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Sample records for air force satellite

  1. Training augmentation device for the Air Force satellite Control Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoates, Keith B.

    1993-01-01

    From the 1960's and into the early 1980's satellite operations and control were conducted by Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), now Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), out of the Satellite Control Facility at Onizuka AFB, CA. AFSC was responsible for acquiring satellite command and control systems and conducting routine satellite operations. The daily operations, consisting of satellite health and status contacts and station keeping activities, were performed for AFSC by a Mission Control Team (MCT) staffed by civilian contractors who were responsible for providing their own technically 'qualified' personnel as satellite operators. An MCT consists of five positions: mission planner, ground controller, planner analyst, orbit analyst, and ranger controller. Most of the training consisted of On-the-Job-Training (OJT) with junior personnel apprenticed to senior personnel until they could demonstrate job proficiency. With most of the satellite operators having 15 to 25 years of experience, there was minimal risk to the mission. In the mid 1980's Air Force Space Command (AFSPACOM) assumed operational responsibility for a newly established control node at Falcon AFB (FAFB) in CO. The satellites and ground system program offices (SPO's) are organized under AFSC's Space and Missiles Systems Center (SMC) to function as a systems engineering and acquisition agency for AFSPACECOM. The collection of the satellite control nodes, ground tracking stations, computer processing equipment, and connecting communications links is referred to as the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN).

  2. Air Force Satellite Control Network and SDI development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleier, T.

    The Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN) represents a military, worldwide network of control centers and remote tracking sites (RTS). A relatively large and growing constellation of DOD satellites is supported. The near term and long term plans for the AFSCN are discussed, taking into account also the impact of the Space Defense Initiative (SDI) on the AFSCN. It is pointed out that the SDI adds a new dimension to the support provided by the AFSCN to the DOD satellites, because some SDI scenarios being considered include many more satellite platforms, each containing multiple kinetic energy weapons. Space-ground link sites are discussed along with AFSCN control sites, and communication between RTS and control centers. Attention is given to changing roles and responsibilities, the Satellite Test Center (STC) as an excellent site for the R and D phase of SDI development, and an operational concept for a highly proliferated weapons platforms architecture, and goals of developing more survivable satellite systems.

  3. Small Satellites and the DARPA/Air Force Falcon Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, David J.; Walker, Steven H.; Sackheim, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    The FALCON ((Force Application and Launch from CONUS) program is a technology demonstration effort with three major components: a Small Launch Vehicle (SLV), a Common Aero Vehicle (CAV), and a Hypersonic Cruise Vehicle (HCV). Sponsored by DARPA and executed jointly by the United States Air Force and DARPA with NASA participation, the objectives are to develop and demonstrate technologies that will enable both near-term and far-term capability to execute time-critical, global reach missions. The focus of this paper is on the SLV as it relates to small satellites and the implications of lower cost to orbit for small satellites. The target recurring cost for placing 1000 pounds payloads into a circular reference orbit of 28.5 degrees at 100 nautical miles is $5,000,000 per launch. This includes range costs but not the payload or payload integration costs. In addition to the nominal 1000 pounds to LEO, FALCON is seeking delivery of a range of orbital payloads from 220 pounds to 2200 pounds to the reference orbit. Once placed on alert status, the SLV must be capable of launch within 24 hours.

  4. Small satellites and the DARPA/Air Force FALCON program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, David J.; Walker, Steven H.; Sackheim, Robert L.

    2005-07-01

    The FALCON program is a technology demonstration effort with three major components: a Small Launch Vehicle (SLV), a Hypersonic Technology Vehicle (HTV), and a Hypersonic Cruise Vehicle (HCV). Sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and executed jointly by the United States Air Force and DARPA with NASA participation, the objectives are to develop and demonstrate technologies that will enable both near-term and far-term capability to execute time-critical, global reach missions. The focus of this paper is on the SLV as it relates to small satellites and the implications of lower cost to orbit for small satellites. The target recurring cost for placing 1000 pounds payloads into a circular reference orbit of 28.5∘ at 100 nautical miles is $5,000,000 per launch. This includes range costs but not the payload or payload integration costs. In addition to the nominal 1000 pounds to low earth orbit (LEO), FALCON is seeking delivery of a range of orbital payloads from 220 to 2200 pounds to the reference orbit. Once placed on 'alert' status, the SLV must be capable of launch within 24 h.

  5. Analysis of the US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Imagery for Global Lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfen, Gregory R.

    1999-01-01

    The U. S. Air Force operates the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), a system of near-polar orbiting satellites designed for use in operational weather forecasting and other applications. DMSP satellites carry a suite of sensors that provide images of the earth and profiles of the atmosphere. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado has been involved with the archival of DMSP data and its use for several research projects since 1979. This report summarizes the portion of this involvement funded by NASA.

  6. The Early Development of Satellite Characterization Capabilities at the Air Force Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, J.; Kissell, K.

    This presentation overviews the development of optical Space Object Identification (SOI) techniques at the Air Force laboratories during the two-decade "pre-operational" period prior to 1980 when the Groundbased Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance (GEODSS) sensors were deployed. Beginning with the launch of Sputnik in 1957, the United States Air Force has actively pursued the development and application of optical sensor technology for the detection, tracking, and characterization of artificial satellites. Until the mid-1980s, these activities were primarily conducted within Air Force research and development laboratories which supplied data to the operational components on a contributing basis. This presentation traces the early evolution of the optical space surveillance technologies from the early experimental sensors that led to the current generation of operationally deployed and research systems. The contributions of the participating Air Force organizations and facilities will be reviewed with special emphasis on the development of technologies for the characterization of spacecraft using optical signatures and imagery. The presentation will include descriptions and photographs of the early facilities and instrumentation, and examples of the SOI collection and analysis techniques employed. In this early period, computer support was limited so all aspects of space surveillance relied heavily on manual interaction. Many military, government, educational, and contractor agencies supported the development of instrumentation and analysis techniques. This overview focuses mainly on the role played by Air Force System Command and Office of Aerospace Research, and the closely related activities at the Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The omission of other agencies from this review reflects the limitations of this presentation, not the significance of their contributions.

  7. Air Force Space Command satellite orbit predictor using parallel virtual machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Susan K.

    1993-12-01

    Parallel computing is the wave of the future. As the need for computational power increases, one processor is no longer sufficient to achieve the speed necessary to solve today's complex problems. The Air Force Space Command (AFSPACEOM) tracks approximately 8000 satellites daily; the model used by the AFSPACECOM, SGP4, (Simplified General Perturbation Model Four), has been the operational model since 1976. This thesis contains a detailed discussion of the mathematical theory of the SGP4 model. The tracking of a satellite requires extensive calculations. The satellite can be tracked more efficiently with parallel processing techniques. The principles developed are applicable to a Naval ship tracking multiple incoming threats; the increase in the speed of processing incoming data would result in personnel being informed faster and thus allow more time for better decisions during combat. Three parallel algorithms applied to SGP4 for implementations on a Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) are developed. PVM is a small software package that allows a network of computer workstations to appear as a single large distributed-memory parallel computer. This thesis contains a description of several algorithms for the implementation on PVM to track satellites, the optimal number of workstations, and methods of distributing data.

  8. The Air Force Academy Small Satellite Program—Using Space Physics to Educate the Next Generation of Space Professionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHarg, M. G.; Krause, L. H.; Balthazor, R. L.; Chun, F. K.; Dearborn, M. E.; Bell, D. E.; Knipp, D. J.; Saylor, W. W.; Lawrence, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    The United States Air Force Academy uses Space Physics as the scientific rational for an undergraduate course which has cadets design, build, test and operate small satellites that fly real Academy and third-party space weather payloads. While the course description emphasizes the engineering aspects of small satellite design, this interdisciplinary course has cadets and faculty participating from across the engineering, science, and management majors. We find that grounding the requirements for the spacecraft in space physics, leads to cadets who are motivated to solve a real science problem.

  9. Flight-Proven Nano-Satellite Architecture for Hands-On Academic Training at the US Air Force Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Craig I.; Sellers, Lt. Jerry, , Col.; Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the use of "commercial-off-the-shelf" open-architecture satellite sub-systems, based on the flight- proven "SNAP" nanosatellite platform, to provide "hands-on" education and training at the United States Air Force Academy. The UK's first nanosatellite: SNAP-1, designed and built by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) and Surrey Space Centre staff - in less than a year - was launched in June 2000. The 6.5 kg spacecraft carries advanced, UK-developed, GPS navigation, computing, propulsion and attitude control technologies, which have been used to demonstrate orbital manoeuvring and full three-axis controlled body stabilisation. SNAP-1's primary payload is a machine vision system which has been used to image the in-orbit deployment of another SSTL-built spacecraft: Tsinghua-1. The highly successful, SNAP-1 mission has also demonstrated how the concept of using a standardised, modular nanosatellite bus can provide the core support units (power system, on-board data-handling and communications systems and standardised payload interface) for a practical nanosatellite to be constructed and flown in a remarkably short time-frame. Surrey's undergraduate and post-graduate students have made a major input to the SNAP concept over the last six years in the context of project work within the Space Centre. Currently, students at the USAF Academy are benefiting from this technology in the context of designing their own nanosatellite - FalconSAT-2. For the FalconSAT-2 project, the approach has been to focus on building up infrastructure, including design and development tools that can serve as a firm foundation to allow the satellite design to evolve steadily over the course of several missions. Specific to this new approach has been a major effort to bound the problem faced by the students. To do this, the program has leveraged the research carried out at the Surrey Space Centre, by "buying into" the SNAP architecture. Through this, the Academy program

  10. Air Force Seal Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1996-01-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to control leakage at the required conditions. This presentation briefly describes current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engines.

  11. Air Force seal activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayhew, Ellen R.

    1994-01-01

    Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

  12. Future Air Force systems.

    PubMed

    Tremaine, S A

    1986-10-01

    Planning for the future is under way in earnest at the Aeronautical Systems Division (ASD) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It has been statistically established that it takes from 14-16 years from the generation of a new system idea to enter into engineering development. With this unpleasing, but realistic, schedule in mind, ASD has, during the last 3 years, been initiating long-term planning projects that are pre-starts for new system ideas. They are generated from throughout the Air Force and are locally managed and funded. Through this process, which spans from 12-14 months, specific and revolutionary new ideas for the systems of the future are generated. This article addresses more than a dozen specific new ideas in work at ASD today. These ideas range from a need to replace the C-130 type aircraft after the year 2000 to planning a follow-on to the B-18 well into the 21st century. Among other specific projects are investigation into an immortal fighter intended to be free of reliability and maintenance demands for an especially long period of operation, a new training system and advanced trainer to replace the T-38, a transatmospheric vehicle that could operate in the 100,000-500,000 foot flight region (30,480-152,400 m), and a new means of defending against hostile cruise missile launchers and cruise missiles. Other ideas are also addressed. The article concludes with emphasis on systems that can operate hypersonically in and out of the known atmosphere and greater use of airbreathing propulsion systems operating between Mach 3 and Mach 6. PMID:3778403

  13. Interior view Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  14. Maintenance of satellite formations using environmental forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishna D.; Misra, Arun K.; Varma, Surjit; Reid, Tyler; Bellefeuille, Francis

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the maintenance of satellite formations using two environmental forces: solar radiation pressure and aerodynamic forces. It is assumed that the satellites are equipped with solar flaps or aerodynamic flaps. Control using aerodynamic flaps is considered for satellite formations in LEO while solar flaps is applied to formations in LEO as well as GEO. The simple control laws based on open-loop and closed-loop control methods are designed for required rotation of the flaps to achieve desired formation keeping. The feasibility of the proposed schemes is proven via stability analyses followed by numerical simulations. A linear flap rotation scheme is found to keep the relative position errors bounded to ±5 m. The proposed control methods show the effectiveness of the use of solar radiation pressure and aerodynamic forces for satellite formation flying.

  15. The Community College of the Air Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaapke, Lyle D.; Wojciechowske, William A.

    1977-01-01

    The Community College of the Air Force is unique as a postsecondary occupational education institution because it integrates Air Force technical education and civilian-related education into programs which are totally responsive to the Air Force community. (JG)

  16. Satellite Remote Sensing of Aerosol Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yoram; Ramaprasad, Jaya; Procopio, Aline; Levin, Zev

    1999-01-01

    The role of aerosol forcing remains one of the largest uncertainties in estimating man's impact on the global climate system. One school of thought suggests that remote sensing by satellite sensors will provide the data necessary to narrow these uncertainties. While satellite measurements of direct aerosol forcing appear to be straightforward, satellite measurements of aerosol indirect forcing will be more complicated. Pioneering studies identified indirect aerosol forcing using AVHRR data in the biomass burning regions of Brazil. We have expanded this analysis with AVHRR to include an additional year of data and assimilated water vapor fields. The results show similar latitudinal dependence as reported by Kaufman and Fraser, but by using water vapor observations we conclude that latitude is not a proxy for water vapor and the strength of the indirect effect is not correlated to water vapor amounts. In addition to the AVHRR study we have identified indirect aerosol forcing in Brazil at much smaller spatial scales using the MODIS Airborne Simulator. The strength of the indirect effect appears to be related to cloud type and cloud dynamics. There is a suggestion that some of the cloud dynamics may be influenced by smoke destabilization of the atmospheric column. Finally, this study attempts to quantify remote sensing limitations due to the accuracy limits of the retrieval algorithms. We use a combination of numerical aerosol transport models, ground-based AERONET data and ISCCP cloud climatology to determine how much of the forcing occurs in regions too clean to determine from satellite retrievals.

  17. 78 FR 17185 - U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Space Command... inform users of an upcoming event related to the GPS satellite constellation. U.S. Air Force Space... process L2C or L5 CNAV. U.S. Air Force Space Command ] expects to conduct one to two CNAV tests per...

  18. 78 FR 49484 - Exchange of Air Force Real Property for Non-Air Force Real Property

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... Department of Air Force Exchange of Air Force Real Property for Non-Air Force Real Property SUMMARY: Notice identifies excess Federal real property under administrative jurisdiction of the United States Air Force it... under the administrative jurisdiction of the Air Force. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr....

  19. Lorentz Force Based Satellite Attitude Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Dipak Kumar; Sinha, Manoranjan

    2016-07-01

    Since the inception of attitude control of a satellite, various active and passive control strategies have been developed. These include using thrusters, momentum wheels, control moment gyros and magnetic torquers. In this present work, a new technique named Lorentz force based Coulombic actuators for the active control is proposed. This method uses electrostatic charged shells, which interact with the time varying earth's magnetic field to establish a full three axes control of the satellite. It is shown that the proposed actuation mechanism is similar to a satellite actuated by magnetic coils except that the resultant magnetic moment vanishes under two different conditions. The equation for the required charges on the the Coulomb shells attached to the satellite body axes is derived, which is in turn used to find the available control torque for actuating the satellite along the orbit. Stability of the proposed system for very high initial angular velocity and exponential stability about the origin are proved for a proportional-differential control input. Simulations are carried out to show the efficacy of the proposed system for the attitude control of the earth-pointing satellite.

  20. Forced air heat sink apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A high efficiency forced air heat sink assembly employs a split feed transverse flow configuration to minimize the length of the air flow path through at least two separated fin structures. Different embodiments use different fin structure material configurations including honeycomb, corrugated and serpentine. Each such embodiment uses a thermally conductive plate having opposed exterior surfaces; one for receiving a component to be cooled and one for receiving the fin structures. The serpentine structured fin embodiment employs a plurality of fin supports extending from the plate and forming a plurality of channels for receiving the fin structures. A high thermal conductivity bondant, such as metal-filled epoxy, may be used to bond the fin structures to either the plate or the fin supports. Dip brazing and soldering may also be employed depending upon the materials selected.

  1. Development of a tethered satellite force transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    The SEDS (Small Expendable Deployer System)/Delta II is a demonstration flight of a tethered satellite deployer system. The satellite or end mass payload, which is deployed and tethered to the Delta II rocket, is instrumented to determine its dynamics during deployment. A three-component force transducer or strain-gage balance was developed to measure tether tension on the end-mass side of the tether. The transducer was designed to measure tensions up to 20N in each direction and resolve tensions as low as 0.002N. In addition, the transducer was required to withstand the shock, vibration, and temperature excursions of the mission. The development of the transducer from design to testing and integration is discussed.

  2. Air and sea rescue via satellite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scales, W. C.; Swanson, R.

    1984-03-01

    Two approaches to a satellite system for air and sea rescue to be put into use by the 1990s, one employing polar-orbiting satellites and the other using fixed geosynchronous satellites over the equator, are discussed. A battery-powered transmitter on a ship or aircraft would be activated in an accident to emit a low-power omnidirectional signal that would be relayed by a satellite to an earth station. The polar-orbiting approach, now being evaluated on a small-scale with the Cospas-Sarsat system, allows complete coverage of the earth, including the poles, and provides a fix on the origin of the distress signals by means of the Doppler shift. A parallel effort for the testing of geostationary satellites to measure system sensitivity to various interference sources, to optimize design, and to measure land and sea performance is reviewed.

  3. 26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. "AIR INSTALLATIONS; EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE, CALIFORNIA; HIGH SPEED TEST TRACK." Drawing No. 10-259. One inch to 400 feet plan of original 10,000-foot sled track. No date. No D.O. series number. No headings as above. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Edwards Air Force Base, North of Avenue B, between 100th & 140th Streets East, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Air Force Training for Instructional Systems Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calkins, Ronald R.

    Detailed information is provided about the Air Force Instructional System Development (ISD) Model to supplement the 1979 AECT presentation made in New Orleans. Information of interest to instructional systems designers includes (1) a short overview of the Air Force ISD model, (2) an extended example which demonstrates the Air Training Command…

  5. 11. COPY OF 1970 AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF LORING AIR FORCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. COPY OF 1970 AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF LORING AIR FORCE BASE. PHOTOGRAPH LOCATED AT AIR FORCE BASE CONVERSION AGENCY, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, MAINE. - Loring Air Force Base, Airfield, Central portion of base, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  6. Implementation of Satellite Techniques in the Air Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellner, Andrzej; Jafernik, Henryk

    2016-06-01

    The article shows process of the implementation satellite systems in Polish aviation which contributed to accomplishment Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) concept. Since 1991 authors have introduced Satellite Navigation Equipment in Polish Air Forces. The studies and researches provide to the Polish Air Force alternative approaches, modernize their navigation and landing systems and achieve compatibility with systems of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). Acquired experience, conducted military tests and obtained results enabled to take up work scientifically - research in the environment of the civil aviation. Therefore in 2008 there has been launched cooperation with Polish Air Navigation Services Agency (PANSA). Thanks to cooperation, there have been compiled and fulfilled three fundamental international projects: EGNOS APV MIELEC (EGNOS Introduction in European Eastern Region - APV Mielec), HEDGE (Helicopters Deploy GNSS in Europe), SHERPA (Support ad-Hoc to Eastern Region Pre-operational in GNSS). The successful completion of these projects enabled implementation 21 procedures of the RNAV GNSS final approach at Polish airports, contributing to the implementation of PBN in Poland as well as ICAO resolution A37-11. Results of conducted research which served for the implementation of satellite techniques in the air transport constitute the meaning of this material.

  7. Force-limited vibration tests aplied to the FORTE` satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.R.; Butler, T.A.

    1996-02-01

    A force limited random vibration test was conducted on a small satellite called FORTE{prime}. This type of vibration test reduces the over testing that can occur in a conventional vibration test. Two vibration specifications were used in the test: The conventional base acceleration specification, and an interface force specification. The vibration level of the shaker was controlled such that neither the table acceleration nor the force transmitted to the test item exceeded its specification. The effect of limiting the shake table vibration to the force specification was to reduce (or ``notch``) the shaker acceleration near some of the satellite`s resonance frequencies. This paper describes the force limited test conducted for the FORTE{prime} satellite. The satellite and its dynamic properties are discussed, and the concepts of force limiting theory are summarized. The hardware and setup of the test are then described, and the results of the force limited vibration test are discussed.

  8. Air pollution measurements from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, C. B.; Griggs, M.; Malkmus, W.; Bartle, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    A study is presented on the remote sensing of gaseous and particulate air pollutants which is an extension of a previous report. Pollutants can be observed by either active or passive remote sensing systems. Calculations discussed herein indicate that tropospheric CO, CO2, SO2, NO2, NH3, HCHO, and CH4 can be measured by means of nadir looking passive systems. Additional species such as NO, HNO3, O3, and H2O may be measured in the stratosphere through a horizon experiment. A brief theoretical overview of resonance Raman scattering and resonance fluorescence is given. It is found that radiance measurements are most promising for general global applications, and that stratospheric aerosols may be measured using a sun occultation technique. The instrumentation requirements for both active and passive systems are examined and various instruments now under development are described.

  9. Solar photovoltaic research and development program of the Air Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory. [silicon solar cell applicable to satellite power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, J.

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas: laser weapon effects, solar silicon solar cell concepts, and high voltage hardened, high power system technology. Emphasis is placed on solar cells with increased energy conversion efficiency and radiation resistance characteristics for application to satellite power systems.

  10. NASA/Air Force Cost Model: NAFCOM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winn, Sharon D.; Hamcher, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM) is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects and is primarily used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels.

  11. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  12. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  13. Calibration of Ocean Forcing with satellite Flux Estimates (COFFEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Charlie; Jan, Dastugue; Jackie, May; Rowley, Clark; Smith, Scott; Spence, Peter; Gremes-Cordero, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Predicting the evolution of ocean temperature in regional ocean models depends on estimates of surface heat fluxes and upper-ocean processes over the forecast period. Within the COFFEE project (Calibration of Ocean Forcing with satellite Flux Estimates, real-time satellite observations are used to estimate shortwave, longwave, sensible, and latent air-sea heat flux corrections to a background estimate from the prior day's regional or global model forecast. These satellite-corrected fluxes are used to prepare a corrected ocean hindcast and to estimate flux error covariances to project the heat flux corrections for a 3-5 day forecast. In this way, satellite remote sensing is applied to not only inform the initial ocean state but also to mitigate errors in surface heat flux and model representations affecting the distribution of heat in the upper ocean. While traditional assimilation of sea surface temperature (SST) observations re-centers ocean models at the start of each forecast cycle, COFFEE endeavors to appropriately partition and reduce among various surface heat flux and ocean dynamics sources. A suite of experiments in the southern California Current demonstrates a range of COFFEE capabilities, showing the impact on forecast error relative to a baseline three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation using operational global or regional atmospheric forcing. Experiment cases combine different levels of flux calibration with assimilation alternatives. The cases use the original fluxes, apply full satellite corrections during the forecast period, or extend hindcast corrections into the forecast period. Assimilation is either baseline 3DVAR or standard strong-constraint 4DVAR, with work proceeding to add a 4DVAR expanded to include a weak constraint treatment of the surface flux errors. Covariance of flux errors is estimated from the recent time series of forecast and calibrated flux terms. While the California Current examples are shown, the approach is

  14. Satellite Remote Sensing of Aerosol Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yoram; Ramaprasad, Jaya; Procopio, Aline; Levin, Zev

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol and cloud impacts on the earth's climate become a recent hot topic in climate studies. Having near future earth observing satellites, EOS-AM1 (Earth Observing System-AM1), ENVISAT (Environmental Satellites) and ADEOS-2 (Advanced Earth Observation Satellite-2), it will be a good timing to discuss how to obtain and use the microphysical parameters of aerosols and clouds for studying their climate impacts. Center for Climate System Research (CCSR) of the University of Tokyo invites you to 'Symposium on synergy between satellite-remote sensing and climate modeling in aerosol and cloud issues.' Here, we like to discuss the current and future issues in the remote sensing of aerosol and cloud microphysical parameters and their climate modeling studies. This workshop is also one of workshop series on aerosol remote sensing held in 1996, Washington D. C., and Meribel, France in 1999. It should be reminded that NASDA/ADEOS-1 & -2 (National Space Development Agency of Japan/Advanced Earth Observation Satellite-1 & -2) Workshop will be held in the following week (Dec. 6-10, 1999), so that this opportunity will be a perfect period for you to attend two meetings for satellite remote sensing in Japan. A weekend in Kyoto, the old capital of Japan, will add a nice memory to your visiting Japan. *Issues in the symposium: 1) most recent topics in aerosol and cloud remot sensing, and 2) utility of satellite products on climate modeling of cloud-aerosol effects.

  15. Alternating Magnetic Field Forces for Satellite Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Nurge, Mark A.; Starr, Stnaley O.

    2012-01-01

    Selected future space missions, such as large aperture telescopes and multi-component interferometers, will require the precise positioning of a number of isolated satellites, yet many of the suggested approaches for providing satellites positioning forces have serious limitations. In this paper we propose a new approach, capable of providing both position and orientation forces, that resolves or alleviates many of these problems. We show that by using alternating fields and currents that finely-controlled forces can be induced on the satellites, which can be individually selected through frequency allocation. We also show, through analysis and experiment, that near field operation is feasible and can provide sufficient force and the necessary degrees of freedom to accurately position and orient small satellites relative to one another. In particular, the case of a telescope with a large number of free mirrors is developed to provide an example of the concept. We. also discuss the far field extension of this concept.

  16. Overview--Air Force policy on halons.

    PubMed

    Morehouse, E T

    1993-05-01

    Halons have been used for decades by the Air Force for a variety of fire protection applications. Their unique combination of effectiveness, low toxicity, ease of use, cleanliness, and low manufacturing cost appear to make them ideal for many situations. Unfortunately, they also deplete the earth's protective ozone layer and, consequently, their production is being phased out globally under the Montreal Protocol. United States legislation implementing the terms of the Protocol required an end to production of ozone depleting chemicals (ODCs) by the year 2000. In November 1991, the Air Force issued a policy requiring an end to ODC purchases by the end of 1997. In February 1992, President Bush announced an even more accelerated phaseout to 1995. The Montreal Protocol is expected to be amended to reflect the more aggressive US phaseout date. This accelerated date increases the urgency of the Air Force's search for ODC alternatives, especially for mission critical uses for which no alternatives have yet been identified. The search is complicated by the fact that the requirements an alternative must meet are unique to their specific application. This paper will provide an overview of the most important Air Force halon uses and review Air Force strategies for ensuring mission continuity until alternatives can be developed. PMID:8516757

  17. Improving Energy Security for Air Force Installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, David

    Like civilian infrastructure, Air Force installations are dependent on electrical energy for daily operations. Energy shortages translate to decreased productivity, higher costs, and increased health risks. But for the United States military, energy shortages have the potential to become national security risks. Over ninety-five percent of the electrical energy used by the Air Force is supplied by the domestic grid, which is susceptible to shortages and disruptions. Many Air Force operations require a continuous source of energy, and while the Air Force has historically established redundant supplies of electrical energy, these back-ups are designed for short-term outages and may not provide sufficient supply for a longer, sustained power outage. Furthermore, it is the goal of the Department of Defense to produce or procure 25 percent of its facility energy from renewable sources by fiscal year 2025. In a government budget environment where decision makers are required to provide more capability with less money, it is becoming increasingly important for informed decisions regarding which energy supply options bear the most benefit for an installation. The analysis begins by exploring the field of energy supply options available to an Air Force installation. The supply options are assessed according to their ability to provide continuous and reliable energy, their applicability to unique requirements of Air Force installations, and their costs. Various methods of calculating energy usage by an installation are also addressed. The next step of this research develops a methodology and tool which assesses how an installation responds to various power outage scenarios. Lastly, various energy supply options are applied to the tool, and the results are reported in terms of cost and loss of installation capability. This approach will allow installation commanders and energy managers the ability to evaluate the cost and effectiveness of various energy investment options.

  18. Air Force cryocooler development for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haskin, William L.

    1987-01-01

    An overview is given of Air Force sponsored cryocooler development for long duration spacecraft missions. Alternate approaches are being pursued to insure eventual success. The types of closed cycle cryocoolers that are now in advanced development include Vuilleumier, turbo-Brayton, and rotary-reciprocating refrigerators. Linear Stirling coolers with magnetic bearings have also been jointly sponsored by NASA and the Air Force. Technology is also being explored for future coolers using magnetic materials at low temperatures and for refrigerators with sorption compresssors. All of these cryocoolers are presently configured primarily for use with infrared sensor systems, but the designs could be adapted for use with cryogenic fluid storage systems or other applications.

  19. 77 FR 55465 - US Air Force Exclusive Patent License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... Department of the Air Force US Air Force Exclusive Patent License AGENCY: Air Force Research Laboratory...) days from the date of publication of this Notice. Written objections should be sent to: Air Force Research Laboratory, Office of the Staff Judge Advocate, AFRL/RIJ, 26 Electronic Parkway, Rome, New...

  20. SOLVENT RECOVERY AT VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a feasibility study of the addition of vapor recovery and solvent purification equipment for Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) to reuse the large quantities of waste solvent generated in space shuttle preparation operations. (NOTE: Operation of VAFB as ...

  1. Considering the Audience: Air Force Recruiting Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Darek L.

    2012-01-01

    Each Air Force recruiter is formally trained in public speaking and the art of salesmanship or persuasion. These recruiters communicate to thousands of high school students each year through presentations in classrooms, auditoriums and other venues as part of their assigned duties. Persuasive presentations are public speaking events specifically…

  2. Air Force electrochemical impregnation process results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L. E.

    1978-01-01

    The status of the Air Force Electrochemical program was reviewed. The performance characteristics of the system was attributed to the use of an electrochemical impregnation process. The electrode improvements, the prototype equipment designs, and the actual construction of a production facility are discussed.

  3. Air Force Research Laboratory Cryocooler Technology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Thomas M.; Smith, D. Adam; Easton, Ryan M.

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the cryogenic refrigerator and cryogenic integration programs in development and characterization under the Cryogenic Cooling Technology Group, Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The vision statement for the group is to support the space community as the center of excellence for developing and transitioning space cryogenic thermal management technologies. This paper will describe the range of Stirling, pulse tube; reverse Brayton, and Joule-Thomson cycle cryocoolers currently under development to meet current and future Air Force and Department of Defense requirements. Cooling requirements at 10K, 35K, 60K, 95K, and multistage cooling requirements at 35/85K are addressed. In order to meet these various requirements, the Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate is pursuing various strategic cryocooler and cryogenic integration options. The Air Force Research Laboratory, working with industry partners, is also developing several advanced cryogenic integration technologies that will result in the reduction in current cryogenic system integration penalties and design time. These technologies include the continued development of gimbaled transport systems, 35K and 10K thermal storage units, heat pipes, cryogenic straps, and thermal switches.

  4. Air Force Convair F-102 at Wallops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Two models of the Air Force's Convair F-102 sit poised for launch from Langley's Wallops Island facility. The coke bottle shape of the model on the bottom follows the area rule. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, by James Schultz (page 60).

  5. Air Force Convair F-102 at Wallops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1953-01-01

    Two models of the Air Force's Convair F-102 sit poised for launch from Langley's Wallops Island facility. The Coke Bottle shape of the model on the bottom follows the area rule. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, (page 60), by James Schultz.

  6. Forces and Motion: Dynamics of the Tethered Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In this 'Lift off to Learning' series, Loren Shriver, commander of STS 46, and the other members of the mission (Claude Nicollier, Marsha Ivins, Andrew Allen, Jeffrey Hoffman, Franklin Chiang-Diaz, and Franco Maerba) use computer graphics, and physical experiments to explain how the tethered satellite to be deployed during their mission will be raised, how it works, the influence of the Shuttle on the satellite and the satellite's influence on the Shuttle's orbit, the gravitational effects, and other effects concerning the Theoretical Physics used to plan this mission (gravity gradient force, center of mass, angular momentum, centrifugal force, and coriolis effect). This video ends with a discussion of the technology transfer and utilization of this tethered satellite concept and design.

  7. Air Force construction automation/robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nease, Al; Dusseault, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    The Air Force has several unique requirements that are being met through the development of construction robotic technology. The missions associated with these requirements place construction/repair equipment operators in potentially harmful situations. Additionally, force reductions require that human resources be leveraged to the maximum extent possible and that more stringent construction repair requirements push for increased automation. To solve these problems, the U.S. Air Force is undertaking a research and development effort at Tyndall AFB, FL to develop robotic teleoperation, telerobotics, robotic vehicle communications, automated damage assessment, vehicle navigation, mission/vehicle task control architecture, and associated computing environment. The ultimate goal is the fielding of robotic repair capability operating at the level of supervised autonomy. The authors of this paper will discuss current and planned efforts in construction/repair, explosive ordnance disposal, hazardous waste cleanup, fire fighting, and space construction.

  8. (?) The Air Force Geophysics Laboratory: Aeronomy, aerospace instrumentation, space physics, meteorology, terrestrial sciences and optical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGinty, A. B.

    1982-04-01

    Contents: The Air Force Geophysics Laboratory; Aeronomy Division--Upper Atmosphere Composition, Middle Atmosphere Effects, Atmospheric UV Radiation, Satellite Accelerometer Density Measurement, Theoretical Density Studies, Chemical Transport Models, Turbulence and Forcing Functions, Atmospheric Ion Chemistry, Energy Budget Campaign, Kwajalein Reference Atmospheres, 1979, Satellite Studies of the Neutral Atmosphere, Satellite Studies of the Ionosphere, Aerospace Instrumentation Division--Sounding Rocket Program, Satellite Support, Rocket and Satellite Instrumentation; Space Physics Division--Solar Research, Solar Radio Research, Environmental Effects on Space Systems, Solar Proton Event Studies, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, Ionospheric Effects Research, Spacecraft Charging Technology; Meteorology Division--Cloud Physics, Ground-Based Remote-Sensing Techniques, Mesoscale Observing and Forecasting, Design Climatology, Aircraft Icing Program, Atmospheric Dynamics; Terrestrial Sciences Division--Geodesy and Gravity, Geokinetics; Optical Physics Division--Atmospheric Transmission, Remote Sensing, INfrared Background; and Appendices.

  9. Using PHM to measure equipment usable life on the Air Force's next generation reusable space booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasdel, A.

    The U.S. Air Force procures many launch vehicles and launch vehicle services to place their satellites at their desired location in space. The equipment on-board these satellite and launch vehicle often suffer from premature failures that result in the total loss of the satellite or a shortened mission life sometimes requiring the purchase of a replacement satellite and launch vehicle. The Air Force uses its EELV to launch its high priority satellites. Due to a rise in the cost of purchasing a launch using the Air Force's EELV from 72M in 1997 to as high as 475M per launch today, the Air Force is working to replace the EELV with a reusable space booster (RSB). The RSB will be similar in design and operations to the recently cancelled NASA reusable space booster known as the Space Shuttle. If the Air Force uses the same process that procures the EELV and other launch vehicles and satellites, the RSB will also suffer from premature equipment failures thus putting the payloads at a similar high risk of mission failure. The RSB is expected to lower each launch cost by 50% compared to the EELV. The development of the RSB offers the Air Force an opportunity to use a new reliability paradigm that includes a prognostic and health management program and a condition-based maintenance program. These both require using intelligent, decision making self-prognostic equipment The prognostic and health management program and its condition-based maintenance program allows increases in RSB equipment usable life, lower logistics and maintenance costs, while increasing safety and mission assurance. The PHM removes many decisions from personnel that, in the past resulted in catastrophic failures and loss of life. Adding intelligent, decision-making self-prognostic equipment to the RSB will further decrease launch costs while decreasing risk and increasing safety and mission assurance.

  10. Aeronautical mobile satellite service: Air traffic control applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sim, Dave

    1990-01-01

    Canada's history both in aviation and in satellite communications development spans several decades. The introduction of aeronautical mobile satellite communications will serve our requirements for airspace management in areas not served by line-of-sight radio and radar facilities. The ensuing improvements in air safety and operating efficiency are eagerly awaited by the aviation community.

  11. DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  13. SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHEAST AND NORTHEAST SIDES. Looking west - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Fuel & Water Tank, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Air Force construction automation/robotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nease, A. D.; Alexander, E. F.

    1993-01-01

    The Air Force has several missions which generate unique requirements that are being met through the development of construction robotic technology. One especially important mission will be the conduct of Department of Defense (DOD) space activities. Space operations and other missions place construction/repair equipment operators in dangerous environments and potentially harmful situations. Additionally, force reductions require that human resources be leveraged to the maximum extent possible, and more stringent construction repair requirements push for increased automation. To solve these problems, the U.S. Air Force is undertaking a research and development effort at Tyndall AFB, FL, to develop robotic construction/repair equipment. This development effort involves the following technologies: teleoperation, telerobotics, construction operations (excavation, grading, leveling, tool change), robotic vehicle communications, vehicle navigation, mission/vehicle task control architecture, and associated computing environment. The ultimate goal is the fielding of a robotic repair capability operating at the level of supervised autonomy. This paper will discuss current and planned efforts in space construction/repair, explosive ordnance disposal, hazardous waste cleanup, and fire fighting.

  15. Air Force construction automation/robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nease, A. D.; Alexander, E. F.

    1993-02-01

    The Air Force has several missions which generate unique requirements that are being met through the development of construction robotic technology. One especially important mission will be the conduct of Department of Defense (DOD) space activities. Space operations and other missions place construction/repair equipment operators in dangerous environments and potentially harmful situations. Additionally, force reductions require that human resources be leveraged to the maximum extent possible, and more stringent construction repair requirements push for increased automation. To solve these problems, the U.S. Air Force is undertaking a research and development effort at Tyndall AFB, FL, to develop robotic construction/repair equipment. This development effort involves the following technologies: teleoperation, telerobotics, construction operations (excavation, grading, leveling, tool change), robotic vehicle communications, vehicle navigation, mission/vehicle task control architecture, and associated computing environment. The ultimate goal is the fielding of a robotic repair capability operating at the level of supervised autonomy. This paper will discuss current and planned efforts in space construction/repair, explosive ordnance disposal, hazardous waste cleanup, and fire fighting.

  16. Optimal satellite formation reconfiguration actuated by inter-satellite electromagnetic forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei-wei; Yang, Le-ping; Zhu, Yan-wei; Zhang, Yuan-wen

    2013-08-01

    The inter-satellite electromagnetic forces generated by the magnetic dipoles on neighboring satellites provide an attractive control actuation alternative for satellite formation flight due to the prominent advantages of no propellant consumption or plume contamination. However, the internal force nature as well as the inherent high nonlinearity and coupling of electromagnetic forces bring unique dynamic characteristics and challenges. This paper investigates the nonlinear translational dynamics, trajectory planning and control of formation reconfiguration actuated by inter-satellite electromagnetic forces. The nonlinear translational dynamic model is derived by utilizing analytical mechanics theory; and analysis on the dynamic characteristics is put forward. Optimal reconfiguration trajectories of electromagnetic force actuated formation are studied by applying optimal control theory and the Gauss pseudospectral method. Considering the high nonlinearity and uncertainty in the dynamic model, an inner-and-outer loop combined control strategy based on feedback linearization theory and adaptive terminal sliding mode control is proposed with finite-time convergence capability and good robust performance. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation results are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed translational model, reconfiguration trajectory optimization approach and control strategy.

  17. Reading Grade Levels of Air Force Civilian Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, Randy H.; Mathews, John J.

    A study was conducted to examine the reading levels of United States Air Force civilian employees according to occupational groupings and grade structure. Approximately 1,050 Air Force civilian subjects were tested on the Nelson-Denny Reading Test or the California Reading Test. Subjects were selected from eight Air Force bases representing the…

  18. 10. "TEST STAND 15, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "TEST STAND 1-5, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. 1958. Test Area 1-115. Original is a color print, showing Test Stand 1-5 from below, also showing the superstructure of TS1-4 at left. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Clearance of Air Force lands. 644.516 Section 644... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.516 Clearance of Air Force lands. The Chief of Engineers has no responsibility for inspecting or clearing excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological...

  20. 32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air Force claims organization. 842.11 Section 842.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Functions and Responsibilities § 842.11 Air Force claims organization....

  1. 32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air Force claims organization. 842.11 Section 842.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Functions and Responsibilities § 842.11 Air Force claims organization....

  2. 32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air Force claims organization. 842.11 Section 842.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Functions and Responsibilities § 842.11 Air Force claims organization....

  3. 32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Clearance of Air Force lands. 644.516 Section 644... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.516 Clearance of Air Force lands. The Chief of Engineers has no responsibility for inspecting or clearing excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological...

  4. 77 FR 33202 - Department of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Department of the Air Force Corrected Intent To Grant a Partially Exclusive Patent License AGENCY: The United States Air Force, DoD. SUMMARY: This notice replaces the one published on May 18, 2012 in the Federal... amended; the Department of the Air Force announces its intention to grant SCADA Security Innovation,...

  5. 32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Clearance of Air Force lands. 644.516 Section... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.516 Clearance of Air Force lands. The Chief of Engineers has no responsibility for inspecting or clearing excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological...

  6. 32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air Force claims organization. 842.11 Section 842.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Functions and Responsibilities § 842.11 Air Force claims organization....

  7. 32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Clearance of Air Force lands. 644.516 Section... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.516 Clearance of Air Force lands. The Chief of Engineers has no responsibility for inspecting or clearing excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological...

  8. 32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Clearance of Air Force lands. 644.516 Section 644... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.516 Clearance of Air Force lands. The Chief of Engineers has no responsibility for inspecting or clearing excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological...

  9. 32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air Force claims organization. 842.11 Section 842.11 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Functions and Responsibilities § 842.11 Air Force claims organization....

  10. AIR QUALITY FORECAST VERIFICATION USING SATELLITE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA 's operational geostationary satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depths (AODs) were used to verify National Weather Service (NWS) experimental (research mode) particulate matter (PM2.5) forecast guidance issued during the summer 2004 International Consortium for Atmosp...

  11. Keesler Air Force Base team tours Stennis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center Deputy Director Patrick Scheuermann (seated, center) welcomed members of the Keesler Air Force Base management team from Biloxi during a Nov. 4 tour of the rocket engine test facility. During the visit, Keesler team members toured several areas, including the A-3 Test Stand construction site and the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne engine assembly facility. Management team members visiting Stennis included Brig. Gen. Ian R. Dickinson (seated, right), commander of the Keesler base, and Col. Christopher Valle (seated, left), vice commander of the base.

  12. Modeling radiation forces acting on satellites for precision orbit determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Antreasian, P. G.; Rosborough, G. W.; Putney, B. H.

    1992-01-01

    Models of the TOPEX/Poseidon spacecraft are developed by means of finite-element analyses for use in generating acceleration histories for various orbit orientations which account for nonconservative radiation forces. The acceleration profiles are developed with an analysis based on the use of the 'box-wing' model in which the satellite is modeled as a combination of flat plates. The models account for the effects of solar, earth-albedo, earth-IR, and spacecraft-thermal radiation. The finite-element analysis gives the total force and induced accelerations acting on the satellite. The plate types used in the analysis have parameters that can be adjusted to optimize model performance according to the micromodel analysis and tracking observations. Acceleration related to solar radiation pressure is modeled effectively, and the techniques are shown to be useful for the precise orbit determinations required for spacecraft such as the TOPEX/Poseidon.

  13. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  14. Satellite methods underestimate indirect climate forcing by aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Joyce E.; Xu, Li; Wang, Minghuai

    2011-01-01

    Satellite-based estimates of the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) are consistently smaller than the estimates from global aerosol models, and, partly as a result of these differences, the assessment of this climate forcing includes large uncertainties. Satellite estimates typically use the present-day (PD) relationship between observed cloud drop number concentrations (Nc) and aerosol optical depths (AODs) to determine the preindustrial (PI) values of Nc. These values are then used to determine the PD and PI cloud albedos and, thus, the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on top of the atmosphere radiative fluxes. Here, we use a model with realistic aerosol and cloud processes to show that empirical relationships for ln(Nc) versus ln(AOD) derived from PD results do not represent the atmospheric perturbation caused by the addition of anthropogenic aerosols to the preindustrial atmosphere. As a result, the model estimates based on satellite methods of the AIE are between a factor of 3 to more than a factor of 6 smaller than model estimates based on actual PD and PI values for Nc. Using ln(Nc) versus ln(AI) (Aerosol Index, or the optical depth times angstrom exponent) to estimate preindustrial values for Nc provides estimates for Nc and forcing that are closer to the values predicted by the model. Nevertheless, the AIE using ln(Nc) versus ln(AI) may be substantially incorrect on a regional basis and may underestimate or overestimate the global average forcing by 25 to 35%. PMID:21808047

  15. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  16. Air Force geographic information and analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Henney, D.A.; Jansing, D.S.; Durfee, R.C.; Margle, S.M.; Till, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    A microcomputer-based geographic information and analysis system (GIAS) was developed to assist Air Force planners with environmental analysis, natural resources management, and facility and land-use planning. The system processes raster image data, topological data structures, and geometric or vector data similar to that produced by computer-aided design and drafting (CADD) systems, integrating the data where appropriate. Data types included Landsat imagery, scanned images of base maps, digitized point and chain features, topographic elevation data, USGS stream course data, highway networks, railroad networks, and land use/land cover information from USGS interpreted aerial photography. The system is also being developed to provide an integrated display and analysis capability with base maps and facility data bases prepared on CADD systems. 3 refs.

  17. Tethered satellite system control using electromagnetic forces and reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alandi Hallaj, Mohammad Amin; Assadian, Nima

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel non-rotating space tethered configuration is introduced which its relative positions controlled using electromagnetic forces. The attitude dynamics is controlled by three reaction wheels in the body axes. The nonlinear coupled orbital dynamics of a dumbbell tethered satellite formation flight are derived through a constrained Lagrangian approach. These equations are presented in the leader satellite orbital frame. The tether is assumed to be mass-less and straight, and the J2 perturbation is included to the analysis. The forces and the moments of the electromagnetic coils are modeled based on the far-filed model of the magnetic dipoles. A guidance scheme for generating the desired positions as a function of time in Cartesian form is presented. The satellite tethered formation with variable length is controlled utilizing a linear controller. This approach is applied to a specified scenario and it is shown that the nonlinear guidance method and the linear controller can control the nonlinear system of the tethered formation and the results are compared with optimal control approach.

  18. 32 CFR 631.15 - Air Force policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air Force policy. 631.15 Section 631.15 National... INVESTIGATIONS ARMED FORCES DISCIPLINARY CONTROL BOARDS AND OFF-INSTALLATION LIAISON AND OPERATIONS Off-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.15 Air Force...

  19. 32 CFR 631.15 - Air Force policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Air Force policy. 631.15 Section 631.15 National... INVESTIGATIONS ARMED FORCES DISCIPLINARY CONTROL BOARDS AND OFF-INSTALLATION LIAISON AND OPERATIONS Off-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.15 Air Force...

  20. 32 CFR 644.327 - Air Force military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Air Force military real property. 644.327 Section... Force military real property. Military real property under the control of the Department of the Air Force will be placed in excess status as outlined in AFR 87-4....

  1. 32 CFR 631.15 - Air Force policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Air Force policy. 631.15 Section 631.15 National... INVESTIGATIONS ARMED FORCES DISCIPLINARY CONTROL BOARDS AND OFF-INSTALLATION LIAISON AND OPERATIONS Off-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.15 Air Force...

  2. 32 CFR 644.327 - Air Force military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air Force military real property. 644.327... Force military real property. Military real property under the control of the Department of the Air Force will be placed in excess status as outlined in AFR 87-4....

  3. 32 CFR 631.15 - Air Force policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air Force policy. 631.15 Section 631.15 National... INVESTIGATIONS ARMED FORCES DISCIPLINARY CONTROL BOARDS AND OFF-INSTALLATION LIAISON AND OPERATIONS Off-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.15 Air Force...

  4. 32 CFR 631.15 - Air Force policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air Force policy. 631.15 Section 631.15 National... INVESTIGATIONS ARMED FORCES DISCIPLINARY CONTROL BOARDS AND OFF-INSTALLATION LIAISON AND OPERATIONS Off-Installation Operations (Military Patrols and Investigative Activities) and Policy § 631.15 Air Force...

  5. 32 CFR 644.327 - Air Force military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Air Force military real property. 644.327 Section... Force military real property. Military real property under the control of the Department of the Air Force will be placed in excess status as outlined in AFR 87-4....

  6. 32 CFR 644.327 - Air Force military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air Force military real property. 644.327... Force military real property. Military real property under the control of the Department of the Air Force will be placed in excess status as outlined in AFR 87-4....

  7. 32 CFR 644.327 - Air Force military real property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air Force military real property. 644.327 Section... Force military real property. Military real property under the control of the Department of the Air Force will be placed in excess status as outlined in AFR 87-4....

  8. New Methods for Air Quality Model Evaluation with Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, T.; Harkey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite major advances in the ability of satellites to detect gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, there remains significant, untapped potential to apply space-based data to air quality regulatory applications. Here, we showcase research findings geared toward increasing the relevance of satellite data to support operational air quality management, focused on model evaluation. Particular emphasis is given to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aboard the NASA Aura satellite, and evaluation of simulations from the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. This work is part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST), and is motivated by ongoing dialog with state and federal air quality management agencies. We present the response of satellite-derived NO2 to meteorological conditions, satellite-derived HCHO:NO2 ratios as an indicator of ozone production regime, and the ability of models to capture these sensitivities over the continental U.S. In the case of NO2-weather sensitivities, we find boundary layer height, wind speed, temperature, and relative humidity to be the most important variables in determining near-surface NO2 variability. CMAQ agreed with relationships observed in satellite data, as well as in ground-based data, over most regions. However, we find that the southwest U.S. is a problem area for CMAQ, where modeled NO2 responses to insolation, boundary layer height, and other variables are at odds with the observations. Our analyses utilize a software developed by our team, the Wisconsin Horizontal Interpolation Program for Satellites (WHIPS): a free, open-source program designed to make satellite-derived air quality data more usable. WHIPS interpolates level 2 satellite retrievals onto a user-defined fixed grid, in effect creating custom-gridded level 3 satellite product. Currently, WHIPS can process the following data products: OMI NO2 (NASA retrieval); OMI NO2 (KNMI retrieval); OMI

  9. Improving National Air Quality Forecasts with Satellite Aerosol Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, Jassim; Szykman, James; Pierce, R. Bradley; Kittaka, Chieko; Neil, Doreen; Chu, D. Allen; Remer, Lorraine; Gumley, Liam; Prins, Elaine; Weinstock, Lewis; MacDonald, Clinton; Wayland, Richard; Dimmick, Fred; Fishman, Jack

    2005-09-01

    Accurate air quality forecasts can allow for mitigation of the health risks associated with high levels of air pollution. During September 2003, a team of NASA, NOAA, and EPA researchers demonstrated a prototype tool for improving fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air quality forecasts using satellite aerosol observations. Daily forecast products were generated from a near-real-time fusion of multiple input data products, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)/ Earth Observing System (EOS) instrument on the NASA Terra satellite, PM2.5 concentration from over 300 state/local/national surface monitoring stations, meteorological fields from the NOAA/NCEP Eta Model, and fire locations from the NOAA/National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA) product. The products were disseminated via a Web interface to a small group of forecasters representing state and local air management agencies and the EPA. The MODIS data improved forecaster knowledge of synoptic-scale air pollution events, particularly over oceans and in regions devoid of surface monitors. Forecast trajectories initialized in regions of high AOD offered guidance for identifying potential episodes of poor air quality. The capability of this approach was illustrated with a case study showing that aerosol resulting from wildfires in the northwestern United States and southwestern Canada is transported across the continent to influence air quality in the Great Lakes region a few days later. The timing of this demonstration was selected to help improve the accuracy of the EPA's AIRNow (www.epa.gov/airnow/) air quality index next-day PM2.5 forecast, which began on 1 October 2003. Based on the positive response from air quality managers and forecasters, this prototype was expanded and transitioned to an operational

  10. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  11. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  12. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  13. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  14. 33 CFR 334.1280 - Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force. 334.1280 Section 334.1280 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1280 Bristol Bay, Alaska; air-to-air weapon range, Alaskan Air Command, U.S. Air Force....

  15. Determination of external forces in alpine skiing using a differential global navigation satellite system.

    PubMed

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2013-01-01

    In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS). The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD) were -26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and -6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force) allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions. PMID:23917257

  16. Determination of External Forces in Alpine Skiing Using a Differential Global Navigation Satellite System

    PubMed Central

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2013-01-01

    In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS). The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD) were −26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and −6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force) allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions. PMID:23917257

  17. Air Force's First C-17 Flies into Retirement

    NASA Video Gallery

    The U.S. Air Force has retired its first C-17 transport after 21 years as a flight test aircraft and use in joint NASA-USAF propulsion research. NASA research pilot Frank Batteas, who was an Air Fo...

  18. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast Deflector Fences, Northeast & Southwest sides of Operational Apron, Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  19. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Operational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Operational & Hangar Access Aprons, Spanning length of northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  20. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket Booster Disassembly & Refurbishment Complex, Thrust Vector Control Deservicing Facility, Hangar Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  1. VIEW, FRONT ELEVATION, LOOKING SOUTHSOUTHEAST Mountain Home Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, FRONT ELEVATION, LOOKING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST - Mountain Home Air Force Base 1958 Senior Officers' Housing, Colonel's Residence, Tuck Street (originally Locust Street), Mountain Home, Elmore County, ID

  2. Improving UK Air Quality Modelling Through Exploitation of Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Richard; Chipperfield, Martyn; Savage, Nick

    2014-05-01

    In this work the applicability of satellite observations to evaluate the operational UK Met Office Air Quality in the Unified Model (AQUM) have been investigated. The main focus involved the AQUM validation against satellite observations, investigation of satellite retrieval error types and of synoptic meteorological-atmospheric chemistry relationships simulated/seen by the AQUM/satellite. The AQUM is a short range forecast model of atmospheric chemistry and aerosols up to 5 days. It has been designed to predict potentially hazardous air pollution events, e.g. high concentrations of surface ozone. The AQUM has only been validated against UK atmospheric chemistry recording surface stations. Therefore, satellite observations of atmospheric chemistry have been used to further validate the model, taking advantage of better satellite spatial coverage. Observations of summer and winter 2006 tropospheric column NO2 from both OMI and SCIAMACHY show that the AQUM generally compares well with the observations. However, in northern England positive biases (AQUM - satellite) suggest that the AQUM overestimates column NO2; we present results of sensitivity experiments on UK emissions datasets suspected to be the cause. In winter, the AQUM over predicts background column NO2 when compared to both satellite instruments. We hypothesise that the cause is the AQUM winter night-time chemistry, where the NO2 sinks are not substantially defined. Satellite data are prone to errors/uncertainty such as random, systematic and smoothing errors. We have investigated these error types and developed an algorithm to calculate and reduce the random error component of DOAS NO2 retrievals, giving more robust seasonal satellite composites. The Lamb Weather Types (LWT), an objective method of classifying the daily synoptic weather over the UK, were used to create composite satellite maps of column NO2 under different synoptic conditions. Under cyclonic conditions, satellite observed UK column NO2 is

  3. Group Task Force on Satellite Rescue and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Group Task Force was chartered by the Administrator of NASA to recommend 'a policy outlining the criteria, the design standards, and the pricing model to guide NASA in assessing the responsibilities for government and nongovernment Satellite Rescue and Repair Missions.' Criteria for accepting such missions, risks, and benefits to all sectors of our economy involved in satellite services, adequacy of planning and training, and the impact on NASA's primary mission were reviewed. The Group began by asking a more fundamental question; is satellite rescue and repair a logical element of NASA's mission? Factors considered were: (1) the probability of rescue or repair opportunities arising; (2) the economic justification for such attempts; (3) the benefits to NASA, both from such ad hoc learning experiences in space operations and the impact on the public perception of NASA; (4) the effect of such unanticipated missions on NASA's scheduled activities; (5) any potential effect on NASA's technical capability to work in space; and (6) any potential effect on U.S. economic competitiveness.

  4. Air Force academic medicine: a climate survey.

    PubMed

    Jones, Woodson S; Yun, Heather C

    2011-12-01

    Air Force (AF) Medical Service leadership considers education, training, and research as key priorities. However, AF academic physicians' perceptions about the academic environment and challenges to success are not well described. AF faculty physicians were surveyed in autumn 2009. One hundred seventy-two responded and rated the academic environment as needing improvement (median Likert-like score 2 [interquartile range 1] on 1-5 scale). The impact of stepping away from an academically oriented career path for other executive positions was rated negatively (median Likert-like score 2, interquartile range 1). Concerns included loss of clinical skills, career disruption, and the challenge of returning to and/or competing for positions within the academic pathway. New policies limiting deployment of Program Directors and/or key teaching faculty were viewed favorably. Most physicians (59%) completing this survey expressed concerns about the AF academic environment and identified numerous challenges. Information from this survey can guide future initiatives to enhance leadership's goals. PMID:22338353

  5. Lorentz Force Effects on the Orbit of a Charged Artificial Satellite: A New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aziz, Yehia A.

    2007-02-01

    A charged artificial satellite moving relative to a magnetic field accelerates in a direction perpendicular to its velocity and the magnetic field due to the Lorentz force. The geomagnetic field is considered as a multipole potential field and the satellite electrical charged is supposed to be constant. The study is provided to compute Lorentz force acceleration of a charged satellite in Earth's magnetic field as a function of orbital elements of the satellite. Periodic perturbations in the orbital elements of the satellite are derived using Lagrange planetary equations. Numerical results for a chosen satellites orbit shows the most effects of Lorentz force are in semi major axis, eccentricity, and the longitude of the satellite, but there aren't any effects of the force on the inclination and the argument of the perigee of the satellite elements.

  6. United States Air Force Child Care Center Infant Care Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Ardyn; And Others

    Intended to guide Air Force infant caregivers in providing high quality group care for infants 6 weeks to 6 months of age, this infant care guide must be used in conjunction with other Air Force regulations on day care, such as AFR 215-1, Volume VI (to be renumbered AFR 215-27). After a brief introductory chapter (Chapter I), Chapter II indicates…

  7. 19. DETAIL OF AIR FORCE WEATHER INFORMATION TERMINAL AND CHART ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL OF AIR FORCE WEATHER INFORMATION TERMINAL AND CHART RECORDER LOCATED IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF CONSOLE IN PHOTOS A-15 THROUGH A-18. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. 32 CFR 855.22 - Air Force procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... analysis (32 CFR part 989, Environmental Impact Analysis Process). The local Government agency... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air Force procedures. 855.22 Section 855.22 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT...

  9. 32 CFR 855.22 - Air Force procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... analysis (32 CFR part 989, Environmental Impact Analysis Process). The local Government agency... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air Force procedures. 855.22 Section 855.22 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT...

  10. 32 CFR 855.22 - Air Force procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... analysis (32 CFR part 989, Environmental Impact Analysis Process). The local Government agency... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air Force procedures. 855.22 Section 855.22 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT...

  11. Living History: Pioneering Bandswomen of the United States Air Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Jeananne

    2015-01-01

    This narrative describes two United States Air Force bandswomen whose combined careers span the past sixty years. Cornetist Martha (Martye) Jean Awkerman joined the U.S. Women in the Air Force (WAF) Band in 1955. She served the WAF band as cornet soloist and principal trumpet until the band was disbanded in 1961. In 1983, tubist Jan Duga joined…

  12. 32 CFR 855.22 - Air Force procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... analysis (32 CFR part 989, Environmental Impact Analysis Process). The local Government agency... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air Force procedures. 855.22 Section 855.22 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT...

  13. 32 CFR 855.22 - Air Force procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... analysis (32 CFR part 989, Environmental Impact Analysis Process). The local Government agency... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air Force procedures. 855.22 Section 855.22 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT...

  14. Some Factors Influencing Air Force Simulator Training Effectiveness. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro, Paul W.

    A study of U.S. Air Force simulator training was conducted to identify factors that influence the effectiveness of such training and to learn how its effectiveness is being determined. The research consisted of a survey of ten representative Air Force simulator training programs and a review of the simulator training research literature. A number…

  15. SAMIRA - SAtellite based Monitoring Initiative for Regional Air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Philipp; Stebel, Kerstin; Ajtai, Nicolae; Diamandi, Andrei; Horalek, Jan; Nicolae, Doina; Stachlewska, Iwona; Zehner, Claus

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present a new ESA-funded project entitled Satellite based Monitoring Initiative for Regional Air quality (SAMIRA), which aims at improving regional and local air quality monitoring through synergetic use of data from present and upcoming satellites, traditionally used in situ air quality monitoring networks and output from chemical transport models. Through collaborative efforts in four countries, namely Romania, Poland, the Czech Republic and Norway, all with existing air quality problems, SAMIRA intends to support the involved institutions and associated users in their national monitoring and reporting mandates as well as to generate novel research in this area. Despite considerable improvements in the past decades, Europe is still far from achieving levels of air quality that do not pose unacceptable hazards to humans and the environment. Main concerns in Europe are exceedances of particulate matter (PM), ground-level ozone, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). While overall sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions have decreased in recent years, regional concentrations can still be high in some areas. The objectives of SAMIRA are to improve algorithms for the retrieval of hourly aerosol optical depth (AOD) maps from SEVIRI, and to develop robust methods for deriving column- and near-surface PM maps for the study area by combining satellite AOD with information from regional models. The benefit to existing monitoring networks (in situ, models, satellite) by combining these datasets using data fusion methods will be tested for satellite-based NO2, SO2, and PM/AOD. Furthermore, SAMIRA will test and apply techniques for downscaling air quality-related EO products to a spatial resolution that is more in line with what is generally required for studying urban and regional scale air quality. This will be demonstrated for a set of study sites that include the capitals of the four countries and the highly polluted areas along the border of Poland and the

  16. Values identified in different groups of Air Force nurses.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, B G; All, A C; Loving, G L; Nishikawa, H A

    2001-02-01

    Fundamental personal values are reflected in the choices and decisions made in every aspect of our lives. This descriptive study identified values held by a convenience sample of 224 Air Force nurses stationed at four U.S. Air Force medical facilities. Study participants identified seven of eight literature-supported values in the categories "important" or "very important" across the demographic factors of age, gender, educational level, military rank, marital status, and years of Air Force or civilian nursing experience. These seven values were ability utilization, achievement, altruism, autonomy, economic reward, economic security, and personal development. Personnel using this information may ease the transition process to military nursing, facilitate job placement to positions reflecting personally held values, and provide valuable insight for Air Force nurse recruiters who have limited knowledge of the nursing profession. In all, this would promote job satisfaction and Air Force nurse retention. PMID:11272712

  17. Satellite observations of air-sea interaction over the Kuroshio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S.; Nonaka, M.; Hafner, J.; Liu, W. T.

    2002-12-01

    Satellite microwave measurements are analyzed, revealing robust co-variability in sea surface temperature (SST) and wind speed over the Kuroshio and its Extension (KE). Ocean hydrodynamic instabilities cause the KE to meander and result into large SST variations. Increased (reduced) wind speeds are found to be associated with warm (cold) SST anomalies. This positive SST-wind correlation in KE is confirmed by in-situ buoy measurements and is consistent with a vertical shear adjustment mechanism. Namely, an increase in SST reduces the static stability of the near-surface atmosphere, intensifying the vertical turbulence mixing and bringing fast-moving air from aloft to the sea surface. South of Japan, the Kuroshio is known to vary between nearshore and offshore paths. Both paths seem semi-permanent and can persist months to years. As the Kuroshio shifts its path, coherent wind changes are detected. In particular, winds are high south of Tokyo when the Kuroshio takes the nearshore path while they are greatly reduced when this warm current leaves the coast in the offshore path. Further upstream in the East China Sea, on the warmer flank of the Kuroshio Front, there are a zone of high wind speed and a band of raining cloud due to the region's unstable atmospheric stratification near the surface. Surface wind convergence is roughly collocated with the Kuroshio Current. By increasing the baroclinicity and condensational heating, the Kuroshio Front aids the growth of the so-called Taiwan cyclone, an important winter weather phenomenon for Japan. The positive SST-wind correlation over the strong Kuroshio Current and its extension is opposite to the negative one often observed in regions of weak currents such as south of the Aleutian low that is considered to be indicative of atmosphere-to-ocean forcing.

  18. 76 FR 57026 - Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... Force Research Laboratory overview focusing on the Air Force Science and Technology plan emphasizing... Department of the Air Force Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: Under...

  19. Laser Communications Airborne Testbed: Potential For An Air-To-Satellite Laser Communications Link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmann, Robert J.

    1988-05-01

    The Laser Communications Airborne Testbed (LCAT) offers an excellent opportunity for testing of an air-to-satellite laser communications link with the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The direct detection laser portion of the ACTS is suitable for examining the feasibility of an airborne terminal. Development of an airborne laser communications terminal is not currently part of the ACTS program; however, an air-to-satellite link is of interest. The Air Force performs airborne laser communications experiments to examine the potential usefulness of this technology to future aircraft. Lasers could be used, for example, by future airborne command posts and reconnaissance aircraft to communicate via satellite over long distances and transmit large quantities of data in the fastest way possible from one aircraft to another or to ground sites. Lasers are potentially secure, jam resistant and hard to detect and in this regard increase the survivability of the users. Under a contract awarded by Aeronautical Systems Division's Avionics Laboratory, a C-135E testbed aircraft belonging to ASD's 4950th Test Wing will be modified to create a Laser Communications Airborne Testbed. The contract is for development and fabrication of laser testbed equipment and support of the aircraft modification effort by the Test Wing. The plane to be modified is already in use as a testbed for other satellite communications projects and the LCAT effort will expand those capabilities. This analysis examines the characteristics of an LCAT to ACTS direct detection communications link. The link analysis provides a measure of the feasibility of developing an airborne laser terminal which will interface directly to the LCAT. Through the existence of the LCAT, the potential for development of an air-to-satellite laser communications terminal for the experimentation with the ACTS system is greatly enhanced.

  20. The Indian ocean experiment: aerosol forcing obtained from satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeev, K.; Ramanathan, V.

    The tropical Indian Ocean provides an ideal and unique natural laboratory to observe and understand the role of anthropogenic aerosols in climate forcing. Since 1996, an international team of American, European and Indian scientists have been collecting aerosol, chemical and radiation data from ships and surface stations, which culminated in a multi-platform field experiment conducted during January to March of 1999. A persistent haze layer that spread over most of the northern Indian Ocean during wintertime was discovered. The layer, a complex mix of organics, black carbon, sulfates, nitrates and other species, subjects the lower atmosphere to a strong radiative heating and a larger reduction in the solar heating of the ocean. We present here the regional distribution of aerosols and the resulting clear sky aerosol radiative forcing at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) observed over the Indian Ocean during the winter months of 1997, 1998 and 1999 based on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimated using NOAA14-AVHRR and the TOA radiation budget data from CERES on board TRMM. Using the ratio of surface to TOA clear sky aerosol radiative forcing observed during the same period over the Indian Ocean island of Kaashidhoo (Satheesh and Ramanathan, 2000), the clear sky aerosol radiative forcing at the surface and the atmosphere are discussed. The regional maps of AVHRR derived AOD show abnormally large aerosol concentration during the winter of 1999 which is about 1.5 to 2 times larger than the AOD during the corresponding period of 1997 and 1998. A large latitudinal gradient in AOD is observed during all the three years of observation, with maximum AOD in the northern hemisphere. The diurnal mean clear sky aerosol forcing at TOA in the northern hemisphere Indian Ocean is in the range of -4 to -16 Wm -2 and had large spatio-temporal variations while in the southern hemisphere Indian Ocean it is in the range of 0 to -6Wm -2. The importance of integrating in-situ data with satellite

  1. Air quality performed with satellite measurement within the QUITSAT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masieri, Samuele; Petritoli, Andrea; Premuda, Margarita; Kostadinov, Ivan; Bortoli, Daniele; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    Ground pollutants monitoring, using satellite observation, represents an interesting and high potential approach to air quality that could be inserted into Global monitoring systems. The QUITSAT Italian pilot project (air QUality with Integration of ground based and SAtellite measurements and chemical Transport and multiphase model), funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), proposes a new approach producing some interesting results in this frame. The approach focuses in the integration of the satellite observations (ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY and AURA/OMI) with the outputs of the GAMES (Gas Aerosol Modelling Evaluation System) chemical transport model, to provide the evaluation of the tropospheric profiles of some atmo-spheric compounds such as NO2 , O3 , HCHO and SO2 . This activity appears to be very useful to retrieve the surface concentration of trace gases from tropospheric columns of atmospheric compounds obtained with satellite instrumentation. The comparison with the in situ analyzer network over the Po' Valley shows a good correlation between the two data set. The corre-spondence can be improved taking into account also concentration gradients between different stations, classifying the ground base stations according to their rural or urban characteristics and considering the general orography of the ground. Results and methodology are presented and discussed.

  2. [Medical research in the US Armed Forces. (Report 5). The US Air Force and Coast Guard].

    PubMed

    Agapitov, A A; Aleĭnikov, S I; Bolekhan, V N; Ivchenko, E V; Krassiĭ, A B; Nagibovich, O A; Petrov, S V; Rezvantsev, M V; Soldatov, E A; Shalakhin, R A; Sheppli, E V

    2013-02-01

    The present article is the last part of the review dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Armed Forces. The first through fourth parts were published in the previous issues of the journal. Specifically this article is dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Air Force and Coast Guard. It is shown that in the US Air Force the medical research is conducted in the Air Force Research Laboratory and in the US Coast Guard--in its Research and Development Center. The particular research programs conducted in the above mentioned units are discussed. PMID:23808204

  3. Improving UK Air Quality Modelling Through Exploitation of Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, R.; Chipperfield, M.; Savage, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Met Office's operational regional Air Quality Unified Model (AQUM) contains a description of atmospheric chemistry/aerosols which allows for the short-term forecast of chemical weather (e.g. high concentrations of ozone or nitrogen dioxide, which can trigger warnings of poor air quality). AQUM's performance has so far only been tested against a network of surface monitoring stations. Therefore, with recent improvements in the quality and quantity of satellite measurements, data products (e.g. tropospheric columns, vertical profiles) from several satellite instruments will be used to test the performance of the model. First comparisons between an AQUM simulation for the UK heatwave event of July 2006 and data from OMI, TES (both on AURA) and MODIS (on AQUA) have identified multiple model-satellite biases. The chemical/aerosol species investigated for this simulation include nitrogen dioxide (NO2), ozone (O3), formaldehyde (HCHO), carbon monoxide (CO) and aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 0.55 microns wavelength. NO2 spatial positive mean biases (AQUM-OMI July 2006 monthly mean tropospheric columns) over north- east England suggest model overestimation in the area's urban regions. Currently, sensitivity tests of the NOx emission datasets are investigating these biases and the model's represent of urban pollution. In the UK O3 monthly mean vertical profile comparisons (AQUM-TES), strong positive mean biases are detected in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. Since the AQUM does not use a stratospheric chemistry scheme, the satellite climatological vertical boundary conditions will be investigated (e.g. test the model with new boundary conditions using multiple satellite instruments or perturb existing climatologies). Comparisons of HCHO (AQUM-OMI monthly mean tropospheric columns) biases highlight strong negative biases over continental Europe and sporadic positive biases in the south-east lateral boundary conditions. Therefore, evaluation and development of

  4. Air Quality Study Using Satellites - Current Capability and Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.; Joiner, Joanna; Gleason, James; Liu, Xiong; Torres, Omar; Krotkov, Nickolay; Ziemke, Jerry; Chandra, Sushil

    2008-01-01

    Satellite instruments have had great success in monitoring the stratospheric ozone and in understanding the processes that control its daily to decadal scale variations. This field is now reaching its zenith with a number of satellite instruments from the US, Europe and Canada capping several decades of active research in this field. The primary public policy imperative of this research was to make reliable prediction of increases in biologically active surface UV radiation due to human activity. By contrast retrieval from satellite data of atmospheric constituents and photo-chemically active radiation that affect air quality is a new and growing field that is presenting us with unique challenges in measurement and data interpretation. A key distinction compared to stratospheric sensors is the greatly enhanced role of clouds, aerosols, and surfaces (CAS) in determining the quality and quantity of useful data that is available for air quality research. In our presentation we will use data from several sensors that are currently flying on the A-train satellite constellation, including OMI, MODIS, CLOUDSAT, and CALIPSO, to highlight that CAS can have both positive and negative effects on the information content of satellite measurements. This is in sharp contrast to other fields of remote sensing where CAS are usually considered an interference except in those cases when they are the primary subject of study. Our analysis has revealed that in the reflected wavelengths one often sees much further down into the atmosphere, through most cirrus, than one does in the emitted wavelengths. The lower level clouds provide a nice background against which one can track long-range transport of trace gases and aerosols. In addition, differences in trace gas columns estimated over cloudy and adjacent clear pixels can be used to measure boundary layer trace gases. However, in order to take full advantage of these features it will be necessary to greatly advance our understanding of

  5. Satellite-aided evaluation of population exposure to air pollution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, William J.; George, Anthony J., Jr.; Bryant, Nevin A.

    1979-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 set schedules for states to implement regional, spatial assessments of air quality impacts. Accordingly, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency recently published guidelines for quantifying population exposure to adverse air quality impact by using air quality and population data by census tracts. Our research complements the EPA guidelines in that it demonstrates the ability to determine population exposure to air pollution through computer processing that utilizes Landsat satellite-derived land use information. Three variables-a 1985 estimate of total suspended particulates for 2-km2 grid cells, Landsat-derived residential land cover data for 0.45-ha cells, and population totals for census tracts-were spatially registered and cross-tabulated to produce tabular and map products illustrating relative air quality exposure for residential population by 2-km2 cells. It would cost $20,000 to replicate our analysis for an area similar in size to the 4000-km2 Portland area. Once completed, the spatially fine, computer-compatible air quality and population data are amenable to the timely and efficient generation of population-at-risk tabular and map information on a continuous or periodic basis.

  6. 78 FR 26758 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Department of the Air Force. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the... announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting will take place 25...

  7. 76 FR 78906 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: Under the... announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting will take place 10 to...

  8. 77 FR 51526 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under... Defense announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting will take...

  9. 75 FR 54331 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the... announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting will take place...

  10. 76 FR 18537 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the... announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting will take place on...

  11. 76 FR 65187 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... Scientific Advisory Board (76 FR 57026, September 15, 2011). Since the Department of the Air Force is unable... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting Cancellation Notice....

  12. 77 FR 22770 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Due to difficulties, beyond the control of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board or its Designated...

  13. 75 FR 22392 - US Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-28

    ... Department of the Air Force US Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting AGENCY: US Air Force Academy Board of Visitors. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to 10 U.S.C. 9355, the US Air Force... CFR 102-3.155, the Administrative Assistant to Secretary of the Air Force has determined that...

  14. 77 FR 36492 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Department of the Air Force. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Due to difficulties, beyond the control of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board or its Designated Federal Officer,...

  15. 77 FR 73026 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Department of the Air Force, DOT. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: Under the... announces that a United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) quarterly meeting will take...

  16. 78 FR 77664 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, Department of the Air Force. ACTION: ACTION:Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the... Defense announces that the United States Air Force (USAF) Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting...

  17. 75 FR 32750 - US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... Department of the Air Force US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: Under the... announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting will take place...

  18. 78 FR 18326 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the... announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) quarterly meeting will take...

  19. 76 FR 28215 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under... Defense announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting will take...

  20. 75 FR 13514 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the... announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting will take place...

  1. Standard operating procedure for air quality stationary source management at Air Force installations in the Air Force Materiel Command

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, C.M.; Ryckman, S.J.

    1997-12-31

    To sustain compliance and avoid future enforcement actions associated with air quality stationary sources and to provide installation commanders with a certification process for Title V permitting, and Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Stationary Source Management has been developed. The SOP consists of two major sections: Stationary Source Planning and Administration, and Stationary Source Operations These two main sections are further subdivided into twelve subsections which delineate requirements (e.g. maintaining inventories, applying for and maintaining permits, keeping records, reporting and certifying compliance) and assign ownership of processes and responsibilities (e.g. appointing a manager/alternate for each identified stationary air source). In addition, the SOP suggests training that should be provided from operator to commander levels to ensure that all personnel involved with a stationary air source are aware of their responsibilities. Implementation of the SOP should provide for the essential control necessary for installation commanders to eliminate stationary air source non-compliance and to certify compliance in accordance with the Title V Operating Permit requirements. This paper will discuss: the background and purpose for the SOPs content, the twelve subsections of the SOP, the success of implementation at various installations, the relevance or the recommended training, the success of negotiating with various labor unions for SOP implementation and the success of the SOP in reference to its intended purpose.

  2. View of building 11070 showing vents and forced air system ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of building 11070 showing vents and forced air system on east side, looking southwest. - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, China Lake Pilot Plant, Maintenance Shop, C Street, China Lake, Kern County, CA

  3. Space chimp Enos returns to Patrick Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1961-01-01

    Enos the chimpanzee that orbited the earth twice in a Mercury spacecraft arrives back at Patrick Air Force Base. Enos landed some 220 nautical miles south of Bermuda and was picked up up by the U.S.S. Stormes.

  4. Scanner Buildings Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Scanner Buildings - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors Clear Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Engineering Features: Klystron Tubes and Utilidors - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. Engineering Features Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Engineering Features - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. General view. View to southwest Offutt Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view. View to southwest - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  8. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  9. GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. Pencil on paper, dated December 4, 1952. Also marked "PWC 103474." By J.Y. Long Company, Engineers, Oakland, California - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  10. 2. Northeast front. View to southwest. Offutt Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Northeast front. View to southwest. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Squadron Operations Building, At southwestern-most boundary of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  11. Looking north Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking north - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  12. BMEWS Radar Beam Generation and Projection Clear Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BMEWS Radar Beam Generation and Projection - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  13. Exterior, looking west Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Exterior, looking west - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  14. Interior, looking northwest Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking northwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  15. CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTROL BUILDING, WEST FRONT SHOWING ENTRANCE - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Firing Control Building, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, The Solid ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, The Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility Manufacturing Building, Southeast corner of Schwartz Road and Contractors Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. 5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. NORTH SIDE AND WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. 6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. Edwards Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. OUTER BLAST DOOR, WEST REAR. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 3. SOUTH SIDE. Edwards Air Force Base, South Base ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Hydraulic Fluid Buildings, Northeast of Looking Glass Avenue at southwest side of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  1. Interior, looking northeast Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, looking northeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  2. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

  3. Designing Forced-Air HVAC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-31

    This guide explains proper calculation of heating and cooling design loads for homes.used to calculated for the home using the protocols set forth in the latest edition of the Air Conditioning Contractors of America’s (ACCA) Manual J (currently the 8th edition), ASHRAE 2009 Handbook of Fundamentals, or an equivalent computation procedure.

  4. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Endeavour, after completing a mission of almost 17 days duration in space, touches down on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995. In this photo the nose gear is still in the air as the orbiter touches down.

  5. Photographic copy of plan drawing, Department of the Air Force, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of plan drawing, Department of the Air Force, Air Defense Command Directorate of Installations, May 28, 1954, Civil Engineers Office, in possession of Selfridge Base Museum, Mt. Clemens, Michigan. FLOOR PLAN, 826-198-4 - Selfridge Field, Building No. 199, South of George Avenue between Walnut & Birch Streets, Mount Clemens, Macomb County, MI

  6. 2. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC3 AIR FORCE BUILDING (BLDG. 761) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC-3 AIR FORCE BUILDING (BLDG. 761) FROM THE NORTHWEST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, SLC-3 Air Force Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. 1. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC3 AIR FORCE BUILDING (BLDG. 761) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL VIEW OF SLC-3 AIR FORCE BUILDING (BLDG. 761) FROM THE SOUTHWEST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, SLC-3 Air Force Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  8. Air Quality Science and Regulatory Efforts Require Geostationary Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, Kenneth E.; Allen, D. J.; Stehr, J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Air quality scientists and regulatory agencies would benefit from the high spatial and temporal resolution trace gas and aerosol data that could be provided by instruments on a geostationary platform. More detailed time-resolved data from a geostationary platform could be used in tracking regional transport and in evaluating mesoscale air quality model performance in terms of photochemical evolution throughout the day. The diurnal cycle of photochemical pollutants is currently missing from the data provided by the current generation of atmospheric chemistry satellites which provide only one measurement per day. Often peak surface ozone mixing ratios are reached much earlier in the day during major regional pollution episodes than during local episodes due to downward mixing of ozone that had been transported above the boundary layer overnight. The regional air quality models often do not simulate this downward mixing well enough and underestimate surface ozone in regional episodes. Having high time-resolution geostationary data will make it possible to determine the magnitude of this lower-and mid-tropospheric transport that contributes to peak eight-hour average ozone and 24-hour average PM2.5 concentrations. We will show ozone and PM(sub 2.5) episodes from the CMAQ model and suggest ways in which geostationary satellite data would improve air quality forecasting. Current regulatory modeling is typically being performed at 12 km horizontal resolution. State and regional air quality regulators in regions with complex topography and/or land-sea breezes are anxious to move to 4-km or finer resolution simulations. Geostationary data at these or finer resolutions will be useful in evaluating such models.

  9. Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, COmbat Operations Center, Utility Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 57, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/57, Rev. "B"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966 "drawings updated." Various scales. 29 x 41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  10. Satellite Remote Sensing of Ozone Change, Air Quality and Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; Bhartia, Pawan K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To date satellite remote sensing of ozone depletion has been very successful. Data sets have been validated and measured trends are in agreement with model calculations. Technology developed for sensing the stratosphere is now being employed to study air quality and climate with promising results. These new data show that air quality is a transcontinental issue, but that better instrumentation is needed. Recent data show a connection between the stratosphere, troposphere and climate, which will require new technology to quantify these relationships. NASA and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) are planning and developing new missions. Recent results from TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer), SeaWiffs, and Terra will be discussed and upcoming missions to study atmospheric chemistry will be discussed.

  11. U.S. BICENTENNIAL EXPOSITION AND THE U. S. AIR FORCE THUNDERBIRDS AIR SHOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Four Air Force Thunderbirds jets streak toward a low pass over the 3rd Century America during an air show today. The Thunderbirds precision flying team will return to 3rd Century America to again entertain visitors with air shows on September 1 and 2.

  12. The FUSE satellite is prepped for prelaunch processing at Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, begin removing the plastic covering from NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite before prelaunch processing. FUSE will undergo a functional test of its systems, followed by installation of the flight batteries and solar arrays. Tests are also scheduled for the communications and data systems linking FUSE with the spacecraft control center at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. FUSE was developed and will be operated by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe - hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is targeted for May 20 at Launch Complex 17.

  13. The FUSE satellite is prepped for prelaunch processing at Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite is unveiled before prelaunch processing. FUSE will undergo a functional test of its systems, followed by installation of the flight batteries and solar arrays. Tests are also scheduled for the communications and data systems linking FUSE with the spacecraft control center at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. FUSE was developed and will be operated by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe - hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is targeted for May 20 at Launch Complex 17.

  14. The FUSE satellite is prepped for prelaunch processing at Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, get ready to remove the protective shipping cover from NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite for prelaunch processing. FUSE will undergo a functional test of its systems, followed by installation of the flight batteries and solar arrays. Tests are also scheduled for the communications and data systems linking FUSE with the spacecraft control center at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. FUSE was developed and will be operated by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe - hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is targeted for May 20 at Launch Complex 17.

  15. The FUSE satellite is prepped for prelaunch processing at Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite stands alone after workstands have been removed. As part of prelaunch processing, FUSE will undergo a functional test of its systems, followed by installation of the flight batteries and solar arrays. Tests are also scheduled for the communications and data systems linking FUSE with the spacecraft control center at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. FUSE was developed and will be operated by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe - hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is targeted for May 20 at Launch Complex 17.

  16. Thermal imbalance force modelling for a GPS satellite using the finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vigue, Yvonne; Schutz, Bob E.

    1991-01-01

    Methods of analyzing the perturbation due to thermal radiation and determining its effects on the orbits of GPS satellites are presented, with emphasis on the FEM technique to calculate satellite solar panel temperatures which are used to determine the magnitude and direction of the thermal imbalance force. Although this force may not be responsible for all of the force mismodeling, conditions may work in combination with the thermal imbalance force to produce such accelerations on the order of 1.e-9 m/sq s. If submeter accurate orbits and centimeter-level accuracy for geophysical applications are desired, a time-dependent model of the thermal imbalance force should be used, especially when satellites are eclipsing, where the observed errors are larger than for satellites in noneclipsing orbits.

  17. Toward Obtaining Reliable Particulate Air Quality Information from Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Chatfield, R. B.; Legg, M.; Esswein, R.; Justice, E.

    2009-12-01

    Air quality agencies use ground sites to monitor air quality, providing accurate information at particular points. Using measurements from satellite imagery has the potential to provide air quality information in a timely manner with better spatial resolution and at a lower cost that can also useful for model validation. While previous studies show acceptable correlations between Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) derived from MODIS and surface Particulate Matter (PM) measurements on the eastern US, the data do not correlate well in the western US (Al-Saadi et al., 2005; Engle-Cox et al., 2004) . This paper seeks to improve the AOD-PM correlations by using advanced statistical analysis techniques. Our study area is the San Joaquin Valley in California because air quality in this region has failed to meet state and federal attainment standards for PM for the past several years. A previous investigation found good correlation of the AOD values between MODIS, MISR and AERONET, but poor correlations (R2 ~ 0.02) between satellite-based AOD and surface PM2.5 measurements. PM2.5 measurements correlated somewhat better (R2 ~ 0.18) with MODIS-derived AOD using the Deep Blue surface reflectance algorithm (Hsu et al., 2006) rather than the standard MODIS algorithm. This level of correlation is not adequate for reliable air quality measurements. Pelletier et al. (2007) used generalized additive models (GAMs) and meteorological data to improve the correlation between PM and AERONET AOD in western Europe. Additive models are more flexible than linear models and the functional relationships can be plotted to give a sense of the relationship between the predictor and the response. In this paper we use GAMs to improve surface PM2.5 to MODIS-AOD correlations. For example, we achieve an R2 ~ 0.44 using a GAM that includes the Deep Blue AOD, and day of year as parameters. Including NOx observations, improves the R2 ~ 0.64. Surprisingly Ångström exponent did not prove to be a significant

  18. Using Satellite Aerosol Retrievals to Monitor Surface Particulate Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Holben, Brent N.; Schafer, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    The MODIS and MISR aerosol products were designed nearly two decades ago for the purpose of climate applications. Since launch of Terra in 1999, these two sensors have provided global, quantitative information about column-integrated aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and relative aerosol type parameters (such as Angstrom exponent). Although primarily designed for climate, the air quality (AQ) community quickly recognized that passive satellite products could be used for particulate air quality monitoring and forecasting. However, AOD and particulate matter (PM) concentrations have different units, and represent aerosol conditions in different layers of the atmosphere. Also, due to low visible contrast over brighter surface conditions, satellite-derived aerosol retrievals tend to have larger uncertainty in urban or populated regions. Nonetheless, the AQ community has made significant progress in relating column-integrated AOD at ambient relative humidity (RH) to surface PM concentrations at dried RH. Knowledge of aerosol optical and microphysical properties, ambient meteorological conditions, and especially vertical profile, are critical for physically relating AOD and PM. To make urban-scale maps of PM, we also must account for spatial variability. Since surface PM may vary on a finer spatial scale than the resolution of standard MODIS (10 km) and MISR (17km) products, we test higher-resolution versions of MODIS (3km) and MISR (1km research mode) retrievals. The recent (July 2011) DISCOVER-AQ campaign in the mid-Atlantic offers a comprehensive network of sun photometers (DRAGON) and other data that we use for validating the higher resolution satellite data. In the future, we expect that the wealth of aircraft and ground-based measurements, collected during DISCOVER-AQ, will help us quantitatively link remote sensed and ground-based measurements in the urban region.

  19. Flextime: A Modified Work Force Scheduling Technique for Selected Headquarters Air Force Logistics Command Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimzey, Reed T.; Prince, Samuel M. O.

    The thesis discusses the advantages and disadvantages of one work force scheduling technique--flextime. The authors were interested in determining if a flextime schedule could be put into effect in a governmental organization such as Headquarters Air Force Logistics Command (AFLC). The study objectives were to determine the feasibility,…

  20. The Air Force health study: an epidemiologic retrospective.

    PubMed

    Buffler, Patricia A; Ginevan, Michael E; Mandel, Jack S; Watkins, Deborah K

    2011-09-01

    In 1979, the U.S. Air Force announced that an epidemiologic study would be undertaken to determine whether the Air Force personnel involved in Operation Ranch Hand-the program responsible for herbicide spraying in Vietnam-had experienced adverse health effects as a result of that service. In January 1982 the Air Force Health Study (AFHS) protocol was approved and the 20 year matched cohort study consisting of independent mortality, morbidity and reproductive health components was initiated. This controversial study has been criticized regarding the study's potential scientific limitations as well as some of the administrative aspects of its conduct. Now, almost 30 years since the implementation of the AFHS and nearly a decade since the final follow up examinations, an appraisal of the study indicates that the results of the AFHS do not provide evidence of disease in the Ranch Hand veterans caused by their elevated levels of exposure to Agent Orange. PMID:21441038

  1. President's Task Force on Communications Policy. Domestic Applications of Communication Satellite Technology. Staff Paper Four.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    President's Task Force on Communications Policy, Washington, DC.

    A staff paper to the President's Task Force on Communications Policy examines the feasibility of a domestic communications satellite system. Although, with expected technological advancement, satellites may play a significant role in domestic transmission and are economically feasible right now, a number of remaining questions make the…

  2. Analysis of generalized forces in the singular perturbation equations of motion of flexible satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. C.; Das, A.

    1976-01-01

    The formulation and existence of a generalized force in the singularly perturbed formulation of flexible satellites is described. The concept of this force sharply reduces the number of degrees of freedom and the equations of motion of satellites with a large number of flexible elements. The force is analyzed to demonstrate its existence and convergence criteria. The complete solution has been obtained in three time zones - the inner boundary layer, the outer boundary layer, and the large time extending beyond these boundary layers. A stability criterion is proposed for this generalized force.

  3. Airborne mass spectrometers: four decades of atmospheric and space research at the Air Force research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A A; Hunton, D E

    1999-11-01

    Mass spectrometry is a versatile research tool that has proved to be extremely useful for exploring the fundamental nature of the earth's atmosphere and ionosphere and in helping to solve operational problems facing the Air Force and the Department of Defense. In the past 40 years, our research group at the Air Force Research Laboratory has flown quadrupole mass spectrometers of many designs on nearly 100 sounding rockets, nine satellites, three Space Shuttles and many missions of high-altitude research aircraft and balloons. We have also used our instruments in ground-based investigations of rocket and jet engine exhaust, combustion chemistry and microwave breakdown chemistry. This paper is a review of the instrumentation and techniques needed for space research, a summary of the results from many of the experiments, and an introduction to the broad field of atmospheric and space mass spectrometry in general. PMID:10548806

  4. 76 FR 3617 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 9355, Title 10, United States Code (U.S.C.), the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) Board of Visitors (BoV)...

  5. 32 CFR 806.27 - Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents. 806.27 Section 806.27 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.27 Samples of Air Force FOIA...

  6. 32 CFR 806.27 - Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents. 806.27 Section 806.27 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.27 Samples of Air Force FOIA...

  7. 32 CFR 806.27 - Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents. 806.27 Section 806.27 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.27 Samples of Air Force FOIA...

  8. 32 CFR 806.27 - Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents. 806.27 Section 806.27 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.27 Samples of Air Force FOIA...

  9. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. 806.29 Section 806.29 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section...

  10. 32 CFR 806.27 - Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents. 806.27 Section 806.27 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.27 Samples of Air Force FOIA processing documents. (a) This section...

  11. Satellite-based monitoring of air quality within QUITSAT project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Nicolantonio, W.

    2009-04-01

    Satellite remote sensing of both trace gas constituents and Particulate Matter (PM) can be profitably exploited in Air Quality (AQ) assessment. The actual potential role of satellite observations is here highlighted combined with regional meteorological and Chemical Transport Models (CTM) in the context of air quality monitoring as experienced in QUITSAT Project over Northern Italy (from 43:09 to 46:39 N, from 6:19 to 14:23 E). QUITSAT (2006-2009) is a pilot project funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI) in the framework of its institutional priorities for the Natural and Technological disaster management programme. AQ monitoring is in general based on local ground measurements. In recent years, this issue has been inserted in a more extended frame, in which CTM have joined ground-based data and satellite observations to provide a better characterization of AQ monitoring, forecasting and planning on a regional scale. In particular, two satellite-based products arisen from analysis methodologies developed in QUITSAT and relative to significant pollutants as PM2.5 and NO2 are presented within this work. The MODIS sensors capability (Terra and Aqua/NASA platforms) to retrieve Aerosol Optical Properties (AOP) has been used in a semi-empirical approach to estimate PM2.5 content at the ground. At first, PM2.5 concentration sampled in several sites over Northern Italy are employed in order to infer AOP to PM conversion parameters. A spatial-temporal coincidence procedure has been performed amongst EO and non-EO data. To take into account the aerosol columnar dispersion and the AOP dependence on the relative humidity (RH) meteorological fields (Planetary Boundary Layer and RH) simulated by MM5 are considered. MODIS aerosol level 2 products (MOD04 and MYD04 collection 5, 10x10 km2 spatial resolution) and PM2.5 samplings performed by Regional Environmental Agencies (ARPA Emilia Romagna and ARPA Lombardia) and carried out over further 6 measurements sites (located in Milano

  12. Compressed Air System Optimization Improves Production and saves energy at a Satellite Manufacturer

    SciTech Connect

    2002-05-01

    In 2001, a compressed air improvement project was implemented following an audit on the compressed air system at Boeing Satellite Systems (formerly Hughes Space & Communications Company) in Los Angeles, California.

  13. Measuring the force of drag on air sheared sessile drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, Andrew J. B.; Fleck, Brian; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2012-11-01

    To blow a drop along or off of a surface (i.e. to shed the drop), the drag force on the drop (based on flow conditions, drop shape, and fluid properties) must overcome the adhesion force between the drop and the surface (based on surface tension, drop shape, and contact angle). While the shedding of sessile drops by shear flow has been studied [Milne, A. J. B. & Amirfazli, A. Langmuir 25, 14155 (2009).], no independent measurements of the drag or adhesion forces have been made. Likewise, analytic predictions are limited to hemispherical drops and low air velocities. We present, therefore, measurements of the drag force on sessile drops at air velocities up to the point of incipient motion. Measurements were made using a modified floating element shear sensor in a laminar low speed wind tunnel to record drag force over the surface with the drop absent, and over the combined system of the surface and drop partially immersed in the boundary layer. Surfaces of different wettabilities were used to study the effects of drop shape and contact angles, with drop volume ranged between approximately 10 and 100 microlitres. The drag force for incipient motion (which by definition equals the maximum of the adhesion force) is compared to simplified models for drop adhesion such as that of Furmidge

  14. Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry air and air/water vapor mixtures in the same forced convection cooling test rig (jet array impingement configurations) with mass ratios of water vapor to air up to 0.23. The primary objective was to verify by direct experiment that selected existing methods for evaluation of viscosity and thermal conductivity of air/water vapor mixtures could be used with confidence to predict heat transfer coefficients for such mixtures using as a basis heat transfer data for dry air only. The property evaluation methods deemed most appropriate require as a basis a measured property value at one mixture composition in addition to the property values for the pure components.

  15. Depression and burnout symptoms among Air Force family medicine providers.

    PubMed

    Varner, Derrick F; Foutch, Brian K

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of depression and burnout symptoms among family medicine providers on active duty in the US Air Force. Results demonstrated that 84% of those surveyed scored positive for degrees of depression symptoms; only sex differences were significant. PMID:24758978

  16. 34. Site Plan: Fort Custer Air Force Station, Fort Custer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Site Plan: Fort Custer Air Force Station, Fort Custer, Michigan, Modification of Electrical Distribution, General Site Plan, USACOE, no date. - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  17. Academic Integrity at the United States Air Force Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, LeAnn

    2006-01-01

    In troubled times, where threats to honor abound, it is essential that people support students who may have been enculturated in social dishonesty. The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) has worked hard to put in place a number of supports to help cadets to grow beyond social norms where dishonesty may be tolerated. The academy seeks to…

  18. STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed in this view of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it completes a mission of almost 17 days duration in space on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995.

  19. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The main landing gear is on the ground and the nose gear is about to touch down as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  20. STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The drag chute is fully deployed as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

  1. Communication Theory and Research in Air Force Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, John A.

    The United States Air Force is unique among the armed services in placing all its professional military education (PME) and professional continuing education (PCE) under a single command. Furthermore, most of the schools and courses are in the same geographical location at the Maxwell/Gunter complex in Montgomery, Alabama. There are basic…

  2. 11. EXTERIOR VIEW OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE MAN EXAMINING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. EXTERIOR VIEW OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE MAN EXAMINING CONTENTS OF SHIELDING TANK AS FUEL ELEMENT ASSEMBLY IS RAISED AND LOWERED. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-6172, TAKEN NOVEMBER 10, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. Air Force Officer Qualifying Test Form O: Development and Standardization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Deborah L.; And Others

    This report presents the rationale, development, and standardization of the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) Form O. The test is used to select individuals for officer commissioning programs, and candidates for pilot and navigator training. Form O contains 380 items organized in 16 subtests. All items are administered in a single test…

  4. Forces Acting on a Ball in an Air Jet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Zendri, G.; Oss, S.

    2011-01-01

    The forces acting on a ball in an air jet have been measured using simple equipment. Such measurements allow quite a precise, non-ambiguous description and understanding of the physical mechanism which explains the famous levitating ball experiment. (Contains 7 figures.)

  5. Child Maltreatment: The United States Air Force's Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollerstrom, Willard W.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article presents descriptive data on almost 20,000 substantiated cases of child abuse/neglect which occurred over a 6-year period in U.S. Air Force families. The paper discusses annual percentage increases in child maltreatment reports, substantiation rates for abuse, programs serving military personnel and families, and offenders' and…

  6. Information Assurance within the United States Air Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, John D.

    2010-01-01

    According to the Department of Defense (DoD), a review of information assurance (IA) in the United States Air Force (USAF) in 2009, cyber security is jeopardized because of information loss. This situation has occurred in large part because of less than optimal training practices or adherence to training protocols. The purpose of this study was…

  7. 33. Site Plan: Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, Michigan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Site Plan: Custer Air Force Station, Battle Creek, Michigan, FD Radar Facilities-FPS-27, Electrical Plot Plan and Duet Details, USACOE, not date. - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  8. Substance Abuse Education in the U.S. Air Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colson, James D.

    1978-01-01

    The USAF Substance Abuse Seminar represents a new phase of preventative drug and alcohol abuse education. The seminar includes: Air Force Drug/Alcohol Abuse Control policies; local conditions regarding substance abuse; sociopharmacology concerning the status of substances relative to their effects; and personal responsibility in the use of…

  9. Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/15, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  10. Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/14, Rev. "B"; file drawer 77-1/102. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. photocopy on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  11. Continental Land Mass Air Traffic Control (COLM ATC). [using three artificial satellite configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecar, J. A.; Henrich, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The application of various satellite systems and techniques relative to providing air traffic control services for the continental United States was studied. Three satellite configurations were reviewed. The characteristics and capabilities of the satellites are described. The study includes consideration for the various ranging waveforms, multiple access alternatives, and the power and bandwidth required as a function of the number of users.

  12. Radio frequency power issues and their implications to spacecraft processing at Vandenberg Air Force Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crean, Timothy G.

    Satellite usage of microcircuit technology for applications such as low-noise amplifiers is discussed with attention focused on the vulnerability of these devices to damage by high-power RF sources. The Vandenberg Air Force Base RF environment is described as well as a program underway which is designed to establish and control a 10 V/m RF environment at Titan payload processing facilities through a program of equipment modifications and procedural controls. It is argued that, for RF protection requirements beyond the 10 V/m range, it is necessary to incorporate RF shielding into the design of payload fairings, transporters and processing facilities.

  13. Validation and Verification of Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Michael; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Cetola, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    The NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) is the Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) operational Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) combining real time precipitation observations and analyses, global forecast model data, vegetation, terrain, and soil parameters with the community Noah land surface model, along with other hydrology module options, to generate profile analyses of global soil moisture, soil temperature, and other important land surface characteristics. (1) A range of satellite data products and surface observations used to generate the land analysis products (2) Global, 1/4 deg spatial resolution (3) Model analysis generated at 3 hours

  14. Air pollution radiative forcing from specific emissions sectors at 2030

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Nadine; Shindell, Drew T.; Koch, Dorothy M.; Streets, David G.

    2008-01-01

    Reduction of short-lived air pollutants can contribute to mitigate global warming in the near-term with ancillary benefits to human health. However, the radiative forcings of short-lived air pollutants depend on the location and source type of the precursor emissions. We apply the Goddard Institute for Space Studies atmospheric composition-climate model to quantify near-future (2030 A1B) global annual mean radiative forcing by ozone (O3) and sulfate from six emissions sectors in seven geographic regions. At 2030 the net forcings from O3, sulfate, black and organic carbon, and indirect CH4 effects for each emission sector are (in mWm-2) biomass burning, +95; domestic, +68; transportation, +67; industry, -131; and power, -224. Biomass burning emissions in East Asia and central and southern Africa, domestic biofuel emissions in East Asia, south Asia, and central and southern Africa, and transportation emissions in Europe and North America have large net positive forcings and are therefore attractive targets to counter global warming. Power and industry emissions from East Asia, south Asia, and north Africa and the Middle East have large net negative forcings. Therefore air quality control measures that affect these regional sectors require offsetting climate measures to avoid a warming impact. Linear relationships exist between O3 forcing and biomass burning and domestic biofuel CO precursor emissions independent of region with sensitivity of +0.2 mWm-2/TgCO. Similarly, linear relationships exist between sulfate forcing and SO2 precursor emissions that depend upon region but are independent of sector with sensitivities ranging from -3 to -12 mWm-2/TgS.

  15. Reply to Quaas et al.: Can satellites be used to estimate indirect climate forcing by aerosols?

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J. E.; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Li; Wang, Minghuai

    2011-11-15

    We welcome the comments by Quaas et al. (1). In our paper (2), we used a model to show that the methods used to estimate indirect aerosol forcing using satellite data, especially those based on relating the slope of present-day (PD) drop number (Nc) to aerosol optical depth (AOD), underestimate the forcing calculated when both PD and preindustrial (PI) data are available.

  16. 77 FR 61573 - Science Advisory Board Satellite Task Force; Availability of Draft Report and Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC276 Science Advisory Board Satellite Task Force... draft report of the SAB Satellite Task Force (here called the SATTF) for public comment. The draft... Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) asked the SAB to review the existing and...

  17. Innovating to integrate the intangibles into the learning Air Force.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Benjamin T; Weigel, Fred K; Overstreet, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    United States federal law and other regulations require the US military services to provide professional military education to their forces. Meeting that requirement will become increasingly difficult with the absence of a federal government budget, significant cuts to defense spending, and expected future cuts to both defense spending and manpower. Additionally, the operations tempo remains high despite the withdrawal of troops from Iraq and the planned withdrawal from Afghanistan. The resulting time and budget constraints will likely make it more difficult for the services to provide every member with the opportunity to compete for positions in coveted in-residence professional military education programs. Thus, the Air Force is considering a new lifetime learning approach to professional military education. As the Air Force seeks to develop its new paradigm, we must understand what benefits of the current system should be retained and what drawbacks should be allayed. Unfortunately, there is little research in this area. We content analyze data collected from Air Force officers attending in-residence professional military education, synthesize our findings with education and technology literature, and suggest innovative technologies that can maximize the intangible benefits and minimize the drawbacks of professional military education. The blended approach we present can create a richer, more meaningful learning experience for the service member, while simultaneously lowering the cost per member and providing greater opportunity to attend in-residence professional military education. PMID:24488877

  18. Forced-air patient warming blankets disrupt unidirectional airflow.

    PubMed

    Legg, A J; Hamer, A J

    2013-03-01

    We have recently shown that waste heat from forced-air warming blankets can increase the temperature and concentration of airborne particles over the surgical site. The mechanism for the increased concentration of particles and their site of origin remained unclear. We therefore attempted to visualise the airflow in theatre over a simulated total knee replacement using neutral-buoyancy helium bubbles. Particles were created using a Rocket PS23 smoke machine positioned below the operating table, a potential area of contamination. The same theatre set-up, warming devices and controls were used as in our previous study. This demonstrated that waste heat from the poorly insulated forced-air warming blanket increased the air temperature on the surgical side of the drape by > 5°C. This created convection currents that rose against the downward unidirectional airflow, causing turbulence over the patient. The convection currents increased the particle concentration 1000-fold (2 174 000 particles/m(3) for forced-air warming vs 1000 particles/m(3) for radiant warming and 2000 particles/m(3) for the control) by drawing potentially contaminated particles from below the operating table into the surgical site. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:407-10. PMID:23450029

  19. OAFlux Satellite-Based High-Resolution Analysis of Air-Sea Turbulent Heat, Moisture, and Momentum Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lisan

    2016-04-01

    The Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) project at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution has recently developed a new suite of products: the satellite-based high-resolution (HR) air-sea turbulent heat, moisture, and momentum fluxes over the global ocean from 1987 to the present. The OAFlux-HR fluxes are computed from the COARE bulk algorithm using air-sea variables (vector wind, near-surface humidity and temperature, and ocean surface temperature) derived from multiple satellite sensors and multiple missions. The vector wind time series are merged from 14 satellite sensors, including 4 scatterometers and 10 passive microwave radiometers. The near-surface humidity and temperature time series are retrieved from 11 satellite sensors, including 7 microwave imagers and 4 microwave sounders. The endeavor has greatly improved the depiction of the air-sea turbulent exchange on the frontal and meso-scales. The OAFlux-HR turbulent flux products are valuable datasets for a broad range of studies, including the study of the long-term change and variability in the oean-surface forcing functions, quantification of the large-scale budgets of mass, heat, and freshwater, and assessing the role of the ocean in the change and variability of the Earth's climate.

  20. Sensitivity of contrail cirrus radiative forcing to air traffic scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newinger, Christina; Burkhardt, Ulrike

    2012-05-01

    Air traffic effects high cloudiness and therefore the Earth's radiation budget by producing contrail cirrus. Contrail cirrus comprise of line-shaped contrails and irregularly shaped ice clouds that originate from them. The warming effect of contrail cirrus is disproportionally large at night, since at daytime the cooling due to the short wave cloud albedo effect acts toward compensating the long wave warming effect. Therefore it has been suggested to restrict air traffic to daytime in order to reduce its climate impact. The potential for reducing the contrail cirrus radiative forcing by shifting air traffic to daytime depends on the diurnal cycle of contrail cirrus coverage which is in turn determined by the diurnal cycle of air traffic and the contrail cirrus lifetimes. Simulations with a global atmospheric general circulation model indicate that the annual mean contrail cirrus coverage may be almost constant over the day even in areas where air traffic is close to zero at night. A conceptual model describing the temporal evolution of contrail cirrus coverage reveals that this is due to the large variability in contrail cirrus lifetimes in combination with the spreading of contrail cirrus. This large variability of lifetimes is consistent with observational evidence but more observations are needed to constrain the contrail lifetime distribution. An idealized mitigation experiment, shifting nighttime flights to daytime, indicates that contrail cirrus radiative forcing is not significantly changed.

  1. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA... FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section is a checklist format of processing steps and...

  2. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA... FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section is a checklist format of processing steps and...

  3. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA... FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section is a checklist format of processing steps and...

  4. 32 CFR 806.29 - Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA... FORCE ADMINISTRATION AIR FORCE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT PROGRAM § 806.29 Administrative processing of Air Force FOIA requests. (a) This section is a checklist format of processing steps and...

  5. The effect of solar forcing induced atmospheric perturbations on LEO satellites' nominal aerodynamic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwankwo, Victor U. J.; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Weigel, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric drag is the strongest force perturbing the motion of satellites in low Earth orbits LEO, and could cause re-entry of satellites, difficulty in identifying and tracking of the satellites and other space objects, manuvering and prediction of lifetime and re-entry. Solar activities influence the temperature, density and composition of the upper atmosphere. These effects thus strongly depend on the phase of a solar cycle. The frequency of intense flares and storms increase during solar maximum. Heating up of the atmosphere causes its expansion eventually leading to accelerated drag of orbiting satellites, especially those in LEO. In this paper, we present the model of the atmospheric drag effect on the trajectory of hypothetical LEO satellites of different ballistic coefficients. We investigate long-term trend of atmospheric drag on LEO satellites due to solar forcing induced atmospheric perturbations and heating at different phases of the solar cycle, and during interval of strong geomagnetic disturbances or storms. We show the dependence of orbital decay on severity of both the solar cycle and phase, and the extent of geomagnetic perturbations. The result of the model compares well with the observed decay profile of existing LEO satellites and provides a better understanding of the issue of the orbital decay. Our result may also be useful for selection of launch window of satellites for an extended lifetime in the orbit.

  6. Eielson Air Force Base Operable Unit 2 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.E.; Jarvis, T.T.; Jarvis, M.R.; Whelan, G.

    1994-10-01

    Operable Unit 2 at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, is one of several operable units characterized by petroleum, oil, and lubricant contamination, and by the presence of organic products floating at the water table, as a result of Air Force operations since the 1940s. The base is approximately 19,270 acres in size, and comprises the areas for military operations and a residential neighborhood for military dependents. Within Operable Unit 2, there are seven source areas. These source areas were grouped together primarily because of the contaminants released and hence are not necessarily in geographical proximity. Source area ST10 includes a surface water body (Hardfill Lake) next to a fuel spill area. The primary constituents of concern for human health include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Monitored data showed these volatile constituents to be present in groundwater wells. The data also showed an elevated level of trace metals in groundwater.

  7. Utilization of geothermal resources at United States Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Grogger, P.K.

    1980-09-01

    The Air Force installations on the continental United States as well as Alaska and Hawaii, were evaluated as to the possibility of utilizing geothermal energy to develop electricity, produce process steam, or heat and/or cool buildings. Twenty-five bases have suspected geothermal resources available. Because of either need or available technology seven installations were rated priority I, six were rated priority II and priority III and IV totaled ten. Geological and geophysical data indicated further investigation of the priority I installations, Saylor Creek Range, Idaho, Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota, Charleston AFB, South Carolina, Kirkland AFB, New Mexico, Vandenberg AFB, California, Luke AFB, Arizona, and Williams AFB, Arizona, should be accomplished as soon as possible. The use of geothermal energy will decrease the need for fossil fuels by the USAF and during times of short supply allow such fuels to be used for the Air Force's primary mission, military defense.

  8. Geothermal-resource verification for Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, P.R. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    This report summarizes the various types of geothermal energy reviews some legal uncertainties of the resource and then describes a methodology to evaluate geothermal resources for applications to US Air Force bases. Estimates suggest that exploration costs will be $50,000 to $300,000, which, if favorable, would lead to drilling a $500,000 exploration well. Successful identification and development of a geothermal resource could provide all base, fixed system needs with an inexpensive, renewable energy source.

  9. F-1 Engine Test Firing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    This photograph depicts the Rocketdyne static firing of the F-1 engine at the towering 76-meter Test Stand 1-C in Area 1-125 of the Edwards Air Force Base in California. The Saturn V S-IC (first) stage utilized five F-1 engines for its thrust. Each engine provided 1,500,000 pounds, for a combined thrust of 7,500,000 pounds with liquid oxygen and kerosene as its propellants.

  10. Air Force research in human sensory feedback for telepresence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Julian, Ronald G.

    1993-01-01

    Telepresence operations require high quality information transfer between the human master and the remotely located slave. Present Air Force research focuses on the human aspects of the information needed to complete the control/feedback loop. Work in three key areas of human sensory feedback for manipulation of objects are described. Specific projects in each key area are outlined, including research tools (hardware), planned research, and test results. Nonmanipulative feedback technologies are mentioned to complete the advanced teleoperation discussions.

  11. Common Operating and Response Environment - U.S. Air Force

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users. Integration of Air Force data streams, summarizing the information and providing team members with the information they need to rapidly understand and respond.

  12. Psychosocial factors associated with smoking in Air Force recruits.

    PubMed

    Jex, T T; Lombard, T

    1998-04-01

    The ability to identify modifiable risk factors associated with smoking in U.S. Air Force recruits may prove useful in developing smoking prevention programs. We assessed 257 recruits for selected psychosocial factors previously found to be associated with smoking in young adults in the general population. Cross-sectional analysis revealed significant differences between smokers and nonsmokers for six of the eight factors addressed. Implications for the development of smoking prevention programs are discussed. PMID:9575766

  13. Deployment stressors and outcomes among Air Force chaplains.

    PubMed

    Levy, Hannah C; Conoscenti, Lauren M; Tillery, John F; Dickstein, Benjamin D; Litz, Brett T

    2011-06-01

    Military chaplains are invaluable caregiver resources for service members. Little is known about how chaplains respond to the challenge of providing spiritual counsel in a warzone. In this exploratory study, 183 previously deployed Air Force chaplains completed an online survey assessing operational and counseling stress exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, compassion fatigue, and posttraumatic growth. Despite reporting exposure to stressful counseling experiences, Air Force chaplains did not endorse high compassion fatigue. Rather, chaplains experienced positive psychological growth following exposure to stressful counseling experiences. However, 7.7% of Air Force chaplains reported clinically significant PTSD symptoms, suggesting that they are not immune to deployment-related mental health problems. Simultaneous regression analyses revealed that counseling stress exposure predicted compassion fatigue (β = .20) and posttraumatic growth (β = .24), suggesting that caretaking in theatre is stressful enough to spur positive psychological growth in chaplains. Consistent with findings from previous studies, hierarchical regression analyses revealed that operational stress exposure predicted PTSD symptom severity (β = .33) while controlling for demographic variables. PMID:21567477

  14. Waste management issues at US Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Doesburg, J.M.

    1992-05-01

    Air Force installations are industrial bases for projecting men and machinery around the globe. Supporting this mission typically requires large quantities of stockpiled potentially hazardous materials. Over the past several decades, spills, poor accounting, mis-handling, and lack of understanding have led to discharges of hazardous substances into the environment. The Installation Restoration Program (IRP) is a Department of Defense directed program aimed at remediating discharges of hazardous substances, POL (petroleum, oil, and lubricants), and solid waste disposal at defense installations. The IRP is broader in scope than even the US EPA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and requires the Air Force managers to integrate their programs with a broad range of regulations (See Table 1 below). Managing the wastes generated by the remediation program is one of the unexpected problems the Air Force has faced in their remediation efforts. The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, to pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don`t really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. Moreover, these policies ignore a fundamental technology available to today`s environmental managers: waste minimization.

  15. Waste management issues at US Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Doesburg, J.M.

    1992-05-01

    Air Force installations are industrial bases for projecting men and machinery around the globe. Supporting this mission typically requires large quantities of stockpiled potentially hazardous materials. Over the past several decades, spills, poor accounting, mis-handling, and lack of understanding have led to discharges of hazardous substances into the environment. The Installation Restoration Program (IRP) is a Department of Defense directed program aimed at remediating discharges of hazardous substances, POL (petroleum, oil, and lubricants), and solid waste disposal at defense installations. The IRP is broader in scope than even the US EPA Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and requires the Air Force managers to integrate their programs with a broad range of regulations (See Table 1 below). Managing the wastes generated by the remediation program is one of the unexpected problems the Air Force has faced in their remediation efforts. The traditional approach to remediating sites in the US has been to remove the material and place it in a secure landfill, or in the case of groundwater, to pump and treat the effluent. These technologies have proven to be very expensive and don't really fix the problem. The waste is just moved from one place to another. Moreover, these policies ignore a fundamental technology available to today's environmental managers: waste minimization.

  16. Thermal forcing on the tropical Pacific from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Gautier, Catherine

    1990-01-01

    Monthly fields of latent heat flux and surface solar irradiance derived from spaceborne sensors were combined to estimate the surface thermal forcing on the tropical Pacific from 1980 to 1983. The annual cycle and the anomalies associated with 1982-1983 ENSO episode were examined. Along the equator and during the early phase of the episode the reduction of solar irradiance into the ocean is found to be compensated to some extent by the decrease in evaporative cooling. The distribution of correlation coefficients demonstrated that outside the equatorial waveguides, surface thermal forcing plays a significant role in the seasonal change of sea surface temperature and surface solar irradiance is main driving force. Significant correlation is also found between anomalous latent heat flux and anomalous change of sea surface temperature over a broad area in the equatorial and southern tropical Pacific, indicating that surface thermal forcing may play a larger role than expected in the anomalous sea surface temperature change, particularly in the reestablishment of the cold tongue at end of the episode.

  17. Register Closing Effects on Forced Air Heating System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.

    2003-11-01

    Closing registers in forced air heating systems and leaving some rooms in a house unconditioned has been suggested as a method of quickly saving energy for California consumers. This study combined laboratory measurements of the changes in duct leakage as registers are closed together with modeling techniques to estimate the changes in energy use attributed to closing registers. The results of this study showed that register closing led to increased energy use for a typical California house over a wide combination of climate, duct leakage and number of closed registers. The reduction in building thermal loads due to conditioning only a part of the house was offset by increased duct system losses; mostly due to increased duct leakage. Therefore, the register closing technique is not recommended as a viable energy saving strategy for California houses with ducts located outside conditioned space. The energy penalty associated with the register closing technique was found to be minimized if registers furthest from the air handler are closed first because this tends to only affect the pressures and air leakage for the closed off branch. Closing registers nearer the air handler tends to increase the pressures and air leakage for the whole system. Closing too many registers (more than 60%) is not recommended because the added flow resistance severely restricts the air flow though the system leading to safety concerns. For example, furnaces may operate on the high-limit switch and cooling systems may suffer from frozen coils.

  18. Evaluating NOx emission inventories for regulatory air quality modeling using satellite and air quality model data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemball-Cook, Susan; Yarwood, Greg; Johnson, Jeremiah; Dornblaser, Bright; Estes, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of NOx emissions in the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality's (TCEQ) State Implementation Plan (SIP) modeling inventories of the southeastern U.S. We used retrieved satellite tropospheric NO2 columns from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) together with NO2 columns from the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions (CAMx) to make top-down NOx emissions estimates using the mass balance method. Two different top-down NOx emissions estimates were developed using the KNMI DOMINO v2.0 and NASA SP2 retrievals of OMI NO2 columns. Differences in the top-down NOx emissions estimates made with these two operational products derived from the same OMI radiance data were sufficiently large that they could not be used to constrain the TCEQ NOx emissions in the southeast. The fact that the two available operational NO2 column retrievals give such different top-down NOx emissions results is important because these retrievals are increasingly being used to diagnose air quality problems and to inform efforts to solve them. These results reflect the fact that NO2 column retrievals are a blend of measurements and modeled data and should be used with caution in analyses that will inform policy development. This study illustrates both benefits and challenges of using satellite NO2 data for air quality management applications. Comparison with OMI NO2 columns pointed the way toward improvements in the CAMx simulation of the upper troposphere, but further refinement of both regional air quality models and the NO2 column retrievals is needed before the mass balance and other emission inversion methods can be used to successfully constrain NOx emission inventories used in U.S. regulatory modeling.

  19. 75 FR 44214 - Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Quality Task Force AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation Service, United States Department of Agriculture. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Agricultural Air Quality Task Force (AAQTF) will meet to...

  20. Response of air stagnation frequency to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Horton, Daniel E; Harshvardhan; Diffenbaugh, Noah S

    2012-01-01

    Stagnant atmospheric conditions can lead to hazardous air quality by allowing ozone and particulate matter to accumulate and persist in the near-surface environment. By changing atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, global warming could alter the meteorological factors that regulate air stagnation frequency. We analyze the response of the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) Air Stagnation Index (ASI) to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing using global climate model projections of late-21(st) century climate change (SRES A1B scenario). Our results indicate that the atmospheric conditions over the highly populated, highly industrialized regions of the eastern United States, Mediterranean Europe, and eastern China are particularly sensitive to global warming, with the occurrence of stagnant conditions projected to increase 12-to-25% relative to late-20(th) century stagnation frequencies (3-18+ days/year). Changes in the position/strength of the polar jet, in the occurrence of light surface winds, and in the number of precipitation-free days all contribute to more frequent late-21(st) century air mass stagnation over these high-population regions. In addition, we find substantial inter-model spread in the simulated response of stagnation conditions over some regions using either native or bias corrected global climate model simulations, suggesting that changes in the atmospheric circulation and/or the distribution of precipitation represent important sources of uncertainty in the response of air quality to global warming. PMID:23284587

  1. 76 FR 69712 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... that the SAB meeting will take place November 2, 2011 at 1180 Air Force Pentagon, Rm 4E979, Washington....zuber@pentagon.af.mil . Bao-Anh Trinh, Air Force Federal Register Liaison Officer. BILLING CODE...

  2. HAER NE9A (sheet 1 of 1) Offutt Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HAER NE-9-A (sheet 1 of 1) - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Avenue between Comstat Drive & Nightwatch Avenue, Offutt Air Force Base, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  3. 75 FR 81591 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... of the Air Force. In addition, the SAB will discuss and reach a consensus on the results of the Air Force Research Laboratory Science and Technology FY11 Review. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended,...

  4. Recommendations on the use of satellite remote-sensing data for urban air quality.

    PubMed

    Engel-Cox, Jill A; Hoff, Raymond M; Haymet, A D J

    2004-11-01

    In the last 5 yr, the capabilities of earth-observing satellites and the technological tools to share and use satellite data have advanced sufficiently to consider using satellite imagery in conjunction with ground-based data for urban-scale air quality monitoring. Satellite data can add synoptic and geospatial information to ground-based air quality data and modeling. An assessment of the integrated use of ground-based and satellite data for air quality monitoring, including several short case studies, was conducted. Findings identified current U.S. satellites with potential for air quality applications, with others available internationally and several more to be launched within the next 5 yr; several of these sensors are described in this paper as illustrations. However, use of these data for air quality applications has been hindered by historical lack of collaboration between air quality and satellite scientists, difficulty accessing and understanding new data, limited resources and agency priorities to develop new techniques, ill-defined needs, and poor understanding of the potential and limitations of the data. Specialization in organizations and funding sources has limited the resources for cross-disciplinary projects. To successfully use these new data sets requires increased collaboration between organizations, streamlined access to data, and resources for project implementation. PMID:15587550

  5. Process to manufacture effervescent tablets: air forced oven melt granulation.

    PubMed

    Yanze, F M; Duru, C; Jacob, M

    2000-12-01

    In the present study we apply melt granulation in an air forced oven, called "are forced oven melt granulation" to the single-stage manufacture of effervescent granules consisting of anhydrous citric acid (43.2%) and sodium bicarbonate (56.8%) in order to make tablets. This study established that process parameters such as concentration of PEG 6000, residence time in the air forced oven, fineness of PEG 6000, fineness of the initial effervescent mix and efficiency of two lubricants markedly influenced several granule and tablet characteristics. The granules ready to be compressed into tablets were stable for 7 days at 60% RH/18 degrees C. It is a dry, simple, rapid, effective, economical, reproducible process particularly well suited to the manufacture of effervescent granules which are easily compressed into effervescent tablets. Of all the formulations tested, only formulations B2 and E2 melt granulated for 30 minutes gave tablets which had optimum compression characteristics without processing problems during compression. PMID:11189868

  6. Eielson Air Force Base OU-1 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.T.; Jarvis, T.T.; Van Houten, N.C.; Lewis, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment report is the second volume in a set of three volumes for operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The companion documents contain the Remedial Investigation and the Feasibility Study. Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) is one of several groups of hazardous waste sites located at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, Alaska. The operable units at Eielson are typically characterized by petroleum, oil, lubricant/solvent contamination, and by the presence of organics floating at the water table. In 1989 and 1990, firms under contract to the Air Force conducted field studies to gather information about the extent of chemical contamination in soil, groundwater, and soil air pore space (soil gas) at the site. This report documents the results of a baseline risk assessment, which uses the 1989 and 1991 site characterization database to quantify the potential human health risk associated with past Base industrial activities in the vicinity of OU-1. Background data collected in 1992 were also used in the preparation of this report.

  7. 33 CFR 334.700 - Choctawhatchee Bay, aerial gunnery ranges, Air Armament Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... gunnery ranges, Air Armament Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. 334.700 Section 334.700 Navigation and... Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The danger zones—(1) Aerial gunnery range in west part of Choctawhatchee Bay. The danger zone shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States as defined at 33 CFR...

  8. 33 CFR 334.700 - Choctawhatchee Bay, aerial gunnery ranges, Air Armament Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... gunnery ranges, Air Armament Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. 334.700 Section 334.700 Navigation and... Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The danger zones—(1) Aerial gunnery range in west part of Choctawhatchee Bay. The danger zone shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States as defined at 33 CFR...

  9. 78 FR 40446 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date of... Moore, Designated Federal Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950...

  10. 78 FR 75334 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... National Guard. One team will be instructed to develop a future U.S. Air Force with 65% Active Component... team will build a future U.S. Air Force with 55% Active Component and 45% Reserve Component. The third team will plan a future U.S. Air Force with 35% Active Component and 65% Reserve Component and...

  11. Evaluating Cadet Leadership Positions at the U.S. Air Force Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Didier, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force relies on effective leadership to complete its mission. The U.S. Air Force Academy exists to develop leaders of character for the Air Force through a four-year program. Part of this program involves cadets participating in leadership positions. By exploring nine types of cadet leadership positions, this dissertation aims to…

  12. 32 CFR 865.5 - Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force. 865.5 Section 865.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION AND MISSION-GENERAL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARDS Air Force Board for Correction of Military...

  13. 32 CFR 644.535 - Support in clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Support in clearance of Air Force lands. 644.535 Section 644.535 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.535 Support in clearance of Air Force lands. Where Air Force...

  14. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  15. 32 CFR 855.7 - Conditions for use of Air Force airfields.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force airfields. 855.7 Section 855.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits §...

  16. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  17. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; MacDill Air Force....768 Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. The following area is a... title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of MacDill Air Force Base,...

  18. 32 CFR 644.535 - Support in clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Support in clearance of Air Force lands. 644.535 Section 644.535 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.535 Support in clearance of Air Force lands. Where Air Force...

  19. 32 CFR 809a.9 - Conditions for use of Air Force resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force resources. 809a.9 Section 809a.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE... Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.9 Conditions for use of Air Force resources. This...

  20. 32 CFR 809a.9 - Conditions for use of Air Force resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force resources. 809a.9 Section 809a.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE... Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.9 Conditions for use of Air Force resources. This...

  1. 32 CFR 855.7 - Conditions for use of Air Force airfields.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force airfields. 855.7 Section 855.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits §...

  2. 32 CFR 865.5 - Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force. 865.5 Section 865.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION AND MISSION-GENERAL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARDS Air Force Board for Correction of Military...

  3. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  4. 32 CFR 865.5 - Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force. 865.5 Section 865.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION AND MISSION-GENERAL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARDS Air Force Board for Correction of Military...

  5. 32 CFR 855.7 - Conditions for use of Air Force airfields.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force airfields. 855.7 Section 855.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits §...

  6. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; MacDill Air Force....768 Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. The following area is a... title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of MacDill Air Force Base,...

  7. 76 FR 27003 - Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force AGENCY...: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Agricultural Air Quality Task Force (AAQTF) will meet to continue... Updates D. Federal Travel Regulations E. Air Quality Issues/Concerns from Previous Task Force...

  8. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  9. 78 FR 10127 - Request for Nominations to the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Air Quality Task Force AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation Service, United States Department of Agriculture. ACTION: Notice of Request for Nominations to the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force. SUMMARY... term on the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force (AAQTF) which was established by the...

  10. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  11. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  12. 32 CFR 644.535 - Support in clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Support in clearance of Air Force lands. 644.535 Section 644.535 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.535 Support in clearance of Air Force lands. Where Air Force...

  13. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; MacDill Air Force....768 Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. The following area is a... title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of MacDill Air Force Base,...

  14. 32 CFR 809a.9 - Conditions for use of Air Force resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force resources. 809a.9 Section 809a.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE... Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.9 Conditions for use of Air Force resources. This...

  15. 32 CFR 644.535 - Support in clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Support in clearance of Air Force lands. 644.535 Section 644.535 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.535 Support in clearance of Air Force lands. Where Air Force...

  16. 32 CFR 644.535 - Support in clearance of Air Force lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Support in clearance of Air Force lands. 644.535 Section 644.535 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL... Excess Land and Improvements § 644.535 Support in clearance of Air Force lands. Where Air Force...

  17. 32 CFR 855.7 - Conditions for use of Air Force airfields.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force airfields. 855.7 Section 855.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits §...

  18. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  19. 32 CFR 809a.9 - Conditions for use of Air Force resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force resources. 809a.9 Section 809a.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE... Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.9 Conditions for use of Air Force resources. This...

  20. 32 CFR 865.5 - Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force. 865.5 Section 865.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION AND MISSION-GENERAL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARDS Air Force Board for Correction of Military...

  1. 32 CFR 855.7 - Conditions for use of Air Force airfields.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force airfields. 855.7 Section 855.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits §...

  2. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; MacDill Air Force....768 Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. The following area is a... title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of MacDill Air Force Base,...

  3. 32 CFR 809a.9 - Conditions for use of Air Force resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conditions for use of Air Force resources. 809a.9 Section 809a.9 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE... Disturbance Intervention and Disaster Assistance § 809a.9 Conditions for use of Air Force resources. This...

  4. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  5. 32 CFR 865.5 - Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Decision of the Secretary of the Air Force. 865.5 Section 865.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE ORGANIZATION AND MISSION-GENERAL PERSONNEL REVIEW BOARDS Air Force Board for Correction of Military...

  6. 32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. 728... Guard Personnel § 728.25 Army and Air Force National Guard personnel. (a) Medical and dental care. Upon... Care) and AFR 168-6 (Persons Authorized Medical Care) to members of the Army and Air Force...

  7. 33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; MacDill Air Force....768 Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. The following area is a... title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of MacDill Air Force Base,...

  8. 33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force... River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The waters within an area... Commander, 45th Space Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, and such agencies as he/she may designate....

  9. 78 FR 61342 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place... Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense Pentagon, Room...

  10. 78 FR 43865 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date of... Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense Pentagon, Room 3A874, Washington, DC...

  11. 78 FR 53133 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date of..., Designated Federal Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

  12. 78 FR 56219 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place..., Designated Federal Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

  13. Attitudes Toward Family Enrichment and Support Programs among Air Force Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orthner, Dennis K.; Bowen, Gary L.

    1982-01-01

    Drawing upon survey data from a probability sample of 331 U.S. Air Force married couples and 101 Air Force single parents, determined the attitudes of Air Force families toward family enrichment and support programs. States implications for family programing. (Author)

  14. 75 FR 22560 - Federal Advisory Committee; U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Charter... that it is renewing the charter for the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (hereafter referred to... of science and technology relating to the Air Force mission. The Board shall: a. Provide...

  15. Why social network analysis is important to Air Force applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havig, Paul R.; McIntire, John P.; Geiselman, Eric; Mohd-Zaid, Fairul

    2012-06-01

    Social network analysis is a powerful tool used to help analysts discover relationships amongst groups of people as well as individuals. It is the mathematics behind such social networks as Facebook and MySpace. These networks alone cause a huge amount of data to be generated and the issue is only compounded once one adds in other electronic media such as e-mails and twitter. In this paper we outline the basics of social network analysis and how it may be used in current and future Air Force applications.

  16. The Air Force modular automatic test equipment (mate) maintenance concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, J.; Persans, D.; Caporale, J.

    The Air Force has developed the Modular Automatic Test Equipment (MATE) system as a disciplined approach to the definition, acquisition, and support of automatic test equipment. The system is expressed in a series of guides regarding the hardware, computer program, human factors, and documentation required to implement the considered approach. The present investigation is concerned with the facet of the guidelines which addresses the MATE maintenance concepts. Attention is given to maintenance problems in the field, a MATE system maintenance concept overview, maintenance-oriented tests, integrated diagnostics, the MATE system operational/confidence test scenario, and a MATE system optional self-test.

  17. Vandenberg Air Force Base Pressure Gradient Wind Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Warning category winds can adversely impact day-to-day space lift operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. NASA's Launch Services Program and other programs at VAFB use wind forecasts issued by the 30 Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) to determine if they need to limit activities or protect property such as a launch vehicle. The 30 OSSWF tasked the AMU to develop an automated Excel graphical user interface that includes pressure gradient thresholds between specific observing stations under different synoptic regimes to aid forecasters when issuing wind warnings. This required the AMU to determine if relationships between the variables existed.

  18. NASA Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM): Capabilities and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAfee, Julie; Culver, George; Naderi, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    NAFCOM is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. Uses cost estimating relationships (CERs) which correlate historical costs to mission characteristics to predict new project costs. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects. It is intended to be used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels and estimates development and production costs. NAFCOM is applicable to various types of missions (crewed spacecraft, uncrewed spacecraft, and launch vehicles). There are two versions of the model: a government version that is restricted and a contractor releasable version.

  19. Investigating the Effects of Non-Gravitational Force Modelling on GPS Satellite Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, E. J.; King, R. W.; Herring, T.; Ziebart, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Non-gravitational forces such as solar radiation pressure, earth radiation pressure, antenna thrust and thermal re-radiation are relatively small contributors to the overall GPS satellite orbital force budget. However, if neglected, these small non-gravitationally induced accelerations produce significant errors in satellite positions and velocities when integrated over time. For applications where centimetre level orbital accuracy is required (i.e. ppb accuracy ground positioning), these forces must be accounted for either through realistic a priori physical models and/or appropriate parameter estimation. Current GPS processing approaches typically use an approximate solar radiation pressure force, together with estimated parameters that are meant to account for non-modeled forces. These parameters often fall into the categories of scaling and sinusoidal once-per-revolution parameters. Here we investigate the effects of using more detailed physically based models of radiation forces and interaction between these models and the parameterisation of the non-modeled forces. Ideally, with a complete physical model, additional parameters are not required. Reduction of the number of empirical parameters estimated can result in large effects on the stability of the terrestrial reference frame determined with GPS. These analyses are done using an adapted version of the GAMIT processing software which includes a Fourier series model for radiation forces developed at University College London.

  20. Noise impacts from professional dog grooming forced-air dryers

    PubMed Central

    Scheifele, Peter M.; Johnson, Michael T.; Byrne, David C.; Clark, John G.; Vandlik, Ashley; Kretschmer, Laura W.; Sonstrom, Kristine E.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to measure the sound output of four commonly used brands of forced-air dryers used by dog groomers in the United States. Many dog groomers have questions about the effect of this exposure on their hearing, as well as on the hearing of the dogs that are being groomed. Readings taken from each dryer at 1 meter (the likely distance of the dryer from the groomer and the dog) showed average levels ranging from 105.5 to 108.3 dB SPL or 94.8 to 108.0 dBA. Using the 90 dBA criterion required by the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration, dog groomers/bathers are at risk if exposure to the lowest intensity dryer (94.8 dBA) exceeds 4 hours per day. If the more stringent 85 dBA criterion and 3 dB tradeoff is applied, less than one hour of exposure is permissible in an 8 hour day. Cautions are recommended for any persons exposed to noise from forced-air dryers. PMID:23117536

  1. The Impact of Physical Atmosphere on Air Quality and the Utility of Satellite Observations in Air Quality Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour Biazar, A.; McNider, R. T.; Park, Y. H.; Doty, K.; Khan, M. N.; Dornblaser, B.

    2012-12-01

    Physical atmosphere significantly impacts air quality as it regulates production, accumulation, and transport of atmospheric pollutants. Consequently, air quality simulations are greatly influenced by the uncertainties that emanates from the simulation of physical atmosphere. Since air quality model predictions are increasingly being used in health studies, regulatory applications, and policy making, reducing such uncertainties in model simulations is of outmost importance. This paper describes some of the critical aspects of physical atmosphere affecting air quality models that can be improved by utilizing satellite observations. Retrievals of skin temperature, surface albedo, surface insolation, cloud top temperature and cloud reflectance obtained from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) by NASA/MSFC GOES Product Generation System (GPGS) have been utilized to improve the air quality simulations used in the State Implementation Plan (SIP) attainment demonstrations. Satellite observations of ground temperature are used to recover surface moisture and heat capacity and thereby improving model simulation of air temperature. Observations of clouds are utilized to improve the photochemical reaction rates within the photochemical model and also to assimilate clouds in the meteorological model. These techniques have been implemented and tested in some of the widely used air quality decision modeling systems such as MM5/WRF/CMAQ/CAMx. The results from these activities show significant improvements in air quality simulations.

  2. Satellite communications experiment for the Ontario air ambulance service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterworth, John S.

    1988-01-01

    A satellite communications experiment was conducted to develop a reliable voice communications system between paramedics and doctors at certain larger medical centers. The experiment used INMARSAT's Atlantic Ocean Region satellite which provides coverage to the western border of Ontario. Forward downlink power from the satellite is in great demand, so two highly power-efficient modulation schemes were chosen for evaluation during the experiment. These were amplitude-companded single-sideband (ACSSB) and linear predictive coding in conjunction with DMSK modulation. Good performance with a signal to noise ratio of about 10 dB was demonstrated from many parts of the province with the evevation angle to the satellite ranging from five to twenty degrees and with the aircraft both in-flight and on the runway.

  3. Satellite communications experiment for the Ontario air ambulance service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, John S.

    1988-05-01

    A satellite communications experiment was conducted to develop a reliable voice communications system between paramedics and doctors at certain larger medical centers. The experiment used INMARSAT's Atlantic Ocean Region satellite which provides coverage to the western border of Ontario. Forward downlink power from the satellite is in great demand, so two highly power-efficient modulation schemes were chosen for evaluation during the experiment. These were amplitude-companded single-sideband (ACSSB) and linear predictive coding in conjunction with DMSK modulation. Good performance with a signal to noise ratio of about 10 dB was demonstrated from many parts of the province with the evevation angle to the satellite ranging from five to twenty degrees and with the aircraft both in-flight and on the runway.

  4. A Study of the Inclination of Satellites of a Planet After Spin Axis Forced Tumbling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldrin, Luiz Augusto; Winter, O.; Vieira Neto, E.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In order to analyze the theory of satellite loss resulting from a giant impact on Uranus, we decided to do few a study about this problem using forced tumbling of the spin axis of planet. We used two different kinds of forced tumbling to simulate the obliquity variation: linear variation and damped variation. To do this, we made numerical simulations of N-body problem with J2 oblateness coefficient of the central body. First, we studied the relation of the time tumbling of Uranus' spin axis and the semi-major axis of the hypothetical satellite with a specific final inclination. In both cases the results are a power law. Later we study the final inclination of the satellite in relation to the number of collisions (pseudo collision). And finally we studied the final inclination of several different initial conditions (orbital elements) of the satellites. We concluded that the initial inclination and initial longitude of ascending node are important to the final satellite inclination. For future studies we want implement a more realistic model using the attitude equations of the central body and study the origin of the obliquity of the others planets of the solar system. Aknowledments: FAPESP, CAPES and CNPq.

  5. Tropospheric Aerosol Climate Forcing in Clear-Sky Satellite Observations over the Oceans.

    PubMed

    Haywood; Ramaswamy; Soden

    1999-02-26

    Tropospheric aerosols affect the radiative forcing of Earth's climate, but their variable concentrations complicate an understanding of their global influence. Model-based estimates of aerosol distributions helped reveal spatial patterns indicative of the presence of tropospheric aerosols in the satellite-observed clear-sky solar radiation budget over the world's oceans. The results show that, although geographical signatures due to both natural and anthropogenic aerosols are manifest in the satellite observations, the naturally occurring sea-salt is the leading aerosol contributor to the global-mean clear-sky radiation balance over oceans. PMID:10037595

  6. Air compliance through pollution prevention at Air Force Materiel Command facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Kolpa, R.; Ryckman, S.J. Jr.; Smith, A.E.

    1999-03-19

    Options for air compliance through pollution prevention (P2) have been identified at 14 facilities of the US Air Force Materiel Command, ranging from depots with significant light industrial activity to laboratories. Previous P2 efforts concentrated on reducing hazardous and solid wastes, with any reduction in air impacts generally being a collateral benefit. This work focused on reducing air emissions and air compliance vulnerabilities. P2 options were identified in three stages. First, potentially applicable P2 options were identified from Internet and published information. Attention was given to identifying the types of sources to which an option could be applied, the option's state of development, and constraints that could limit its application. Traditional P2 options involving technology or equipment changes and material substitution were considered. In addition, newer approaches based on administrative ''controls'' were considered. These included inserting P2 into operating permits in exchange for administrative relief, privatization, derating boilers, and reducing an installation's potential to emit and compliance vulnerability by separating sources not under the Air Force's ''common control.'' Next, criteria and toxic emissions inventories by source category were prepared from inventory data supplied by facilities. The major problems at this stage were differences in the levels of detail provided by facilities and in the categories used by different installations. Emitting categories were matched to P2 option categories to identify candidate options. Candidates were screened to account for local regulations and technical information about sources in the inventories. When possible, emission reductions were estimated to help facility personnel prioritize options. Some options identified are being actively pursued by facilities to determine their site-specific feasibility. Although much work has been done to implement material substitution programs, this

  7. Rome Air Development Center Air Force technical objective document fiscal year 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-12-01

    This TOD describes the RADC technical programs in support of the Air Force Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence (C3I) mission. The technical objectives have been aligned with the VANGUARD mission areas of Command, Control, and Communications (C3), Reconnaissance and Intelligence, Strategic Systems (Defense) and Technology as a means of focusing the RADC support of VANGUARD. This document is prepared to provide industry and universities with the midterm technical objectives in these areas.

  8. Laser-communication cooperative research and development agreement between Air Force Phillips Lab and Ball Aerospace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begley, David L.; Kehr, Robert L.; Sarto, Anthony W.; Casey, William; Coffelt, Everett L.; Goodrich, Alan; Thompson, William E.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of a cooperative research and development program between Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. and the Air Force Phillips Laboratory for laser communications. This effort employs hardware and equipment originally developed to support the crosslinking between geostationary Defense Support Program surveillance satellites. This joint activity modifies the existing hardware for ground based demonstrations and simulations focuses at risk reduction for future applications and technology insertion into operational architectures meeting future commercial, civil, and DOD communications requirements. The ultimate goal of the program is to produce hardware for a near term flight demonstration. A brief overview of the capabilities of the existing hardware will be presented followed by a status of the development efforts and future plans.

  9. A Strategy to Assess Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing of Climate Using Satellite Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have a complex internal chemical composition and optical properties. Therefore it is difficult to model their impact on redistribution and absorption of solar radiation, and the consequent impact on atmospheric dynamics and climate. The use in climate models of isolated aerosol parameters retrieved from satellite data (e.g. optical thickness) may result in inconsistent calculations, if the model assumptions differ from these of the satellite retrieval schemes. Here we suggest a strategy to assess the direct impact of aerosol on the radiation budget at the top and bottom of the atmosphere using satellite and ground based measurements of the spectral solar radiation scattered by the aerosol. This method ensures consistent use of the satellite data and increases its accuracy. For Kaufman and Tanre: Strategy for aerosol direct forcing anthropogenic aerosol in the fine mode (e.g. biomass burning smoke and urban pollution) consistent use of satellite derived optical thickness can yield the aerosol impact on the spectral solar flux with accuracy an order of magnitude better than the optical thickness itself. For example, a simulated monthly average smoke optical thickness of 0.5 at 0.55 microns (forcing of 40-50 W/sq m) derived with an error of 20%, while the forcing can be measured directly with an error of only 0-2 W/sq m. Another example, the effect of large dust particles on reflection of solar flux can be derived three times better than retrievals of optical thickness. Since aerosol impacts not only the top of the atmosphere but also the surface irradiation, a combination of satellite and ground based measurements of the spectral flux, can be the most direct mechanism to evaluate the aerosol effect on climate and assimilate it in climate models. The strategy is applied to measurements from SCAR-B and the Tarfox experiments. In SCAR-B aircraft spectral data are used to derive the 24 hour radiative forcing of smoke at the top of the atmosphere of

  10. A flight investigation of oscillating air forces: Equipment and technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III

    1975-01-01

    The equipment and techniques are described which are to be used in a project aimed at measuring oscillating air forces and dynamic aeroelastic response of a swept wing airplane at high subsonic speeds. Electro-hydraulic inertia type shakers installed in the wing tips will excite various elastic airplane modes while the related oscillating chordwise pressures at two spanwise wing stations and the wing mode shapes are recorded on magnetic tape. The data reduction technique, following the principle of a wattmeter harmonic analyzer employed by Bratt, Wight, and Tilly, utilizes magnetic tape and high speed electronic multipliers to record directly the real and imaginary components of oscillatory data signals relative to a simple harmonic reference signal. Through an extension of this technique an automatic flight-flutter-test data analyzer is suggested in which vector plots of mechanical admittance or impedance would be plotted during the flight test.

  11. Robins Air Force Base solar cogeneration facility, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    A conceptual design and cost estimate for a demonstration solar facility to generate electricity and deliver process steam to the existing base distribution systems is considered. The solar energy system is a central receiver arrangement. The technical approach to the project and the rationale for selecting the site at Robins Air Force Base are discussed. The evaluation of alternative configurations considered to have potential for improving the facility value is summarized. The solar facility is described, including system level functional requirements, design, operation, performance, cost, safety, environmental, institutional, and regulatory considerations. The design, functional requirements and operating characteristics which influence cost or performance for each subsystem are described. The subsystems are the collector, receiver/tower, master control, electric power generation, and facility steam and feedwater subsystems.

  12. High performance target measurement flights from Vandenberg Air Force Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalfant, C. P.; Rosen, H.; Jerger, J. H.

    A description is presented of a new launch facility which is being prepared for the High Performance Target Measurement (HPTEM) booster at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). A deactivated Atlas launch complex is currently being modified to allow the rocket to be launched from a semisilo. The underground launch operations building will contain a new control center and instrumentation room. Attention is given to the Multi-Spectral Measurement Program (MSMP), details concerning the launch facility, and a target and flight safety trajectory analysis. Construction and modification of the facility is scheduled to be completed in mid-1983. The first HPTEM launch is planned to occur in April 1984. The HPTEM launch facility can also be utilized to launch Aries I (single stage) and Aries II (two-stage) probes with minor modification.

  13. STS-92 - Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    With its drag parachute deployed to help slow it down, the Space Shuttle Discovery rolls down the runway after landing at Edwards Air Force Base in Southern California at the conclusion of mission STS-92 on October 24, 2000. STS-92 was the 100th mission since the fleet of four Space Shuttles began flying in 1981. (Due to schedule changes, missions are not always launched in the order that was originally planned.) The almost 13-day mission, the 46th Shuttle mission to land at Edwards, was the last construction mission for the International Space Station prior to the first scientists taking up residency in the orbiting space laboratory the following month. The seven-member crew on STS-92 included mission specialists Koichi Wakata, Michael Lopez-Alegria, Jeff Wisoff, Bill McArthur and Leroy Chiao, pilot Pam Melroy and mission commander Brian Duffy.

  14. Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Air Force facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, David F.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program is an initiative within the US Air Force to acquire and validate advanced technologies that could be used to sustain superior capabilities in the area or space nuclear propulsion. The SNTP Program has a specific objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept. The term PIPET refers to a project within the SNTP Program responsible for the design, development, construction, and operation of a test reactor facility, including all support systems, that is intended to resolve program technology issues and test goals. A nuclear test facility has been designed that meets SNTP Facility requirements. The design approach taken to meet SNTP requirements has resulted in a nuclear test facility that should encompass a wide range of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) test requirements that may be generated within other programs. The SNTP PIPET project is actively working with DOE and NASA to assess this possibility.

  15. A Satellite-Based Multi-Pollutant Index of Global Air Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Mathew J.; Martin, Randall V.; vanDonkelaar, Aaron; Lamsal, Lok; Brauer, Michael; Brook, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution is a major health hazard that is responsible formillions of annual excess deaths worldwide. Simpleindicators are useful for comparative studies and to asses strends over time. The development of global indicators hasbeen impeded by the lack of ground-based observations in vast regions of the world. Recognition is growing of the need for amultipollutant approach to air quality to better represent human exposure. Here we introduce the prospect of amultipollutant air quality indicator based on observations from satellite remote sensing.

  16. The FUSE satellite is moved to a payload attach fitting in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    While a crane lifts NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite, workers at Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, help guide it toward the circular Payload Attach Fitting (PAF) in front of it. FUSE is undergoing a functional test of its systems, plus installation of flight batteries and solar arrays. Developed by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe - hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. FUSE is scheduled to be launched May 27 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket at Launch Complex 17.

  17. The FUSE satellite is moved to a payload attach fitting in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Suspended by a crane in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite is lowered onto a circular Payload Attach Fitting (PAF). FUSE is undergoing a functional test of its systems, plus installation of flight batteries and solar arrays. Developed by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe - hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. FUSE is scheduled to be launched May 27 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket at Launch Complex 17.

  18. The FUSE satellite is moved to a payload attach fitting in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers at Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, maneuver an overhead crane toward NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite standing between vertical workstands. The crane will lift FUSE to move it onto the Payload Attach Fitting (PAF) in front of it. FUSE is undergoing a functional test of its systems, plus installation of flight batteries and solar arrays. Developed by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe - hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. FUSE is scheduled to be launched May 27 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket at Launch Complex 17.

  19. Estimation Accuracy of air Temperature and Water Vapor Amount Above Vegetation Canopy Using MODIS Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomosada, M.

    2005-12-01

    Estimation accuracy of the air temperature and water vapor amount above vegetation canopy using MODIS satellite data is indicated at AGU fall meeting. The air temperature and water vapor amount which are satisfied the multilayer energy budget model from the ground surface to the atmosphere are estimated. Energy budget models are described the fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat exchange for the ground surface and the vegetated surface. Used MODIS satellite data is the vegetated surface albedo which is calculated from visible and near infrared band data, the vegetated surface temperature, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), LAI (Leaf Area Index). Estimation accuracy of air temperature and water vapor amount above vegetation canopy is evaluated comparing with the value which is measured on a flux research tower in Tomakomai northern forest of Japan. Meteorological parameters such as temperature, wind speed, water vapor amount, global solar radiation are measured on a flux tower from the ground to atmosphere. Well, MODIS satellite observes at day and night, and it snows in Tomakomai in winter. Therefore, estimation accuracy is evaluated dividing on at daytime, night, snowfall day, and not snowfall day. There is the investigation of the undeveloped region such as dense forest and sea in one of feature of satellite observation. Since there is almost no meteorological observatory at the undeveloped region so far, it is hard to get the meteorological parameters. Besides, it is the one of the subject of satellite observation to get the amount of physical parameter. Although the amount of physical parameter such as surface temperature and concentration of chlorophyll-a are estimated by satellite, air temperature and amount of water vapor above vegetation canopy have not been estimated by satellite. Therefore, the estimation of air temperature and water vapor amount above vegetation canopy using satellite data is significant. Further, a highly accurate

  20. Global measurements of air pollution from satellites. [employing radiometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. L.; Bartle, E. R.; Griggs, M.; Hall, G. D.; Hesketh, W. D.; Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reichle, H.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual design of an FOV nadir radiometer was examined for its applicability to monitoring the radiation process in the atmosphere as it relates to aerosol behavior. The instrument employs a gas filter correlation technique and is suitable for transportation onboard satellite.

  1. Satellite measurements of large-scale air pollution - Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Fraser, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for deriving large-scale pollution parameters from NIR and visible satellite remote-sensing images obtained over land or water is described and demonstrated on AVHRR images. The method is based on comparison of the upward radiances on clear and hazy days and permits simultaneous determination of aerosol optical thickness with error Delta tau(a) = 0.08-0.15, particle size with error + or - 100-200 nm, and single-scattering albedo with error + or - 0.03 (for albedos near 1), all assuming accurate and stable satellite calibration and stable surface reflectance between the clear and hazy days. In the analysis of AVHRR images of smoke from a forest fire, good agreement was obtained between satellite and ground-based (sun-photometer) measurements of aerosol optical thickness, but the satellite particle sizes were systematically greater than those measured from the ground. The AVHRR single-scattering albedo agreed well with a Landsat albedo for the same smoke.

  2. 78 FR 22852 - Establishment of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-17

    ... U.S.C. 552b), and 41 CFR 102-3.50(a), the Department of Defense gives notice that it is establishing... regular members of the Air Force to provide a base of trained personnel from which the personnel of the reserve components of the Air Force could be recruited; e. Maintains a peacetime rotation force to...

  3. 77 FR 41165 - Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force AGENCY... Agriculture (USDA), Agricultural Air Quality Task Force (AAQTF) will meet to continue discussions on critical... for Task Force Anaerobic Digester Technologies Odor Management Technologies Committee Updates E....

  4. Why Is Outdoor Recreation Worth $30 Million to the Air Force?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heeg, Phillip

    The Air Force outdoor recreation program evolved from the Army "rest and recreation" areas set up during World War II. During the last decade, financial pressures and eroding support for recreation programs forced a reexamination of the objectives of such programs. Starting with the premise that the Air Force was the main customer and that…

  5. Coupling Satellite and Ground-Based Instruments to Map Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, Robert J.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Hostetler, Chris (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols is a significant but highly uncertain factor in global climate change. Only satellites can offer the global coverage essential to reducing this uncertainty; however, satellite measurements must be coupled with correlative, in situ measurements both to constrain the aerosol optical properties required in satellite retrieval algorithms and to provide chemical identification of aerosol sources. This grant funded the first two years of a three-year project which seeks to develop methodologies for combining spaceborne lidar with in-situ aerosol data sets to improve estimates of direct aerosol climate forcing. Progress under this two-year grant consisted in the development and deployment of a new in-situ capability for measuring aerosol 180' backscatter and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio. This new measurement capacity allows definitive lidar/in-situ comparisons and improves our ability to interpret lidar data in terms of climatically relevant quantities such as the extinction coefficient and optical depth. Measurements were made along the coast of Washington State, in Central Illinois, over the Indian Ocean, and in the Central Pacific. Thus, this research, combined with previous measurements by others, is rapidly building toward a global data set of extinction-to-backscatter ratio for key aerosol types. Such information will be critical to interpreting lidar data from the upcoming PICASSO-CENA, or P-C, satellite mission. Another aspect of this project is to investigate innovative ways to couple the lidar-satellite signal with targeted in-situ measurements toward a direct determination of aerosol forcing. This aspect is progressing in collaboration with NASA Langley's P-C lidar simulator and radiative transfer modeling by the University of Lille, France.

  6. Coupling Satellite and Ground-Based Instruments to Map Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charlson, Robert J.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Hostetler, Chris (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols is a significant but highly uncertain factor in global climate change. Only satellites can offer the global coverage essential to reducing this uncertainty; however, satellite measurements must be coupled with correlative, in situ measurements both to constrain the aerosol optical properties required in satellite retrieval algorithms and to provide chemical identification of aerosol sources. This grant funded the third year of a three-year project which seeks to develop methodologies for combining spaceborne lidar with in-situ aerosol data sets to improve estimates of direct aerosol climate forcing. Progress under this one-year grant consisted in analysis and publication of field studies using a new in-situ capability for measuring aerosol 180 deg backscatter and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio. This new measurement capacity allows definitive lidar/in-situ comparisons and improves our ability to interpret lidar data in terms of climatically relevant quantities such as the extinction coefficient and optical depth. Analyzed data consisted of measurements made along the coast of Washington State, in Central Illinois, over the Indian Ocean, and in the Central Pacific. Thus, this research, combined with previous measurements by others, is rapidly building toward a global data set of extinction-to-backscatter ratio for key aerosol types. Such information will be critical to interpreting lidar data from the upcoming PICASSO-CENA, or P-C, satellite mission. Another aspect of this project is to investigate innovative ways to couple the lidar-satellite signal with target in-situ measurements toward a direct determination of aerosol forcing. This aspect is progressing in collaboration with NASA Langley's P-C lidar simulator.

  7. Integrated Training System for Air Force On-the-Job Training: Specification Development. Final Technical Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Stuart B.; And Others.

    The Air Force conducted this study for two purposes: (1) to define the system of Air Force On-the-Job Training (OJT); and (2) to prepare a set of functional specifications for an integrated, base-level OJT evaluation and management system with linkages to the Major Commands and Air Staff. The study was conducted in four phases. During the first…

  8. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  9. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  10. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  11. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  12. 32 CFR 644.475 - Excessing Army military and Air Force property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Excessing Army military and Air Force property... the Related Land) § 644.475 Excessing Army military and Air Force property. The procedures for placing... commander concerned is required. When, under AFR 87-4, the responsible DE is called upon by the Air...

  13. IMPROVING NATIONAL AIR QUALITY FORECASTS WITH SATELLITE AEROSOL OBSERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality forecasts for major US metropolitan areas have been provided to the public through a partnership between the US Environmental Protection Agency and state and local air agencies since 1997. Recent years have witnessed improvement in forecast skill and expansion of fore...

  14. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning Using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna A.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  15. First Estimates of the Radiative Forcing of Aerosols Generated from Biomass Burning using Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chistopher, Sundar A.; Kliche, Donna V.; Chou, Joyce; Welch, Ronald M.

    1996-01-01

    Collocated measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) scanner are used to examine the radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols generated from biomass burning for 13 images in South America. Using the AVHRR, Local Area Coverage (LAC) data, a new technique based on a combination of spectral and textural measures is developed for detecting these aerosols. Then, the instantaneous shortwave, longwave, and net radiative forcing values are computed from the ERBE instantaneous scanner data. Results for the selected samples from 13 images show that the mean instantaneous net radiative forcing for areas with heavy aerosol loading is about -36 W/sq m and that for the optically thin aerosols are about -16 W/sq m. These results, although preliminary, provide the first estimates of radiative forcing of atmospheric aerosols from biomass burning using satellite data.

  16. Assessing the Value of Enhancing AirNow Data with NASA Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, A. N.; Burke, B.; Huang, S.; Dye, T.; Dawes, S. S.; DeWinter, J. L.; Zahn, P. H.; Haderman, M.; Szykman, J.; White, J. E.; Dickerson, P.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    We will describe the methodology and findings from a study that addressed how satellite-enhanced air quality information provided through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) AirNow Satellite Data Processor (ASDP) program could contribute to greater socioeconomic benefits. This study was funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and conducted, in partnership with the EPA, by the Center for Technology in Government at the University at Albany (CTG) and Sonoma Technology, Inc. (STI). AirNow is the national repository of real-time air quality data and forecasts for the United States. While mainly a public outreach and awareness tool, AirNow relies on the same network of ground-based air quality monitors that is used by federal, state, local, and tribal governments throughout the United States. Extensive as the monitoring network is, considerable gaps exist in certain parts of the United States. Even areas with monitors considered adequate for regulatory purposes can lack information needed to resolve localized air quality issues or give forecasters sufficient confidence about the potential air quality impact of specific events. Monitors are expensive to deploy and maintain; thus, EPA is seeking other ways to improve coverage and detail. Satellite-estimated data can provide information for many places where ground monitors do not exist, and supplement ground monitors, providing additional information for use in analysis and forecasting. ASDP uses satellite-derived estimates for fine-particle pollution (PM2.5) and provides coverage for a small window of time during the day. As satellite capabilities improve in terms of different types of sensors and increased coverage throughout the day, the ASDP program is prepared to extend its scope to additional pollutants and provide greater enhancements to the ground-based networks. In this study, CTG assessed the socioeconomic benefits of air quality data at a community level through three

  17. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  18. Starfleet Deferred: Project Orion in the 1962 Air Force Space Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziarnick, B.

    Project Orion, the Cold War American program (1957-1965) studying nuclear pulse propulsion for space applications, has long interested space enthusiasts for what it was and what it might have been, but it has long been believed that neither the United States government nor the US Air Force took the program very seriously. However, recently declassified US Air Force documents shed more light on the classified history of Project Orion. Far from being ignored by Air Force leadership, through the efforts of the Strategic Air Command, Air Force leaders like General Curtis LeMay were convinced that Project Orion should be funded as a major weapons system. The high water mark of Project Orion was the 1962 Air Force Space Program proposal by the Air Force Chief of Staff to devote almost twenty percent of the Air Force space budget from 1962-1967 to Orion development before the program was cancelled by the civilian Secretary of the Air Force under pressure from the Department of Defense. This paper details the history of Project Orion in the 1962 Air Force Space Program proposal, and concludes with a few lessons learned for use by modern interstellar advocates.

  19. A graphics approach in the design of the dual air density Explorer satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    A computer program was developed to generate a graphics display of the Dual Air Density (DAD) Explorer satellites which aids in the engineering and scientific design. The program displays a two-dimensional view of both spacecraft and their surface features from any direction. The graphics have been an indispensable tool in the design, analysis, and understanding of the critical locations of the various surface features for both satellites.

  20. 32 CFR 903.6 - Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reassignment of Air Force members to become... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS AIR FORCE ACADEMY PREPARATORY SCHOOL § 903.6 Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school....

  1. 32 CFR 903.6 - Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reassignment of Air Force members to become... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS AIR FORCE ACADEMY PREPARATORY SCHOOL § 903.6 Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school....

  2. 32 CFR 903.6 - Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reassignment of Air Force members to become... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS AIR FORCE ACADEMY PREPARATORY SCHOOL § 903.6 Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school....

  3. 32 CFR 903.6 - Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reassignment of Air Force members to become... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS AIR FORCE ACADEMY PREPARATORY SCHOOL § 903.6 Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school....

  4. 32 CFR 903.6 - Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reassignment of Air Force members to become... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS AIR FORCE ACADEMY PREPARATORY SCHOOL § 903.6 Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school....

  5. 77 FR 33202 - Notice To Extend Public Comment Period for United States Air Force Modernizations and Enhancement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Department of the Air Force Notice To Extend Public Comment Period for United States Air Force Modernizations... Alaska Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: The United States Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Notification of extension of public comment period. SUMMARY: Alaskan Command (ALCOM), on behalf of the U.S. Air Force and...

  6. 77 FR 30509 - Notice To Extend Public Comment Period for United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Department of the Air Force Notice To Extend Public Comment Period for United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: The United States Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Notification of Extension of Public Comment Period. SUMMARY: The U.S. Air Force is issuing this notice...

  7. Signatures of semi-direct radiative forcing by absorbing aerosols in satellite observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, E. M.; Hosseinpour, F.; Colarco, P. R.

    2014-12-01

    Semi-direct radiative forcing of climate occurs when interactions between aerosols and radiative fluxes in the atmosphere yield a dynamical response in clouds. Semi-direct forcing is typically thought to be a positive radiative forcing whereby soot and biomass burning aerosols absorb sunlight and burn-off clouds. However, a negative semi-direct forcing is suspected in at least two regimes, the summertime Southeast Atlantic Ocean and the wintertime North Indian Ocean, where the heating profile by aerosol absorption by solar radiation is elevated above the elevation of the low clouds. Here we use a combination of satellite data and a model simulation to further characterize the signature of semi-direct radiative forcing in these two locations and elsewhere on the globe. We apply CERES albedos, Calipso profiles of aerosol extinction and cloud-top altitude, and a simulation with the Goddard Earth Observing System Model version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth system model with meteorology constrained by MERRA and an assimilation of MODIS AOT (MERRAero). to quantify the vertical heating profile by aerosols under clear and cloudy skies. We seek to determine: (1) where aerosol heating by soot and biomass burning aerosol is occurring; (2) where vertically in the column the heating is occurring relative to the observed level of low cloud development; and (3) whether the variations of albedo with aerosol forcing suggest a positive, negative, or inconclusive semi-direct radiative forcing.

  8. 78 FR 46928 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... peacetime rotation force to support operational tempo goals of 1:2 for regular members of the Air Forces and... statement in writing and submit with their registration. The Commission's staff will assign time to...

  9. IMT-2000 Satellite Standards with Applications to Mobile Air Traffic Communications Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamma, Mohammed A.

    2004-01-01

    The International Mobile Telecommunications - 2000 (IMT-2000) standard and more specifically the Satellite component of it, is investigated as a potential alternative for communications to aircraft mobile users en-route and in terminal area. Its application to Air Traffic Management (ATM) communication needs is considered. A summary of the specifications of IMT-2000 satellite standards are outlined. It is shown via a system research analysis that it is possible to support most air traffic communication needs via an IMT-2000 infrastructure. This technology can compliment existing, or future digital aeronautical communications technologies such as VDL2, VDL3, Mode S, and UAT.

  10. Satellite-aided evaluation of population exposure to air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, W. J.; George, A. J., Jr.; Bryant, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation of population exposure to air pollution through the computer processing of Landsat digital land use data, along with total suspended particulate estimates and population data by census tracts, is demonstrated. Digital image processing was employed to analyze simultaneously data from Landsat MSS bands 4 through 7 in order to extract land use and land cover information. The three data sets were spatially registered in a digital format, compatible with integrated computer processing, and cross-tabulated. A map illustrating relative air quality by 2-sq km cells for the residential population in the Portland, Oregon area is obtained.

  11. Air Force space power technology development at the Phillips research site

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, K.; Radzykewycz, D.; James, W.R.; Donet, C.; Mayberry, C.

    1998-07-01

    the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) have the potential to increase EPS specific power to 10 W/kg by FY2000 and 13 W/kg by FY2005. Examples of these technologies include multijunction solar cells with up to 1/3 higher efficiency of state-of-the-art (SOA) GaAs and GaInP2/GaAs/Ge cells, energy storage batteries and flywheels with three times the energy density of SOA batteries, high efficiency power electronics that reduce thermal control loads, and a solar thermal system with integrated (non-photovoltaic) energy generation and (non-electrochemical) energy storage.

  12. Vegetation studies on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzer, Paul A.; Hickson, Diana E.; Hinkle, C. Ross

    1988-01-01

    Vandenburg Air Force Base, located in coastal central California with an area of 98,400 ac, contains resources of considerable biological significance. Available information on the vegetation and flora of Vandenburg is summarized and new data collected in this project are presented. A bibliography of 621 references dealing with vegetation and related topics related to Vanderburg was compiled from computer and manual literature searches and a review of past studies of the base. A preliminary floristic list of 642 taxa representing 311 genera and 80 families was compiled from past studies and plants identified in the vegetation sampling conducted in this project. Fifty-two special interest plant species are known to occur or were suggested to occur. Vegetation was sampled using permanent plots and transects in all major plant communities including chaparral, Bishop pine forest, tanbark oak forest, annual grassland, oak woodland, coastal sage scrub, purple sage scrub, coastal dune scrub, coastal dunes, box elder riparian woodland, will riparian woodland, freshwater marsh, salt marsh, and seasonal wetlands. Comparison of the new vegetation data to the compostie San Diego State University data does not indicate major changes in most communities since the original study. Recommendations are made for additional studies needed to maintain and extend the environmental data base and for management actions to improve resource protection.

  13. Sitewide feasibility study Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Last, G.V.; Lanigan, D.C.; Josephson, G.B.; Bagaasen, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    The Sitewide Feasibility Study (FS) is required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for Eielson Air Force Base (AFB). It is based on findings presented in the Sitewide Remedial Investigation (RI) Report (USAF 1995a), and the Sitewide Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) Report (USAF 1995b). Under the FFA, 64 potential source areas were placed in one of six operable units, based on similar contaminant and environmental characteristics, or were included for evaluation under a Source Evaluation Report (SER). The sitewide RI was directed at contamination that was not confined to an operable unit (OU) or SER source area. The objectives of the sitewide RI were to: Provide information about site characteristics to support individual OU RI/FS efforts and the sitewide RI/FS, including site hydrogeology and determination of background soil and groundwater characteristics; identify and characterize contamination that is not confined or attributable to a specific source area through sitewide monitoring of groundwater and surface water; evaluate cumulative risks to human health and the environment from contamination on a sitewide basis; and provide a mechanism for continued cohesive sitewide monitoring.

  14. Review of wildlife resources of Vandenberg Air Force Base, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, David R.

    1989-01-01

    Wildlife resources are reviewed for purposes of developing a Base Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in Santa Barbara County, California. The review and recommendations were prepared by review of applicable scientific literature and environmental documents for VAFB, discussing information needs with natural resource management professionals at VAFB, and observations of base field conditions. This process found that there are 29 federally listed vertebrates (endangered, threatened, or Category 2) that occur or may occur in the vicinity of VAFB. There are also 63 other state listed or regionally declining species that may occur in the vicinity of VAFB. Habitats of VAFB represent a very valuable environmental resource for rare and declining wildlife in California. However, little information is available on VAFB wildlife resources other than lists of species that occur or are expected to occur. Recommendations are presented to initiate a long-term wildlife monitoring program at VAFB to provide information for environmental impact assessment and wise land use planning.

  15. Seasonal variation of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing over the globe derived from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Shashi K.; Staylor, W. Frank; Darnell, Wayne L.; Wilber, Anne C.; Ritchey, Nancy A.

    1993-01-01

    Global distributions of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing parameters have been derived using parameterized radiation models with satellite meteorological data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, and directly measured top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Specifically, shortwave, longwave, and total cloud forcing at the surface, and column-averaged values of longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere were derived for the midseasonal months of April, July, and October 1985 and January 1986, covering a complete annual cycle. Seasonal variability is illustrated by comparing the results for July 1985 and January 1986, which represent the seasonal extremes. Surface shortwave cloud forcing is always negative, representing a cooling of the surface, with strongest cooling (-120 to -180 W/sq m) occurring over midlatitude storm tracks of the summer hemisphere. Surface longwave cloud forcing is always positive, representing a warming of the surface, with strongest warming (60 to 75 W/sq m) occurring over storm tracks of the winter hemisphere. Zonal averages show the entire summer hemisphere dominated by shortwave cooling, the middle and high latitudes of the winter hemisphere dominated by longwave warming, and a broad zone of transition in between. The globally averaged total cloud forcing amounts to a cooling throughout the year, ranging from a low of about -12 W/sq m for July 1985 to a high of about -25 W/sq m for January 1986. The longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere shows a strong warming over deep convective regions in the tropics and a moderate cooling outside the tropics, amounting to a weak cooling (-2 to -5 W/sq m) in the global average. Comparisons of the results with general circulation model simulations show broad qualitative agreement regarding the locations of prominent warming and cooling regions. Quantitative comparisons, on the other hand, show significant differences between the

  16. Laser Geodynamics Satellite I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The LAGEOS I (Laser Geodynamics Satellite) was developed and launched by the Marshall Space Flight Center on May 4, 1976 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California . The two-foot diameter satellite orbited the Earth from pole to pole and measured the movements of the Earth's surface.

  17. Evaluation of the AirNow Satellite Data Processor for 2010-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, A. N.; DeWinter, J. L.; Dye, T.; Haderman, M.; Zahn, P. H.; Szykman, J.; White, J. E.; Dickerson, P.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) AirNow program provides the public with real-time and forecasted air quality conditions. Millions of people each day use information from AirNow to protect their health. The AirNow program (http://www.airnow.gov) reports ground-level ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) with a standardized index called the Air Quality Index (AQI). AirNow aggregates information from over 130 state, local, and federal air quality agencies and provides tools for over 2,000 agency staff responsible for monitoring, forecasting, and communicating local air quality. Each hour, AirNow systems generate thousands of maps and products. The usefulness of the AirNow air quality maps depends on the accuracy and spatial coverage of air quality measurements. Currently, the maps use only ground-based measurements, which have significant gaps in coverage in some parts of the United States. As a result, contoured AQI levels have high uncertainty in regions far from monitors. To improve the usefulness of air quality maps, scientists at EPA, Dalhousie University, and Sonoma Technology, Inc., in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), have completed a project to incorporate satellite-estimated surface PM2.5 concentrations into the maps via the AirNow Satellite Data Processor (ASDP). These satellite estimates are derived using NASA/NOAA satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals and GEOS-Chem modeled ratios of surface PM2.5 concentrations to AOD. GEOS-Chem is a three-dimensional chemical transport model for atmospheric composition driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS). The ASDP can fuse multiple PM2.5 concentration data sets to generate AQI maps with improved spatial coverage. The goals of ASDP are to provide more detailed AQI information in monitor-sparse locations and to augment monitor

  18. Mantle rheology and satellite signatures from present-day glacial forcings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabadini, Roberto; Yuen, David A.; Gasperini, Paolo

    1988-01-01

    Changes in the long-wavelength region of the earth's gravity field resulting from both present-day glacial discharges and the possible growth of the Antarctic ice sheet are considered. Significant differences in the responses between the Maxell and Burger body rheologies are found for time spans of less than 100 years. The quantitative model for predicting the secular variations of the gravitational potential, and means for incorporating glacial forcings, are described. Results are given for the excitation of the degree two harmonics. It is suggested that detailed satellite monitoring of present-day ice movements in conjunction with geodetic satellite missions may provide a reasonable alternative for the esimation of deep mantle viscosity.

  19. Estimation of daily mean air temperature from satellite derived radiometric data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, D.

    1976-01-01

    The Screwworm Eradication Data System (SEDS) at JSC utilizes satellite derived estimates of daily mean air temperature (DMAT) to monitor the effect of temperature on screwworm populations. The performance of the SEDS screwworm growth potential predictions depends in large part upon the accuracy of the DMAT estimates.

  20. Global Carbon Monoxide Products from Combined AIRS, TES and MLS Measurements on A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Juying X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attie, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background modelbased field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  1. The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test: Validity, Fairness, and Bias. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardison, Chaitra M.; Sims, Carra S.; Wong, Eunice C.

    2010-01-01

    The Air Force has long recognized the importance of selecting the most qualified officers possible. For more than 60 years, it has relied on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) as one measure of those qualifications. A variety of concerns have been raised about whether the AFOQT is biased, too expensive, or even valid for predicting…

  2. 33 CFR 334.744 - Eglin Poquito Housing at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. 334.744 Section 334.744 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.744 Eglin Poquito Housing at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States, as defined at 33 CFR part...

  3. 78 FR 51175 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date of... 5:00 p.m. Registration will begin at 8:00 a.m. ADDRESSES: 2521 South Clark Street Suite 200,...

  4. 78 FR 58525 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... closed meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will..., September 26, 2013, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. ADDRESSES: 2521 South Clark Street, Suite 525, Crystal...

  5. 78 FR 32634 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission''), to include a closed... Street, Suite 525, Crystal City, VA 22202. Address of Open Meeting: Rayburn House Office Building,...

  6. 78 FR 46329 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... Office of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date of...:00 p.m. Registration will begin at 12:30 p.m. ADDRESSES: 2521 South Clark Street, Suite 200,...

  7. 78 FR 61343 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date of Open..., Crystal City, VA 22202. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mrs. Marcia Moore, Designated Federal...

  8. 78 FR 36751 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date of... 5:00 p.m. ADDRESSES: 2521 South Clark Street, Suite 200, Crystal City, VA 22202. FOR...

  9. 78 FR 40730 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date of...:00 p.m. Registration will begin at 8:00 a.m. ADDRESSES: 2521 South Clark Street, Suite 200,...

  10. 78 FR 37798 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date of...:00 p.m. ADDRESSES: 2521 South Clark Street, Suite 525, Crystal City, VA 22202. FOR...

  11. 78 FR 33394 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... unique interests, roles, history, organizational structure, and operational factors influencing decision... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place. DATES: Date...

  12. Air Force Institute of Technology, Civil Engineering School: Environmental Protection Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Inst. of Tech., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH. School of Engineering.

    This document contains information assembled by the Civil Engineering School to meet the initial requirements of NEPA 1969 and Executive Orders which required the Air Force to implement an effective environmental protection program. This course presents the various aspects of Air Force environmental protection problems which military personnel…

  13. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  14. 32 CFR 644.392 - Air Force-preliminary report of excess.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Air Force-preliminary report of excess. 644.392... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.392 Air Force—preliminary report of excess... Force screens its own properties for other defense requirements and clears the disposal with DOD and...

  15. 33 CFR 334.740 - North Shore Choctawhatchee Bay, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Shore Choctawhatchee Bay, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States as defined at 33 CFR part 329 within the area bounded by a..., Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. 334.740 Section 334.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF...

  16. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  17. 76 FR 52932 - Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force AGENCY... Quality Task Force (AAQTF) will meet to continue discussions on critical air quality issues relating...

  18. 32 CFR 644.392 - Air Force-preliminary report of excess.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Air Force-preliminary report of excess. 644.392... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.392 Air Force—preliminary report of excess... Force screens its own properties for other defense requirements and clears the disposal with DOD and...

  19. 32 CFR 644.392 - Air Force-preliminary report of excess.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air Force-preliminary report of excess. 644.392... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.392 Air Force—preliminary report of excess... Force screens its own properties for other defense requirements and clears the disposal with DOD and...

  20. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  1. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  2. 32 CFR 644.392 - Air Force-preliminary report of excess.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Air Force-preliminary report of excess. 644.392... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.392 Air Force—preliminary report of excess... Force screens its own properties for other defense requirements and clears the disposal with DOD and...

  3. 33 CFR 334.740 - North Shore Choctawhatchee Bay, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Shore Choctawhatchee Bay, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States as defined at 33 CFR part 329 within the area bounded by a..., Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. 334.740 Section 334.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF...

  4. 32 CFR 644.415 - Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Army military and Air Force lands-$50,000 limitation. 644.415 Section 644.415 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... Interests § 644.415 Army military and Air Force lands—$50,000 limitation. (a) 10 U.S.C. 2672 authorizes...

  5. 33 CFR 334.740 - North Shore Choctawhatchee Bay, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Shore Choctawhatchee Bay, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (a) The area. The restricted area shall encompass all navigable waters of the United States as defined at 33 CFR part 329 within the area bounded by a..., Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. 334.740 Section 334.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF...

  6. 32 CFR 644.392 - Air Force-preliminary report of excess.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air Force-preliminary report of excess. 644.392... PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.392 Air Force—preliminary report of excess... Force screens its own properties for other defense requirements and clears the disposal with DOD and...

  7. 78 FR 59343 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission'') will take place... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mrs. Marcia Moore, Designated Federal Officer, National Commission on the Structure...

  8. 78 FR 78943 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY... the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission''). DATES: Date of Closed... INFORMATION CONTACT: Mrs. Marcia Moore, Designated Federal Officer, National Commission on the Structure...

  9. PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO JP-8 JET FUEL VAPORS AND EXHAUST AT AIR FORCE BASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and gro...

  10. Personal Value Systems and Career Objectives of Men vis-a-vis Women Air Force Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, Charles W.

    Basic objectives of this research were to compare the personal values and career objectives of Air Force women to Air Force men. The research used a personal values questionnaire to establish which values and objectives were most likely to be translated into behavior. Values and objectives of 307 women officers and a control sample of 323 men were…

  11. 19. Photographic copy of construction drawing, F.E. Warren Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photographic copy of construction drawing, F.E. Warren Air Force Base Installation Office, ca. 1955 (original print located at F.E. Warren Air Force Base Archives, Cheyenne, Wyoming). SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS. - Fort David A. Russell, Gymnasium, Randall Avenue between Fourth & Fifth Streets, Cheyenne, Laramie County, WY

  12. 20. Photographic copy of construction drawing, F.E. Warren Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photographic copy of construction drawing, F.E. Warren Air Force Base Installation Office, ca. 1955 (original print located at F.E. Warren Air Force Base Archives, Cheyenne, Wyoming). NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS. - Fort David A. Russell, Gymnasium, Randall Avenue between Fourth & Fifth Streets, Cheyenne, Laramie County, WY

  13. 75 FR 48929 - Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Register of July 28, 2010, Notice of a Meeting (75 FR 44214). This document corrects the location of the... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force AGENCY...; (919) 541-5400. The Agricultural Air Quality Task Force (AAQTF) will meet to continue discussions...

  14. Annotated Bibliography of the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory Technical Reports--1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Esther M., Comp.

    This annotated bibliography presents a listing of technical reports (1976) dealing with personnel and training research conducted by the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory, an institution charged with the planning and execution of United States Air Force exploratory and advanced development programs for selection, motivation, training,…

  15. An Analysis of Air Force Reading Improvement Programs: Results of USAF Survey Number 73-89.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockovak, William P.

    This report summarizes the results of a questionnaire that was sent to the education offices of 93 Air Force bases in the continental United States. The purpose of the questionnaire was to obtain objective information concerning the present status of Air Force reading improvement programs in an effort to obtain insight into the type and degree of…

  16. Use of Geostationary Satellite Data to Force Land Surface Schemes within Atmospheric Mesoscale Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapenta, William M.; Suggs, Ron; McNider, Richard T.; Jedlovec, Gary; Dembek, Scott R.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A technique has been developed for assimilating GOES-derived skin temperature tendencies and insolation into the surface energy budget equation of a mesoscale model so that the simulated rate of temperature change closely agrees with the satellite observations. A critical assumption of the technique is that the availability of moisture (either from the soil or vegetation) is the least known term in the model's surface energy budget. Therefore, the simulated latent heat flux, which is a function of surface moisture availability, is adjusted based upon differences between the modeled and satellite-observed skin temperature tendencies. An advantage of this technique is that satellite temperature tendencies are assimilated in an energetically consistent manner that avoids energy imbalances and surface stability problems that arise from direct assimilation of surface shelter temperatures. The fact that the rate of change of the satellite skin temperature is used rather than the absolute temperature means that sensor calibration is not as critical. The technique has been employed on a semi-operational basis at the GHCC within the PSU/NCAR MM5. Assimilation has been performed on a grid centered over the Southeastern US since November 1998. Results from the past year show that assimilation of the satellite data reduces both the bias and RMSE for simulations of surface air temperature and relative humidity. These findings are based on comparison of assimilation runs with a control using the simple 5-layer soil model available in MM5. A significant development in the past several months was the inclusion of the detailed Oregon State University land surface model (OSU/LSM) as an option within MM5. One of our working hypotheses has been that the assimilation technique, although simple, may provide better short-term forecasts than a detailed LSM that requires significant number initialized parameters. Preliminary results indicate that the assimilation out performs the OSU

  17. 2010-2011 Performance of the AirNow Satellite Data Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, A. N.; DeWinter, J. L.; Haderman, M. D.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R. V.; Szykman, J.; White, J. E.; Dickerson, P.; Zahn, P. H.; Dye, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) AirNow program provides maps of real time hourly Air Quality Index (AQI) conditions and daily AQI forecasts nationwide (http://www.airnow.gov). The public uses these maps to make health-based decisions. The usefulness of the AirNow air quality maps depends on the accuracy and spatial coverage of air quality measurements. Currently, the maps use only ground-based measurements, which have significant gaps in coverage in some parts of the United States. As a result, contoured AQI levels have high uncertainty in regions far from monitors. To improve the usefulness of air quality maps, scientists at EPA, Dalhousie University, and Sonoma Technology, Inc. have been working in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to incorporate satellite-estimated surface PM2.5 concentrations into the maps via the AirNow Satellite Data Processor (ASDP). These satellite estimates are derived using NASA/NOAA satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals and GEOS-Chem modeled ratios of surface PM2.5 concentrations to AOD. GEOS-Chem is a three-dimensional chemical transport model for atmospheric composition driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GOES). The ASDP can fuse multiple PM2.5 concentration data sets to generate AQI maps with improved spatial coverage. The goal of ASDP is to provide more detailed AQI information in monitor-sparse locations and augment monitor-dense locations with more information. We will present a statistical analysis for 2010-2011 of the ASDP predictions of PM2.5 focusing on performance at validation sites. In addition, we will present several case studies evaluating the ASDP's performance for multiple regions and seasons, focusing specifically on days when large spatial gradients in AQI and wildfire smoke impact were observed.

  18. A decade of U.S. Air Force bat strikes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peurach, Suzanne C.; Dove, Carla J.; Stepko, Laura

    2009-01-01

    From 1997 through 2007, 821 bat strikes were reported to the U.S. Air Force (USAF) Safety Center by aircraft personnel or ground crew and sent to the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, for identification. Many samples were identified by macroscopic and or microscopic comparisons with bat specimens housed in the museum and augmented during the last 2 years by DNA analysis. Bat remains from USAF strikes during this period were received at the museum from 40 states in the United States and from 20 countries. We confirmed that 46% of the strikes were caused by bats, but we did not identify them further; we identified 5% only to the family or genus level, and 49% to the species level. Fifty-five of the 101 bat-strike samples submitted for DNA analysis have been identified to the species level. Twenty-five bat species have been recorded striking USAF planes worldwide. The Brazilian free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis; n = 173) is the species most commonly identified in USAF strike impacts, followed by the red bat (Lasiurus borealis; n = 83). Bat strikes peak during the spring and fall, with >57% occurring from August through October; 82% of the reports that included time of strike were recorded between 2100 and 0900 hours. More than 12% of the bat strikes were reported at >300 m above ground level (AGL). Although <1% of the bat-strike reports indicated damage to USAF aircraft, cumulative damage for 1997 through 2007 totaled >$825,000 and >50% of this sum was attributable to 5 bat-strike incidents. Only 5 bats from the 10 most damaging bat strikes were identified to the species level, either because we did not receive remains with the reports or the sample was insufficient for identification.

  19. Monitoring of Air Pollution by Satellites (MAPS), phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Griggs, M.; Bartle, E. R.

    1972-01-01

    Results are reported upon which the design of a satellite remote gas filter correlation (RGFC) instrument can be based. Although a final decision about the feasibility of measuring some of the pollutants with the required accuracy is still outstanding and subject to further theoretical and experimental verifications, viable concepts are presented which permit the initiation of the design phase. The pollutants which are of concern in the troposphere and stratosphere were selected. The infrared bands of these pollutants were identified, together with the bands of interfering gases, and the line parameters of the pollutants as well as interfering gases were generated through a computer program. Radiative transfer calculations (line-by-line) were made to establish the radiation levels at the top of the atmosphere and the signal levels at the detector of the RGFC instrument. Based upon these results the channels for the RGFC were selected. Finally, the problem areas, which need further investigations, were delineated and the supporting data requirements were established.

  20. Understanding The Correlation of San Joaquin Air Quality Monitoring With Aerosol Optical Thickness Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballard, M.; Newcomer, M.; Rudy, J.; Lake, S.; Sambasivam, S.; Strawa, A. W.; Schmidt, C.; Skiles, J.

    2007-12-01

    Air quality in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) has failed to meet state and federal attainment standards for Particulate Matter (PM) for several years. Air quality agencies currently use ground monitoring sites to monitor air quality in the San Joaquin Valley. This method provides accurate information at specific points but does not provide a clear indication of what is occurring over large regions. Using measurements from satellite imagery has the potential to provide valuable air quality information in a timely manner across large regions. While previous studies show good correlations between satellite derived Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) and surface PM measurements on the East Coast of the United States, the data do not correlate well in the SJV. This paper compares PM2.5 ground data from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the Interagency Monitoring of Protected Environments (IMPROVE) sites with satellite data in an effort to understand this discrepancy. To verify satellite AOT value accuracy, ground AOT values were collected from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and from measurements using the hand-held MicroTops II Sun Photometer field instrument. We found good correlation of the AOT values between MODIS, MISR and AERONET. However, we found poor correlations between satellite- based AOT values and PM2.5 values, and consideration of aerosol speciation did not improve the correlations. Further investigation is needed to determine the causes of the poor correlation. Acquiring detailed information on the meteorological conditions and vertical profiles of the atmosphere using ground-based LIDAR or data from CALIPSO may provide better results.

  1. SR-71B - in Flight - View from Air Force Tanker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This look-down view shows NASA 831, an SR-71B flown by Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as it cruises over the Mojave Desert. The photo was from an Air Force refueling tanker taken on a 1997 mission. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in

  2. Aeronautical Satellite Data Link System (SDLS) for high-density air-traffic areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delrieu, Alain; Loisy, Claude; Clinch, Philip; Benhaim, Philippe

    1995-01-01

    The European Space Agency has recently commissioned a study to investigate the feasibility of a low-cost aeronautical Satellite Data Link System (SDLS) to provide for the needs of Air Traffic Services, i.e. safety related communications over continental areas with high air-traffic density. This study is placed in today's context which sees the first generation of Aeronautical Mobile Satellite System (AMSS) being gradually but restrictively put into service in oceanic airspaces with low air-traffic density. This paper first discusses the case of ATS dedicated versus mixed (ATS and commercial) Comms service provision and identifies the specific ATS comms requirements context. Specific emphasis is put on the ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) standardization framework for both the ATN (Aeronautical Telecommunication Network) and the SSR (Secondary Surveillance Radar) Mode S specific services. An architectural system and network design for a future SDLS is then proposed, such as to meet the ATS comms requirements within the realm of existing technologies. To minimize development risk and cost, consideration is given to re-use the ESA-developed Land Mobile Communication Technology, known as MSBN (Mobile Satellite Business Network) featuring distinct subnetworks. It is particularly suited to an ATM (Air Traffic Management) decentralized architecture made of independent ATC (Air Traffic Control) Centers. Finally the study follow-on phase is introduced, which is intended to cover system design and development leading to a demonstration program, as a first step towards proposals for international standardization and acceptance.

  3. Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

    2010-03-01

    This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

  4. Assimilation of Satellite Data in Regional Air Quality Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnider, Richard T.; Norris, William B.; Casey, Daniel; Pleim, Jonathan E.; Roselle, Shawn J.; Lapenta, William M.

    1997-01-01

    In terms of important uncertainty in regional-scale air-pollution models, probably no other aspect ranks any higher than the current ability to specify clouds and soil moisture on the regional scale. Because clouds in models are highly parameterized, the ability of models to predict the correct spatial and radiative characteristics is highly suspect and subject to large error. The poor representation of cloud fields from point measurements at National Weather Services stations and the almost total absence of surface moisture availability observations has made assimilation of these variables difficult to impossible. Yet, the correct inclusion of clouds and surface moisture are of first-order importance in regional-scale photochemistry.

  5. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  6. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  7. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  8. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  9. 32 CFR 643.122 - Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Reserve facilities-Air Force and Navy use. 643... Force and Navy use. MACOM may approve local agreements with other Army, DOD, and Reserve elements... Force or Navy Reserve, or which involve a transfer of funds between services for other than...

  10. GRACE Mission Design: Impact of Uncertainties in Disturbance Environment and Satellite Force Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazanek, Daniel D.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Seywald, Hans; Qu, Min

    2000-01-01

    The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) primary mission will be performed by making measurements of the inter-satellite range change between two co-planar, low altitude, near-polar orbiting satellites. Understanding the uncertainties in the disturbance environment, particularly the aerodynamic drag and torques, is critical in several mission areas. These include an accurate estimate of the spacecraft orbital lifetime, evaluation of spacecraft attitude control requirements, and estimation of the orbital maintenance maneuver frequency necessitated by differences in the drag forces acting on both satellites. The FREEMOL simulation software has been developed and utilized to analyze and suggest design modifications to the GRACE spacecraft. Aerodynamic accommodation bounding analyses were performed and worst-case envelopes were obtained for the aerodynamic torques and the differential ballistic coefficients between the leading and trailing GRACE spacecraft. These analyses demonstrate how spacecraft aerodynamic design and analysis can benefit from a better understanding of spacecraft surface accommodation properties, and the implications for mission design constraints such as formation spacing control.

  11. Improved Satellite-based Photosysnthetically Active Radiation (PAR) for Air Quality Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pour Biazar, A.; McNider, R. T.; Cohan, D. S.; White, A.; Zhang, R.; Dornblaser, B.; Doty, K.; Wu, Y.; Estes, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the challenges in understanding the air quality over forested regions has been the uncertainties in estimating the biogenic hydrocarbon emissions. Biogenic volatile organic compounds, BVOCs, play a critical role in atmospheric chemistry, particularly in ozone and particulate matter (PM) formation. In southeastern United States, BVOCs (mostly as isoprene) are the dominant summertime source of reactive hydrocarbon. Despite significant efforts in improving BVOC estimates, the errors in emission inventories remain a concern. Since BVOC emissions are particularly sensitive to the available photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), model errors in PAR result in large errors in emission estimates. Thus, utilization of satellite observations to estimate PAR can help in reducing emission uncertainties. Satellite-based PAR estimates rely on the technique used to derive insolation from satellite visible brightness measurements. In this study we evaluate several insolation products against surface pyranometer observations and offer a bias correction to generate a more accurate PAR product. The improved PAR product is then used in biogenic emission estimates. The improved biogenic emission estimates are compared to the emission inventories over Texas and used in air quality simulation over the period of August-September 2013 (NASA's Discover-AQ field campaign). A series of sensitivity simulations will be performed and evaluated against Discover-AQ observations to test the impact of satellite-derived PAR on air quality simulations.

  12. Development concerns for satellite-based air traffic control surveillance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary results of an investigation directed toward the configuration of a practical system design which can form the baseline for assessing the applications and value of a satellite based air traffic surveillance system for future use in the National Airspace System (NAS) are described. This work initially studied the characteristics and capabilities of a satellite configuration which would operate compatibly with the signal structure and avionics of the next generation air traffic control secondary surveillance radar system, the Mode S system. A compatible satellite surveillance system concept is described and an analysis is presented of the link budgets for the various transmission paths. From this, the satellite characteristics are established involving a large multiple feed L band antenna of approximately 50 meter aperture dimension. Trade offs involved in several of the alternative large aperture antennas considered are presented as well as the influence of various antenna configurations on the performance capabilities of the surveillance system. The features and limitations of the use of large aperture antenna systems for air traffic surveillance are discussed. Tentative results of this continuing effort are summarized with a brief description of follow on investigations involving other space based antenna systems concepts.

  13. GCM estimate of the indirect aerosol forcing using satellite-retrieved cloud droplet effective radii

    SciTech Connect

    Boucher, O.

    1995-05-01

    In a recent paper, satellite data radiances were analyzed to retrieve cloud droplet effective radii and significant interhemispheric differences for both maritime and continental clouds were reported. The mean cloud droplet radius in the Northern Hemisphere is smaller than in the Southern Hemisphere by about 0.7 {mu}m. This hemispheric contrast suggests the presence of an aerosol effect on cloud droplet size and is consistent with higher cloud condensation nuclei number concentration in the Northern Hemisphere due to anthropogenic production of aerosol precursors. In the present study, we constrain a climate model with the satellite retrievals and discuss the climate forcing that can be inferred from the observed distribution of cloud droplet radius. Based on two sets of experiments, this sensitivity study suggests that the indirect radiative forcing by anthropogenic aerosols could be about -0.6 or -1 W m{sup -2} averaged in the 0{degrees}-50{degrees}N latitude band. The uncertainty of these estimates is difficult to assess but is at least 50%. 30 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Preparing for Routine Satellite Global Volcano Deformation Observations: The Volcano Deformation Database Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Andrews, B. J.; Cooper, J.; Henderson, S. T.; Delgado, F.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) has greatly expanded the number volcanoes that can be monitored for ground deformation - the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased almost five-fold since 1997 (to more than 213 volcanoes in 2014). However, from 1992-2014, there are still gaps in global volcano surveillance and only a fraction of the 1400 subaerial Holocene volcanoes have frequent observations in this time period. Starting in 2014, near global observations of volcano deformation should begin with the Sentinel satellites from the European Space Agency, ALOS-2 from the Japanese Space Agency, and eventually NISAR from the Indian Space Agency and NASA. With more frequent observations, more volcano deformation episodes are sure to be observed, but evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how can we determine if deformation will lead to eruption? To answer this question, an international task force has been formed to create an inventory of volcano deformation events as part of the Global Volcano Model (http://globalvolcanomodel.org/gvm-task-forces/volcano-deformation-database/). We present the first results from our global study focusing on volcanoes that have few or no previous studies. In some cases, there is a lack of SAR data (for example, volcanoes of the South Sandwich Islands). For others, observations either show an absence of deformation or possible deformation that requires more data to be verified. An example of a deforming volcano that has few past studies is Pagan, an island in the Marianas Arc comprised of 2 stratovolcanoes within calderas. Our new InSAR measurements from both the ALOS and Envisat satellites show deformation near the 1981 May VEI 4 lava flow eruption on North Pagan at 2-3 cm/year between 2004-2010. Another example of a newly observed volcano is Karthala volcano in the Comoros. InSAR observations between 2004-2010 span four eruptions, only one of which is

  15. Vandenberg Air Force Base Upper Level Wind Launch Weather Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, Jaclyn A.; Wheeler, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    The 30th Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) provides comprehensive weather services to the space program at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. One of their responsibilities is to monitor upper-level winds to ensure safe launch operations of the Minuteman III ballistic missile. The 30 OSSWF tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to analyze VAFB sounding data with the goal of determining the probability of violating (PoV) their upper-level thresholds for wind speed and shear constraints specific to this launch vehicle, and to develop a tool that will calculate the PoV of each constraint on the day of launch. In order to calculate the probability of exceeding each constraint, the AMU collected and analyzed historical data from VAFB. The historical sounding data were retrieved from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory archive for the years 1994-2011 and then stratified into four sub-seasons: January-March, April-June, July-September, and October-December. The maximum wind speed and 1000-ft shear values for each sounding in each subseason were determined. To accurately calculate the PoV, the AMU determined the theoretical distributions that best fit the maximum wind speed and maximum shear datasets. Ultimately it was discovered that the maximum wind speeds follow a Gaussian distribution while the maximum shear values follow a lognormal distribution. These results were applied when calculating the averages and standard deviations needed for the historical and real-time PoV calculations. In addition to the requirements outlined in the original task plan, the AMU also included forecast sounding data from the Rapid Refresh model. This information provides further insight for the launch weather officers (LWOs) when determining if a wind constraint violation will occur over the next few hours on day of launch. The interactive graphical user interface (GUI) for this project was developed in

  16. Ray-tracing simulations vs. satellite observations of gravity waves forced by deep convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisch, Silvio; Trinh, Thai; Chun, Hye-Yeong; Ern, Manfred; Preusse, Peter; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Riese, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Gravity waves (GW) are a prominent coupling mechanism between their tropospheric sources and the upper stratosphere to mesosphere region. They contribute prominently to the wave driving of the Quasi-biennial-oscillation (QBO) in the tropics and other large scale circulations like the Brewer-Dobson circulation. One important dynamic source of GWs is convection. Convective GWs have considerable short horizontal wavelengths and are therefore not entirely observable by infrared limb-sounding satellite instruments. For this reason, we present the results of GW ray-tracing calculations from convective sources up to the mesosphere. We utilized the Gravity wave Regional Or Global RAy-Tracer (GROGRAT) to perform the GW trajectory calculations. The launch conditions for each GW were calculated using the convective GW source scheme from Yonsei University (South Korea) to quantify the excitation by deep convection. Heating rates, cloud data, and atmospheric background data were provided by the MERRA dataset for the estimation of convective forcing by deep convection and as the atmospheric background for the ray-tracing calculations afterwards. The resulting momentum flux distributions are in remarkable coincidence with typical geographic regions of deep convection in the tropics. Additionally, the momentum flux distributions of higher latitude regions are simulated using a standard launch distribution for GWs. In order to validate our findings we compare our simulation results with satellite measurements of temperature amplitudes and momentum flux from infrared limb-sounding satellite instruments. These validations are complemented with an in-depth analysis of the observational filter for two different satellite instruments (HIRDLS and SABER). Scanning geometry, limitations in the detection of short wavelengths, aliasing effects, and the detector sensitivity are taken into account to quantify the level of uncertainty in our results. This analysis finally shows a good agreement

  17. Overview of New Cloud Optical Properties in Air Force Weather Worldwide Merged Cloud Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, T. E.; Conner, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Air Force Weather (AFW) has documented requirements for real-time cloud analysis to support DoD missions around the world. To meet these needs, AFW utilizes the Cloud Depiction and Forecast System (CDFS) II system to develop an hourly cloud analysis. The system creates cloud masks at pixel level from 16 different satellite sources, diagnoses cloud layers, reconciles the pixel level data to a regular grid by instrument class, and optimally merges the various instrument classes to create a final multi-satellite analysis. In Jan, 2013, Northrop Grumman Corp. delivered a new CDFS II baseline which included the addition of new Atmospheric and Environmental Research Inc (AER) developed Cloud Optical Property (COP) variables in the analysis. The new variables include phase (ice/water), optical depth, ice/water path, and particle size. In addition, the COP schemes have radically changed the derivation of cloud properties like cloud top height and thickness. The Northrop-developed CDFS II Test Bed was used to examine and characterize the behavior of these new variables in order to understand how the variables are performing, especially between instrument classes. Understanding this behavior allows performance tuning and uncertainty estimation which will assist users seeking to reason with the data and will be necessary for use in model development and climatology development. This presentation will provide a basic overview of the CDFS II produced COP variables and show results from experiments conducted on the CDFS II Testbed. Results will include a basic comparison of COP derived using different instrument classes as well as comparison between pixel level and derived gridded products with an eye towards better characterization of uncertainty.

  18. Using global aerosol models and satellite data for air quality studies: Challenges and data needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian

    2006-01-01

    Aerosol particles, also known as PM2.5 (particle diameter less than 2.5 pm) and PM10 (particle diameter less than 10 pm), are one of the key atmospheric components that determines air quality. Yet, air quality forecasts for PM are still in their infancy and remain a challenging task. It is difficult to simply relate PM levels to local meteorological conditions, and large uncertainties exist in regional air quality model emission inventories and initial and boundary conditions. Especially challenging are periods when a significant amount of aerosol comes from outside the regional modeling domain through long-range transport. In the past few years, NASA has launched several satellites with global aerosol measurement capabilities, providing large-scale chemical weather pictures. NASA has also supported development of global models which simulate atmospheric transport and transformation processes of important atmospheric gas and aerosol species. I will present the current modeling and satellite capabilities for PM2.5 studies, the possibilities and challenges in using satellite data for PM2.5 forecasts, and the needs of future remote sensing data for improving air quality monitoring and modeling.

  19. Air Force Achieves Fuel Efficiency through Industry Best Practices

    SciTech Connect

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Air Force’s Air Mobility Command (AMC) is changing the way it does business. It is saving energy and money through an aircraft fleet fuel-efficiency program inspired by private industry best practices and ideas resulting from the empowered fuel savings culture.

  20. The importance of the diurnal and annual cycle of air traffic for contrail radiative forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuber, Nicola; Forster, Piers; Rädel, Gaby; Shine, Keith

    2006-06-01

    Air traffic condensation trails, or contrails, are believed to have a net atmospheric warming effect, although one that is currently small compared to that induced by other sources of human emissions. However, the comparably large growth rate of air traffic requires an improved understanding of the resulting impact of aircraft radiative forcing on climate. Contrails have an effect on the Earth's energy balance similar to that of high thin ice clouds. Their trapping of outgoing longwave radiation emitted by the Earth and atmosphere (positive radiative forcing) is partly compensated by their reflection of incoming solar radiation (negative radiative forcing). On average, the longwave effect dominates and the net contrail radiative forcing is believed to be positive. Over daily and annual timescales, varying levels of air traffic, meteorological conditions, and solar insolation influence the net forcing effect of contrails. Here we determine the factors most important for contrail climate forcing using a sophisticated radiative transfer model for a site in southeast England, located in the entrance to the North Atlantic flight corridor. We find that night-time flights during winter (December to February) are responsible for most of the contrail radiative forcing. Night flights account for only 25 per cent of daily air traffic, but contribute 60 to 80 per cent of the contrail forcing. Further, winter flights account for only 22 per cent of annual air traffic, but contribute half of the annual mean forcing. These results suggest that flight rescheduling could help to minimize the climate impact of aviation.

  1. The importance of the diurnal and annual cycle of air traffic for contrail radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Nicola; Forster, Piers; Rädel, Gaby; Shine, Keith

    2006-06-15

    Air traffic condensation trails, or contrails, are believed to have a net atmospheric warming effect, although one that is currently small compared to that induced by other sources of human emissions. However, the comparably large growth rate of air traffic requires an improved understanding of the resulting impact of aircraft radiative forcing on climate. Contrails have an effect on the Earth's energy balance similar to that of high thin ice clouds. Their trapping of outgoing longwave radiation emitted by the Earth and atmosphere (positive radiative forcing) is partly compensated by their reflection of incoming solar radiation (negative radiative forcing). On average, the longwave effect dominates and the net contrail radiative forcing is believed to be positive. Over daily and annual timescales, varying levels of air traffic, meteorological conditions, and solar insolation influence the net forcing effect of contrails. Here we determine the factors most important for contrail climate forcing using a sophisticated radiative transfer model for a site in southeast England, located in the entrance to the North Atlantic flight corridor. We find that night-time flights during winter (December to February) are responsible for most of the contrail radiative forcing. Night flights account for only 25 per cent of daily air traffic, but contribute 60 to 80 per cent of the contrail forcing. Further, winter flights account for only 22 per cent of annual air traffic, but contribute half of the annual mean forcing. These results suggest that flight rescheduling could help to minimize the climate impact of aviation. PMID:16778887

  2. SR-71 Tail #844 Landing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    With distinctive heat waves trailing behind its engines, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A, tail number 844, lands at the Edwards AFB runway after a 1996 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward

  3. Supplemental site inspection for Air Force Plant 59, Johnson City, New York, Volume 1: Investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Nashold, B.; Rosenblatt, D.; Hau, J.

    1995-08-01

    This summary describes a Supplemental Site Inspection (SSI) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at Air Force Plant 59 (AFP 59) in Johnson City, New York. All required data pertaining to this project were entered by ANL into the Air Force-wide Installation Restoration Program Information System (IRPIMS) computer format and submitted to an appropriate authority. The work was sponsored by the United States Air Force as part of its Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Previous studies had revealed the presence of contaminants at the site and identified several potential contaminant sources. Argonne`s study was conducted to answer questions raised by earlier investigations.

  4. Relationship between Air Force Officer Qualifying Test Scores and Success in Air Weapons Controller Training. Interim Report for the Period November 1982-February 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finegold, Lawrence S.; Rogers, Deborah

    This project investigated the relationship between Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) composite scores and student performance in Air Force air weapons controller training. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of using AFOQT scores as one selection criteria for entry to the air weapons controller field. An analysis of…

  5. Detection of regional air pollution episodes utilizing satellite data in the visual range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowley, C. J.; Burke, H. K.; Barnes, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative analysis of satellite-observed haze patterns and ground-based aerosol measurements is carried out for July 20-23, 1978. During this period, a significant regional air pollution episode existed across the northeastern United States, accompanied by widespread haze, reduced surface visibility, and elevated sulfate levels measured by the Sulfate Regional Experiment (SURE) network. The results show that the satellite-observed haze patterns correlate closely with the area of reported low surface visibility (less than 4 mi) and high sulfate levels. Quantitative information on total aerosol loading derived from the satellite-digitized data, using an atmospheric radiative transfer model, agrees well with the results obtained from the ground-based measurements.

  6. Cloud Observation and Modeling Test Bed for Air Force Weather Applications: Overview and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Air Force Weather (AFW) has documented requirements for real-time cloud analysis and short range cloud forecasts to support DoD missions around the world. To meet these needs, AFW utilizes the Cloud Depiction and Forecast System (CDFS) II system to develop a hourly cloud analysis and short range forecast. The system creates cloud masks from 16 different satellite sources and optimally merges them to create the analysis. This analysis then forms the initialization field for a short range 'advective' based cloud forecast. Northrop Grumman Corp. has recently delivered a CDFS II based Cloud Model Test Bed. This system offers the ability to test several aspects of the CDFS II system including: the effect of adding and subtracting sources of cloud imagery, the effect of changing source and skill of required external data sources, and the impact of changing the cloud information merge process among the various sources. In addition, the test bed offers a capability to generate a robust cloud modeling baseline against which to measure progress of a next generation Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) based advanced data assimilation system. Finally, the test bed allows the development and testing of new cloud modeling validation techniques (and sources) to provide greater confidence in results generated from the test bed. This presentation will provide a basic overview of the CDFS II system and of the newly developed Test Bed and will include results from the first series of experiments conducted using the Test Bed.

  7. Validation and Verification of Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Michael; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Cetola, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) is the Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) operational Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) combining real time precipitation observations and analyses, global forecast model data, vegetation, terrain, and soil parameters with the community Noah land surface model, along with other hydrology module options, to generate profile analyses of global soil moisture, soil temperature, and other important land surface characteristics. (1) A range of satellite data products and surface observations used to generate the land analysis products (2) Global, 1/4 deg spatial resolution (3) Model analysis generated at 3 hours. AFWA recognizes the importance of operational benchmarking and uncertainty characterization for land surface modeling and is developing standard methods, software, and metrics to verify and/or validate LIS output products. To facilitate this and other needs for land analysis activities at AFWA, the Model Evaluation Toolkit (MET) -- a joint product of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Developmental Testbed Center (NCAR DTC), AFWA, and the user community -- and the Land surface Verification Toolkit (LVT), developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), have been adapted to operational benchmarking needs of AFWA's land characterization activities.

  8. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-10-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived surface skin temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) 2003-2014 were investigated and the three data sets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. The AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically warmer up to 1.65 K at the sea ice boundary and colder down to -2.04 K in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three data sets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~ 2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  9. Uncertainties of satellite-derived surface skin temperatures in the polar oceans: MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, and AIRS only

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, H.-J.; Yoo, J.-M.; Jeong, M.-J.; Won, Y.-I.

    2015-05-01

    Uncertainties in the satellite-derived Surface Skin Temperature (SST) data in the polar oceans during two periods (16-24 April and 15-23 September) of 2003-2014 were investigated and the three datasets were intercompared as follows: MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Ice Surface Temperature (MODIS IST), the SST of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder/Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AIRS/AMSU), and AIRS only. AIRS only algorithm was developed in preparation for the degradation of the AMSU-A. MODIS IST was systematically up to 1.65 K warmer at the sea ice boundary and up to 2.04 K colder in the polar sea ice regions of both the Arctic and Antarctic than that of the AIRS/AMSU. This difference in the results could have been caused by the surface classification method. The spatial correlation coefficient of the AIRS only to the AIRS/AMSU (0.992-0.999) method was greater than that of the MODIS IST to the AIRS/AMSU (0.968-0.994). The SST of the AIRS only compared to that of the AIRS/AMSU had a bias of 0.168 K with a RMSE of 0.590 K over the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and a bias of -0.109 K with a RMSE of 0.852 K over the Southern Hemisphere high latitudes. There was a systematic disagreement between the AIRS retrievals at the boundary of the sea ice, because the AIRS only algorithm utilized a~less accurate GCM forecast over the seasonally-varying frozen oceans than the microwave data. The three datasets (MODIS, AIRS/AMSU and AIRS only) showed significant warming rates (2.3 ± 1.7 ~2.8 ± 1.9 K decade-1) in the northern high latitude regions (70-80° N) as expected from the ice-albedo feedback. The systematic temperature disagreement associated with surface type classification had an impact on the resulting temperature trends.

  10. The response of subsurface oceans in icy satellites to tidally driven forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, E. M.; Glatzmaier, G. A.; Nimmo, F.

    2009-12-01

    Observations from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft suggest that subsurface global water oceans are likely present on multiple icy satellites of Jupiter and Saturn. However, the dynamics of these oceans, under the influence of a time-varying tidal potential and buoyancy and coriolis forces, have not been investigated in detail. We have investigated the large scale ocean flow in two ways. First, we simulate the 3-D global circulation of the subsurface oceans on Europa and Titan driven primarily by a time-varying tidal potential and secondarily by heating at the base of the ocean. Second, we analyze the behavior of tidally-forced subsurface oceans in two-dimensions using quasi-nonlinear shallow water theory. These approaches allow us to predict potentially observable effects, in particular non-synchronous rotation of the ice shell driven by ocean torques and spatial variations in the heat flow supplied to the base of the ice shell, and magnetic induction effects due to the ocean circulation. Time-series analyses suggest that the ocean responds primarily at the tidal frequency; however, there are responses at lower frequencies as well. Preliminary results of full 3-D simulations will be presented, and comparisons will be made to the forced shallow water model.

  11. Can satellite-derived aerosol optical depth quantify the surface aerosol radiative forcing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hui; Ceamanos, Xavier; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Carrer, Dominique; Xue, Yong

    2014-12-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the climate of the Earth through aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Nowadays, aerosol particles are detected, quantified and monitored by remote sensing techniques using low Earth orbit (LEO) and geostationary (GEO) satellites. In the present article, the use of satellite-derived AOD (aerosol optical depth) products is investigated in order to quantify on a daily basis the ARF at the surface level (SARF). By daily basis we mean that an average SARF value is computed every day based upon the available AOD satellite measurements for each station. In the first part of the study, the performance of four state-of-art different AOD products (MODIS-DT, MODIS-DB, MISR, and SEVIRI) is assessed through comparison against ground-based AOD measurements from 24 AERONET stations located in Europe and Africa during a 6-month period. While all AOD products are found to be comparable in terms of measured value (RMSE of 0.1 for low and average AOD values), a higher number of AOD estimates is made available by GEO satellites due to their enhanced frequency of scan. Experiments show a general lower agreement of AOD estimates over the African sites (RMSE of 0.2), which show the highest aerosol concentrations along with the occurrence of dust aerosols, coarse particles, and bright surfaces. In the second part of this study, the lessons learned about the confidence in aerosol burden derived from satellites are used to estimate SARF under clear sky conditions. While the use of AOD products issued from GEO observations like SEVIRI brings improvement in the SARF estimates with regard to LEO-based AOD products, the resulting absolute bias (13 W/m2 in average when AERONET AOD is used as reference) is judged to be still high in comparison with the average values of SARF found in this study (from - 25 W/m2 to - 43 W/m2) and also in the literature (from - 10 W/m2 to - 47 W/m2).

  12. A Geostationary Satellite Constellation for Observing Global Air Quality: Status of the CEOS Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saadi, J. A.; Zehner, C.

    2011-12-01

    Several countries and space agencies are currently planning to launch geostationary satellites in the 2017-2022 time frame to obtain atmospheric composition measurements for characterizing anthropogenic and natural distributions of tropospheric ozone, aerosols, and their precursors, which are important factors in understanding air quality and climate change. While a single geostationary satellite can view only a portion of the globe, it is possible for a minimum of three geostationary satellites, positioned to view Europe/Middle East/Africa, Asia/Australasia, and the Americas, to collectively provide near-global coverage. Harmonizing the planned geostationary missions to be contemporaneous and have common observing capabilities and data distribution protocols would synergistically enable critically needed understanding of the interactions between regional and global atmospheric composition and of the implications for air quality and climate. Such activities would directly address societal benefit areas of the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), including Health, Energy, Climate, Disasters, and Ecosystems, and are responsive to the requirements of each mission to provide advanced user services and societal benefits. Over the past 2 years, the Atmospheric Composition Constellation (ACC) of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) has developed a white paper describing such collaboration and the benefits to be derived from it. The resulting ACC recommendations were endorsed by CEOS in May 2011. Here we will present an update on collaborative activities and next steps. This presentation is envisioned to serve as an introduction to the oral sessions associated with Session A.25.

  13. Tilted wheel satellite attitude control with air-bearing table experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inumoh, Lawrence O.; Forshaw, Jason L.; Horri, Nadjim M.

    2015-12-01

    Gyroscopic actuators for satellite control have attracted significant research interest over the years, but their viability for the control of small satellites has only recently started to become clear. Research on variable speed gyroscopic actuators has long been focused on single gimbal actuators; double gimbal actuators typically operate at constant wheel spin rate and allow tilt angle ranges far larger than the ranges needed to operate most satellite missions. This research examines a tilted wheel, a newly proposed type of inertial actuator that can generate torques in all three principal axes of a rigid satellite using a spinning wheel and a double tilt mechanism. The tilt mechanism tilts the angular momentum vector about two axes providing two degree of freedom control, while variation of the wheel speed provides the third. The equations of motion of the system lead to a singularity-free system during nominal operation avoiding the need for complex steering logic. This paper describes the hardware design of the tilted wheel and the experimental setup behind both standalone and spherical air-bearing tables used to test it. Experimental results from the air bearing table are provided with the results depicting the high performance capabilities of the proposed actuator in torque generation.

  14. Radiation pressure and air drag effects on the orbit of the balloon satellite 1963 30D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slowey, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    Computed orbits of the balloon satellite 1963 30D are given every 2 days over an interval of 456 days near the beginning of the satellite's lifetime and an interval of 824 days near the end of its lifetime. The effects of radiation pressure on the satellite are examined in some detail. It is found that the variations in all the elements can be represented by use of a single parameter to specify the effect of diffuse reflection from the satellite's surface, and that this parameter remains constant, or nearly so, during the entire 7-year lifetime. Success in obtaining a consistent representation of the radiation-pressure effects is ascribed to the inclusion of the effects of terrestrial radiation pressure, using a model for the earth's albedo that includes seasonal and latitudinal variations. Anomalous effects in the orbital acceleration, as well as in the other elements, are represented quite well by including a small force at right angle to the solar direction and by allowing this to rotate about the solar direction. This implies that the satellite is aspherical, that it is rotating, and that the axis of rotation precesses.

  15. Satellite observation of atmospheric methane: intercomparison between AIRS and GOSAT TANSO-FTS retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, M.; Xiong, X.; Saitoh, N.; Warner, J.; Zhang, Y.; Chen, L.; Weng, F.

    2015-10-01

    Space-borne observations of atmospheric methane (CH4) have been made using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS/Aqua satellite since August 2002 and the Thermal and Near-infrared Sensor for Carbon Observation Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) on the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) since April 2009. This study compared the GOSAT TANSO-FTS thermal infrared (TIR) version 1.0 CH4 product with the collocated AIRS version 6 CH4 product using data from 1 August 2010 to 30 June 2012, including the CH4 mixing ratios and the total column amounts. The results show that at 300-600 hPa, where both AIRS and GOSAT-TIR CH4 have peak sensitivities, they agree very well, but GOSAT-TIR retrievals tend to be higher than AIRS in layer 200-300 hPa. At 300 hPa the CH4 mixing ratio from GOSAT-TIR is, on average, 10.3 ± 31.8 ppbv higher than that from AIRS, and at 600 hPa GOSAT-TIR retrieved CH4 is -16.2 ± 25.7 ppbv lower than AIRS CH4. Comparison of the total column amount of CH4 shows that GOSAT-TIR agrees with AIRS to within 1 % in the mid-latitude regions of Southern Hemisphere and in tropics. In the mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, GOSAT-TIR is ~ 1-2 % lower than AIRS, and in the high-latitude regions of Southern Hemisphere the difference of GOSAT from AIRS varies from -3 % in October to +2 % in July. The difference between AIRS and GOSAT TANSO-FTS retrievals is mainly due to the difference in retrieval algorithms and instruments itself, and the larger difference in the high latitude regions is associated with the low information content and small degree of freedoms of the retrieval. The degree of freedom of GOSAT-TIR retrievals is lower than that of AIRS also indicates that the constraint in GOSAT-TIR retrieval may be too strong. From the good correlation between AIRS and GOSAT-TIR retrievals and the seasonal variation they observed we are confident that the thermal infrared measurements from AIRS and GOSAT-TIR can provide

  16. Satellite observation of atmospheric methane: intercomparison between AIRS and GOSAT TANSO-FTS retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Mingmin; Xiong, Xiaozhen; Saitoh, Naoko; Warner, Juying; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Liangfu; Weng, Fuzhong; Fan, Meng

    2016-08-01

    Space-borne observations of atmospheric methane (CH4) have been made using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the EOS/Aqua satellite since August 2002 and the Thermal and Near-infrared Sensor for Carbon Observation Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) on the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) since April 2009. This study compared the GOSAT TANSO-FTS thermal infrared (TIR) version 1.0 CH4 product with the collocated AIRS version 6 CH4 product using data from 1 August 2010 to 30 June 2012, including the CH4 mixing ratios and the total column amounts. The results show that at 300-600 hPa, where both AIRS and GOSAT-TIR CH4 have peak sensitivities, they agree very well, but GOSAT-TIR retrievals tend to be higher than AIRS in layer 200-300 hPa. At 300 hPa the CH4 mixing ratio from GOSAT-TIR is, on average, 10.3 ± 31.8 ppbv higher than that from AIRS, and at 600 hPa GOSAT-TIR retrieved CH4 is -16.2 ± 25.7 ppbv lower than AIRS CH4. Comparison of the total column amount of CH4 shows that GOSAT-TIR agrees with AIRS to within 1 % in the mid-latitude regions of the Southern Hemisphere and in the tropics. In the mid to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, comparison shows that GOSAT-TIR is ˜ 1-2 % lower than AIRS, and in the high-latitude regions of the Southern Hemisphere the difference of GOSAT from AIRS varies from -3 % in October to +2 % in July. The difference between AIRS and GOSAT TANSO-FTS retrievals is mainly due to the difference in retrieval algorithms and instruments themselves, and the larger difference in the high-latitude regions is associated with the low information content and small degrees of freedom of the retrieval. The degrees of freedom of GOSAT-TIR retrievals are lower than that of AIRS, which also indicates that the constraint in GOSAT-TIR retrievals may be too strong. From the good correlation between AIRS and GOSAT-TIR retrievals and the seasonal variation they observed, we are confident that the thermal infrared

  17. Aerosols, Chemistry, and Radiative Forcing: A 3-D Model Analysis of Satellite and ACE-Asia data (ACMAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Zhao, Xue-Peng

    2005-01-01

    We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into the multi-national Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia) mission. Our objectives are (1) to understand the physical, chemical, and optical properties of aerosols and the processes that control those properties over the Asian-Pacific region, (2) to investigate the interaction between aerosols and tropospheric chemistry, and (3) to determine the aerosol radiative forcing over the Asia-Pacific region. We will use the Georgia TecWGoddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) model to link satellite observations and the ACE-Asia measurements. First, we will use the GOCART model to simulate aerosols and related species, and evaluate the model with satellite and in-situ observations. Second, the model generated aerosol vertical profiles and compositions will be used to validate the satellite products; and the satellite data will be used for during- and post- mission analysis. Third, we will use the model to analyze and interpret both satellite and ACE- Asia field campaign data and investigate the aerosol-chemistry interactions. Finally, we will calculate aerosol radiative forcing over the Asian-Pacific region, and assess the influence of Asian pollution in the global atmosphere. We propose a research project to incorporate a global 3-D model and satellite data into

  18. HAER NE9B (sheet 1 of 2) Offutt Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HAER NE-9-B (sheet 1 of 2) - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  19. HAER NE9B (sheet 2 of 2) Offutt Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HAER NE-9-B (sheet 2 of 2) - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Looking Glass Aircraft, On Operational Apron covering northeast half of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  20. Temporal Geophysical Investigations of the FT-2-Plume at the Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) facility has been the focus of several geophysical investigations. After several decades of fire training exercises, significant amounts of hydrocarbons and some solvents seeped into the subsurface cont...

  1. 7. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING LASER LABORATORY. WrightPatterson Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR VIEW, SHOWING LASER LABORATORY. - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71A, Propulsion Research Laboratory, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  2. 77 FR 35365 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance in contested environments; ensuring cyber situational awareness for commanders; and extended uses of Air Force Space Command space-based sensors. The draft FY13...

  3. QUALITY MANAGEMENT DURING SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGIES EXAMPLE SITE MARCH AIR FORCE BASE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the remedial approach, organizational structure and key elements facilitating effective and efficient remediation of contaminated sites at March Air Force Base (AFB), California. The U.S. implementation and quality assurance approach to site remediation for ...

  4. QUALITY MANAGEMENT DURING SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGIES; EXAMPLE SITE MARCH AIR FORCE BASE, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the remedial approach, organizational structure and key elements facilitating effective and efficient remediation of contaminated sites at March Air Force Base (AFB), California. The U.S. implementation and quality assurance approach to site remediation for a...

  5. Making Program Assessment Work: A Profile of the U.S. Air Force Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millis, Barbara J.; Lowe, James K.; Aretz, Anthony J.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the three levels of course and program assessment present at the U.S. Air Force Academy, including assessment at the course, departmental, and institutional levels. Points out common elements useful to all assessment efforts. (EV)

  6. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report contains information related to the sampling and chemical analysis of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of a field investigation of ground water contamination.

  7. Dyess Air Force Base, Atlas F Missle Site S8, Launch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Dyess Air Force Base, Atlas F Missle Site S-8, Launch Control Center (LCC), Approximately 3 miles east of Winters, 500 feet southwest of Highway 17700, northwest of Launch Facility, Winters, Runnels County, TX

  8. 77 FR 1913 - Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-12

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Meeting..., Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, Post Office Box 2890, Washington, DC...

  9. [The problems of assessment of the high noise impact on the experts of the Air Force].

    PubMed

    Zinkin, V N; Sheshegov, P M

    2012-01-01

    Air Force specialists are exposed to high intensity noise levels exceeded the maximum permissible levels. Infrasound as a productive factor in accordance with the general technical requirements (OTT) Air Force-86 is not included in the list of standardized factors. The adverse acoustic environment makes the risk of occupational (sensorineural deafness) and professionally-related diseases of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. The system of physical fitness for military service in the Air Force and serving in the Air Force with high-intensity sources of noise, the system of treatment and preventive measures for adverse effects of noise and the procedure for examination of persons with diseases caused by the influence of noise are needed to be reviewed in accordance with the existing state legislative frameworks. PMID:22545451

  10. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  11. 75 FR 8917 - Notice of a Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of a Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation Service, Department of Agriculture. ACTION: Notice of a meeting..., Natural Resources Conservation Service, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW., Room 6165 South...

  12. Thermodynamic Vent System Applied as Propellant Delivery System for Air Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Responding to a request from the Air Force, NASA Lewis Research Center engineers designed a combination pressure control and propellant delivery system based on thermodynamic vent system (TVS) technology. The Air Force is designing a new type of orbit transfer vehicle that uses energy from sunlight to both propel and power the vehicle. Because this vehicle uses propellant at a substantially slower rate than higher-energy rockets, it needed the Lewis-developed TVS technology for long-duration storage of cryogen propellants. Lewis engineers, in conjunction with industry partners, showed how this TVS technology could also be used to deliver propellant to the thruster. The Air Force has now begun the ground test demonstration phase. After successful completion of ground testing, the Air Force plans to use this technology in a space flight as early as 1999.

  13. TEMPORAL GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE FT-2-PLUME AT THE WURTSMITH AIR FORCE BASE, OSCODA, MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) facility has been the focus of several geophysical investigations. After several decades of fire training exercises, significant amounts of hydrocarbons and some solvents seeped into the Subsurface cont...

  14. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  15. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  16. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Techinical Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  17. Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Microwave Equipment Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

  18. 2. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). WrightPatterson Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71, Power Plant Engine Test Torque Stands, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  19. 3. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). WrightPatterson Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71, Power Plant Engine Test Torque Stands, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  20. 6. RETAINING WALLS, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). WrightPatterson Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. RETAINING WALLS, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71, Power Plant Engine Test Torque Stands, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  1. 4. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). WrightPatterson Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. RETAINING WALL, NORTHEAST VIEW (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 71, Power Plant Engine Test Torque Stands, Seventh Street between D & G Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  2. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  3. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  4. 33 CFR 334.600 - TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. 334.600 Section 334... Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. (a) The danger zone. From the west side of... the Commanding Officer, Naval Ordnance Test Unit, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, or such agencies...

  5. 32 CFR 884.11 - Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures for return of an Air Force member to... OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.11 Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States. (a) Include...

  6. 32 CFR 884.11 - Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for return of an Air Force member to... OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.11 Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States. (a) Include...

  7. 32 CFR 884.11 - Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedures for return of an Air Force member to... OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.11 Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States. (a) Include...

  8. 33 CFR 334.750 - Ben's Lake, a tributary of Choctawhatchee Bay, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Choctawhatchee Bay, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area. 334.750 Section 334.750 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.750 Ben's Lake, a tributary of Choctawhatchee Bay, Fla., at Eglin Air Force..., without the permission of the Commander, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, or his authorized...

  9. 33 CFR 334.600 - TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. 334.600 Section 334... Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. (a) The danger zone. From the west side of... the Commanding Officer, Naval Ordnance Test Unit, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, or such agencies...

  10. 32 CFR 884.11 - Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedures for return of an Air Force member to... OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.11 Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States. (a) Include...

  11. 33 CFR 334.750 - Ben's Lake, a tributary of Choctawhatchee Bay, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Choctawhatchee Bay, Fla., at Eglin Air Force Base; restricted area. 334.750 Section 334.750 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.750 Ben's Lake, a tributary of Choctawhatchee Bay, Fla., at Eglin Air Force..., without the permission of the Commander, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, or his authorized...

  12. 33 CFR 334.600 - TRIDENT Basin adjacent to Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Canaveral Harbor at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. 334.600 Section 334... Canaveral Air Force Station, Brevard County, Fla.; danger zone. (a) The danger zone. From the west side of... the Commanding Officer, Naval Ordnance Test Unit, Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, or such agencies...

  13. 32 CFR 884.11 - Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedures for return of an Air Force member to... OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY PERSONNEL DELIVERY OF PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES CIVILIAN AUTHORITIES FOR TRIAL § 884.11 Procedures for return of an Air Force member to the United States. (a) Include...

  14. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  15. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  16. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  17. 77 FR 62221 - Renewal of the Board of Visitors of the U.S. Air Force Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ... of the Secretary Renewal of the Board of Visitors of the U.S. Air Force Academy AGENCY: DoD. ACTION... Visitors of the U.S. Air Force Academy (hereafter referred to as ``the Board''). The Board is a non... relating to the U.S. Air Force Academy, to include morale, discipline, and social climate, the...

  18. New Satellite Measurements of Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing from MODIS, MISR, and POLDER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y.

    2000-01-01

    New set of satellites, MODIS and MISR launched on EOS-Terra and POLDER launched on ADEOS-1, and scheduled for ADEOS-II and PARASOL in orbit with EOS-AQUA, open exciting opportunities to measure aerosol and their radiative forcing of climate. Each of these instruments has a different approach to invert remote sensing data to derive the aerosol properties. MODIS is using wide spectral range 0.47-2.1 micron. MISR is using narrower spectral range (0.44 to 0.87 micron) but observing the same spot from 9 different angles along the satellite track. POLDER using similar wavelengths, uses two dimensional view with a wide angle optics and adds polarization to the inversion process. Among these instruments, we expect to measure the global distribution of aerosol, to distinguish small pollution particles from large particles from deserts and ocean spray. We shall try to measure the aerosol absorption of solar radiation, and their refractive index that indicates the effect of liquid water on the aerosol size and interaction with sunlight. The radiation field measured by these instruments in variety of wavelengths and angles, is also used to derive the effect of the aerosol on reflection of sunlight spectral fluxes to space. When combined with flux measurements at the ground, it gives a complete characterization of the effect of aerosol on solar illumination, heating in the atmosphere and reflection to space.

  19. 78 FR 54634 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ...In accordance with 10 U.S.C. 9355, the U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA) Board of Visitors (BoV) will hold a meeting in Harmon Hall, United States Air Force Academy, in Colorado Springs CO on October 10- 11, 2013. The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. The purpose of this meeting is to review morale and discipline, social climate, curriculum, instruction, infrastructure, fiscal affairs, academic......

  20. Precise time technology for selected Air Force systems: Present status and future requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yannoni, N. F.

    1981-01-01

    Precise time and time interval (PTTI) technology is becoming increasingly significant to Air Force operations as digital techniques find expanded utility in military missions. Timing has a key role in the function as well as in navigation. A survey of the PTTI needs of several Air Force systems is presented. Current technology supporting these needs was reviewed and new requirements are emphasized for systems as they transfer from initial development to final operational deployment.

  1. 78 FR 55686 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ...Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5 U.S.C., Appendix, as amended), the Government in the Sunshine Act of 1976 (5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the United States Air Force Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) meeting will take place 23-24 Sep 2013 at the Secretary of the Air Force Technical and Analytical......

  2. Drag on a Satellite Moving across a Spherical Galaxy: Tidal and Frictional Forces in Short-lived Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpi, Monica; Pallavicini, Andrea

    1998-07-01

    The drag force on a satellite of mass M moving with speed V in the gravitational field of a spherically symmetric background of stars is computed. During the encounter, the stars are subject to a time-dependent force that alters their equilibrium. The resulting distortion in the stellar density field acts back to produce a force FΔ that decelerates the satellite. This force is computed using a perturbative technique known as linear response theory. In this paper, we extend the formalism of linear response to derive the correct expression for the back-reaction force FΔ that applies when the stellar system is described by an equilibrium one-particle distribution function. FΔ is expressed in terms of a suitable correlation function that couples the satellite dynamics to the unperturbed dynamics of the stars. At time t, the force depends upon the whole history of the composite system. In the formalism, we account for the shift of the stellar center of mass resulting from linear momentum conservation. The self-gravity of the response is neglected since it contributes to a higher order in the perturbation. Linear response theory applies also to the case of a satellite orbiting outside the spherical galaxy. The case of a satellite moving on a straight line, at high speed relative to the stellar dispersion velocity, is explored. We find that the satellite during its passage raises (1) global tides in the stellar distribution and (2) a wake, i.e., an overdense region behind its trail. If the satellite motion is external to the galaxy, it suffers a dissipative force that is not exclusively acting along V but acquires a component along R, the position vector relative to the center of the spherical galaxy. We derive the analytical expression of the force in the impulse approximation. In penetrating short-lived encounters, the satellite moves across the stellar distribution and the transient wake excited in the density field is responsible for most of the deceleration. We

  3. Air traffic management system design using satellite based geo-positioning and communications assets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horkin, Phil

    1995-01-01

    The current FAA and ICAO FANS vision of Air Traffic Management will transition the functions of Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance to satellite based assets in the 21st century. Fundamental to widespread acceptance of this vision is a geo-positioning system that can provide worldwide access with best case differential GPS performance, but without the associated problems. A robust communications capability linking-up aircraft and towers to meet the voice and data requirements is also essential. The current GPS constellation does not provide continuous global coverage with a sufficient number of satellites to meet the precision landing requirements as set by the world community. Periodic loss of the minimum number of satellites in view creates an integrity problem, which prevents GPS from becoming the primary system for navigation. Furthermore, there is reluctance on the part of many countries to depend on assets like GPS and GLONASS which are controlled by military communities. This paper addresses these concerns and provides a system solving the key issues associated with navigation, automatic dependent surveillance, and flexible communications. It contains an independent GPS-like navigation system with 27 satellites providing global coverage with a minimum of six in view at all times. Robust communications is provided by a network of TDMA/FDMA communications payloads contained on these satellites. This network can support simultaneous communications for up to 30,000 links, nearly enough to simultaneously support three times the current global fleet of jumbo air passenger aircraft. All of the required hardware is directly traceable to existing designs.

  4. Satellite Models for Global Environmental Change in the NASA Health and Air Quality Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, J.; Estes, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing of the environment offers a unique vantage point that can fill in the gaps of environmental, spatial, and temporal data for tracking disease. Health and Air Quality providers and researchers are effective by the global environmental changes that are occurring and they need environmental data to study and understand the geographic, environmental, and meteorological differences in disease. This presentation maintains a diverse constellation of Earth observing research satellites and sponsors research in developing satellite data applications across a wide spectrum of areas including environmental health; infectious disease; air quality standards, policies, and regulations; and the impact of climate change on health and air quality. Successfully providing predictions with the accuracy and specificity required by decision makers will require advancements over current capabilities in a number of interrelated areas. These areas include observations, modeling systems, forecast development, application integration, and the research to operations transition process. This presentation will highlight many projects on which NASA satellites have been a primary partner with local, state, Federal, and international operational agencies over the past twelve years in these areas. Domestic and International officials have increasingly recognized links between environment and health. Health providers and researchers need environmental data to study and understand the geographic, environmental, and meteorological differences in disease. The presentation is directly related to Earth Observing systems and Global Health Surveillance and will present research results of the remote sensing environmental observations of earth and health applications, which can contribute to the health research. As part of NASA approach and methodology they have used Earth Observation Systems and Applications for Health Models to provide a method for bridging gaps of environmental

  5. Assessing Impact of Aerosol Intercontinental Transport on Regional Air Quality and Climate: What Satellites Can Help

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin

    2011-01-01

    Mounting evidence for intercontinental transport of aerosols suggests that aerosols from a region could significantly affect climate and air quality in downwind regions and continents. Current assessment of these impacts for the most part has been based on global model simulations that show large variability. The aerosol intercontinental transport and its influence on air quality and climate involve many processes at local, regional, and intercontinental scales. There is a pressing need to establish modeling systems that bridge the wide range of scales. The modeling systems need to be evaluated and constrained by observations, including satellite measurements. Columnar loadings of dust and combustion aerosols can be derived from the MODIS and MISR measurements of total aerosol optical depth and particle size and shape information. Characteristic transport heights of dust and combustion aerosols can be determined from the CALIPSO lidar and AIRS measurements. CALIPSO liar and OMI UV technique also have a unique capability of detecting aerosols above clouds, which could offer some insights into aerosol lofting processes and the importance of above-cloud transport pathway. In this presentation, I will discuss our efforts of integrating these satellite measurements and models to assess the significance of intercontinental transport of dust and combustion aerosols on regional air quality and climate.

  6. 78 FR 63459 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force. ACTION..., that the GPS Directorate will host a GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group (SSCWG) meeting on...

  7. Comparative Performance of Male and Female Enlistees on Air Force Selection Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitola, Bert M.; Wilbourn, James M.

    Male and female enlistee samples were compared for total groups and by enlistment region in terms of their performance on the Airman Qualifying Examination and the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery. Women in the Air Force test-retest performance were evaluated on the Armed Forces Women's Selection Test. WAF performance on the AFWST was…

  8. 78 FR 69365 - Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Notice of Meeting of the Agricultural Air Quality Task Force AGENCY: Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). ACTION... Program Office update D. Update on agricultural air quality regulatory issues at EPA E. AAQTF...

  9. 32 CFR 989.7 - Requests from Non-Air Force agencies or entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requester's expense, an analysis of environmental impacts (40 CFR 1506.5), or the requester may be required... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requests from Non-Air Force agencies or entities. 989.7 Section 989.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR...

  10. 32 CFR 989.7 - Requests from Non-Air Force agencies or entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requester's expense, an analysis of environmental impacts (40 CFR 1506.5), or the requester may be required... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requests from Non-Air Force agencies or entities. 989.7 Section 989.7 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR...

  11. Role of Eurasian snow cover in wintertime circulation: Decadal simulations forced with satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsolini, Yvan J.; Kvamstø, Nils G.

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the impact of the Eurasian snow cover extent on the Northern Hemisphere winter circulation by performing a suite of ensemble simulations with the Météo-France "Arpege Climat" atmospheric general circulation model, spanning 2 decades (1979-2000). Observed snow cover derived from satellite infrared and visible imagery has been forced weekly into the model. Variability in autumn-early winter snow cover extent over eastern Eurasia is linked to circulation anomalies over the North Pacific that are influencing the North Atlantic sector in late winter through the development of the Aleutian-Icelandic Low Seesaw teleconnection. The forcing of realistic snow cover in the model augments potential predictability over eastern Eurasia and the North Pacific and improves the hindcast skill score of the Aleutian-Icelandic Low Seesaw teleconnection. Enhanced eastern Eurasia snow cover is associated with an anomalous upper-tropospheric wave train across Eurasia, anomalously high upward wave activity flux, and a displaced stratospheric polar vortex.

  12. Sensitivity of an oceanic general circulation model forced by satellite wind stress fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grima, Nicolas; Bentamy, Abderrahim; Katsaros, Kristina; Quilfen, Yves; Delecluse, Pascale; Levy, Claire

    1999-04-01

    Satellite wind and wind stress fields at the sea surface, derived from the scatterometers on European Remote Sensing satellites 1 and 2 (ERS-1 and ERS-2) are used to drive the ocean general circulation model (OGCM) "OPA" in the tropical oceans. The results of the impact of ERS winds are discussed in terms of the resulting thermocline, current structures, and sea level anomalies. Their adequacy is evaluated on the one hand by comparison with simulations forced by the Arpege-Climat model and on the other hand by comparison with measurements of the Tropical Atmosphere-Ocean (TAO) buoy network and of the TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter. Regarding annual mean values, the thermal and current responses of the OGCM forced by ERS winds are in good agreement with the TAO buoy observations, especially in the central and eastern Pacific Ocean. In these regions the South Equatorial Current, the Equatorial Undercurrent, and the thermocline features simulated by the OGCM forced by scatterometer wind fields are described. The impact of the ERS-1 winds is particularly significant to the description of the main oceanic variability. Compared to the TAO buoy observations, the high-frequency (a few weeks) and the low-frequency of the thermocline and zonal current variations are described. The correlation coefficients between the time series of the thermocline simulated by ERS winds and that observed by the TAO buoy network are highly significant; their mean value is 0.73, over the whole basin width, while it is 0.58 between Arpege model simulation and buoy observations. At the equator the time series of the zonal current simulated by the ERS winds, at three locations (110°W, 140°W, and 165°E) and at two depths, are compared to the TAO current meter and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements. The mean value of the significant correlation coefficients computed with the in situ measurements is 0.72 for ERS, while it is 0.51 for the Arpege-Climat model. Thus ERS wind fields

  13. Electromagnetic forces in the air gap of a permanent magnet linear generator at no load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, K.; Danielsson, O.; Leijon, M.

    2006-02-01

    The basis for the work is the slow speed energy conversion of ocean wave energy into electricity using a direct-drive three-phase permanent magnetized linear generator. One of several important issues is the normal forces in the air gap, which is critical when designing the support structure of the generator. The electromagnetic forces in the air gap have been analyzed using Maxwell stress tensor method implemented in a two- dimensional finite element code. Simplified analytic calculations are made in order to validate the results from the extensive computer calculations. The normal electromagnetic forces in the air gap, Fδ, are analyzed for a two-sided linear generator at no load. An unstable condition of the global force on the piston occurs due to the fast increasing normal force as the air gap width decreases. A horizontal displacement of the piston from a neutral position with 3 mm air gap on both sides produces a resulting horizontal force on the piston, increasing with the displacement. A displacement of 1 mm gives a resulting horizontal force on the piston of 5.5 kN per pole and meter of core length, which is increased to 9 kN per pole and meter of core length for a displacement of 1.5 mm. Furthermore, the normal force varies due to cogging as the piston moves vertically. At a constant air gap width of 3 mm the normal forces per pole are varying between 9.9 and 11.3 kN/m of core length as the piston is moving from one pole to the next.

  14. Estimating the Radiative Forcing of Carbonaceous Aerosols over California based on Satellite and Ground Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yangyang; Bahadur, R.; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-10-04

    Carbonaceous aerosols have the potential to impact climate both through directly absorbing incoming solar radiation, and by indirectly affecting the cloud layer. To quantify this impact recent modeling studies have made great efforts to simulate both the spatial and temporal distribution of carbonaceous aerosols and their associated radiative forcing. This study makes the first observationally constrained assessment of the direct radiative forcing of carbonaceous aerosols at a regional scale over California. By exploiting multiple observations (including ground sites and satellites), we constructed the distribution of aerosol optical depths and aerosol absorption optical depths over California for a ten-year period (2000-2010). The total solar absorption was then partitioned into contributions from elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and dust aerosols using a newly developed scheme. Aerosol absorption optical depth due to carbonaceous aerosols (EC and OC) at 440 nm is 50%-200% larger than natural dust, with EC contributing the bulk (70%-90%). Observationally constrained EC absorption agrees reasonably well with estimates from regional transport models, but the model underestimates the OC AAOD by at least 50%. We estimate that the TOA warming from carbonaceous aerosols is 0.7 W/m2 and the TOA forcing due to OC is close to zero. The atmospheric heating of carbonaceous aerosols is 2.2-2.9 W/m2, of which EC contributed about 80-90%. The atmospheric heating due to OC is estimated to be 0.1 to 0.4 W/m2, larger than model simulations. The surface brightening due to EC reduction over the last two decades is estimated to be 1.5-3.5 W/m2.

  15. Temporal and spatial assessments of minimum air temperature using satellite surface temperature measurements in Massachusetts, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Itai; Chudnovsky, Alexandra; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Although meteorological stations provide accurate air temperature observations, their spatial coverage is limited and thus often insufficient for epidemiological studies. Satellite data expand spatial coverage, enhancing our ability to estimate near surface air temperature (Ta). However, the derivation of Ta from surface temperature (Ts) measured by satellites is far from being straightforward. In this study, we present a novel approach that incorporates land use regression, meteorological variables and spatial smoothing to first calibrate between Ts and Ta on a daily basis and then predict Ta for days when satellite Ts data were not available. We applied mixed regression models with daily random slopes to calibrate Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Ts data with monitored Ta measurements for 2003. Then, we used a generalized additive mixed model with spatial smoothing to estimate Ta in days with missing Ts. Out-of-sample tenfold cross-validation was used to quantify the accuracy of our predictions. Our model performance was excellent for both days with available Ts and days without Ts observations (mean out-of-sample R2=0.946 and R2=0.941 respectively). Furthermore, based on the high quality predictions we investigated the spatial patterns of Ta within the study domain as they relate to urban vs. non-urban land uses. PMID:22721687

  16. Particulate Matter Air Quality Assessment using Integrated Surface, Satellite, and Meteorological Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, P.; Christopher, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    Recent developments in satellite remote sensing of aerosols over land provide new tools for monitoring particulate matter air quality with high temporal and spatial resolution. Monitoring particulate matter air quality from space borne measurements is largely confined to relating columnar satellite retrievals of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) with ground measurements of PM2.5 mass concentration. However, vertical distribution of aerosols and meteorological effects such as wind speed, temperature, and humidity also play a major role in this AOT-PM2.5 relationship. In this study, using 3 years of coincident hourly PM2.5 mass concentration (PM2.5 or PM2.5), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer-derived AOT, and rapid update cycle meteorological fields, we developed multiple regression equations and neural network models as function of season the continental United States. Our goal is to examine whether the use of meteorological fields will improve the relationship between PM2.5 and AOT. Our results indicate that there is up to threefold improvement in the correlation coefficients while using meteorological information through multiple regression methods compared to two variant regression (AOT versus PM2.5) equations. A 20-50% improvement in root-mean square error is observed when adding temperature and boundary layer height to the AOT-PM2.5 relationship. These results and analysis are useful to research and operational communities that seek to improve the use of satellite information for assessing surface PM2.5.

  17. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  18. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  19. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...

  20. 33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base... Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U.S. Air Force, MacDill Air Force Base...″, longitude 82°33′02.44″; and thence to a point on the shore line of MacDill Air Force Base at latitude...