G. R.; Maruyama, Y.; Charbon, E.

    2011-12-01

    In situ exploration of planetary surfaces has to date required multiple techniques that, when used together, yield important information about their formation histories and evolution. We present a time-resolved laser spectroscopic technique that could potentially collect complementary sets of data providing information on mineral structure, composition, and hydration state. Using a picosecond-scale pulsed laser and a fast time-resolved detector we can simultaneously collect spectra from Raman, Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), and fluorescence emissions that are separated in time due to the unique decay times of each process. The use of a laser with high rep rate (40 KHz) and low pulse energy (1 μJ/pulse) allows us to rapidly collect high signal to noise Raman spectra while minimizing sample damage. Increasing the pulse energy by about an order of magnitude creates a microscopic plasma near the surface and enables the collection of LIBS spectra at an unusually high rep rate and low pulse energy. Simultaneously, broader fluorescence peaks can be detected with lifetimes varying from nanosecond to microsecond. We will present Raman, LIBS, and fluorescence spectra obtained on natural mineral samples such as sulfates, clays, pyroxenes and carbonates that are of interest for Mars mineralogy. We demonstrate this technique using a photocathode-based streak camera detector as well as a newly-developed solid state Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) sensor array based on Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We will discuss the impact of system design and detector choice on science return of a potential planetary surface mission, with a specific focus on size, weight, power, and complexity. The research described here was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).

  11. Comparison of different fluorescence spectrum analysis techniques to characterize humification levels of waste-derived dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Shao, L M; Zhang, C Y; He, P J; Lü, F

    2012-12-01

    In the present work, the humification level of waste-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) at different waste biostability was investigated, by using fluorescent excitation-emission matrix (EEM) scanning. Different fluorescence spectrum analysis techniques were applied and compared. Experimental results demonstrate that parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis was sensitive to reflect DOM humification, and the most reasonable to deconstruct DOM compositions, when compared with other spectrum analysis techniques. It suggests applying the DOM-EEM-PARAFAC pipeline for rapid estimation of waste biostability.

  12. Detection of citrus canker and Huanglongbing using fluorescence imaging spectroscopy and support vector machine technique.

    PubMed

    Wetterich, Caio Bruno; Felipe de Oliveira Neves, Ruan; Belasque, José; Marcassa, Luis Gustavo

    2016-01-10

    Citrus canker and Huanglongbing (HLB) are citrus diseases that represent a serious threat to the citrus production worldwide and may cause large economic losses. In this work, we combined fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) and a machine learning technique to discriminate between these diseases and other ordinary citrus conditions that may be present at citrus orchards, such as citrus scab and zinc deficiency. Our classification results are highly accurate when discriminating citrus canker from citrus scab (97.8%), and HLB from zinc deficiency (95%). These results show that it is possible to accurately identify citrus diseases that present similar symptoms.

  13. Visualization of oxygen transfer across the air-water interface using a fluorescence oxygen visualization method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhee

    2002-04-01

    Oxygen concentration fields in a water body were visualized by the fluorescence oxygen visualization (FOV) method. Pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was used as a fluorescent indicator of oxygen, and an intensive charge coupled-device (ICCD) camera as an image detector. Sequential images (over 2000 images) of the oxygen concentration field around the surface water of the tank (1 x 1 x 0.75 m3) were produced during the 3 h experiment. From image processing, the accurate pathway of oxygen-rich, cold water at the water surface was also visualized. The amount of oxygen transferred through the air-water interface during the experiment was measured and the oxygen transfer coefficient (K(L)) was determined as 0.22 m/d, which was much higher than that is expected in molecular diffusion. Results suggest that vertical penetration of cold water was the main pathway of oxygen in the water body in the tank. The average velocity of cold water penetrating downward in water body was also measured from consecutive images and the value was 0.3-0.6 mm/s. The FOV method used in this research should have wide application in experimental fluid mechanics and can also provide a phenomenological description of oxygen transfer under physically realizable natural conditions in lakes and reservoirs.

  14. Effect of Clouds on Apertures of Space-based Air Fluorescence Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolsky, P.; Krizmanic, J.

    2003-01-01

    Space-based ultra-high-energy cosmic ray detectors observe fluorescence light from extensive air showers produced by these particles in the troposphere. Clouds can scatter and absorb this light and produce systematic errors in energy determination and spectrum normalization. We study the possibility of using IR remote sensing data from MODIS and GOES satellites to delimit clear areas of the atmosphere. The efficiency for detecting ultra-high-energy cosmic rays whose showers do not intersect clouds is determined for real, night-time cloud scenes. We use the MODIS SST cloud mask product to define clear pixels for cloud scenes along the equator and use the OWL Monte Carlo to generate showers in the cloud scenes. We find the efficiency for cloud-free showers with closest approach of three pixels to a cloudy pixel is 6.5% exclusive of other factors. We conclude that defining a totally cloud-free aperture reduces the sensitivity of space-based fluorescence detectors to unacceptably small levels.

  15. Spectral fluorescence signature techniques and absorption measurements for continuous monitoring of biofuel-producing microalgae cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín de la Cruz, M. C.; Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Yarovenko, N.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Biofuel production from microalgae can be both sustainable and economically viable. Particularly in the case of algal growth in wastewater an extra benefit is the removal or biotransformation of pollutants from these types of waters. A continuous monitoring system of the microalgae status and the concentration of different wastewater contaminants could be of great help in the biomass production and the water characterisation. In this study we present a system where spectral fluorescence signature (SFS) techniques are used along with absorption measurements to monitor microalgae cultures in wastewater and other mediums. This system aims to optimise the microalgae production for biofuel applications or other uses and was developed and tested in prototype indoor photo-bioreactors at the University of Vigo. SFS techniques were applied using the fluorescence analyser INSTAND-SCREENER developed by Laser Diagnostic Instruments AS. INSTAND-SCREENER permits wavelength scanning in two modes, one in UV and another in VIS. In parallel, it permits the on-line monitoring and rapid analysis of both water quality and phytoplankton status without prior treatment of the sample. Considering that different contaminants and microalgae features (density, status etc.) have different spectral signatures of fluorescence and absorption properties, it is possible to characterise them developing classification libraries. Several algorithms were used for the classification. The implementation of this system in an outdoor raceway reactor in a Spanish wastewater treatment plant is also discussed. This study was part of the Project EnerBioAlgae (http://www.enerbioalgae.com/), which was funded by the Interreg SUDOE and led by the University of Vigo.

  16. High resolution x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy - a new technique for site- and spin-selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin

    1996-12-01

    X-ray spectroscopy has long been used to elucidate electronic and structural information of molecules. One of the weaknesses of x-ray absorption is its sensitivity to all of the atoms of a particular element in a sample. Through out this thesis, a new technique for enhancing the site- and spin-selectivity of the x-ray absorption has been developed. By high resolution fluorescence detection, the chemical sensitivity of K emission spectra can be used to identify oxidation and spin states; it can also be used to facilitate site-selective X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and site-selective Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The spin polarization in K fluorescence could be used to generate spin selective XANES or spin-polarized EXAFS, which provides a new measure of the spin density, or the nature of magnetic neighboring atoms. Finally, dramatic line-sharpening effects by the combination of absorption and emission processes allow observation of structure that is normally unobservable. All these unique characters can enormously simplify a complex x-ray spectrum. Applications of this novel technique have generated information from various transition-metal model compounds to metalloproteins. The absorption and emission spectra by high resolution fluorescence detection are interdependent. The ligand field multiplet model has been used for the analysis of K{alpha} and K{beta} emission spectra. First demonstration on different chemical states of Fe compounds has shown the applicability of site selectivity and spin polarization. Different interatomic distances of the same element in different chemical forms have been detected using site-selective EXAFS.

  17. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  18. Invited review article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N; Sheetz, Kraig E; Field, Jeffrey J; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W; Squier, Jeffrey A

    2009-08-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences.

  19. Cell-death assessment by fluorescent and nonfluorescent cytosolic and nuclear staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Atale, N; Gupta, S; Yadav, U C S; Rani, V

    2014-07-01

    Apoptosis, a genetically programmed cellular event leads to biochemical and morphological changes in cells. Alterations in DNA caused by several factors affect nucleus and ultimately the entire cell leading to compromised function of the organ and organism. DNA, a master regulator of the cellular events, is an important biomolecule with regards to cell growth, cell death, cell migration and cell differentiation. It is therefore imperative to develop the staining techniques that may lead to visualize the changes in nucleus where DNA is housed, to comprehend the cellular pathophysiology. Over the years a number of nuclear staining techniques such as propidium iodide, Hoechst-33342, 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), Acridine orange-Ethidium bromide staining, among others have been developed to assess the changes in DNA. Some nonnuclear staining techniques such as Annexin-V staining, which although does not stain DNA, but helps to identify the events that result from DNA alteration and leads to initiation of apoptotic cell death. In this review, we have briefly discussed some of the most commonly used fluorescent and nonfluorescent staining techniques that identify apoptotic changes in cell, DNA and the nucleus. These techniques help in differentiating several cellular and nuclear phenotypes that result from DNA damage and have been identified as specific to necrosis or early and late apoptosis as well as scores of other nuclear deformities occurring inside the cells.

  20. Image thresholding techniques for localization of sub-resolution fluorescent biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ghaye, Julien; Kamat, Madhura Avinash; Corbino-Giunta, Linda; Silacci, Paolo; Vergères, Guy; De Micheli, Giovanni; Carrara, Sandro

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we explore adaptive global and local segmentation techniques for a lab-on-chip nutrition monitoring system (NutriChip). The experimental setup consists of Caco-2 intestinal cells that can be artificially stimulated to trigger an immune response. The eventual response is optically monitored using immunofluoresence techniques targeting toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Two problems of interest need to be addressed by means of image processing. First, a new cell sample must be properly classified as stimulated or not. Second, the location of the stained TLR2 must be recovered in case the sample has been stimulated. The algorithmic approach to solving these problems is based on the ability of a segmentation technique to properly segment fluorescent spots. The sample classification is based on the amount and intensity of the segmented pixels, while the various segmenting blobs provide an approximate localization of TLR2. A novel local thresholding algorithm and three well-known spot segmentation techniques are compared in this study. Quantitative assessment of these techniques based on real and synthesized data demonstrates the improved segmentation capabilities of the proposed algorithm.

  1. Passive focusing techniques for piezoelectric air-coupled ultrasonic transducers.

    PubMed

    Gómez Álvarez-Arenas, Tomás E; Camacho, Jorge; Fritsch, Carlos

    2016-04-01

    This paper proposes a novel passive focusing system for Air-Coupled Ultrasonic (ACU) piezoelectric transducers which is inspired by the Newtonian-Cassegrain (NC) telescope concept. It consist of a primary spherical mirror with an output hole and a flat secondary mirror, normal to the propagation axis, that is the transducer surface itself. The device is modeled and acoustic field is calculated showing a collimated beam with a symmetrical focus. A prototype according to this design is built and tested with an ACU piezoelectric transducer with center frequency at 400 kHz, high-sensitivity, wideband and 25 mm diameter flat aperture. The acoustic field is measured and compared with calculations. The presented prototype exhibit a 1.5 mm focus width and a collimated beam up to 15 mm off the output hole. In addition, the performance of this novel design is compared, both theoretically and experimentally, with two techniques used before for electrostatic transducers: the Fresnel Zone Plate - FZP and the off-axis parabolic or spherical mirror. The proposed NC arrangement has a coaxial design, which eases the transducers positioning and use in many applications, and is less bulky than off-axis mirrors. Unlike in off-axis mirrors, it is now possible to use a spherical primary mirror with minimum aberrations. FZP provides a more compact solution and is easy to build, but presents some background noise due to interference of waves diffracted at out of focus regions. By contrast, off-axis parabolic mirrors provide a well defined focus and are free from background noise, although they are bulky and more difficult to build. Spherical mirrors are more easily built, but this yields a non symmetric beam and a poorly defined focus.

  2. Identification of Scleractinian Coral Recruits Using Fluorescent Censusing and DNA Barcoding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Min; de Palmas, Stéphane; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Denis, Vianney; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of coral recruits has been problematic due to a lack of definitive morphological characters being available for higher taxonomic resolution. In this study, we tested whether fluorescent detection of coral recruits used in combinations of different DNA-barcoding markers (cytochrome oxidase I gene [COI], open reading frame [ORF], and nuclear Pax-C intron [PaxC]) could be useful for increasing the resolution of coral spat identification in ecological studies. One hundred and fifty settlement plates were emplaced at nine sites on the fringing reefs of Kenting National Park in southern Taiwan between April 2011 and September 2012. A total of 248 living coral spats and juveniles (with basal areas ranging from 0.21 to 134.57 mm2) were detected on the plates with the aid of fluorescent light and collected for molecular analyses. Using the COI DNA barcoding technique, 90.3% (224/248) of coral spats were successfully identified into six genera, including Acropora, Isopora, Montipora, Pocillopora, Porites, and Pavona. PaxC further separated I. cuneata and I. palifera of Isopora from Acropora, and ORF successfully identified the species of Pocillopora (except P. meandrina and P. eydouxi). Moreover, other cnidarian species such as actinarians, zoanthids, and Millepora species were visually found using fluorescence and identified by COI DNA barcoding. This combination of existing approaches greatly improved the taxonomic resolution of early coral life stages, which to date has been mainly limited to the family level based on skeletal identification. Overall, this study suggests important improvements for the identification of coral recruits in ecological studies. PMID:25211345

  3. Air Permitting Streamlining Techniques and Approaches for Greenhouse Gases, 2012

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report presents potential GHG permit streamlining options and observations developed by the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee (CAAAC): Permits, New Source Review and Toxics Subcommittee GHG Permit Streamlining Workgroup

  4. Monitoring changes in whiting (Merlangius merlangus) fillets stored under modified atmosphere packaging by front face fluorescence spectroscopy and instrumental techniques.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, Abdo; Karoui, Romdhane

    2016-06-01

    Quality assessment of whiting (Merlangius merlangus) fillets stored in normal air (control group) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP1: 50% N2/50% CO2 and MAP2: 80% N2/20% CO2) for up to 15 days at 4 °C was performed. The physico-chemical [pH, drip loss, moisture content, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide value (PV)], textural (i.e., hardness, fragility, gumminess, chewiness, springiness, cohesiveness), and color (i.e., L(∗), a(∗), b(∗)) parameters were determined. Front face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS) emission spectra were also scanned on the same samples with excitation set at 290 and 360 nm. The results indicated that MAP treatment, particularly MAP1 had an obvious preservative effect on fish quality by reducing pH value, TBARS and TVB-N contents, and retarding the softening of fish texture compared to control samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to physico-chemical and instrumental data sets showed a clear discrimination of fish samples according to both their storage time and condition. A complete (100%) of correct classification was obtained by the concatenation of spectral, physico-chemical, and instrumental data sets. The results demonstrated that storage under MAP can be recommended to improve quality of whiting fillets, which in turn, can be evaluated by FFFS as a rapid and non-destructive technique.

  5. Single molecule fluorescence imaging as a technique for barium tagging in neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, B. J. P.; McDonald, A. D.; Nygren, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Background rejection is key to success for future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. To achieve sensitivity to effective Majorana lifetimes of ~ 1028 years, backgrounds must be controlled to better than 0.1 count per ton per year, beyond the reach of any present technology. In this paper we propose a new method to identify the birth of the barium daughter ion in the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The method adapts Single Molecule Fluorescent Imaging, a technique from biochemistry research with demonstrated single ion sensitivity. We explore possible SMFI dyes suitable for the problem of barium ion detection in high pressure xenon gas, and develop a fiber-coupled sensing system with which we can detect the presence of bulk Ba++ ions remotely. We show that our sensor produces signal-to-background ratios as high as 85 in response to Ba++ ions when operated in aqueous solution. We then describe the next stage of this R&D program, which will be to demonstrate chelation and fluorescence in xenon gas. If a successful barium ion tag can be developed using SMFI adapted for high pressure xenon gas detectors, the first essentially zero background, ton-scale neutrinoless double beta decay technology could be realized.

  6. Development of a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique for visualizing CGMMV in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Shargil, D; Zemach, H; Belausov, E; Lachman, O; Kamenetsky, R; Dombrovsky, A

    2015-10-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), which belongs to the genus Tobamovirus, is a major pathogen of cucurbit crops grown indoors and in open fields. Currently, immunology (e.g., ELISA) and molecular amplification techniques (e.g., RT-PCR) are employed extensively for virus detection in plant tissues and commercial seed lots diagnostics. In this study, a fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, using oligonucleotides whose 5'-terminals were labeled with red cyanine 3 (Cy3) or green fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), was developed for the visualization of the pathogen in situ. This simple and reliable method allows detection and localization of CGMMV in the vegetative and reproductive tissues of cucumber and melon. When this technique was applied in male flowers, anther tissues were found to be infected; whereas the pollen grains were found to be virus-free. These results have meaningful epidemiological implications for the management of CGMMV, particularly with regard to virus transfer via seed and the role of insects as CGMMV vectors.

  7. Air leak seal for lung dissection plane with diode laser irradiation: monitoring heat-denature with auto-fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, Maya; Arai, Tsunenori

    2008-02-01

    We studied the monitoring of heat-denature by autofluorescence spectrum from lung dissection plane during laser air leak sealing procedure. In order to seal the air leakage from lung in thoracotomy, we proposed novel laser sealing method with the combination of the diode laser (810nm wavelength) irradiation and indocyanine green staining (peak absorption wavelength: 805 nm). This sealing method is expected to preserve the postoperative ventilatory capacity and achieve minimally invasive surgery. We previously reported that this laser sealing only requires thin sealing margin (less than 300 μm in thickness) compared with that of the suturing or stapling. The most serious issue on the laser air leak sealing might be re-air-leakage due to rigid surface layer caused by excessive heat-denature, such as carbonization. We should achieve laser air leak sealing minimizing the degree of heat denature. Dissection planes of isolated porcine lung with /without the diode laser irradiation were prepared as samples. We measured the auto-fluorescence from these samples using a spectrometer. When the diode laser was irradiated with 400J/cm2, the surface of diode laser irradiated lung was fully carbonized. The ration of auto-fluorescence emission of 450nm / 500 nm, with 280 nm excitation wavelength was decreased less tha 50 % of initial value. That of 600 nm / 500 nm was increased over 700 % of initial value. The decreasing of the 450 nm auto-fluorescence intensity might be attributed to the heat-denaturing of the interstitial collagen in lung. However, increasing of the 600 nm didn't specify the origins, we suppose it might be originated from heat-denature substance, like carbonization. We could establish the useful monitoring for lung heat-denaturing with simple methodology. We think the auto-fluorescence measurement can be helpful not only for understanding the sealing mechanism, but also for controlling the degree of heat-denaturing during the procedure.

  8. Development and Testing of an Air Fluorescence Imaging System for the Detection of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Inrig, Elizabeth; Koslowsky, Vern; Andrews, Bob; Dick, Michael; Forget, Patrick; Ing, Harry; Hugron, Roger; Wong, Larry

    2011-12-13

    Detection of radionuclides emitting short-range radiation, such as {alpha} and low-energy {beta} particles, has always presented a challenge, particularly when such radionuclides are dispersed over a wide area. In this situation, conventional detection methods require the area of interest to be surveyed using a fragile probe at very close range--a slow, error-prone, and potentially dangerous process that may take many hours for a single room. The instrument under development uses a novel approach by imaging radiation-induced fluorescence in the air surrounding a contaminated area, rather than detecting the radiation directly. A robust and portable system has been designed and built that will allow contaminated areas to be rapidly detected and delineated. The detector incorporates position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes, UV filters, a fast electronic shutter and an aspherical phase mask that significantly increases the depth-of-field. Preliminary tests have been conducted using sealed {sup 241}Am sources of varying activities and surface areas. The details of the instrument design will be described and the results of recent testing will be presented.

  9. Time-correlated Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy based on a silicon photomultiplier and time-correlated single photon counting technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunling; Zhang, Liying; Yang, Ru; Liang, Kun; Han, Dejun

    2013-02-01

    We report a time-correlated Raman spectroscopy technique based on a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) and a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique to exploit the natural temporal separation between Raman and fluorescence phenomena to alleviate the high fluorescence background with conventional Raman detection. The TCSPC technique employed can greatly reduce the effect of high dark count rate (DCR) and crosstalk of SiPM that seriously hinder its application in low light level detection. The operating principle and performance of the 400 ps time resolution system are discussed along with the improvement of the peak-to-background ratio (PBR) for bulk trinitrotoluene (TNT) Raman spectrum relative to a commercial Raman spectrometer with charge coupled device (CCD). The fluorescence lifetime for solid TNT and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) spectrum for 10(-6) mol/L trace TNT have also been obtained by this system, showing excellent versatility and convenience in spectroscopy measurement.

  10. Multispectral fluorescence imaging technique for discrimination of cucumber (Cucumis Sativus) seed viability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, we developed a nondestructive method for discriminating viable cucumber (Cucumis sativus) seeds based on hyperspectral fluorescence imaging. The fluorescence spectra of cucumber seeds in the 420–700 nm range were extracted from hyperspectral fluorescence images obtained using 365 nm u...

  11. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (λEX ∼ 280 nm, λEM ∼ 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  12. A "turn-on" fluorescent sensor for ozone detection in ambient air using protein-directed gold nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Qi, Wenjing; Liu, Chun; Zhang, Qing

    2017-04-01

    A "turn-on" fluorescent sensor for ozone using bovine serum albumin-directed gold nanoclusters (BSA-Au NCs) via energy transfer was developed. The spectral overlap of fluorescent spectrum of BSA-Au NCs with absorption spectrum of indigo carmine (IDS) was utilized. Ozone cleaves C = C bond of IDS and suppresses energy transfer from BSA-Au NCs to IDS. Therefore, this proposed fluorescent sensor is a "turn-on" detection motif. It is the first application of fluorescent nanoclusters in sensitively detecting ozone from 0.2 to 12 μM with the limit of detection of 35 nM (the volume of 500 μL, 1.68 ppb). The proposed fluorescent sensor for ozone is more sensitive and faster (within 2 min) than most methods and is with good selectivity for ozone detection against other reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen, or metallic ions. Besides, the proposed method is also utlized in ozone detection in ambient air by monitoring 1 h (60 min) in Qijiang district in Chongqing city. The average of concentration of ozone in ambient air ranges from 44.97 to 52.85 μg/m(3). The results are compared with the automatic monitoring data provided by Qijiang Environmental Monitoring Station and the relative deviations range, respectively, from 2.1 to 5.6%, which suggests that it is a promising fluorescent sensor for ozone in ambient air. This study not only develops a new model of energy transfer motif using BSA-Au NCs as donor and IDS as acceptor but also expands the application of BSA-Au NCs in environmental science. Graphical abstract A "turn-on" fluorescent sensor for ozone detection using bovine serum albumin-directed gold nanoclusters (BSA-Au NCs) via energy transfer is developed. It is the first time to utilize spectral overlap of fluorescent spectrum of BSA-Au NCs with absorption spectrum of indigo carmine and to achieve fast, sensitive, and selective ozone detection with a limit of detection of down to 35 nM (the volume of 500 μL, 1.68 ppb).

  13. Light stress effect and by nitrogen deficiency in plants of Petiveria alliacea measured with two-chlorophyll-fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuluaga, H.; Oviedo, A.; Solarte, Efrain; Pena, E. J.

    2004-10-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence was studied in Petiveria alliacea plants exposed to different nitrogen concentrations and light radiation, the response was measured by two different forms; (1) measuring the photosynthetic efficiency with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometro (PAM) emitted by a 650 nm diode and (2) measuring the fluorescence spectra caused by high power 452 nm diode with a SD2000 spectrometer. It was found out that the photosynthetic efficiency decreased in the plants exposed to high radiance and low nitrogen. Two chlorophyll fluorescence peaks were observed on 684 nm and 739 nm, the intensities in this wavelengths are inversely related with the light radiance. The correlation between the FIR and photosynthetic efficiency was very strong (r2 = -0.809, p <<0.01) this let us conclude that the fluorescence spectral analysis induced by the diode (excitation at 452 nm) is an efficient technique to detect stress by high light intensity and nitrogen in P. Alliacea plants.

  14. Relative ability of laser fluorescence techniques to quantitate early mineral loss in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ando, M; Hall, A F; Eckert, G J; Schemehorn, B R; Analoui, M; Stookey, G K

    1997-01-01

    This in vitro investigation was undertaken to explore two different nondestructive methods to detect very early demineralization. These methods were based on the premise that the clinical detection of caries at a very early stage of formation might permit more efficient reversal of the caries process than may occur when lesions are detected at a more advanced stage, such as a so-called 'white spot'. The methods evaluated in this study were quantitative laser fluorescence (QLF) and an experimental dye-enhanced laser fluorescence (DELF) technique. Prepared and polished bovine enamel specimens were demineralized in a conventional lactic acid-Carbopol solution for varying periods of time between 0 and 24 h with an area of sound enamel retained on each specimen. The coded and randomized specimens were then analyzed for the presence and severity of enamel demineralization using QLF after which they were exposed to a selected dye (Pyrromethene 556) and similarly examined using DELF. The specimens were then sectioned and examined by conventional transverse microradiography and by confocal laser-scanning microscopy. Results were analyzed statistically with sensitivity and specificity determined using sound enamel as the reference. The results indicated that QLF could detect demineralization which occurred as a result of 8 h exposure to the decalcification solution and was able to quantify changes in lesion severity associated with longer demineralization. While DELF was capable of detecting enamel demineralization after only 2 h exposure to the decalcification solution, it was unable to quantify increasing amounts of demineralization associated with longer periods of exposure to the decalcification solution. In summary, while DELF was able to detect very early demineralization, only QLF was capable of detecting and quantifying changes in the extent of the decalcification occurring with demineralization periods up to 24 h.

  15. Geomagnetic Field Effects on the Imaging Air Shower Cherenkov Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commichau, S.C.; Biland, A.; Kranich, D.; de los Reyes, R.; Moralejo, A.; Sobczyńska, D.

    Imaging Air Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) detect the Cherenkov light flashes of Extended Air Showers (EAS) triggered by VHE gamma-rays impinging on the Earth's atmosphere. Due to the overwhelming background from hadron induced EAS, the discrimination of the rare gamma-like events is rather difficult, in particular at energies below 100 GeV. The influence of the Geomagnetic Field (GF) on the EAS development can further complicate this discrimination and, in addition, also systematically affect the gamma-efficiency and energy resolution of an IACT. Here we present the results from dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for the MAGIC telescope site, show the GF effects on real data as well as possible corrections for these effects.

  16. Atmospheric Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric fluorescence from these showers. Accurate knowledge of the conversion from atmospheric fluorescence to energy loss by ionizing particles in the atmosphere is key to this technique. In this paper we discuss a small balloon-borne instrument to make the first in situ measurements versus altitude of the atmospheric fluorescence yield. The instrument can also be used in the lab to investigate the dependence of the fluorescence yield in air on temperature, pressure and the concentrations of other gases that present in the atmosphere. The results can be used to explore environmental effects on and improve the accuracy of cosmic ray energy measurements for existing ground-based experiments and future space-based experiments.

  17. Fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and anisotropy screening of living cells based on total internal reflection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Thomas; Angres, Brigitte; Steuer, Heiko; Strauss, Wolfgang S. L.; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2009-02-01

    A setup for fluorescence measurements of surfaces of biological samples, in particular the plasma membrane of living cells, is described. The method is based on splitting of a laser beam and multiple total internal reflections (TIR) within the bottom of a microtiter plate, such that up to 96 individual samples are illuminated simultaneously by an evanescent electromagnetic field. Two different screening procedures for the detection of fluorescence arising from the plasma membrane of living cells by High Throughput Screening (HTS) and High Content Screening (HCS), are distinguished. In the first case a rapid measurement of large sample numbers based on fluorescence intensity, and in the second case a high content of information from a single sample based on the parameters fluorescence lifetime (Fluorescence Lifetime Screening, FLiS) and fluorescence anisotropy (Fluorescence Lifetime Polarization Screening, FLiPS) is achieved. Both screening systems were validated using cultivated cells incubated with different fluorescent markers (e. g. NBD-cholesterol) as well as stably transfected cells expressing a fluorescent membrane-associating protein. In addition, particularly with regard of potential pharmaceutical applications, the kinetics of the intracellular translocation of a fluorescent protein kinase c fusion protein upon stimulation of the cells was determined. Further, a caspase sensor based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins was tested. Enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP) anchored to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane of living cells transfers its excitation energy via a spacer (DEVD) to an enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP). Upon apoptosis DEVD is cleaved, and energy transfer is disrupted, as proven by changes in fluorescence intensity and decay times.

  18. New developments of X-ray fluorescence imaging techniques in laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, Kouichi; Matsuno, Tsuyoshi; Takimoto, Yuki; Yamanashi, Masaki; Kometani, Noritsugu; Sasaki, Yuji C.; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kato, Shuichi; Yamada, Takashi; Shoji, Takashi; Kawahara, Naoki

    2015-11-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is a well-established analytical technique with a long research history. Many applications have been reported in various fields, such as in the environmental, archeological, biological, and forensic sciences as well as in industry. This is because XRF has a unique advantage of being a nondestructive analytical tool with good precision for quantitative analysis. Recent advances in XRF analysis have been realized by the development of new x-ray optics and x-ray detectors. Advanced x-ray focusing optics enables the making of a micro x-ray beam, leading to micro-XRF analysis and XRF imaging. A confocal micro-XRF technique has been applied for the visualization of elemental distributions inside the samples. This technique was applied for liquid samples and for monitoring chemical reactions such as the metal corrosion of steel samples in the NaCl solutions. In addition, a principal component analysis was applied for reducing the background intensity in XRF spectra obtained during XRF mapping, leading to improved spatial resolution of confocal micro-XRF images. In parallel, the authors have proposed a wavelength dispersive XRF (WD-XRF) imaging spectrometer for a fast elemental imaging. A new two dimensional x-ray detector, the Pilatus detector was applied for WD-XRF imaging. Fast XRF imaging in 1 s or even less was demonstrated for Euro coins and industrial samples. In this review paper, these recent advances in laboratory-based XRF imaging, especially in a laboratory setting, will be introduced.

  19. 77 FR 45307 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: Georgia; Control Techniques...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: Georgia; Control Techniques Guidelines and Reasonably Available Control Technology AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency..., in the alternative, to conditionally approve that revision which relates to certain...

  20. 78 FR 34306 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-07

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans: North Carolina; Control Techniques Guidelines and Reasonably Available Control Technology AGENCY: Environmental Protection... approval of its reasonably available control technology (RACT) requirements for volatile organic...

  1. Contouring Of Tooth Imprints By Means Of A Fluorescence Technique Adapted To A Spatially Filtered Moire Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongsma, Frans H. M.; Lambrechts, Paul; Vanherle, Guido

    1983-07-01

    A technique has been developed to produce plane equidistant contouring surfaces on tooth-imprints. This technique consists of spatially filtering a negative obtained by photographing the imprint under a Moire illumination. Unfortunately this technique turned out to be very sensitive for a non-uniform surface reflectivity. To obtain an object-brightness depending only upon the contouring mechanism, the imprint has been coated with a fluorescent dye. A HeCd-laser (λ=422 nm) served as a lightsource for the projection of the Moire-interference pattern on the imprint. The radiation of the fluorescent coating (λ=530 nm) is used to form an image on the negative. In this way the surface with specular reflection properties is transformed into a Labertian surface. The spatial filtering technique allows multiple exposures of the final negative enabling an increased depth of field. Contour mappings with a resolution in depth of less than 10 μm have been obtained.

  2. Measurement of resistance to solute transport across surfactant-laden interfaces using a Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, Edward P.; Nivaggioli, Thierry; Hatton, T. Alan

    1994-01-01

    A noninvasive fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique is under development to measure interfacial transport in two phase systems without disturbing the interface. The concentration profiles of a probe solute are measured in both sides of the interface by argon-ion laser, and the system relaxation is then monitored by a microscope-mounted CCD camera.

  3. Evaluation of Urban Air Quality By Passive Sampling Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, T. V.; Miranda, A. I.; Duarte, S.; Lima, M. J.

    Aveiro is a flat small city in the centre of Portugal, close to the Atlantic coast. In the last two decades an intensive development of demographic, traffic and industry growth in the region was observed which was reflected on the air quality degrada- tion. In order to evaluate the urban air quality in Aveiro, a field-monitoring network by passive sampling with high space resolution was implemented. Twenty-four field places were distributed in a area of 3x3 Km2 and ozone and NO2 concentrations were measured. The site distribution density was higher in the centre, 250x250 m2 than in periphery where a 500x500 m2 grid was used. The selection of field places took into consideration the choice criteria recommendation by United Kingdom environmental authorities, and three tubes and a blank tube for each pollutant were used at each site. The sampling system was mounted at 3m from the ground usually profiting the street lampposts. Concerning NO2 acrylic tubes were used with 85 mm of length and an in- ternal diameter of 12mm, where in one of the extremities three steel grids impregnated with a solution of TEA were placed and fixed with a polyethylene end cup (Heal et al., 1999); PFA Teflon tube with 53 mm of length and 9 mm of internal diameter and three impregnated glass filters impregnated with DPE solution fixed by a teflon end cup was used for ozone sampling (Monn and Hargartner, 1990). The passive sampling method for ozone and nitrogen dioxide was compared with continuous measurements, but the amount of measurements wasnSt enough for an accurate calibration and validation of the method. Although this constraint the field observations (June to August 2001) for these two pollutants assign interesting information about the air quality in the urban area. A krigger method of interpolation (Surfer- Golden Software-2000) was applied to field data to obtain isolines distribution of NO2 and ozone concentration for the studied area. Even the used passive sampling method has many

  4. Fluorescence properties of dyes adsorbed to silver islands, investigated by picosecond techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, A.; Lippitsch, M. E.; Draxler, S.; Riegler, M.; Aussenegg, F. R.

    1985-02-01

    The fluorescence properties of dye molecules (rhodamine 6G and erythrosin) adsorbed on pure glass surfaces and on silver islands films are investigated by cw and picosecond time-resolved methods. On pure glass surfaces we observe concentration quenching below a critical intermolecular distance (reduction of the fluorescence power per molecule as well as shortened and non-exponential fluorescence decay). On silver islands films the shortening in fluorescence lifetime is more drastic and is nearly independent of the intermolecular distance. This behavior suggests an electrodynamic interaction between dye monomers and plasmons in the metal particles, modified by a damping influence of dye dimers.

  5. MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANT BIOMARKERS WITH EXHALED BREATH TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has appeal as a noninvasive surrogate sample for lung-derived fluid. Additionally, EBC can be collected multiple times over the course of a study, unlike many other lung sampling techniques which can be performed fewer times. However validat...

  6. Global measurements of air pollution from satellites. [employing radiometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. L.; Bartle, E. R.; Griggs, M.; Hall, G. D.; Hesketh, W. D.; Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reichle, H.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual design of an FOV nadir radiometer was examined for its applicability to monitoring the radiation process in the atmosphere as it relates to aerosol behavior. The instrument employs a gas filter correlation technique and is suitable for transportation onboard satellite.

  7. The Moss Techniques for Air Pollution Study in Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect

    Marinova, S.; Marinov, A.; Frontasyeva, M.; Strelkova, L.; Yurukova, L.; Steinnes, E.

    2010-01-21

    The paper presents new results on atmospheric deposition of 41 elements in four areas of Bulgaria during the European moss survey in 2005. The results have been obtained by the moss biomonitoring technique. Ninety seven moss samples were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (ENAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS).

  8. APPLICATION OF STABLE ISOTOPE TECHNIQUES TO AIR POLLUTION RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stable isotope techniques provide a robust, yet under-utilized tool for examining pollutant effects on plant growth and ecosystem function. Here, we survey a range of mixing model, physiological and system level applications for documenting pollutant effects. Mixing model examp...

  9. Disentangling who is who during rhizosphere acidification in root interactions: combining fluorescence with optode techniques

    PubMed Central

    Faget, Marc; Blossfeld, Stephan; von Gillhaussen, Philipp; Schurr, Ulrich; Temperton, Vicky M.

    2013-01-01

    Plant–soil interactions can strongly influence root growth in plants. There is now increasing evidence that root–root interactions can also influence root growth, affecting architecture and root traits such as lateral root formation. Both when species grow alone or in interaction with others, root systems are in turn affected by as well as affect rhizosphere pH. Changes in soil pH have knock-on effects on nutrient availability. A limitation until recently has been the inability to assign species identity to different roots in soil. Combining the planar optode technique with fluorescent plants enables us to distinguish between plant species grown in natural soil and in parallel study pH dynamics in a non-invasive way at the same region of interest (ROI). We measured pH in the rhizosphere of maize and bean in rhizotrons in a climate chamber, with ROIs on roots in proximity to the roots of the other species as well as not-close to the other species. We found clear dynamic changes of pH over time and differences between the two species in rhizosphere acidification. Interestingly, when roots of the two species were interacting, the degree of acidification or alkalization compared to bulk soil was less strong then when roots were not growing in the vicinity of the other species. This cutting-edge approach can help provide a better understanding of plant–plant and plant–soil interactions. PMID:24137168

  10. Disentangling who is who during rhizosphere acidification in root interactions: combining fluorescence with optode techniques.

    PubMed

    Faget, Marc; Blossfeld, Stephan; von Gillhaussen, Philipp; Schurr, Ulrich; Temperton, Vicky M

    2013-01-01

    Plant-soil interactions can strongly influence root growth in plants. There is now increasing evidence that root-root interactions can also influence root growth, affecting architecture and root traits such as lateral root formation. Both when species grow alone or in interaction with others, root systems are in turn affected by as well as affect rhizosphere pH. Changes in soil pH have knock-on effects on nutrient availability. A limitation until recently has been the inability to assign species identity to different roots in soil. Combining the planar optode technique with fluorescent plants enables us to distinguish between plant species grown in natural soil and in parallel study pH dynamics in a non-invasive way at the same region of interest (ROI). We measured pH in the rhizosphere of maize and bean in rhizotrons in a climate chamber, with ROIs on roots in proximity to the roots of the other species as well as not-close to the other species. We found clear dynamic changes of pH over time and differences between the two species in rhizosphere acidification. Interestingly, when roots of the two species were interacting, the degree of acidification or alkalization compared to bulk soil was less strong then when roots were not growing in the vicinity of the other species. This cutting-edge approach can help provide a better understanding of plant-plant and plant-soil interactions.

  11. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence as a fast multielemental technique for human placenta sample analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marguí, E.; Ricketts, P.; Fletcher, H.; Karydas, A. G.; Migliori, A.; Leani, J. J.; Hidalgo, M.; Queralt, I.; Voutchkov, M.

    2017-04-01

    In the present contribution, benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been evaluated as a cost-effective multielemental analytical technique for human placenta analysis. An easy and rapid sample preparation consisting of suspending 50 mg of sample in 1 mL of a Triton 1% solution in deionized water showed to be the most suitable for this kind of samples. However, for comparison purposes, an acidic microwave acidic digestion procedure was also applied. For both sample treatment methodologies, limits of detection for most elements were in the low mg/kg level. Accurate and precise results were obtained using internal standardization as quantification approach and applying a correction factor to compensate for absorption effects. The correction factor was based on the proportional ratio between the slurry preparation results and those obtained for the analysis of a set of human placenta samples analysed by microwave acidic digestion and ICP-AES analysis. As a study case, the developed TXRF methodology was applied for multielemental analysis (K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb and Sr) of several healthy women's placenta samples from two regions in Jamaica.

  12. Residual Stress Relaxation and Stiffness-Confinement Effects in Polymer Films: Characterization by Non-Contact Ellipsometry and Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askar, Shadid; Torkelson, John

    2015-03-01

    The relaxation of residual stresses in spin-coated polymer films is characterized using two optical techniques: ellipsometry and fluorescence. Both techniques show that residual stresses relax over hours at several tens of degrees above the film glass transition temperature (Tg). Ellipsometry shows that thickness can increase or decrease during residual stress relaxation depending on thermal history of the film. However, the presence or relaxation of stresses has no measurable effect on Tg as measured by ellipsometry. We have adapted the well-known sensitivity of the pyrene dye fluorescence spectral shape to local environment polarity in order to characterize stress relaxation and to monitor stiffness-confinement effects. The spectral shape of the pyrene fluorescence spectrum shows similar stress relaxation regardless of whether relaxation is accompanied by increases or decreases in film thickness. Fluorescence also indicates that single-layer polystyrene films supported on silica stiffen with decreasing nanoscale thickness. For the first time, stiffness gradients as a function of distance from interfaces are demonstrated using pyrene label fluorescence in conjunction with multilayer films.

  13. Technique for air bubble management during endothelial keratoplasty in eyes after penetrating glaucoma surgery.

    PubMed

    Banitt, Michael; Arrieta-Quintero, Esdras; Parel, Jean-Marie; Fantes, Francisco

    2011-02-01

    Our purpose was to develop a technique for maintaining air within the anterior chamber during endothelial keratoplasty in eyes that have previously undergone trabeculectomy or a glaucoma drainage implant. Whole human globes and rabbits underwent penetrating glaucoma surgery to develop the technique. Without the aid of any additional device or manipulation, continuing to inject air into the anterior chamber as it escapes through the sclerostomy or tube eventually fills the subconjunctival space and allows for back pressure. This allows for a full anterior chamber air fill and brief elevation of intraocular pressure. We employed this overfilling technique on 3 patients with previous incisional glaucoma surgery to perform successful Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty without complication. We recommend using the overfilling technique when performing Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty surgery in eyes with previous penetrating glaucoma surgery because it is a simple technique without the need for pre- or postoperative manipulation.

  14. A technique of purification process of single-walled carbon nanotubes with air.

    PubMed

    Song, Xin; Fang, Yan

    2007-07-01

    A technique of purifying SWCNTs has been developed by means of oxidizing carbonaceous particles with air using fluidized-bed. Air was introduced into the fluidized-bed by pump with controllable flux. The powders were "boiling" at a temperature of 550 degrees C for 50 min. With this technique, the flux can be controlled simply. The fluidized-bed was applied as the heating apparatus instead of rotated quartz tubes. The air and the powders can be mixed with each other more sufficiently. Characteristics of the raw and purified powder were presented using Raman spectroscopy and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), revealing that the purified powder is free from carbonaceous particles.

  15. Proximal Sensing of Plant-Pathogen Interactions in Spring Barley with Three Fluorescence Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Leufen, Georg; Noga, Georg; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    In the last years fluorescence spectroscopy has come to be viewed as an essential approach in key research fields of applied plant sciences. However, the quantity and particularly the quality of information produced by different equipment might vary considerably. In this study we investigate the potential of three optical devices for the proximal sensing of plant-pathogen interactions in four genotypes of spring barley. For this purpose, the fluorescence lifetime, the image-resolved multispectral fluorescence and selected indices of a portable multiparametric fluorescence device were recorded at 3, 6, and 9 days after inoculation (dai) from healthy leaves as well as from leaves inoculated with powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis) or leaf rust (Puccinia hordei). Genotype-specific responses to pathogen infections were revealed already at 3 dai by higher fluorescence mean lifetimes in the spectral range from 410 to 560 nm in the less susceptible varieties. Noticeable pathogen-induced modifications were also revealed by the ‘Blue-to-Far-Red Fluorescence Ratio’ and the ‘Simple Fluorescence Ratio’. Particularly in the susceptible varieties the differences became more evident in the time-course of the experiment i.e., following the pathogen development. The relevance of the blue and green fluorescence to exploit the plant-pathogen interaction was demonstrated by the multispectral fluorescence imaging system. As shown, mildewed leaves were characterized by exceptionally high blue fluorescence, contrasting the values observed in rust inoculated leaves. Further, we confirm that the intensity of green fluorescence depends on the pathogen infection and the stage of disease development; this information might allow a differentiation of both diseases. Moreover, our results demonstrate that the detection area might influence the quality of the information, although it had a minor impact only in the current study. Finally, we highlight the relevance of different excitation

  16. Herbal Extract Incorporated Nanofiber Fabricated by an Electrospinning Technique and its Application to Antimicrobial Air Filtration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongan; Yang, Byeong Joon; Bae, Gwi-Nam; Jung, Jae Hee

    2015-11-18

    Recently, with the increased attention to indoor air quality, antimicrobial air filtration techniques have been studied widely to inactivate hazardous airborne microorganisms effectively. In this study, we demonstrate herbal extract incorporated (HEI) nanofibers synthesized by an electrospinning technique and their application to antimicrobial air filtration. As an antimicrobial herbal material, an ethanolic extract of Sophora flavescens, which exhibits great antibacterial activity against pathogens, was mixed with the polymer solution for the electrospinning process. We measured various characteristics of the synthesized HEI nanofibers, such as fiber morphology, fiber size distribution, and thermal stability. For application of the electrospun HEI nanofibers, we made highly effective air filters with 99.99% filtration efficiency and 99.98% antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis. The pressure drop across the HEI nanofiber air filter was 4.75 mmH2O at a face air velocity of 1.79 cm/s. These results will facilitate the implementation of electrospun HEI nanofiber techniques to control air quality and protect against hazardous airborne microorganisms.

  17. Detection of illicit drugs with the technique of spectral fluorescence signatures (SFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poryvkina, Larisa; Babichenko, Sergey

    2010-10-01

    The SFS technology has already proved its analytical capabilities in a variety of industrial and environmental tasks. Recently it has been introduced for forensic applications. The key features of the SFS method - measuring a 3-dimensional spectrum of fluorescence of the sample (intensity versus excitation and emission wavelengths) with following recognition of specific spectral patterns of SFS responsible for individual drugs - provide an effective tool for the analysis of untreated seized samples, without any separation of the substance of interest from its mixture with accompanying cutting agents and diluents as a preparatory step. In such approach the chemical analysis of the sample is substituted by the analysis of SFS matrix visualized as an optical image. The SFS technology of drug detection is realized by NarTest® NTX2000 analyzer, compact device intended to measure suspicious samples in liquid, solid and powder forms. It simplifies the detection process due to fully automated procedures of SFS measuring and integrated expert system for recognition of spectral patterns. Presently the expert system of NTX2000 is able to detect marijuana, cocaine, heroin, MDMA, amphetamine and methamphetamine with the detection limit down to 5% of the drug concentration in various mixtures. The numerous tests with street samples confirmed that the use of SFS method provides reliable results with high sensitivity and selectivity for identification of drugs of abuse. More than 3000 street samples of the aforesaid drugs were analyzed with NTX2000 during validation process, and the correspondence of SFS results and conclusions of standard forensic analyses with GC/MS techniques was in 99.4% cases.

  18. Properties of DNA-polyintercalating drugs studied by fluorescence lifetime techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Stefan; Popa, Liviu M.

    1995-01-01

    Dimers of the fluorescent dye Oxazole Yellow (YOYO and POPO) are used for high sensitive DNA detection in gel electrophoresis. Upon binding to DNA they show a 3000 to 5000 fold enhancement of fluorescence. The binding constant of those dimers to dsDNA is between 108 M-1 and 109 M-1. This is due to the dye's ability to bisintercalate between adjacent DNA basepairs. We investigated the occurring forms of intercalation of YOYO to dsDNA in solutions of different ionic strength by fluorescence lifetime methods.

  19. Binding of caffeine with caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid using fluorescence quenching, UV/vis and FTIR spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abebe; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-03-01

    The interactions of caffeine (CF) with chlorogenic acid (CGA) and caffeic acid (CFA) were investigated by fluorescence quenching, UV/vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques. The results of the study indicated that the fluorescence quenching between caffeine and hydroxycinnamic acids could be rationalized in terms of static quenching or the formation of non-fluorescent CF-CFA and CF-CGA complexes. From fluorescence quenching spectral analysis, the quenching constant (KSV), quenching rate constant (kq), number of binding sites (n), thermodynamic properties and conformational changes of the interaction were determined. The quenching constants (KSV) between CF and CGA, CFA are 1.84 × 10(4) and 1.04 × 10(4) L/mol at 298 K and their binding site n is ~ 1. Thermodynamic parameters determined using the Van't Hoff equation indicated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waal's forces have a major role in the reaction of caffeine with caffeic acid and chlorogenic acid. The 3D fluorescence, UV/vis and FTIR spectra also showed that the binding of CF with CFA and CGA induces conformational changes in CFA and CGA.

  20. Imaging of chlorophyll a fluorescence: theoretical and practical aspects of an emerging technique for the monitoring of photosynthetic performance.

    PubMed

    Oxborough, Kevin

    2004-05-01

    The development of chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence imaging systems has greatly increased the versatility of Chl a fluorometry as a non-invasive technique for the investigation of photosynthesis in plants and algae. For example, systems that image at the microscopic level have made it possible to measure PSII photochemical efficiencies from chloroplasts within intact leaves and from individual algal cells within mixed populations, while systems that image over much larger areas have been used to investigate heterogeneous patterns of photosynthetic performance across leaves and in screening programmes that image tens or even hundreds of plants simultaneously. In addition, it is now practical to use fluorescence imaging systems as real-time, multi-channel fluorometers, which can be used to record continuous fluorescence traces from multiple leaves, plants, or algal cells. This paper discusses some of the theoretical and practical issues associated with the imaging of Chl a fluorescence and with Chl a fluorometry in general. This discussion includes a review of the most commonly used Chl a fluorescence parameters.

  1. Development of a skin phantom of the epidermis and evaluation by using fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Thorsten; Beer, Sebastian; Maeder, Ulf; Burg, Jan M.; Schlupp, Peggy; Schmidts, Thomas; Runkel, Frank; Fiebich, Martin

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this project was to develop a skin phantom that resembles the epidermis including the lipid matrix of the stratum corneum and the dermis. The main intent was to achieve optical properties similar to skin tissue. Therefore, two compartments of the skin, dermis and epidermis, were examined regarding their optical properties. Based on these results, the skin phantom was designed using relevant skin components. The scattering coefficient was measured by using Reflectance-based Confocal Microscopy (RCM) and the fluorescence spectrum was detected via confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). Prospective, the skin phantom can be used to incorporate various fluorescing chemicals, such as fluorescent dyes and fluorescent-labeled drugs to perform calibration measurements in wide-field and laser-scanning microscopes to provide a basis for the quantification of skin penetration studies.

  2. Degree of dissociation of apohemoglobin studied by nano-second fluorescence-polarization technique.

    PubMed

    Kinosita, K; Mitaku, S; Ikegami, A

    1975-05-30

    A fluorescent dye 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate was complexed with human apohemoglobin and sperm whale apomyoglobin. Nanosecond fluorescence-polarization kinetics were measured for each of these complexes in KC1 solutions to obtain their fluorescence lifetimes and rotational correlation times. The rotational correlation time of apohemoglobin-dye complex was found to be 21 ns, which was about twice that of apomyoglobin-dye complex, 11 ns. These values were constant over an ionic strength range from 0 to 1.7. Circular dichroism spectra (215-300 nm) and fluorescence lifetimes of the complexes were also found to be independent of the ionic strength, indicating that no gross conformational change occurs with the change in the salt concentration, These results suggest that apohemoglobin remains dimeric over the ionic-strength range examined.

  3. An innovative air data system for the Space Shuttle Orbiter - Data analysis techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. D.; Wolf, H.; Heck, M. L.; Siemers, P. M., III

    1981-01-01

    The Shuttle Entry Air Data System (SEADS) is an experimental system designed to supply research quality air data and to meet Orbiter operational air data requirements throughout entry. SEADS incorporates no mechanical devices but is based on the concept that the fuselage proper, whether symmetrical or not, can be instrumented so as to function both as a pitot-static probe and as a differential pressure flow direction sensor. Specifically SEADS consists of 20 flush orifices, each routed to a pair of absolute pressure transducers. A computational technique has been developed capable of extracting air data parameters solely from surface pressure measurements. The digital filtering algorithm implemented in SEADS is the natural adaptation to air data sensing of a technology widely used in navigation, guidance, and control systems.

  4. Application of a fluorescence intensity ratio technique for the intrinsic determination of pH using an optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thotath, Bhadra; Nguyen, T. Hien; Zhang, Weiwei; Wren, Stephen P.; Baxter, Gregory W.; Sun, Tong; Collins, Stephen F.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2015-09-01

    An intensity ratio technique has been used for characterizing fluorescence spectra from novel coumarin dyes for pH sensing, in the range of 0.5 - 6, providing results that are independent of possible fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source, deterioration of the indicator and changes in optical coupling. The arrangement was determined to have a sensitivity of 25% per unit pH change (at a pH of 4).

  5. Ecophysiological Analysis of Microorganisms in Complex Microbial Systems by Combination of Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization with Extracellular Staining Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    Ecophysiological analysis and functions of single cells in complex microbial systems can be examined by simple combinations of Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for identification with various staining techniques targeting functional phenotypes. In this chapter, we describe methods and protocols optimized for the study of extracellular enzymes, surface hydrophobicity and specific surface structures. Although primarily applied to the study of microbes in wastewater treatment (activated sludge and biofilms), the methods may also be used with minor modifications in several other ecosystems.

  6. Quasi-continuous combined scattered light and fluorescence measurements: a novel measurement technique for shaken microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Samorski, M; Müller-Newen, G; Büchs, J

    2005-10-05

    A novel quasi-continuous on-line measuring technique for shaken microtiter plates is presented. Light scattering as well as intracellular and/or protein fluorescence (e.g. NADH, YFP) is measured during the shaking procedure, thus allowing a process monitoring of 96 different simultaneous cultures in a microtiter plate. In contrast to existing measurement techniques, the shaking process does not have to be stopped to take the measurements, thus avoiding the corresponding interruption of the cultures' oxygen supply and any unpredictable effects on the cultures. Experiments were conducted with E. coli in LB, TB, and MOPS minimal medium and V. natriegens in modified LB and TB media. Intensity curves of scattered light and NADH fluorescence were used to distinguish different lag phases, growth velocities, or inoculation densities. Data from this new method corresponded well to the off-line measured optical densities and to the oxygen transfer rates of cultures run in simultaneously conducted shake flask experiments at equivalent oxygen transfer capacities. With the aid of yellow fluorescence protein fused to interleukin-6 the optimal induction time of an expressing E. coli strain could be determined by on-line monitoring of product formation. Thus, this measuring technique enables the researcher to evaluate and to discriminate different cultures on a screening level and to improve screening conditions, process development and scale-up.

  7. Investigating the Correlation between Miscibility and Physical Stability of Amorphous Solid Dispersions Using Fluorescence-Based Techniques.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bin; Tang, Xing; Taylor, Lynne S

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a fluorescence-based technique to evaluate drug-polymer miscibility and to probe the correlation between miscibility and physical stability of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs). Indomethacin-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (IDM-HPMC), indomethacin-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate, and indomethacin-polyvinylpyrrolidone (IDM-PVP) were used as model systems. The miscibility of the IDM-polymer systems was evaluated by fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The physical stability of IDM-polymer ASDs stored at 40 °C was evaluated using fluorescence imaging and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The experimentally determined miscibility limit of IDM with the polymers was 50-60%, 20-30%, and 70-80% drug loading for HPMC, HPMCAS, and PVP, respectively. The X-ray results showed that for IDM-HPMC ASDs, samples with a drug loading of less than 50% were maintained in amorphous form during the study period, while samples with drug loadings higher than 50% crystallized within 15 days. For IDM-HPMCAS ASDs, samples with drug loading less than 30% remained amorphous, while samples with drug loadings higher than 30% crystallized within 10 days. IDM-PVP ASDs were found to be resistant to crystallization for all compositions. Thus, a good correlation was observed between phase separation and reduced physical stability, suggesting that miscibility is indeed an important ASDs characteristic. In addition, fluorescence-based techniques show promise in the evaluation of drug-polymer miscibility.

  8. Novel, in-situ Raman and fluorescence measurement techniques: Imaging using optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Jerry Chance

    The following dissertation describes the development of methods for performing standoff and in- situ Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical imaging and non-imaging analytical applications. The use of Raman spectroscopy for the in- situ identification of crack cocaine and cocaine.HCl using a fiberoptic Raman probe and a portable Raman spectrograph has been demonstrated. We show that the Raman spectra of both forms of cocaine are easily distinguishable from common cutting agents and impurities such as benzocaine and lidocaine. We have also demonstrated the use of Raman spectroscopy for in-situ identification of drugs separated by thin layer chromatography. We have investigated the use of small, transportable, Raman systems for standoff Raman spectroscopy (e.g. <20 m). For this work, acousto-optical (AOTF) and liquid crystal tunable filters (LCTF) are being used both with, and in place of dispersive spectrographs and fixed filtering devices. In addition, we improved the flexibility of the system by the use of a modified holographic fiber-optic probe for light and image collection. A comparison of tunable filter technologies for standoff Raman imaging is discussed along with the merits of image transfer devices using small diameter image guides. A standoff Raman imaging system has been developed that utilizes a unique polymer collection mirror. The techniques used to produce these mirrors make it easy to design low f/# polymer mirrors. The performance of a low f/# polymer mirror system for standoff Raman chemical imaging has been demonstrated and evaluated. We have also demonstrated remote Raman hyperspectral imaging using a dimension-reduction, 2-dimensional (2-D) to 1-dimensional (1-D), fiber optic array. In these studies, a modified holographic fiber-optic probe was combined with the dimension-reduction fiber array for remote Raman imaging. The utility of this setup for standoff Raman imaging is demonstrated by monitoring the polymerization of

  9. Laser induced fluorescence in algae: A new technique for remote detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, E. J.; Hickman, G. D.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of the absorption and fluorescence spectra were obtained for four various types of marine and fresh water algae using a pulsed N2/Ne dye laser as the source of excitation. The absorption maxima for the algae ranged from 420 to 675 nm, while their fluorescent spectra ranged from 580 to 685 nm. It appears feasible that various algal species can be identified by detection of their fluorescent signatures using a tunable laser as the excitation source. However, if one is concerned only with detection of chlorophyll a, the optimum excitation is approximately 600 + 50 nm while detection is at 685 nm. An analysis of both calculations and laboratory results indicates that it should be feasible to measure chlorophyll a in concentrations as low as 1.0 mg/m3 using a 100 kW peak pulsed laser from an altitude of 500 meters.

  10. Modelling of Swelling by the Fluorescence Technique in Kappa Carrageenan Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tari, Ozlem; Pekcan, Onder

    2011-12-01

    Kappa (-κ) carrageenan gels prepared with various carrageenan concentrations in pure water were completely dried and then swelled in water vapor. Steady state fluorescence measurements were performed using a spectrometer equipped with temperature controller. Pyranine was embedded in κ-carrageenan gels as a fluorescence probe during gel preparation. The fluorescence intensity, I, increased exponentially as swelling time is increased for all gel samples. The increase in I was modelled using Li-Tanaka equation from which swelling time constants, τc and cooperative diffusion coefficients, Dc were determined. It was observed that Dc increased as the swelling temperature was increased. On the other hand at each temperature, it was seen that Dc decreased as kappa carrageenan concentration was increased. Activation energies for swelling were obtained and found to be 57.4, 58.3 and 62.73 kJ mol-1 for the gels with increasing amount of κ-carrageenan content.

  11. Detecting the barium daughter in 136Xe 0-νββ decay using single-molecule fluorescence imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygren, David R.

    2015-11-01

    Single-molecule fluorescent imaging may provide an avenue to efficiently detect the Ba++ daughter atom in the decay 136Xe → Ba + 2e-, and, unambiguously associate the birth point in space within the electron trajectories of the decay event. Chelation of doubly-charged alkaline earth elements such as calcium and barium by certain precursor molecules converts the resulting complex from a non-fluorescent to a fluorescent state. Repeated photo-excitation of a single fluorescent complex reveals both presence and location with high precision. This technique, widespread now in biochemistry, biophysics and biology, may permit a similar discriminating response in a large high-pressure xenon gas TPC for the Ba++ ion from xenon double-beta decay. The TPC measures the event time and energy of the two nascent electrons, as well as topology and position in 3-D from their trajectories in the gas. Measurement of the 2-D location of the molecular ion after arrival at the cathode plane permits an association of ion with the event. Demonstration of an efficient, highly specific detection of the barium daughter would provide a long-sought pathway to a background-free result in the search for this decay mode, of central importance for determining the nature of the neutrino.

  12. Potential of Fluorescence Imaging Techniques To Monitor Mutagenic PAH Uptake by Microalga

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), is one of the major environmental pollutants that causes mutagenesis and cancer. BaP has been shown to accumulate in phytoplankton and zooplankton. We have studied the localization and aggregation of BaP in Chlorella sp., a microalga that is one of the primary producers in the food chain, using fluorescence confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy with the phasor approach to characterize the location and the aggregation of BaP in the cell. Our results show that BaP accumulates in the lipid bodies of Chlorella sp. and that there is Förster resonance energy transfer between BaP and photosystems of Chlorella sp., indicating the close proximity of the two molecular systems. The lifetime of BaP fluorescence was measured to be 14 ns in N,N-dimethylformamide, an average of 7 ns in Bold’s basal medium, and 8 ns in Chlorella cells. Number and brightness analysis suggests that BaP does not aggregate inside Chlorella sp. (average brightness = 5.330), while it aggregates in the supernatant. In Chlorella grown in sediments spiked with BaP, in 12 h the BaP uptake could be visualized using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:25020149

  13. Blind Source Separation Techniques for the Decomposition of Multiply Labeled Fluorescence Images

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Richard A.; Mitkovski, Mišo; Kirchhoff, Frank; Neher, Erwin; Theis, Fabian J.; Zeug, André

    2009-01-01

    Methods of blind source separation are used in many contexts to separate composite data sets according to their sources. Multiply labeled fluorescence microscopy images represent such sets, in which the sources are the individual labels. Their distributions are the quantities of interest and have to be extracted from the images. This is often challenging, since the recorded emission spectra of fluorescent dyes are environment- and instrument-specific. We have developed a nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) algorithm to detect and separate spectrally distinct components of multiply labeled fluorescence images. It operates on spectrally resolved images and delivers both the emission spectra of the identified components and images of their abundance. We tested the proposed method using biological samples labeled with up to four spectrally overlapping fluorescent labels. In most cases, NMF accurately decomposed the images into contributions of individual dyes. However, the solutions are not unique when spectra overlap strongly or when images are diffuse in their structure. To arrive at satisfactory results in such cases, we extended NMF to incorporate preexisting qualitative knowledge about spectra and label distributions. We show how data acquired through excitations at two or three different wavelengths can be integrated and that multiple excitations greatly facilitate the decomposition. By allowing reliable decomposition in cases where the spectra of the individual labels are not known or are known only inaccurately, the proposed algorithms greatly extend the range of questions that can be addressed with quantitative microscopy. PMID:19413985

  14. Analysis of tincal ore waste by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfa, Orhan Murat; Üstündağ, Zafer; Özkırım, Ilknur; Kagan Kadıoğlu, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Etibank Borax Plant is located in Kırka-Eskişehir, Turkey. The borax waste from this plant was analyzed by means of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The standard addition method was used for the determination of the concentration of Al, Fe, Zn, Sn, and Ba. The results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  15. Determination of rhenium in molybdenite by X-ray fluorescence. A combined chemical-spectrometric technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solt, M.W.; Wahlberg, J.S.; Myers, A.T.

    1969-01-01

    Rhenium in molybdenite is separated from molybdenum by distillation of rhenium heptoxide from a perchloric-sulphuric acid mixture. It is concentrated by precipitation of the sulphide and then determined by X-ray fluorescence. From 3 to 1000 ??g of rhenium can be measured with a precision generally within 2%. The procedure tolerates larger amounts of molybdenum than the usual colorimetric methods. ?? 1969.

  16. Fluorescence technique for on-line monitoring of state of hydrogen-producing microorganisms

    DOEpatents

    Seibert, Michael; Makarova, Valeriya; Tsygankov, Anatoly A.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2007-06-12

    In situ fluorescence method to monitor state of sulfur-deprived algal culture's ability to produce H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion, comprising: a) providing sulfur-deprived algal culture; b) illuminating culture; c) measuring onset of H.sub.2 percentage in produced gas phase at multiple times to ascertain point immediately after anerobiosis to obtain H.sub.2 data as function of time; and d) determining any abrupt change in three in situ fluorescence parameters; i) increase in F.sub.t (steady-state level of chlorophyll fluorescence in light adapted cells); ii) decrease in F.sub.m', (maximal saturating light induced fluorescence level in light adapted cells); and iii) decrease in .DELTA.F/F.sub.m'=(F.sub.m'-F.sub.t)/F.sub.m' (calculated photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) signaling full reduction of plastoquinone pool between PSII and PSI, which indicates start of anaerobic conditions that induces synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme for subsequent H.sub.2 production that signal oxidation of plastoquinone pool asmain factor to regulate H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion.

  17. Development of a temporal filtering technique for suppression of interferences in applied laser-induced fluorescence diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Ehn, Andreas; Kaldvee, Billy; Bood, Joakim; Aldén, Marcus

    2009-04-20

    A temporal filtering technique, complementary to spectral filtering, has been developed for laser-induced fluorescence measurements. The filter is applicable in cases where the laser-induced interfering signals and the signal of interest have different temporal characteristics. For the interfering-signal discrimination a picosecond laser system along with a fast time-gated intensified CCD camera were used. In order to demonstrate and evaluate the temporal filtering concept two measurement situations were investigated; one where toluene fluorescence was discriminated from interfering luminescence of an aluminum surface, and in the other one Mie scattering signals from a water aerosol were filtered out from acetone fluorescence images. A mathematical model was developed to simulate and evaluate the temporal filter for a general measurement situation based on pulsed-laser excitation together with time-gated detection. Using system parameters measured with a streak camera, the model was validated for LIF imaging of acetone vapor inside a water aerosol. The results show that the temporal filter is capable of efficient suppression of interfering signal contributions. The photophysical properties of several species commonly studied by LIF in combustion research have been listed and discussed to provide guidelines for optimum use of the technique.

  18. Techniques of Fluorescence Cholangiography During Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy for Better Delineation of the Bile Duct Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yoshiharu; Ishizawa, Takeaki; Tani, Keigo; Harada, Nobuhiro; Kaneko, Junichi; Saiura, Akio; Bandai, Yasutsugu; Kokudo, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the clinical and technical factors affecting the ability of fluorescence cholangiography (FC) using indocyanine green (ICG) to delineate the bile duct anatomy during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). Application of FC during LC began after laparoscopic fluorescence imaging systems became commercially available. In 108 patients undergoing LC, FC was performed by preoperative intravenous injection of ICG (2.5 mg) during dissection of Calot's triangle, and clinical factors affecting the ability of FC to delineate the extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. Equipment-related factors associated with bile duct detectability were also assessed among 5 laparoscopic systems and 1 open fluorescence imaging system in ex vivo studies. FC delineated the confluence between the cystic duct and common hepatic duct (CyD–CHD) before and after dissection of Calot's triangle in 80 patients (74%) and 99 patients (92%), respectively. The interval between ICG injection and FC before dissection of Calot's triangle was significantly longer in the 80 patients in whom the CyD–CHD confluence was detected by fluorescence imaging before dissection (median, 90 min; range, 15–165 min) than in the remaining 28 patients in whom the confluence was undetectable (median, 47 min; range, 21–205 min; P < 0.01). The signal contrast on the fluorescence images of the bile duct samples was significantly different among the laparoscopic imaging systems and tended to decrease more steeply than those of the open imaging system as the target-laparoscope distance increased and porcine tissues covering the samples became thicker. FC is a simple navigation tool for obtaining a biliary roadmap to reach the “critical view of safety” during LC. Key factors for better bile duct identification by FC are administration of ICG as far in advance as possible before surgery, sufficient extension of connective tissues around the bile ducts, and placement of the tip of

  19. The Use of Sensory Analysis Techniques to Assess the Quality of Indoor Air.

    PubMed

    Lewkowska, Paulina; Dymerski, Tomasz; Gębicki, Jacek; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2017-01-02

    The quality of indoor air is one of the significant elements that influences people's well-being and health inside buildings. Emissions of pollutants, which may cause odor nuisance, are the main reason for people's complaints regarding the quality of indoor air. As a result, it is necessary to perform tests aimed at identifying the sources of odors inside buildings. The article contains basic information on the characteristics of the sources of indoor air pollution and the influence of the odor detection threshold on people's health and comfort. An attempt was also made to classify and use sensory analysis techniques to perform tests of the quality of indoor air, which would enable identification of sensory experience and would allow for indication of the degree of their intensity.

  20. Spatial and temporal air quality pattern recognition using environmetric techniques: a case study in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Syed Abdul Mutalib, Sharifah Norsukhairin; Juahir, Hafizan; Azid, Azman; Mohd Sharif, Sharifah; Latif, Mohd Talib; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Zain, Sharifuddin M; Dominick, Doreena

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to identify spatial and temporal patterns in the air quality at three selected Malaysian air monitoring stations based on an eleven-year database (January 2000-December 2010). Four statistical methods, Discriminant Analysis (DA), Hierarchical Agglomerative Cluster Analysis (HACA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), were selected to analyze the datasets of five air quality parameters, namely: SO2, NO2, O3, CO and particulate matter with a diameter size of below 10 μm (PM10). The three selected air monitoring stations share the characteristic of being located in highly urbanized areas and are surrounded by a number of industries. The DA results show that spatial characterizations allow successful discrimination between the three stations, while HACA shows the temporal pattern from the monthly and yearly factor analysis which correlates with severe haze episodes that have happened in this country at certain periods of time. The PCA results show that the major source of air pollution is mostly due to the combustion of fossil fuel in motor vehicles and industrial activities. The spatial pattern recognition (S-ANN) results show a better prediction performance in discriminating between the regions, with an excellent percentage of correct classification compared to DA. This study presents the necessity and usefulness of environmetric techniques for the interpretation of large datasets aiming to obtain better information about air quality patterns based on spatial and temporal characterizations at the selected air monitoring stations.

  1. Improved technique for evaluating oral free flaps by pinprick testing assisted by indocyanine green near-infrared fluorescence angiography.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Tetsuji; Masumoto, Kazuma; Uchiyama, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Yoshiko; Azuma, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yuji; Katou, Fuminori

    2014-10-01

    In head and neck surgery, free-flap reconstruction using a microvascular anastomosis is an indispensable option after tumor ablation. Because the success of free-flap reconstruction is enhanced by rapid identification and salvage of failing flaps, postoperative monitoring of free flaps is essential. We describe a new technique using indocyanine green (ICG) near-infrared angiography and pinprick testing to monitor intraoral free flaps. A solution of ICG (Diagnogreen, 5 ml) was intravenously injected, and scanning was performed with a near-infrared video camera system. Thirty seconds after ICG injection, a pinprick test was performed by placing a 24-gage needle through the dermis to the subcutaneous fat of the flap. Pinprick testing during ICG fluorescence imaging was performed in 30 patients. Flap perfusion was confirmed in all patients, and all flaps survived postoperatively. ICG fluorescence imaging demonstrated that flap perfusion was maintained.

  2. Fluorescence enhancement from nano-gap embedded plasmonic gratings by a novel fabrication technique with HD-DVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, K.; Pathak, A.; Menke, D.; Cornish, P. V.; Gangopadhyay, K.; Korampally, V.; Gangopadhyay, S.

    2012-12-01

    We demonstrate strong electromagnetic field enhancement from nano-gaps embedded in silver gratings for visible wavelengths. These structures fabricated using a store-bought HD-DVD worth 10 and conventional micro-contact printing techniques have shown maximum fluorescence enhancement factors of up to 118 times when compared to a glass substrate under epi-fluorescent conditions. The novel fabrication procedure provides for the development of a cost-effective and facile plasmonic substrate for low-level chemical and biological detection. Electromagnetic field simulations were also performed that reveal the strong field confinement in the nano-gap region embedded in the silver grating, which is attributed to the combined effect of localized as well as propagating surface plasmons.

  3. Fluorescence enhancement from nano-gap embedded plasmonic gratings by a novel fabrication technique with HD-DVD.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, K; Pathak, A; Menke, D; Cornish, P V; Gangopadhyay, K; Korampally, V; Gangopadhyay, S

    2012-12-14

    We demonstrate strong electromagnetic field enhancement from nano-gaps embedded in silver gratings for visible wavelengths. These structures fabricated using a store-bought HD-DVD worth $10 and conventional micro-contact printing techniques have shown maximum fluorescence enhancement factors of up to 118 times when compared to a glass substrate under epi-fluorescent conditions. The novel fabrication procedure provides for the development of a cost-effective and facile plasmonic substrate for low-level chemical and biological detection. Electromagnetic field simulations were also performed that reveal the strong field confinement in the nano-gap region embedded in the silver grating, which is attributed to the combined effect of localized as well as propagating surface plasmons.

  4. Study of nonlinear effects in coumarin-30 using two-photon fluorescence and the Z-scan technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudel, Milan; Chen, Jinhai; Kolomenski, Alexandre; Schuessler, Hans

    2008-10-01

    The nonlinear propagation dynamics of 45 fs laser pulses in methanol solution has been studied with the two-photon fluorescence and the Z-scan technique. The competing nonlinear processes include self-focusing, self-phase modulation, filamention, intensity clamping and the two- photon absorption [1]. A systematic study has been performed of these nonlinear effects at different the laser powers. The simultaneous measurements of two-photon fluorescence and the transmission, displaying also continuum generation, were performed, to better understand the interplay between these effects [2]. In addition, the influence of a linear chirp of the laser pulse on the nonlinear propagation dynamics was investigated. [0pt] [1] H. Schroeder, S. L. Chin, Opt. Communications, 11, 1695-1703 (2002) [0pt] [2] M. C. Fischer, H. C. Liu, I. R. Piletic, and W. S. Warren, Opt. Express, 16, 4192-4205 (2008)

  5. Application of the Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence technique to trace elements determination in tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, T.; Lartigue, J.; Zarazua, G.; Avila-Perez, P.; Navarrete, M.; Tejeda, S.

    2008-12-01

    Many studies have identified an important number of toxic elements along with organic carcinogen molecules and radioactive isotopes in tobacco. In this work we have analyzed by Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence 9 brands of cigarettes being manufactured and distributed in the Mexican market. Two National Institute of Standards and Technology standards and a blank were equally treated at the same time. Results show the presence of some toxic elements such as Pb and Ni. These results are compared with available data for some foreign brands, while their implications for health are discussed. It can be confirmed that the Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence method provides precise (reproducible) and accuracy (trueness) data for 15 elements concentration in tobacco samples.

  6. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis techniques for contaminant screening of leafy greens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everard, Colm D.; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Hoyoung

    2014-05-01

    The production of contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is needed to reduce foodborne illnesses and related costs. Leafy greens grown in the field can be susceptible to fecal matter contamination from uncontrolled livestock and wild animals entering the field. Pathogenic bacteria can be transferred via fecal matter and several outbreaks of E.coli O157:H7 have been associated with the consumption of leafy greens. This study examines the use of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging coupled with multivariate image analysis to detect fecal contamination on Spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea). Hyperspectral fluorescence images from 464 to 800 nm were captured; ultraviolet excitation was supplied by two LED-based line light sources at 370 nm. Key wavelengths and algorithms useful for a contaminant screening optical imaging device were identified and developed, respectively. A non-invasive screening device has the potential to reduce the harmful consequences of foodborne illnesses.

  7. Structural investigation of nuclear RNP particles containing pre-mRNA by different fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Borissova, O F; Krichevskaya, A A; Samarina, O P

    1981-01-01

    Ethidium bromide (EB) adsorption isotherms on 30S nuclear RNP particles isolated from liver nuclei has revealed 6% of double-stranded regions in pre-mRNA (dsRNA). It has been established by measurements of the EB fluorescence polarization that the bulk of dsRNA regions in RNP is rigidly attached to RNP. They are longer than 45 degree A. The increase of NaCl concentration from 0.1 up to 0.4 M causes a significant loosening of dsRNA-protein bonds. As a result the dsRNA segments become more flexible. Measurements of energy transfer from fluorescamine (covalently bound to the protein) to EB (adsorbed on dsRNA) have yielded information about dsRNA location. The fact that absorbtion of exciting light by fluorescamine causes pronounced increase of EB fluorescence is consistent with the idea that helical regions of RNA are located outside the RNP particles. PMID:7220348

  8. Direct Observation of Oil Consumption Mechanisms in a Production Spark Ignition Engine Using Fluorescence Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    investigated for different piston ring end-gap configurations. A radiotracer was used to perform direct measurement of the oil consumption while Laser- induced ...and Instrumentation . . . . 43 3.1 General .......... ................... .. 43 3.2 Engine Description ....... ............. .. 43 3.3 Laser Induced ...Duty Diesels h" Non-dimensionalized Ah. k Proportionality constant for surface tension 11 (NI [mK]). Kpa kilo-Pascal LIF Laser Induced Fluorescence

  9. Investigation on the interactions of clenbuterol to bovine serum albumin and lysozyme by molecular fluorescence technique.

    PubMed

    Bi, Shuyun; Pang, Bo; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhao, Tingting; Yu, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Clenbuterol interacting with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LYS) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The results indicated that clenbuterol quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA and LYS via a static quenching procedure. The binding constants of clenbuterol with BSA and LYS were 1.16×10(3) and 1.49×10(3) L mol(-1) at 291 K. The values of ΔH and ΔS implied that hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction played a major role in stabilizing the complex (clenbuterol-BSA or clenbuterol-LYS). In the presence of Fe2+, Fe3+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, or Zn2+, the binding constants of clenbuterol to BSA or LYS had no significant differences. The distances between the donor (BSA or LYS) and acceptor (clenbuterol) were 2.61 and 2.19 nm for clenbuterol-BSA and clenbuterol-LYS respectively. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectrometry was used to analyze the conformational changes of BSA and LYS.

  10. The modified fluorescence based vesicle fluctuation spectroscopy technique for determination of lipid bilayer bending properties.

    PubMed

    Drabik, Dominik; Przybyło, Magda; Chodaczek, Grzegorz; Iglič, Aleš; Langner, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Lipid bilayer is the main constitutive element of biological membrane, which confines intracellular space. The mechanical properties of biological membranes may be characterized by various parameters including membrane stiffness or membrane bending rigidity, which can be measured using flicker noise spectroscopy. The flicker noise spectroscopy exploits the spontaneous thermal undulations of the membrane. The method is based on the quantitative analysis of a series of microscopic images captured during thermal membrane fluctuations. Thus, measured bending rigidity coefficient depends on the image quality as well as the selection of computational tools for image processing and mathematical model used. In this work scanning and spinning disc confocal microscopies were used to visualize fluctuating membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bending rigidity coefficient was calculated for different acquisition modes, using different fluorescent probes and different image processing methods. It was shown that both imaging approaches gave similar bending coefficient values regardless of acquisition time. Using the developed methodology the effect of fluorescent probe type and aqueous phase composition on the value of the membrane bending rigidity coefficient was measured. Specifically it was found that the bending rigidity coefficient of DOPC bilayer in water is smaller than that determined for POPC membrane. It has been found that the POPC and DOPC bending rigidities coefficient in sucrose solution was lower than that in water. Fluorescence imaging makes possible the quantitative analysis of membrane mechanical properties of inhomogeneous membrane.

  11. A Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) Technique for the Measurement of Solute Transport Across Surfactant-Laden Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, Edward P.; Hatton, T. Alan

    1996-01-01

    The technique of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) has been applied to the measurement of interfacial transport in two-phase systems. FRAP exploits the loss of fluorescence exhibited by certain fluorophores when over-stimulated (photobleached), so that a two-phase system, originally at equilibrium, can be perturbed without disturbing the interface by strong light from an argon-ion laser and its recovery monitored by a microscope-mounted CCD camera as it relaxes to a new equilibrium. During this relaxation, the concentration profiles of the probe solute are measured on both sides of the interface as a function of time, yielding information about the transport characteristics of the system. To minimize the size of the meniscus between the two phases, a photolithography technique is used to selectively treat the glass walls of the cell in which the phases are contained. This allows concentration measurements to be made very close to the interface and increases the sensitivity of the FRAP technique.

  12. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  13. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Mira Stone; Tillman, Fred D.; Choi, Jee-Won; Smith, James A.

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10 -14 to 10 -9 m 2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3×10 -13 m 2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8×10 -10 m 2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2×10 -9 to 1.5×10 -9 m 2, and ranged from 3.6×10 -9 to 6.8×10 -9 m 2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0×10 -14 m 2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3×10 -14 m 2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit was achieved

  14. Application of image restoration and three-dimensional visualization techniques to frog microvessels in-situ loaded with fluorescent indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagakis, Stamatis N.; Curry, Fitz-Roy E.; Lenz, Joyce F.

    1993-07-01

    In situ experiments on microvessels require image sensors of wide dynamic range due to large variations of the intensity in the scene, and 3D visualization due to the thickness of the preparation. The images require restoration because of the inherent tissue movement, out-of- focus-light contamination, and blur. To resolve the above problems, we developed an imaging system for quantitative imaging based on a 12 bits/pixel cooled CCD camera and a PC based digital imaging system. We applied the optical sectioning technique with image restoration using a modified nearest neighbor algorithm and iterative constrained deconvolution on each of the 2D optical sections. For the 3D visualization of the data, a volume rendering software was used. The data provided 3D images of the distribution of fluorescent indicators in intact microvessels. Optical cross sections were also compared with cross sections of the same microvessels examined in the electron microscope after their luminal surfaces were labeled with a tracer which was both electron dense and fluorescent. This procedure enabled precise identification of the endothelial cells in the microvessel wall as the principal site of accumulation of the fluorescent calcium indicator, fura-2, during microperfusion experiments.

  15. Demonstration of lipofuscin and Nissl bodies in crystal violet stained sections using a fluorescence technique or pyronin Y stain.

    PubMed

    Terr, L I

    1986-09-01

    This paper presents two simple, reliable methods for identification of lipofuscin and Nissl bodies in the same section. One method shows that lipofuscin stained with crystal violet retains its ability to fluoresce and can be observed under the fluorescence microscope after the stain has faded. Fading is accompanied by a gradual increase in the intensity of the fluorescence and is complete in about 5 min. Exciting illumination from this part of the spectrum also substantially fades staining of other autofluorescing tissue elements, such as lipids. Nonfluorescing structures, such as Nissl bodies, remain stained. By changing from transillumination with tungsten light to epifluorescent illumination and vice versa, both types of structures--Nissl bodies and lipofuscin--can be identified in the same section. The second technique uses pyronin Y for staining Nissl bodies in preparations previously stained with crystal violet. Nissl bodies are stained pink but lipofuscin remains violet. Lipofuscin in these sections also remains autofluorescent after the crystal violet stain has faded under violet or near-UV light.

  16. Multimodal in vivo imaging of oral cancer using fluorescence lifetime, photoacoustic and ultrasound techniques

    PubMed Central

    Fatakdawala, Hussain; Poti, Shannon; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Bec, Julien; Liu, Jing; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Tinling, Steven P.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Marcu, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This work reports a multimodal system for label-free tissue diagnosis combining fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm), ultrasound backscatter microscopy (UBM), and photoacoustic imaging (PAI). This system provides complementary biochemical, structural and functional features allowing for enhanced in vivo detection of oral carcinoma. Results from a hamster oral carcinoma model (normal, precancer and carcinoma) are presented demonstrating the ability of FLIm to delineate biochemical composition at the tissue surface, UBM and related radiofrequency parameters to identify disruptions in the tissue microarchitecture and PAI to map optical absorption associated with specific tissue morphology and physiology. PMID:24049693

  17. Simple and direct method for detecting phosphorus in air at normal pressure and temperature using a combination of LIBS and LIFS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jeffery, Mohammad O.; Kondou, H.; Belenkevitch, Alexander; Azzeer, Abdallah M.

    2002-05-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EAP) designated phosphorus as hazardous material; it is flammable and poisonous. Phosphorus attacks the respiratory system, liver, kidneys, jaw, teeth, blood, eyes, and skin. Phosphorus is an element that has a high detection limit when using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) techniques. In order to improve on detection limits, laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) has been proposed, as an extension to LIBS. The ultimate goal of this work is to use the combined LIBS & LIFS techniques to detect the presence of phosphorus in air and to measure its level. In order to provide 'proof-of-concept' results, the sample used for our experiment was prepared using the 'igniting' strip of a safety match box. The spectrally and temporally resolved detection of the specific atomic emission revealed analytical information about the elemental composition of the sample. A tunable Ti: sapphire laser, at the resonance wavelength of 253.4 nm, was then used to probe the plume by exciting the phosphorus element and we measured the fluorescence from the atoms at 213.62 nm and 214.91 nm. The whole experiment was carried out in a few minutes. We have thus demonstrated for the first time, to our knowledge, the use of LIBS and LIFS in air quality monitoring and in particular for phosphorus detection.

  18. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  19. Laser Induced Dual Fluorescence Ratiometric Technique for Mixing Characterization in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedding, David; Hidrovo, Carlso

    2016-11-01

    Increasing the rate of mixing within microfluidic systems is vitally important in understanding biological and chemical reaction kinetics and mechanisms. The small length scales characteristic of these systems which translate into highly viscous, Stokes flows result in mixing that is primarily dominated by diffusion. In order to counteract this, an approach that utilizes inertial droplet collisions to promote chaotic advection between two mixing species has been developed. A Laser-Induced Dual Fluorescence (LIDF) system in conjunction with a high-speed camera and appropriate optics are used to capture two intensity fields providing information about the mixing process as well as the excitation intensity field over the volume of interest. The rate of mixing for the coalescing droplets was quantified by taking the standard deviation of the first intensity field over time, while the second intensity field provides information about the intensity field. A ratiometric imaging approach allows removal of mixing fluorescence signal noise in the form of variation in excitation intensity, primarily from the lasing patterns and lensing effects within the interrogation volume. NSF CAREER Award Grant CBET - 1151091.

  20. Non-destructive analysis of didymium and praseodymium molybdate crystals using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, C. K.; Joseph, Daisy; Pandita, Sanjay; Kotru, P. N.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of didymium (Di) and praseodymium molybdate crystals were carried out using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). The assigned empirical chemical formulae of the composites were tested and verified by the EDXRF technique by estimating experimental major elemental concentration ratios. On the Basis of these ratios, the established formulae for some of the composite materials have been verified and suggestions made for their refinement. Non-destructive technique used in this analysis enables to retain the original crystal samples and makes rapid simultaneous scan of major elements such as La, Pr, Ned and Mo as well as impurities such as Ce. Absence of samarium(Sm) in the spectrum during analysis of didymium molybdate crystals indicated an incomplete growth of mixed rare earth single crystal. These crystals (e.g.,Di) are shown to be of modified stoichiometry with Ce as trace impurity.

  1. Use of Modern Chemical Protein Synthesis and Advanced Fluorescent Assay Techniques to Experimentally Validate the Functional Annotation of Microbial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Stephen

    2012-07-20

    The objective of this research program was to prototype methods for the chemical synthesis of predicted protein molecules in annotated microbial genomes. High throughput chemical methods were to be used to make large numbers of predicted proteins and protein domains, based on microbial genome sequences. Microscale chemical synthesis methods for the parallel preparation of peptide-thioester building blocks were developed; these peptide segments are used for the parallel chemical synthesis of proteins and protein domains. Ultimately, it is envisaged that these synthetic molecules would be ‘printed’ in spatially addressable arrays. The unique ability of total synthesis to precision label protein molecules with dyes and with chemical or biochemical ‘tags’ can be used to facilitate novel assay technologies adapted from state-of-the art single molecule fluorescence detection techniques. In the future, in conjunction with modern laboratory automation this integrated set of techniques will enable high throughput experimental validation of the functional annotation of microbial genomes.

  2. Elemental analysis of tree leaves by total reflection X-ray fluorescence: New approaches for air quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bilo, Fabjola; Borgese, Laura; Dalipi, Rogerta; Zacco, Annalisa; Federici, Stefania; Masperi, Matteo; Leonesio, Paolo; Bontempi, Elza; Depero, Laura E

    2017-03-22

    This work shows that total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) is a fast, easy and successful tool to determine the presence of potentially toxic elements in atmospheric aerosols precipitations on tree leaves. Leaves are collected in eleven parks of different geographical areas of the Brescia city, Northern Italy, for environmental monitoring purposes. Two sample preparation procedures are considered: microwave acid digestion and the novel SMART STORE method for direct analysis. The latter consists in sandwiching a portion of the leaf between two organic foils, metals free, to save it from contamination and material loss. Mass composition of macro, micro and trace elements is calculated for digested samples, while relative elemental amount are obtained from direct analysis. Washed and unwashed leaves have a different composition in terms of trace elements. Differentiation occurs according to Fe, Pb and Cu contributions, considered as most representative of air depositions, and probably related to anthropogenic sources. Direct analysis is more representative of the composition of air precipitations. Advantages and drawbacks of the presented methods of sample preparation and TXRF analysis are discussed. Results demonstrate that TXRF allows to perform accurate and precise quantitative analysis of digested samples. In addition, direct analysis of leaves may be used as a fast and simple method for screening in the nanograms range.

  3. X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy: the Potential of Astrophysics-developed Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvis, M.; Allen, B.; Hong, J.; Grindlay, J.; Kraft, R.; Binzel, R. P.; Masterton, R.

    2012-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence from the surface of airless bodies has been studied since the Apollo X-ray fluorescence experiment mapped parts of the lunar surface in 1971-1972. That experiment used a collimated proportional counter with a resolving power of ~1 and a beam size of ~1degree. Filters separated only Mg, Al and SI lines. We review progress in X-ray detectors and imaging for astrophysics and show how these advances enable much more powerful use of X-ray fluorescence for the study of airless bodies. Astrophysics X-ray instrumentation has developed enormously since 1972. Low noise, high quantum efficiency, X-ray CCDs have flown on ASCA, XMM-Newton, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, Swift and Suzaku, and are the workhorses of X-ray astronomy. They normally span 0.5 to ~8 keV with an energy resolution of ~100 eV. New developments in silicon based detectors, especially individual pixel addressable devices, such as CMOS detectors, can withstand many orders of magnitude more radiation than conventional CCDs before degradation. The capability of high read rates provides dynamic range and temporal resolution. Additionally, the rapid read rates minimize shot noise from thermal dark current and optical light. CMOS detectors can therefore run at warmer temperatures and with ultra-thin optical blocking filters. Thin OBFs mean near unity quantum efficiency below 1 keV, thus maximizing response at the C and O lines.such as CMOS detectors, promise advances. X-ray imaging has advanced similarly far. Two types of imager are now available: specular reflection and coded apertures. X-ray mirrors have been flown on the Einstein Observatory, XMM-Newton, Chandra and others. However, as X-ray reflection only occurs at small (~1degree) incidence angles, which then requires long focal lengths (meters), mirrors are not usually practical for planetary missions. Moreover the field of view of X-ray mirrors is comparable to the incident angle, so can only image relatively small regions. More useful

  4. Modelling and analysis of ozone concentration by artificial intelligent techniques for estimating air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylan, Osman

    2017-02-01

    High ozone concentration is an important cause of air pollution mainly due to its role in the greenhouse gas emission. Ozone is produced by photochemical processes which contain nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds in the lower atmospheric level. Therefore, monitoring and controlling the quality of air in the urban environment is very important due to the public health care. However, air quality prediction is a highly complex and non-linear process; usually several attributes have to be considered. Artificial intelligent (AI) techniques can be employed to monitor and evaluate the ozone concentration level. The aim of this study is to develop an Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy inference approach (ANFIS) to determine the influence of peripheral factors on air quality and pollution which is an arising problem due to ozone level in Jeddah city. The concentration of ozone level was considered as a factor to predict the Air Quality (AQ) under the atmospheric conditions. Using Air Quality Standards of Saudi Arabia, ozone concentration level was modelled by employing certain factors such as; nitrogen oxide (NOx), atmospheric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity. Hence, an ANFIS model was developed to observe the ozone concentration level and the model performance was assessed by testing data obtained from the monitoring stations established by the General Authority of Meteorology and Environment Protection of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The outcomes of ANFIS model were re-assessed by fuzzy quality charts using quality specification and control limits based on US-EPA air quality standards. The results of present study show that the ANFIS model is a comprehensive approach for the estimation and assessment of ozone level and is a reliable approach to produce more genuine outcomes.

  5. A study of density measurements in hypersonic helium tunnels using an electron beam fluorescence technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honaker, W. C.; Hunter, W. W., Jr.; Woods, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted at Langley Research Center to determine the feasibility of using electron-beam fluorescence to measure the free-stream static density of gaseous helium flow over a wide range of conditions. These experiments were conducted in the Langley hypersonic helium tunnel facility and its 3-inch prototype. Measurements were made for a range of stagnation pressures and temperatures and produced free-stream number densities of 1.53 x 10 to the 23rd to 1.25 x 10 to the 24th molecules/cu m and static temperatures from 2 K to 80 K. The results showed the collision quenching cross section to be 4.4 x 10 to the -15th sq cm at 1 K and to have a weak temperature dependence of T to the 1/6. With knowledge of these two values, the free-stream number density can be measured quite accurately.

  6. Use of x-ray fluorescence and diffraction techniques in studying ancient ceramics of Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunaratne, B. S. B.

    2012-07-01

    Ceramics were produced for centuries in Sri Lanka for various purposes. Ancient ceramic articles such as pottery, bricks, tiles, sewer pipes, etc, were made from naturally occurring raw materials. Use of X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) in characterizing of two ancient ceramic samples from two different archaeological sites in Sri Lanka is presented. The information obtained in this manner is used to figure out the ancient ceramic technology, particularly to learn about the raw materials used, the source of raw materials, processing parameters such as firing temperature or binders used in ceramic production. This information then can be used to explore the archaeometric background such as the nature and extent of cultural and technological interaction between different periods of history in Sri Lanka.

  7. Studies of cytochrome c-551 unfolding using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques.

    PubMed

    Sil, Pallabi; Paul, Simanta Sarani; Silvio, Eva Di; Travaglini-Allocatelli, Carlo; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, we have studied the equilibrium unfolding transitions of cytochrome c from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (cytc551), a small bacterial protein. Similar to eukaryotic cytochrome c, cytc551 folds sequentially, although significant differences exist in the order of folding units (foldons). There are two regions of cytc551 (N-terminal helix with residue number 3 to 10 and the loop 2 region containing residues 34 to 45), in which no foldon unit could be assigned. In addition, the helix containing the Cys-X-X-Cys-His motif, adjacent to the N-terminal helix (residue number 3 to 10), shows unexplained ultra-fast collapse. To obtain further insights, we have studied cytc551 site-directed mutants using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and molecular dynamics simulation. We have found out that cytc551 unfolds through the formation of a fluorescently dark intermediate state and the amplitude of the dark component depends on the position of labeling. We have utilized this position dependence to propose a shape change model during the unfolding of cytc551. The present results show that the N-terminal helix remains in a collapsed position even in the completely unfolded state and this helix may act as a rigid support to guide the folding of its adjacent helix. This rigid support may be responsible for the ultra-fast collapse of the adjacent helix region, which occurs during the initial events of folding. The present results also show that the C-terminal end of loop 2 traverses a large distance during unfolding compared to the N-terminal end, which justifies the observed flexibility of the loop 2 region.

  8. Using soft computing techniques to predict corrected air permeability using Thomeer parameters, air porosity and grain density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nooruddin, Hasan A.; Anifowose, Fatai; Abdulraheem, Abdulazeez

    2014-03-01

    Soft computing techniques are recently becoming very popular in the oil industry. A number of computational intelligence-based predictive methods have been widely applied in the industry with high prediction capabilities. Some of the popular methods include feed-forward neural networks, radial basis function network, generalized regression neural network, functional networks, support vector regression and adaptive network fuzzy inference system. A comparative study among most popular soft computing techniques is presented using a large dataset published in literature describing multimodal pore systems in the Arab D formation. The inputs to the models are air porosity, grain density, and Thomeer parameters obtained using mercury injection capillary pressure profiles. Corrected air permeability is the target variable. Applying developed permeability models in recent reservoir characterization workflow ensures consistency between micro and macro scale information represented mainly by Thomeer parameters and absolute permeability. The dataset was divided into two parts with 80% of data used for training and 20% for testing. The target permeability variable was transformed to the logarithmic scale as a pre-processing step and to show better correlations with the input variables. Statistical and graphical analysis of the results including permeability cross-plots and detailed error measures were created. In general, the comparative study showed very close results among the developed models. The feed-forward neural network permeability model showed the lowest average relative error, average absolute relative error, standard deviations of error and root means squares making it the best model for such problems. Adaptive network fuzzy inference system also showed very good results.

  9. Fluorescence background subtraction technique for hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography/x-ray computed tomography imaging of a mouse model of early stage lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ale, Angelique; Ermolayev, Vladimir; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2013-05-01

    The ability to visualize early stage lung cancer is important in the study of biomarkers and targeting agents that could lead to earlier diagnosis. The recent development of hybrid free-space 360-deg fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and x-ray computed tomography (XCT) imaging yields a superior optical imaging modality for three-dimensional small animal fluorescence imaging over stand-alone optical systems. Imaging accuracy was improved by using XCT information in the fluorescence reconstruction method. Despite this progress, the detection sensitivity of targeted fluorescence agents remains limited by nonspecific background accumulation of the fluorochrome employed, which complicates early detection of murine cancers. Therefore we examine whether x-ray CT information and bulk fluorescence detection can be combined to increase detection sensitivity. Correspondingly, we research the performance of a data-driven fluorescence background estimator employed for subtraction of background fluorescence from acquisition data. Using mice containing known fluorochromes ex vivo, we demonstrate the reduction of background signals from reconstructed images and sensitivity improvements. Finally, by applying the method to in vivo data from K-ras transgenic mice developing lung cancer, we find small tumors at an early stage compared with reconstructions performed using raw data. We conclude with the benefits of employing fluorescence subtraction in hybrid FMT-XCT for early detection studies.

  10. Measurement of the internal pH of mast cell granules using microvolumetric fluorescence and isotopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    De Young, M.B.; Nemeth, E.F.; Scarpa, A.

    1987-04-01

    The intragranular pH of isolated mast cell granules was measured. Because of the minute amounts of isolated granules available, two techniques were developed by modifying aminoacridine fluorescence and (/sup 14/C)methylamine accumulation techniques to permit measurements with microliter sample volumes. Granule purity was demonstrated by electron microscopy, ruthenium red exclusion, and biochemical (histamine, mast cell granule protease) analysis. The internal pH was determined to be 5.55 +/- 0.06, indicating that the pH environment within mast cell granules is not significantly different from that of previously studied granule types (i.e., chromaffin, platelet, pancreatic islet, and pituitary granules). Collapse of the pH gradient by NH+4 was demonstrated with both techniques. No evidence of Cl-/OH- or specific cation/H+ transport was found, and major chloride permeability could not be unequivocably demonstrated. Ca/sup 2 +/ and Cl- at concentrations normally present extracellularly destabilized granules in the presence of NH+4, but this phenomenon does not necessarily indicate a role for these ions in the exocytotic release of granule contents from intact cells. The pH measurement techniques developed for investigating the properties of granules in mast cells may be useful for studying other granules that can be obtained only in limited quantities.

  11. [Parallel factor analysis as an analysis technique for the ratio of three-dimensional fluorescence peak in Taihu Lake].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Liao, Hai-qing; Hua, Zu-lin; Xie, Fa-zhi; Tang, Zhi; Zhang, Liang

    2012-01-01

    The present paper proposes a new method to find the ratio of three-dimensional fluorescence peak. At first, the excitation-emission fluorescence matrix of water samples was treated with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and then fluorescence peaks intensity and ratio of fluorescence peak were obtained from the parallel factor analysis model. From the parallel factor analysis model, the same fluorescence peaks of different water samples lie at the same excitation-emission wavelength and the overlap of different fluorescence peaks of the same water sample is reduced. Analysing regional characteristic in Taihu Lake, the ratio of factor score and the ratio of fluorescence peak showed strong correlation.

  12. Classification techniques for fault detection and diagnosis of an air-handling unit

    SciTech Connect

    House, J.M.; Lee, W.Y.; Shin, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    The objective of this study is to demonstrate the application of several classification techniques to the problem of detecting and diagnosing faults in data generated by a variable-air-volume air-handling unit simulation model and to describe the strengths and weaknesses of the techniques considered. Artificial neural network classifiers, nearest neighbor classifiers, nearest prototype classifiers, a rule-based classifier, and a Bayes classifier are considered for both fault detection and diagnostics. Based on the performance of the classification techniques, the Bayes classifier appears to be a good choice for fault detection. It is a straightforward method that requires limited memory and computational effort, and it consistently yielded the lowest percentage of incorrect diagnosis. For fault diagnosis, the rule-based method is favored for classification problems such as the one considered here, where the various classes of faulty operation are well separated and can be distinguished by a single dominant symptom or feature. Results also indicate that the success or failure of classification techniques hinges to a large degree on an ability to separate different classes of operation in some feature (temperature, pressure, etc.) space. Hence, preprocessing of data to extract dominant features is as important as the selection of the classifier.

  13. Structuration in the Interface of Direct and Reversed Micelles of Sucrose Esters, Studied by Fluorescent Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Catalina; Ortega, Anakenna; Sanchez, Susana A.; Morales, Javier; Gunther, German

    2015-01-01

    Background Reactors found in nature can be described as micro-heterogeneous systems, where media involved in each micro-environment can behave in a markedly different way compared with the properties of the bulk solution. The presence of water molecules in micro-organized assemblies is of paramount importance for many chemical processes, ranging from biology to environmental science. Self-organized molecular assembled systems are frequently used to study dynamics of water molecules because are the simplest models mimicking biological membranes. The hydrogen bonds between sucrose and water molecules are described to be stronger (or more extensive) than the ones between water molecules themselves. In this work, we studied the capability of sucrose moiety, attached to alkyl chains of different length, as a surface blocking agent at the water-interface and we compared its properties with those of polyethylenglycol, a well-known agent used for this purposes. Published studies in this topic mainly refer to the micellization process and the stability of mixed surfactant systems using glycosides. We are interested in the effect induced by the presence of sucrose monoesters at the interface (direct and reverse micelles) and at the palisade (mixtures with Triton X-100). We believe that the different functional group (ester), the position of alkyl chain (6-O) and the huge capability of sucrose to interact with water will dramatically change the water structuration at the interface and at the palisade, generating new possibilities for technological applications of these systems. Results Our time resolved and steady state fluorescence experiments in pure SEs micelles show that sucrose moieties are able to interact with a high number of water molecules promoting water structuration and increased viscosity. These results also indicate that the barrier formed by sucrose moieties on the surface of pure micelles is more effective than the polyoxyethylene palisade of Triton X-100

  14. A borax fusion technique for quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Van Willigen, J H; Kruidhof, H; Dahmen, E A

    1971-04-01

    A borax fusion technique to cast glass discs for quantitative X-ray analysis is described in detail. The method is based on the "nonwetting" properties of a Pt/Au alloy towards molten borax, on the favourable composition of the flux and finally on the favourable form of the casting mould. The critical points of the technique are stressed, resulting in a method which could be carried out successfully by inexperienced workers. In general the method compares favourably in speed and accuracy with wet-chemical methods.

  15. In vivo monitoring of toxic metals: assessment of neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    To date, cadmium, lead, aluminum, and mercury have been measured in vivo in humans. The possibilities of monitoring other toxic metals have also been demonstrated, but no human studies have been performed. Neutron activation analysis appears to be most suitable for Cd and Al measurements, while x-ray fluorescence is ideally suited for measurement of lead in superficial bone. Filtered neutron beams and polarized x-ray sources are being developed which will improve in vivo detection limits. Even so, several of the current facilities are already suitable for use in epidemiological studies of selected populations with suspected long-term low-level ''environmental'' exposures. Evaluation and diagnosis of patients presenting with general clinical symptoms attributable to possible toxic metal exposure may be assisted by in vivo examination. Continued in vivo monitoring of industrial workers, especially follow-up measurements, will provide the first direct assessment of changes in body burden and a direct measure of the biological life-times of these metals in humans. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. A comparison of air leakage prediction techniques for auxiliary ventilation ducting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gillies, A.D.S.; Wu, H.W.

    1999-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews prediction techniques for determination of leakage and friction along auxiliary ventilation ducting systems. In order to compare various prediction techniques that have been developed over the past, a macroscopic investigation of air leakage and friction resistance of auxiliary ventilation ducting systems has been undertaken. Measurements were conducted on 450 and 915 mm diameter fabric ducting over 100 m duct length to determine frictional resistances and the extent of leakage. Due to the high degree of accuracy required and the large volume of data that needed to be collected, electronic auxiliary ventilation ducting systems were developed based on this information. It was found that these models provided good correlation with most the existing prediction techniques. The experimental methodology relying on computer data acquisition has allowed the accuracy of measured values to be treated with a high degree of confidence. The reliability of the developed models allows prediction of leakage, frictional impedance and airflow with enhanced confidence.

  17. A comparison of hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence imaging techniques for detection of contaminants on leafy greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensuring the supply of safe, contaminant free fresh fruit and vegetables is of importance to consumers, suppliers and governments worldwide. In this study, three hyperspectral imaging (HSI) configurations coupled with two multivariate image analysis techniques are compared for detection of fecal con...

  18. Estimation of Soil Moisture Content Using Air-Launched GPR Techniques in Variable Soil Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardel, B.; Kelly, B.

    2008-12-01

    Air-launched Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques have most frequently been used for infrastructure characterization, but these techniques show promise for soil moisture estimation in the near subsurface. Air- launched GPR data can be acquired very quickly, and data processing can be easily automated, so these techniques have potential for efficient estimation of water content in the shallow subsurface over large areas. In this experiment, we investigate the efficacy of air-launched GPR techniques for estimating soil water content under saturated and dry conditions in both sandy and organic-rich soils. Data were also acquired to investigate the depth of penetration of air-launched data in these soils using multiple GPR frequencies. The experiment was performed in a large tank under controlled climatic conditions. Initially, the tank was filled with wet sand to a depth of 24-cm, and GPR data were acquired over the sand using 250-, 500-, and 1000-MHz antennas. Then, a thin plastic tarp was placed on the wet sand, a 3-cm layer of dry sand was placed on the tarp, and data collection was repeated. Additional 3-cm layers of dry sand were placed in the tank, with data acquisition after each layer, until the dry sand layer was 15-cm thick. The tank was then excavated, and a basal layer of dry sand was added. Data were again acquired over the dry sand, and the incremental filling of the tank and data acquisition were repeated using 3-cm layers of wet sand. Finally, the entire process was repeated using a basal layer of wet organic soil overlain by dry organic soil and using a basal layer of dry organic soil overlain by wet organic soil. For all air-launch data, the dielectric constant was determined using the amplitudes of the reflection from the soil surface, and Topp's equation was used to convert the dielectric constant to water content. Data analysis is ongoing, but preliminary results indicate that water content can be estimated with reasonable accuracy in both

  19. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P.; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG. PMID:23935422

  20. High-speed sterilization technique using dielectric barrier discharge plasmas in atmospheric humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamae, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma produced by an ac voltage application of 1 kHz in atmospheric humid air was investigated in order to develop low-temperature, low-cost and high-speed plasma sterilization technique. The biological indicators covered with a Tyvek sheet were set just outside the DBD plasma region, where the air temperature and humidity as a discharge gas were precisely controlled by an environmental test chamber. The results show that the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores was found to be dependent strongly on the humidity, and was completed within 15 min at a relative humidity of 90 % and a temperature of 30 C. The treatment time for sterilization is shorter than those of conventional sterilization methods using ethylene oxide gas and dry heat treatment. It is considered that reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals that are effective for the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores could be produced by the DBD plasma in the humid air. Repetitive micro-pulsed discharge plasmas in the humid air will be applied for the sterilization experiment to enhance the sterilization efficiency.

  1. Analysis of caspase3 activation in ChanSu-induced apoptosis of ASTC-a-1 cells by fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Chen, Tongsheng; Wang, Longxiang; Wang, Huiying

    2008-02-01

    ChanSu(CS), a traditional Chinese medicine, is composed of many chemical compoments. It is isolated from the dried white secretion of the auricular and skin glands of toads, and it has been widely used for treating the heart diseases and other systemic illnesses. However, it is difficult to judge antitumor effect of agents derived from ChanSu and the underlying mechanism of ChanSu inducing cell apoptosis is still unclear. This report was performed to explore the inhibitory effect and mechanism of ChanSu on human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1). Fluorescence emission spectra and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) were used to study the caspase-3 activation during the ChanSu-induced human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cell apoptosis. CCK-8 was used to assay the inhibition of ChanSu on the cell viability. The cells expressing stably with SCAT3 was used to examine if caspase-3 was activated by ChanSu using acceptor photobleaching technique. Our data showed that treatment of ASTC-a-1 cell with ChanSu resulted in the inhibition of viability and induction of apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner and the SCAT3 was almost cleaved 24 h after ChanSu treatment, implying that ChanSu induced cell apoptosis via a caspase-3-dependent death pathway. Our findings extend the knowledge about the cellular signaling mechanisms mediating ChanSu-induced apoptosis.

  2. Cutaneous tumors in vivo investigations using fluorescence and diffuse reflectance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Troyanova, P.; Nikolova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    In the recent years, there has been growing interest in the common use of laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) and reflectance spectroscopy (RS) to differentiate disease from normal surrounding tissue - so called optical biopsy method. Painless, instant diagnoses from optical biopsies will soon be a reality. These forms of optical diagnoses are preferable to the removal of several square millimeters of tissue surface - common in traditional biopsies - followed by delays while samples are sent for clinical analysis. The goal of this work was investigation of cutaneous benign and malignant lesions by the methods of LIAFS and RS. A nitrogen laser at 337 nm was applied for the needs of autofluorescence excitation. Broad-spectrum halogen lamp (from 400 to 900 nm) was applied for diffuse reflectance measurements. An associated microspectrometer detected in vivo the fluorescence and reflectance signals from human skin. The main spectral features of benign lesions - compound nevus, dysplastic nevi, heamangioma and basal cell papilloma and malignant lesions - pigmented, amelanotic and secondary malignant melanoma, as well as basal cell carcinoma are discussed and their possible origins are indicated. Spectra from healthy skin areas near to the lesion were detected to be used posteriori to reveal changes between healthy and lesion skin spectra. Influence of the main skin pigments on the spectra detected is discussed and evaluation of possibilities for differentiation between malignant and benign lesions is made based on their spectral properties. This research shows that non-invasive and high-sensitive in vivo detection by means of appropriate light sources and detectors should be possible, related to real-time determination of existing pathological conditions.

  3. Early diagnosis of tongue malignancy using laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Unnikrishnan V., K.; Ongole, Ravikiran; Pai, Keerthilatha M.; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2015-07-01

    Oral cancer together with pharyngeal cancer is the sixth most common malignancy reported worldwide and one with high mortality ratio among all malignancies [1]. Worldwide 450,000 new cases are estimated in 2014[2]. About 90% are a type of cancer called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC of the tongue is the most common oral malignancy accounting for approximately 40% of all oral carcinomas. One of the important factors for successful therapy of any malignancy is early diagnosis. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis, lack of reliable diagnostic methods for early detection leading to delay in therapy is an important factor responsible for the increase in the mortality rate in various types of cancers. Spectroscopy techniques are extremely sensitive for the analysis of biochemical changes in cellular systems. These techniques can provide a valuable information on alterations that occur during the development of cancer. This is especially important in oral cancer, where "tumor detection is complicated by a tendency towards field cancerization, leading to multi-centric lesions" and "current techniques detect malignant change too late" [3], and "biopsies are not representative of the whole premalignant lesion". [4

  4. Relationship between stallion sperm motility and viability as detected by two fluorescence staining techniques using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Love, C C; Thompson, J A; Brinsko, S P; Rigby, S L; Blanchard, T L; Lowry, V K; Varner, D D

    2003-10-01

    Relationships between sperm motility parameters and viability were evaluated using two fluorescent staining techniques in fresh extended semen (fresh and after 24 h storage at 5 degrees C) that had various concentrations of dead sperm added to simulate different levels of viable and nonviable sperm. Both protocols incorporated SYBR-14 and propidium iodide (PI) while the second protocol added the mitochondrial probe JC-1. The relationship between total sperm motility and percent viable sperm was high between staining protocols (r = 0.98). Time (0 h versus 24 h, P<0.0001) and treatment (0, 10, 25, 50, and 75% nonviable sperm, P<0.0001) affected percent total sperm motility and percent viable sperm for both staining protocols. Actual percent viable sperm for each time and treatment did not differ from expected values.

  5. Resonance fluorescence of a site-controlled quantum dot realized by the buried-stressor growth technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauß, Max; Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Voigt, Robert; Schnauber, Peter; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Rodt, Sven; Strittmatter, André; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2017-03-01

    Site-controlled growth of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) represents a major advancement to achieve scalable quantum technology platforms. One immediate benefit is the deterministic integration of quantum emitters into optical microcavities. However, site-controlled growth of QDs is usually achieved at the cost of reduced optical quality. Here, we show that the buried-stressor growth technique enables the realization of high-quality site-controlled QDs with attractive optical and quantum optical properties. This is evidenced by performing excitation power dependent resonance fluorescence experiments at cryogenic temperatures showing QD emission linewidths down to 10 μeV. Resonant excitation leads to the observation of the Mollow triplet under CW excitation and enables coherent state preparation under pulsed excitation. Under resonant π-pulse excitation we observe clean single-photon emission associated with g(2)(0) = 0.12 limited by non-ideal laser suppression.

  6. Characterization of Air Plane Soot Surrogates using Raman spectroscopy and laser ablation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazallon, Bertrand; Ortega, Ismael Kenneth; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Pirim, Claire; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. Aircraft exhaust plumes contain species (gases and soot particles) produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Soot particles emitted by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied for many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. The reasons behind these discrepancies reside in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g., with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (514 and 785 nm excitation wavelengths) and ablation techniques (Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particle surrogates produced from a CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios). They are produced as analogues of air-plane soot collected at different engine regimes (PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan) simulating a landing and take-off (LTO) cycle (MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/)) [6]. The spectral parameters of the first-order Raman bands of these soot samples are analyzed using a de-convolution approach described by Sadezky et al. (2005) [5]. A systematic Raman analysis is carried out to select a number of parameters (laser wavelength, irradiance at sample, exposure time) that will alter the sample and the

  7. Comparison of three techniques to measure unsaturated-zone air permeability at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ.

    PubMed

    Olson, M S; Tillman, F D; Choi, J W; Smith, J A

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare three techniques to measure the air permeability of the unsaturated zone at Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and to examine the effects of moisture content and soil heterogeneity on air permeability. Air permeability was measured in three ways: laboratory experiments on intact soil cores, field-scale air pump tests and calibration of air permeability to air pressures measured in the field under natural air pressure conditions using a numerical airflow model. The results obtained from these three methods were compared and found to be similar. Laboratory experiments performed on intact cores measured air permeability values on the order of 10(-14) to 10(-9) m2. Low-permeability cores were found between land surface and a depth of 0.6 m. The soil core data were divided into two layers with composite vertical permeability values of 1.3 x 10(-13) m2 from land surface to a 0.6-m depth and 3.8 x 10(-10) m2 for the lower layer. Analyses of the field-scale pump tests were performed for two scenarios: one in which the entire unsaturated zone was open to the atmosphere and one assuming a cap of low permeability extending 0.6 m below land surface. The vertical air permeability values obtained for the open scenario ranged from 1.2 x 10(-9) to 1.5 x 10(-9) m2, and ranged from 3.6 x 10(-9) to 6.8 x 10(-9) m2 in the lower layer, assuming an upper cap permeability of 6.0 x 10(-14) m2. The results from the open scenario are much higher than expected and the possible reasons for this ambiguity are discussed. The results from the capped scenario matched closely with those from the other methods and indicated that it is important to have background information on the study site to correctly analyze the pump test data. The optimized fit of the natural subsurface air pressure was achieved with an intrinsic permeability value of 3.3 x 10(-14) m2. When the data were refitted to the model assuming two distinct layers of the unsaturated zone, the optimized fit

  8. Monitoring of bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/acyclovir system using fluorescence resonance energy transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Tao; Li, Yongjun; Ni, Fenge; Zhang, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Cytotoxic gene therapy mediated by gene transfer of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene followed by acyclovir (ACV) treatment has been reported to inhibit malignant tumor growth in a variety of studies. The magnitude of "bystander effect" is an essential factor for this anti-tumor approach in vivo. However, the mechanism by which HSV-tk/ACV brings "bystander effect" is poorly understood. In this report, the plasmid CD3 (ECFP-CRS-DsRed) and TK-GFP were transferred to the human adenoid cystic carcinoma line ACC-M cell line. The CD3-expressing cells apoptosis was monitored using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. First, CD3 and TK-GFP co-expressing ACC-M cells apoptosis was monitored using FRET technique. The apoptosis was induced by ACV and initiated by caspase3. The FRET efficient was remarkably decreased and then disappeared during cellular apoptosis, which indicated that the TK-GFP expressing ACC-M cells apoptosis, induced by ACV, was via a caspase3-dependent pathway. Secondly, CD3 and TK-GFP mixed expressing ACC-M cells apoptosis, induced by ACV, were monitored using FRET technique. The apoptotic phenomena appeared in the CD3-expressing ACC-M cells. The results show that HSV-tk/ACV system killed ACC-M cells using its bystander effect. These results confirm that HSV-tk/ACV system is potential for cancer gene therapy.

  9. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy: A powerful technique for elucidating rovibronic structure in electronic transitions of polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Alexander, Ula N.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate the power of high resolution, two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) spectroscopy for observing rovibronic transitions of polyatomic molecules. The technique involves scanning a tunable laser over absorption features in the electronic spectrum while monitoring a segment, in our case 100 cm-1 wide, of the dispersed fluorescence spectrum. 2D-LIF images separate features that overlap in the usual laser induced fluorescence spectrum. The technique is illustrated by application to the S1-S0 transition in fluorobenzene. Images of room temperature samples show that overlap of rotational contours by sequence band structure is minimized with 2D-LIF allowing a much larger range of rotational transitions to be observed and high precision rotational constants to be extracted. A significant advantage of 2D-LIF imaging is that the rotational contours separate into their constituent branches and these can be targeted to determine the three rotational constants individually. The rotational constants determined are an order of magnitude more precise than those extracted from the analysis of the rotational contour and we find the previously determined values to be in error by as much as 5% [G. H. Kirby, Mol. Phys. 19, 289 (1970), 10.1080/00268977000101291]. Comparison with earlier ab initio calculations of the S0 and S1 geometries [I. Pugliesi, N. M. Tonge, and M. C. R. Cockett, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104303 (2008), 10.1063/1.2970092] reveals that the CCSD/6-311G** and RI-CC2/def2-TZVPP levels of theory predict the rotational constants, and hence geometries, with comparable accuracy. Two ground state Fermi resonances were identified by the distinctive patterns that such resonances produce in the images. 2D-LIF imaging is demonstrated to be a sensitive method capable of detecting weak spectral features, particularly those that are otherwise hidden beneath stronger bands. The sensitivity is demonstrated by observation of the three isotopomers of fluorobenzene

  10. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy: a powerful technique for elucidating rovibronic structure in electronic transitions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Gascooke, Jason R; Alexander, Ula N; Lawrance, Warren D

    2011-05-14

    We demonstrate the power of high resolution, two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) spectroscopy for observing rovibronic transitions of polyatomic molecules. The technique involves scanning a tunable laser over absorption features in the electronic spectrum while monitoring a segment, in our case 100 cm(-1) wide, of the dispersed fluorescence spectrum. 2D-LIF images separate features that overlap in the usual laser induced fluorescence spectrum. The technique is illustrated by application to the S(1)-S(0) transition in fluorobenzene. Images of room temperature samples show that overlap of rotational contours by sequence band structure is minimized with 2D-LIF allowing a much larger range of rotational transitions to be observed and high precision rotational constants to be extracted. A significant advantage of 2D-LIF imaging is that the rotational contours separate into their constituent branches and these can be targeted to determine the three rotational constants individually. The rotational constants determined are an order of magnitude more precise than those extracted from the analysis of the rotational contour and we find the previously determined values to be in error by as much as 5% [G. H. Kirby, Mol. Phys. 19, 289 (1970)]. Comparison with earlier ab initio calculations of the S(0) and S(1) geometries [I. Pugliesi, N. M. Tonge, and M. C. R. Cockett, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104303 (2008)] reveals that the CCSD∕6-311G∗∗ and RI-CC2∕def2-TZVPP levels of theory predict the rotational constants, and hence geometries, with comparable accuracy. Two ground state Fermi resonances were identified by the distinctive patterns that such resonances produce in the images. 2D-LIF imaging is demonstrated to be a sensitive method capable of detecting weak spectral features, particularly those that are otherwise hidden beneath stronger bands. The sensitivity is demonstrated by observation of the three isotopomers of fluorobenzene-d(1) in natural abundance in

  11. Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Christl, M. J.; Fountain, W. F.; Gregory, J. C.; Martens, K. U.; Sokolsky, Pierre; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Several existing and planned experiments estimate the energies of ultra-high energy cosmic rays from air showers using the atmospheric nitrogen fluorescence. The nitrogen fluorescence yield from air shower electrons depends on the atmospheric composition. We will discuss the uncertainties in the fluorescence yield form electrons in the real atmosphere and describe a concept for a small balloon payload to measure the atmospheric fluorescence yield as a function of attitude.

  12. Lidar Tracking of Multiple Fluorescent Tracers: Method and Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.; Willis, Ron J.

    1992-01-01

    Past research and applications have demonstrated the advantages and usefulness of lidar detection of a single fluorescent tracer to track air motions. Earlier researchers performed an analytical study that showed good potential for lidar discrimination and tracking of two or three different fluorescent tracers at the same time. The present paper summarizes the multiple fluorescent tracer method, discusses its expected advantages and problems, and describes our field test of this new technique.

  13. Incentive Motivation Techniques Evaluation in Air Force Technical Training. Final Report for Period June 1971-April 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Robert D.; And Others

    The report describes an 18-month research project at Chanute Air Force Base, Illinois, designed to evaluate the effectiveness of inceptive motivation techniques in Air Force technical training. The first phase of the research identified incentives. The findings were used in the second phase of the research which made these incentives contingent on…

  14. Evaluation of a portable X-ray fluorescence instrument for the determination of lead in workplace air samples.

    PubMed

    Morley, J C; Clark, C S; Deddens, J A; Ashley, K; Roda, S

    1999-05-01

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations for worker exposure to lead specify worker protection levels based upon airborne concentrations of lead dust. The rapid, on-site determination of lead in air filter samples using a portable x-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument with an attachment to hold the filter would expedite the exposure assessment process and facilitate compliance with the OSHA standards. A total of 65 lead in air filter samples were collected at bridge blasting lead-abatement projects using closed-faced, 37-mm cassettes with pre-loaded 0.8 micron pore size mixed cellulose ester membrane filters. The lead loading range of the data set was 0.1-1514.6 micrograms (micrograms) of lead/sample. Samples were initially analyzed with a field portable XRF (NITON 700) using an experimental non-destructive XRF method. Samples were subsequently analyzed using National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Method 7105 (Graphite Furnace AA) as a reference analytical method. The paired data were not normally distributed; therefore, the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for statistical analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between data from the field portable XRF method and the NIOSH method (p-value = 0.72). Linear regression of the data resulted in a slope of 0.959, a y-intercept of 5.20 micrograms, and an r2 of 0.985. The XRF limit of detection and limit of quantitation were determined to be 6.2 and 17 micrograms of lead/sample, respectively. The XRF method accuracy was +/- 16.4% (7.1%-27%, 90% confidence interval). The data presented in this study indicate that field-portable XRF can be used for the analysis of lead air filter samples over the range of 17 to 1500 micrograms of lead/sample. The practicing industrial hygienist can use field-portable XRF to produce a rapid, on-site determination of lead exposure that can immediately be communicated to workers and help identify appropriate levels

  15. Nudging technique for scale bridging in air quality/climate atmospheric composition modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurizi, A.; Russo, F.; D'Isidoro, M.; Tampieri, F.

    2011-06-01

    The interaction between air quality and climate involves dynamical scales that cover an immensely wide range. Bridging these scales in numerical simulations is fundamental in studies devoted to megacity/hot-spot impacts on climate. The nudging technique is proposed as a bridging method that can couple different models at different scales. Here, nudging is used to force low resolution chemical composition models using a high resolution run on critical areas. A one-year numerical experiment focused on the Po Valley hot spot is performed using the BOLCHEM model to asses the method. The results show that the model response is stable to perturbation induced by the nudging and that, if a high resolution run is taken as a reference, there is an increase in model skills of low resolution run when the technique is applied. This improvement depends on the species and the season. The effect spreads outside the forcing area and remains noticeable over an extension about 9 times larger.

  16. Microscopic air void analysis of hardened Portland cement concrete by the isolated shadow technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Basil Mark

    The Isolated Shadow Technique is an image processing and analysis procedure for identifying and characterizing surface voids dispersed on an otherwise flat plane of heterogeneous solids. The objective of the Isolated Shadow Technique is to capture, process, and analyze images of a flat surface in which all of the features, save the boundary outlines of any surface voids, are eliminated. In short, the technique utilizes a series of digital images of the subject planar surface; where each image of the series is subjected to a unique lighting condition. By positioning the lights such that the shadows cast into the craters vary between images, these variations can be sequestered and the edges of the voids can subsequently be reconstructed from the isolated shadows. The primary purpose of this work was the development of the Isolated Shadow Technique for the particular application of quantitatively describing the microscopic voids in hardened Portland cement concrete. The Isolated Shadow System was developed for this application of the technique. The hardware and software of the system are described and the function is demonstrated. The system was found to have an average accuracy of 2.7% with a maximum deviation of 5.0% when compared to physical measurements. The results of polished sections of concrete specimens characterized by the Isolated Shadow System are compared to the results obtained with the commonly used standard methods (ASTM C 457; A and B). The coefficients of variation of parameters calculated to describe the air-void system (according to the ASTM C 457 formulations) are shown to be in the neighborhood of one percent when the observed test area includes at least 7,830 mmsp2 of polished concrete (with paste contents ranging from approximately 28% to 32%). The sensitivity of the air-void system parameters (as computed by the system) to changes in magnification and mosaic size are evaluated. A critical analysis of the underlying assumptions of the ASTM C

  17. Europium Uptake and Partitioning in Oat (Avena sativa) Roots as studied By Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Confocal Microscopy Profiling Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, Robert J.; Wang, Zheming; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2003-11-15

    The uptake of Eu3+ by elongating oat plant roots was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence lifetime measurement, as well as laser excitation time-resolved confocal fluorescence profiling technique. The results of this work indicated that the initial uptake of Eu(III) by oat root was most evident within the apical meristem of the root just proximal to the root cap. Distribution of assimilated Eu(III) within the roots differentiation and elongation zone was non-uniform. Higher concentrations were observed within the vascular cylinder, specifically in the phloem and developing xylem parenchyma. Elevated levels of the metal were also observed in the root hairs of the mature root. The concentration of assimilated Eu3+ dropped sharply from the apical meristem to the differentiation and elongation zone and then gradually decreased as the distance from the root cap increased. Fluorescence spectroscopic characteristics of the assimilated Eu3+ suggested that the Eu3+ exists a s inner-sphere mononuclear complexes inside the root. This work has also demonstrated the effectiveness of a time-resolved Eu3+ fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal fluorescence profiling techniques for the in vivo, real-time study of metal[Eu3+] accumulation by a functioning intact plant root. This approach can prove valuable for basic and applied studies in plant nutrition and environmental uptake of actinide radionuclides.

  18. Development of a measurement technique for ion distribution in an extended nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kazoe, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuma; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2011-11-01

    Ion behavior confined in extended nanospace (10(1)-10(3) nm) is important for nanofluidics and nanochemistry with dominant surface effects. In this paper, we developed a new measurement technique of ion distribution in the nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to achieve a spatial resolution of 87 nm higher than the diffraction limit. Fluorescein was used for ratiometric measurement of pH with two excitation wavelengths. The pH profile in a 2D nanochannel of 410 nm width and 405 nm depth was successfully measured at an uncertainty of 0.05. The excess protons, showing lower pH than the bulk, nonuniformly distributed in the nanochannel to cancel the negative charge of glass wall, especially when the electric double layer is thick compared to the channel size. The present study first revealed the ion distribution near the surface or in the nanochannel, which is directly related to the electric double layer. In addition, the obtained proton distribution is important to understand the nanoscale water structure between single molecules and continuum phase. This technique will greatly contribute to understanding the basic science in nanoscale and interfacial dynamics, which are strongly required to develop novel miniaturized systems for biochemical analysis and further applications.

  19. Characterization of uranium bearing material using x-ray fluorescence and direct gamma-rays measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Mujaini, M. Chankow, N.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Hamid, N. A.

    2016-01-22

    Uranium ore can be easily detected due to various gamma-ray energies emitted from uranium daughters particularly from {sup 238}U daughters such as {sup 214}Bi, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 226}Ra. After uranium is extracted from uranium ore, only low energy gamma-rays emitted from {sup 235}U may be detected if the detector is placed in close contact to the specimen. In this research, identification and characterization of uranium bearing materials is experimentally investigated using direct measurement of gamma-rays from {sup 235}U in combination with the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique. Measurement of gamma-rays can be conducted by using high purity germanium (HPGe) detector or cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector while a {sup 57}Coradioisotope-excited XRF spectrometer using CdTe detector is used for elemental analysis. The proposed technique was tested with various uranium bearing specimens containing natural, depleted and enriched uranium in both metallic and powder forms.

  20. Spatial and temporal single-cell volume estimation by a fluorescence imaging technique with application to astrocytes in primary culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatibi, Siamak; Allansson, Louise; Gustavsson, Tomas; Blomstrand, Fredrik; Hansson, Elisabeth; Olsson, Torsten

    1999-05-01

    Cell volume changes are often associated with important physiological and pathological processes in the cell. These changes may be the means by which the cell interacts with its surrounding. Astroglial cells change their volume and shape under several circumstances that affect the central nervous system. Following an incidence of brain damage, such as a stroke or a traumatic brain injury, one of the first events seen is swelling of the astroglial cells. In order to study this and other similar phenomena, it is desirable to develop technical instrumentation and analysis methods capable of detecting and characterizing dynamic cell shape changes in a quantitative and robust way. We have developed a technique to monitor and to quantify the spatial and temporal volume changes in a single cell in primary culture. The technique is based on two- and three-dimensional fluorescence imaging. The temporal information is obtained from a sequence of microscope images, which are analyzed in real time. The spatial data is collected in a sequence of images from the microscope, which is automatically focused up and down through the specimen. The analysis of spatial data is performed off-line and consists of photobleaching compensation, focus restoration, filtering, segmentation and spatial volume estimation.

  1. Determination of sulfadiazine based on its derivatization with fluorescamine by self-ordered ring fluorescence microscopic imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Yang, Le; Liu, Ying

    2012-09-01

    A self-ordered ring (SOR) fluorescence microscopic imaging technique has been developed for the determination of trace amounts of sulfadiazine based on its derivatization with fluorescamine. In the presence of HAc-NaAc buffer solution (pH 3.12) and polyvinyl alcohol-124 (PVA-124), the droplet containing fluorescamine derivatized sulfadiazine can form a SOR on the solid support after solvent evaporation with the diameter of 1.86 mm and its ring belt width of 54.9 microm. The quantitative analysis of sulfadiazine is achieved with the linear range of 7.8 x 10(-14)-1.8 x 10(-12) mol x ring(-1) (3.9 x 10(-7)-9.0 x 10(-6) mol x L(-1) and detection limit of 7.8 x 10(-5) mol x ring(-1) (3.9 x 10(-8) mol x L(-1)) when 0.2 microL droplet was spotted. The technique has been satisfactorily applied to the determination of sulfadiazine in the tablet, synthetic sample and residues in six different milk samples with the recoveries of 91.0%-105.8%, respectively, and RSDs less than 4.4%.

  2. Using chemical, microbial and fluorescence techniques to understand contaminant sources and pathways to wetlands in a conservation site.

    PubMed

    Rhymes, J; Jones, L; Lapworth, D J; White, D; Fenner, N; McDonald, J E; Perkins, T L

    2015-04-01

    Nutrients and faecal contaminants can enter wetland systems in a number of ways, with both biological and potentially human-health implications. In this study we used a combination of inorganic chemistry, dissolved organic matter (DOM) fluorescence and Escherichia coli and total coliform (TC) count techniques to study the sources and multiple pathways of contamination affecting a designated sand dune site of international conservation importance, surrounded by agricultural land. Analysis of stream samples, groundwater and dune slack wetlands revealed multiple input pathways. These included riverbank seepage, runoff events and percolation of nutrients from adjacent pasture into the groundwater, as well as some on-site sources. The combined techniques showed that off-site nutrient inputs into the sand dune system were primarily from fertilisers, revealed by high nitrate concentrations, and relatively low tryptophan-like fulvic-like ratios<0.4Ramanunits (R.U.). The E. coli and TC counts recorded across the site confirm a relatively minor source of bacterial and nutrient inputs from on-site grazers. Attenuation of the nutrient concentrations in streams, in groundwater and in run-off inputs occurs within the site, restoring healthier groundwater nutrient concentrations showing that contaminant filtration by the sand dunes provides a valuable ecosystem service. However, previous studies show that this input of nutrients has a clear adverse ecological impact.

  3. In vivo effects of focused shock waves on tumor tissue visualized by fluorescence staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Lukes, Petr; Zeman, Jan; Horak, Vratislav; Hoffer, Petr; Pouckova, Pavla; Holubova, Monika; Hosseini, S Hamid R; Akiyama, Hidenori; Sunka, Pavel; Benes, Jiri

    2015-06-01

    Shock waves can cause significant cytotoxic effects in tumor cells and tissues both in vitro and in vivo. However, understanding the mechanisms of shock wave interaction with tissues is limited. We have studied in vivo effects of focused shock waves induced in the syngeneic sarcoma tumor model using the TUNEL assay, immunohistochemical detection of caspase-3 and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Shock waves were produced by a multichannel pulsed-electrohydraulic discharge generator with a cylindrical ceramic-coated electrode. In tumors treated with shock waves, a large area of damaged tissue was detected which was clearly differentiated from intact tissue. Localization and a cone-shaped region of tissue damage visualized by TUNEL reaction apparently correlated with the conical shape and direction of shock wave propagation determined by high-speed shadowgraphy. A strong TUNEL reaction of nuclei and nucleus fragments in tissue exposed to shock waves suggested apoptosis in this destroyed tumor area. However, specificity of the TUNEL technique to apoptotic cells is ambiguous and other apoptotic markers (caspase-3) that we used in our study did not confirmed this observation. Thus, the generated fragments of nuclei gave rise to a false TUNEL reaction not associated with apoptosis. Mechanical stress from high overpressure shock wave was likely the dominant pathway of tumor damage.

  4. Determination of aflatoxins in air samples of refuse-derived fuel by thin-layer chromatography with laser-induced fluorescence spectrometric detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bicking, M.K.L.; Kniseley, R.N.; Svec, H.J.

    1983-02-01

    An analytical method is described which allows determination of aflatoxins in a complex matrix. An apparatus has been developed that quantitates fluorescent compounds on thin-layer chromatography plates. A nitrogen laser excitation source produces a detection limit of 10 pg for four aflatoxins. Aflatoxin B1 has been found at levels up to 17 ppb in solid samples collected from the air at a plant which produces refuse-derived fuel. 7 figures, 1 table.

  5. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  6. A preliminary study of air-pollution measurement by active remote-sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. L.; Proctor, E. K.; Gasiorek, L. S.; Liston, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollutants are identified, and the needs for their measurement from satellites and aircraft are discussed. An assessment is made of the properties of these pollutants and of the normal atmosphere, including interactions with light of various wavelengths and the resulting effects on transmission and scattering of optical signals. The possible methods for active remote measurement are described; the relative performance capabilities of double-ended and single-ended systems are compared qualitatively; and the capabilities of the several single-ended or backscattering techniques are compared quantitatively. The differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is shown to be superior to the other backscattering techniques. The lidar system parameters and their relationships to the environmental factors and the properties of pollutants are examined in detail. A computer program that models both the atmosphere (including pollutants) and the lidar system is described. The performance capabilities of present and future lidar components are assessed, and projections are made of prospective measurement capabilities for future lidar systems. Following a discussion of some important operational factors that affect both the design and measurement capabilities of airborne and satellite-based lidar systems, the extensive analytical results obtained through more than 1000 individual cases analyzed with the aid of the computer program are summarized and discussed. The conclusions are presented. Recommendations are also made for additional studies to investigate cases that could not be explored adequately during this study.

  7. High-contrast fluorescence microscopy for a biomolecular analysis based on polarization techniques using an optical interference mirror slide.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2014-12-01

    Fluorescence microscopy with an improved contrast for fluorescence images is developed using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide, which can enhance the fluorescence from a fluorophore as a result of the double interference of the excitation light and emission light. To improve the contrast of a fluorescence image using an OIM slide, a linearly-polarized excitation light was employed, and the fluorescence emission polarized perpendicular to the polarization of the excitation light was detected. The image contrast with this optical system was improved 110-fold for rhodamine B spotted on the OIM, in comparison with a glass slide using a general fluorescence microscopy optical system. Moreover, a 24-fold improvement of the image contrast was achieved for the detection of Cy3-labeled streptavidin bound to immobilize biotin.

  8. A blue fluorescent labeling technique utilizing micro- and nanoparticles for tracking in LIVE/DEAD® stained pathogenic biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Burkholderia cepacia.

    PubMed

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Ernst, Julia; Lautenschläger, Christian; Pletz, Mathias W; Fischer, Dagmar; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that target and treat biofilms are widely applied to bacterial cultures using popular live/dead staining techniques with mostly red or green fluorescent markers (eg, with SYTO(®) 9, propidium iodide, fluorescein). Therefore, visualizing drugs or micro- and nanoparticulate delivery systems to analyze their distribution and effects in biofilms requires a third fluorescent dye that does not interfere with the properties of the live/dead markers. The present study establishes and evaluates a model for tracking polymeric particles in fluorescently stained biological material. To this end, poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based micro- and nanoparticles were used as well-established model systems, which, because of their favorable safety profiles, are expected to play important future roles with regard to drug delivery via inhalation. PLGA was covalently and stably labeled with 7-amino-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid (AMCA), after which blue fluorescent poly(ethylene glycol)-block-PLGA (PEG-PLGA) particles were prepared using a mixture of fluorescent AMCA-PLGA and PEG-PLGA. Because chitosan is known to reduce negative surface charge, blue fluorescent PEG-PLGA-particles with chitosan were also prepared. These micro- and nanoparticles were physicochemically characterized and could be clearly distinguished from live/dead stained bacteria in biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  9. A blue fluorescent labeling technique utilizing micro- and nanoparticles for tracking in LIVE/DEAD® stained pathogenic biofilms of Staphylococcus aureus and Burkholderia cepacia

    PubMed Central

    Klinger-Strobel, Mareike; Ernst, Julia; Lautenschläger, Christian; Pletz, Mathias W; Fischer, Dagmar; Makarewicz, Oliwia

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that target and treat biofilms are widely applied to bacterial cultures using popular live/dead staining techniques with mostly red or green fluorescent markers (eg, with SYTO® 9, propidium iodide, fluorescein). Therefore, visualizing drugs or micro- and nanoparticulate delivery systems to analyze their distribution and effects in biofilms requires a third fluorescent dye that does not interfere with the properties of the live/dead markers. The present study establishes and evaluates a model for tracking polymeric particles in fluorescently stained biological material. To this end, poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based micro- and nanoparticles were used as well-established model systems, which, because of their favorable safety profiles, are expected to play important future roles with regard to drug delivery via inhalation. PLGA was covalently and stably labeled with 7-amino-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid (AMCA), after which blue fluorescent poly(ethylene glycol)-block-PLGA (PEG-PLGA) particles were prepared using a mixture of fluorescent AMCA-PLGA and PEG-PLGA. Because chitosan is known to reduce negative surface charge, blue fluorescent PEG-PLGA-particles with chitosan were also prepared. These micro- and nanoparticles were physicochemically characterized and could be clearly distinguished from live/dead stained bacteria in biofilms using confocal laser scanning microscopy. PMID:26917959

  10. A novel method for rapid and non-invasive detection of plants senescence using delayed fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingrui; Xing, Da; Wang, Junsheng; Zeng, Lizhang; Li, Qiang

    2007-05-01

    Plants senescence is a phase of plants ontogeny marked by declining photosynthetic activity that is paralleled by a decline in chloroplast function. The photosystem II ( PSII ) in a plant is considered the primary site where light-induced delayed fluorescence (DF) is produced. With the leaves of Catharanthus roseus (Catharanthus roseus (L.) G.Don) as testing models, we have studied the effects of plants senescence induced by dark and/or exogenous hormones treatments on characteristics of DF by using a home-made portable DF detection system, which can enable various DF parameters, such as DF decay kinetic curve and DF intensity, to be rapidly produced for the plants in a short time. The results show that the changes in DF intensity of green plants can truly reflect the changes in photosynthetic capacity and chlorophyll content. Therefore, DF may be used an important means of evaluating in vivo plants senescence physiology. The changes in DF intensity may provide a new approach for the rapid and early detection of plants senescence caused by age or other senescence-related factors. DF technique could be potential useful for high throughput screening and less time-consuming and automated identifying the interesting mutants with genetic modifications that change plants senescence progress.

  11. Laser-induced fluorescence of green plants. I - A technique for the remote detection of plant stress and species differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Wood, F. M., Jr.; Mcmurtrey, J. E., III; Newcomb, W. W.

    1984-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of green plants was evaluated as a means of remotely detecting plant stress and determining plant type. Corn and soybeans were used as representatives of monocots and dicots, respectively, in these studies. The fluorescence spectra of several plant pigments was excited with a nitrogen laser emitting at 337 nm. Intact leaves from corn and soybeans also fluoresced using the nitrogen laser. The two plant species exhibited fluorescence spectra which had three maxima in common at 440, 690, and 740 nm. However, the relative intensities of these maxima were distinctly different for the two species. Soybeans had an additional slight maxima at 525 nm. Potassium deficiency in corn caused an increase in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. Simulated water stress in soybeans resulted in increased fluorescence at 440, 525, 690, and 740 nm. The inhibition of photosynthesis in soybeans by 3-(3-4-dichlorophenyl)-1-1-dimethyl urea (DCMU) gave incresed fluorescence primarily at 690 and 740 nm. Chlorosis as occurring in senescent soybean leaves caused a decrease in fluorescence at 690 and 740 nm. These studies indicate that LIF measurements of plants offer the potential for remotely detecting certain types of stress condition and also for differentiating plant species.

  12. Imaging time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of organelle specific fluorophores and photosensitizers using ps pulsed diode lasers and TCSPC techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalfi-Happ, Claudia; Dolp, Frank; Forster, Florian; Rueck, Angelika

    2004-09-01

    A time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) module (SPC-730, Becker & Hickl, Germany) was connected to a laser scanning microscope (Zeiss, Germany) equipped with an ultrafast photomultiplier. Short pulse excitation was achieved with two laser diodes emitting at 398nm and 434nm with a pulse duration of 70ps and 60 ps (PicoQuant, Germany) to allow intracellular fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). With this setup, fluorescence lifetime of the mitochondrial marker Rhodamine 123 could be studied in solution under the same instrumental conditions as used for fluorescence lifetime imaging of cell monolayers. With the same set of parameters, fluorescence lifetime of Rhodamine 123 was calculated with good reproducibility in mitochondria of living cells. We present here a comparison of different fitting routines, including a multiexponential fitting based on the method of Laplace transformation. Fluorescence lifetimes calculated with the multiexponential fitting routine proved to be particularly useful to study the distribution of 5-ALA metabolites in cell monolayers.

  13. Multi-sensor fusion techniques for state estimation of micro air vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavanik, Daniel; Hardt-Stremayr, Alexander; Gremillion, Gregory; Weiss, Stephan; Nothwang, William

    2016-05-01

    Aggressive flight of micro air vehicles (MAVs) in unstructured, GPS-denied environments poses unique challenges for estimation of vehicle pose and velocity due to the noise, delay, and drift in individual sensor measurements. Maneuvering flight at speeds in excess of 5 m/s poses additional challenges even for active range sensors; in the case of LIDAR, an assembled scan of the vehicles environment will in most cases be obsolete by the time it is processed. Multi-sensor fusion techniques which combine inertial measurements with passive vision techniques and/or LIDAR have achieved breakthroughs in the ability to maintain accurate state estimates without the use of external positioning sensors. In this paper, we survey algorithmic approaches to exploiting sensors with a wide range of nonlinear dynamics using filter and bundle-adjustment based approaches for state estimation and optimal control. From this foundation, we propose a biologically-inspired framework for incorporating the human operator in the loop as a privileged sensor in a combined human/autonomy paradigm.

  14. Application of cell-surface engineering for visualization of yeast in bread dough: development of a fluorescent bio-imaging technique in the mixing process of dough.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tatsuro; Shiraga, Seizaburo; Araki, Tetsuya; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Yamada, Masaharu; Takeya, Koji; Sagara, Yasuyuki

    2009-07-01

    Cell-surface engineering (Ueda et al., 2000) has been applied to develop a novel technique to visualize yeast in bread dough. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was bonded to the surface of yeast cells, and 0.5% EGFP yeasts were mixed into the dough samples at four different mixing stages. The samples were placed on a cryostat at -30 degrees C and sliced at 10 microm. The sliced samples were observed at an excitation wavelength of 480 nm and a fluorescent wavelength of 520 nm. The results indicated that the combination of the EGFP-displayed yeasts, rapid freezing, and cryo-sectioning made it possible to visualize 2-D distribution of yeast in bread dough to the extent that the EGFP yeasts could be clearly distinguished from the auto-fluorescent background of bread dough.

  15. Investigation of Essential Element Distribution in the Equine Metacarpophalangeal Joint using a Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kaabar, Wejdan; Gundogdu, O.; Attenburrow, D.; Bradley, D. A.; Tzaphlidou, M.; Janousch, M.

    2008-05-20

    In articular cartilage, Ca, P, K and S are among some of the well known co-factors of the metalloproteinases enzymatic family, the latter playing a pivotal role in the growth and degeneration of the collagenous bone-cartilage interface of articulating joints. Current study forms part of a larger investigation concerning the distribution of these and other key elements in such media. For the purpose of evaluating these low atomic number elements (Z{<=}20), use was made of the capabilities of the LUCIA Station, located at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Using an incident radiation energy of 4.06 keV, a synchrotron radiation micro x-ray fluorescence (SR-{mu}XRF) technique was applied in examining the distribution of the essential elements Ca, P, K and S in the bone-cartilage interface of both healthy and diseased (osteoarthritic) areas of an equine metacarpophalangeal joint. The SR-{mu}XRF mappings and line profile patterns have revealed remarkable changes in both the pattern and absolute distributions of these elements, agreeing with the findings of others. The elemental presence shown in the individual area scans encompassing the lesion each reflect the visibly abraded outer surface of the cartilage and change in shape of the bone surface. One of the area scans for the bone-cartilage interface shows a marked change in both the pattern and absolute elemental presence for all three elements compared to that observed at two other scan sites. The observation of change in bone cartilage composition around the surface of the articulating joint is thought to be novel, the variation being almost certainly due to the differing weight-bearing role of the subchondral bone at each locati0008.

  16. Investigation of Essential Element Distribution in the Equine Metacarpophalangeal Joint using a Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaabar, Wejdan; Gundogdu, O.; Tzaphlidou, M.; Janousch, M.; Attenburrow, D.; Bradley, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    In articular cartilage, Ca, P, K and S are among some of the well known co-factors of the metalloproteinases enzymatic family, the latter playing a pivotal role in the growth and degeneration of the collagenous bone-cartilage interface of articulating joints. Current study forms part of a larger investigation concerning the distribution of these and other key elements in such media. For the purpose of evaluating these low atomic number elements (Z⩽20), use was made of the capabilities of the LUCIA Station, located at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Using an incident radiation energy of 4.06 keV, a synchrotron radiation micro x-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF) technique was applied in examining the distribution of the essential elements Ca, P, K and S in the bone-cartilage interface of both healthy and diseased (osteoarthritic) areas of an equine metacarpophalangeal joint. The SR-μXRF mappings and line profile patterns have revealed remarkable changes in both the pattern and absolute distributions of these elements, agreeing with the findings of others. The elemental presence shown in the individual area scans encompassing the lesion each reflect the visibly abraded outer surface of the cartilage and change in shape of the bone surface. One of the area scans for the bone-cartilage interface shows a marked change in both the pattern and absolute elemental presence for all three elements compared to that observed at two other scan sites. The observation of change in bone cartilage composition around the surface of the articulating joint is thought to be novel, the variation being almost certainly due to the differing weight-bearing role of the subchondral bone at each location.

  17. Binding of fluorescent acridine dyes acridine orange and 9-aminoacridine to hemoglobin: Elucidation of their molecular recognition by spectroscopy, calorimetry and molecular modeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2016-06-01

    The molecular interaction between hemoglobin (HHb), the major human heme protein, and the acridine dyes acridine orange (AO) and 9-aminoacridine (9AA) was studied by various spectroscopic, calorimetric and molecular modeling techniques. The dyes formed stable ground state complex with HHb as revealed from spectroscopic data. Temperature dependent fluorescence data showed the strength of the dye-protein complexation to be inversely proportional to temperature and the fluorescence quenching was static in nature. The binding-induced conformational change in the protein was investigated using circular dichroism, synchronous fluorescence, 3D fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy results. Circular dichroism data also quantified the α-helicity change in hemoglobin due to the binding of acridine dyes. Calorimetric studies revealed the binding to be endothermic in nature for both AO and 9AA, though the latter had higher affinity, and this was also observed from spectroscopic data. The binding of both dyes was entropy driven. pH dependent fluorescence studies revealed the existence of electrostatic interaction between the protein and dye molecules. Molecular modeling studies specified the binding site and the non-covalent interactions involved in the association. Overall, the results revealed that a small change in the acridine chromophore leads to remarkable alteration in the structural and thermodynamic aspects of binding to HHb.

  18. Doppler ultrasound surveillance in deep tunneling compressed-air work with Trimix breathing: bounce dive technique compared to saturation-excursion technique.

    PubMed

    Vellinga, T P van Rees; Sterk, W; de Boer, A G E M; van der Beek, A J; Verhoeven, A C; van Dijk, F J H

    2008-01-01

    The Western Scheldt Tunneling Project in The Netherlands provided a unique opportunity to evaluate two deep-diving techniques with Doppler ultrasound surveillance. Divers used the bounce diving techniques for repair and maintenance of the TBM. The tunnel boring machine jammed at its deepest depth. As a result the work time was not sufficient. The saturation diving technique was developed and permitted longer work time at great depth. Thirty-one divers were involved in this project. Twenty-three divers were examined using Doppler ultrasound. Data analysis addressed 52 exposures to Trimix at 4.6-4.8 bar gauge using the bounce technique and 354 exposures to Trimix at 4.0-6.9 bar gauge on saturation excursions. No decompression incidents occurred with either technique during the described phase of the project. Doppler ultrasound revealed that the bubble loads assessed in both techniques were generally low. We find out, that despite longer working hours, shorter decompression times and larger physical workloads, the saturation-excursion technique was associated with significant lower bubble grades than in the bounce technique using Doppler Ultrasound. We conclude that the saturation-excursion technique with Trimix is a good option for deep and long exposures in caisson work. The Doppler technique proved valuable, and it should be incorporated in future compressed-air work.

  19. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-15

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging.

  20. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-01

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging.

  1. Nucleic acid distribution pattern in avian erythrocytes and mammalian lymphocytes: comparative studies by fluorescence microscopy and digital imaging analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Isitor, G N; Asgarali, Z; Pouching, K

    2008-12-01

    Nucleated erythrocytes of healthy domestic chicken and ducks, and lymphocytes of healthy Sprague Dawley rats were evaluated for nucleic acid distribution pattern, employing light and fluorescence microscopy procedures, as well as digital imaging analytical methods. The results demonstrate a unique organization of nuclear DNA of mature chicken and duck erythrocytes, as well as immature duck erythrocytes, as delineated spherical nuclear bodies that mostly corresponded with euchromatin zones of the cells in routine Wright-stain blood smears. The nuclear DNA of the rat lymphocytes, on the other hand, was observed as a more diffuse green fluorescing nuclear areas, with punctate variably-sized diffuse areas of RNA red fluorescence. RNA red color fluorescence was also evident in the narrow cytoplasm of the lymphocytes, especially in large lymphocytes, in comparison with the cytoplasm of the mature avian erythrocytes that completely lacked any nucleic acid fluorescence. Nuclear RNA fluorescence was lacking in the mature chicken erythrocytes, compared with those of the mature and immature duck erythrocytes as well as lymphocytes of both avian and rats blood. The significance of these findings lies in the establishment of normal benchmarks for the nuclear and cytoplasmic nucleic acid pattern in eukaryotic cells. These normal benchmarks become valuable in rapid diagnostic situations associated with pathologies, such as the presence of viral nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusion bodies that can alter the nucleic acid pattern of the host cells, and in conditions of cellular abnormal protein aggregations. Variability of cellular nucleic acid pattern can also aid in prognostic assessments of neoplastic conditions.

  2. A combination of air and fluid drilling technique for zones of lost circulation in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, S.L.; Niederhofer, J.D.; Beavers, W.M.

    1986-02-01

    Structural geologic information available for the coal-bearing formations in the Black Warrior basin documents the occurrence of numerous fault and fracture zones. A combination air/fluid drilling technique may be advantageous to coalbed-methane operations in this and other areas with similar hydrologic and geologic conditions. The authors successfully used this technique recently on coalbed-methane wells in Tuscaloosa County, AL.

  3. Nudging technique for scale bridging in air quality/climate atmospheric composition modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurizi, A.; Russo, F.; D'Isidoro, M.; Tampieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    The interaction between air quality and climate involves dynamical scales that cover a very wide range. Bridging these scales in numerical simulations is fundamental in studies devoted to megacity/hot-spot impacts on larger scales. A technique based on nudging is proposed as a bridging method that can couple different models at different scales. Here, nudging is used to force low resolution chemical composition models with a run of a high resolution model on a critical area. A one-year numerical experiment focused on the Po Valley hot spot is performed using the BOLCHEM model to asses the method. The results show that the model response is stable to perturbation induced by the nudging and that, taking the high resolution run as a reference, performances of the nudged run increase with respect to the non-forced run. The effect outside the forcing area depends on transport and is significant in a relevant number of events although it becomes weak on seasonal or yearly basis.

  4. Detecting discontinuities in time series of upper air data: Demonstration of an adaptive filter technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zurbenko, I.; Chen, J.; Rao, S.T.

    1997-11-01

    The issue of global climate change due to increased anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has gained considerable attention and importance. Climate change studies require the interpretation of weather data collected in numerous locations and/or over the span of several decades. Unfortunately, these data contain biases caused by changes in instruments and data acquisition procedures. It is essential that biases are identified and/or removed before these data can be used confidently in the context of climate change research. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the use of an adaptive moving average filter and compare it with traditional parametric methods. The advantage of the adaptive filter over traditional parametric methods is that it is less effected by seasonal patterns and trends. The filter has been applied to upper air relative humidity and temperature data. Applied to generated data, the filter has a root mean squared error accuracy of about 600 days when locating changes of 0.1 standard deviations and about 20 days for changes of 0.5 standard deviations. In some circumstances, the accuracy of location estimation can be improved through parametric techniques used in conjunction with the adaptive filter.

  5. Development of a pronuclear DNA microinjection technique for production of green fluorescent protein-expressing bubaline (Bubalus bubalis) embryos.

    PubMed

    Verma, V; Gautam, S K; Palta, P; Manik, R S; Singla, S K; Chauhan, M S

    2008-04-01

    Oocytes from abattoir-derived bubaline (Bubalus bubalis) ovaries were subjected to IVM and IVF; the objective was to develop a pronuclear DNA microinjection technique to produce embryos expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). The largest proportion (61.2%) of zygotes in which one (1 PN) or two pronuclei (2 PN) were visible was when centrifugation (14,000 x g for 15 min) was done 16 h after insemination. Centrifugation had no adverse effects on cleavage rate, development to morulae/blastocysts, and total cell number of embryos. Piercing the pronuclear but not the plasma membrane reduced (P<0.05) cleavage rate (44.0% vs. 51.0%), without affecting subsequent development. Following microinjection of a GFP-DNA construct, cleavage rate (55.9, 38.9, and 30.9%) and proportion of cleaved embryos that developed to morulae (39.9, 25.6, and 15.5%) and blastocyst stages (22.4, 13.4, and 2.8%) were higher (P<0.05) for non-injected controls than for those injected with buffer alone, which, in turn, were higher (P<0.05) than for those injected with buffer containing 5 microg/mL DNA. The cleavage rate (39.2% vs. 34.8%) and proportion of cleaved embryos that developed to morulae/blastocysts (37.5% vs. 10.9%) were higher (P<0.05) for microinjected zygotes with 2 PN than for those with 1 PN. The cleavage rate and the proportion of cleaved embryos that developed to morulae and blastocysts were higher (P<0.05) following culture of microinjected zygotes in mCR2aa medium (40.7, 32.7, and 9.1%, respectively) compared to those for mSOFaa (33.3, 26.0, and 6.5%, respectively) or after culture in TCM-199+co-culture with buffalo oviductal epithelial cells (31.2, 25.0, and 4.5%, respectively). The proportion of embryos expressing GFP was higher (P<0.01) for 2 PN than for 1 PN zygotes (15.9% vs. 13.7%). Thirty-five embryos expressed GFP; the proportion of mosaic embryos (62.8%) was higher (P<0.01) than of embryos in which all blastomeres expressed GFP (37.2%); eight and two of those embryos

  6. A study of the effect of molecular and aerosol conditions in the atmosphere on air fluorescence measurements at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; García Gámez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Krieger, A.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Peķala, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Cabo, I.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, F.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovancova, J.; Schovánek, P.; Schroeder, F.; Schulte, S.; Schüssler, F.; Schuster, D.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Segreto, A.; Semikoz, D.; Settimo, M.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Squartini, R.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tarutina, T.; Taşcău, O.; Tcaciuc, R.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tegolo, D.; Thao, N. T.; Thomas, D.; Ticona, R.; Tiffenberg, J.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torres, I.; Travnicek, P.; Tridapalli, D. B.; Tristram, G.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrlich, P.; Wainberg, O.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Winnick, M. G.; Wu, H.; Wundheiler, B.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    The air fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is designed to perform calorimetric measurements of extensive air showers created by cosmic rays of above 1018eV. To correct these measurements for the effects introduced by atmospheric fluctuations, the Observatory contains a group of monitoring instruments to record atmospheric conditions across the detector site, an area exceeding 3000 km 2. The atmospheric data are used extensively in the reconstruction of air showers, and are particularly important for the correct determination of shower energies and the depths of shower maxima. This paper contains a summary of the molecular and aerosol conditions measured at the Pierre Auger Observatory since the start of regular operations in 2004, and includes a discussion of the impact of these measurements on air shower reconstructions. Between 1018 and 1020eV, the systematic uncertainties due to all atmospheric effects increase from 4% to 8% in measurements of shower energy, and 4gcm to 8gcm in measurements of the shower maximum.

  7. Fluorescent microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  8. Molecular architecture in cyanine dye aggregates at the air-water interface. Effect of monolayer composition and organization on fluorescent behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidyanathan, S.; Patterson, L.K.; Moebius, D.; Gruniger, H.R.

    1985-01-31

    The fluorescence behavior of an amphiphatic oxacyanine dye and its thiacyanine analogue has been investigated in spread monolayers at the air-water interface. J-aggregate formation as a function of area/(dye molecule) was monitored by spectral changes in pure dye monolayers and in 1:1 mixtures of dye with various fatty acid coaggregates. Simultaneously, the thermodynamic behavior of these systems was characterized by the associated surface pressure-area isotherms. In all cases, J-aggregate formation may be related to a phase transition in the isotherm. The intensity of aggregate fluorescence is found to be inversely related to the work, ..delta..W, of compression of the monolayer through the transition. Inclusion of the fatty acid coaggregate was shown to facilitate J-aggregate formation in the order stearic > elaidic > oleic. Both fluorescence and thermodynamic data indicate more extensive aggregate formation in the thiacyanine systems. Aside from the paramount role played by the chromophore-chromophore interactions in determining J-aggregate phenomena, this study suggests important contributions from dispersion forces involving the long hydrocarbon moieties. 13 refs., 10 figs.

  9. [Use of laser flow-type fluorescence aerosol particle counter to evaluate the concentration of microbes in the surface air under high dust content].

    PubMed

    Kalinin, Iu T; Vorob'ev, S A; Khramov, E N; Vorob'eva, E A; Kuznetsov, A P; Kiselev, O S

    2000-01-01

    The paper deals with the use of a laser flow-type fluorescence aerosol particle counter to evaluate the concentrations of microbes in the surface air under high dust content. Various circuits of flow-type optic aerosol recorders are analyzed. Flow spectral luminescence analysis of some particles flow while exciting the fourth harmonics of a pulse laser on yttrium-aluminium garnet with neodymium by ultraviolet radiation is shown to be the most optimum method for indication of individual aerosol particles. Experiments were conducted on the authors' model of a pilot plant based on this method. The model of a laser flow-type optic analyzer was developed for experimental studies that give a clear display of biological aerosols in complex aerosols. The laser flow-type analyzer-based unit developed may provide a fluorescence signal of aerosol particles in the flow of a sample and that light diffusion signal from them at an exciting light wavelength of 266 nm. Experiments with BVC aerosols and soil dust particles were conducted in different regions of Russia. They showed it possible to detect and to rapidly calculate soil microorganisms by laser flow-type fluorescence assay of individual particles when excited by ultraviolet radiation.

  10. Application of CORSIKA Simulation Code to Study Lateral and Longitudinal Distribution of Fluorescence Light in Cosmic Ray Extensive Air Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheri, Zahra; Davoudifar, Pantea; Rastegarzadeh, Gohar; Shayan, Milad

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we used CORSIKA code to understand the characteristics of cosmic ray induced showers at extremely high energy as a function of energy, detector distance to shower axis, number, and density of secondary charged particles and the nature particle producing the shower. Based on the standard properties of the atmosphere, lateral and longitudinal development of the shower for photons and electrons has been investigated. Fluorescent light has been collected by the detector for protons, helium, oxygen, silicon, calcium and iron primary cosmic rays in different energies. So we have obtained a number of electrons per unit area, distance to the shower axis, shape function of particles density, percentage of fluorescent light, lateral distribution of energy dissipated in the atmosphere and visual field angle of detector as well as size of the shower image. We have also shown that location of highest percentage of fluorescence light is directly proportional to atomic number of elements. Also we have shown when the distance from shower axis increases and the shape function of particles density decreases severely. At the first stages of development, shower axis distance from detector is high and visual field angle is small; then with shower moving toward the Earth, angle increases. Overall, in higher energies, the fluorescent light method has more efficiency. The paper provides standard calibration lines for high energy showers which can be used to determine the nature of the particles.

  11. Lighter-Than-Air Blimps As a Testbed For River Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    River science has seen a methodological revolution during the past decade as new platforms, sensors, and processing algorithms have allowed the remote collection of river data with ever-increasing ease, accuracy, precision, and extent. Recently, hand-held, low cost lighter-than-air blimps have been suggested as an important platform for river remote sensing, particularly when high-resolution and low-cost imaging is required. Because blimps are small, inexpensive, and relatively simple to operate in the field, they allow rapid river remote sensing trials, particularly over shorter river reaches. Unlike most airborne or satellite approaches, hand-held blimps can also be used to do very rapid repeat imaging. Field experiments show that such hand-held platforms are not as stable as most airborne and satellite platforms, and they have far reduced lift, allowing only very small and simple camera systems. They are also susceptible to become entangled in near-channel trees, and almost always have the problem of inclusion of the operator somewhere in resulting image. These issues notwithstanding, the simple adjustment of blimp tether length can easily allow adjustment of ground resolution to extremely high levels, and programmable cameras can allow versatility in automatic camera shutter intervals, shutter speeds, and other image constraints. We utilize low-altitude helikite platforms to test the potential for remote sensing (a) well geometrically-controlled measurements of water surface configuration, (b) submerged and near-channel sediment sizes, (c) water depth, and (d) surface velocity. The velocity imaging techniques include the use of natural and artificial particle image velocimetry (PIV) features, with velocity extracted using either the principles of motion blur or from sequential images. In addition, we use these low-cost, mobile platforms to test the brightness and color effects of shadows cast upon the water surface, and use these results to suggest potential

  12. Size-fractionated sampling and chemical analysis by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry of PMx in ambient air and emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, A. C.; Kuhlbusch, T. A. J.; Fissan, H.; Schmidt, K.-G.

    2001-11-01

    PM 10 and PM 2.5 (PMx) have been recently introduced as new air quality standards in the EU (Council Directive 1999/30/EC) for particulate matter. Different estimates and measurements showed that the limit values for PM 10 will be exceeded at different locations in Europe, and thus measures will have to be taken to reduce PMx mass concentrations. Source apportionment has to be carried out, demanding comparable methods for ambient air and emission sampling and chemical analysis. Therefore, a special ambient-air sampler and a specially designed emission sampler have been developed. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) was used for multi-element analyses as a fast method with low detection limits. For ambient air measurements, a sampling unit was built, impacting particle size classes 10-2.5 μm and 2.5-1.0 μm directly onto TXRF sample carriers. An electrostatic precipitator (ESP) was used as back-up filter to also collect particles <1 μm directly onto the TXRF sample carriers. Air quality is affected by natural and anthropogenic sources, and the emissions of particles <10 μm and <2.5 μm, respectively, have to be determined to quantify their contributions to the so-called coarse (10-2.5 μm) and fine (<2.5 μm) particle modes in ambient air. For this, an in-stack particle sampling system was developed, according to the new ambient air quality standards and in view of subsequent analysis by TXRF. These newly developed samplers, in combination with TXRF analyses, were employed in field campaigns to prove the feasibility and capabilities of the approach. Ambient air data show the quantification of a wide spectrum of elements. From those concentrations, PMx ratios were calculated as an indicator for different sources of elements. Results useful for source apportionment are also the elemental day/night ratios calculated to determine local contributions to PMx mass concentrations. With regard to the emission measurements, results of mass and elemental

  13. A simple semi-empirical technique for apportioning the impact of roadways on air quality in an urban neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangasinghe, M. A.; Dirks, K. N.; Singhal, N.; Costello, S. B.; Longley, I.; Salmond, J. A.

    2014-02-01

    Air pollution from the transport sector has a marked effect on human health, so isolating the pollutant contribution from a roadway is important in understanding its impact on the local neighbourhood. This paper proposes a novel technique based on a semi-empirical air pollution model to quantify the impact from a roadway on the air quality of a local neighbourhood using ambient records of a single air pollution monitor. We demonstrate the proposed technique using a case study, in which we quantify the contribution from a major highway with respect to the local background concentration in Auckland, New Zealand. Comparing the diurnal variation of the model-separated background contribution with real measurements from a site upwind of the highway shows that the model estimates are reliable. Amongst all of the pollutants considered, the best estimations of the background were achieved for nitrogen oxides. Although the multi-pronged approach worked well for predominantly vehicle-related pollutants, it could not be used effectively to isolate emissions of PM10 due to the complex and less predictable influence of natural sources (such as marine aerosols). The proposed approach is useful in situations where ambient records from an upwind background station are not available (as required by other techniques) and is potentially transferable to situations such as intersections and arterial roads. Applying this technique to longer time series could help to understand the changes in pollutant concentrations from the road and background sources for different emission scenarios, for different years or seasons. Modelling results also show the potential of such a hybrid semi-empirical models to contribute to our understanding of the physical parameters determining air quality and to validate emissions inventory data.

  14. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10-4 m3/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10-4 m3/s (±18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono-directional configuration, the

  15. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2013-03-15

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of {+-}3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s ({+-}18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed

  16. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique.

    PubMed

    Battista, L; Sciuto, S A; Scorza, A

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (18.0 l∕min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (±18.0 l∕min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono

  17. Fluorescence Based Primer Extension Technique to Determine Transcriptional Starting Points and Cleavage Sites of RNases In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Christopher F.; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence based primer extension (FPE) is a molecular method to determine transcriptional starting points or processing sites of RNA molecules. This is achieved by reverse transcription of the RNA of interest using specific fluorescently labeled primers and subsequent analysis of the resulting cDNA fragments by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Simultaneously, a traditional Sanger sequencing reaction is run on the gel to map the ends of the cDNA fragments to their exact corresponding bases. In contrast to 5'-RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends), where the product must be cloned and multiple candidates sequenced, the bulk of cDNA fragments generated by primer extension can be simultaneously detected in one gel run. In addition, the whole procedure (from reverse transcription to final analysis of the results) can be completed in one working day. By using fluorescently labeled primers, the use of hazardous radioactive isotope labeled reagents can be avoided and processing times are reduced as products can be detected during the electrophoresis procedure. In the following protocol, we describe an in vivo fluorescent primer extension method to reliably and rapidly detect the 5' ends of RNAs to deduce transcriptional starting points and RNA processing sites (e.g., by toxin-antitoxin system components) in S. aureus, E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:25406941

  18. Measurement of Bluetongue Virus Binding to a Mammalian Cell Surface Receptor by an In Situ Immune Fluorescent Staining Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A quantifiable in situ immune fluorescent assay (IFA) was developed to measure bluetongue virus (BTV) binding to mammalian cells. The utility of the assay was demonstrated with both Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and bovine pulmonary artery endothelial (CPAE) cells. Since heparin sulfate (HS) has been ...

  19. APPLICATION OF BIAS AND ADJUSTMENT TECHNIQUES TO THE ETA-CMAQ AIR QUALITY FORECAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current air quality forecast system, based on linking NOAA's Eta meteorological model with EPA's Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model, consistently overpredicts surface ozone concentrations, but simulates its day-to-day variability quite well. The ability of bias cor...

  20. Microfluidic chip based micro RNA detection through the combination of fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhile; Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Wu, Lei; Chen, Peng; Yun, Binfeng; Cui, Yiping

    2017-03-10

    We present a novel microfluidic chip based method for the detection of micro RNA (miRNA) via the combination of fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopies. First, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are immobilized onto a glass slide, forming a SERS enhancing substrate. Then a specificially designed molecular beacon (MB) is attached to the SERS substrate. The 3' end of the MB is decorated with a thiol group to facilitate the attachment of the MB, while the 5' end of the MB is labeled with an organic dye 6-FAM, which is used both as the fluorophore and SERS reporter. In the absence of target miRNA, the MB will form a hairpin structure, making 6-FAM close to the Ag NPs. Hence, the fluorescence of 6-FAM will be quenched and the Raman signal of 6-FAM will be enhanced. On the contrary, with target miRNA present, hybridization between the miRNA and MB will unfold the MB and increase the distance between 6-FAM and the Ag NPs. Thus the fluorescence of 6-FAM will recover and the SERS signal of 6-FAM will decrease. So the target miRNA will simultaneously introduce opposite changing trends in the intensities of the fluorescence and SERS signals. By combining the opposite changes in the two optical spectra, an improved sensitivity and linearity toward the target miRNA is achieved as compared with using solely fluorescence or SERS. Moreover, introducing the microfluidic chip can reduce the reaction time, reagent dosage and complexity of detection. With the improved sensitivity and simplicity, we anticipate that the presented method can have great potential in the investigation of miRNA related diseases.

  1. Microfluidic chip based micro RNA detection through the combination of fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhile; Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Wu, Lei; Chen, Peng; Yun, Binfeng; Cui, Yiping

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel microfluidic chip based method for the detection of micro RNA (miRNA) via the combination of fluorescence and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopies. First, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) are immobilized onto a glass slide, forming a SERS enhancing substrate. Then a specificially designed molecular beacon (MB) is attached to the SERS substrate. The 3‧ end of the MB is decorated with a thiol group to facilitate the attachment of the MB, while the 5‧ end of the MB is labeled with an organic dye 6-FAM, which is used both as the fluorophore and SERS reporter. In the absence of target miRNA, the MB will form a hairpin structure, making 6-FAM close to the Ag NPs. Hence, the fluorescence of 6-FAM will be quenched and the Raman signal of 6-FAM will be enhanced. On the contrary, with target miRNA present, hybridization between the miRNA and MB will unfold the MB and increase the distance between 6-FAM and the Ag NPs. Thus the fluorescence of 6-FAM will recover and the SERS signal of 6-FAM will decrease. So the target miRNA will simultaneously introduce opposite changing trends in the intensities of the fluorescence and SERS signals. By combining the opposite changes in the two optical spectra, an improved sensitivity and linearity toward the target miRNA is achieved as compared with using solely fluorescence or SERS. Moreover, introducing the microfluidic chip can reduce the reaction time, reagent dosage and complexity of detection. With the improved sensitivity and simplicity, we anticipate that the presented method can have great potential in the investigation of miRNA related diseases.

  2. Dielectric controlled excited state relaxation pathways of a representative push-pull stilbene: A mechanistic study using femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, Shahnawaz; Sen, Pratik

    2013-02-01

    Femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique was employed to reinvestigate the intriguing dependence of fluorescence quantum yield of trans-4-dimethylamino-4'-nitrostilbene (DNS) on dielectric properties of the media. In polar solvents, such as methanol and acetonitrile, the two time components of the fluorescence transients were assigned to intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) dynamics and to the depletion of the ICT state to the ground state via internal conversion along the torsional coordinate of nitro moiety. The viscosity independence of the first time component indicates the absence of any torsional coordinate in the charge transfer process. In slightly polar solvent (carbon tetrachloride) the fluorescence transients show a triple exponential behavior. The first time component was assigned to the formation of the ICT state on a 2 ps time scale. Second time component was assigned to the relaxation of the ICT state via two torsion controlled channels. First channel involves the torsional motion about the central double bond leading to the trans-cis isomerization via a conical intersection or avoided crossing. The other channel contributing to the depopulation of ICT state involves the torsional coordinates of dimethylanilino and/or nitrophenyl moieties and leads to the formation of a conformationally relaxed state, which subsequently relaxes back to the ground state radiatively, and is responsible for the high fluorescence quantum yield of DNS in slightly polar solvents such as carbon tetrachloride, toluene, etc. The excited singlet state which is having a dominant π-π* character may also decay via intersystem crossing to the n-π* triplet manifold and thus accounts for the observed triplet yield of the molecule in slightly polar solvents.

  3. A comparison of planar, laser-induced fluorescence, and high-sensitivity interferometry techniques for gas-puff nozzle density measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S. L.; Weber, B. V.; Mosher, D.; Phipps, D. G.; Stephanakis, S. J.; Commisso, R. J.; Qi, N.; Failor, B. H.; Coleman, P. L.

    2008-10-15

    The distribution of argon gas injected by a 12-cm-diameter triple-shell nozzle was characterized using both planar, laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and high-sensitivity interferometry. PLIF is used to measure the density distribution at a given time by detecting fluorescence from an acetone tracer added to the gas. Interferometry involves making time-dependent, line-integrated gas density measurements at a series of chordal locations that are then Abel inverted to obtain the gas density distribution. Measurements were made on nominally identical nozzles later used for gas-puff Z-pinch experiments on the Saturn pulsed-power generator. Significant differences in the mass distributions obtained by the two techniques are presented and discussed, along with the strengths and weaknesses of each method.

  4. Oil species identification technique developed by Gabor wavelet analysis and support vector machine based on concentration-synchronous-matrix-fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyan; Shi, Xiaofeng; Li, Wendong; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Jinliang; Yang, Chun; Wang, Zhendi

    2016-03-15

    Concentration-synchronous-matrix-fluorescence (CSMF) spectroscopy was applied to discriminate the oil species by characterizing the concentration dependent fluorescence properties of petroleum related samples. Seven days weathering experiment of 3 crude oil samples from the Bohai Sea platforms of China was carried out under controlled laboratory conditions and showed that weathering had no significant effect on the CSMF spectra. While different feature extraction methods, such as PCA, PLS and Gabor wavelet analysis, were applied to extract discriminative patterns from CSMF spectra, classifications were made via SVM to compare their respective performance of oil species recognition. Ideal correct rates of oil species recognition of 100% for the different types of oil spill samples and 92% for the closely-related source oil samples were achieved by combining Gabor wavelet with SVM, which indicated its advantages to be developed to a rapid, cost-effective, and accurate forensic oil spill identification technique.

  5. Analyses of Clay Mineralogy of some Southeastern Nigeria Soils using X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igwe, C.; Stahr, K.

    2009-04-01

    Detailed knowledge of soil mineralogy helps in understanding the soil forming processes, the chemical constituent and the general characteristics of the soil. We used x-ray diffraction (XRD) and fluorescence techniques (XRF) to analyse the clay mineralogy and soil chemical properties of varieties of soils within south-eastern Nigeria. The XRD involved both powder and oriented clay analyses. The aim was to determine the clay minerals in both whole sample (fine-earth fraction) and the oriented clays. Soils analysed were from floodplain of alluvial deposits to upland soils derived from shale and sandstone geological formation. The XRD patterns of the clay fraction from selected soils indicate that they are well-defined diffractions at 0.72 nm indicating kaolinite as the dominant clay mineral. Kaolinites are mainly the alumina-silicate clays with 1:1 octahedral and tetrahedral relationship. The 2:1 clay minerals present were illite at 1.0 nm for soils formed on the shale formations, interlayer vermiculite (IV) occurred at 1.4 nm again for soils on shales while smectite was observed especially in floodplain soils at 1.8 nm in those soils. The presence of smectite where it occurred, showed that diffraction peaks found between 1.0 and 1.4 nm in Mg-saturated samples shifted to 1.8 nm after the samples were solvated with glycerol, indicating the presence of smectite in various quantities in the soils. The presence of the 1:1 and 2:1 minerals can be used as a basis for grouping of the soils into expanding and non expanding soils. This grouping is very significant in all activities aimed at managing the soils for sustainable productivity. The energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analyses of the clays confirm the dominance of Si and Al in the soils. In some of the soils EDX showed the presence of K and Fe as being one of the prominent elemental components of the clay minerals. The geochemical properties of the soils as shown by XRF were dominated by the SiO2, Al2O3 and the Fe2O3

  6. Development of steady-state electrical-heating fluorescence-sensing (SEF) technique for thermal characterization of one dimensional (1D) structures by employing graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiang; Li, Changzheng; Yue, Yanan; Xie, Danmei; Xue, Meixin; Hu, Niansu

    2016-11-01

    A fluorescence signal has been demonstrated as an effective implement for micro/nanoscale temperature measurement which can be realized by either direct fluorescence excitation from materials or by employing nanoparticles as sensors. In this work, a steady-state electrical-heating fluorescence-sensing (SEF) technique is developed for the thermal characterization of one-dimensional (1D) materials. In this method, the sample is suspended between two electrodes and applied with steady-state Joule heating. The temperature response of the sample is monitored by collecting a simultaneous fluorescence signal from the sample itself or nanoparticles uniformly attached on it. According to the 1D heat conduction model, a linear temperature dependence of heating powers is obtained, thus the thermal conductivity of the sample can be readily determined. In this work, a standard platinum wire is selected to measure its thermal conductivity to validate this technique. Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are employed as the fluorescence agent for temperature sensing. Parallel measurement by using the transient electro-thermal (TET) technique demonstrates that a small dose of GQDs has negligible influence on the intrinsic thermal property of platinum wire. This SEF technique can be applied in two ways: for samples with a fluorescence excitation capability, this method can be implemented directly; for others with weak or no fluorescence excitation, a very small portion of nanoparticles with excellent fluorescence excitation can be used for temperature probing and thermophysical property measurement.

  7. Measurement techniques investigated for detection of hydrogen chloride gas in ambient air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Nine basic techniques are discussed, ranging from concentration (parts per million) to dosage only (parts per million-seconds) measurement techniques. Data for each technique include lower detection limit, response time, instrument status, and in some cases, specificity. Several techniques discussed can detect ambient hydrogen chloride concentrations below 1 part per million with a response time of seconds.

  8. A Novel Technique to Treat Air Leak Following Lobectomy: Intrapleural Infusion of Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinou, Froso; Potaris, Konstantinos; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.; Tsipas, Panteleimon; Karagkiouzis, Grigorios; Konstantinou, Marios

    2016-01-01

    Background Persistent air leak following pulmonary lobectomy can be very difficult to treat and results in prolonged hospitalization. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a new method of postoperative air leak management using intrapleurally infused fresh frozen plasma via the chest tube. Material/Methods Between June 2008 and June 2014, we retrospectively reviewed 98 consecutive patients who underwent lobectomy for lung cancer and postoperatively developed persistent air leak treated with intrapleural instillation of fresh frozen plasma. Results The study identified 89 men and 9 women, with a median age of 65.5 years (range 48–77 years), with persistent postoperative air leak. Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma was successful in stopping air leaks in 90 patients (92%) within 24 hours, and in 96 patients (98%) within 48 hours, following resumption of the procedure. In the remaining 2, air leak ceased at 14 and 19 days. Conclusions Intrapleural infusion of fresh frozen plasma is a safe, inexpensive, and remarkably effective method for treatment of persistent air leak following lobectomy for lung cancer. PMID:27079644

  9. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Exploratory Development for Air Force Systems. Delivery Order 0006: Paint Stripping Effects on Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    alloy were based upon the brightnesses of the pre-paint FPI indications; the objective was to have a similar distribution of brightness values in each...acetone. • Visually examine the specimens under both UV-A radiation and white light to verify that there is no residual fluorescent indication of any...6 4.5 Brightness Measurement of Penetrant Indications ...................................................................... 7 5. EDDY

  10. Investigating the intersystem crossing rate and triplet quantum yield of Protoporphyrin IX by means of pulse train fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotardo, Fernando; Cocca, Leandro H. Z.; Acunha, Thiago V.; Longoni, Ana; Toldo, Josene; Gonçalves, Paulo F. B.; Iglesias, Bernardo A.; De Boni, Leonardo

    2017-04-01

    Photophysical investigations of PPIX were described in order to determine the triplet conversion efficiency. Time resolved fluorescence and pulse train fluorescence were employed to characterize the main mechanism responsible for deactivation of the first singlet excited state (excited singlet and triplet states). Single pulse and Z-Scan analysis were employed to measure the singlet excited state absorption cross-sections. Theoretical calculations were performed in order to get some properties of PPIX in ground state, first singlet and triplet excited state. A TD-DFT result shows a great possibility of ISC associated to out-of-plane distortions in porphyrinic ring. Furthermore, the B and Q bands in the calculated spectrum are assigned to the four frontier molecular orbitals as proposed by Gouterman for free-based porphyrins.

  11. Tunneled central venous catheter exchange: techniques to improve prevention of air embolism.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Umberto G; Torcia, Pierluca; Rigamonti, Paolo; Colombo, Francesca; Giordano, Antonino; Gallieni, Maurizio; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Malfunctioning tunneled hemodialysis central venous catheters (CVCs), because of thrombotic or infectious complications, are frequently exchanged. During the CVC exchanging procedure, there are several possible technical complications, as in first insertion, including air embolism. Prevention remains the key to the management of air embolism. Herein, we emphasize the technical tricks capable of reducing the risk of air embolism in long-term CVC exchange. In particular, adoption of a 5 to 10 degrees Trendelenburg position, direct puncture of the previous CVC venous lumen for guide-wire insertion, as opposed to guide-wire introduction after cutting the CVC, a light manual compression of the internal jugular vein venotomy site after catheter removal. The Valsalva maneuvre in collaborating patients, valved introducers, and correction of hypovolemia are also useful precautions. Principles of air embolism diagnosis and treatment are also outlined in the article.

  12. [Quality of interior air: biological contaminants and their effects on health; bioaerosols and gathering techniques].

    PubMed

    Bălan, Gabriela

    2007-01-01

    Indoor Air Quality: biological contaminants and health effects; airborne organisms and sampling instruments. Biological contaminants include bacteria, molds, viruses, animal dander and cat saliva, house dust, mites, cockroaches and pollen. Symptoms of health problems caused by biological pollutants include sneezing, watery eyes, coughing, shortness of breath, dizziness, lethargy, fevers. Children, elderly people with breathing problems, allergies and lung diseases are particularly susceptible to disease-causing biological agents in the indoor air. It is convenient to consider microbiological samplers for collecting organisms in air as falling into several broad categories. Many popular microbiological air samplers use the principle of impaction to trap the organisms by impacting them directly on to agar. Further distinct groups are the impingers, which operate by impinging organisms into liquid.

  13. The Refuelable Zinc-air Battery: Alternative Techniques for Zinc and Electrolyte Regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J F; Krueger, R

    2006-01-19

    An investigation was conducted into alternative techniques for zinc and electrolyte regeneration and reuse in the refuelable zinc/air battery that was developed by LLNL and previously tested on a moving electric bus using cut wire. Mossy zinc was electrodeposited onto a bipolar array of inclined Ni plates with an energy consumption of 1.8 kWh/kg. Using a H{sub 2}-depolarized anode, zinc was deposited at 0.6 V (0.8 kA/m{sup 2}); the open circuit voltage was 0.45 V. Three types of fuel pellets were tested and compared with results for 0.75 mm cut wire: spheres produced in a spouted bed (UCB); coarse powder produced by gas-atomization (Noranda); and irregular pellets produced by chopping 1-mm plates of compacted zinc fines (Eagle-Picher, Inc.). All three types transported within the cell. The coarse powder fed continuously from hopper to cell, as did the compacted pellets (< 0.83 mm). Large particles (> 0.83 mm; Eagle-Picher and UCB) failed to feed from hopper into cell, being held up in the 2.5 mm wide channel connecting hopper to cell. Increasing channel width to {approx}3.5 mm should allow all three types to be used. Energy losses were determined for shorting of cells during refueling. The shorting currents between adjacent hoppers through zinc particle bridges were determined using both coarse powder and chopped compressed zinc plates. A physical model was developed allowing scaling our results for electrode polarization and bed resistance Shorting was found to consume < 0.02% of the capacity of the cell and to dissipate {approx}0.2 W/cell of heat. Corrosion rates were determined for cut wire in contact with current collector materials and battery-produced ZnO-saturated electrolyte. The rates were 1.7% of cell capacity per month at ambient temperatures; and 0.08% of capacity for 12 hours at 57 C. The total energy conversion efficiency for zinc recovery using the hydrogen was estimated at 34% (natural gas to battery terminals)--comparable to fuel cells. Producing

  14. Monte Carlo Simulation of Characteristic Secondary Fluorescence in Electron Probe Microanalysis of Homogeneous Samples Using the Splitting Technique.

    PubMed

    Petaccia, Mauricio; Segui, Silvina; Castellano, Gustavo

    2015-06-01

    Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) is based on the comparison of characteristic intensities induced by monoenergetic electrons. When the electron beam ionizes inner atomic shells and these ionizations cause the emission of characteristic X-rays, secondary fluorescence can occur, originating from ionizations induced by X-ray photons produced by the primary electron interactions. As detectors are unable to distinguish the origin of these characteristic X-rays, Monte Carlo simulation of radiation transport becomes a determinant tool in the study of this fluorescence enhancement. In this work, characteristic secondary fluorescence enhancement in EPMA has been studied by using the splitting routines offered by PENELOPE 2008 as a variance reduction alternative. This approach is controlled by a single parameter NSPLIT, which represents the desired number of X-ray photon replicas. The dependence of the uncertainties associated with secondary intensities on NSPLIT was studied as a function of the accelerating voltage and the sample composition in a simple binary alloy in which this effect becomes relevant. The achieved efficiencies for the simulated secondary intensities bear a remarkable improvement when increasing the NSPLIT parameter; although in most cases an NSPLIT value of 100 is sufficient, some less likely enhancements may require stronger splitting in order to increase the efficiency associated with the simulation of secondary intensities.

  15. Aquatic and terrestrial optical measurements - laser induced fluorescence technique (ATOM-LIFT): Summer 1997 field measurement campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurtrey, James E., III; Cecchi, Giovanna; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Kim, Moon S.; Bazzani, Marco; Corp, Lawrence A.

    1998-07-01

    A joint IROE-CNR, NASA/GSFC, and USDA/ARS measurement campaign was conducted in Italy for a three week period in July, 1997. The campaign was split into two parts: the first part for aquatic vegetation studies and the second part for terrestrial vegetation studies. The main objective of the campaign was to study optical properties of intact plant material as it relates to photosynthetic activity of living vegetation. The aquatic studies were carried out at an aquarium-laboratory in the seashore city of Livorno on the West coast of Italy. The investigations involved an important sea grass species that is native to the Mediterranean Sea. The terrestrial studies were carried out Northeast of the Town of St. Stefano di Cadore (Belluno), Italy. Measurements were taken in a wooded site at an Italian Department of Forestry Station on species of natural alpine vegetation. Instrumentation available for the studies were the Italian Fluorescence Light Detection And Ranging (FLIDAR) System, the NASA/USDA Fluorescence Imaging System (FIS), the Perkin Elmer Spectrofluorometer and LI-COR 6400 infrared gas exchange analyzer for photosynthesis measurements. Preliminary evaluations, analysis, and summaries were made by personnel from both Italian and United Sates groups on data collected during the measurement campaign. The joint Italian/American data collection effort with Aquatic and Terrestrial Optical Measurements produced a range of data for characterizing the relationships between fluorescence and the photosynthetic potentials of vegetative scenes.

  16. A turn-on fluorescence-sensing technique for glucose determination based on graphene oxide-DNA interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hui; Lin, Zihan; Su, Xingguang

    2014-11-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional carbon nanomaterial one atom thick. Interactions between graphene oxide (GO) and ssDNA containing different numbers of bases have been proved to be remarkably different. In this paper we propose a novel approach for turn-on fluorescence sensing determination of glucose. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced by glucose oxidase-catalysed oxidation of glucose. In the presence of ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) the hydroxyl radical (•OH) is generated from H2O2 by the Fenton reaction. This attacks FAM-labelled long ssDNA causing irreversible cleavage, as a result of the oxidative effect of •OH, producing an FAM-linked DNA fragment. Because of the weak interaction between GO and short FAM-linked DNA fragments, restoration of DNA fluorescence can be achieved by addition of glucose. Due to the excellent fluorescence quenching efficiency of GO and the specific catalysis of glucose oxidase, the sensitivity and selectivity of this method for GO-DNA sensing are extremely high. The linear range is from 0.5 to 10 μmol L(-1) and the detection limit for glucose is 0.1 μmol L(-1). The method has been successfully used for analysis of glucose in human serum.

  17. Determination of tungsten in tantalum-tungsten alloy by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry using fusion, thin layer, and pressed powder pellet techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lunfu; Zou, Deshuang; Dai, Yichun; Tang, Guangping

    2015-08-01

    A method is described for the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) determination of tungsten in tantalum-tungsten alloy over the range of 10.5%-13.5%. The sample was prepared by three methods, namely, borate fusion, filter paper disk, and pressed powder pellet, respectively. We compared the feature of the three methods of specimen preparation and found that filter paper disk method was the most suitable technique for specimen preparation. Furthermore, the results were compared with those given by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and the relative standard deviation was less than 2%, which could meet the requirement of this application.

  18. Data on Heavy metal in coastal sediments from South East Coast of Tamilnadu, India using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Technique.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, J; Senthilkumar, G; Gandhi, M Suresh; Ravisankar, R

    2016-12-01

    This article contains the chemical and geographical data and figures for the chemical data in sediments of East Coast (Pattipulam to Dhevanampattinam) of Tamilnadu. The obtained data are related to the research article "Heavy Metal Assessment in Sediment Samples Collected From Pattipulam to Dhevanampattinam along the East Coast of Tamil Nadu Using EDXRF Technique" (Chandramohan et al., 2016) [1]. Chemical data are collected from Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (EDXRF). Furthermore, the obtained chemical data describes it in more detail in the figures.

  19. In vivo validation of a bimodal technique combining time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrasonic backscatter microscopy for diagnosis of oral carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Xie, Hongtao; Liu, Jing; Lam, Matthew; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Zhou, Feifei; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Dobbie, Allison; Tinling, Steven L.; Gandour-Edwards, Regina F.; Monsky, Wayne L.; Gregory Farwell, D.; Marcu, Laura

    2012-11-01

    Tissue diagnostic features generated by a bimodal technique integrating scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and ultrasonic backscatter microscopy (UBM) are investigated in an in vivo hamster oral carcinoma model. Tissue fluorescence is excited by a pulsed nitrogen laser and spectrally and temporally resolved using a set of filters/dichroic mirrors and a fast digitizer, respectively. A 41-MHz focused transducer (37-μm axial, 65-μm lateral resolution) is used for UBM scanning. Representative lesions of the different stages of carcinogenesis show that fluorescence characteristics complement ultrasonic features, and both correlate with histological findings. These results demonstrate that TRFS-UBM provide a wealth of co-registered, complementary data concerning tissue composition and structure as it relates to disease status. The direct co-registration of the TRFS data (sensitive to surface molecular changes) with the UBM data (sensitive to cross-sectional structural changes and depth of tumor invasion) is expected to play an important role in pre-operative diagnosis and intra-operative determination of tumor margins.

  20. Cl2 Measurements in Polluted Coastal Air Using a Br- Addition CIMS Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, M. J.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular chlorine (Cl2) was measured in ambient air using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) with Br- as a reagent ion. Ionization was carried out by adding CHBr3 to ambient air and flowing the gas mixture through a 63Ni ion source maintained at 300 Torr. The resulting Cl2Br- adduct was collisionally dissociated in a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer and detected as Cl-. Ambient Cl2 measurements were made at Irvine, CA, from August 1-8, 2008. Air was drawn to the instrument from outside via a ~4m long laminar flow inlet. Inlet and instrument blanks were assessed by passing ambient air through carbonate-coated glass wool, and the instrument was calibrated with a Cl2 permeation tube. During this study, the mean detection limit for Cl2 was estimated at approximately 2 ppt. Cl2 showed a diel cycle on the days it was detectable, with nighttime mixing ratios up to about 15 ppt and daytime values of a few ppt or less. A rapid decrease in Cl2 in surface air was observed overnight in association with stagnation of the nocturnal surface layer.

  1. Portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy as a rapid screening technique for analysis of TiO2 and ZnO in sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Lim, Jin-Hee; Quevedo, Ivan R.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Linder, Sean W.

    2016-02-01

    This investigation reports a rapid and simple screening technique for the quantification of titanium and zinc in commercial sunscreens using portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (pXRF). A highly evolved technique, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was chosen as a comparative technique to pXRF, and a good correlation (r2 > 0.995) with acceptable variations (≤ 25%) in results between both techniques was observed. Analytical figures of merit such as detection limit, quantitation limit, and linear range of the method are reported for the pXRF technique. This method has a good linearity (r2 > 0.995) for the analysis of titanium (Ti) in the range of 0.4-14.23 wt%, and zinc (Zn) in the range of 1.0-23.90 wt%. However, most commercial sunscreens contain organic ingredients, and these ingredients are known to cause matrix effects. The development of appropriate matrix matched working standards to obtain the calibration curve was found to be a major challenge for the pXRF measurements. In this study, we have overcome the matrix effect by using metal-free commercial sunscreens as a dispersing media for the preparation of working standards. An easy extension of this unique methodology for preparing working standards in different matrices was also reported. This method is simple, rapid, and cost-effective and, in comparison to conventional techniques (e.g., ICP-MS), did not generate toxic wastes during sample analysis.

  2. The study of in vivo x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technique for gadolinium (Gd) measurements in human bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; Nie, L. H.

    2016-08-01

    An in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source, for the detection of gadolinium has been investigated. Gd is of interest because of the extensive use of Gd-based contrast agents in MR imaging. A human simulating bone phantom set has been developed. The phantoms were doped with seven concentrations of Gd. Additional elements important for in vivo x-ray fluorescence, Na, Cl and Ca, were also included to create an overall elemental composition consistent with the Reference Man. A new 5 GBq 109Cd source was purchased to improve the source activity in comparison to the previous study (0.17 GBq). The previously published minimum detection limit (MDL) for Gd phantom measurements using KXRF system was 3.3 ppm. In this study the minimum detection limit for bare bone phantoms was found to reduce the MDL to 0.8, a factor of 4.1. The previous published data used only three layers of plastic as soft tissue equivalent materials and found the MDL of 4-4.8 ppm. In this study we have used the plastic with more realistic thicknesses to simulate a soft tissue at tibia. The detection limits for phantoms with Lucite as a tissue equivalent, using a new source, was determined to be 1.81 to 3.47 ppm (μg Gd per gram phantom). Our next study would be testing an in vivo K x-ray fluorescence system, based on 109Cd source on human volunteers who went through MR imaging and were injected by Gd.

  3. Non-dispersive atomic-fluorescence spectrometry of trace amounts of bismuth by introduction of its gaseous hydride into a premixed argon (entrained air)-hydrogen flame.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Nakahara, T; Musha, S

    1979-10-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of bismuth by generation of its gaseous hydride and introduction of the hydride into a premixed argon (entrained air)-hydrogen flame, the atomic-fluorescence lines from which are all detected by use of a non-dispersive system. The detection limit is 5 pg/ml, or 0.1 ng of bismuth, but the reagent blank found in a 20-ml sample volume was approximately 2 ng of bismuth. Analytical working curves obtained by measuring peak-heights and integrated peak-areas of the signals are linear over a range of about four orders of magnitude from the detection limit. Perchloric, phosphoric and sulphuric acids up to 2.0M concentration give no interference, but nitric acid gives slight depression of the signal. The presence of silver, gold, nickel, palladium, platinum, selenium and tellurium in 1000-fold ratio to bismuth causes pronounced depression of the signal, whereas mercury and tin slightly enhance the atomic-fluorescence signal. The method has been applied to the determination of bismuth in aluminium-base alloys and sulphide ores with use of the standard additions method. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by flame atomic-absorption spectrometry and optical emission spectrometry with an inductively coupled plasma.

  4. A detection method of vegetable oils in edible blended oil based on three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Yu-Tian

    2016-12-01

    Edible blended vegetable oils are made from two or more refined oils. Blended oils can provide a wider range of essential fatty acids than single vegetable oils, which helps support good nutrition. Nutritional components in blended oils are related to the type and content of vegetable oils used, and a new, more accurate, method is proposed to identify and quantify the vegetable oils present using cluster analysis and a Quasi-Monte Carlo integral. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra were obtained at 250-400nm (excitation) and 260-750nm (emission). Mixtures of sunflower, soybean and peanut oils were used as typical examples to validate the effectiveness of the method.

  5. [Changes in the model membrane structure induced by ribonuclease and lysozyme studied by the fluorescent probe technique].

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, G P

    1999-01-01

    Using fluorescent probes DSM and DSP-12, the effect of ribonuclease and lysozyme on the structural state of liposomes composed of phosphatidylcholine and diphosphatidylglycerol was studied. A correlation between the changes in probe quantum yield and the amount of protein-bound lipids was established. It is assumed that the formation of protein-lipid complexes increases the packing density of lipids and restricts their mobility. As the content of diphosphatidylglycerol in the lipid bilayer increases, the condensing effect of proteins becomes more pronounced.

  6. Comparative studies of metal air pollution by atomic spectrometry techniques and biomonitoring with moss and lichens.

    PubMed

    State, Gabriel; Popescu, Ion V; Radulescu, Cristiana; Macris, Cristina; Stihi, Claudia; Gheboianu, Anca; Dulama, Ioana; Niţescu, Ovidiu

    2012-09-01

    Our study was dedicated to the analysis of air pollution level with metals in Dambovita County, Romania; maps of the concentration distributions for air pollutants were drawn; statistical analysis includes calculation of the background concentrations and the contamination factors. The highest values of the contamination factor CF is 63.1 ± 6.63 for mosses samples and 33.12 ± 3.96 for lichens and it indicates extreme contaminations in the surroundings of steel works and an electric plant. The comparison of the distribution maps for Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations enables the identification of the pollution sources, the limits of areas with very high levels of pollution, the comparison of the concentration gradients in some areas and the influence of woodlands on the spread of pollutants through the air.

  7. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200μs. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  8. Application of cytoplasmic Ca2+ fluorescence imaging techniques to study the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine ginseng extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Heming; Liu, Songhao

    2009-11-01

    The exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine offers advantages including good efficiency and smaller side-effects, however, the exact mechanisms have not been classified. A lot of literatures indicated the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations of skeletal muscle cells increased significantly during exercise-induced fatigue. This study is aimed to establish a rat skeletal muscle cell model of exercise-induced fatigue. We applied cytoplasmic Ca2+ fluorescence imaging techniques to study the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine ginseng extract. In our research, the muscle tissues from the newborn 3 days rats were taken out and digested into cells. The cells were randomly divided into the ginseng extract group and the control group. The cells from the two groups were cultured in the medium respectively added 2mg/ml ginseng extract and 2mg/ml D-hanks solution. After differentiating into myotubes, the two groups of cells treated with a fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM were put on the confocal microscope and the fluorescence intensity of cells pre- and post- stimulation with dexamethasone were detected. It was found that cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations of the two groups of cells both increased post-stimulation, however, the increasing amplitude of fluorescence intensity of the ginseng extract group was significantly lower than that of the control group. In conclusion, stimulating the cells with dexamethasone is a kind of workable cell models of exercise-induced fatigue, and the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by ginseng extract may be connected to regulatating cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations.

  9. Analgesic efficacy using loss of resistance to air vs. saline in combined spinal epidural technique for labour analgesia.

    PubMed

    Leo, S; Lim, Y; Sia, A T H

    2008-09-01

    Identification of the epidural space is often performed using the loss of resistance technique to either air or saline. We sought to investigate if the medium used affected the quality of analgesia obtained by parturients who received labour epidurals. We conducted a retrospective audit of labour epidurals performed on nulliparous parturients in our institution from May 2003 to March 2005. All epidural catheters were inserted by senior obstetric anaesthetists using a combined spinal epidural technique. The following information was recorded: parturients' demographic data, loss of resistance technique used, type and amount of local anaesthetic solution administered, complications encountered during procedure, pre-block and post-block pain scores, incidence of breakthrough pain requiring supplemental medication and post-block side-effects. Data from 2848 patients were collected and analysed; 56% of patients made up the saline group and 44% the air group. Patients in both groups had similar demographic profiles and similar incidences of complications and post-block side-effects. However patients in the air group had a higher incidence of recurrent breakthrough pain P = 0.023). We also identified three other factors that were associated with an increased incidence of recurrent breakthrough pain; administration of pre-block oxytocin, sitting position of the parturient during the procedure and the use of intrathecal bupivacaine for induction of analgesia. Our findings suggest that a loss of resistance to air is associated with a higher incidence of recurrent breakthrough pain among parturients who received combined spinal epidural analgesia for labour than a loss of resistance to saline.

  10. Reference-independent wide field fluorescence lifetime measurements using Frequency-Domain (FD) technique based on phase and amplitude crossing point.

    PubMed

    Yahav, Gilad; Barnoy, Eran; Roth, Nir; Turgeman, Lior; Fixler, Dror

    2016-10-24

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is an essential tool in many scientific fields such as biology and medicine thanks to the known advantages of the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) over the classical fluorescence intensity (FI). However, the frequency domain (FD) FLIM technique suffers from its strong dependence on the reference and its compliance to the sample. In this paper, we suggest a new way to calculate the FLT by using the crossing point (CRPO) between the modulation and phase FLTs measured over several light emitting diode (LED) DC currents values instead of either method alone. This new technique was validated by measuring homogeneous substances with known FLT, where the CRPO appears to be the optimal measuring point. Furthermore, the CRPO method was applied in heterogeneous samples. It was found that the CRPO in known mixed solutions is the weighted average of the used solutions. While measuring B16 and lymphocyte cells, the CRPO of the DAPI compound in single FLT regions was measured at 3.5 ± 0.06 ns and at 2.83 ± 0.07 ns, respectively, both of which match previous reports and multi-frequency analyses. This paper suggests the CRPO as a new method to extract the FLT in problematic cases such as high MCP gains and heterogeneous environments. In traditional FD FLIM measurements, the variation in phase angle and modulation are measured. By measuring over varying DC currents, another variation is detected in the FLT determined through the phase and modulation methods, with the CRPO indicating the true FLT.

  11. Comparison of the measurement techniques employed for evaluation of ambient air odor quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnowski, Wojciech; Majchrzak, Tomasz; Gebicki, Jacek; Dymerski, Tomasz; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation on ambient air odor quality in a vicinity of the industrial sewage treatment plant being a part of the crude oil processing plant. The investigation was performed during spring-winter season using a prototype of electronic nose and the Nasal Ranger field olfactometers. The prototype was equipped with a set of six semiconductor sensors by FIGARO Co. and one PID-type sensor. The field olfactometers were used to determine mean concentration of odorants, which amounted from 2.2 to 20.2 ou/m3 depending on the place of measurement. In case of the investigation with the electronic nose prototype a classification of the ambient air samples with respect to the place of sampling was performed utilizing the kNN (where k=3) algorithm supported with a cross-validation method. Correct classification of the ambient air samples was at the level of 47.9%. Performed investigation revealed that evaluation of the ambient air samples with respect to odor was possible using the electronic nose instrument.

  12. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 10: Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-04-12

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program. The report provides information to home owners who want to make their existing homes more energy efficient by sealing leaks in the building envelope (ceiling, walls, and floors) that let in drafts and let conditioned air escape. The report provides descriptions of 19 key areas of the home where air sealing can improve home performance and energy efficiency. The report includes suggestions on how to find a qualified weatherization or home performance contractor, what to expect in a home energy audit, opportune times for performing air sealing, and what safety and health concerns to be aware of. The report describes some basic building science concepts and topics related to air sealing including ventilation, diagnostic tools, and code requirements. The report will be available for free download from the DOE Building America website. It is a suitable consumer education tool for home performance and weatherization contractors to share with customers to describe the process and value of home energy retrofits.

  13. 77 FR 41337 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Control Technique...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... quality standard (NAAQS) for ozone. This action is being taken under the Clean Air Act (CAA). DATES... plastic parts, metal furniture, large appliances, and miscellaneous metal parts. EPA requires all ozone... substantially as effective as regulations in reducing emissions of VOC in ozone nonattainment areas....

  14. Determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) by application of online 77 K fluorescence spectroscopy and a sweeping technique in micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ching; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2002-10-16

    The principal advantage of the use of Shopl'skii effect (low temperature spectrum) is that spectral sharpening occurs both in absorption and emission. However, thus far using the technique of capillary electrophoresis/low temperature fluorescence spectroscopy (CE/LTFS) either at 77 or 4.2 K remains difficult to obtain an on-line spectrum, if the analyte is present at low concentration. This paper examines the feasibility of combining the techniques of online concentration and CE/LTFS to identify LSD and related compounds in urine at 77 K. To improve sensitivity, sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) and cation-selective exhaustive injection-sweep-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CSEI-sweep-MEKC) were used for on-line concentration which resulted in detection limits of approximately 20 approximately 60 ppt, respectively.

  15. Injectant mole-fraction imaging in compressible mixing flows using planar laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Abbitt, John D., III; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is described for imaging the injectant mole-fraction distribution in nonreacting compressible mixing flow fields. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, is induced by a broadband argon-ion laser and collected using an intensified charge-injection-device array camera. The technique eliminates the thermodynamic dependence of the iodine fluorescence in the compressible flow field by taking the ratio of two images collected with identical thermodynamic flow conditions but different iodine seeding conditions.

  16. Laser Scanning–Based Tissue Autofluorescence/Fluorescence Imaging (LS-TAFI), a New Technique for Analysis of Microanatomy in Whole-Mount Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hidetoshi; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Bhat, Ramray; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Seiki, Motoharu; Bissell, Mina J.

    2012-01-01

    Intact organ structure is essential in maintaining tissue specificity and cellular differentiation. Small physiological or genetic variations lead to changes in microanatomy that, if persistent, could have functional consequences and may easily be masked by the heterogeneity of tissue anatomy. Current imaging techniques rely on histological, two-dimensional sections requiring sample manipulation that are essentially two dimensional. We have developed a method for three-dimensional imaging of whole-mount, unsectioned mammalian tissues to elucidate subtle and detailed micro- and macroanatomies in adult organs and embryos. We analyzed intact or dissected organ whole mounts with laser scanning–based tissue autofluorescence/fluorescence imaging (LS-TAFI). We obtained clear visualization of microstructures within murine mammary glands and mammary tumors and other organs without the use of immunostaining and without probes or fluorescent reporter genes. Combining autofluorescence with reflected light signals from chromophore-stained tissues allowed identification of individual cells within three-dimensional structures of whole-mounted organs. This technique could be useful for rapid diagnosis of human clinical samples and possibly the effect of subtle variations such as low dose radiation. PMID:22542846

  17. Online hourly determination of 62 VOCs in ambient air: system evaluation and comparison with another two analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Durana, Nieves; Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Luclo; García, José A; Ilardia, Juan L; Gómez, M Carmen; Gangoiti, Gotzon

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents results of the processing and validation of data collected by an automatic gas chromatograph (AGC). This system was used to monitor 62 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban air in the Basque Country, Spain. The nonpolar compounds (C2-C10) identified-paraffins, olefins, aromatics, and chlorinated compounds-accounted for 88% of the mass of total non-methane hydrocarbons (TNMHCs) in ambient air. The evaluation of linearity, precision, detection limits (DLs), and stability of retention times (RTs) indicates that the equipment is suitable for measuring ambient air automatically for prolonged periods (6 months). The calibration of the equipment using response factors calculated on the basis of the effective carbon number (ECN) showed variations of over 10% for acetylene, isoprene, and n-hexane. The results provided by the automatic chromatograph correlated significantly with simultaneous results from other widely used techniques for determining VOCs in ambient air: (1) portable GC, equipped with photoionization detector (PID), and (2) active adsorption on Tenax-TA followed by thermal desorption and chromatographic analysis.

  18. Fast fabrication of copper nanowire transparent electrodes by a high intensity pulsed light sintering technique in air.

    PubMed

    Ding, Su; Jiu, Jinting; Tian, Yanhong; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2015-12-14

    Copper nanowire transparent electrodes have received increasing interest due to the low price and nearly equal electrical conductivity compared with other TEs based on silver nanowires and indium tin oxide (ITO). However, a post-treatment at high temperature in an inert atmosphere or a vacuum environment was necessary to improve the conductivity of Cu NW TEs due to the easy oxidation of copper in air atmosphere, which greatly cancelled out the low price advantage of Cu NWs. Here, a high intensity pulsed light technique was introduced to sinter and simultaneously deoxygenate these Cu NWs into a highly conductive network at room temperature in air. The strong light absorption capacity of Cu NWs enabled the welding of the nanowires at contact spots, as well as the removal of the thin layer of residual organic compounds, oxides and hydroxide of copper even in air. The Cu NW TE with a sheet resistance of 22.9 Ohm sq(-1) and a transparency of 81.8% at 550 nm has been successfully fabricated within only 6 milliseconds exposure treatment, which is superior to other films treated at high temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere. The HIPL process was simple, convenient and fast to fabricate easily oxidized Cu NW TEs in large scale in an air atmosphere, which will largely extend the application of cheap Cu NW TEs.

  19. 75 FR 59180 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... Technique Guidelines for Paper, Film, and Foil Coatings AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... adopting the requirements of EPA's Control Technique Guidelines (CTG) for paper, film, and foil coatings..., Film, and Foil Coatings,'' that is located in the ``Rules and Regulations'' section of this...

  20. Fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques (FISH) to detect changes in CYP19a gene expression of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    SciTech Connect

    Park, June-Woo; Tompsett, Amber; Zhang, Xiaowei; Newsted, John L.; Jones, Paul D.; Au, Doris; Kong, Richard; Wu, Rudolf S.S.; Giesy, John P. Hecker, Markus

    2008-10-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a sensitive in situ hybridization methodology using fluorescence-labeled riboprobes (FISH) that allows for the evaluation of gene expression profiles simultaneously in multiple target tissues of whole fish sections of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes). To date FISH methods have been limited in their application due to autofluorescence of tissues, fixatives or other components of the hybridization procedure. An optimized FISH method, based on confocal fluorescence microscopy was developed to reduce the autofluorescence signal. Because of its tissue- and gender-specific expression and relevance in studies of endocrine disruption, gonadal aromatase (CYP19a) was used as a model gene. The in situ hybridization (ISH) system was validated in a test exposure with the aromatase inhibitor fadrozole. The optimized FISH method revealed tissue-specific expression of the CYP19a gene. Furthermore, the assay could differentiate the abundance of CYP19a mRNA among cell types. Expression of CYP19a was primarily associated with early stage oocytes, and expression gradually decreased with increasing maturation. No expression of CYP19a mRNA was observed in other tissues such as brain, liver, or testes. Fadrozole (100 {mu}g/L) caused up-regulation of CYP19a expression, a trend that was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis on excised tissues. In a combination approach with gonad histology, it could be shown that the increase in CYP19a expression as measured by RT-PCR on a whole tissue basis was due to a combination of both increases in numbers of CYP19a-containing cells and an increase in the amount of CYP19a mRNA present in the cells.

  1. Using respirometric techniques and fluorescent in situ hybridization to evaluate the heterotrophic active biomass in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A; Wentzel, M C; Bux, F

    2007-10-15

    The separation and accurate quantification of active biomass components in activated sludge is of paramount importance in models, used for the management and design of waste water (WW) treatment plants. Accurate estimates of microbial population concentrations and the direct, in situ determination of kinetic parameters could improve the calibration and validation of existing models of biological nutrient removal activated sludge systems. The aim of this study was to obtain correlations between heterotrophic active biomass (Z(BH)) concentrations predicted by mathematical models and quantitative information obtained by Fluorescent in situ hybridizations (FISH). Respirometric batch test were applied to mixed liquors drawn from a well-defined parent anoxic/aerobic activated sludge system to quantify the Z(BH) concentrations. Similarly fluorescent labeled, 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes specific for ammonia and nitrite oxidizers were used in combination with DAPI staining to validate the Z(BH) active biomass component in activate sludge respirometric batch tests. For the direct enumeration and simultaneous in situ analysis of the distribution of nitrifying bacteria, in situ hybridization with oligonucleotide probes were used. Probes (NSO 1225, NSR 1156, and NIT3) were used to target the nitrifiers and the universal probe (EUB MIX) was used to target all Eubacteria. Deducting the lithoautotrophic population from the total bacteria population revealed the Z(BH) population. A conversion factor of 8.49 x 10(-11) mg VSS/cell was applied to express the Z(BH) in terms of COD concentration. Z(BH) values obtained by molecular probing correlated closely with values obtained from the modified batch test. However, the trend of consistently poor correspondence of measured and theoretical concentrations were evident. Therefore, the focus of this study was to investigate alternative technology, such as FISH to validate or replace kinetic parameters which are invariably

  2. Development of simulation techniques suitable for the analysis of air traffic control situations and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A terminal area simulation is described which permits analysis and synthesis of current and advanced air traffic management system configurations including ground and airborne instrumentation and new and modified aircraft characteristics. Ground elements in the simulation include navigation aids, surveillance radars, communication links, air-route structuring, ATC procedures, airport geometries and runway handling constraints. Airborne elements include traffic samples with individual aircraft performance and operating characteristics and aircraft navigation equipment. The simulation also contains algorithms for conflict detection, conflict resolution, sequencing and pilot-controller data links. The simulation model is used to determine the sensitivities of terminal area traffic flow, safety and congestion to aircraft performance characteristics, avionics systems, and other ATC elements.

  3. Joint Doctrine and Joint Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures for Air Mobility Opearations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    135 boom type aircraft refueling an F-15E. I-13 General Overview receptacle. Boom refueling allows for the rapid transfer of fuel under high pressure ...had spread to epidemic levels from consumption of contaminated water. A C-5 loaded with a reverse osmosis water purification unit (ROWPU) would help...fixed-wing aircraft. Movement of patients requires special air traffic control considerations to comply with patient-driven altitude and pressurization

  4. Identification of European Air Masses Using an Interactive Computer Technique for Separating Mixed Normal Distributions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    classifying a maritime surface, he refers to the Pacific, Atlantic, or Gulf of Mexico using the general term "maritime" only when the exact origin is...portions of North Atlantic NPA PA air modified over warm North Atlantic TC Southern U.S. and Northern Mexico TG Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean NTG TG...Bergeron, T., 1928: " Uber Die Dreidimensional Verknupfende Wetteranalyse, Teil I." Geofys. Pub!., Vol. 5, No. 6. Berggren, R., 1953: "On Temperature

  5. Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques.

    PubMed

    Heredia Rivera, Birmania; Gerardo Rodriguez, Martín

    2016-10-01

    Particulate matter accumulated on car engine air-filters (CAFs) was examined in order to investigate the potential use of these devices as efficient samplers for collecting street level air that people are exposed to. The morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of a variety of particles were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The particulate matter accumulated by the CAFs was studied in two categories; the first was of removed particles by friction, and the second consisted of particles retained on the filters. Larger particles with a diameter of 74-10 µm were observed in the first category. In the second one, the detected particles had a diameter between 16 and 0.7 µm. These particles exhibited different morphologies and composition, indicating mostly a soil origin. The elemental composition revealed the presence of three groups: mineral (clay and asphalt), metallic (mainly Fe), and biological particles (vegetal and animal debris). The palynological analysis showed the presence of pollen grains associated with urban plants. These results suggest that CAFs capture a mixture of atmospheric particles, which can be analyzed in order to monitor urban air. Thus, the continuous availability of large numbers of filters and the retroactivity associated to the car routes suggest that these CAFs are very useful for studying the high traffic zones within a city.

  6. Pico2 Monitoring of Transferred Jejunum Perfusion Using an Air Tonometry Technique After Hypopharyngeal Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Imanishi, Yorihisa; Ito, Fumihiro; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Kato, Takashi; Nameki, Hideo; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of intraluminal Pco2 (Pico2) monitoring by air tonometry for the assessment of the vascular condition of the transferred jejunum after surgery for hypopharyngeal cancer. Pico2 in the transplanted jejunum of 24 patients was monitored using air tonometry after radical surgery for hypopharyngeal cancer from 2003 to 2010. All but 1 patient, who removed the catheter before monitoring began, were monitored safely. Pico2 in the transferred jejunum correlated with arterial Pco2 (Paco2) that was measured concurrently, and dissociation of Pico2 from Paco2 was observed in cases with vascular complication. In those cases without postoperative vascular complication, the Pico2 value gradually increased for 3 hours but then decreased by 12 hours after surgery. Three patients experienced major vascular complication. All 3 patients had continuous elevation of Pico2 >100 mm Hg, although vascular flow in 1 patient recovered by removal of a venous thrombosis and reanastomosis of the vein 7.5 hours after surgery. Four other patients who experienced elevation of Pico2 had their skin suture released for decompression of their neck wound, resulting in a decrease in Pico2 after treatment. The current results demonstrated that continuous monitoring of Pico2 by air tonometry accurately reflects the vascular condition of the transferred jejunum, and this method is one of the best options for postoperative monitoring of jejunum blood perfusion. PMID:25789955

  7. Characterization of Airborne Particles Collected from Car Engine Air Filters Using SEM and EDX Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Heredia Rivera, Birmania; Gerardo Rodriguez, Martín

    2016-01-01

    Particulate matter accumulated on car engine air-filters (CAFs) was examined in order to investigate the potential use of these devices as efficient samplers for collecting street level air that people are exposed to. The morphology, microstructure, and chemical composition of a variety of particles were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). The particulate matter accumulated by the CAFs was studied in two categories; the first was of removed particles by friction, and the second consisted of particles retained on the filters. Larger particles with a diameter of 74–10 µm were observed in the first category. In the second one, the detected particles had a diameter between 16 and 0.7 µm. These particles exhibited different morphologies and composition, indicating mostly a soil origin. The elemental composition revealed the presence of three groups: mineral (clay and asphalt), metallic (mainly Fe), and biological particles (vegetal and animal debris). The palynological analysis showed the presence of pollen grains associated with urban plants. These results suggest that CAFs capture a mixture of atmospheric particles, which can be analyzed in order to monitor urban air. Thus, the continuous availability of large numbers of filters and the retroactivity associated to the car routes suggest that these CAFs are very useful for studying the high traffic zones within a city. PMID:27706087

  8. Analysis of indoor air pollutants checklist using environmetric technique for health risk assessment of sick building complaint in nonindustrial workplace

    PubMed Central

    Syazwan, AI; Rafee, B Mohd; Juahir, Hafizan; Azman, AZF; Nizar, AM; Izwyn, Z; Syahidatussyakirah, K; Muhaimin, AA; Yunos, MA Syafiq; Anita, AR; Hanafiah, J Muhamad; Shaharuddin, MS; Ibthisham, A Mohd; Hasmadi, I Mohd; Azhar, MN Mohamad; Azizan, HS; Zulfadhli, I; Othman, J; Rozalini, M; Kamarul, FT

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To analyze and characterize a multidisciplinary, integrated indoor air quality checklist for evaluating the health risk of building occupants in a nonindustrial workplace setting. Design A cross-sectional study based on a participatory occupational health program conducted by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (Malaysia) and Universiti Putra Malaysia. Method A modified version of the indoor environmental checklist published by the Department of Occupational Health and Safety, based on the literature and discussion with occupational health and safety professionals, was used in the evaluation process. Summated scores were given according to the cluster analysis and principal component analysis in the characterization of risk. Environmetric techniques was used to classify the risk of variables in the checklist. Identification of the possible source of item pollutants was also evaluated from a semiquantitative approach. Result Hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis resulted in the grouping of factorial components into three clusters (high complaint, moderate-high complaint, moderate complaint), which were further analyzed by discriminant analysis. From this, 15 major variables that influence indoor air quality were determined. Principal component analysis of each cluster revealed that the main factors influencing the high complaint group were fungal-related problems, chemical indoor dispersion, detergent, renovation, thermal comfort, and location of fresh air intake. The moderate-high complaint group showed significant high loading on ventilation, air filters, and smoking-related activities. The moderate complaint group showed high loading on dampness, odor, and thermal comfort. Conclusion This semiquantitative assessment, which graded risk from low to high based on the intensity of the problem, shows promising and reliable results. It should be used as an important tool in the preliminary assessment of indoor air quality and as a

  9. 77 FR 58953 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Delaware; Control Technique...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... Technique Guidelines for Plastic Parts, Metal Furniture, Large Appliances, and Miscellaneous Metal Parts... Guidelines (CTG) standards for the following categories: Plastic Parts, Metal Furniture, Large Appliances, and Miscellaneous Metal Parts. EPA is approving this SIP revision to meet the requirements...

  10. Development of More Cost-Effective Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using Quantitative Passive Diffusive-Adsorptive Sampling Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    ER-200830) Development of More Cost-Effective Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using...Methods for Long-Term Monitoring of Soil Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air Using Quantitative Passive Diffusive-Adsorptive Sampling Techniques W912HQ-08-C...volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at sites with potential human health risks. These risks were attributable to subsurface vapor intrusion to indoor air by

  11. Fluorescent protein tagging of endogenous protein in brain neurons using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock-in and in utero electroporation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Uemura, Takeshi; Mori, Takuma; Kurihara, Taiga; Kawase, Shiori; Koike, Rie; Satoga, Michiru; Cao, Xueshan; Li, Xue; Yanagawa, Toru; Sakurai, Takayuki; Shindo, Takayuki; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing is a powerful technique for studying gene functions. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene knock-in has recently been applied to various cells and organisms. Here, we successfully knocked in an EGFP coding sequence at the site immediately after the first ATG codon of the β-actin gene in neurons in the brain by the combined use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and in utero electroporation technique, resulting in the expression of the EGFP-tagged β-actin protein in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. We detected EGFP fluorescence signals in the soma and neurites of EGFP knock-in neurons. These signals were particularly abundant in the head of dendritic spines, corresponding to the localization of the endogenous β-actin protein. EGFP knock-in neurons showed no detectable changes in spine density and basic electrophysiological properties. In contrast, exogenously overexpressed EGFP-β-actin showed increased spine density and EPSC frequency, and changed resting membrane potential. Thus, our technique provides a potential tool to elucidate the localization of various endogenous proteins in neurons by epitope tagging without altering neuronal and synaptic functions. This technique can be also useful for introducing a specific mutation into genes to study the function of proteins and genomic elements in brain neurons. PMID:27782168

  12. Bioaerosol DNA Extraction Technique from Air Filters Collected from Marine and Freshwater Locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckwith, M.; Crandall, S. G.; Barnes, A.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Bioaerosols are composed of microorganisms suspended in air. Among these organisms include bacteria, fungi, virus, and protists. Microbes introduced into the atmosphere can drift, primarily by wind, into natural environments different from their point of origin. Although bioaerosols can impact atmospheric dynamics as well as the ecology and biogeochemistry of terrestrial systems, very little is known about the composition of bioaerosols collected from marine and freshwater environments. The first step to determine composition of airborne microbes is to successfully extract environmental DNA from air filters. We asked 1) can DNA be extracted from quartz (SiO2) air filters? and 2) how can we optimize the DNA yield for downstream metagenomic sequencing? Aerosol filters were collected and archived on a weekly basis from aquatic sites (USA, Bermuda, Israel) over the course of 10 years. We successfully extracted DNA from a subsample of ~ 20 filters. We modified a DNA extraction protocol (Qiagen) by adding a beadbeating step to mechanically shear cell walls in order to optimize our DNA product. We quantified our DNA yield using a spectrophotometer (Nanodrop 1000). Results indicate that DNA can indeed be extracted from quartz filters. The additional beadbeating step helped increase our yield - up to twice as much DNA product was obtained compared to when this step was omitted. Moreover, bioaerosol DNA content does vary across time. For instance, the DNA extracted from filters from Lake Tahoe, USA collected near the end of June decreased from 9.9 ng/μL in 2007 to 3.8 ng/μL in 2008. Further next-generation sequencing analysis of our extracted DNA will be performed to determine the composition of these microbes. We will also model the meteorological and chemical factors that are good predictors for microbial composition for our samples over time and space.

  13. Fluorescence Visual Detection of Herbal Product Substitutions at Terminal Herbal Markets by CCP-based FRET technique

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Guang; Jin, Yan; Liu, Libing; Zhao, Yuyang; Huang, Luqi

    2016-01-01

    Inaccurate labeling of materials used in herbal products may compromise the therapeutic efficacy and may pose a threat to medicinal safety. In this paper, a rapid (within 3 h), sensitive and visual colorimetric method for identifying substitutions in terminal market products was developed using cationic conjugated polymer-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (CCP-based FRET). Chinese medicinal materials with similar morphology and chemical composition were clearly distinguished by the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping method. Assays using CCP-based FRET technology showed a high frequency of adulterants in Lu-Rong (52.83%) and Chuan-Bei-Mu (67.8%) decoction pieces, and patented Chinese drugs (71.4%, 5/7) containing Chuan-Bei-Mu ingredients were detected in the terminal herbal market. In comparison with DNA sequencing, this protocol simplifies procedures by eliminating the cumbersome workups and sophisticated instruments, and only a trace amount of DNA is required. The CCP-based method is particularly attractive because it can detect adulterants in admixture samples with high sensitivity. Therefore, the CCP-based detection system shows great potential for routine terminal market checks and drug safety controls. PMID:27765955

  14. Assessment of serum selenium levels in 2-month-old sucking calves using total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buoso, M. C.; Ceccato, D.; Moschini, G.; Bernardini, D.; Testoni, S.; Torboli, A.; Valdes, M.

    2001-11-01

    The assessment of selenium status of livestock plays an important role in the production of medicine since low serum Se levels influence disease resistance in ruminants. It has been proved that Se deficiency may cause muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy and even death. Serum level has been widely used to evaluate the Se short-term status in animals since there is a good association between serum Se level and the dietary intake of the element over a wide range. The purpose of this work was to determine the Se serum concentration in a population of 78 sucking 2-month-old calves, in order to corroborate a clinical diagnosis of severe deficiency status. The samples were analyzed by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) at the ITAL STRUCTURES Research Laboratory. The results obtained from the serum samples presented Se concentrations varying from 10 to 66 ng/ml. The comparison between the obtained values and the expected serum selenium values (60-80 ng/ml), confirmed a mild to severe deficiency status in the investigated population.

  15. Innovative Techniques to Model, Analyze and Monitor Space Effects on Air Force Space-Based Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-20

    of Comets in the Heliosphere as Observed by SMEI 4 2.8. Zodiacal Light Observations and Modeling 5 2.9. Space Weather Forecasting Lab (SWFL...returned. SMEI is a proof-of- principle experiment for providing an early warning of 1-3 days of the arrival at Earth of a coronal mass ejection (CME...Air Force. Its 1 primary mission was to detect and track Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) en route to Earth and to design and test technology that

  16. Rapid Detection and Identification of Streptococcus Iniae Using a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Indirect Fluorescent Antibody Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is among the major pathogens of a large number of fish species cultured in fresh and marine recirculating and net pen production systems . The traditional plate culture technique to detect and identify S. iniae is time consuming and may be problematic due to phenotypic variations...

  17. Portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy as a rapid screening technique for analysis of TiO2 and ZnO in sunscreens

    PubMed Central

    Bairi, Venu Gopal; Lim, Jin-Hee; Quevedo, Ivan R.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Linder, Sean W.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation reports a rapid and simple screening technique for the quantification of titanium and zinc in commercial sunscreens using portable X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (pXRF). A highly evolved technique, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was chosen as a comparative technique to pXRF, and a good correlation (r2 > 0.995) with acceptable variations (≤25%) in results between both techniques was observed. Analytical figures of merit such as detection limit, quantitation limit, and linear range of the method are reported for the pXRF technique. This method has a good linearity (r2 > 0.995) for the analysis of titanium (Ti) in the range of 0.4–14.23 wt%, and zinc (Zn) in the range of 1.0–23.90 wt%. However, most commercial sunscreens contain organic ingredients, and these ingredients are known to cause matrix effects. The development of appropriate matrix matched working standards to obtain the calibration curve was found to be a major challenge for the pXRF measurements. In this study, we have overcome the matrix effect by using metal-free commercial sunscreens as a dispersing media for the preparation of working standards. An easy extension of this unique methodology for preparing working standards in different matrices was also reported. This method is simple, rapid, and cost-effective and, in comparison to conventional techniques (e.g., ICP-MS), did not generate toxic wastes during sample analysis. PMID:27076699

  18. A Centrifuge-Based Technique for Dry Extraction of Air for Ice Core Studies of Carbon Dioxide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grachev, A. M.; Brook, E. J.

    2008-12-01

    High resolution CO2 data from the Law Dome ice core document an abrupt ~10 ppm drop in CO2 at about 1600 AD (MacFarling Meure et al., Geophys. Res Lett., v. 33, L14810), which has been attributed to changes in human activities. CO2 measurements in ice cores are difficult, however, making verification of this feature an important task. We are undertaking a high-resolution study of CO2 between 1400 and 1800 AD in the WAIS Divide (Antarctica) ice core with a new dry extraction technique. The need for a dry extraction technique as opposed to a melt-refreeze technique in studies of CO2 from ice cores arises because of the well-documented artifacts in CO2 imposed by the presence of liquid water. Three dry-extraction methods have been employed by previous workers to measure CO2: needle-crushing method, ball-bearings method, and cheese-grater method (B. Stauffer, in: Encyclopedia of Quaternary Science, p. 1181, Elsevier 2007). Each has limitations, and we propose a simpler dry extraction technique, based on a large-capacity refrigerated centrifuge (the "centrifuge technique"), which eliminates the need to employ cryogenic temperatures to collect extracted gas and is more compatible with high sample throughput. The technique is now being tested on ~25-gram WAIS Divide samples in conjunction with CO2 measurements with a gas chromatograph. The technique employs a Beckman J- 6B centrifuge, in which evacuated stainless steel flask is placed: the flask has a weight inside positioned directly over a tall-standing piece of ice whose cross-section is small compared to that of the flask. Upon acceleration to 3000 rpm the weight moves down and presses the ice sample into a thin tablet covering flask's bottom, yielding the air extraction efficiency of ~80%. Preliminary tests suggest that precision and accuracy can be achieved at the level of ~1 ppm once the system is fine-tuned.

  19. Investigation on pretreatment of centrifugal mother liquid produced in the production of polyvinyl chloride by air-Fenton technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingying; Hua, Xiuyi; Ge, Rui; Guo, Aitong; Guo, Zhiyong; Dong, Deming; Sun, Wentian

    2013-08-01

    Centrifugal mother liquid (CML) is one of the main sources of wastewater produced during the production of polyvinyl chloride in chlor-alkali industry. CML is a typical poorly biodegradable organic wastewater, containing many kinds of refractory pollutants. Specifically, it contains dissolved refractory polymers, especially polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), which can pass though the biotreatment processes and clog the membranes used for further treatment. In this study, to ensure the CML applicable to biotreatment and membrane treatment, a novel efficient and mild technique, air-Fenton treatment, was employed as a pretreatment technique to improve biodegradability of the CML and to break down the polymers in the CML. Firstly, the technique was optimized for the CML treatment by optimizing the main parameters, including the dosage of ferrous sulfate, initial pH of the wastewater, [H2O2]/[Fe(2+)], aeration rate, reaction time, and temperature, based on removal efficiency of COD and PVA from the CML. Then, the optimized technique was tested and evaluated. The results indicated that under the optimized conditions, the air-Fenton treatment could remove 66, 98, and 55 % of the COD, PVA, and TOC, respectively, from the CML. After the treatment, biodegradability of the wastewater increased significantly (BOD/COD increased from 0.31 to 0.68), and almost all of the PVA polymers were removed or broken down. Meanwhile, concentration of the remaining iron ions, which were added during the treatment, was also quite low (only 2.9 mg/L). Furthermore, most of the suspended materials and ammonia nitrogen, and some of the phosphorus in the wastewater were removed simultaneously.

  20. Air cavity-based Fabry-Perot interferometer sensor fabricated using a sawing technique for refractive index measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eun Joo; Lee, Woo-Jin; Kim, Myoung Jin; Hwang, Sung Hwan; Rho, Byung Sup

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated a refractive index sensor based on a fiber optic Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer with an open air cavity fabricated using a one-step mechanical sawing technique. The sensor head consists of a short FP cavity near the fiber patch cord tip, which was assembled by joining a ceramic ferrule and a single-mode fiber together. Owing to the open air cavity in the sensor head, various liquid samples with different refractive index can fill in-line air cavity, which makes the device usable as a refractometer. Moreover, due to the sensor head encircled with the robust ceramic ferrule, the device is attractive for sensing measurement in harsh environments. The sensor was tested in different refractive index solutions. The experimental result shows that the attenuation peak wavelength of the sensor is shifted toward a shorter wavelength with increasing refractive index, and the refractive index sensitivity is ˜92.5 nm/refractive index unit (RIU) and 73.75 dB/RIU. The proposed sensor can be used as an in-line refractometer for many potential applications in the sensing field.

  1. Application of a statistical post-processing technique to a gridded, operational, air quality forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, L. S.; Agnew, P.; Moseley, S.; Ordóñez, C.; Savage, N. H.; Tilbee, M.

    2014-12-01

    An automated air quality forecast bias correction scheme based on the short-term persistence of model bias with respect to recent observations is described. The scheme has been implemented in the operational Met Office five day regional air quality forecast for the UK. It has been evaluated against routine hourly pollution observations for a year-long hindcast. The results demonstrate the value of the scheme in improving performance. For the first day of the forecast the post-processing reduces the bias from 7.02 to 0.53 μg m-3 for O3, from -4.70 to -0.63 μg m-3 for NO2, from -4.00 to -0.13 μg m-3 for PM2.5 and from -7.70 to -0.25 μg m-3 for PM10. Other metrics also improve for all species. An analysis of the variation of forecast skill with lead-time is presented and demonstrates that the post-processing increases forecast skill out to five days ahead.

  2. Evaluation of bioaerosol sampling techniques for the detection of Chlamydophila psittaci in contaminated air.

    PubMed

    Van Droogenbroeck, Caroline; Van Risseghem, Marleen; Braeckman, Lutgart; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2009-03-16

    Chlamydophila (C.) psittaci, a category B bioterrorism agent, causes respiratory disease in birds and psittacosis or parrot fever in man. The disease spreads aerogenically and no vaccines are available for either birds or man. Highly sensitive C. psittaci bioaerosol monitoring methods are unavailable. We evaluated: (1) dry filtration for collecting C. psittaci from contaminated air using different samplers and membrane filters, (2) impingement into different liquid collection media by use of the AGI-30 impinger and the BioSampler and (3) impaction into newly designed C. psittaci media utilizing the MAS-100 aerosol impactor. For personal bioaerosol sampling, we recommend the use of a gelatin filter in combination with the IOM inhalable dust sampler at an airflow rate of 2L/min. This allowed the detection of 10 organisms of C. psittaci by both PCR and culture. For stationary bioaerosol monitoring, sampling 1000L of air in 10min with the MAS-100 impactor and ChlamyTrap 1 impaction medium was most efficient and made it possible to detect 1 and 10 C. psittaci organisms by PCR and culture, respectively. ChlamyTrap 1 in combination with the MAS-100 impactor might also be applicable for bioaerosol monitoring of viruses.

  3. Pattern recognition techniques for visualizing the biotropic waveform of air temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozheredov, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that long periods of adverse weather have a negative effect on the human cardiovascular system. A number of studies have set a lower limit of around 5 days for the duration of these periods. However, the specific features of the negative dynamics of the main weather characteristics—air temperature and atmospheric pressure—remained open. To address this problem, the present paper proposes a conjunctive method of the theory of pattern recognition. It is shown that this method approaches a globally optimal (in the sense of recognition errors) Neumann critical region and can be used to solve various problems in heliobiology. To illustrate the efficiency of this method, we show that some quickly relaxing short sequences of temperature and pressure time series (the so-called temperature waves and waves of atmospheric pressure changes) increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases and can lead to serious organic lesions (particularly myocardial infarction). It is established that the temperature waves and waves of atmospheric pressure changes increase the average morbidity rate of myocardial infarction by 90% and 110%, respectively. Atmospheric pressure turned out to be a more biotropic factor than air temperature.

  4. A novel Fast Gas Chromatography based technique for higher time resolution measurements of speciated monoterpenes in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Kato, S.; Nakashima, Y.; Kajii, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Biogenic emissions supply the largest fraction of non-methane volatile organic compounds (VOC) from the biosphere to the atmospheric boundary layer, and typically comprise a complex mixture of reactive terpenes. Due to this chemical complexity, achieving comprehensive measurements of biogenic VOC (BVOC) in air within a satisfactory time resolution is analytically challenging. To address this, we have developed a novel, fully automated Fast Gas Chromatography (Fast-GC) based technique to provide higher time resolution monitoring of monoterpenes (and selected other C9-C15 terpenes) during plant emission studies and in ambient air. To our knowledge, this is the first study to apply a Fast-GC based separation technique to achieve quantification of terpenes in air. Three chromatography methods have been developed for atmospheric terpene analysis under different sampling scenarios. Each method facilitates chromatographic separation of selected BVOC within a significantly reduced analysis time compared to conventional GC methods, whilst maintaining the ability to quantify individual monoterpene structural isomers. Using this approach, the C10-C15 BVOC composition of single plant emissions may be characterised within a ~ 14 min analysis time. Moreover, in situ quantification of 12 monoterpenes in unpolluted ambient air may be achieved within an ~ 11 min chromatographic separation time (increasing to ~ 19 min when simultaneous quantification of multiple oxygenated C9-C10 terpenoids is required, and/or when concentrations of anthropogenic VOC are significant). This corresponds to a two- to fivefold increase in measurement frequency compared to conventional GC methods. Here we outline the technical details and analytical capability of this chromatographic approach, and present the first in situ Fast-GC observations of 6 monoterpenes and the oxygenated BVOC linalool in ambient air. During this field deployment within a suburban forest ~ 30 km west of central Tokyo, Japan, the

  5. Testing an advanced satellite technique for dust detection as a decision support system for the air quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Femiano, Rossella; Marchese, Francesco; Sannazzaro, Filomena; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio; Di Muro, Ersilia; Divietri, Mariella; Crisci, Anna Maria; Lovallo, Michele; Mangiamele, Lucia; Vaccaro, Maria Pia; Palma, Achille

    2014-05-01

    In order to correctly apply the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE), local Authorities are often requested to discriminate the possible origin (natural/anthropic) of anomalous concentration of pollutants in the air (art.20 Directive 2008/50/CE). In this framework, it's been focused on PM10 and PM2,5 concentrations and sources. In fact, depending on their origin, appropriate counter-measures can be taken devoted to prevent their production (e.g. by traffic restriction) or simply to reduce their impact on citizen health (e.g. information campaigns). In this context suitable satellite techniques can be used in order to identify natural sources (particularly Saharan dust, but also volcanic ash or forest fire smoke) that can be responsible of over-threshold concentration of PM10/2,5 in populated areas. In the framework of the NIBS (Networking and Internationalization of Basilicata Space Technologies) project, funded by the Basilicata Region within the ERDF 2007-2013 program, the School of Engineering of University of Basilicata, the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis of National Research Council (IMAA-CNR) and the Regional Agency for the Protection of the Environment of Basilicata Region (ARPAB) have started a collaboration devoted to assess the potential of the use of advanced satellite techniques for Saharan dust events identification to support ARPAB activities related to the application of the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE) in Basilicata region. In such a joint activity, the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) approach has been assessed and tested as a decision support system for monitoring and evaluating air quality at local and regional level. In particular, RST-DUST products, derived by processing high temporal resolution data provided by SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) sensor on board Meteosat Second Generation platforms, have been analysed together with PM10 measurements performed by the ground

  6. Application of ion chemistry and the SIFT technique to the quantitative analysis of trace gases in air and on breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    Our major objective in this paper is to describe a new method we have developed for the analysis of trace gases at partial pressures down to the ppb level in atmospheric air, with special emphasis on the detection and quantification of trace gases on human breath. It involves the use of our selected ion flow tube (Sift) technique which we previously developed and used extensively for the study of gas phase ionic reactions occurring in ionized media such as the terrestrial atmosphere and interstellar gas clouds. Before discussing this analytical technique we describe the results of our very recent Sift and flowing afterglow (FA) studies of the reactions of the H3O+ and OH- ions, of their hydrates H3O+(H2O)1,2,3 and OH- (H2O)1,2, and of NO+ and O2+, with several hydrocarbons and oxygen-bearing organic molecules, studies that are very relevant to our trace gas analytical studies. Then follows a detailed discussion of the application of our Sift technique to trace gas analysis, after which we present some results obtained for the analyses of laboratory air, the breath of a healthy non-smoking person, the breath of a person who regularly smokes cigarettes, the complex vapours emitted by banana and onion, and the molecules present in a butane/air flame. We show how the quantitative analysis of breath can be achieved from only a single exhalation and in real time (the time response of the instrument is only about 20 ms). We also show how the time variation of breath gases over long time periods can be followed, using the decay of ethanol on the breath after the ingestion of distilled liquor as an example, yet simultaneously following several other trace gases including acetone and isoprene which are very easily detected on the breath of all individuals because of their relatively high partial pressures (typically 100 to 1000 ppb). The breath of a smoker is richer in complex molecules, some nitrogen containing organics apparently being very evident at the 5 to 50 ppb level

  7. A Comprehensive Technique for Forecasting University Enrollment, Instructional Workloads and Funding Levels. AIR Forum 1980 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasher, William F.; And Others

    Analytical techniques developed by the University of Texas at Austin to deal with problems of forecasting future enrollments, instructional workloads, and funding levels are considered. In order to project university enrollments, Texas public high school graduates were projected. In-migration rates were separated from survival rates,…

  8. Use of High Resolution Mobile Monitoring Techniques to Assess Near Road Air Quality Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a description of the techniques used to develop and conduct effective mobile monitoring studies. It also provides a summary of mobile monitoring assessment studies that have been used to assess near-road concentrations and the variability of pollutant l...

  9. Use of High Resolution Mobile Monitoring Techniques to Assess Near-Road Air Quality Variability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a description of the techniques used to develop and conduct effective mobile monitoring studies. It also provides a summary of mobile monitoring assessment studies that have been used to assess near-road concentrations and the variability of pollutant l...

  10. 75 FR 59084 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Control Technique...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... Technique Guidelines for Paper, Film, and Foil Coatings AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from paper, film, and foil coatings. Specifically, Maryland is..., Film, and Foil Coatings. These amendments will reduce VOC emissions from this source category....

  11. Probing the micellization kinetics of pyrene end-labeled diblock copolymer via a combination of stopped-flow light-scattering and fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyan; Li, Yuting; Armes, Steven P; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-10-25

    A pyrene end-labeled double hydrophilic diblock copolymer, poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (Py-PDEA-b-PDMA), was synthesized by sequential monomer addition via oxyanionic polymerization using a 1-pyrenemethanol-based initiator. This diblock copolymer exhibits reversible pH-responsive micellization behavior in aqueous solution, forming PDEA-core micelles stabilized by the soluble PDMA block at neutral or alkaline pH. Taking advantage of the pyrene probe covalently attached to the end of the PDEA block, the pH-induced micellization kinetics of Py-PDEA-b-PDMA was monitored by stopped-flow light scattering using a fluorescence detector. Upon a pH jump from 4.0 to 9.0, both the scattered light intensity and excimer/monomer fluorescence intensity ratios (IE/IM) increase abruptly initially, followed by a more gradual increase to reach plateau values. Interestingly, the IE/IM ratio increases abruptly within the first 10 ms: a triple exponential function is needed to fit the corresponding dynamic trace, leading to three characteristic relaxation time constants (tau(1,fluo) < tau(2,fluo) < tau(3,fluo)). On the other hand, dynamic traces for the scattered light intensity can be well-fitted by double exponential functions: the resulting time constants tau(1,scat) and tau(2,scat) can be ascribed to formation of the quasi-equilibrium micelles and relaxation into their final equilibrium state, respectively. Most importantly, tau(1,scat) obtained from stopped-flow light scattering is in general agreement with tau(2,fluo) obtained from stopped-flow fluorescence. The fastest process (tau(1,fluo) approximately 4 ms) detected by stopped-flow fluorescence is ascribed to the burst formation of small transient micelles comprising only a few chains, which are too small to be detected by conventional light scattering. These nascent micelles undergo rapid fusion and grow into quasi-equilibrium micelles and then slowly approach their final

  12. Determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in mouse blood by capillary electrophoresis/ fluorescence spectroscopy with sweeping techniques in micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ching; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Chou, Shiu-Huey; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2003-03-01

    The separation and on-line concentration of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in mouse blood was achieved by means of capillary electrophoresis/fluorescence spectroscopy using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the surfactant. Techniques involving on-line sample concentration, including sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (sweeping-MEKC) and cation-selective exhaustive injection-sweep-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (CSEI-sweep-MEKC) were applied; the optimum on-line concentration and separation conditions were determined. In the analysis of an actual sample, LSD was found in a blood sample from a test mouse (0.1 mg LSD fed to a 20 g mouse; approximately 1/10 to the value of LD(50)). As a result, 120 and 30 ng/mL of LSD was detected at 20 and 60 min, respectively, after ingestion of the doses.

  13. On-line identification of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in tablets using a combination of a sweeping technique and micellar electrokinetic chromatography/77 K fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ching; Liu, Ju-Tsung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2003-03-01

    This work describes a novel method for the accurate determination of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in tablets. A technique involving sweeping-micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) was used for the initial on-line concentration and separation, after which a cryogenic molecular fluorescence experiment was performed at 77 K. Using this approach, not only the separation of LSD from the tablet extract was achieved, but on-line spectra were readily distinguishable and could be unambiguously assigned. The results are in agreement with analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thus, this method, which was found to be accurate, sensitive and rapid, has the potential for use as a reliable complementary method to GC-MS in such analyses.

  14. Determination of concentrations of Fe, Mg, and Zn in some ferrite samples using neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Ali, I A; Mohamed, Gehan Y; Azzam, A; Sattar, A A

    2017-01-14

    Mg-Zn ferrite is considered as one of the important materials with potential uses in many applications. In this work, samples of ferrite Mg(1-x)ZnxFe2O4 (where x=0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1) were synthesized by the sol-gel method for use in some hyperthermia applications. The composition and purity of the prepared samples hardly affected their properties. Therefore, the elemental concentration of these samples was measured by the X-ray fluorescence technique and thermal neutron activation analysis to check the quality of the prepared samples. The results of both methods were compared with each other and with the molecular ratios of the as-prepared samples. In addition, no existing elemental impurity, with considerable concentration, was measured.

  15. Integrating silicon nanowire field effect transistor, microfluidics and air sampling techniques for real-time monitoring biological aerosols.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fangxia; Tan, Miaomiao; Wang, Zhenxing; Yao, Maosheng; Xu, Zhenqiang; Wu, Yan; Wang, Jindong; Guo, Xuefeng; Zhu, Tong

    2011-09-01

    Numerous threats from biological aerosol exposures, such as those from H1N1 influenza, SARS, bird flu, and bioterrorism activities necessitate the development of a real-time bioaerosol sensing system, which however is a long-standing challenge in the field. Here, we developed a real-time monitoring system for airborne influenza H3N2 viruses by integrating electronically addressable silicon nanowire (SiNW) sensor devices, microfluidics and bioaerosol-to-hydrosol air sampling techniques. When airborne influenza H3N2 virus samples were collected and delivered to antibody-modified SiNW devices, discrete nanowire conductance changes were observed within seconds. In contrast, the conductance levels remained relatively unchanged when indoor air or clean air samples were delivered. A 10-fold increase in virus concentration was found to give rise to about 20-30% increase in the sensor response. The selectivity of the sensing device was successfully demonstrated using H1N1 viruses and house dust allergens. From the simulated aerosol release to the detection, we observed a time scale of 1-2 min. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) tests revealed that higher virus concentrations in the air samples generally corresponded to higher conductance levels in the SiNW devices. In addition, the display of detection data on remote platforms such as cell phone and computer was also successfully demonstrated with a wireless module. The work here is expected to lead to innovative methods for biological aerosol monitoring, and further improvements in each of the integrated elements could extend the system to real world applications.

  16. Application of the radioisotope excited X-ray fluorescence technique in charge optimization during thermite smelting of Fe-Ni, Fe-cr, and Fe-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, I.G.; Joseph, D.; Lal, M.; Bose, D.K.

    1995-10-01

    A wide range of ferroalloys are used to facilitate the addition of different alloying elements to molten steel. High-carbon ferroalloys are produced on a tonnage basis by carbothermic smelting in an electric furnace, and an aluminothermic route is generally adopted for small scale production of low-carbon varieties. The physicochemical principles of carbothermy and aluminothermy have been well documented in the literature. However, limited technical data are reported on the production of individual ferroalloys of low-carbon varieties from their selected resources. The authors demonstrate her the application of an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique in meeting the analytical requirements of a thermite smelting campaign, carried out with the aim of preparing low-carbon-low-nitrogen Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr, and Fe-Ti alloys from indigenously available nickel bearing spent catalyst, mineral chromite, and ilmenite/rutile, respectively. They have chosen the EDXRF technique to meet the analytical requirements because of its capability to analyze samples of ore, minerals, a metal, and alloys in different forms, such as powder, sponge, as-smelted, or as-cast, to obtain rapid multielement analyses with ease. Rapid analyses of thermite feed and product by this technique have aided in the appropriate alterations of the charge constitutents to obtain optimum charge consumption.

  17. The application of remote sensing techniques for air pollution analysis and climate change on Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palve, S. N.; Nemade, P. D., Dr.; Ghude, S. D., Dr.

    2016-06-01

    India is home to an extraordinary variety of climatic regions, ranging from tropical in the south to temperate and alpine in the Himalayan north, where elevated regions receive sustained winter snowfall. The subcontinent is characterized by high levels of air pollution due to intensively developing industries and mass fuel consumption for domestic purposes. The main tropospheric pollutants (O3, NO2, CO, formaldehyde (HCHO) and SO2) and two major greenhouse gases (tropospheric O3 and methane (CH4)) and important parameters of aerosols, which play a key role in climate change and affecting on the overall well-being of subcontinent residents. In light of considering these facts this paper aims to investigate possible impact of air pollutants over the climate change on Indian subcontinent. Satellite derived column aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a cost effective way to monitor and study aerosols distribution and effects over a long time period. AOD is found to be increasing rapidly since 2000 in summer season that may cause adverse effect to the agricultural crops and also to the human health. Increased aerosol loading may likely affect the rainfall which is responsible for the observed drought conditions over the Indian subcontinent. Carbon monoxide is emitted into the atmosphere by biomass burning activities and India is the second largest contributor of CO emissions in Asia. The MOPITT CO retrievals at 850 hPa show large CO emission from the IG region. The development of convective activity associated with the ASM leads to large scale vertical transport of the boundary layer CO from the Indian region into the upper troposphere. TCO over the Indian subcontinent during 2007 has a systematic and gradual variation, spatial as well as temporal. Higher amount of TCO in the northern latitudes and simultaneous lower TCO at near equatorial latitudes indicates depletion of ozone near the equator and accumulation at higher latitudes within the subcontinent. In addition, changes

  18. Demonstration of a stabilized alumina/ethanol colloidal dispersion technique for seeding high temperature air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Skoch, Gary J.; Wernet, Judith H.

    1995-01-01

    Laser anemometry enables the measurement of complex flow fields via the light scattered from small particles entrained in the flow. In the study of turbomachinery, refractory seed materials are required for seeding the flow due to the high temperatures encountered. In this work we present a pH stabilization technique commonly employed in ceramic processing to obtain stable dispersions for generating aerosols of refractory seed material. By adding submicron alumina particles to a preadjusted pH solution of ethanol, a stable dispersion is obtained which when atomized, produces a high quality aerosol. Commercial grade alumina powder is used with a moderate size distribution. Other metal oxide powders in various polar solvents could also be used once the point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) of the powder in the solvent has been determined. Laser anemometry measurements obtained using the new seeding technique are compared to measurements obtained using Polystyrene Latex (PSL) spheres as the seed material.

  19. Workbook of screening techniques for assessing impacts of toxic air pollutants (revised). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    The workbook provides a logical approach to the selection of appropriate screening techniques for estimating ambient concentrations due to various toxic/hazardous pollutant releases. Methods used in the workbook apply to situations where a release can be fairly well-defined, a condition typically associated with non-accidental toxic releases. The format of the workbook is built around a series of release scenarios which may be considered typical and representative of the means by which toxic chemicals become airborne.

  20. Techniques for Computer-Based Training of Air Intercept Decision Making Skills.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    Abramowski October 1982 BEHAVIORAL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES Department Of Psychology D T IC University of Southern California ELECTE MAR 7 13D I’ B LLU... Psychology University of Southern California A O. F APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED . * 0 ONR FINAL REPORT: TECHNIQUES FOR COMPUTER...BEHAVIORAL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES -1 Department of Psychology University of Southern California Sponsored by Office of Naval Research Under Contract

  1. Employing Concept Definition Techniques to Deliver Value on the RAN Air Warfare Destroyer Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    team approach, early systems architecting and judicious use of Model Based Systems Engineering ( MBSE ). In this presentation, it is shown how...sponsors. As the program has progressed, this MBSE environment has been progressively expanded to include additional SysML system composition and system...applicability of MBSE techniques in complex/large programs and the reality that theoretical application of MBSE must be tailored and augmented with

  2. Temperature effect on thin lipid film elasticity and phase separation: insights from Langmuir monolayer and fluorescence microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khattari, Z.; Maghrabi, M.; Al-Abdullah, T.

    2015-07-01

    Langmuir monolayer pressure isotherms and compressibility modulus measurements of phospholipid mixtures in several Langmuir monolayer systems at the air/water interface were investigated in this study. The ultimate aim was to carry out a comparison of the elasticity modulus for monolayers with different mixtures of l,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), l,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and chicken egg yolk sphingomyelin (eSM), in the presence/absence of cholesterol (Chol). In particular, we were able to propose that the leading force beyond the phase separation into liquid expanded (LE-) and liquid condensed (LC-) phases emerges from the increasing barrier to incorporate DOPC molecules into a highly ordered LC-phase. In addition, our findings suggest that DOPC lipid molecules have a priority to incorporate in a disordered LE-phase, while DPPC and eSM prefer the ordered one. Also, Chol seems to split almost equally into both phases, indicating that Chol has no priority for either phase and there are no particular interactions between Chol and saturated lipid molecules.

  3. In vivo optical analysis of pancreatic cancer tissue in living model mice using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshiaki; Hattori, Yusuke; Katagiri, Takashi; Mitsuoka, Hiroki; Sato, Ken-ichi; Asakura, Toru; Shimosegawa, Toru; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-02-01

    Living pancreatic cancer tissues grown subcutaneously in nude mice are studied by in vivo Raman spectroscopy and autofluorescence imaging. Comparing the same point spectra of alive pancreatic cancer tissue to that of the dead tissue, it is found that they are different each other. The results suggest that the spectral changes reflect the protein conformational changes in the tumor tissue with death of the host animal. From the result of autofluorescence study, in vivo autofluorescence imaging has potential as a method to assign the histological elements of the pancreatic cancer tissue without any staining. These results strongly suggest that combination of these techniques is very important to study biological tissue.

  4. UPb ages of zircon rims: A new analytical method using the air-abrasion technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Winegarden, D.L.; Walter, M.

    1990-01-01

    We present a new technique for directly dating, by conventional techniques, the rims of zircons. Several circumstances, such as a xenocrystic or inherited component in igneous zircon and metamorphic overgrowths on igneous cores, can result in grains with physically distinct age components. Pneumatic abrasion has been previously shown by Krogh to remove overgrowths and damaged areas of zircon, leaving more resistant and isotopically less disturbed parts available for analysis. A new abrader design, which is capable of very gently grinding only tips and interfacial edges of even needle-like grains, permits easy collection of abraded material for dating. Five examples demonstrate the utility of the "dust-collecting" technique, including two studies that compare conventional, ion microprobe and abrader data. Common Pb may be strongly concentrated in the outermost zones of many zircons and this Pb is not easily removed by leaching (even in weak HF). Thus, the benefit of removing only the outermost zones (and avoiding mixing of age components) is somewhat compromised by the much higher common Pb contents which result in less precise age determinations. A very brief abrasion to remove the high common Pb zones prior to collection of material for dating is selected. ?? 1990.

  5. Extracting micro air vehicles aerodynamic forces and coefficients in free flight using visual motion tracking techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mettler, B. F.

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a methodology to extract aerial vehicles’ aerodynamic characteristics from visually tracked trajectory data. The technique is being developed to study the aerodynamics of centimeter-scale aircraft and develop flight simulation models. Centimeter-scale aircraft remains a largely unstudied domain of aerodynamics, for which traditional techniques like wind tunnels and computational fluid dynamics have not yet been fully adapted and validated. The methodology takes advantage of recent progress in commercial, vision-based, motion-tracking systems. This system dispenses from on-board navigation sensors and enables indoor flight testing under controlled atmospheric conditions. Given the configuration of retro-reflective markers affixed onto the aerial vehicle, the vehicle’s six degrees-of-freedom motion can be determined in real time. Under disturbance-free conditions, the aerodynamic forces and moments can be determined from the vehicle’s inertial acceleration, and furthermore, for a fixed-wing vehicle, the aerodynamic angles can be plotted from the vehicle’s kinematics. By combining this information, we can determine the temporal evolution of the aerodynamic coefficients, as they change throughout a trajectory. An attractive feature of this technique is that trajectories are not limited to equilibrium conditions but can include non-equilibrium, maneuvering flight. Whereas in traditional wind-tunnel experiments, the operating conditions are set by the experimenter, here, the aerodynamic conditions are driven by the vehicle’s own dynamics. As a result, this methodology could be useful for characterizing the unsteady aerodynamics effects and their coupling with the aircraft flight dynamics, providing insight into aerodynamic phenomena taking place at centimeter scale flight.

  6. Dating the Lower Paleolithic Open-Air Site of Holon, Israel by Luminescence and ESR Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porat, Naomi; Zhou, Li Ping; Chazan, Michael; Noy, Tamar; Horwitz, Liora Kolska

    1999-05-01

    The open-air Acheulian site in Holon, Israel, was dated by the luminescence methods and by electron spin resonance (ESR). Situated in the coastal plain Quaternary Kurkar Group, the Holon site was first excavated in the late 1960s, when typical lower Paleolithic lithics and middle Pleistocene fauna were found. In order to date the site, new test pits were dug adjacent to the earlier excavations and the archaeological bed was exposed in a section comprising a series of paleosols and aeolianites. Alkali feldspars separated from the sediments were dated using the infrared stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence signals, and quartz was dated using the optically stimulated luminescence signal. The age of the archaeological bed is constrained by two samples to 198,000 ± 22,000-201,000 ± 17,000 yr. The age of the base of the section is 240,000 ± 29,000 yr, and the age of the top is 81,000 ± 8000 yr. Two teeth from the archaeological bed, recovered from the original excavation collection, yielded an average ESR age of 204,000 ± 16,000 yr, calculated using the linear uptake model, which is in a very good agreement with the luminescence ages. These dates place Holon within the range of other late Acheulian and Acheulo-Yabrudian sites in this region such as Tabun E (younger chronology), Yabrud I (archaeological level 18), and Berekhat Ram.

  7. Pollution of ambient air by volatile anesthetics: a comparison of 4 anesthetic management techniques.

    PubMed

    Barberio, Joy C; Bolt, Jason D; Austin, Paul N; Craig, William J

    2006-04-01

    Long-term exposure to waste anesthetic gas (WAG) may lead to health problems. The purpose of this study was to compare WAG concentrations resulting from 4 combinations of fresh gas flow (FGF) and vaporizer settings during a simulated intravenous induction in which the anesthetic is deepened using a volatile anesthetic delivered via mask ventilation before intubation. By using a lung model, WAG was sampled 3 times each using 4 combinations and 3 volatile anesthetics: 3% sevoflurane, 2% isoflurane, and 6% desflurane. The combinations were FGF off/vaporizer on, FGF on/vaporizer off, both on, and both off. WAG was measured using a MIRAN Ambient Air Analyzer placed at a level approximating the anesthetist's head. One-way analysis of variance with a Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test was used to compare the concentration of WAG among the combinations of FGF/vaporizer settings for each agent. Regardless of the agent, only the FGF on/vaporizer on combination at 60 seconds resulted in a statistically greater WAG level (P < .005). The results support using 3 of the 4 combinations examined when mask ventilation with a volatile agent accompanies intravenous induction. Future studies should examine other methods of controlling WAG levels and use time-weighted averages to help address clinical significance.

  8. Adaptive critic learning techniques for engine torque and air-fuel ratio control.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Javaherian, Hossein; Kovalenko, Olesia; Huang, Ting

    2008-08-01

    A new approach for engine calibration and control is proposed. In this paper, we present our research results on the implementation of adaptive critic designs for self-learning control of automotive engines. A class of adaptive critic designs that can be classified as (model-free) action-dependent heuristic dynamic programming is used in this research project. The goals of the present learning control design for automotive engines include improved performance, reduced emissions, and maintained optimum performance under various operating conditions. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we developed a neural network model of the engine and neural network controllers based on the idea of approximate dynamic programming to achieve optimal control. We have developed and simulated self-learning neural network controllers for both engine torque (TRQ) and exhaust air-fuel ratio (AFR) control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values. For both control problems, excellent neural network controller transient performance has been achieved.

  9. Adhesion patterning by a novel air-lock technique enables localization and in-situ real-time imaging of reprogramming events in one-to-one electrofused hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, S.; Yamazaki, S.; Kurosawa, O.; Oana, H.; Kotera, H.; Washizu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Although fusion of somatic cells with embryonic stem (ES) cells has been shown to induce reprogramming, single-cell level details of the transitory phenotypic changes that occur during fusion-based reprogramming are still lacking. Our group previously reported on the technique of one-to-one electrofusion via micro-slits in a microfluidic platform. In this study, we focused on developing a novel air-lock patterning technique for creating localized adhesion zones around the micro-slits for cell localization and real-time imaging of post fusion events with a single-cell resolution. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) were fused individually with mouse ES cells using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fusion chip consisting of two feeder channels with a separating wall containing an array of micro-slits (slit width ∼3 μm) at a regular spacing. ES cells and MEFs were introduced separately into the channels, juxtaposed on the micro-slits by dielectrophoresis and fused one-to-one by a pulse voltage. To localize fused cells for on-chip culture and time-lapse microscopy, we implemented a two-step approach of air-lock bovine serum albumin patterning and Matrigel coating to create localized adhesion areas around the micro-slits. As a result of time-lapse imaging, we could determine that cell division occurs within 24 h after fusion, much earlier than the 2–3 days reported by earlier studies. Remarkably, Oct4-GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) was confirmed after 25 h of fusion and thereafter stably expressed by daughter cells of fused cells. Thus, integrated into our high-yield electrofusion platform, the technique of air-lock assisted adhesion patterning enables a single-cell level tracking of fused cells to highlight cell-level dynamics during fusion-based reprogramming. PMID:27822330

  10. Investigating Early/Middle Bronze Age copper and bronze axes by micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and neutron imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Elin; Pereira, Marco A. Stanojev; Lopes, Filipa; Marques, José G.; Santos, Joana P.; Araújo, M. Fátima; Silva, Rui J. C.; Senna-Martinez, João C.

    2016-08-01

    Micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) analysis and neutron imaging techniques, namely 2D radiography and 3D tomography, have been applied for the study of four metal axes from the Early/Middle Bronze Age in Western Iberia, a period characterized by a metallurgical change in the use of copper to bronze. Micro-XRF analysis has shown that one of the axes was produced in copper with some arsenic while the other three were produced in a copper-tin alloy (bronze) with variable tin contents and some arsenic and lead. Neutron radiography and tomography were applied to study internal heterogeneities of the axes in a non-invasive way since the specificities of neutron interaction with matter allow a suitable penetration of these relatively thick copper-based objects when compared to the use of a conventional X-ray radiography. Neutron imaging allowed the visualization of internal fissures and pores and the evaluation of their distribution, size and shape. Relevant information for the reconstruction of ancient manufacturing techniques was gathered, revealing that one ax was produced with the mold in an angle of ≈ 25°, probably to facilitate gas escape during metal pouring. Also, information regarding physical weaknesses of the axes was collected, providing relevant data for their conservation. The combination of these non-destructive techniques allowed the evaluation of the metal composition and the internal structure of the axes. Micro-XRF allowed the distinction among copper and bronze axes, and provided data about the composition of early bronzes for which data is scarce. The neutron imaging study allowed for the first time the visualization of internal heterogeneities in early bronze axes, namely pores and large voids, providing relevant information for the reconstruction of ancient manufacturing techniques and raising pertinent information regarding physical weaknesses of these types of objects.

  11. Rate constant for the reaction H + NO2 from 195 to 400 K with FP-RF and DF-RF techniques. [Flash Photolysis and Discharge Flow-Resonance Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J. V.; Nava, D. F.; Payne, W. A.; Lee, J. H.; Stief, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements are made of the rate constant for the reaction H + NO2 yielding OH + NO over significant temperature ranges with the flash photolysis-resonance fluorescence (FP-RF) technique and also with the discharge flow-resonance fluorescence (DF-RF) technique. Since it is important to study chemical reactions with more than one technique, the above reaction is investigated with the FP-RF technique over the temperature range 230-400 K. The results reported do not agree with earlier determinations. Accordingly, a separate set of measurements is made with the DF-RF technique over the temperature range 195-368 K; the results are also reported. The reaction is also considered theoretically, especially with regard to the question of temperature dependence and absolute magnitude of the rate constant.

  12. Bench-Top Antigen Detection Technique that Utilizes Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes which Emit and Absorb Light in the Near Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaljay-Spence, Vanessa A.; Scardelletti, Maximilian C.

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the development of a bench-top technique to detect antigens in fluids. The technique involves the use of near infrared NIR fluorescent dyes conjugated to antibodies, centrifugation, nanofilters, and spectrometry. The system used to detect the antigens utilizes a spectrometer, fiber optic cables, NIR laser, and laptop computer thus making it portable and ideally suited for desk top analysis. Using IgM as an antigen and the secondary antibody, anti-IgM conjugated to the near infrared dye, IRDye (trademark) 800, for detection, we show that nanofiltration can efficiently and specifically separate antibody-antigen complexes in solution and that the complexes can be detected by a spectrometer and software using NIR laser excitation at 778 nm and NIR dye offset emission at 804 nm. The peak power detected at 778 nm for the excitation emission and at 804 nm for the offset emission is 879 pW (-60.06 dBm) and 35.7 pW (-74.5 dBm), respectively.

  13. Genomic arrays in chronic lymphocytic leukemia routine clinical practice: are we ready to substitute conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques?

    PubMed

    Puiggros, Anna; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Salido, Marta; Ferrer, Ana; Abella, Eugènia; Gimeno, Eva; Nonell, Lara; Herranz, María José; Galván, Ana Belén; Rodríguez-Rivera, María; Melero, Carme; Pairet, Silvia; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Serrano, Sergi; Florensa, Lourdes; Solé, Francesc; Espinet, Blanca

    2013-05-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by a highly variable clinical course. Del(11q) and del(17p), routinely studied by conventional G-banding cytogenetics (CGC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have been related to progression and shorter overall survival. Recently, array-based karyotyping has gained acceptance as a high-resolution new tool for detecting genomic imbalances. The aim of the present study was to compare genomic arrays with CGC and FISH to ascertain whether the current techniques could be substituted in routine procedures. We analyzed 70 patients with CLL using the Cytogenetics Whole-Genome 2.7M Array and CytoScan HD Array (Affymetrix), CGC and FISH with the classical CLL panel. Whereas 31.4% and 68.6% of patients presented abnormalities when studied by CGC and FISH, respectively, these rates increased when arrays were also analyzed (78.6% and 80%). Although abnormality detection is higher when arrays are applied, one case with del(11q) and three with del(17p) were missed by genomic arrays due to their limited sensitivity. We consider that the complete substitution of CGC and FISH by genomic arrays in routine laboratories could negatively affect the management of some patients harboring 11q or 17p deletions. In conclusion, genomic arrays are valid to detect known and novel genomic imbalances in CLL, but should be maintained as a complementary tool to the current techniques.

  14. New-construction techniques and HVAC (heating, venting and air conditioning) overpressurization for radon reduction in schools

    SciTech Connect

    Witter, K.A.; Craig, A.B.; Saum, D.

    1988-04-01

    Construction of a school in Fairfax County, Virginia, is being carefully monitored since elevated indoor radon levels have been identified in many existing houses near the site. Soil-gas radon concentrations measured prior to pouring of the slabs were also indicative of a potential radon problem should the soil gas enter the school; however, subslab radon measurements collected thus far are lower than anticipated. In addition, the school's heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system has been designed to operate continously in overpressurization to help reduce pressure-driven entry of radon-containing soil gas into the building. Following completion, indoor radon levels in the school will be monitored to determine the effectiveness of these radon-resistant new-construction techniques and HVAC overpressurization in limiting radon entry into the school.

  15. A comparison of reanalysis techniques: applying optimal interpolation and Ensemble Kalman Filtering to improve air quality monitoring at mesoscale.

    PubMed

    Candiani, Gabriele; Carnevale, Claudio; Finzi, Giovanna; Pisoni, Enrico; Volta, Marialuisa

    2013-08-01

    To fulfill the requirements of the 2008/50 Directive, which allows member states and regional authorities to use a combination of measurement and modeling to monitor air pollution concentration, a key approach to be properly developed and tested is the data assimilation one. In this paper, with a focus on regional domains, a comparison between optimal interpolation and Ensemble Kalman Filter is shown, to stress pros and drawbacks of the two techniques. These approaches can be used to implement a more accurate monitoring of the long-term pollution trends on a geographical domain, through an optimal combination of all the available sources of data. The two approaches are formalized and applied for a regional domain located in Northern Italy, where the PM10 level which is often higher than EU standard limits is measured.

  16. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  17. An evaluation of analytical methods, air sampling techniques, and airborne occupational exposure of metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    Verma, Dave K; Shaw, Don S; Shaw, M Lorraine; Julian, Jim A; McCollin, Shari-Ann; des Tombe, Karen

    2006-02-01

    This article summarizes an assessment of air sampling and analytical methods for both oil and water-based metalworking fluids (MWFs). Three hundred and seventy-four long-term area and personal airborne samples were collected at four plants using total (closed-face) aerosol samplers and thoracic samplers. A direct-reading device (DustTrak) was also used. The processes sampled include steel tube making, automotive component manufacturing, and small part manufacturing in a machine shop. The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method PS42-97 of analysis was evaluated in the laboratory. This evaluation included sample recovery, determination of detection limits, and stability of samples during storage. Results of the laboratory validation showed (a) the sample recovery to be about 87%, (b) the detection limit to be 35 microg, and (c) sample stability during storage at room temperature to decline rapidly within a few days. To minimize sample loss, the samples should be stored in a freezer and analyzed within a week. The ASTM method should be the preferred method for assessing metalworking fluids (MWFs). The ratio of thoracic aerosol to total aerosol ranged from 0.6 to 0.7. A similar relationship was found between the thoracic extractable aerosol and total extractable aerosol. The DustTrak, with 10-microm sampling head, was useful in pinpointing the areas of potential exposure. MWF exposure at the four plants ranged from 0.04 to 3.84 mg/m3 with the geometric mean ranging between 0.22 to 0.59 mg/m3. Based on this data and the assumption of log normality, MWF exposures are expected to exceed the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended exposure limit of 0.5 mg/m3 as total mass and 0.4 mg/m3 as thoracic mass about 38% of the time. In addition to controlling airborne MWF exposure, full protection of workers would require the institution of programs for fluid management and dermal exposure prevention.

  18. Development of a two photon/laser induced fluorescence technique for the detection of atmospheric OH radicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, John

    1990-01-01

    The development of a new mid-IR laser source was the primary goal. Backward propagating stimulated D2 Raman frequency down conversion of a commercially available 1.06 micron Nd:YAG laser was shown to generate an efficient source of 1.56 micron radiation with near diffraction limited beam quality. The efficient generation of a 2.9 micron laser source was also achieved using backward propagating CH4 Raman frequency down conversion of the 1.56 micron pump. Slightly higher efficiencies were obtained for frequency down conversion of the 1.06 micron Nd:YAG using the H2 Raman shift yielding a near diffraction limited source in the 200 mJ range at 1.9 micron. Similar conversion efficiencies are anticipated as a result of extending the wavelength coverage of recently available Ti:sapphire pulse laser to not only cover the 740 to 860 nm fundamental wavelength range but also the .95 to 1.15 and 1.06 to 1.33 micron range using D2 and H2, respectively. The anticipated sensitivity of a TP-LIF OH sensor using this mid-IR source would give signal limited detection of 1.4 x 10(exp 5) OH/cu cm under boundary layer conditions and 5.5 x 10(exp 4) OH/cu cm under free troposphere sampling conditions for a five minute signal integration period. This level of performance coupled with the techniques non-perturbing nature and freedom from both interferences and background would allow reliable tropospheric OH measurement to be obtained under virtually any ambient condition of current interest, including interstitial and sampling.

  19. Monte Carlo fluorescence microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Alexander X.; Hofmann, Matthias C.; Cong, Wenxiang; Xu, Yong; Wang, Ge

    2011-07-01

    Fluorescence microscopy allows real-time monitoring of optical molecular probes for disease characterization, drug development, and tissue regeneration. However, when a biological sample is thicker than 1 mm, intense scattering of light would significantly degrade the spatial resolution of fluorescence microscopy. In this paper, we develop a fluorescence microtomography technique that utilizes the Monte Carlo method to image fluorescence reporters in thick biological samples. This approach is based on an l0-regularized tomography model and provides an excellent solution. Our studies on biomimetic tissue scaffolds have demonstrated that the proposed approach is capable of localizing and quantifying the distribution of optical molecular probe accurately and reliably.

  20. Air pollution study in Croatia using moss biomonitoring and ICP-AES and AAS analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Špirić, Zdravko; Vučković, Ivana; Stafilov, Trajče; Kušan, Vladimir; Frontasyeva, Marina

    2013-07-01

    Moss biomonitoring technique was applied in a heavy-metal pollution study of Croatia in 2006 when this country participated in the European moss survey for the first time. This survey was repeated in 2010, and the results are presented in this study. For this purpose, 121 moss samples were collected during summer and autumn 2010. The content of 21 elements was determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry and atomic absorption spectrometry. Principal component analyses was applied to show the association between the elements. Six factors (F1-F6) were determined, of which two are anthropogenic (F3 and F6), two are mixed geogenic-anthropogenic (F1 and F5), and two are geogenic factors (F2 and F4). Geographical distribution maps of the elements over the sampled territory were constructed using geographic information systems technology. Comparison of the median values of some of the anthropogenic elements-such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, vanadium, and zinc-with those from the 2006 study shows that anthropogenic pollution has changed insignificantly during the last 5 years. The data obtained in the investigation in Norway are taken for comparison with pristine area, which indicates that Croatia is somewhat polluted but still, shows a more favourable picture when compared with two neighbouring countries.

  1. Technique for in situ measurement of calcium in intracellular inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive stores using the fluorescent indicator mag-fura-2.

    PubMed Central

    Hofer, A M; Machen, T E

    1993-01-01

    Stimulation of cells with calcium-mobilizing agonists frequently results in inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-mediated discharge of Ca from an internal store. We report here a technique for directly monitoring Ca within this and other stores in gastric epithelial cells. This technique takes advantage of the propensity of the acetoxymethyl ester derivative of the fluorescent dye mag-fura-2 (which is sensitive to Ca concentrations above 5 microM) to accumulate in subcellular compartments where it can report changes in the free Ca concentration. Intact dye-loaded cells responded to cholinergic stimulation with a decrease in the 350 nm/385 nm excitation ratio, as measured in individual cells with a digital imaging microscope, consistent with reduced Ca concentration in one or more cellular compartments. When cells were permeabilized with digitonin and incubated in an "intracellular buffer," the cytoplasmic dye was released, leaving the mag-fura-2 in the internal store. InsP3 caused the ratio from the trapped indicator to decrease (i.e., Ca was released) in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was blocked by the InsP3 receptor antagonist heparin. Ca sequestration into the internal store was ATP-dependent, and reuptake into the InsP3-sensitive pool was blocked by thapsigargin, a specific inhibitor of the Ca-ATPase of the internal store. We used this technique to investigate the role of Cl on the release and reloading of the InsP3-sensitive internal store and found that Ca uptake was reduced in Cl-free solutions, suggesting an important function for Cl in the refilling of this pool. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8464866

  2. An accurate air temperature measurement system based on an envelope pulsed ultrasonic time-of-flight technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. S.; Huang, Y. P.; Huang, K. N.; Young, M. S.

    2007-11-01

    A new microcomputer based air temperature measurement system is presented. An accurate temperature measurement is derived from the measurement of sound velocity by using an ultrasonic time-of-flight (TOF) technique. The study proposes a novel algorithm that combines both amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) to get the TOF measurement. The proposed system uses the AM and PM envelope square waveform (APESW) to reduce the error caused by inertia delay. The APESW ultrasonic driving waveform causes an envelope zero and phase inversion phenomenon in the relative waveform of the receiver. To accurately achieve a TOF measurement, the phase inversion phenomenon was used to sufficiently identify the measurement pulse in the received waveform. Additionally, a counter clock technique was combined to compute the phase shifts of the last incomplete cycle for TOF. The presented system can obtain 0.1% TOF resolution for the period corresponding to the 40kHz frequency ultrasonic wave. Consequently, with the integration of a humidity compensation algorithm, a highly accurate and high resolution temperature measurement can be achieved using the accurate TOF measurement. Experimental results indicate that the combined standard uncertainty of the temperature measurement is approximately 0.39°C. The main advantages of this system are high resolution measurements, narrow bandwidth requirements, and ease of implementation.

  3. Does free-air carbon dioxide enrichment affect photochemical energy use by evergreen trees in different seasons? A chlorophyll fluorescence study of mature loblolly pine

    SciTech Connect

    Hymus, G.J.; Ellsworth, D.S.; Baker, N.R.; Long, S.P.

    1999-08-01

    Previous studies of the effects of growth at elevated CO{sup 2} on energy partitioning in the photosynthetic apparatus have produced conflicting results. The hypothesis was developed and tested that elevated CO{sub 2} increases photochemical energy use when there is a high demand for assimilates and decreases usage when demand is low. Modulated chlorophyll a fluorescence and leaf gas exchange were measured on needles at the tope of a mature, 12-m loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.l) forest. Trees were exposed to ambient CO{sub 2} or ambient plus 20 Pa CO{sub 2} using free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment. During April and August, periods of shoot growth, light-saturated photo-synthesis and linear electron transport were increased by elevated CO{sub 2}. In November, when growth had ceased but temperatures were still moderate, CO{sub 2} treatment had no significant effect on linear electron transport. In February, when low temperatures were likely to inhibit translocation, CO{sub 2} treatment caused a significant decrease in linear electron transport. This coincided with a slower recovery of the maximum photosystem II efficiency on transfer of needles to the shade, indicating that growth in elevated CO{sub 2} induced a more persistent photoinhibition. Both the summer increase and the winter decrease in linear electron transport in elevated CO{sub 2} resulted from a change in photochemical quenching, not in the efficiency of energy transfer within the photosystem II antenna. There was no evidence of any effect of CO{sub 2} on photochemical energy sinks other than carbon metabolism. Their results suggest that elevated CO{sub 2} may increase the effects of winter stress on evergreen foliage.

  4. Remote Sensing of Chlorophyll Fluorescence by the Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Morgan, F., II; Demajistre, R.; Cook, B. D.; Corp, L. A.

    2014-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the amount of fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or Fraunhofer lines in the reflected solar spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is designed and constructed specifically for airborne and groundbased ChlF measurements using the line fill-in ChlF measurement technique. In this paper, we will present the design of this triple etalon Fabry-Perot imaging instrument and the results of its vegetation fluorescence measurements obtained from the ground in the laboratory and from a NASA Langley King Air during our 2014 airborne campaign over vegetated targets in North Carolina and Virginia.

  5. Advanced combined application of micro-X-ray diffraction/micro-X-ray fluorescence with conventional techniques for the identification of pictorial materials from Baroque Andalusia paintings.

    PubMed

    Herrera, L K; Montalbani, S; Chiavari, G; Cotte, M; Solé, V A; Bueno, J; Duran, A; Justo, A; Perez-Rodriguez, J L

    2009-11-15

    The process of investigating paintings includes the identification of materials to solve technical and historical art questions, to aid in the deduction of the original appearance, and in the establishment of the chemical and physical conditions for adequate restoration and conservation. In particular, we have focused on the identification of several samples taken from six famous canvases painted by Pedro Atanasio Bocanegra, who created a very special collection depicting the life of San Ignacio, which is located in the church of San Justo y Pastor of Granada, Spain. The characterization of the inorganic and organic compounds of the textiles, preparation layers, and pictorial layers have been carried out using an XRD diffractometer, SEM observations, EDX spectrometry, FT-IR spectrometry (both in reflection and transmission mode), pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and synchrotron-based micro-X-ray techniques. In this work, the advantages over conventional X-ray diffraction of using combined synchrotron-based micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence in the identification of multi-layer paintings is demonstrated.

  6. Masking Agents Evaluation for Lead Determination by Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Technique: Effect of KI, L-Cysteine, and 1,10-Phenanthroline

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Blanca G.; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Hydride generation (HG) of lead technique presents interferences from foreign ions of complex matrix samples. In order to minimize these interferences, the effect of masking agents such as KI, L-cysteine, and 1,10-phenanthroline was studied in the absence and in the presence of selected interfering species (As, Cr, Cu, and Fe). Different modes of addition of masking agents were accomplished, that is, to either sample or KBH4 reducing solution. The lead determinations were performed using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system coupled to HG and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The linearity of calibration curves (1–10 μg Pb L−1) was not affected by the addition of the masking agents. The use of KI in the reducing solution diminished interferences from concentrations of As and Cu, while 1,10-phenanthroline showed a positive effect on the interference by As. Moreover, Cr and Cu appeared to be the most serious interfering ions for plumbane (PbH4), because they drastically reduced the analytical signal of lead. Fe did not present any interference under the employed experimental conditions, even at high levels. The accuracy was established through the analysis of certified reference material (i.e., BCR-610, groundwater) using KI as masking agent. The detection limit reached by FIA-HG-AFS proposed methodology was 0.03 μg Pb L−1. PMID:27148365

  7. On the distribution of uranium in hair: Non-destructive analysis using synchrotron radiation induced X-ray fluorescence microprobe techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelsson, A.; Eriksson, M.; Pettersson, H. B. L.

    2015-06-01

    In the present study the distribution of uranium in single human hair shafts has been evaluated using two synchrotron radiation (SR) based micro X-ray fluorescence techniques; SR μ-XRF and confocal SR μ-XRF. The hair shafts originated from persons that have been exposed to elevated uranium concentrations. Two different groups have been studied, i) workers at a nuclear fuel fabrication factory, exposed mainly by inhalation and ii) owners of drilled bedrock wells exposed by ingestion of water. The measurements were carried out on the FLUO beamline at the synchrotron radiation facility ANKA, Karlsruhe. The experiment was optimized to detect U with a beam size of 6.8 μm × 3 μm beam focus allowing detection down to ppb levels of U in 10 s (SR μ-XRF setup) and 70 s (SR confocal μ-XRF setup) measurements. It was found that the uranium was present in a 10-15 μm peripheral layer of the hair shafts for both groups studied. Furthermore, potential external hair contamination was studied by scanning of unwashed hair shafts from the workers. Sites of very high uranium signal were identified as particles containing uranium. Such particles, were also seen in complementary analyses using variable pressure electron microscope coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (ESEM-EDX). However, the particles were not visible in washed hair shafts. These findings can further increase the understanding of uranium excretion in hair and its potential use as a biomonitor.

  8. Characterizing the compositional variation of dissolved organic matter over hydrophobicity and polarity using fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis and two-dimensional correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Su, Ben-Sheng; Qu, Zhen; He, Xiao-Song; Song, Ying-Hao; Jia, Li-Min

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) obtained from three leachates with different landfill ages was fractionated, and its compositional variation based on hydrophobicity and polarity was characterized by synchronous fluorescence spectra combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and two-dimensional correlation technique. The results showed that the bulk DOM and its fractions were comprised of tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances. Tyrosine-like matter was dominant in the young leachate DOM and its fractions, while tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances were the main components in the intermediate and old leachate DOMs and their fractions. Tryosine-, tryptophan-, fulvic-, and humic-like substances varied concurrently with the hydrophobicity and polarity. However, the change ratio of these substances was different for the three leachates. Tyrosine-like matter, humic-like materials, and fulvic-like substances were the most sensitive to the hydrophobicity and polarity in the young, intermediate, and old leachates, respectively. Such an integrated approach jointly enhances the characterization of the hydrophobicity- and polarity-dependent DOM fractions and provides a promising way to elucidate the environmental behaviors of different DOM species.

  9. Masking Agents Evaluation for Lead Determination by Flow Injection-Hydride Generation-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Technique: Effect of KI, L-Cysteine, and 1,10-Phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Blanca G; Leal, Luz O; Ferrer, Laura; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    Hydride generation (HG) of lead technique presents interferences from foreign ions of complex matrix samples. In order to minimize these interferences, the effect of masking agents such as KI, L-cysteine, and 1,10-phenanthroline was studied in the absence and in the presence of selected interfering species (As, Cr, Cu, and Fe). Different modes of addition of masking agents were accomplished, that is, to either sample or KBH4 reducing solution. The lead determinations were performed using a flow injection analysis (FIA) system coupled to HG and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). The linearity of calibration curves (1-10 μg Pb L(-1)) was not affected by the addition of the masking agents. The use of KI in the reducing solution diminished interferences from concentrations of As and Cu, while 1,10-phenanthroline showed a positive effect on the interference by As. Moreover, Cr and Cu appeared to be the most serious interfering ions for plumbane (PbH4), because they drastically reduced the analytical signal of lead. Fe did not present any interference under the employed experimental conditions, even at high levels. The accuracy was established through the analysis of certified reference material (i.e., BCR-610, groundwater) using KI as masking agent. The detection limit reached by FIA-HG-AFS proposed methodology was 0.03 μg Pb L(-1).

  10. A Comparison of Statistical Techniques for Combining Modeled and Observed Concentrations to Create High-Resolution Ozone Air Quality Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality surfaces representing pollutant concentrations across space and time are needed for many applications, including tracking trends and relating air quality to human and ecosystem health. The spatial and temporal characteristics of these surfaces may reveal new informat...

  11. Planar temperature measurement in compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-induced iodine fluorescence technique that is suitable for the planar measurement of temperature in cold nonreacting compressible air flows is investigated analytically and demonstrated in a known flow field. The technique is based on the temperature dependence of the broadband fluorescence from iodine excited by the 514-nm line of an argon-ion laser. Temperatures ranging from 165 to 245 K were measured in the calibration flow field. This technique makes complete, spatially resolved surveys of temperature practical in highly three-dimensional, low-temperature compressible flows.

  12. The Inter-Mammary Sticky Roll: A Novel Technique for Securing a Doppler Ultrasonic Probe to the Precordium for Venous Air Embolism Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wali, Arvin R; Gabel, Brandon C; Khalessi, Alexander A; Sang U, Hoi; Drummond, John C

    2016-01-01

    Venous air embolism is a devastating and potentially life-threatening complication that can occur during neurosurgical procedures. We report the development and use of the “inter-mammary sticky roll,” a technique to reliably secure a precordial Doppler ultrasonic probe to the chest wall during neurosurgical cases that require lateral decubitus positioning. We have found that this noninvasive technique is safe, and effectively facilitates a constant Doppler signal with no additional risk to the patient. PMID:27625905

  13. Nonlinear torque and air-to-fuel ratio control of spark ignition engines using neuro-sliding mode techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ting; Javaherian, Hossein; Liu, Derong

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a new approach for the calibration and control of spark ignition engines using a combination of neural networks and sliding mode control technique. Two parallel neural networks are utilized to realize a neuro-sliding mode control (NSLMC) for self-learning control of automotive engines. The equivalent control and the corrective control terms are the outputs of the neural networks. Instead of using error backpropagation algorithm, the network weights of equivalent control are updated using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. Moreover, a new approach is utilized to update the gain of corrective control. Both modifications of the NSLMC are aimed at improving the transient performance and speed of convergence. Using the data from a test vehicle with a V8 engine, we built neural network models for the engine torque (TRQ) and the air-to-fuel ratio (AFR) dynamics and developed NSLMC controllers to achieve tracking control. The goal of TRQ control and AFR control is to track the commanded values under various operating conditions. From simulation studies, the feasibility and efficiency of the approach are illustrated. For both control problems, excellent tracking performance has been achieved.

  14. Direct Trace Element Analysis of Liquid Blood Samples by In-Air Ion Beam Analytical Techniques (PIXE-PIGE).

    PubMed

    Huszank, Robert; Csedreki, László; Török, Zsófia

    2017-02-07

    There are various liquid materials whose elemental composition is of interest in various fields of science and technology. In many cases, sample preparation or the extraction can be complicated, or it would destroy the original environment before the analysis (for example, in the case of biological samples). However, multielement direct analysis of liquid samples can be realized by an external PIXE-PIGE measurement system. Particle-induced X-ray and gamma-ray emission spectroscopy (PIXE, PIGE) techniques were applied in external (in-air) microbeam configuration for the trace and main element determination of liquid samples. The direct analysis of standard solutions of several metal salts and human blood samples (whole blood, blood serum, blood plasma, and formed elements) was realized. From the blood samples, Na, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Br elemental concentrations were determined. The focused and scanned ion beam creates an opportunity to analyze very small volume samples (∼10 μL). As the sample matrix consists of light elements, the analysis is possible at ppm level. Using this external beam setup, it was found that it is possible to determine elemental composition of small-volume liquid samples routinely, while the liquid samples do not require any preparation processes, and thus, they can be analyzed directly. In the case of lower concentrations, the method is also suitable for the analysis (down to even ∼1 ppm level) but with less accuracy and longer measurement times.

  15. Assessment of marine and urban-industrial environments influence on built heritage sandstone using X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy and complementary techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morillas, Héctor; García-Galan, Javier; Maguregui, Maite; Marcaida, Iker; García-Florentino, Cristina; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-09-01

    The sandstone used in the construction of the tower of La Galea Fortress (Getxo, north of Spain) shows a very bad conservation state and a high percentage of sandstone has been lost. The fortress is located just on a cliff and close to the sea, and it experiments the direct influence of marine aerosol and also the impact of acid gases (SOx and NOx) coming from the surrounding industry and maritime traffic. This environment seems to be very harmful for the preservation of the sandstone used in it, promoting different pathologies (disintegration, alveolization, cracking or erosion blistering, salts crystallization on the pores, efflorescences etc.). In this work, a multianalytical methodology based on a preliminary in-situ screening of the affected sandstone using a handheld energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (HH-ED-XRF) and a subsequent characterization of extracted sample in the laboratory using elemental (μ-ED-XRF, Scanning Electron Microscope coupled to an X-Max Energy-Dispersive (SEM-EDS) and Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)) and molecular techniques (micro-Raman spectroscopy (μ-RS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD)) was applied in order to characterize the original composition of this kind of stone and related deterioration products. With the whole methodology, it was possible to assess that the sandstone contain a notable percentage of calcite. The sulfation and nitration of this carbonate detected in the stone led to the dissolution process of the sandstone, promoting the observed material loss. Additionally, the presence of salts related with the influence of marine aerosol confirms that this kind of environment have influence on the conservation state of the sandstone building.

  16. Comparison of two fluorescent antibody techniques (FATS) for detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid of spawning chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; McKibben, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Two versions of the fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) were compared for detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum in coelomic fluid samples from naturally infected spawning chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. For the membrane filtration-FAT (MF-FAT), trypsin-treated samples were passed through 0.2 ??m polycarbonate filters to concentrate bacteria for direct enumeration by immunofluorescence microscopy. For the smear-FAT (S-FAT), samples were centrifuged at 8800 x g for 10 min and the pelleted material was smeared on slides for immunofluorescence staining Detected prevalences of Renibacterium salmoninarum were 1.8 to 3.4 times higher by the MF-FAT than by the S-FAT: differences were significant at p ??? 0.0002. The S-FAT consistently detected R. salmoninarum only in samples with calculated bacterial concentrations ??? 2.4 x 103 cells ml-1 by MF-FAT testing. Increasing the area examined on a filter or slide from 50 to 100 microscope fields at 1000x magnification resulted in the detection of a maximum of 4% additional positive samples by the MF-FAT and 7% additional positive samples by the S-FAT. In individual samples for which bacterial counts were obtained by both the MF-FAT and the S-FAT, the counts averaged from 47 times (??30 SD) to 175 times (??165 SD) higher by the MF-FAT. Centrifugation of samples at 10000 x g for 10 min resulted in a 4-fold increase in mean bacterial counts by the S-FAT compared with a 10-min centrifugation at 2000 x g, but the highest calculated bacterial concentration obtained by S-FAT testing was more than 6-fold lower than that obtained for the same sample by MF-FAT testing. Because of its greater sensitivity, the MF-FAT is preferable to the S-FAT for use in critical situations requiring the detection of low numbers of R. salmoninarum.

  17. Increased incidence of micronuclei assessed with the micronucleus assay and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique in peripheral blood lymphocytes of nurses exposed to nitrous oxide.

    PubMed

    Lewińska, D; Stepnik, M; Krajewski, W; Arkusz, J; Stańczyk, M; Wrońska-Nofer, T

    2005-03-07

    It has been postulated that exposure to nitrous oxide and halogenated anaesthetics is associated with various adverse health effects such as neurological and reproductive abnormalities or impairment of hepatic functions. In spite of the quite well known genotoxic effects of exposure to nitrous oxide in vivo, the mechanisms of these effects are still not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of micronuclei and to identify the type of chromosomal damage (clastogenic or aneugenic) in peripheral blood lymphocytes of operating-room nurses exposed to nitrous oxide. The study group comprised 46 women working at departments where the concentration of nitrous oxide ranged from 14 to 2308 mg/m3. The control population was composed of 28 women employed in the same hospitals but in non-surgical departments. The clastogenic/aneugenic effect of nitrous oxide was evaluated in lymphocytes using the standard micronucleus (MN) assay in combination with the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique with pancentromeric probes. The results show a significant increase of the MN frequency in lymphocytes of exposed nurses compared with the control group (4.36+/-2.23 versus 9.02+/-4.67). The multiple regression analysis revealed a statistically significant relationship (p=0.0009) between MN frequency and exposure status, indicating that the level of exposure was the main factor affecting chromosomal damage. As assessed by FISH analysis, the overall frequencies of centromere-positive MN in the control and exposed groups were 43 and 49%, respectively. The increase observed in the exposed group may suggest a slight, statistically insignificant pro-aneugenic effect of exposure to nitrous oxide.

  18. Novel one-step headspace dynamic in-syringe liquid phase derivatization-extraction technique for the determination of aqueous aliphatic amines by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Muniraj, Sarangapani; Shih, Hou-Kung; Chen, Ying-Fang; Hsiech, Chunming; Ponnusamy, Vinoth Kumar; Jen, Jen-Fon

    2013-06-28

    A novel one-step headspace (HS) dynamic in-syringe (DIS) based liquid-phase derivatization-extraction (LPDE) technique has been developed for the selective determination of two short-chain aliphatic amines (SCAAs) in aqueous samples using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection (FLD). Methylamine (MA) and dimethylamine (DMA) were selected as model compounds of SCAAs. In this method, a micro-syringe pre-filled with derivatizing reagent solution (9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate) in the barrel was applied to achieve the simultaneous derivatization and extraction of two methylamines evolved from alkalized aqueous samples through the automated reciprocated movements of syringe plunger. After the derivatization-extraction process, the derivatized phase was directly injected into HPLC-FLD for analysis. Parameters influencing the evolution of methylamines and the HS-DIS-LPDE efficiency, including sample pH and temperature, sampling time, as well as the composition of derivatization reagent, reaction temperature, and frequency of reciprocated plunger movements, were thoroughly examined and optimized. Under optimal conditions, detections were linear in the range of 25-500μgL(-1) for MA and DMA with correlation coefficients all above 0.995. The limits of detection (based on S/N=3) were 5 and 19ngmL(-1) for MA and DMA, respectively. The applicability of the developed method was demonstrated for the determination of MA and DMA in real water samples without any prior cleanup of the sample. The present method provides a simple, selective, automated, low cost and eco-friendly procedure to determine aliphatic amines in aqueous samples.

  19. Integrated Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret (Inventor); Gruhlke, Russell W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A detection method is integrated with a filtering method and an enhancement method to create a fluorescence sensor that can be miniaturized. The fluorescence sensor comprises a thin film geometry including a waveguide layer, a metal film layer and sensor layer. The thin film geometry of the fluorescence sensor allows the detection of fluorescent radiation over a narrow wavelength interval. This enables wavelength discrimination and eliminates the detection of unwanted light from unknown or spurious sources.

  20. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Smith, K D; Burt, W L

    1992-11-01

    By inserting an Erreger 485 exciter filter into the operating microscope, translucent yellow Healon (sodium hyaluronate) transforms into a brilliant opaque green viscoelastic. We have developed this technique and termed it "fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement." Using the technique, we demonstrated that the time required to remove Healon from the anterior chamber after intraocular lens insertion varies. Healon is usually aspirated quickly, in less than 17 seconds. Otherwise it traps behind the intraocular lens and requires more time for irrigation/aspiration (I/A) and manipulation of the I/A tip. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement minimized I/A time, reducing excess turbulence and manipulation in the anterior chamber, and thus may reduce corneal endothelial cell loss. This study also demonstrated that fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement prevented postoperative intraocular pressure rise, compared to the conventional removal of clear Healon. Fluorescent viscoelastic enhancement assures the surgeon that a large amount of Healon is not left behind.

  1. Air pollution source identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fordyce, J. S.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for air pollution source identification are reviewed, and some results obtained with them are evaluated. Described techniques include remote sensing from satellites and aircraft, on-site monitoring, and the use of injected tracers and pollutants themselves as tracers. The use of a large number of trace elements in ambient airborne particulate matter as a practical means of identifying sources is discussed in detail. Sampling and analysis techniques are described, and it is shown that elemental constituents can be related to specific source types such as those found in the earth's crust and those associated with specific industries. Source identification sytems are noted which utilize charged particle X-ray fluorescence analysis of original field data.

  2. Effect of Controlled Deposition of ZnS Shell on the Photostability of CdTe Quantum Dots as Studied by Conventional Fluorescence and FCS Techniques.

    PubMed

    Patra, Satyajit; Seth, Sudipta; Samanta, Anunay

    2015-12-21

    The effect of one and two monolayers of ZnS shells on the photostability of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in aqueous and nonaqueous media has been studied by monitoring the fluorescence behavior of the QDs under ensemble and single-molecule conditions. ZnS capping of the CdTe QDs leads to significant enhancement of the fluorescence brightness of these QDs. Considerable enhancement of the photostability of the shell-protected QDs, including the suppression of photoactivation, is also observed. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy measurements reveal an increase in the number of particles undergoing reversible fluorescent on-off transitions in the volume under observation with increasing excitation power; this effect is found to be more pronounced in the case of core-only QDs than for core-shell QDs.

  3. Dual-Mode Combined Infra Red and Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Technique for Real-Time Industrial Process Control with Special Reference to the Food Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallav, P.; Hutchins, D. A.; Diamond, G. G.; Gan, T. H.; Hellyer, J. E.

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the use of air-coupled ultrasound and Near Infra red (NIR) as complimentary techniques for food quality assessment. A major study has been performed, in collaboration with four industrial food companies, to investigate the use of air-coupled ultrasound and NIR to both detect foreign bodies, and to measure certain parameters of interest, such as the amount of a certain additive. The research has demonstrated that air-coupled ultrasound can be used in on-line situations, measuring food materials such as chocolate and cheese. It is also capable of performing measurements on moving sealed metal cans containing food, and is able to detect foreign bodies with the top removed, as encountered just before sealing. NIR has been used as a complimentary technique to test food materials where propagation of air-coupled ultrasound was found to be difficult. This could be due to the presence of air pockets within the food material, as in the case of bread dough.

  4. Dry deposition of acidic air pollutants to tree leaves, determined by a modified leaf-washing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Mirai; Takamatsu, Takejiro; Koshikawa, Masami K.; Yamamura, Shigeki; Inubushi, Kazuyuki

    Dry deposition fluxes ( FL) of NO 3- and SO 42- to leaf surfaces were measured for Japanese red pine ( Pinus densiflora), Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria japonica), Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa), and Japanese white oak ( Quercus myrsinaefolia), together with atmospheric concentrations ( CL) of NO x (NO + NO 2), T-NO 3 (gaseous HNO 3 + particulate NO 3-) and SO x (gaseous SO 2 + particulate SO 42-) around the leaves in a suburban area of Japan, using a modified leaf-washing technique. FL of NO 3- and SO 42- decreased as follows: pine >> cedar > cypress ≥ oak and pine >> cedar > oak ≥ cypress, respectively. FL of NO 3- for all tree species fluctuated synchronously with CL of T-NO 3. FL of SO 42- fluctuated with CL of SO x, but the dominant pollutant deposited (SO 2 or SO 42-) appeared to differ for different tree species. Dry deposition conductance ( KL) of T-NO 3 and SO x was derived as an FL/ CL ratio. Seasonal variations of KL likely reflect the gas/particle ratios of T-NO 3 and SO x, which were affected by meteorological conditions such as temperature. Dry deposition velocities ( Vd) of T-NO 3 and SO x were obtained as the mathematical product of annual mean KL and the total leaf surface areas in the forests. The comparison of Vd among tree species indicated that the loads of acidic air pollutants were higher to coniferous forests than broad-leaved forest because of the higher KL and/or larger leaf surface areas.

  5. Development of Motivation Assessment Techniques for Air Force Officer Training and Education Programs: Motivation for Pilot Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Calvin W.; And Others

    The study was an investigation into the relevance of motivational factors operating in various Air Force training programs, especially Air Training Command's Undergraduate Pilot Training Program. The research project, as a whole, was directed toward understanding motivational factors as they distinguish those who drop out of training from those…

  6. Optimal stimulus intensity and reliability of air stimulation technique for elicitation of laryngo-upper esophageal sphincter contractile reflex.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Osamu; Easterling, Caryn; Rittmann, Tanya; Hofmann, Candy; Shaker, Reza

    2005-03-01

    To determine the optimal air stimulus intensity and duration for elicitation of the laryngo-upper esophageal sphincter (UES) contractile reflex, we studied 37 healthy volunteers 20 to 81 years of age. A sleeve device monitored the UES pressure. For laryngeal stimulation, we used an air stimulator unit (Pentax AP-4000) that incorporated a nasolaryngeal endoscope. The arytenoids and interarytenoid areas were stimulated at least three times by three different stimuli: 6-mm Hg air pulse with 50-ms duration, 10-mm Hg air pulse with 50-ms duration, and 6-mm Hg air pulse with 2-second duration. Of 1,165 air stimulations, 1,041 resulted in mucosal deflections. Of these, 451 resulted in an abrupt increase in UES pressure. The response/deflection ratio for 6-mm Hg stimulation with 2-second duration was significantly higher than those for air pulses with 50-ms duration (p < .001). We conclude that although the laryngo-UES contractile reflex can be elicited by an air pulse with 50-ms duration, this ultrashort stimulation is not reliable. Using longer-duration pulses (at least 2 seconds) improves the reliability of elicitation of the laryngo-UES contractile reflex.

  7. Determination of subnanogram per cubic meter concentrations of metals in the air of a trace metal clean room by impaction graphite furnace atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liang, Z W; Wei, G T; Irwin, R L; Walton, A P; Michel, R G; Sneddon, J

    1990-07-15

    Air, drawn by vacuum through a jet, was impacted against the inside surface of an atomic absorption graphite electrothermal atomizer (ETA). The amounts of the particles thus collected were determined at the ng m-3 level by graphite furnace atomic absorption or at the pg m-3 level by laser excited atomic fluorescence. The overall reproducibility of two sets of measurements, made 7 months apart, was 23%, with no significant difference between the two sets of data, based on Student's "t" test at the 95% confidence level. Short-term reproducibility varied from 13% to 34% depending upon the air concentration of the metal. The method shows promise for monitoring long-term effectiveness of the filtering systems in trace metal clean rooms. It was not possible to test for accuracy, due to the low concentrations involved, but accuracy was expected to be within a factor of 2 or 3 of the actual value, based on theoretical aspects of impaction.

  8. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to < 10 ns. A temporal resolution of half the excitation period is possible which in this instance is 15 ns. This stroboscopic technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  9. Fluorescence lifetime in cardiovascular diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, Laura

    2010-01-01

    We review fluorescence lifetime techniques including time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) instrumentation and associated methodologies that allow for characterization and diagnosis of atherosclerotic plaques. Emphasis is placed on the translational research potential of TR-LIFS and FLIM and on determining whether intrinsic fluorescence signals can be used to provide useful contrast for the diagnosis of high-risk atherosclerotic plaque. Our results demonstrate that these techniques allow for the discrimination of important biochemical features involved in atherosclerotic plaque instability and rupture and show their potential for future intravascular applications.

  10. An analytical method coupling accelerated solvent extraction and HPLC-fluorescence for the quantification of particle-bound PAHs in indoor air sampled with a 3-stages cascade impactor.

    PubMed

    Liaud, Céline; Millet, Maurice; Le Calvé, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Most of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are associated to airborne particles and their health impact depends on the particle size where they are bound. This work aims to develop a high sensitive analytical technique to quantify particulate PAHs sampled with a 3-stages cascade impactor in order to derive simultaneously their individual concentration in PM1, PM2.5 and PM10. Three key steps of the method were evaluated separately in order to avoid any PAHs loss during the global sample preparation procedure: (1) the accelerated solvent extraction of PAHs from the filter; (2) the primary concentration of the extract until 1 mL by means of a rotary evaporator at 45°C and 220 mbar and (3) the final concentration of the pre-concentrated extract to about 100-150 µL under a gentle nitrogen stream. Each recovery experiment was realized in triplicates. All these steps evaluated independently show that the overall PAHs loss, even for those with a low molecular weight, should not exceed more than a few percent. Extracts were then analyzed by using a HPLC coupled to fluorescence and Diode Array Detectors with the external standard method. The resulting calibration curves containing between 9 and 12 points were plotted in the concentration range of 0.05-45 µg L(-1) for most of the 16 US-EPA priority PAHs and were fully linear (R(2)>0.999). Limits Of Quantification were in the range 0.05-0.47 µg L(-1) corresponding to 0.75-7.05 pg m(-3) for 20 m(3) of pumped air. Finally, taking into account the average PAHs concentrations previously reported in typical European indoor environments, and considering the use of a 3-stages cascade impactor to collect simultaneously PM>10 µm, 2.5 µm

  11. Fluorescence Recovery after Merging a Droplet to Measure the Two-dimensional Diffusion of a Phospholipid Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Dae-Woong; Kim, KyuHan; Choi, Myung Chul; Choi, Siyoung Q.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new method to measure the lateral diffusivity of a surfactant monolayer at the fluid-fluid interface, called fluorescence recovery after merging (FRAM). FRAM adopts the same principles as the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, especially for measuring fluorescence recovery after bleaching a specific area, but FRAM uses a drop coalescence instead of photobleaching dye molecules to induce a chemical potential gradient of dye molecules. Our technique has several advantages over FRAP: it only requires a fluorescence microscope rather than a confocal microscope equipped with high power lasers; it is essentially free from the selection of fluorescence dyes; and it has far more freedom to define the measured diffusion area. Furthermore, FRAM potentially provides a route for studying the mixing or inter-diffusion of two different surfactants, when the monolayers at a surface of droplet and at a flat air/water interface are prepared with different species, independently. PMID:26556128

  12. Fluorescence Recovery after Merging a Droplet to Measure the Two-dimensional Diffusion of a Phospholipid Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Dae-Woong; Kim, KyuHan; Choi, Myung Chul; Choi, Siyoung Q

    2015-10-15

    We introduce a new method to measure the lateral diffusivity of a surfactant monolayer at the fluid-fluid interface, called fluorescence recovery after merging (FRAM). FRAM adopts the same principles as the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, especially for measuring fluorescence recovery after bleaching a specific area, but FRAM uses a drop coalescence instead of photobleaching dye molecules to induce a chemical potential gradient of dye molecules. Our technique has several advantages over FRAP: it only requires a fluorescence microscope rather than a confocal microscope equipped with high power lasers; it is essentially free from the selection of fluorescence dyes; and it has far more freedom to define the measured diffusion area. Furthermore, FRAM potentially provides a route for studying the mixing or inter-diffusion of two different surfactants, when the monolayers at a surface of droplet and at a flat air/water interface are prepared with different species, independently.

  13. Controlling Air Traffic (Simulated) in the Presence of Automation (CATS PAu) 1995: A Study of Measurement Techniques for Situation Awareness in Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Jennifer R.

    1995-01-01

    As automated systems proliferate in aviation systems, human operators are taking on less and less of an active role in the jobs they once performed, often reducing what should be important jobs to tasks barely more complex than monitoring machines. When operators are forced into these roles, they risk slipping into hazardous states of awareness, which can lead to reduced skills, lack of vigilance, and the inability to react quickly and competently when there is a machine failure. Using Air Traffic Control (ATC) as a model, the present study developed tools for conducting tests focusing on levels of automation as they relate to situation awareness. Subjects participated in a two-and-a-half hour experiment that consisted of a training period followed by a simulation of air traffic control similar to the system presently used by the FAA, then an additional simulation employing automated assistance. Through an iterative design process utilizing numerous revisions and three experimental sessions, several measures for situational awareness in a simulated Air Traffic Control System were developed and are prepared for use in future experiments.

  14. Laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence: a technique for detection of dimethoate effect on chlorophyll content and photosynthetic activity of wheat plant.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Jitendra Kumar; Gopal, R

    2011-03-01

    Laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (LICF) spectra and fluorescence induction kinetics (FIK) curves of wheat plant leaves treated with different concentrations (50, 100 and 200 ppm) of dimethoate are recorded. LICF spectra are recorded in the region of 650-780 nm using violet diode laser (405 nm) and FIK curve at 685 and 730 nm with red diode laser (635 nm) for excitation. The fluorescence intensity ratios (FIR) are determined from LICF spectra and vitality index (R(fd)) from FIK curves. These parameters along with photosynthetic pigment contents and growth parameters are used to analyze the effect of dimethoate on wheat plants. The result indicates that lower concentration of 50 ppm shows stimulatory response while higher concentrations of dimethoate are hazardous for growth, photosynthetic pigments and activity of wheat plants.

  15. SU-E-P-15: Technique Factor Modulation and Reference Plane Air Kerma Rates in Response to Simulated Patient Thickness Variations for a Sample of Current Generation Fluoroscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wunderle, K; Rakowski, J; Dong, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare approaches to technique factor modulation and air kerma rates in response to simulated patient thickness variations for four state-of-the-art and one previous-generation interventional fluoroscopes. Methods: A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom was used as a tissue surrogate for the purposes of determining fluoroscopic reference plane air kerma rates, kVp, mA, and spectral filtration over a wide range of simulated tissue thicknesses. Data were acquired for each fluoroscopic and acquisition dose curve within a default abdomen or body imaging protocol. Results: The data obtained indicated vendor- and model-specific variations in the approach to technique factor modulation and reference plane air kerma rates across a range of tissue thicknesses. Some vendors have made hardware advances increasing the radiation output capabilities of their fluoroscopes; this was evident in the acquisition air kerma rates. However, in the imaging protocol evaluated, all of the state-of-the-art systems had relatively low air kerma rates in the fluoroscopic low-dose imaging mode as compared to the previous-generation unit. Each of the newest-generation systems also employ copper filtration in the selected protocol in the acquisition mode of imaging; this is a substantial benefit, reducing the skin entrance dose to the patient in the highest dose-rate mode of fluoroscope operation. Conclusion: Understanding how fluoroscopic technique factors are modulated provides insight into the vendor-specific image acquisition approach and provides opportunities to optimize the imaging protocols for clinical practice. The enhanced radiation output capabilities of some of the fluoroscopes may, under specific conditions, may be beneficial; however, these higher output capabilities also have the potential to lead to unnecessarily high dose rates. Therefore, all parties involved in imaging, including the clinical team, medical physicists, and imaging vendors, must work

  16. Quantitative pteridine fluorescence analysis: A possible age-grading technique for the adult stages of the blow fly Calliphora vicina (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Victoria; Hannig, Laura; Kinast, Ronja; Verhoff, Marcel A; Rothweiler, Florian; Zehner, Richard; Amendt, Jens

    2017-03-04

    Age estimation of adult flies could extend the possible window of time for calculating the minimal postmortem interval (PMImin) by means of entomological methods. Currently, this is done by estimating the time required by necrophagous Diptera to reach certain juvenile developmental landmarks, and the method only works until the end of metamorphosis and emergence of the adult fly. Particularly at indoor crime scenes, being able to estimate the age of trapped adult flies would be an important tool with which to extend the calculable PMI beyond the developmental period. Recently, several promising age-dependent morphological and physiological characteristics of adult insects have been investigated in medical and forensic entomology, but the results are still preliminary and restricted to a few species. We examined adults of the forensically relevant blow fly species Calliphora vicina and investigated the fluorescence levels of pteridine, a group of metabolites that accumulates in the eyes during aging. From Day 1 to Day 25 post-emergence, flies were kept at three different temperature regimes (20°C, 25°C, and fluctuating temperatures in the context of a field study) and 12:12 L:D. From Day 1 until Day 7, the fluorescence of pteridine was determined on a daily basis, and thereafter, every three days. The achieved fly age was multiplied with the relevant temperature and converted into accumulated degree-days (ADD). The fluorescence level of pteridine increased linear with increasing ADD (females: R(2)=0.777; males: R(2)=0.802). The difference between sexes was significant (p<0.001). Neither head weight nor temperature had an effect on pteridine fluorescence. Because the variation in pteridine fluorescence increased with increasing ADD, it seems favorable to combine several aging methods for more precise results. In context, we emphasize that different body parts of the same specimen can be used to analyze cuticular hydrocarbons (legs), pteridine fluorescence (head

  17. Étude comparative des techniques d'analyse par fluorescence X à dispersion d'énergie (ED-XRF) et à dispersion de longueur d'onde (WD-XRF), et par spectrométrie d'émission atomique à source plasma couplée par induction (ICP-AES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, A.; Benyaïch, F.; Bounakhla, M.; Bilal, E.; Moutte, J.; Gruffat, J. J.; Zahry, F.

    2004-11-01

    Dans ce travail, nous présentons une étude comparative des techniques d'analyse par fluorescence X à dispersion d'énergie (ED-XRF) et à dispersion de longueur d'onde (WD-XRF), et par spectrométrie d'émission atomique à source plasma couplée par induction (ICP-AES). Les résultats de la calibration des spectromètres à dispersion d'énergie, à excitation par sources radioactives (55Fe, 109Cd et 241Am) et à excitation secondaire (cible secondaire Mo et Cu) du Centre National pour l'Energie, les Sciences et les Techniques Nucléaires (CNESTEN, Rabat, Maroc) sur des échantillons étalons de références de l'Agence International de l'Energie Atomique (AIEA) et du Community Bureau of Référence (BCR) ont été comparés aux résultats d'analyse des mêmes échantillons étalons par la spectrométrie X à dispersion de longueur d'onde (WD-XRF) et par spectrométrie d'émission atomique à source plasma couplé par induction (ICP-AES) au département GENERIC du centre SPIN à l'Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne (France). Les trois techniques d'analyse utilisées donnent des résultats comparables pour le dosage des éléments majeurs, alors que pour les traces on note des déviations importantes à cause des effets de matrice qui sont difficiles à corriger dans le cas de la fluorescence X.

  18. Feasibility study for joint retrieval of air density and ozone in the stratosphere and mesosphere with the limb-scan technique.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xia; Lu, Daren

    2006-12-10

    Air density is a key sensing object for its high variability especially in the mesosphere, and ozone plays an important role in the physical, chemical, and radiant processes in the atmosphere system. Therefore it is essential to obtain their global vertical distributions jointly with high precision and vertical resolution. There is little work on joint retrieval of air density and ozone distributions using the ultraviolet limb-scan technique, although much work has been done on ozone measurement. Numerical simulations of joint air density and ozone retrieval in the middle atmosphere (20-90 km) are carried out using limb-scattered radiances at four bands (255, 300, 320, and 340 nm). Results show that joint retrieval of dual parameters using the limb-scan technique is feasible with high precision in nearly the whole region concerned, where air density and ozone have a precision of 1%-2% and 3%-5%, respectively, provided that high measurement precision and accurate correction of multiple-scattered radiance at long ultraviolet bands are ensured.

  19. Condition Monitoring Techniques for Electromechanical Equipment Used in Air Force Ground C3I (Command, Control, Communications and Intelligence) Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    refrigerant line leak developed. Refrigerant could also be a long lead item at remote locations. 4.1.2.4 Legionnaires ’ Disease Air conditioning...menu listing the input options with appropriate prompts to the operator, would giide him through the process much as the automated teller machine does...ventillation systems have been identified by the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta as participating in the cause of this affliction. The Air Force should

  20. Accurate measurements of Primary Standard Gas Mixtures (PSMs) of CH4 in synthetic and scrubbed real air analyzed by two independent measuring techniques: CRDS and GC-FID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Edgar; Viallon, Joële; Moussay, Philippe; Choteau, Tiphaine; Wielgosz, Robert Ian

    2014-05-01

    In 2013 the BIPM organized the international comparison CCQM-K82 designed to evaluate the level of comparability between National Metrology Institutes (NMI) preparative capabilities for gravimetric methane in air primary reference mixtures in the range (1800-2200) nmol mol-1. This required the development of a measurement facility to compare standards, which was validated prior to the comparison with a suite of ten standards of methane in air prepared gravimetrically by NIST. The mixtures were intentionally prepared in two different air matrices, half in scrubbed real air and half in synthetic, to demonstrate that the use of synthetic air based standards did not introduced any bias for the measurement of atmospheric methane concentrations. The BIPM facility is based on two analytical techniques used under repeatability conditions, namely, cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and gas chromatography (GC-FID). GC-FID measurements were performed following a traditional protocol including ratios to a stable control cylinder, giving a typical relative uncertainty of 0.025%. CRDS measurements were performed with the same protocol, but also in a much shorter process that did not use any control cylinder, allowing the reduction of the relative uncertainty to 0.01%. Using the ten standards as references to construct a calibration line, all protocols resulted in a good linearity with very similar residuals. In particular, no effect of the air matrix was observed, as could be especially expected in CRDS due to different pressure broadening parameters, demonstrating the close matching between synthetic and scrubbed real air matrices.

  1. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    SciTech Connect

    Farquar, G; Leif, R

    2009-07-15

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  2. Fourth-derivative synchronous spectrofluorimetry and HPLC with fluorescence detection as two analytical techniques for the simultaneous determination of itopride and domperidone.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fawzia; Nasr, Jenny Jeehan

    2016-02-01

    Two simple, rapid and sensitive methods, namely, fourth-derivative synchronous spectrofluorimetry (method I) and HPLC with fluorescence detection (method II) were developed for the simultaneous analysis of a binary mixture of itopride HCl (ITP) and domperidone (DOM) without prior separation. The first method was based on measuring the fourth derivative of the synchronous fluorescence spectra of the two drugs at Δλ = 40 nm in methanol. The different experimental parameters affecting the synchronous fluorescence of the studied drugs were carefully optimized. Chromatographic separation was performed in < 6.0 min using a RP C18 column (250 mm × 4.6 mm i.d., 5 µm particle size) with fluorescence detection at 344 nm after excitation at 285 nm. A mobile phase composed of a mixture of 0.02 M phosphate buffer with acetonitrile in a ratio of 55 : 45, pH 4.5, was used at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. Linearity ranges were found to be 0.1-2 µg/mL for ITP in both methods, whereas those for DOM were found to be 0.08-2 and 0.05-1.5 µg/mL in methods I and II, respectively. The proposed methods were successfully applied for the determination of the studied drugs in synthetic mixtures and laboratory-prepared tablets.

  3. In situ investigation of the surface silvering of late Roman coins by combined use of high energy broad-beam and low energy micro-beam X-ray fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, F. P.; Garraffo, S.; Pappalardo, L.; Rizzo, F.

    2012-07-01

    The compositional analysis of archeological metals performed with the X-ray Fluorescence technique (XRF) provides information on the ancient technology. One of the most interesting case-study concerns the techniques used by Romans for silvering the surface of coins. Different metallurgical processes have been suggested in previous studies. Recently the investigation has been addressed to the mercury-silvering and to its possible use in the mass-production of coins minted during the late period (after 294 AD). In the present paper the non-destructive investigation of the silvering process used for manufacturing the Roman nummi - the important typology of coin introduced by Diocletian in his monetary reform - is approached by the combined use of the standard X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and the low energy micro-X-Ray Fluorescence (LE-μXRF) portable methods. The research was focused on the systematic determination of the mercury presence in a large number of samples and on its correlation with silver in the surface of the coins. 1041 Roman nummi belonging to the Misurata Treasure were analyzed in situ, at the Leptis Magna Museum (Al Khums, Libya). The treasure, composed of about 108 thousand silvered coins, gives the unique opportunity to study the Roman coinage in a wide interval of time (about 40 years in the period 294-333 AD) and in almost all the imperial mints operating in the Roman world.

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopy of anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Kühni, M.; Guibert, P.

    2014-06-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence of anisole as tracer of isooctane at an excitation wavelength of 266 nm was investigated for conditions relevant to rapid compression machine studies and for more general application of internal combustion engines regarding temperature, pressure, and ambient gas composition. An optically accessible high pressure and high temperature chamber was operated by using different ambient gases (Ar, N2, CO2, air, and gas mixtures). Fluorescence experiments were investigated at a large range of pressure and temperature (0.2-4 MPa and 473-823 K). Anisole fluorescence quantum yield decreases strongly with temperature for every considered ambient gas, due to efficient radiative mechanisms of intersystem crossing. Concerning the pressure effect, the fluorescence signal decreases with increasing pressure, because increasing the collisional rate leads to more important non-radiative collisional relaxation. The quenching effect is strongly efficient in oxygen, with a fluorescence evolution described by Stern-Volmer relation. The dependence of anisole fluorescence versus thermodynamic parameters suggests the use of this tracer for temperature imaging in specific conditions detailed in this paper. The calibration procedure for temperature measurements is established for the single-excitation wavelength and two-color detection technique.

  5. Enhanced fluorescence cell imaging with metal-coated slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moal, Eric; Fort, Emmanuel; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Janin, Anne; Murata, Hideyuki; Cordelières, Fabrice P.

    2007-07-01

    The last decade has witnessed momentous advances in fluorescence microscopy. The introduction of novel fluorescent markers, together with the development of original microscopy techniques, made it possible to study biomolecular interactions in living cells and to examine the structure and function of living tissues. The emergence of these innovative techniques had a remarkable impact on all the life sciences. However, many biological and medical applications involve the detection of minute quantities of biomolecules, and are limited by the signal weakness in common observation conditions. Here, we show that silver and gold-coated microscope slides can be used as mirror substrates to efficiently improve detection sensitivity when fluorescence microscopy is applied to micrometer-thick biological samples. We report a fourfold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and a noticeable strengthening of the image contrast, when mirror substrates are used with standard air microscope objectives. We demonstrate that metal-coated substrates provide the means to get sensitivity-enhanced fluorescence detection with dry optics, while keeping a wide field observation and a large depth of field. This is a crucial advantage for automated and high-throughput applications to cell and tissue diagnostic analysis.

  6. Measurements of Solar Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence at 685 nm by Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, F.; Yee, J. H.; Boldt, J.; Cook, W. B.; Corp, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) by terrestrial vegetation is linked closely to photosynthetic efficiency that can be exploited to monitor the plant health status and to assess the terrestrial carbon budget from space. The weak, broad continuum ChlF signal can be detected from the fill-in of strong O2 absorption lines or solar Fraunhofer lines in the reflected spectral radiation. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) Airborne Plant Fluorescence Sensor (APFS) is a triple etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer designed and optimized specifically for the ChlF sensing from an airborne platform using this line fill-in technique. In this paper, we will present the results of APFS ChlF measurements obtained from a NASA Langley King Air during two airborne campaigns (12/12 in 2014 and 5/20 in 2015) over various land, river, and vegetated targets in Virginia during stressed and growth seasons.

  7. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  8. Fate of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting as studied by two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy in combination with multiple fluorescence labeling techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Ping; Shen, Qi-Rong; Yu, Guang-Hui; Ran, Wei; Xu, Yang-Chun

    2012-02-01

    Detailed knowledge of the molecular events during composting is important in improving the efficiency of this process. By combining two-dimensional Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) correlation spectroscopy and multiple fluorescent labeling, it was possible to study the degradation of biopolymers during rapeseed meal and wheat bran composting. Two-dimensional FTIR correlation spectroscopy provided structural information and was used to deconvolute overlapping bands found in the compost FTIR spectra. The degradation of biopolymers in rapeseed meal and wheat bran composts followed the sequence: cellulose, heteropolysaccharides, and proteins. Fluorescent labeling suggested that cellulose formed an intact network-like structure and the other biopolymers were embedded in the core of this structure. The sequence of degradation of biopolymers during composting was related to their distribution patterns.

  9. Microencapsulated Fluorescent Dye Penetrant.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    Microencapsulated fluorescent dye pentrant materials were evaluated for feasibility as a technique to detect cracks on metal surfaces when applied as...a free flowing dry powder. Various flourescent dye solutions in addition to a commercial penetrant (Zyglo ZL-30) were microencapsulated and tested on

  10. Fluorescence and Light Scattering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ronald J.; Oprysa, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the mentioned experiment is to aid students in developing tactics for distinguishing between signals originating from fluorescence and light scattering. Also, the experiment provides students with a deeper understanding of the physicochemical bases of each phenomenon and shows that the techniques are actually related.

  11. Analysis of Biophysical, Optical and Genetic Diversity of DoD Coral Reef Communities Using Advanced Fluorescence and Molecular Biology Techniques (Addendum)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Gorbunov M.Y., Kuzminov F.I., Fadeev V.V., Dongun Kim J., Falkowski P.G. (2011). A Kinetic Model of Non-Photochemical Quenching in Cyanobacteria ...2010) - Fluorescent diagnostics of cyanobacteria . - «SPIE Photonics Europe», 2010, April12-16, Brussels, Belgium. 16. Gostev T., F. Kuzminov, M...April12-16, Brussels, Belgium. 17. Kuzminov F., E. Maximov, M. Gorbunov, V. Fadeev. (2010) - Diagnostics of cyanobacteria and zooxanthellae using

  12. Development of a Mobile Tracer Correlation Techniques for Assessment of Air Emissions from Landfills and Other Area Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improved understanding of air emissions from large area sources such as landfills, waste water ponds, open-source processing, and agricultural operations is a topic of increasing environmental importance. In many cases, the size of the area source, coupled with spatial-heteroge...

  13. TECHNIQUES TO ASSESS CROSS-BORDER AIR POLLUTION AND APPLICATION TO A U.S.-MEXICO BORDER REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A year-long assessment of cross-border air pollution was conducted in the eastmost section of the US-Mexico border region, known as the Lower Rio Grande Valley, in South Texas. Measurements were conducted on the US side and included fine particle mass (PM2.5) and elemental com...

  14. Binding investigation on the interaction between Methylene Blue (MB)/TiO2 nanocomposites and bovine serum albumin by resonance light-scattering (RLS) technique and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuesheng; Zhang, Yue; Sun, Shaofa; Zhang, Aiqing; Liu, Yi

    2013-11-05

    The interaction between Methylene Blue (MB)/TiO2 nanocomposites and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by resonance light scattering (RLS), fluorescence, three-dimension spectra and UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy. Several factors which may influence the RLS intensity were also investigated before characterizing MB/TiO2-BSA complex. It was proved that the mechanism of MB/TiO2 nanocomposites binding to BSA was mainly a result of the formation of MB/TiO2-BSA complex. The binding constant of MB/TiO2-BSA is 0.762 × 10(-5) L mol(-1) at 298K. By calculating the binding constant at different temperature, the thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔG, and ΔS can be observed and deduced that the hydrophobic interactions played an important role to stabilize the complex. The distance r (3.73 nm) between donor (BSA) and acceptor (MB/TiO2) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The binding site for MB/TiO2 on BSA was mainly located in sub-domain IIA. The UV-vis absorbance, circular dichroism and three dimension fluorescence have also been used to investigate the effect of MB/TiO2 on the conformation of BSA.

  15. Fluorescence quenching of beta-carboline alkaloids in micellar media. A study to select the adequate surfactant to use in analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Martín, Laura; Olives, Ana I; del Castillo, Benito; Martín, M Antonia

    2005-01-01

    The study of fluorescence quenching of the fluorophores allows the localization of the alkaloids (harmane and harmine) in the micelles (SDS, CTAB, Brij-35) to be established. In aqueous micellar solutions (SDS and Brij-35) at pH 13.0, emission corresponding to the neutral or zwitterionic forms can be observed. In the presence of CTAB (pH = 13.0) it was possible to observe the emission of anionic form. These species are not present in buffered aqueous solutions at these pH values. Bromide ion was added to the different surfactant solutions and the quenching effect was studied according to the Stern-Volmer equation. In the presence of SDS the quenching effect is considerably reduced compared to the aqueous solutions without surfactants, while for Brij-35 micelles were similar to those observed in homogeneous aqueous solution. For CTAB micelles a notable fluorescence quenching was observed for the different pH values studied. The fluorescence quenching studies show that the neutral species are associated inside the micelles, instead of the ionic species (cationic, zwitterionic or anionic) remaining on the surface of the micelles. The anionic surface of SDS micelles prevents the quenching effect by anionic quenchers for both neutral and charged species.

  16. Influence of Air Abrasion and Sonic Technique on Microtensile Bond Strength of One-Step Self-Etch Adhesive on Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Anja, Baraba; Walter, Dukić; Nicoletta, Chieffi; Marco, Ferrari; Pezelj Ribarić, Sonja; Ivana, Miletić

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesive to human dentin surface modified with air abrasion and sonic technique and to assess the morphological characteristics of the pretreated dentin surface. The occlusal enamel was removed to obtain a flat dentin surface for thirty-six human molar teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n = 12 per group), according to the pretreatment of the dentin: (1) control group, (2) air abrasion group, and (3) sonic preparation group. Microtensile bond strength test was performed on a universal testing machine. Two specimens from each experimental group were subjected to SEM examination. There was no statistically significant difference in bond strength between the three experimental groups (P > 0.05). Mean microtensile bond strength (MPa) values were 35.3 ± 12.8 for control group, 35.8 ± 13.5 for air abrasion group, and 37.7 ± 12.0 for sonic preparation group. The use of air abrasion and sonic preparation with one-step self-etch adhesive does not appear to enhance or impair microtensile bond strength in dentin. PMID:25879053

  17. Single-cell analysis of dihydroartemisinin-induced apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated caspase-8 activation and mitochondrial pathway in ASTC-a-1 cells using fluorescence imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ying-Ying; Chen, Tong-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Li

    2010-07-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a front-line antimalarial herbal compound, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activity with low toxicity. We have previously reported that DHA induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. However, the cellular target and molecular mechanism of DHA-induced apoptosis is still poorly defined. We use confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching techniques to explore the roles of DHA-elicited reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the DHA-induced Bcl-2 family proteins activation, mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase cascade, and cell death. Cell Counting Kit-8 assay and flow cytometry analysis showed that DHA induced ROS-mediated apoptosis. Confocal imaging analysis in a single living cell and Western blot assay showed that DHA triggered ROS-dependent Bax translocation, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, alteration of mitochondrial morphology, cytochrome c release, caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 activation, indicating the coexistence of ROS-mediated mitochondrial and death receptor pathway. Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time that DHA induces cell apoptosis by triggering ROS-mediated caspase-8/Bid activation and the mitochondrial pathway, which provides some novel insights into the application of DHA as a potential anticancer drug and a new therapeutic strategy by targeting ROS signaling in lung adenocarcinoma therapy in the future.

  18. Two-dimensional simulation of the single-sided air-coupled ultrasonic pitch-catch technique for non-destructive testing.

    PubMed

    Delrue, Steven; Van Den Abeele, Koen; Blomme, Erik; Deveugele, Jurgen; Lust, Pieter; Matar, Olivier Bou

    2010-02-01

    Non-contact air-coupled ultrasonic inspection of materials using single-sided access offers interesting possibilities for the development of in-line non-destructive testing (NDT) systems. This contribution reports observations and simulations obtained from a single-sided air-coupled pitch-catch configuration. The pitch-catch technique involves a set-up in which transmitter and receiver are located at the same side of the test object. Sound waves, reflected once or multiple times from the back-wall of the object or refracted by a discontinuity, are recorded and analyzed for visualization. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated, experimentally, in the case of artificial defects in aluminium samples. Depending on the configuration one or more ultrasonic images of the defect can be observed, their number and relative position containing information about the location of the defect. The experiments are simulated using two distinctive methods. The first simulation is based on a ray tracing (shadow) approach, the second method uses a spectral solution implemented within COMSOL. Both simulation methods allow simple prediction of the response images in experimental conditions with supplementary levels of complexity, which will assist the development and optimization of online inspection techniques.

  19. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  20. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  1. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Sunday, April 9, 2017 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... general dentist, who has been trained in restorative dentistry techniques, will perform any procedures that use air- ...

  2. Leader/Follower: An Analysis of a Proposed Technique for Increasing Competition in Air Force Weapon System Procurements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    A comprehensive model for applying the leader / follower procurement technique to introduce competition into the system acquisition process is...presented in this research effort. A comparative analysis of three procurement techniques (second sourcing, technology licensing, and leader / follower ) is...presented to determine the factors that must be exhibited by a system before an acquisition program can be adapted to the leader / follower procurement

  3. Imaging individual green fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Daniel W.; Hom-Booher, Nora; Vale, Ronald D.

    1997-07-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy techniques have allowed the video-time imaging of single molecules of fluorescent dyes covalently bound to proteins in aqueous environments. However, the techniques have not been exploited fully because proteins can be difficult to label, and dye modification may cause partial or complete loss of activity. These difficulties could be circumvented by fusing proteins to green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria. Here we report that single S65T mutant GFP molecules can be imaged using total internal reflection microscopy, and that ATP-driven movement of an individual kinesin molecule (a microtubule motor protein) fused to GFP can be readily observed.

  4. A comparative study on total reflection X-ray fluorescence determination of low atomic number elements in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using different excitation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, N. L.; Kanrar, Buddhadev; Aggarwal, S. K.; Wobrauschek, Peter; Rauwolf, M.; Streli, Christina

    2014-09-01

    A comparison of trace element determinations of low atomic number (Z) elements Na, Mg, Al, P, K and Ca in air, helium and vacuum atmospheres using W Lβ1, Mo Kα and Cr Kα excitations has been made. For Mo Kα and W Lβ1 excitations a Si (Li) detector with beryllium window was used and measurements were performed in air and helium atmospheres. For Cr Kα excitation, a Si (Li) detector with an ultra thin polymer window (UTW) was used and measurements were made in vacuum and air atmospheres. The sensitivities of the elemental X-ray lines were determined using TXRF spectra of standard solutions and processing them by IAEA QXAS program. The elemental concentrations of the elements in other solutions were determined using their TXRF spectra and pre-determined sensitivity values. The study suggests that, using the above experimental set up, Mo Kα excitation is not suited for trace determination of low atomic number element. Excitation by WLβ1 and helium atmosphere, the spectrometer can be used for the determination of elements with Z = 15 (P) and above with fairly good detection limits whereas Cr Kα excitation with ultra thin polymer window and vacuum atmosphere is good for the elements having Z = 11 (Na) and above. The detection limits using this set up vary from 7048 pg for Na to 83 pg for Ti.

  5. The History of Ground-Based Very High Energy Gamma-Ray Astrophysics with the Atmospheric Air Cherenkov Telescope Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoyan, Razmik

    2013-06-01

    In the recent two decades the ground-based technique of imaging atmosphericescopes has established itself as a powerful new discipline in science. As of today some ˜ 150 sources of gamma rays of very different types, of both galactic and extragalactic origin, have been discovered due to this technique. The study of these sources is providing clues to many basic questions in astrophysics, astro-particle physics, physics of cosmic rays and cosmology. The current generation of telescopes, despite the young age of the technique, offers a solid performance. The technique is still maturing, leading to the next generation large instrument known under the name Cherenkov Telescope Array. The latter's sensitivity will be an order of magnitude higher than that of the currently best instruments VERITAS, H.E.S.S. and MAGIC. This article is devoted to outlining the milestones in a long history that step-by-step have given shape to this technique and have brought about today's successful source marathon.

  6. Investigation of Techniques to Improve Continuous Air Monitors Under Conditions of High Dust Loading in Environmental Settings

    SciTech Connect

    Suilou Huang; Stephen D. Schery; John C. Rodgers

    2002-07-23

    A number of DOE facilities, such as the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), use alpha-particle environmental continuous air monitors (ECAMs) to monitor air for unwanted releases of radioactive aerosols containing such materials as plutonium and uranium. High sensitivity, ease of operation, and lack of false alarms are all important for ECAMs. The object of the project was to conduct investigations to improve operation of ECAMs, particularly under conditions where a lot of nonradioactive dust may be deposited on the filters (conditions of high dust loading). The presence of such dust may increase the frequency with which filters must be changed and can lead to an increased incidence of false alarms due to deteriorated energy resolution and response specificity to the radionuclides of interest. A major finding of the investigation, not previously documented, was that under many conditions thick layers of underlying nonradioactive dust do not decrease energy resolution and specificity for target radionuclides if the radioactive aerosol arrives as a sudden thin burst deposit, as commonly occurs in the early-warning alarm mode. As a result, operators of ECAMs may not need to change filters as often as previously thought and have data upon which to base more reliable operating procedures.

  7. An evaluation of the sources of air pollution in the city of Chandigarh, India: A study using EDXRF technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandhu, H. K.; Puri, Sanjiv; Shahi, J. S.; Mehta, D.; Garg, M. L.; Singh, Nirmal; Mangal, P. C.; Suri, C. R.; Swietlick, E.; Trehan, P. N.

    1996-07-01

    The elemental composition of aerosol samples, collected from July 1994 to January 1995, in the city of Chandigarh, India was determined using EDXRF technique. The elemental concentration levels are generally found to be higher by a factor of 2-5 in the winter season as compared to the rainy season. The receptor model, employing the multivariate statistical techniques was applied to the acquired data set of elemental concentrations in order to assess the impact of relevant sources at the sampling site. Possible sources identified from this analysis are soil dust, refuse burning, field burning, exhaust from automobiles and smelter activity.

  8. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. We present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source. We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4-6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. These quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.

  9. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2016-09-28

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. In this paper, we present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source. We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4–6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. Finally, these quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.

  10. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  11. Millefiori glasswork technique in the Migration Period: Investigation of beads with the use of nondestructive X-ray fluorescence micro-analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hložek, M.; Trojek, T.

    2015-11-01

    This article shows how a non-destructive X-ray fluorescence micro-analysis enabled us to describe the elemental composition and the production technology of a unique millefiori bead that was found in a burial ground in Kyjov (Hodonin district, Czech Republic) dating back to the Migration Period. This graveyard includes more than 250 graves belonging to the Germanic Lombard tribe that were carefully explored in 2010. Only a few Langobardic burial grounds have been revealed in the Moravia until now. This burial ground is therefore a remarkable find, to which particular attention has been paid. The main aim of our project was to provide a proper description of the production technology for the millefiori bead.

  12. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

  13. Effects of air annealing on CdS quantum dots thin film grown at room temperature by CBD technique intended for photosensor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Shaheed U.; Desale, Dipalee J.; Siddiqui, Farha Y.; Ghosh, Arindam; Birajadar, Ravikiran B.; Ghule, Anil V.; Sharma, Ramphal

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of different intensities (40, 60 100 and 200 W) of light on CdS quantum dots thin film annealed at 350 °C indicating enhancement in (a) photo-current and (b) photosensitivity. Highlights: ► The preparation of CdS nanodot thin film at room temperature by M-CBD technique. ► Study of air annealing on prepared CdS nanodots thin film. ► The optimized annealing temperature for CdS nanodot thin film is 350 °C. ► Modified CdS thin films can be used in photosensor application. -- Abstract: CdS quantum dots thin-films have been deposited onto the glass substrate at room temperature using modified chemical bath deposition technique. The prepared thin films were further annealed in air atmosphere at 150, 250 and 350 °C for 1 h and subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, electrical resistivity and I–V system. The modifications observed in morphology and opto-electrical properties of the thin films are presented.

  14. On-line study of flavonoids of Trollius chinensis Bunge binding to DNA with ethidium bromide using a novel combination of chromatographic, mass spectrometric and fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhiling; Wang, Hong; Ren, Biao; Zhang, Baobao; Hashi, Yuki; Chen, Shizhong

    2013-03-22

    The study of the interaction between drugs and DNA is an important way to understand the role of drug molecules. A novel online analytical method for this purpose combining high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-electrospray ionization-ion-trap time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n)) and DNA-ethidium bromide detection with a fluorescence detector (DNA-EB-FLD) was firstly developed, which could rapidly identify the chemical constituents and obtain the profile related to DNA binding activity. This method has been applied for a precise or probable identification of the chemical constituents by ultraviolet (UV) absorption and MS(n) data analysis, while the DNA binding profile has been characterized by directly measuring the fluorescence intensity of compound-DNA-EB. Using this method, Trollius chinensis Bunge was studied and 18 constituents were identified by MS(n) data; six of them (4'-methoxy-2″-O-(2‴-methylbutyryl)vitexin,2″-O-(3‴-methoxycaffeoyl)vitexin) and 4'-methoxy-2″-O-(2‴-methylbutyryl)orientin,acacetin-7-O-rutinoside,quercetin-3-O-xylosylglucoside,quercetin-3-O-arabinosylglucoside) were identified for the first time in T. chinensis Bunge, and 16 constituents accounted for its activity of binding to DNA. The established (HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n) DNA-EB-FLD) system has proved to offer a useful strategy for correlating the chemical profile with the binding to DNA activities of the components without their isolation and purification, and may be used for multicomponent analysis of active substances in other herbs.

  15. Application of the ultrasonic technique and high-speed filming for the study of the structure of air-water bubbly flows

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, R.D.M.; Venturini, O.J.; Tanahashi, E.I.; Neves, F. Jr.; Franca, F.A.

    2009-10-15

    Multiphase flows are very common in industry, oftentimes involving very harsh environments and fluids. Accordingly, there is a need to determine the dispersed phase holdup using noninvasive fast responding techniques; besides, knowledge of the flow structure is essential for the assessment of the transport processes involved. The ultrasonic technique fulfills these requirements and could have the capability to provide the information required. In this paper, the potential of the ultrasonic technique for application to two-phase flows was investigated by checking acoustic attenuation data against experimental data on the void fraction and flow topology of vertical, upward, air-water bubbly flows in the zero to 15% void fraction range. The ultrasonic apparatus consisted of one emitter/receiver transducer and three other receivers at different positions along the pipe circumference; simultaneous high-speed motion pictures of the flow patterns were made at 250 and 1000 fps. The attenuation data for all sensors exhibited a systematic interrelated behavior with void fraction, thereby testifying to the capability of the ultrasonic technique to measure the dispersed phase holdup. From the motion pictures, basic gas phase structures and different flows patterns were identified that corroborated several features of the acoustic attenuation data. Finally, the acoustic wave transit time was also investigated as a function of void fraction. (author)

  16. Two-dimensional imaging of molecular hydrogen in H2-air diffusion flames using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, W.; Kumar, V.; Glesk, I.; Miles, R.; Diskin, G.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a tunable ArF laser at 193.26 nm to record simultaneous single-laser-shot, planar images of molecular hydrogen and hot oxygen in a turbulent H2-air diffusion flame. Excitation spectra of fuel and oxidant-rich flame zones confirm a partial overlap of the two-photon H2 and single-photon O2 Schumann-Runge absorption bands. UV Rayleigh scattering images of flame structure and estimated detection limits for the H2 two-photon imaging are also presented.

  17. Chloroform uptake by gutta-percha and assessment of its concentration in air during the chloroform-dip technique.

    PubMed

    Margelos, J; Verdelis, K; Eliades, G

    1996-10-01

    The use of chloroform as an adjunct to the practice of endodontics has been a matter of debate. In the present study the chloroform uptake of gutta-percha cones was determined by a gravimetric assay for different times of chloroform dip. In conjunction with an assessment of the amount of gutta-percha dissolved during dip, this provided an estimate of the amount of chloroform that patients are exposed to in clinical conditions. An assay was also performed of the chloroform concentration in the air in a dental office. Chloroform uptake was shown to increase with an increasing dipping time. There also seems to be a difference in this uptake between pure chloroform and a chloroform preparation with colophonium. The concentration levels of chloroform evaporated during the practice of chloroform dip within a dental office do not exceed the safety limits.

  18. Entrainment Heat Flux Computed with Lidar and Wavelet Technique in Buenos Aires During Last Chaitén Volcano Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawelko, Ezequiel Eduardo; Salvador, Jacobo Omar; Ristori, Pablo Roberto; Pallotta, Juan Vicente; Otero, Lidia Ana; Quel, Eduardo Jaime

    2016-06-01

    At Lidar Division of CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET) a multiwavelength Raman-Rayleigh lidar optimized to measure the atmospheric boundary layer is being operated. This instrument is used for monitoring important aerosol intrusion events in Buenos Aires, such as the arrival of volcanic ashes from the Chaitén volcano eruption on May 2008. That was the first monitoring of volcanic ash with lidar in Argentina. In this event several volcanic ash plumes with high aerosol optical thickness were detected in the free atmosphere, affecting the visibility, surface radiation and therefore, the ABL evolution. In this work, the impact of ashes in entrainment flux ratio is studied. This parameter is obtained from the atmospheric boundary layer height and entrainment zone thickness using algorithms based on covariance wavelet transform.

  19. Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Michael J.; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. PMID:25275114

  20. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  1. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    DOE PAGES

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; ...

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research andmore » Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.« less

  2. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si-Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wofsy, Steve C.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Kort, Eric A.; Fischer, Marc L.; Trainer, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. We estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.

  3. Techniques used for the analysis of oculometer eye-scanning data obtained from an air traffic control display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Daniel J.; Burdette, Daniel W.; Capron, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The methodology and techniques used to collect and analyze look-point position data from a real-time ATC display-format comparison experiment are documented. That study compared the delivery precision and controller workload of three final approach spacing aid display formats. Using an oculometer, controller lookpoint position data were collected, associated with gaze objects (e.g., moving aircraft) on the ATC display, and analyzed to determine eye-scan behavior. The equipment involved and algorithms for saving, synchronizing with the ATC simulation output, and filtering the data are described. Target (gaze object) and cross-check scanning identification algorithms are also presented. Data tables are provided of total dwell times, average dwell times, and cross-check scans. Flow charts, block diagrams, file record descriptors, and source code are included. The techniques and data presented are intended to benefit researchers in other studies that incorporate non-stationary gaze objects and oculometer equipment.

  4. An intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Carroll, M. A.; Mcfarland, M.; Ridley, B. A.; Davis, D. D.; Bradshaw, J.; Rodgers, M. O.; Torres, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results from an intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted at Wallops Island, VA, in July 1983. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence system and two chemiluminescence instruments. The intercomparisons were performed with ambient air at NO mixing ratios ranging from 10 to 60 pptv and NO-enriched ambient air at mixing ratios from 20 to 170 pptv. All instruments sampled from a common manifold. The techniques exhibited a high degree of correlation among themselves and with changes in the NO mixing ratio. Agreement among the three techniques was placed at approximately + or - 30 percent. Within this level of agreement, no artifacts or species interferences were identified.

  5. Top-down estimate of methane emissions in California using a mesoscale inverse modeling technique: The South Coast Air Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Yu Yan; Brioude, Jerome; McKeen, Stuart A.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Kim, Si -Wan; Frost, Gregory J.; Ahmadov, Ravan; Peischl, Jeff; Bousserez, Nicolas; Liu, Zhen; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Wofsy, Steve C.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Kort, Eric A.; Fischer, Marc L.; Trainer, Michael

    2015-07-28

    Methane (CH4) is the primary component of natural gas and has a larger global warming potential than CO2. Some recent top-down studies based on observations showed CH4 emissions in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) were greater than those expected from population-apportioned bottom-up state inventories. In this study, we quantify CH4 emissions with an advanced mesoscale inverse modeling system at a resolution of 8 km × 8 km, using aircraft measurements in the SoCAB during the 2010 Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change campaign to constrain the inversion. To simulate atmospheric transport, we use the FLEXible PARTicle-Weather Research and Forecasting (FLEXPART-WRF) Lagrangian particle dispersion model driven by three configurations of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model. We determine surface fluxes of CH4 using a Bayesian least squares method in a four-dimensional inversion. Simulated CH4 concentrations with the posterior emission inventory achieve much better correlations with the measurements (R2 = 0.7) than using the prior inventory (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Emission Inventory 2005, R2 = 0.5). The emission estimates for CH4 in the posterior, 46.3 ± 9.2 Mg CH4/h, are consistent with published observation-based estimates. Changes in the spatial distribution of CH4 emissions in the SoCAB between the prior and posterior inventories are discussed. Missing or underestimated emissions from dairies, the oil/gas system, and landfills in the SoCAB seem to explain the differences between the prior and posterior inventories. Furthermore, we estimate that dairies contributed 5.9 ± 1.7 Mg CH4/h and the two sectors of oil and gas industries (production and downstream) and landfills together contributed 39.6 ± 8.1 Mg CH4/h in the SoCAB.

  6. The effect of the atmospheric condition on the extensive air shower analysis at the Telescope Array experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tokuno, H.; Kakimoto, F.; Tomida, T.

    2011-09-22

    The accuracies in determination of air shower parameters such as longitudinal profiles or primary energies with the fluorescence detection technique are strongly dependent on atmospheric conditions of the molecular and aerosol components. Moreover, air fluorescence photon yield depends on the atmospheric density, and the transparency of the air for fluorescence photons depends on the atmospheric conditions from EAS to FDs. In this paper, we describe the atmospheric monitoring system in the Telescope Array (TA experiment), and the impact of the atmospheric conditions in air shower reconstructions. The systematic uncertainties of the determination of the primary cosmic ray energies and of the measurement of depth of maximum development (X{sub max}) of EASs due to atmospheric variance are evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation.

  7. Integration of biomonitoring and instrumental techniques to assess the air quality in an industrial area located in the coastal of central Asturias, Spain.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Susana Marta; Lage, Joana; Freitas, Maria do Carmo; Pedro, Ana Isabel; Ribeiro, Tiago; Silva, Alexandra Viana; Canha, Nuno; Almeida-Silva, Marina; Sitoe, Timóteo; Dionisio, Isabel; Garcia, Sílvia; Domingues, Gonçalo; de Faria, Julia Perim; Fernández, Beatriz González; Ciaparra, Diane; Wolterbeek, Hubert T

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the world, epidemiological studies were established to examine the relationship between air pollution and mortality rates and adverse respiratory health effects. However, despite the years of discussion the correlation between adverse health effects and atmospheric pollution remains controversial, partly because these studies are frequently restricted to small and well-monitored areas. Monitoring air pollution is complex due to the large spatial and temporal variations of pollution phenomena, the high costs of recording instruments, and the low sampling density of a purely instrumental approach. Therefore, together with the traditional instrumental monitoring, bioindication techniques allow for the mapping of pollution effects over wide areas with a high sampling density. In this study, instrumental and biomonitoring techniques were integrated to support an epidemiological study that will be developed in an industrial area located in Gijon in the coastal of central Asturias, Spain. Three main objectives were proposed to (i) analyze temporal patterns of PM₁₀ concentrations in order to apportion emissions sources, (ii) investigate spatial patterns of lichen conductivity to identify the impact of the studied industrial area in air quality, and (iii) establish relationships amongst lichen conductivity with some site-specific characteristics. Samples of the epiphytic lichen Parmelia sulcata were transplanted in a grid of 18 by 20 km with an industrial area in the center. Lichens were exposed for a 5-mo period starting in April 2010. After exposure, lichen samples were soaked in 18-MΩ water aimed at determination of water electrical conductivity and, consequently, lichen vitality and cell damage. A marked decreasing gradient of lichens conductivity relative to distance from the emitting sources was observed. Transplants from a sampling site proximal to the industrial area reached values 10-fold higher than levels far from it. This finding showed that

  8. Application of /sup 13/C NMR, fluorescence, and light-scattering techniques for structural studies of oil-in-water microemulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Tricot, Y.; Kiwi, J.; Niederberger, W.; Graetzel, M.

    1981-04-02

    The nature of the microdroplets present in oil-in-water microemulsions was examined by using the 4-component model system water-hexadecane-sodium hexadecyl sulfate-pentanol. Three compositions were selected corresponding to regions in the pahse diagram where the content of water, cosurfactant, and oil, respectively, approached the tolerable limit to yield clear isotropic solutions. In the water-side microemulsion, the radius of the droplets is 127A as determined from quasi-elastic light-scattering measurements. Fluorescence experiments showed that the core of the microspheres has a microviscosity similar to hexadecane at room temperature. /sup 13/C NMR shift analysis was applied to test the partitioning of cosurfactant between the surface and the interior of the droplet. For all three compositions significant fractions of the cosurfactant are present in the interior. This is corroborated by results obtained from T/sub 1/ relaxation-time analysis at different field strengths. The influence of the field strength on T/sub 1/ is explained in terms of a model based on a distribution of correlation times. In particular, the importance of taking into account slower rotational modes such as the tumbling of the whole microsphere is illustrated.

  9. Characterization of a two-dimensional temperature field within a rapid compression machine using a toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, Camille; Sotton, Julien; Mura, Arnaud; Bellenoue, Marc

    2009-12-01

    The homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion process is an advanced operating mode for automotive engines. The self-ignition mechanisms that occur within the combustion chamber exhibit extreme temperature dependence. Therefore, the thorough understanding of corresponding phenomena requires the use of diagnostic methods featuring a sufficient thermal sensitivity, applicable in severe conditions similar to those encountered within engines. In this respect, toluene planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) is applied to the inert compression flow generated within an optical rapid compression machine (RCM). A relatively simple diagnostic system is retained: a single wavelength excitation device (266 nm) and a single (filtered) collection system. This diagnostic system is associated with an image processing strategy specifically adapted to RCM devices. Despite the severe conditions under consideration (40 bar, 700-950 K), the method allows us to obtain relatively large two-dimensional temperature fields that display a level of description seldom achieved in such devices. In particular the temperature gradients, which play a crucial role in HCCI combustion processes, can be estimated. The present experimental results confirm the good reliability and accuracy of the method. The information gathered with this toluene PLIF method puts in evidence its high potentialities for the study of aero-thermal-reactive processes as they take place in real engine conditions. The retained strategy also brings new possibilities of non-intrusive analysis for flows practically encountered within industrial devices.

  10. Measurements of He metastable atom density profile in front of substrate in ECR plasma flow by laser-induced fluorescence technique.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyota, H.; Takiyama, K.; Oda, T.

    1998-10-01

    Metastable atoms of rare gases affect on the etching processes and the radical formation processes in a reactive plasma because of their high internal energy. Fundamental understanding is required of the creation and annihilation mechanisms of the metastable atoms in the plasma, especially in the boundary region between plasma and substrate. We have measured spatial profile of He metastable (2^1S) atom density in plasma flow from an ECR plasma source by polarized laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy [1]. It has been shown that the metastable atoms near the outlet of the plasma flow are created by collisional-radiative processes. However, the remarkable decrease near the substrate placed in the downstream has not been clearly understood. Observation of the polarized LIF due to forbidden excitation is made with high spatial resolution in the vicinity of the substrate to obtain the detailed density profile. Based on these results, possible annihilation mechanism of the metastable atoms will be briefly discussed. [1] H. Toyota et al.; Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 36 (1997) 4670.

  11. Quantitative analysis of human remains from 18(th)-19(th) centuries using X-ray fluorescence techniques: The mysterious high content of mercury in hair.

    PubMed

    Pessanha, Sofia; Carvalho, Marta; Carvalho, Maria Luisa; Dias, António

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the unusual concentration of mercury in the hair of an individual buried in the 18th to mid-19th centuries and the comparison with the elemental composition of other remains from the same individual. Two energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) setups, one with tri-axial geometry and the second one with micro-beam capabilities and a vacuum system, for light elements detection, have been used. Quantitative evaluation of the obtained spectra were made by fundamental parameters and winAXIL program by compare mode method. The levels of Hg in the hair of buried samples presented a concentration over 5% (w/w), a significantly lower presence of this element in the cranium, and no Hg in the remaining organs. Furthermore, there was no evidence of Hg in the burial soil, which has been also analyzed. From this result, we could conclude that the possibility of post-mortem contamination from the burial surroundings is very unlikely. The obtained results are indicative of the apparent use of a mercury-based compound for medical purposes, most likely lice infestation.

  12. Pressure mapping for sphere and half-sphere enhanced diamond anvil cells using synchrotron x-ray diffraction and fluorescence techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Liu, L. L.; Cai, Z.; Shu, J.

    2015-12-01

    The measurement for equation of state (EoS) of materials under pressure conditions above 200 GPa is a long-standing challenging subject. Recently, second stage anvil, which was loaded inside the diamond anvil cell (DAC), had been reported by various groups. This method could generate pressure over 300 GPa, or above 600 GPa from the EoS measurement of Re metal between the tiny anvil or 2 half-spheres. Several alternative approaches, using ruby balls, or glassy carbon, or diamond, with single sphere, 2 half-spheres, or multi spheres geometry inside DAC, were tested. The NIST X-ray powder standard, ZnO was selected as pressure marker. Focused ion beam (FIB) was used to cut the half-sphere from diamond anvil top directly to avoid the difficulty of alignment. The synchrotron x-ray diffraction with fine beam size down to 100 nm using zone plate set-up was used to map the pressure gradient at the sphere or half-sphere zone inside DAC. The pressure could be boosted at center of sphere by up to 10 - 70 GPa at about 200 GPa conditions. From broken anvils, trace element analysis using fine focusing synchrotron x-ray fluorescence method revealed the potential anvil damage from FIB cutting the diamond anvil tip, which might decrease the strength of anvils. Fine touch from FIB cutting at final stage using low ion beam current is suggested.

  13. Modeling of experimental treatment of acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-containing water using corona discharge technique.

    PubMed

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Sano, Noriaki; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut

    2006-03-01

    Acetaldehyde-laden air and phenol-contaminated water were experimentally treated using corona discharge reactions and gas absorption in a single water-film column. Mathematical modeling of the combined treatment was developed in this work. Efficient removal of the gaseous acetaldehyde was achieved while the corona discharge reactions produced short-lived species such as O and O- as well as ozone. Direct contact of the radicals and ions with water was known to produce aqueous OH radical, which contributes to the decomposition of organic contaminants: phenol, absorbed acetaldehyde, and intermediate byproducts in the water. The influence of initial phenol concentration ranging from 15 to 50 mg L(-1) and that of influent acetaldehyde ranging from 0 to 200 ppm were experimentally investigated and used to build the math model. The maximum energetic efficiency of TOC, phenol, and acetaldehyde were obtained at 25.6 x 10(-9) mol carbon J(-1), 25.0 x 10(-9) mol phenol J(-1), and 2.0 x 10(-9) mol acetaldehyde J(-1), respectively. The predictions for the decomposition of acetaldehyde, phenol, and their intermediates were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Integration of Novel Low-Cost Colorimetric, Laser Photometric, and Visual Fluorescent Techniques for Rapid Identification of Falsified Medicines in Resource-Poor Areas: Application to Artemether–Lumefantrine

    PubMed Central

    Green, Michael D.; Hostetler, Dana M.; Nettey, Henry; Swamidoss, Isabel; Ranieri, Nicola; Newton, Paul N.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of falsified antimalarial drugs can be reduced with effective drug regulatory agencies and proper enforcement. Fundamental to these agencies taking action, rapid identification must be made as soon as they appear in the market place. Since falsified antimalarials occur mostly in developing countries, performing drug analysis presents itself with unique challenges. A fundamental factor in choosing a useful technique is affordability and simplicity. Therefore, we suggest a three-tiered drug evaluation strategy for identifying a falsified drug in resource-poor areas. Tier I is a simple comparison of a tablet's weight and dimensions with official specifications. Tier II uses inexpensive photometric devices (laser and fluorescence) to evaluate a tablet. Suspicious samples from Tier I and II assessments are then subjected to a colorimetric assay for active ingredients identification and quantification. In this article, we evaluate a novel colorimetric assay for the simultaneous assessment of both lumefantrine and artemether in co-formulated Coartem™ tablets, and integrate the method with two novel, low-cost, fluorescence and laser photometric devices. Image analysis software is used for the assessments. Although artemether–lumefantrine is used as an example, the strategy may be adapted to other medicines. PMID:25897066

  15. Ultrasensitive analysis of lysergic acid diethylamide and its C-8 isomer in hair by capillary zone electrophoresis in combination with a stacking technique and laser induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Airado-Rodríguez, Diego; Cruces-Blanco, Carmen; García-Campaña, Ana M

    2015-03-25

    This article deals with the development and validation of a novel capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with laser induced fluorescence detection method for the analysis of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its isomer iso-LSD in hair samples. The separation of both analytes has been achieved in less than 13 min in a 72-cm effective length capillary with 75-μm internal diameter. As running buffer 25 mM citrate, pH 6.0 has been employed and separation temperature and voltage of 20 °C and 13 kV respectively, were applied. Field amplified sample injection (FASI) has been employed for on-line sample preconcentration, using ultrapure water containing 117 μM H3PO4 as optimum injection medium. Injection voltage and time have been optimized by means of experimental design, obtaining values of 7 kV and 15s, respectively. Methylergonovine has been employed as internal standard in order to compensate irreproducibility from electrokinetic injection. The analytical method has been applied to hair samples, previous extraction of the target analytes by ultrasound assisted solid-liquid extraction at 40 °C for 2.5 h, employing acetonitrile as extracting solvent. Linear responses were found for LSD and iso-LSD in matrix-matched calibrations from around 0.400 up to 50.0 pg mg(-1). LODs (3 S/N) in the order of 0.100 pg mg(-1) were calculated for both analytes, obtaining satisfactory recovery percentages for this kind of sample.

  16. Determination of elemental distribution in green micro-algae using synchrotron radiation nano X-ray fluorescence (SR-nXRF) and electron microscopy techniques--subcellular localization and quantitative imaging of silver and cobalt uptake by Coccomyxa actinabiotis.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, T; Farhi, E; Boisson, A-M; Vial, J; Cloetens, P; Bohic, S; Rivasseau, C

    2014-02-01

    The newly discovered unicellular micro-alga Coccomyxa actinabiotis proves to be highly radio-tolerant and strongly concentrates radionuclides, as well as large amounts of toxic metals. This study helps in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the accumulation and detoxification of silver and cobalt. Elemental distribution inside Coccomyxa actinabiotis cells was determined using synchrotron nano X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at the ID22 nano fluorescence imaging beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The high resolution and high sensitivity of this technique enabled the assessment of elemental associations and exclusions in subcellular micro-algae compartments. A quantitative treatment of the scans was implemented to yield absolute concentrations of each endogenous and exogenous element with a spatial resolution of 100 nm and compared to the macroscopic content in cobalt and silver determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The nano X-ray fluorescence imaging was complemented by transmission electron microscopy coupled to X-ray microanalysis (TEM-EDS), yielding differential silver distribution in the cell wall, cytosol, nucleus, chloroplast and mitochondria with unique resolution. The analysis of endogenous elements in control cells revealed that iron had a unique distribution; zinc, potassium, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate had their maxima co-localized in the same area; and sulfur, copper and chlorine were almost homogeneously distributed among the whole cell. The subcellular distribution and quantification of cobalt and silver in micro-alga, assessed after controlled exposure to various concentrations, revealed that exogenous metals were mainly sequestered inside the cell rather than on mucilage or the cell wall, with preferential compartmentalization. Cobalt was homogeneously distributed outside of the chloroplast. Silver was localized in the cytosol at low concentration and in the whole cell excluding the

  17. Optimal fluorescence waveband determination for detecting defect cherry tomatoes using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defect cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface, and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-...

  18. Comparison of different surface modification techniques for electrodes by means of electrochemistry and micro synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence. dimerization of cobalt(II) tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine and its influence on the electrodeposition on gold surfaces.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Karl; De Wael, Karolien; Vincze, Laszlo; Adriaens, Annemie

    2005-09-01

    This paper compares different electrochemical surface modification techniques with special attention to the immobilization of cobalt(II) tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine tetrasodium salt (Co(II)TSPc) on gold electrodes. Electrochemical and synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) microbeam analysis were performed in order to compare the amount of adsorbed CoTSPc onto the gold electrode and to determine the level of uniformity of the deposited layer. The nondestructive, quantitative characterization of CoTSPc deposition on gold electrodes by means of scanning SR-XRF on the microscopic scale has never been described before. The described methodology can be in general used for thin-film characterization. Depending on the degree of dimerization of the CoTSPc molecules, different electrochemical behavior is observed.

  19. A comparison of sulfur-free and ambient air enclosure techniques for measuring the exchange of reduced sulfur gases between soils and the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Mark S.; Galloway, James N.

    1991-08-01

    The exchange of reduced sulfur gases between the atmosphere and forest soils in the Shaver Hollow watershed (Shenandoah National Park, Virginia) were measured with sulfur-free and ambient air enclosures at least twice a month from March through November 1989. Soils within sulfur-free enslosures were sources of carbonyl sulfide (COS) and carbon disulfide (CS2). Atmospheric fluxes of COS and CS2 ranged from 0.77 to 13.03 ng COS-S/sq m-min and from 2.04 to 15.74 ng CS2-S/sq m-min. In contrast, soils within ambient air enclosures were sinks for COS and CS2. Uptake rates of COS and CS2 ranged from 2.78 to 16.20 ng COS-S/sq m-min and from 3.42 to 26.62 ng CS2-S/sq m-min. The discrepancy in the direction of these fluxes was caused by the flux-measurement techniques.

  20. Fiber optic oxygen sensor using fluorescence quenching for aerospace application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, Allen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we explore Fluorescence Technology as applied to the design and development of O2 sensors that can be used for aerospace application and discuss the various test and measurement techniques used to estimate the O2 gas concentration. Jet fuel comprised of heavier hydrocarbon components is much less volatile, than jet fuel having a flash point of approximately 37° C and JP-4 having a flash point of approximately -17° C. In contrast, straight-run gasoline has a flash point of approximately -40°C. The flash point is the minimum temperature where a liquid fuel can generate enough vapor to form a flammable mixture with air. If the temperature is below the flash point there isn't enough fuel evaporating to form a flammable fuel-air mixture. Since jet fuel and gasoline have similar flammable concentration limits, gasoline must produce much more vapor at a given temperature to have such a low flash point; hence gasoline is much more volatile than jet fuel. We compare the various intensity based approaches and contrast them with the frequency domain techniques that measure phase to extract fluorescent lifetimes. An innovate compact measurement system using the frequency heterodyning cross correlation technique that can be used for various applications is described in detail while the benefits are explored together with some test data collected. The various inerting fuel tank requirements are explained.

  1. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Draxler, S; Lippitsch, M E

    1996-07-20

    A family of sensors is presented with fluorescence decay-time measurements used as the sensing technique. The concept is to take a single fluorophore with a suitably long fluorescence decay time as the basic building block for numerous different sensors. Analyte recognition can be performed by different functional groups that are necessary for selective interaction with the analyte. To achieve this, the principle of excited-state electron transfer is applied with pyrene as the fluorophore. Therefore the same instrumentation based on a small, ambient air-nitrogen laser and solid-state electronics can be used to measure different analytes, for example, oxygen, pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, ammonium, lead, cadmium, zinc, and phosphate.

  2. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1996-07-01

    A family of sensors is presented with fluorescence decay-time measurements used as the sensing technique. The concept is to take a single fluorophore with a suitably long fluorescence decay time as the basic building block for numerous different sensors. Analyte recognition can be performed by different functional groups that are necessary for selective interaction with the analyte. To achieve this, the principle of excited-state electron transfer is applied with pyrene as the fluorophore. Therefore the same instrumentation based on a small, ambient air-nitrogen laser and solid-state electronics can be used to measure different analytes, for example, oxygen, pH, carbon dioxide, potassium, ammonium, lead, cadmium, zinc, and phosphate.

  3. Comparison of conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization technique for detection of Listeria spp. in ground beef, turkey, and chicken breast fillets in İzmir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Ayse Handan

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of Listeria species in refrigerated fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef was evaluated, comparing the conventional culture method and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). FISH uses hybridization of a nucleic acid sequence target of a microorganism with a specific DNA probe labeled with a fluorochrome and imaging by a fluorescence microscope. First, Listeria was inoculated in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, or ground beef, and the applicability of the FISH method was evaluated. Second, Listeria was detected in fresh chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef by culture and FISH methods. Listeria was isolated from 27 (37.4%) of 216 samples by the standard culture method, whereas FISH detected 25 (24.7%) preenriched samples. Of these isolates, 17 (63%) were L. innocua, 6 (22%) L. welshimeri, and 4 (14.8%) L. seeligeri. Overall, the prevalences of Listeria spp. found with the conventional culture method in chicken breast fillet, turkey breast fillet, and ground beef were 9.7, 6.9, and 20.8%, whereas with the FISH technique these values were 11.1, 6.9, and 16.7%, respectively. The molecular FISH technique appears to be a cheap, sensitive, and time-efficient procedure that could be used for routine detection of Listeria spp. in meat. This study showed that retail raw meats are potentially contaminated with Listeria spp. and are, thus, vehicles for transmitting diseases caused by foodborne pathogens, underlining the need for increased precautions, such as implementation of hazard analysis and critical control points and consumer food safety education.

  4. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction using diethyldithiocarbamate as a chelating agent and the dried-spot technique for the determination of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se and Pb by energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocot, Karina; Zawisza, Beata; Sitko, Rafal

    2012-07-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) using sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) as a chelating agent was investigated for the simultaneous determination of iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, selenium and lead ions in water samples. The procedure was performed using 5 mL of the sample, 100 μL of a 0.5% solution of DDTC, 30 μL of carbon tetrachloride (extraction phase) and 500 μL of methanol (disperser solvent). The experiments showed that Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb can be simultaneously extracted at a pH of 5 and that Se can be extracted at a pH of 2-3. The results were compared with those obtained using ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate as a chelating agent. For all analytes, a linear range was observed up to 0.4 μg mL- 1. If Fe and Zn are present in concentrations 10 times higher than those of the other analytes, then the linearity is observed up to 0.2 μg mL- 1. In the present study, the organic phase that contained preconcentrated elements was deposited onto a Millipore filter and measured using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The obtained detection limits were 2.9, 1.5, 2.0, 2.3, 2.5, 2.0 and 3.9 ng mL- 1 for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se and Pb, respectively. This combination of DLLME and the dried-spot technique is promising for multielement analyses using other spectroscopy techniques, such as laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy or total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

  5. Bioaerosol Analysis by Online Fluorescence Detection and Fluorescence Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, Alex; Pöhlker, Christopher; Treutlein, Bärbel; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    is the first study reporting continuous online measurements of bioaerosol particles over several months, a range of characteristic size distribution patterns, and a persistent bioaerosol peak at 3 μm. The measurement results confirm that PBAPs account for a substantial proportion of coarse aerosol particle number and mass in continental boundary layer air. Moreover, they suggest that the number concentration of viable bioparticles is dominated by fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria with aerodynamic diameters around 3 μm rather than single bacterial cells with diameters around 1 μm. Filter samples were later collected at the same sampling location and analyzed with a fluorescence microscope. By observing collected particles both with transmitted white light and with fluorescent emission from near-UV excitation, the technique provides information about whether individual particles are biological and regarding their viability. Characteristic images of FBAPs are shown. Further goals are to correlate size distributions from the UV-APS with size information gained from microscopy, and also to constrain uncertainties that arise from non-biological particles that also exhibit fluorescence. [1] Huffman et al. (2009) Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 9, 17705 - 17751.

  6. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-06-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding.

  7. Chemical reactivation of quenched fluorescent protein molecules enables resin-embedded fluorescence microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hanqing; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Zhu, Mingqiang; Lv, Xiaohua; Li, Anan; Li, Shiwei; Li, Longhui; Yang, Tao; Wang, Siming; Yang, Zhongqin; Xu, Tonghui; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2014-01-01

    Resin embedding is a well-established technique to prepare biological specimens for microscopic imaging. However, it is not compatible with modern green-fluorescent protein (GFP) fluorescent-labelling technique because it significantly quenches the fluorescence of GFP and its variants. Previous empirical optimization efforts are good for thin tissue but not successful on macroscopic tissue blocks as the quenching mechanism remains uncertain. Here we show most of the quenched GFP molecules are structurally preserved and not denatured after routine embedding in resin, and can be chemically reactivated to a fluorescent state by alkaline buffer during imaging. We observe up to 98% preservation in yellow-fluorescent protein case, and improve the fluorescence intensity 11.8-fold compared with unprocessed samples. We demonstrate fluorescence microimaging of resin-embedded EGFP/EYFP-labelled tissue block without noticeable loss of labelled structures. This work provides a turning point for the imaging of fluorescent protein-labelled specimens after resin embedding. PMID:24886825

  8. Cresyl violet: a red fluorescent Nissl stain.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Buylla, A; Ling, C Y; Kirn, J R

    1990-08-01

    Cresyl violet is widely used by neurobiologists to visualize Nissl substance in bright-field microscopy. Here we describe a method for using this dye as a red fluorescent Nissl stain. Unlike the bright-field staining technique, fluorescent cresyl is compatible with other fluorescent dyes and tracers, such as fluorescein, Fluoro-Gold and Fast Blue. The procedure requires only minor modifications of routine bright-field cresyl staining, the most significant being dilution of the stain. Thus, fluorescent red cresyl violet is simple to implement and may be of general use in fluorescence microscopy.

  9. Quantitative characterization of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor flowfield using unified, laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, D. G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    A calibrated, nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence (LIIF) was used to quantify the steady, compressible flowfield of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor. The combustor was configured with single and staged, transverse-air injection into a supersonic-air freestream behind a rearward-facing step. Pressure, temperature, two-velocity components, and injectant mole fraction were measured with high spatial resolution in the three-dimensional flowfields. These experimental results provide a benchmark set of data for validation of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes being developed to model supersonic combustor flowfields.

  10. An adaptive dual-optimal path-planning technique for unmanned air vehicles with application to solar-regenerative high altitude long endurance flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitfield, Clifford A.

    2009-12-01

    A multi-objective technique for Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) path and trajectory autonomy generation, through task allocation and sensor fusion has been developed. The Dual-Optimal Path-Planning (D-O.P-P.) Technique generates on-line adaptive flight paths for UAVs based on available flight windows and environmental influenced objectives. The environmental influenced optimal condition, known as the driver' determines the condition, within a downstream virtual window of possible vehicle destinations and orientation built from the UAV kinematics. The intermittent results are pursued by a dynamic optimization technique to determine the flight path. This sequential optimization technique is a multi-objective optimization procedure consisting of two goals, without requiring additional information to combine the conflicting objectives into a single-objective. An example case-study and additional applications are developed and the results are discussed; including the application to the field of Solar Regenerative (SR) High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) UAV flight. Harnessing solar energy has recently been adapted for use on high altitude UAV platforms. An aircraft that uses solar panels and powered by the sun during the day and through the night by SR systems, in principle could sustain flight for weeks or months. The requirements and limitations of solar powered flight were determined. The SR-HALE UAV platform geometry and flight characteristics were selected from an existing aircraft that has demonstrated the capability for sustained flight through flight tests. The goals were to maintain continual Situational Awareness (SA) over a case-study selected Area of Interest (AOI) and existing UAV power and surveillance systems. This was done for still wind and constant wind conditions at altitude along with variations in latitude. The characteristics of solar flux and the dependence on the surface location and orientation were established along with fixed flight maneuvers for

  11. A novel hybrid model for air quality index forecasting based on two-phase decomposition technique and modified extreme learning machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Deyun; Wei, Shuai; Luo, Hongyuan; Yue, Chenqiang; Grunder, Olivier

    2017-02-15

    The randomness, non-stationarity and irregularity of air quality index (AQI) series bring the difficulty of AQI forecasting. To enhance forecast accuracy, a novel hybrid forecasting model combining two-phase decomposition technique and extreme learning machine (ELM) optimized by differential evolution (DE) algorithm is developed for AQI forecasting in this paper. In phase I, the complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition (CEEMD) is utilized to decompose the AQI series into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) with different frequencies; in phase II, in order to further handle the high frequency IMFs which will increase the forecast difficulty, variational mode decomposition (VMD) is employed to decompose the high frequency IMFs into a number of variational modes (VMs). Then, the ELM model optimized by DE algorithm is applied to forecast all the IMFs and VMs. Finally, the forecast value of each high frequency IMF is obtained through adding up the forecast results of all corresponding VMs, and the forecast series of AQI is obtained by aggregating the forecast results of all IMFs. To verify and validate the proposed model, two daily AQI series from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2016 collected from Beijing and Shanghai located in China are taken as the test cases to conduct the empirical study. The experimental results show that the proposed hybrid model based on two-phase decomposition technique is remarkably superior to all other considered models for its higher forecast accuracy.

  12. Which Microbial Communities Are Present? Using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridisation (FISH): Microscopic Techniques for Enumeration of Troublesome Microorganisms in Oil and Fuel Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmkvist, Lars; Østergaard, Jette Johanne; Skovhus, Torben Lund

    Enumeration of microbes involved in souring of oil fields and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) with culture-based methods, usually yield inadequate and contradictory results. Any cultivation step will almost certainly alter the population structure of the sample and thus the results of cultivation analysis are not a good basis for mitigation decisions. The need for methods that are cultivation independent has over the past 10 years facilitated the development of several analytical methods for determination of bacterial identity, quantity, and to some extent function, applied directly to samples of the native population. In this chapter, we demonstrate the features and benefits of applying microscopic techniques to a situation often encountered in the oil and petroleum industry: Control of microbial growth in fuel storage tanks. The methods described in this chapter will focus on direct counts of specific groups of microorganisms with microscopy and these are based on the detection of genetic material and not on culturing.

  13. Comparison of a compatible and an incompatible pepper-tobamovirus interaction by biochemical and non-invasive techniques: chlorophyll a fluorescence, isothermal calorimetry and FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rys, Magdalena; Juhász, Csilla; Surówka, Ewa; Janeczko, Anna; Saja, Diana; Tóbiás, István; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Barna, Balázs; Gullner, Gábor

    2014-10-01

    Leaves of a pepper cultivar harboring the L(3) resistance gene were inoculated with Obuda pepper virus (ObPV), which led to the appearance of hypersensitive necrotic lesions approx. 72 h post-inoculation (hpi) (incompatible interaction), or with Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) that caused no visible symptoms on the inoculated leaves (compatible interaction). ObPV inoculation of leaves resulted in ion leakage already 18 hpi, up-regulation of a pepper carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) gene from 24 hpi, heat emission and declining chlorophyll a content from 48 hpi, and partial desiccation from 72 hpi. After the appearance of necrotic lesions a strong inhibition of photochemical energy conversion was observed, which led to photochemically inactive leaf areas 96 hpi. However, leaf tissues adjacent to these inactive areas showed elevated ΦPSII and Fv/Fm values proving the advantage of chlorophyll a imaging technique. PMMoV inoculation also led to a significant rise of ion leakage and heat emission, to the up-regulation of the pepper CCD gene as well as to decreased PSII efficiency, but these responses were much weaker than in the case of ObPV inoculation. Chlorophyll b and total carotenoid contents as measured by spectrophotometric methods were not significantly influenced by any virus inoculations when these pigment contents were calculated on leaf surface basis. On the other hand, near-infrared FT-Raman spectroscopy showed an increase of carotenoid content in ObPV-inoculated leaves suggesting that the two techniques detect different sets of compounds.

  14. Determination of the rate coefficients for the reactions IO + NO2 + M (air) --> IONO2 + M and O(3P) + NO2 --> O2 + NO using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Terry J; Blitz, Mark A; Heard, Dwayne E

    2006-06-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy via excitation of the A2pi(3/2) <-- X2pi(3/2) (2,0) band at 445 nm was used to monitor IO in the presence of NO2 following its generation in the reactions O(3P) + CF3I and O(3P) + I2. Both photolysis of O3 (248 nm) and NO2 (351 nm) were used to initiate the production of IO. The rate coefficients for the thermolecular reaction IO + NO2 + M --> IONO2 + M were measured in air, N2, and O2 over the range P = 18-760 Torr, covering typical tropospheric conditions, and were found to be in the falloff region. No dependence of k1 upon bath gas identity was observed, and in general, the results are in good agreement with recent determinations. Using a Troe broadening factor of F(B) = 0.4, the falloff parameters k0(1) = (9.5 +/- 1.6) x 10(-31) cm6 molecule(-2) s(-1) and k(infinity)(1) = (1.7 +/- 0.3) x 10(-11) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) were determined at 294 K. The temporal profile of IO at elevated temperatures was used to investigate the thermal stability of the product, IONO2, but no evidence was observed for the regeneration of IO, consistent with recent calculations for the IO-NO2 bond strength being approximately 100 kJ mol(-1). Previous modeling studies of iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer that utilize values of k1 measured in N2 are hence validated by these results conducted in air. The rate coefficient for the reaction O(3P) + NO2 --> O2 + NO at 294 K and in 100 Torr of air was determined to be k2 = (9.3 +/- 0.9) x 10(-12) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1), in good agreement with recommended values. All uncertainties are quoted at the 95% confidence limit.

  15. Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ben; Ewart, Paul; Wang, Xiaowei; Stone, Richard; Ma, Hongrui; Walmsley, Harold; Cracknell, Roger; Stevens, Robert; Richardson, David; Fu, Huiyu; Wallace, Stan

    2010-10-15

    A study of in-cylinder fuel-air mixing distributions in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine is reported using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. A multi-component fuel synthesised from three pairs of components chosen to simulate light, medium and heavy fractions was seeded with one of three tracers, each chosen to co-evaporate with and thus follow one of the fractions, in order to account for differential volatility of such components in typical gasoline fuels. In order to make quantitative measurements of fuel-air ratio from PLIF images, initial calibration was by recording PLIF images of homogeneous fuel-air mixtures under similar conditions of in-cylinder temperature and pressure using a re-circulation loop and a motored engine. This calibration method was found to be affected by two significant factors. Firstly, calibration was affected by variation of signal collection efficiency arising from build-up of absorbing deposits on the windows during firing cycles, which are not present under motored conditions. Secondly, the effects of residual exhaust gas present in the firing engine were not accounted for using a calibration loop with a motored engine. In order to account for these factors a novel method of PLIF calibration is presented whereby 'bookend' calibration measurements for each tracer separately are performed under firing conditions, utilising injection into a large upstream heated plenum to promote the formation of homogeneous in-cylinder mixtures. These calibration datasets contain sufficient information to not only characterise the quantum efficiency of each tracer during a typical engine cycle, but also monitor imaging efficiency, and, importantly, account for the impact of exhaust gas residuals (EGR). By use of this method EGR is identified as a significant factor in quantitative PLIF for fuel mixing diagnostics in firing engines. The effects of cyclic variation in fuel concentration on burn rate are analysed for different

  16. Laser Excited Fluorescence Studies Of Black Liquor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. J.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    Laser excited fluorescence of black liquor was investigated as a possible monitoring technique for pulping processes. A nitrogen pumped dye laser was used to examine the fluorescence spectrum of black liquor solutions. Various excitation wavelengths were used between 290 and 403 nm. Black liquor fluorescence spectra were found to vary with both excitation wavelength and black liquor concentration. Laser excited fluorescence was found to be a sensitive technique for measurement of black liquor with good detection limits and linear response over a large dynamic range.

  17. Measurement of density and temperature in a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer using the electron beam fluorescence technique. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report, 1 Oct. 1969 - 1 Sep. 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcronald, A. D.

    1975-01-01

    Mean density and temperature fluctuations were measured across the turbulent, cooled-wall boundary layer in a continuous hypersonic (Mach 9.4) wind tunnel in air, using the nitrogen fluorescence excited by a 50 kV electron beam. Data were taken at three values of the tunnel stagnation pressure, the correspo