Science.gov

Sample records for air formaldehyde concentrations

  1. Reducing indoor air formaldehyde concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, B.; Hermanns, K.

    1985-08-01

    Urea-formaldehyde resin bonded particle board, medium density fiberboard and plywood paneling are used as flooring, wall paneling, for cabinet work and in furniture, and are present in almost every office, home and public building. If large quantities of these products are used in poorly ventilated spaces, high manufacturing quality control is necessary to avoid problems of latent formaldehyde release. Indoor air formaldehyde concentrations depend on the nature of the product, the product surface to air volume (loading) factor, temperature, humidity, age and product emission rates. Standard test methods are now available for measuring product emission rates that make it possible to predict the performance of UF-bonded pressed wood materials if use conditions and environmental parameters are known. Recent modifications in adhesive and board manufacturing parameters have made it possible to reduce formaldehyde emission significantly, and UF-bonded wood products are now capable of meeting indoor air quality standard levels of 0.1 ppm under almost all customary loading conditions.

  2. Effect of an ozone-generating air-purifying device on reducing concentrations of formaldehyde in air

    SciTech Connect

    Esswein, E.J.; Boeniger, M.F.

    1994-02-01

    Formaldehyde, an air contaminant found in many indoor air investigations, poses distinct occupational exposure hazards in certain job categories (e.g., mortuary science) but is also of concern when found or suspected in office buildings and homes. A variety of air-purifying devices (APDs) are currently available or marketed for application to reduce or remove concentrations of a variety of indoor air pollutants through the use of ozone as a chemical oxidant. An investigation was conducted to determine if concentrations of formaldehyde similar to those found in industrial hygiene evaluations of funeral homes could be reduced with the use of an ozone-generating APD. An ozone-generating APD was placed in an exposure chamber and formaldehyde-containing embalming solution was allowed to evaporate naturally, creating peak and mean chamber concentrations of 2.5 and 1.3 ppm, respectively. Continuous-reading instruments were used to sample for formaldehyde and ozone. Active sampling methods were also used to sample simultaneously for formaldehyde and a possible reactant product, formic acid. Triplicate measurements were made in each of three evaluations: formaldehyde alone, ozone alone, and formaldehyde and ozone combined. Concentrations of formaldehyde were virtually identical with and without 0.5 ppm ozone. No reduction in formaldehyde concentration was found during a 90-minute evaluation using ozone at this concentration with peak and average concentrations of approximately 2.5 and 1.3 ppm formaldehyde, respectively. The results of this investigation suggest that the use of ozone is ineffective in reducing concentrations of formaldehyde. Because ozone has demonstrated health hazards, and is a regulated air contaminant in both the occupational and ambient environment, the use of ozone as an air purification agent in indoor air does not seem warranted. 25 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Measurement of formaldehyde concentrations in a subatmospheric steam-formaldehyde autoclave.

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, D; Wiseman, D

    1979-01-01

    A method has been developed for measuring formaldehyde concentrations in a subatmospheric steam-formaldehyde autoclave. Data obtained using this method indicate that the concentration of formaldehyde in the chamber atmosphere is not homogeneous and that it decreases rapidly with time. The penetration of formaldehyde vapour into narrow tubes has also been investigated and was shown to be dependent on the length-to-bore ratio of the tubes. The formaldehyde concentration within the tubes could be increased by using a lower vacuum in the air removal stage at the beginning of the cycle. PMID:572833

  4. Indoor air quality in the Karns research houses: baseline measurements and impact of indoor environmental parameters on formaldehyde concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T. G.; Fung, K. W.; Tromberg, B. J.; Hawthorne, A. R.

    1985-12-01

    Baseline indoor air quality measurements, a nine-month radon study, and an environmental parameters study examining the impact of indoor temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) levels on formaldehyde (CH2O) concentrations have been performed in three unoccupied research homes located in Karns, Tennessee. Inter-house comparison measurements of (1) CH2O concentration, (2) CH20 emission rates from primary CH20 emission sources, (3) radon and radon daughter concentrations, and (4) air exchange rates indicate that the three homes are similar. The results of the nine-month radon study indicate indoor concentrations consistently below the EPA recommended level of 4 pCi/L. Evidence was found that crawl-space concentrations may be reduced using heat pump systems whose outdoor units circulate fresh air through the crawl-spaoe. The modeled results of the environmental parameters study indicate approximate fourfold increases in CH20 concentrations from 0.07 to 0.27 ppm for seasonal T and RH conditions of 20°C, 30% RH and 29°C, 80% RH, respectively. Evaluation of these environmental parameters study data with steady-state CH2O concentration models developed from laboratory studies of the environmental dependence of CH2O emissions from particleboard underlayment indicate good correlations between the laboratory and field studies.

  5. [Attempt to reduce the formaldehyde concentration by blowing cooled fresh air down in to the breathing zone of medical students from an admission port on the ceiling during gross anatomy class].

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Masaaki; Sakai, Makoto; Ishikawa, Youichi; Murakami, Kunio; Kimura, Akihiko; Kakuta, Sachiko; Sato, Fumi

    2008-09-01

    Cadavers in gross anatomy laboratories at most medical schools are conventionally embalmed in formaldehyde solution, which is carcinogenic to humans. Medical students and instructors are thus exposed to formaldehyde vapors emitted from cadavers during dissection. To reduce high formaldehyde concentrations in the breathing zone above cadavers being examined by anatomy medical students provisionally, dissection beds were located under existing admission ports on the ceiling to supply cooled fresh air from the admission port blowing downward on to the cadaver. In all cases, compared to normal condition, the downward flow of cooled fresh air from an admission port reduced formaldehyde concentrations by 0.09-0.98 ppm and reduced to 12.6-65.4% in the air above a cadaver in the breathing zone of students. The formaldehyde concentrations above cadavers under admission ports were not more than the formaldehyde concentrations between beds representing the indoor formaldehyde concentrations. Although the application of an existing admission port on the ceiling in this study did not remove formaldehyde, the downflow of cooled fresh air using this system reduced the formaldehyde concentration in the air above cadavers being attended by anatomy students during dissections. These results suggest the need for reducing formaldehyde levels in gross anatomy laboratories using fundamental countermeasures in order to satisfy the guidelines of 0.08 ppm established by the World Health Organization and the Japan Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare.

  6. Formaldehyde: a candidate toxic air contaminant. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, B.; Parker, T.

    1988-03-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a gas widely used in adhesives and resins, textiles, embalming fluids, fungicides, air fresheners, and cosmetics. It is directly emitted into the ambient outdoor air from vehicular and stationary sources, and is also produced in the atmosphere from other substances by photochemical smog processes. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has determined that there is sufficient evidence for carcinogenicity of formaldehyde to animals, and limited evidence for carcinogenicity to humans. EPA classifies formaldehyde as a probable human carcinogen with a one in a million risk concentration of 0.08 ppb.

  7. Formaldehyde concentrations in biology department teaching facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Korky, J.K.; Schwarz, S.R.; Lustigman, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    As students and faculty in the biological sciences can attest, low grade exposure to formaldehyde by skin contact and inhalation during dissection is quite irritating. Health effects noted upon exposure to formaldehyde at concentrations of 0.1 to 5 ppm are burning of the eyes, lacrimation, and general irritation to the upper respiratory passages. Symptoms reported for higher exposures, 10 to 20 ppm, include coughing, tightening of the chest, headache and palpitation of the heart. Long exposures at 50 to 100 ppm or more might result in pulmonary edema, pneumonitis, and even death. There is also concern with regard to potential long term detrimental effects. Formaldehyde has been cited as a possible carcinogen in animals. It is a known mutagen in laboratory experimental systems involving Drosophilia, grasshoppers, flowering plants, fungi and bacteria. Animal testing has led investigators to postulate that the primary damage resulting from formaldehyde exposure may involve DNA synthesis and ribosomal RNA transcription. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (NIOSH) investigators have been studying occupational exposure to formaldehyde for over a decade in a variety of industries. This study was undertaken to assess formaldehyde concentrations in biology department dissecting facilities in the 1982-1983 academic year in order if routine dissection produces levels of formaldehyde which were unsafe according to NIOSH and OSHA standards. Chronic formaldehyde exposure is cause for greater concern than incidental exposure.

  8. Formaldehyde Concentration Dynamics of the International Space Station Cabin Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    Formaldehyde presents a significant challenge to maintaining cabin air quality on board crewed spacecraft. Generation sources include offgassing from a variety of non-metallic materials as well as human metabolism. Because generation sources are pervasive and human health can be affected by continual exposure to low concentrations, toxicology and air quality control engineering experts jointly identified formaldehyde as a key compound to be monitored as part the International Space Station's (ISS) environmental health monitoring and maintenance program. Data acquired from in-flight air quality monitoring methods are the basis for assessing the cabin environment's suitability for long-term habitation and monitoring the performance of passive and active controls that are in place to minimize crew exposure. Formaldehyde concentration trends and dynamics served in the ISS cabin atmosphere are reviewed implications to present and future flight operations discussed.

  9. Formaldehyde--study of indoor air pollution in Austria.

    PubMed

    Koeck, M; Pichler-Semmelrock, F P; Schlacher, R

    1997-09-01

    As part of a long-term study of indoor air pollution, formaldehyde concentrations were determined in 792 apartments following complaints by inhabitants. Measurements were carried out using Draeger tubes as well as the acetyl acetone method. In 157 apartments, HCHO concentrations of more than 0.1 ppm, exceeding the recommended standard values for indoor air concentrations, were determined. The concentrations determined tended to decrease over time. As far as they were caused by furnishings, they were limited to the spaces where these furnishings were installed. In older-style prefabricated houses with foam-filled particle-board wall systems, concentrations of more than 1.0 ppm were determined. In spite of legal regulations governing the release of formaldehyde from substances, preparations and products containing formaldehyde which have been in existence in Austria since 1990, this substance must still be considered as a possible factor of indoor pollution in causing feelings of ill-health. PMID:9386898

  10. Air formaldehyde and solvent concentrations during surface coating with acid-curing lacquers and paints in the woodworking and furniture industry.

    PubMed

    Thorud, Syvert; Gjolstad, Merete; Ellingsen, Dag G; Molander, Paal

    2005-06-01

    An investigation of contemporary exposure to formaldehyde and organic solvents has been carried out during surface coating with acid-curing lacquers and paints in the Norwegian woodworking and furniture industry over a period of 3 years. The investigation covered 27 factories of different sizes and with different types of production, and totally 557 parallel formaldehyde and solvent samples were collected. The formaldehyde concentration (geometric mean) was 0.15 ppm (range 0.01-1.48 ppm) with about 10% of the samples exceeding the Norwegian occupational exposure limit of 0.5 ppm. The solvent concentration as additive effect (geometric mean) was 0.13 (range 0.0004-5.08) and about 5% of the samples exceeded the Norwegian occupational exposure limit. The most frequently occurring solvents from acid-curing lacquers were n-butyl acetate, ethanol, ethyl acetate and 1-butanol, which were found in 88-98% of the samples. Toluene, n-butyl acetate and 1-butanol were the only solvents with maximum concentrations exceeding their respective occupational exposure limits. Curtain painting machine operators were exposed to the highest concentrations of both formaldehyde (geometric mean 0.51 ppm, range 0.08-1.48 ppm) and organic solvents (additive effect, geometric mean 1.18, range 0.02-5.08). Other painting application work tasks such as automatic and manual spray-painting, manual painting and dip painting, showed on average considerably lower concentrations of both formaldehyde (geometric means 0.07-0.16 ppm) and organic solvents (additive effect, geometric mean 0.02-0.18). Non-painting work tasks also displayed moderate concentrations of formaldehyde (geometric means 0.11-0.17 ppm) and organic solvents (additive effect, geometric mean 0.04-0.07).

  11. Measurement of formaldehyde in clean air

    SciTech Connect

    Neitzert, V.; Seiler, W.

    1981-01-01

    A method for the measurement of small amounts of formaldehyde in air has been developed. The method is based on the derivatization of HCHO with 2.4-Denetrophenylhydragine, forming 2.4-Dentrophylhydragine, measured with GC-ECD-technique. HCHO is preconcentrated using a cryogenic sampling technique. The detection limit is 0.05 ppbv for a sampling volume of 200 liter. The method has been applied for measurements in continental and marine air masses showing HCHO mixing ratios of 0.4--5.0 ppbv and 0.2--1.0 ppbv, respectively. HCHO mixing ratios show diurnal variations with maximum values during the early afternoon and minimum values during the early morning. In continental air, HCHO mixing ratios are positively correlated with CO and SO/sub 2/, indicating anthropogenic HCHO sources which are estimated to be 6--11 x 10/sup 12/g/year/sup -1/ on a global scale.

  12. Predicting formaldehyde concentrations in manufactured housing resulting from medium-density fiberboard

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, S.

    1988-04-01

    HUD previously issued Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards limiting formaldehyde emissions of particleboard and plywood paneling that were manufactured using urea-formaldehyde resins for use in manufactured homes. The report uses indoor air quality models to predict how much medium-density fiberboard(mdf) may be added to manufactured homes already containing maximum loadings of particleboard and plywood paneling, without raising the formaldehyde concentration beyond 400 ppb. It was found that any combination of mdf that results in a chamber-test concentration of 300 ppb may be added to such a home. A sensitivity analysis was done to predict how this formaldehyde concentration limit is affected by variations in temperature, relative humidity, and air-exchange rate. It was concluded that limiting chamber concentrations to 200 ppb would allow for small errors in temperature, relative humidity, and air-exchange rate that might be expected to arise in practice.

  13. Validation of models for predicting formaldehyde concentrations in residences due to pressed-wood products

    SciTech Connect

    Silberstein, S.; Grot, R.A.; Ishiguro, K.; Mulligan, J.L.

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes a laboratory project to assess the accuracy of emission and indoor air quality models to be used in predicting formaldehyde concentrations in residences due to pressed-wood products make with urea-formaldehyde bonding resins. The products tested were particle board underlayment, hardwood-plywood paneling and medium-density fiberboard (mdf). The products were initially characterized in chambers by measuring their formaldehyde surface emission rates over a range of formaldehyde concentrations, air exchange rates and two combinations of temperature and relative humidity. They were then installed in a two-room prototype house in three different combinations (underlayment flooring only; underlayment flooring and paneling; and underlayment flooring, paneling, and mdf). The equilibrium formaldehyde concentrations were monitored as a function of air exchange rate. Particle board underlayment and mdf, but not paneling, behaved as the emission model predicted over a large concentration range, under both sets of temperature and relative humidity. Good agreement was also obtained between measured formaldehyde concentrations and those predicted by a mass-balance indoor air quality model.

  14. In vitro study on cytotoxicity and intracellular formaldehyde concentration changes after exposure to formaldehyde and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ke, Y J; Qin, X D; Zhang, Y C; Li, H; Li, R; Yuan, J L; Yang, X; Ding, S M

    2014-08-01

    HeLa cells were exposed to formaldehyde and its metabolic derivatives, methanol, formic acid, and acetaldehyde, to investigate that the toxicity of formaldehyde is not caused by the chemical group. After 1 h of treatment with formaldehyde, mitochondrial assays showed that low concentrations (e.g. 10 μmol/L) of formaldehyde promoted growth of the HeLa cells, while higher concentrations (e.g. ≥62.5 μmol/L) inhibited cell growth; while all four chemicals at a concentration of 125 μmol/L affected cell growth, formaldehyde affected the largest. Reactive oxygen species concentration increased with the concentration of the exposure chemical. The endogenous formaldehyde content increased the most in the formaldehyde group, but in other three groups, it did not increase as the exposure concentration increased. Expression of dehydrogenase (formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH)) in the formaldehyde (10.40) and methanol (10.60) groups increased significantly compared with the control (1), while it was similar to the control in formic acid (0.90) and acetaldehyde (1.10) groups. Our results suggest that formaldehyde could affect cell activity and even enter cells. Exposure to formaldehyde changes the endogenous formaldehyde concentration in cells within 24 h, and this induces expression of FDH for formaldehyde degradation to maintain the formaldehyde balance. The toxicity of formaldehyde is not caused by the carbon atoms in the aldehyde, hydroxyl, or carboxyl groups. Formaldehyde is hypothesized to be an important signaling molecule in the regulation of cell growth and maintenance of the endogenous formaldehyde level. PMID:24220877

  15. In vitro study on cytotoxicity and intracellular formaldehyde concentration changes after exposure to formaldehyde and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ke, Y J; Qin, X D; Zhang, Y C; Li, H; Li, R; Yuan, J L; Yang, X; Ding, S M

    2014-08-01

    HeLa cells were exposed to formaldehyde and its metabolic derivatives, methanol, formic acid, and acetaldehyde, to investigate that the toxicity of formaldehyde is not caused by the chemical group. After 1 h of treatment with formaldehyde, mitochondrial assays showed that low concentrations (e.g. 10 μmol/L) of formaldehyde promoted growth of the HeLa cells, while higher concentrations (e.g. ≥62.5 μmol/L) inhibited cell growth; while all four chemicals at a concentration of 125 μmol/L affected cell growth, formaldehyde affected the largest. Reactive oxygen species concentration increased with the concentration of the exposure chemical. The endogenous formaldehyde content increased the most in the formaldehyde group, but in other three groups, it did not increase as the exposure concentration increased. Expression of dehydrogenase (formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH)) in the formaldehyde (10.40) and methanol (10.60) groups increased significantly compared with the control (1), while it was similar to the control in formic acid (0.90) and acetaldehyde (1.10) groups. Our results suggest that formaldehyde could affect cell activity and even enter cells. Exposure to formaldehyde changes the endogenous formaldehyde concentration in cells within 24 h, and this induces expression of FDH for formaldehyde degradation to maintain the formaldehyde balance. The toxicity of formaldehyde is not caused by the carbon atoms in the aldehyde, hydroxyl, or carboxyl groups. Formaldehyde is hypothesized to be an important signaling molecule in the regulation of cell growth and maintenance of the endogenous formaldehyde level.

  16. Housing characteristics and indoor concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde in Quebec City, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Nicolas L; Gauvin, Denis; Guay, Mireille; Héroux, Marie-Eve; Dupuis, Geneviève; Legris, Michel; Chan, Cecilia C; Dietz, Russell N; Lévesque, Benoît

    2006-09-01

    Concentrations of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde were determined in a study of 96 homes in Quebec City, Canada, between January and April 2005. In addition, relative humidity, temperature, and air change rates were measured in homes, and housing characteristics were documented through a questionnaire to occupants. Half of the homes had ventilation rates below 7.5 L/s person. Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 3.3 to 29.1 microg/m3 (geometric mean 8.3 microg/m3) and from 9.6 to 90.0 microg/m3 (geometric mean of 29.5 microg/m3), respectively. The housing characteristics documented in the study explained approximately half of the variance of NO2 and formaldehyde. NO2 concentrations in homes were positively correlated with air change rates (indicating a significant contribution of outdoor sources to indoor levels) and were significantly elevated in homes equipped with gas stoves and, to a lesser extent, in homes with gas heating systems. Formaldehyde concentrations were negatively correlated with air change rates and were significantly elevated in homes heated by electrical systems, in those with new wooden or melamine furniture purchased in the previous 12 months, and in those where painting or varnishing had been done in the sampled room in the previous 12 months. Results did not indicate any significant contribution of indoor combustion sources, including wood-burning appliances, to indoor levels of formaldehyde. These results suggest that formaldehyde concentrations in Quebec City homes are caused primarily by off-gassing, and that increasing air change rates in homes could reduce exposure to this compound. More generally, our findings confirm the influence of housing characteristics on indoor concentrations of NO2 and formaldehyde.

  17. [Research on formaldehyde concentration detection system based on photo-elastic modulation].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-Jun; Jiao, Ning; Wang, Rui-Jun; Lei, Shu-Feng; Wang, Gao

    2013-12-01

    There is a growing number of environmental pollution caused by excessive indoor formaldehyde, and in order to quickly and accurately quantify the concentration of formaldehyde gas in indoor air, a system for detecting the concentration of formaldehyde gas based on photo-elastic modulation was designed. It consists of the infrared light source, filters, elastic light modulator, and infrared detectors, and photo-elastic crystal refractive index of cyclical changes was controlled by elastic light modulator. Refractive index caused by the changes in the optical path provided a spectrum distribution function of the optical path difference. Optical path difference function of the system was derived through the HITRAN spectral database. Experiments were carried out using infrared light source combined with narrow band filters, and the transmittance of the center wavelength was more than 90%. Photo-elastic crystal is ZnSe crystal as photo-elastic light modulator, and the drive frequency of the system is 100 kHz. For three different environments at different locations, 10 groups of sample gas were collected for analysis, and the concentration of formaldehyde gas was detected using standard spectrometer and the system for comparing the test data. Experimental results show that when the concentration of formaldehyde gas is high, the system performance is good; When the concentration of formaldehyde gas is low, the signal-to-noise ratio of the system is decreased, and the detection accuracy is slightly reduced, but it still meets the design requirements. PMID:24611392

  18. Law and features of TVOC and Formaldehyde pollution in urban indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Chenchen; Chen, Weidong; Guo, Min; Weng, Mili; Yan, Gang; Shen, Xueyou

    2016-05-01

    There are several categories of indoor air pollutants. Organic pollutants are the most common ones. This study chooses TVOC and Formaldehyde, two of the typical pollutants, as indicators of evaluating household indoor air pollution and improves the TVOC concentration prediction model through the samples of indoor air taken from 3122 households. This study also categorizes and explains the features of household indoor air pollution based on the TVOC and Formaldehyde models as well as a large amount of sample measurement. Moreover, this study combines the TVOC model with the Formaldehyde model to calculate and verify the critical values of each type of indoor air pollution. In this study, indoor air pollution is categorized into three types: decoration pollution, consumption pollution and transition pollution. During the first 12 months after decoration, decoration pollution is the primary pollution type, both TVOC and Formaldehyde are highly concentrated while sometimes seriously over the standard. Pollutants mainly come from volatile sources. After the first 12 month but before 24 months the indoor air pollution is transition pollution. Both decoration materials and human activates affect the indoor air quality. 24 months after decoration, it transits into consumption pollution. In this stage, the main pollutants come from combustion sources, and concentration of pollutants fluctuates with the appearance and disappearance of the sources.

  19. Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowatsch, Stefan

    Formaldehyde, as an aqueous solution ranging from 37 to 50 wt%, continues to be the preferred aldehyde for reaction with phenol for the preparation of phenolic resins. Over 30 million metric tons of formaldehyde represent the global worldwide consumption of formaldehyde for an array of products, besides phenolic resins. These include urea formaldehyde resins, melamine formaldehyde resins, polyacetal resins, methylenebis (4-phenyl isocyanate), butanediol, pentaerythritol, and others.

  20. [Observational study of formaldehyde in air, rain and fog water at a site on the Mangdang Mountain of Fujian, China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-yan; Wang, Hui-xiang; Ma, Yi-yuan

    2010-08-01

    Through 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, the levels of formaldehyde in ambient air, rain and fog samples were measured in Mangdang Mountain, Fujian Province, from March to April 2009. The average concentrations of formaldehyde in ambient air, rain and fog are 4.0 x 10(-10), 2.19 micromol/L and 2.94 micromol/L, respectively. Based on previous researches, this study described formaldehyde hydrolysis and reacting with S(IV) and other chemical reaction processes in liquid phase, explaining the phenomenon that the solubility of formaldehyde in the liquid phase is higher than the theoretical value. On-site measured Henry coefficients (Hme) and the effective Henry coefficients (H*) were derived from concentration of formaldehyde in ambient air, rain and fog samples and references. Comparing Hme and H*, this study found that the measured liquid phase concentrations of formaldehyde are higher than the theoretical concentrations, consistent with the references. The further founding is that Hme/H* in fog is higher than in rain, proving the result of Mangdang Mountain that the concentration of formaldehyde in fog is higher than in rain. Considering the climatic characteristics of Mangdang Mountain in spring, the wet deposition of formaldehyde is an important way in this area.

  1. Concentrations of formaldehyde and other carbonyls in environments affected by incense burning.

    PubMed

    Ho, Steven Sai Hang; Yu, Jian Zhen

    2002-10-01

    Burning incense to pay homage to deities is common in Chinese homes and temples. Air samples were collected and analyzed for carbonyls from a home and a temple in Hong Kong where incense burning occurs on a daily basis. Carbonyls in the air were trapped on a solid sorbent coated with O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine, followed by thermal desorption and subsequent GC/MS analysis. The carbonyls identified include formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, 2-furfural, benzaldehyde, glyoxal, and methylglyoxal. The levels of the above carbonyls correlate with the intensity of the incense-burning activities. The total mixing ratios of the carbonyls in the temple exceed those in the ambient air outside the temple by 11-23 times. Formaldehyde is the most abundant species, contributing to approximately 55% of the total carbonyl mixing ratios in both the temple and the home environments during incense burning. The mixing ratio of formaldehyde ranges from 108 to 346 ppbv in the temple and averages 103 ppbv in the home during incense burning. These values exceed the World Health Organization (WHO) air quality guideline of 100 microg m(-3) (88 ppbv) for formaldehyde. The highest formaldehyde level in the temple exceeds the WHO guideline by 3 times at peak incense burning hours. The mixing ratio of acrolein in the temple ranges from 20 to 99 ppbv, approaching or exceeding the WHO air quality guideline of 50 microg m(-3) (22 ppbv) for acrolein. Our measurements indicate that incense burning significantly elevates the concentrations of a number of carbonyls, most notably formaldehyde and acrolein, in the surrounding environments. This study provides preliminary insights on indoor air quality problems created by incense burning.

  2. Identifying an indoor air exposure limit for formaldehyde considering both irritation and cancer hazards

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a well-studied chemical and effects from inhalation exposures have been extensively characterized in numerous controlled studies with human volunteers, including asthmatics and other sensitive individuals, which provide a rich database on exposure concentrations that can reliably produce the symptoms of sensory irritation. Although individuals can differ in their sensitivity to odor and eye irritation, the majority of authoritative reviews of the formaldehyde literature have concluded that an air concentration of 0.3 ppm will provide protection from eye irritation for virtually everyone. A weight of evidence-based formaldehyde exposure limit of 0.1 ppm (100 ppb) is recommended as an indoor air level for all individuals for odor detection and sensory irritation. It has recently been suggested by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the National Toxicology Program (NTP), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) that formaldehyde is causally associated with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) and leukemia. This has led US EPA to conclude that irritation is not the most sensitive toxic endpoint and that carcinogenicity should dictate how to establish exposure limits for formaldehyde. In this review, a number of lines of reasoning and substantial scientific evidence are described and discussed, which leads to a conclusion that neither point of contact nor systemic effects of any type, including NPC or leukemia, are causally associated with exposure to formaldehyde. This conclusion supports the view that the equivocal epidemiology studies that suggest otherwise are almost certainly flawed by identified or yet to be unidentified confounding variables. Thus, this assessment concludes that a formaldehyde indoor air limit of 0.1 ppm should protect even particularly susceptible individuals from both irritation effects and any potential cancer hazard. PMID:21635194

  3. The predicted impact of increased formaldehyde emissions from industrial flares on ozone concentrations in Houston, TX.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. T.; Vizuete, W.

    2015-12-01

    Houston features one of the largest concentrations of the petrochemical industry in all of North America and flares are widely used there as the final treatment process for unwanted volatile organic compounds. These flares have the potential to produce formaldehyde as the result of incomplete combustion. Formaldehyde emissions are an important precursor to producing hydroxyl radicals and thus can impact atmospheric chemistry and the formation of ozone. Formaldehyde emissions from flares, however, are difficult to measure in situ. Recently, alternative measurement techniques have been developed, like open path optical methods, that allow the direct measurement of flare emissions from the facility's fence line (Johansson et al., 2014; Pikelnaya, Flynn, Tsai, & Stutz, 2013). This observational data indicates that the emission rate of formaldehyde from flares is about 10-20 times greater than those found in the regulatory models developed by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality's (TCEQ). This research will use air quality models to quantify the impact that increased formaldehyde emission from flares will have on Houston ozone concentrations. This study relies on the CAMx model (version 6.1) and emission data developed by Alpine Geophysics LLC (AG) and Climate & Atmospheric Research Associates (CARA) based on the combined databases from TCEQ, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and National Emission Inventory (NEI2008). This model also used meteorology data from the results of WRF-ARW dynamics. The CAMx generated process analysis data will also be used to quantify changes in radical budgets and NOx budgets critical to ozone production.

  4. The use of biofilters to improve indoor air quality: the removal of toluene, TCE, and formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Darlington, A; Dixon, M A; Pilger, C

    1998-01-01

    A biofilter composed of a scrubber, a hydroponic planting system, and an aquatic system with green plants as a base maintained air quality within part of a modern office building. The scrubber was composed of five parallel fiberglass modules with external faces of porous lava rock. The face, largely covered with mosses, was wetted by recirculating water. Air was drawn through the scrubber and the immediately adjacent hydroponic region by a dedicated air handling system. The system was challenged for 4 weeks with three common indoor organic pollutants and removed significant amounts of all compounds. A single pass through the scrubber removed 10% of the trichloroethylene and 50% of the toluene. A single pass lowered formaldehyde air concentrations to 13 micrograms m-3 irrespective of influent levels (ranging between 30 and 90 micrograms m-3). The aquatic system accumulated trichloroethylene but neither toluene nor formaldehyde, suggesting the rapid breakdown of these materials. The botanical components removed some pollutants.

  5. Formaldehyde

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Formaldehyde ; CASRN 50 - 00 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  6. Validation of models for predicting formaldehyde concentrations in residences due to pressed wood products. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Grot, R.A.; Silberstein, S.; Ishiguro, K.

    1985-09-01

    The interim report describes procedures and presents results of the first phase of a laboratory project undertaken at the National Bureau of Standards for the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). The purpose of the project is to assess the accuracy of emission and indoor-air-quality models to be used by CPSC in predicting formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations in residences due to pressed-wood products made with urea-formaldehyde bonding resins, namely particleboard underlayment, hardwood-plywood paneling and medium-density fiberboard (MDF). In phase I, these products were characterized in medium-size dynamic measuring chambers by measuring their HCHO surface emission rates over a range of HCHO concentrations, at 23C and 50% RH. They were then installed in a two-room prototype house and the equilibrium HCHO concentrations were monitored as a function of air exchange rate. Excellent agreement was obtained between measured HCHO concentrations and those predicted by a mass-balance indoor air quality model. In the next phase, the study will be repeated at various different temperatures and relative humidities so that models predicting HCHO surface emission rate as a function of temperature and humidity can be tested.

  7. Formaldehyde emission behavior of building materials: on-site measurements and modeling approach to predict indoor air pollution.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Delphine; Mocho, Pierre; Desauziers, Valérie; Plaisance, Hervé

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate formaldehyde emission behavior of building materials from on-site measurements of air phase concentration at material surface used as input data of a box model to estimate the indoor air pollution of a newly built classroom. The relevance of this approach was explored using CFD modeling. In this box model, the contribution of building materials to indoor air pollution was estimated with two parameters: the convective mass transfer coefficient in the material/air boundary layer and the on-site measurements of gas phase concentration at material surfaces. An experimental method based on an emission test chamber was developed to quantify this convective mass transfer coefficient. The on-site measurement of gas phase concentration at material surface was measured by coupling a home-made sampler to SPME. First results had shown an accurate estimation of indoor formaldehyde concentration in this classroom by using a simple box model.

  8. Lowest adverse effects concentrations (LOAECs) for formaldehyde exposure.

    PubMed

    Gelbke, Heinz-Peter; Gröters, Sibylle; Morfeld, Peter

    2014-10-01

    In 2012 the Committee for Risk Assessment (RAC) of the European Chemicals Agency concluded that 2ppm formaldehyde represent a Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Concentration (LOAEC) for polypoid adenomas, histopathological lesions and cell proliferation. An analysis of all data shows that a LOAEC of 2ppm it is not justified for cell proliferation and polypoid adenomas. Higher values are also supported by a new statistical analysis. For histopathological lesions a NOAEC of 1ppm may be defined but the lesions at 2ppm cannot be regarded as pre-stages for tumour development. One major uncertainty exists: the description of polypoid adenomas and the lesions at 2ppm often is insufficient and diagnostic uncertainties can only be resolved by a re-evaluation according to modern histomorphological standards. Although the discrepancy between our assessment and that of RAC may seem rather small we feel the LOAECs proposed by RAC must be challenged taking into consideration the broad data base for formaldehyde and the potential impact of any published RAC opinion on the present discussions about appropriate occupational and indoor exposure limits.

  9. Removal of formaldehyde from air using functionalized silica supports.

    PubMed

    Ewlad-Ahmed, Abdunaser M; Morris, Michael A; Patwardhan, Siddharth V; Gibson, Lorraine T

    2012-12-18

    This paper demonstrates the use of functionalized meso-silica materials (MCM-41 or SBA-15) as adsorbents for formaldehyde (H₂CO) vapor from contaminated air. Additionally new green nanosilica (GNs) materials were prepared via a bioinspired synthesis route and were assessed for removal of H₂CO from contaminated indoor air. These exciting new materials were prepared via rapid, 15 min, environmentally friendly synthesis routes avoiding any secondary pollution. They provided an excellent platform for functionalization and extraction of H₂CO demonstrating similar performance to the conventional meso-silica materials. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported practical application of this material type. Prior to trapping, all materials were functionalized with amino-propyl groups which led to chemisorption of H₂CO; removing it permanently from air. No retention of H₂CO was achieved with nonfunctionalized material and it was observed that best extraction performance required a dynamic adsorption setup when compared to passive application. These results demonstrate the first application of GNs as potential adsorbents and functionalized meso-silica for use in remediation of air pollution in indoor air.

  10. Removal of formaldehyde from air using functionalized silica supports.

    PubMed

    Ewlad-Ahmed, Abdunaser M; Morris, Michael A; Patwardhan, Siddharth V; Gibson, Lorraine T

    2012-12-18

    This paper demonstrates the use of functionalized meso-silica materials (MCM-41 or SBA-15) as adsorbents for formaldehyde (H₂CO) vapor from contaminated air. Additionally new green nanosilica (GNs) materials were prepared via a bioinspired synthesis route and were assessed for removal of H₂CO from contaminated indoor air. These exciting new materials were prepared via rapid, 15 min, environmentally friendly synthesis routes avoiding any secondary pollution. They provided an excellent platform for functionalization and extraction of H₂CO demonstrating similar performance to the conventional meso-silica materials. To the authors' knowledge this is the first reported practical application of this material type. Prior to trapping, all materials were functionalized with amino-propyl groups which led to chemisorption of H₂CO; removing it permanently from air. No retention of H₂CO was achieved with nonfunctionalized material and it was observed that best extraction performance required a dynamic adsorption setup when compared to passive application. These results demonstrate the first application of GNs as potential adsorbents and functionalized meso-silica for use in remediation of air pollution in indoor air. PMID:23181357

  11. Formaldehyde concentration in discharge from land based aquaculture facilities in Atlantic Canada.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Benoit A; Ernst, William; Garron, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Formaldehyde is used in freshwater aquaculture facilities in the Maritimes region of Canada to prevent external parasites and is discharged without treatment to freshwater receiving environments. In this study, formaldehyde was measured at effluent outfalls and 100 m downstream of four land based aquaculture facilities at various post-treatment time intervals. Concentrations of formaldehyde ranged from 0.2 to 7.1 mg/L. Based on Environment Canada's environmental no effect value, all of the samples show a potential risk to aquatic life. Furthermore, based on a chronic aquatic life water quality criterion of 1.61 mg/L all but two of the samples had concentrations considered to be toxic to aquatic life. An acute water quality criteria was only exceeded once in all of the environmental measurements of formaldehyde. These results lead us to hypothesize that the discharge of formaldehyde from land-based facilities may cause adverse chronic impacts.

  12. [Formaldehyde concentrations in the breathing zone of medical students during gross anatomy laboratory in Toho University].

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, Masaaki; Sakai, Makoto; Ishikawa, Youichi; Murakami, Kunio; Kimura, Akihiko; Kakuta, Sachiko; Sato, Fumi

    2007-06-01

    Cadavers for gross anatomy laboratories are conventionally embalmed by formaldehyde (FA) solution in most medical schools. Thus, medical students and instructors are exposed to FA vapors emitted from cadavers during dissection. As a basic survey for the improvement of the dissection environment, we examined FA concentration in the gross anatomy laboratory during the 2006 academic year at the Faculty of Medicine of Toho University. Air samples were taken from 20 cm above a cadaver as breathing zone, and above a desk between cadavers as indoor FA concentration. FA concentrations in the breathing zone were ranged from 0.24 to 3.04 (mean 1.71) ppm during systematic anatomy, and from 0.72 to 1.60 (mean 1.16) ppm during neuroanatomy, and indoor FA concentration ranged from 048 to 1.11 (mean 0.76) ppm and from 0.21 to 0.23 (mean 0.22) ppm, respectively. These results showed that medical students and instructors are exposed to higher concentrations of FA than allowed by the guidelines of the Japan Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare, and suggested the need to reduce FA levels in the gross anatomy laboratory.

  13. Urban atmospheric formaldehyde concentrations measured by a differential optical absorption spectroscopy method.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Shangshang; Zhou, Rui; Zhou, Bin

    2014-02-01

    In this study a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method was used to monitor formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations in Shanghai ambient air at a research station in Fudan University. The measurements were carried out during April 2010-April 2011 and a total of 120 940 recorded data points were obtained. The average HCHO concentration was found to be the highest (10.0 ppbv) during August 2010 and the lowest (2.0 ppbv) during April 2010. The diurnal variation of HCHO and O3 followed very similar trends in all the seasons. This was evident from the fact that HCHO had a strong positive correlation with O3. Both peaked once in the morning (07:00-09:00 local time), and once in the night (16:00-19:00 local time). The peak concentrations varied from season to season, which could be attributed to the seasonal variation in anthropogenic activity, traffic movement and atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The background HCHO concentration in 2011 winter (similar to 12.0 ppbv) was an order of magnitude higher than that observed in 2010 spring (similar to 2.0 ppbv); corresponding with the results of several pollution controls adopted by the Shanghai administrative government before and after the EXPO 2010 period (May 1, 2010-Oct. 31 2010). This study contributed the basic information for understanding the concentration level and the chemical processes of atmospheric HCHO in a major metropolitan area. PMID:24362786

  14. Median lethal concentration of formaldehyde and its genotoxic potential in bullfrog tadpoles (Lithobates catesbeianus).

    PubMed

    Santana, Juliana M; Dos Reis, Adriana; Teixeira, Patrícia C; Ferreira, Fábio C; Ferreira, Cláudia M

    2015-01-01

    In order to avoid that contaminated frog farms animals escaping in the environment and become potential vector of emergent diseases, studies with disinfection protocol are strictly necessary. The formaldehyde is one of the compounds tested in fungal disinfection protocols and also used in aquaculture. This study aimed to determine the median lethal concentration (LC50-96h) of formaldehyde in bullfrog tadpoles and to evaluate the possible genotoxic effects in acute exposition. Accordingly, the animals were exposed to formaldehyde in the concentrations of 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 mg L(-1), and after 96 h blood samples were drawn for the micronucleus (MN) test. The LC50-96h was 10.53 mg L(-1), and the MN frequency increased in proportion to the formaldehyde concentrations, with an estimated frequency in the negative control being 1.35 MN/individual. We concluded that formaldehyde is genotoxic to tadpoles of bullfrogs in the tested concentrations, and the choice of this chemical should be contemplated before its use in animals in captivity.

  15. Median lethal concentration of formaldehyde and its genotoxic potential in bullfrog tadpoles (Lithobates catesbeianus).

    PubMed

    Santana, Juliana M; Dos Reis, Adriana; Teixeira, Patrícia C; Ferreira, Fábio C; Ferreira, Cláudia M

    2015-01-01

    In order to avoid that contaminated frog farms animals escaping in the environment and become potential vector of emergent diseases, studies with disinfection protocol are strictly necessary. The formaldehyde is one of the compounds tested in fungal disinfection protocols and also used in aquaculture. This study aimed to determine the median lethal concentration (LC50-96h) of formaldehyde in bullfrog tadpoles and to evaluate the possible genotoxic effects in acute exposition. Accordingly, the animals were exposed to formaldehyde in the concentrations of 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 mg L(-1), and after 96 h blood samples were drawn for the micronucleus (MN) test. The LC50-96h was 10.53 mg L(-1), and the MN frequency increased in proportion to the formaldehyde concentrations, with an estimated frequency in the negative control being 1.35 MN/individual. We concluded that formaldehyde is genotoxic to tadpoles of bullfrogs in the tested concentrations, and the choice of this chemical should be contemplated before its use in animals in captivity. PMID:26266476

  16. Graphene oxide as efficient high-concentration formaldehyde scavenger and reutilization in supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongyu; Bu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yutian; Zhang, Junyan

    2015-04-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) was investigated as a low-cost and high-efficient scavenger for high-concentration formaldehyde in alkali media. It showed very high removal capacity, 411 mg of formaldehyde per milligram of GO, and strong resistant to temperature changes. Additionally, the used GO can be easily renewed by a simple electrochemical method. By analyzing the componential and electrochemical characterizations of GO before and after use, the results showed that the degradation mechanism of formaldehyde is a collaborative process of chemical oxidation and physical adsorption, and the former dominates the degradation process. With the aid of oxygen-containing groups in GO, most formaldehyde can be easily oxidized by GO in alkaline media (this is equivalent to GO was reduced by formaldehyde). On the other hand, the used GO (reduced GO, noted as rGO) exhibits more ideal electronic double-layer capacitor (EDLC) feature than GO, along with higher rate capacitance (up to 136 F g(-1) at 50 A g(-1)). In short, GO is not only an efficient formaldehyde scavenger, but the used GO (rGO) can serve as promising electrical energy storage material. This study provides new insights for us to reutilize the discarded adsorbents generated from the environmental protection.

  17. Graphene oxide as efficient high-concentration formaldehyde scavenger and reutilization in supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongyu; Bu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Yutian; Zhang, Junyan

    2015-04-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) was investigated as a low-cost and high-efficient scavenger for high-concentration formaldehyde in alkali media. It showed very high removal capacity, 411 mg of formaldehyde per milligram of GO, and strong resistant to temperature changes. Additionally, the used GO can be easily renewed by a simple electrochemical method. By analyzing the componential and electrochemical characterizations of GO before and after use, the results showed that the degradation mechanism of formaldehyde is a collaborative process of chemical oxidation and physical adsorption, and the former dominates the degradation process. With the aid of oxygen-containing groups in GO, most formaldehyde can be easily oxidized by GO in alkaline media (this is equivalent to GO was reduced by formaldehyde). On the other hand, the used GO (reduced GO, noted as rGO) exhibits more ideal electronic double-layer capacitor (EDLC) feature than GO, along with higher rate capacitance (up to 136 F g(-1) at 50 A g(-1)). In short, GO is not only an efficient formaldehyde scavenger, but the used GO (rGO) can serve as promising electrical energy storage material. This study provides new insights for us to reutilize the discarded adsorbents generated from the environmental protection. PMID:25590697

  18. Direct detection of formaldehyde in air by a novel NAD+- and glutathione-independent formaldehyde dehydrogenase-based biosensor.

    PubMed

    Achmann, S; Hermann, M; Hilbrig, F; Jérôme, V; Hämmerle, M; Freitag, R; Moos, R

    2008-05-15

    An amperometric enzyme-based sensor-system for the direct detection of formaldehyde in air is under investigation. The biosensor is based on a native bacterial NAD(+)- and glutathione-independent formaldehyde dehydrogenase as biorecognition element. The enzyme was isolated from Hyphomicrobium zavarzinii strain ZV 580, grown on methylamine hydrochloride in a fed-batch process. The sensor depends on the enzymatic conversion of the analyte to formic acid. Released electrons are detected in an amperometric measurement at 0.2V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode by means of a redox-mediator. To optimize the sensing device, Ca(2+) and pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) were added to the buffer solution as reconstitutional substances. At this stage, the sensor shows linear response in the tested ppm-range with a sensitivity of 0.39 microA/ppm. The signal is highly reproducible with respect to sensitivity and base line signal. Reproducibility of sensitivity is more than 90% within the same bacterial batch and even when enzyme of different bacterial batches is used. PMID:18585147

  19. Biological indicators for low temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization: investigation of the effect of change in temperature and formaldehyde concentration on spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus NCIMB 8224.

    PubMed

    Wright, A M; Hoxey, E V; Soper, C J; Davies, D J

    1996-03-01

    Five strains of Bacillus stearothermophilus have been studied to identify a spore strain to be used as a biological indicator organism for low temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization. Three strains gave poor reproducibility of batch size and growth index and were discarded. The other two strains gave good reproducibility with a high growth index and gave rise to linear survivor curves when exposed to 5% aqueous formaldehyde. However, only NCIMB 8224 sporulates on a simpler medium and as it was the most resistant to formaldehyde, it was further studied. Tests were carried out in a modified miniclave and factors studied included temperature of the steam and formaldehyde concentration. All studies confirmed the suitability of this strain as a biological indicator organism. PMID:8852673

  20. Formaldehyde exposure in nonoccupational environments

    SciTech Connect

    Dally, K.A.; Hanahan, L.P.; Woodbury, M.A.; Kanarek, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Free formaldehyde may be released from wood products and foam insulation where urea-formaldehyde resins have been used. From January, 1978 to November, 1979, 100 structures were investigated by the Wisconsin Division of Health after receiving complaints of health problems from occupants. Air samples were collected in midget impingers and analyzed for formaldehyde content by the chromotropic acid procedure. Health information was obtained from the occupants via questionnaires. Mean formaldehyde concentrations observed ranged from below the limit of detection to 3.68 ppm. Eye irritation, burning eyes, runny nose, dry or sore throat, headache, and cough were the primary symptoms which were reported by the occupants. Statistically significant associations were seen between formaldehyde levels and age of home/building materials. Observations presented suggest nonoccupational, indoor environmental exposure to formaldehyde is significant and may reach levels which exceed occupational exposure standards.

  1. Developing a Reference Material for Formaldehyde Emissions Testing; Final Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to formaldehyde has been shown to produce broad and potentially severe adverse human health effects. With ubiquitous formaldehyde sources in the indoor environment, formaldehyde concentrations in indoor air are usually higher than outdoors, ranging from 10 to 4000 μg/m3....

  2. Effects of using oxygenated fuels on carbon monoxide, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations in Denver

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.G.; Lanning, J.A.; Wilkes, E.; Jones, R.H.; Wolfe, P.

    1997-12-31

    Oxygenated fuels have been used during the winters in Denver since January 1988, in an attempt to reduce the atmospheric concentration of carbon monoxide. The authors began monitoring ambient concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in Denver in December 1987 and have continued that monitoring every winter since. They now have nine seasons of ambient carbonyl data that coincide with oxygenated fuels usage. The authors will present results of the continuing analyses of atmospheric concentration data for CO collected in the Denver area, to determine the effectiveness of the program for reducing ambient CO. The program has been found to have near zero effect at the downtown Denver site, and 5%--12% reductions at several other sites. The formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentration data will be analyzed to determine the effects of changing oxygenate concentration and composition on carbonyl concentrations. No significant effects have been found on either the concentrations of formaldehyde or acetaldehyde. The authors have also begun analyses of Colorado mandated IM240 emissions test data for CO and NO{sub x} for tests done during an oxygenated fuels period (January, February, November and December 1995) and a nonoxygenated fuels period (April through September 1995). A preliminary analysis of data for more than 100,000 vehicles suggests that oxygenated fuels lead to a reduction of CO emissions of about 13.4% and an increase of NO{sub x} emissions of about 14.6%, as a test fleet weighted average.

  3. 6S Return Samples: Assessment of Air Quality in the International Space Station (ISS) Based on Solid Sorbent Air Sampler (SSAS) and Formaldehyde Monitoring Kit (FMK) Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2004-01-01

    The toxicological assessments of SSAS and FMK analytical results are reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports. Surrogate standard recoveries from the SSAS tubes were 66-76% for 13C-acetone, 85-96% for fluorobenzene, and 73-89% for chlorobenzene. Post-flight flows were far below pre-flight flows and an investigation of the problem revealed that the reduced flow was caused by a leak at the interface of the pump inlet tube and the pump head. This resulted in degradation of pump efficiency. Further investigation showed that the problem occurred before the SSAS was operated on orbit and that use of the post-flight flows yielded consistent and useful results. Recoveries from formaldehyde control badges were 86 to 104%. The two general criteria used to assess air quality are the total-non-methane-volatile organic hydrocarbons (NMVOCs) and the total T-value (minus the CO2 and formaldehyde contributions). The T values will not be reported for these data due to the flow anomaly. Control of atmospheric alcohols is important to the water recovery system engineers, hence total alcohols (including acetone) are also shown for each sample. Octafluoropropane (OFP) is not efficiently trapped by the sorbents used in the SSAS. Because formaldehyde is quantified from sorbent badges, its concentration is also listed separately. These five indices of air quality are summarized.

  4. A new technique for collection, concentration and determination of gaseous tropospheric formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cofer, Wesley R.; Edahl, Robert A.

    This article describes an improved technique for making in situ measurements of gaseous tropospheric formaldehyde (CH 2O). The new technique is based on nebulization/reflux principles that have proved very effective in quantitatively scrubbing water soluble trace gases (e.g. CH 2O) into aqueous mediums, which are subsequently analyzed. Atmospheric formaldehyde extractions and analyses have been performed with the nebulization/reflux concentrator using an acidified dinitrophenylhydrazine solution that indicate that quantitative analysis of CH 2O at global background levels (˜ 0.1 ppbv) is feasible with 20-min extractions. Analysis of CH 2O, once concentrated, is accomplished using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet photometric detection. The CH 2O-hydrazone derivative, produced by the reaction of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine in H 2SO 4 acidified aqueous solution, is detected as CH 2O.

  5. [Environmental tobacco smoke--assessment of formaldehyde concentration in urine samples of exposed medicine students].

    PubMed

    Szumska, Magdalena; Damasiewicz-Bodzek, Aleksandra; Tyrpień-Golder, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) is ranked as one of the factors of confirmed carcinogenicity to human. It consists of the mixture of smoke exhaled by the smoker as well as the sidestream smoke and contains many times higher concentrations of some toxic substances in comparison to the amount of toxic compounds inhaled by a smoker. From many years the issue of passive smoking has been the subject of many research and still not all of its aspects of affecting human health have been explored. Apart from the tobacco varieties, also diverse additives added during the process of tobacco manufacturing, including particularly carbohydrates, influence the composition of the environmental tobacco smoke. During smoking they can undergo many complex transformations, as a result of which toxic components of the environmental tobacco smoke are formed, carbonyl compounds in particular, like aldehydes. They are marked by a significant chemical reactivity which enables them to modify amino groups of proteins leading to the changes in their structure, biological functions and often antigenicity. Therefore their influence to the human body is the cause of numerous adverse health effects caused by the increase in free radical processes which can constitute to the source of these compounds. Well known representative of this group of xenobiotics is formaldehyde as a compound that reflects well the environmental exposure to carbonyl compounds. The considerable source of this compound is tobacco smoke. Therefore analysis of formaldehyde in body fluids is a valuable biomonitoring tool of exposure to it. The aim of this study was the evaluation of formaldehyde concentration in urine samples of medicine students exposed to ETS. The study material consisted of 149 urine samples of students from School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia. The concentration of formaldehyde in urine samples was determined by a spectrophotometric method using the

  6. [Environmental tobacco smoke--assessment of formaldehyde concentration in urine samples of exposed medicine students].

    PubMed

    Szumska, Magdalena; Damasiewicz-Bodzek, Aleksandra; Tyrpień-Golder, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) is ranked as one of the factors of confirmed carcinogenicity to human. It consists of the mixture of smoke exhaled by the smoker as well as the sidestream smoke and contains many times higher concentrations of some toxic substances in comparison to the amount of toxic compounds inhaled by a smoker. From many years the issue of passive smoking has been the subject of many research and still not all of its aspects of affecting human health have been explored. Apart from the tobacco varieties, also diverse additives added during the process of tobacco manufacturing, including particularly carbohydrates, influence the composition of the environmental tobacco smoke. During smoking they can undergo many complex transformations, as a result of which toxic components of the environmental tobacco smoke are formed, carbonyl compounds in particular, like aldehydes. They are marked by a significant chemical reactivity which enables them to modify amino groups of proteins leading to the changes in their structure, biological functions and often antigenicity. Therefore their influence to the human body is the cause of numerous adverse health effects caused by the increase in free radical processes which can constitute to the source of these compounds. Well known representative of this group of xenobiotics is formaldehyde as a compound that reflects well the environmental exposure to carbonyl compounds. The considerable source of this compound is tobacco smoke. Therefore analysis of formaldehyde in body fluids is a valuable biomonitoring tool of exposure to it. The aim of this study was the evaluation of formaldehyde concentration in urine samples of medicine students exposed to ETS. The study material consisted of 149 urine samples of students from School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia. The concentration of formaldehyde in urine samples was determined by a spectrophotometric method using the

  7. Report of the Federal Panel on Formaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The Federal Panel on Formaldehyde concluded that definitive experiments exist which demonstrate the mutagenicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde under laboratory conditions. Formaldehyde induces both gene mutations and chromosomal aberrations in a variety of test systems. Inhalation of formaldehyde causes cancer of the nose in rats. The concentrations of formaldehyde in inhaled air that caused nasal cancer in Fisher 344 rats are within the same order of magnitude as those to which humans may be exposed. The data presently available do not permit a direct assessment of the carcinogenicity of formaldehyde to man. Epidemiologic studies on exposed human populations are in progress and may further clarify the situation. Other experimental and human studies on toxic effects such as teratogenicity and reproductive disorders are as yet inadequate for a health risk assessment. The CIIT 24 month study on animal carcinogenicity has not yet been completely evaluated. Additional data are expected on the effects of prolonged exposure to lower doses of formaldehyde and on the possible carcinogenicity of formaldehyde in the mouse. The panel recommends that, for a comprehensive health risk assessment, further experiments be conducted on the effects of other modes of exposure (ingestion and skin penetration), the effects in humans, and on the pharmacokinetics of formaldehyde in man and animals and the possible role for formaldehyde in reproductive and chronic respiratory disorders. It is the conclusion of the panel that formaldehyde should be presumed to pose a carcinogenic risk to humans. PMID:6977445

  8. USING THE AIR QUALITY MODEL TO ANALYZE THE CONCENTRATIONS OF AIR TOXICS OVER THE CONTINENTAL U.S.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is examining the concentrations and deposition of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), which include a large number of chemicals, ranging from non reactive (i.e. carbon tetrachloride) to reactive (i.e. formaldehyde), exist in gas, aqueous, and...

  9. Characterization of the Sources and Concentrations of Formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds in four new manufactured houses

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Beal, D.; Chandra, S.

    1998-09-01

    The concentrations of formaldehyde, 52 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total VOCs (TVOC) were measured in four new manufactured houses on three occasions over a period of approximately nine months following completion of their construction. The houses were furnished, but unoccupied, model homes produced by a single U.S. manufacturer. Several of the houses incorporated interior finish materials with lower VOC emissions than standard materials. One house had a modified ventilation system. Ventilation rates were measured concurrently with the collection of air samples. A steady-state mass-balance model was used to calculate the area-specific emission rates of the target compounds and TVOC. The emissions of formaldehyde and VOCs from a specimen of plywood used as the floor sheeting were additionally quantified. The median formaldehyde concentration in the four houses was 37 parts-per-billion ( ppb). The formaldehyde concentrations were all less than the most restrictive guideline for this compound of 50 ppb. The concentrations of many of the target VOCs were low. Thirty-one of the VOCs had median concentrations that were at or below 1 ppb. Seven of the compounds were among the most abundant VOCs in all four houses. These compounds were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, ethylene glycol, hexanal, 2-butanone, and acetic acid. The concentrations of the aldehydes, hexanal, octanal and nonanal, in the four houses were either near or exceeded their respective odor thresholds. The concentrations of acetic acid increased with time. In the final sampling period, the odor threshold for acetic acid was exceeded in all of the houses. The range of TVOC concentrations in the four houses was 0.8 to 3 mg m{sup -3}, with a median value of 1.6 mg m{sup -3}. These concentrations were somewhat lower than TVOC concentrations previously measured in several new site-built houses, and the median concentration was only about twice the typical value for existing residences

  10. Formaldehyde Exposures in a University Anatomy Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Kyle William

    Air sampling studies were conducted within a university anatomical laboratory during the embalmment of a cadaver in order to determine if dangerous concentrations of formaldehyde existed. Three air sampling studies were conducted in the anatomical laboratory on three separate days that a cadaver was being embalmed. Samples were collected and analyzed using the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Sampling and Analytical Methods: Method 52. Each air sampling study sampled for short term exposure limit (STEL) and time weighted mean (TWA) breathing zone formaldehyde concentrations as well as area TWA formaldehyde concentrations. A personal aldehyde monitor was also used in each air sampling study to sample for breathing zone formaldehyde concentrations. Measured TWA mean exposures to formaldehyde ranged from 0.15--1.3 parts per million (ppm), STEL formaldehyde exposures ranged from 0.019--0.64 ppm, and eight-hour TWAs ranged from 0.03 to 3.6 ppm. All 8-hour TWA formaldehyde concentrations sampled in the anatomy laboratory during an embalmment were less than the permissible exposure limit (PEL) required by OSHA.

  11. A new method for determining the initial mobile formaldehyde concentrations, partition coefficients, and diffusion coefficients of dry building materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinke; Zhang, Yinping

    2009-07-01

    The initial mobile formaldehyde concentration, C(m,0); the partition coefficient, K; and the diffusion coefficient, D, of a dry building material are key parameters to characterize formaldehyde emissions from the building material. The solvent extraction method and direct thermal desorption method can overestimate C(m,0) because of high temperature. A new method has been developed to determine C(m,0) under similar conditions to common indoor environment, together with K and D. In the proposed method, the tested materials are placed in an airtight environmental chamber for which the temperature can be controlled by a water bath, then the materials undergo a multisorption/emission process and the instantaneous formaldehyde concentration in the chamber is recorded. The K and C(m,0) are determined from the equilibrium concentrations after every sorption by means of the linear least-square regression, and D is obtained by fitting the concentration at the emission stage into a mass-transfer-based model in the literature. Four kinds of wooden medium-density boards are tested. The C(m,0) measured using this method is the mobile formaldehyde concentration in the material, which differs significantly from the total formaldehyde concentration in the material measured by using the traditional method recommended by the Chinese standard (GB/T 17657-1999) extraction method. This means that the mobile formaldehyde takes only a small portion of the total quantity in the tested material. The K, D, and C(m,0) values measured using this new method are used to predict formaldehyde concentrations for sorption processes. The results agree well with experimental data. In addition, some factors influencing the accuracy are analyzed.

  12. Variable volume loading method: a convenient and rapid method for measuring the initial emittable concentration and partition coefficient of formaldehyde and other aldehydes in building materials.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianyin; Yan, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2011-12-01

    The initial emittable formaldehyde and VOC concentration in building materials (C(0)) is a key parameter for characterizing and classifying these materials. Various methods have been developed to measure this parameter, but these generally require a long test time. In this paper we develop a convenient and rapid method, the variable volume loading (VVL) method, to simultaneously measure C(0) and the material/air partition coefficient (K). This method has the following features: (a) it requires a relatively short experimental time (less than 24 h for the cases studied); and (b) is convenient for routine measurement. Using this method, we determined C(0) and K of formaldehyde, propanal and hexanal in one kind of medium density fiberboard, and repeated experiments were performed to reduce measurement error. In addition, an extended-C-history method is proposed to determine the diffusion coefficient and the convective mass transfer coefficient. The VVL method is validated by comparing model predicted results based on the determined parameters with experimental data. The determined C(0) of formaldehyde obtained via this method is less than 10% of the total concentration using the perforator method recommended by the Chinese National Standard, suggesting that the total concentration may not be appropriate to predict emission characteristics, nor for material classification.

  13. Reference values for indoor air pollutant concentrations in new, residential buildings in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Järnström, H.; Saarela, K.; Kalliokoski, P.; Pasanen, A.-L.

    Eight buildings, representing the present construction practice in Finland, were investigated to create numeric reference data for indoor air quality (IAQ) in new residential buildings. Low-emitting materials according to the "Finnish Classification of Building Materials" were used in all the buildings. The airborne volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde, and ammonia concentrations as well as temperature, relative humidity, and the air exchange rate were determined in the newly finished buildings and after 6 and 12 months. Target values for the indoor air concentrations were not generally reached in newly finished buildings. The lowest concentration levels were measured in buildings with mechanical supply and exhaust air systems. Formaldehyde concentrations fulfilled best the target values. The TVOC concentration usually reached the S2/S3-class values within 6 months. However, the ammonia concentration remained above the S3 limit during the whole first year. The concentrations of ammonia and formaldehyde showed seasonal variations, i.e., higher concentrations were measured in summer. The concentrations of individual VOCs generally decreased most strongly during the first 6 months and the final mean concentration levels were generally less than 15 μg m -3. As the occupancy period got longer, the VOCs originating from the construction phase were increasingly replaced by new ones. Reference values based on means and on 95 percentiles are presented to facilitate interpretation of the results of measurements done to ensure that proper construction practices have been applied or to investigate IAQ problems.

  14. The effect of clothing care activities on textile formaldehyde content.

    PubMed

    Novick, Rachel M; Nelson, Mindy L; McKinley, Meg A; Anderson, Grace L; Keenan, James J

    2013-01-01

    Textiles are commonly treated with formaldehyde-based residues that may potentially induce allergic contact dermatitis in sensitive individuals. This study examined the initial formaldehyde content in clothing and resulting changes due to care activities. Twenty clothing articles were examined and 17 of them did not have detectable levels of formaldehyde. One shirt contained a formaldehyde concentration of 3172 ppm, and two pairs of pants had formaldehyde concentrations of 1391 ppm and 86 ppm. The two highest results represent formaldehyde levels that are up to 40-fold greater than international textile regulations. The two items with the greatest formaldehyde content were washed and dried in a manner similar to that used by consumers, including hand and machine washing in hot or cold water followed by air or machine drying. The washing and drying procedures reduced formaldehyde levels to between 26 and 72% of untreated controls. Differences in the temperature or type of washing and drying did not result in a clear trend in the subsequent formaldehyde content. In addition, samples were hot ironed, which did not affect the formaldehyde content as significantly. Understanding the formaldehyde content in clothing and its potential reduction through care activities may be useful for manufacturers and formaldehyde-sensitive individuals.

  15. Ambient concentrations of aldehydes in relation to Beijing Olympic air pollution control measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J. C.; Zhu, T.; Hu, M.; Zhang, L. W.; Cheng, H.; Zhang, L.; Tong, J.; Zhang, J.

    2010-08-01

    Aldehydes are ubiquitous constituents of the atmosphere. Their concentrations are elevated in polluted urban atmospheres. The present study was carried out to characterize three aldehydes of most health concern (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein) in a central Beijing site in the summer and early fall of 2008 (from June to October). Measurements were made before, during, and after the Beijing Olympics to examine whether the air pollution control measures implemented to improve Beijing's air quality during the Olympics had any impact on concentrations of the three aldehydes. Average concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein were 29.34 ± 15.12 μg/m3, 27.09 ± 15.74 μg/m3 and 2.32 ± 0.95 μg/m3, respectively, for the entire period of measurements, all being the highest among the levels measured in cities around the world in photochemical smog seasons. Among the three measured aldehydes, only acetaldehyde had a substantially reduced mean concentration during the Olympic air pollution control period compared to the pre-Olympic period. Formaldehyde and acrolein followed the changing pattern of temperature and were each significantly correlated with ozone (a secondary product of photochemical reactions). In contrast, acetaldehyde was significantly correlated with several pollutants emitted mainly from local emission sources (e.g., NO2, CO, and PM2.5). These findings suggest that local direct emissions had a larger impact on acetaldehyde than formaldehyde and acrolein.

  16. Service life of respirator cartridges for formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, G.O.; Carlson, G.J.; Johnson, J.S.

    1981-11-20

    To date there is no NIOSH-approved air-purifying respirator which will effectively remove formaldehyde gas. Because of formaldehyde's high vapor pressure, service life values calculated using the adsorption isotherm and Wheeler equations indicate that organic vapor cartridges containing activated carbon will last less than 10 minutes at concentrations greater than 10 ppM. Studies were initiated to identify a suitable sorbent for this potentially dangerous material. The project involves the following steps: develop a method for producing relatively high concentrations (20 ppM) of a formaldehyde test mixture; verify this test concentration using the NIOSH-approved chromotropic acid wet chemical technique; and survey a wide variety of sorbents, both plain and impregnated, in hopes of identifying a suitable air-purifying cartridge for formaldehyde. A dynamic formaldehyde generation system was fabricated in which formaldehyde was produced by continuously injecting formalin using a syringe pump. The concentration was monitored using an infrared analyzer and checked using the chromotropic acid technique. Twenty-five cartridges were tested for service life at concentrations of formaldehyde gas from 7.1 to 14.8 ppM. Acid gas cartridges and those containing Pittsburgh FCA or ASC showed superior service life.

  17. Rapid formaldehyde monitoring in ambient air by means of mid-infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahnke, H.; von Basum, G.; Kleinermanns, K.; Hering, P.; Mürtz, M.

    We report the spectroscopic detection of formaldehyde in ambient air using cavity leak-out spectroscopy, a cw variant of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. This technique proved to be suitable for a real-time quantitative analysis of polluted air without any preprocessing of the air sample. Using a tunable CO-overtone sideband laser for the λ=3 μm spectral region and a ring-down cell with R=99.95% mirrors, we achieved a detection limit of 2 parts per billion formaldehyde in ambient air, corresponding to a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 7×10-9/cm (sampling time: 2s). Calibration problems arising from the polarity of the molecule and due to HITRAN database uncertainties are discussed.

  18. Fine organic particle, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde concentrations under and after the influence of fire activity in the atmosphere of Riverside, California.

    PubMed

    Na, Kwangsam; Cocker, David R

    2008-09-01

    Concentrations of gas-phase organic carbons (formaldehyde (HCHO) and acetaldehyde (CH(3)CHO)) and fine particle-phase carbons (organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC)) were measured under and after the influence of fire activity in southern California. The measurement was conducted after the start of the wildfire activities from October 27 through November 6, 2003 at a site in Riverside, southern California. Under the influence of the fire activities, HCHO, CH(3)CHO and EC concentrations were found to be over two times as high as those after the fire activities ended. The total lifetime cancer risk estimated by HCHO and CH(3)CHO concentrations measured was significantly higher under the influence of the wildfire activities than that after the activities ended. OC showed a larger difference in concentrations between the two event periods as compared with gas-phase organic carbons and EC. OC/EC ratios ranged from 3.7 to 12.5 during the study period with the highest OC/EC ratio observed when the study area was under the influence of the fire activities. Correlation analysis and multiple linear regressions between OC/EC concentrations and visibility were performed. It was found that the visibility was even worse under the influence of fire activity as compared to the period after fire activity ended. EC was a stronger contributor to the visibility reduction compared to OC. The influence of air mass pathways on HCHO, CH(3)CHO, OC, and EC concentrations during the wildfire activities was addressed using a backward trajectory model developed by NOAA.

  19. Lack of bronchomotor response to up to 3 ppm formaldehyde in subjects with asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, D.; Eschenbacher, W.L.; Epstein, J.

    1984-10-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether exposure to concentrations of formaldehyde occasionally encountered in polluted indoor air would cause bronchoconstriction in subjects with mild asthma. In seven subjects the increase in specific airways resistance (SR/sub aw/) caused by inhalation of 1 ppm formaldehyde for 10 min was compared with the response caused by inhalation of formaldehyde-free air. Also, the increase in SR/sub aw/ caused by inhalation of 1 and 3 ppm formaldehyde during moderate exercise for 10 min was compared with the response caused by inhalation of formaldehyde-free air during exercise for 10 min. Inhalation of formaldehyde at rest and during exercise did not cause a signficant increase in SR/aw/ in the subjects. It is concluded that brief exposure to these concentrations of formaldehyde, even in association with moderate exercise, is unlikely by itself to cause significant bronchoconstriction in most subjects with mild asthma.

  20. Indoor air-assessment: Indoor concentrations of environmental carcinogens

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, K.W.; Naugle, D.F.; Berry, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    In the report, indoor concentration data are presented for the following general categories of air pollutants: radon-222, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), asbestos, gas phase organic compounds, formaldehyde, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), pesticides, and inorganic compounds. These pollutants are either known or suspect carcinogens (i.e., radon-222, asbestos) or more complex mixtures or classes of compounds which contain known or suspect carcinogens. Concentration data for individual carcinogenic compounds in complex mixtures are usually far from complete. The data presented for complex mixtures often include compounds which are not carcinogenic or for which data are insufficient to evaluate carcinogenicity. Their inclusion is justified, however, by the possibility that further work may show them to be carcinogens, cocarcinogens, initiators or promotors, or that they may be employed as markers (e.g., nicotine, acrolein) for the estimation of exposure to complex mixtures.

  1. Development and characterisation of a state-of-the-art GOME-2 formaldehyde air-mass factor algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewson, W.; Barkley, M. P.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Bösch, H.; Kurosu, T.; Spurr, R.

    2015-01-01

    Space-borne observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) are frequently used to derive surface emissions of isoprene, an important biogenic volatile organic compound. The conversion of retrieved HCHO slant column concentrations from satellite line of sight measurements to vertical columns is determined through application of an air mass factor (AMF), accounting for instrument viewing geometry, radiative transfer, and vertical profile of the absorber in the atmosphere. This step in the trace gas retrieval is subject to large errors. This work presents the AMF algorithm in use at the University of Leicester (UoL), which introduces scene specific variables into a per-observation full radiative transfer AMF calculation, including increasing spatial resolution of key environmental parameter databases, input variable area weighting, instrument specific scattering weight calculation, and inclusion of an ozone vertical profile climatology. Application of these updates to HCHO slant columns from the GOME-2 instrument is shown to typically adjust the AMF by ±10%, compared to a~reference algorithm without these advanced parameterisations. Furthermore, the new UoL algorithm also incorporates a full radiative transfer error calculation for each scene to help characterise AMF uncertainties. Global median AMF errors are typically 50-60%, and are dominated by uncertainties in the HCHO profile shape and its corresponding seasonal variation.

  2. Evaluation of methods to reduce formaldehyde levels of cadavers in the dissection laboratory.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, Mark C; Savoia, Maria C

    2008-01-01

    Dissection of conventionally embalmed cadavers exposes students, staff, and faculty to formaldehyde, a probable carcinogen. Therefore, prudent practices should seek to minimize formaldehyde exposure. In this study, we evaluated two commercially available chemicals, InfuTrace and Perfect Solution, for their effectiveness in reducing ambient formaldehyde levels. Four cadavers embalmed conventionally with formaldehyde and/or with the above agents were compared for their formaldehyde levels under conditions that strictly controlled for air circulation and for locations and methods of testing, and during activities that simulated student dissecting. For InfuTrace, one cadaver was reinfused with InfuTrace after initial standard perfusion with formaldehyde; a second cadaver had InfuTrace injected into the thoracic and abdominal body cavities after formaldehyde perfusion. For Perfect Solution, the product was used for embalming a third cadaver in lieu of formaldehyde. For a control, a fourth cadaver was embalmed with the standard formaldehyde solution. Testing of personal and ambient room air samples and of fluid obtained from the cadavers was performed and analyzed in a blinded fashion. Results indicated that both Perfect Solution, substituted for standard formaldehyde embalming, and InfuTrace infused through the vasculature after formaldehyde embalming, resulted in lower concentrations of formaldehyde than embalming with formaldehyde solution alone or in combination with body cavity injection of InfuTrace. These differences in formaldehyde concentrations are consistent across measuring methods, for example, of room air, of breathing zone air during cadaver handling and dissection, and of liquid samples obtained from the cadavers. Perfect Solution yielded suboptimum fixation and a different texture, color, and smell than the formaldehyde treatments.

  3. An assessment of indoor air concentrations and health risks of volatile organic compounds in three primary schools.

    PubMed

    Sofuoglu, Sait C; Aslan, Guler; Inal, Fikret; Sofuoglu, Aysun

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde, in classrooms, kindergartens, and outdoor playgrounds of three primary schools were measured in spring, winter, and fall terms in İzmir, Turkey. A health-risk assessment was conducted for odor detection, sensory irritation, chronic toxic effects, and cancer. Active sampling was applied for VOCs and formaldehyde on Tenax TA and DNPH tubes, respectively. VOCs were analyzed in a thermal desorption-GC-MS system. Formaldehyde analysis was performed using an HPLC instrument. Benzene, toluene, and formaldehyde were the most abundant compounds with 95th percentile indoor air concentrations of 29, 87, and 106 μg/m(3), respectively. Naphthalene and xylenes followed them with an order of magnitude lower concentrations. Two isomers of dichlorobenzene (1,3 and 1,4) were the other notable compounds. The concentrations were utilized to classify the indoor air pollutants with respect to potential health effects. In addition, carcinogenic and chronic toxic risks were estimated using Monte-Carlo simulation. Formaldehyde appears to be the most concerning pollutant with high chronic toxic and carcinogenic risk levels according to the health assessment followed by naphthalene, benzene, and toluene due to their chronic effects.

  4. Formaldehyde exposure affects growth and metabolism of common bean

    SciTech Connect

    Mutters, R.G.; Madore, M. ); Bytnerowicz, A. )

    1993-01-01

    Recent state and federal directives have slated a substantial increase in the use of methanol as an alternative to gasoline in both fleet and private vehicles in the coming decade. The incomplete combustion of methanol produces formaldehyde vapor, and catalytic converter technology that completely oxidizes formaldehyde has yet to be developed. The approach of this study was to use a range of methanol concentrations encompassing levels currently found or that may occur in the future in the ambient air of some heavily polluted areas to test the potential phytotoxicity of formaldehyde. The study had the following objectives: (1) design and build a formaldehyde vapor generator with sufficient capacity for long-term plant fumigations; (2) determine growth response of common bean to formaldehyde; (3) evaluate physiological and biochemical changes of bean plants associated with formaldehyde exposures. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Experimental investigation of the formaldehyde removal mechanisms in a dynamic botanical filtration system for indoor air purification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Pei, Jingjing; Zhang, Jensen S

    2014-09-15

    Botanical filtration has been proved to be effective for indoor gas pollutant removal. To understand the roles of different transport, storage and removal mechanism by a dynamic botanical air filter, a series of experimental investigations were designed and conducted in this paper. Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) plants was selected for test, and its original soil or activated/pebbles root bed was used in different test cases. It was found that flowing air through the root bed with microbes dynamically was essential to obtain meaningful formaldehyde removal efficiency. For static potted plant as normally place in rooms, the clean air delivery rate (CADR), which is often used to quantify the air cleaning ability of portable air cleaners, was only ∼ 5.1m(3)/h per m(2) bed, while when dynamically with air flow through the bed, the CADR increased to ∼ 233 m(3)/h per m(2) bed. The calculated CADR due to microbial activity is ∼ 108 m(3)/h per m(2) bed. Moisture in the root bed also played an important role, both for maintaining a favorable living condition for microbes and for absorbing water-soluble compounds such as formaldehyde. The role of the plant was to introduce and maintain a favorable microbe community which effectively degraded the volatile organic compounds adsorbed or absorbed by the root bed. The presence of the plant increased the removal efficiency by a factor of two based on the results from the bench-scale root bed experiments.

  6. Experimental investigation of the formaldehyde removal mechanisms in a dynamic botanical filtration system for indoor air purification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Pei, Jingjing; Zhang, Jensen S

    2014-09-15

    Botanical filtration has been proved to be effective for indoor gas pollutant removal. To understand the roles of different transport, storage and removal mechanism by a dynamic botanical air filter, a series of experimental investigations were designed and conducted in this paper. Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) plants was selected for test, and its original soil or activated/pebbles root bed was used in different test cases. It was found that flowing air through the root bed with microbes dynamically was essential to obtain meaningful formaldehyde removal efficiency. For static potted plant as normally place in rooms, the clean air delivery rate (CADR), which is often used to quantify the air cleaning ability of portable air cleaners, was only ∼ 5.1m(3)/h per m(2) bed, while when dynamically with air flow through the bed, the CADR increased to ∼ 233 m(3)/h per m(2) bed. The calculated CADR due to microbial activity is ∼ 108 m(3)/h per m(2) bed. Moisture in the root bed also played an important role, both for maintaining a favorable living condition for microbes and for absorbing water-soluble compounds such as formaldehyde. The role of the plant was to introduce and maintain a favorable microbe community which effectively degraded the volatile organic compounds adsorbed or absorbed by the root bed. The presence of the plant increased the removal efficiency by a factor of two based on the results from the bench-scale root bed experiments. PMID:25164387

  7. INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATION UNIT CONVERSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion (VI). Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors, which can migrate through subsurface soils and may enter the indoor air of overlying buil...

  8. Formaldehyde production promoted by rat nasal cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases with nasal decongestants, essences, solvents, air pollutants, nicotine, and cocaine as substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Hadley, W.M.

    1983-02-01

    To identify compounds which might be metabolized to formaldehyde in the nasal cavity, 32 potential substrates for cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases were screened with rat nasal and, for comparison, liver microsomes. Tested substrates included 6 nasal decongestants, cocaine, nicotine, 9 essences, 3 potential air pollutants, and 12 solvents. Each test substrate, with the possible exception of the air pollutants, contained one or more N-methyl, O-methyl, or S-methyl groups. Eighteen of the tested materials were metabolized to produce formaldehyde by nasal microsomes. Five substrates, namely, the solvents HMPA and dimethylaniline, cocaine, and the essences dimethyl anthranilate and p-methoxyacetophenone, were metabolized to produce formaldehyde at rates exceeding 1000 pmol/mg microsomal protein/min by nasal microsomes. Eight substrates, including four nasal decongestants, nicotine, and an extract of diesel exhaust particles, were metabolized to produce formaldehyde at rates of 200 to 1000 pmol/mg microsomal protein/min. Five other substrates were metabolized to formaldehyde at detectable rates. The results indicate that a variety of materials which often come in contact with the nasal mucosa can be metabolized to formaldehyde by nasal enzymes. The released formaldehyde may influence the irritancy of inhaled compounds and has been suggested to play a role in the tumorigenicity of some compounds.

  9. Removal of formaldehyde by a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in dry air in the 20 °C to 300 °C temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin-Simiand, N.; Pasquiers, S.; Magne, L.

    2016-05-01

    The influence of the gas mixture temperature, from 20 °C up to 300 °C, on the removal of formaldehyde, diluted at low concentration (less than 800 ppm) in dry air at atmospheric pressure, by a pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is studied by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and micro gas chromatography. Efficient removal of CH2O is obtained and it is found that the characteristic energy, less than 200 J l-1, is a decreasing function of the temperature over the whole range of concentration values under consideration. Byproducts issued from the removal are identified and quantified (CO, CO2, HCOOH, HNO3). Experimental results are analysed using a zero-dimensional simplified DBD-reactor model in order to gain insights on the chemical processes involved. It is shown that the dissociation of the molecule competes with oxidation reactions at low temperature, whereas at high temperature oxidation processes dominate.

  10. C-history method: rapid measurement of the initial emittable concentration, diffusion and partition coefficients for formaldehyde and VOCs in building materials.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jianyin; Yao, Yuan; Zhang, Yinping

    2011-04-15

    The initial emittable concentration (C(m,0)), the diffusion coefficient (D(m)), and the material/air partition coefficient (K) are the three characteristic parameters influencing emissions of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials or furniture. It is necessary to determine these parameters to understand emission characteristics and how to control them. In this paper we develop a new method, the C-history method for a closed chamber, to measure these three parameters. Compared to the available methods of determining the three parameters described in the literature, our approach has the following salient features: (1) the three parameters can be simultaneously obtained; (2) it is time-saving, generally taking less than 3 days for the cases studied (the available methods tend to need 7-28 days); (3) the maximum relative standard deviations of the measured C(m,0), D(m) and K are 8.5%, 7.7%, and 9.8%, respectively, which are acceptable for engineering applications. The new method was validated by using the characteristic parameters determined in the closed chamber experiment to predict the observed emissions in a ventilated full scale chamber experiment, proving that the approach is reliable and convincing. Our new C-history method should prove useful for rapidly determining the parameters required to predict formaldehyde and VOC emissions from building materials as well as for furniture labeling.

  11. Influence of humidity on the initial emittable concentration of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde in building materials: experimental observation and correlation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Cai, Chaorui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-01-01

    Humidity is one of the main environmental factors affecting the emission rate and key parameters of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials. Meanwhile, the initial emittable concentration (Cm,0) is proved to be the most sensitive key parameter to the emission behaviours. However, there is no report on the relationship between humidity and Cm,0. In this paper, Cm,0 of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde from a type of medium density fiberboard in absolute humidity (AH) range of 4.6–19.6 g/m3 at 25 °C were tested by virtue of a C-history method. Experimental results indicate that Cm,0 is dramatically dependent on AH, increased by 10 and 2 times for formaldehyde and hexaldehyde when AH rising from 4.6 g/m3 to 19.6 g/m3. A linear relationship between the logarithm of Cm,0 and AH is obtained based on the measured results. In addition, a correlation characterizing the association of emission rate and AH is derived. The effectiveness of the correlation is verified with our experimental results as well as data from literature. With the correlations, the Cm,0 or emission rate different from the test AH conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be useful for predicting the emission characteristics of humidity changing scenarios and for source control. PMID:27025353

  12. Influence of humidity on the initial emittable concentration of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde in building materials: experimental observation and correlation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Cai, Chaorui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-01-01

    Humidity is one of the main environmental factors affecting the emission rate and key parameters of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials. Meanwhile, the initial emittable concentration (Cm,0) is proved to be the most sensitive key parameter to the emission behaviours. However, there is no report on the relationship between humidity and Cm,0. In this paper, Cm,0 of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde from a type of medium density fiberboard in absolute humidity (AH) range of 4.6-19.6 g/m(3) at 25 °C were tested by virtue of a C-history method. Experimental results indicate that Cm,0 is dramatically dependent on AH, increased by 10 and 2 times for formaldehyde and hexaldehyde when AH rising from 4.6 g/m(3) to 19.6 g/m(3). A linear relationship between the logarithm of Cm,0 and AH is obtained based on the measured results. In addition, a correlation characterizing the association of emission rate and AH is derived. The effectiveness of the correlation is verified with our experimental results as well as data from literature. With the correlations, the Cm,0 or emission rate different from the test AH conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be useful for predicting the emission characteristics of humidity changing scenarios and for source control.

  13. Influence of humidity on the initial emittable concentration of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde in building materials: experimental observation and correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Cai, Chaorui; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Yinping

    2016-03-01

    Humidity is one of the main environmental factors affecting the emission rate and key parameters of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials. Meanwhile, the initial emittable concentration (Cm,0) is proved to be the most sensitive key parameter to the emission behaviours. However, there is no report on the relationship between humidity and Cm,0. In this paper, Cm,0 of formaldehyde and hexaldehyde from a type of medium density fiberboard in absolute humidity (AH) range of 4.6-19.6 g/m3 at 25 °C were tested by virtue of a C-history method. Experimental results indicate that Cm,0 is dramatically dependent on AH, increased by 10 and 2 times for formaldehyde and hexaldehyde when AH rising from 4.6 g/m3 to 19.6 g/m3. A linear relationship between the logarithm of Cm,0 and AH is obtained based on the measured results. In addition, a correlation characterizing the association of emission rate and AH is derived. The effectiveness of the correlation is verified with our experimental results as well as data from literature. With the correlations, the Cm,0 or emission rate different from the test AH conditions can be conveniently obtained. This study should be useful for predicting the emission characteristics of humidity changing scenarios and for source control.

  14. Effects of endogenous formaldehyde in nasal tissues on inhaled formaldehyde dosimetry predictions in the rat, monkey, and human nasal passages.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Jeffry D; Campbell, Jerry; Kimbell, Julia S; Conolly, Rory B; Clewell, Harvey J; Andersen, Melvin E

    2014-04-01

    Formaldehyde is a nasal carcinogen in rodents at high doses and is an endogenous compound that is present in all living cells. Due to its high solubility and reactivity, quantitative risk estimates for inhaled formaldehyde have relied on internal dose estimates in the upper respiratory tract. Dosimetry calculations are complicated by the presence of endogenous formaldehyde concentrations in the respiratory mucosa. Anatomically accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the rat, monkey, and human nasal passages were used to simulate uptake of inhaled formaldehyde. An epithelial structure was implemented in the nasal CFD models to estimate formaldehyde absorption from air:tissue partitioning, species-specific metabolism, first-order clearance, DNA binding, and endogenous formaldehyde production. At an exposure concentration of 1 ppm, predicted formaldehyde nasal uptake was 99.4, 86.5, and 85.3% in the rat, monkey, and human, respectively. Endogenous formaldehyde in nasal tissues did not significantly affect wall mass flux or nasal uptake predictions at exposure concentrations > 500 ppb; however, reduced nasal uptake was predicted at lower exposure concentrations. At an exposure concentration of 1 ppb, predicted nasal uptake was 17.5 and 42.8% in the rat and monkey; net desorption of formaldehyde was predicted in the human model. The nonlinear behavior of formaldehyde nasal absorption will affect the dose-response analysis and subsequent risk estimates at low exposure concentrations. Updated surface area partitioning of nonsquamous epithelium and average flux values in regions where DNA-protein cross-links and cell proliferation rates were measured in rats and monkeys are reported for use in formaldehyde risk models of carcinogenesis.

  15. Development and characterisation of a state-of-the-art GOME-2 formaldehyde air-mass factor algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewson, W.; Barkley, M. P.; Gonzalez Abad, G.; Bösch, H.; Kurosu, T.; Spurr, R.; Tilstra, L. G.

    2015-10-01

    Space-borne observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) are frequently used to derive surface emissions of isoprene, an important biogenic volatile organic compound. The conversion of retrieved HCHO slant column concentrations from satellite line-of-sight measurements to vertical columns is determined through application of an air mass factor (AMF), accounting for instrument viewing geometry, radiative transfer, and vertical profile of the absorber in the atmosphere. This step in the trace gas retrieval is subject to large errors. This work presents the AMF algorithm in use at the University of Leicester (UoL), which introduces scene-specific variables into a per-observation full radiative transfer AMF calculation, including increasing spatial resolution of key environmental parameter databases, input variable area weighting, instrument-specific scattering weight calculation, and inclusion of an ozone vertical profile climatology. Application of these updates to HCHO slant columns from the GOME-2 instrument is shown to typically adjust the AMF by ±20 %, compared to a reference algorithm without these advanced parameterisations. On average the GOME-2 AMFs increase by 4 %, with over 70 % of locations having an AMF of 0-20 % larger than originally, largely resulting from the use of the latest GOME-2 reflectance product. Furthermore, the new UoL algorithm also incorporates a full radiative transfer error calculation for each scene to help characterise AMF uncertainties. Global median AMF errors are typically 50-60 %, and are driven by uncertainties in the HCHO profile shape and its vertical distribution relative to clouds and aerosols. If uncertainty on the a priori HCHO profile is relatively small (< 10 %) then the median AMF total error decreases to about 30-40 %.

  16. [Critical approach to technics for the disinfection of respirators with formaldehyde].

    PubMed

    Laguenie, G; Bavoux, F; Garnier, R; Murat, I; Couturier, C

    1983-03-01

    Method of artificial respirators desinfection by Formaldehyde is studied. Formaldehyde and ammoniac quantitative analysis are performed. Air samples are taken by dry process and by wet process. Two concentrations are in ceiling values for exposure of workers and exceed irritant concentrations during chronic exposition. Particular attention should be paid to perform measurement: air samples must be taken by wet process as artificial ventilation circumstances: indeed in this case air is humidified; potential toxicity is unappreciated in this use. Complementary studies are required.

  17. Impact of temperature on the ratio of initial emittable concentration to total concentration for formaldehyde in building materials: theoretical correlation and validation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaodan; Xiong, Jianyin; Zhang, Yinping

    2015-02-01

    The initial emittable concentration (Cm,0) is a key parameter characterizing the emission behaviors of formaldehyde from building materials, which is highly dependent on temperature but has seldom been studied. Our previous study found that Cm,0 is much less than the total concentration (C0,total, used for labeling material in many standards) of formaldehyde. Because Cm,0 and not C0,total directly determines the actual emission behaviors, we need to determine the relationship between Cm,0 and C0,total so as to use Cm,0 as a more appropriate labeling index. By applying statistical physics theory, this paper derives a novel correlation between the emittable ratio (Cm,0/C0,total) and temperature. This correlation shows that the logarithm of the emittable ratio multiplied by power of 0.5 of temperature is linearly related to the reciprocal of temperature. Emissions tests for formaldehyde from a type of medium density fiberboard over the temperature range of 25.0-80.0 °C were performed to validate the correlation. Experimental results indicated that Cm,0 (or emittable ratio) increased significantly with increasing temperature, this increase being 14-fold from 25.0 to 80.0 °C. The correlation prediction agreed well with experiments, demonstrating its effectiveness in characterizing physical emissions. This study will be helpful for predicting/controlling the emission characteristics of pollutants at various temperatures.

  18. [Formaldehyde in hair shampoos].

    PubMed

    Bork, K; Heise, D; Rosinus, A

    1979-01-01

    In most hair shampoos commercially available in Western Germany formaldehyde or formaldehyde liberating substances serve as efficient preservatives especially in shampoos of the lower price group. Besides, PHB-ester, mercury containing substances and since recently brome compounds are used for this purpose. We observed a 15 year old patient who developed an allergic contact dermatitis from formaldehyde in a hair shampoo. However, compared to the widespread opportunities of exposure allergic contact dermatitis caused by hair shampoos is not very frequent. For this rarity of formaldehyde dermatitis caused by shampoos the short period of application and the low concentration because of the high dilution and perhaps the low contact dermatitis reactivity of the scalp are responsible. After all only two out of thirtyone thoroughly questioned patients, who had acquired a professional formaldehyde sensitivity elsewhere, reported a contact dermatitis caused by shampoos, which by the way appeared in the orbital region as typical. Probably allergic contact dermatitis from formaldehyde in shampoos will be expected in patients with a formaldehyde sensitivity acquired formerly elsewhere, especially professionally. To those patients formaldehyde free hair shampoos should be recommended. The declaration of formaledehyde in cosmetics, which will be legally obligatory in Germany in 1979, will be valuable for finding out the alternate products free of formaldehyde.

  19. Optical detection of formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patty, Kira D.; Gregory, Don A.

    2008-04-01

    The potential for buildup of formaldehyde in closed space environments poses a direct health hazard to personnel. The National Aeronautic Space Agency (NASA) has established a maximum permitted concentration of 0.04 ppm for 7 to 180 days for all space craft. Early detection is critical to ensure that formaldehyde levels do not accumulate above these limits. New sensor technologies are needed to enable real time, in situ detection in a compact and reusable form factor. Addressing this need, research into the use of reactive fluorescent dyes which reversibly bind to formaldehyde (liquid or gas) has been conducted to support the development of a formaldehyde sensor. In the presence of formaldehyde the dyes' characteristic fluorescence peaks shift providing the basis for an optical detection. Dye responses to formaldehyde exposure were characterized; demonstrating the optical detection of formaldehyde in under 10 seconds and down to concentrations of 0.5 ppm. To incorporate the dye in an optical sensor device requires a means of containing and manipulating the dye. Multiple form factors using two dissimilar substrates were considered to determine a suitable configuration. A prototype sensor was demonstrated and considerations for a fieldable sensor were presented. This research provides a necessary first step toward the development of a compact, reusable, real time optical formaldehyde sensor suitable for use in the U.S. space program.

  20. Optical Detection of Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patty, Kira D.; Gregory, Don A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential for buildup .of formaldehyde in closed space environments poses a direct health hazard to personnel. The National Aeronautic Space Agency (NASA) has established a maximum permitted concentration of 0.04 ppm for 7 to 180 days for all space craft. Early detection is critical to ensure that formaldehyde levels do not accumulate. above these limits. New sensor technologies are needed to enable real time,in situ detection in a compact and reusable form factor. Addressing this need,research into the use of reactive fluorescent dyes which reversibly bind to formaldehyde (liquid or gas) has been conducted to support the development of a formaldehyde.sensor. In the presence of formaldehyde the dyes' characteristic fluorescence peaks shift providing the basis for an optical detection. Dye responses to formaldehyde exposure were characterized; demonstrating the optical detection of formaldehyde in under 10 seconds and down to concentrations of 0.5 ppm. To .incorporate the dye .in.an optical sensor device requires. a means of containing and manipulating the dye. Multiple form factors using two dissimilar sbstrates were considered to determine a suitable configuration. A prototype sensor was demonstrated and considerations for a field able sensor were presented. This research provides a necessary first step toward the development of a compact, reusable; real time optical formaldehyde sensor suitable for use in the U.S. space program,

  1. Electrokinetic behavior of melamine-formaldehyde latex particles at moderate electrolyte concentration.

    PubMed

    Dahlsten, Per; Próchniak, Piotr; Kosmulski, Marek; Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2009-11-15

    The electrokinetic behavior of micrometer-sized melamine-formaldehyde latex particles in 10(-3)-10(-1)M monovalent electrolyte dispersions was investigated by electrophoresis and electroacoustics. Specific adsorption of the electrolytes was identified as a shift of the isoelectric point (pH(iep)) with an increased ionic strength. All salts had an equal dependence on the ionic strength. The pH(iep) was correlated with the anion sequence predicted by the hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) principle, Hofmeister series, and Born charging. The Born and the Hofmeister anion scale were successful in producing a systematic dependency of the isoelectric point (pH(iep)), particularly in high (10(-1)M) and low (10(-3)M) MF electrolyte dispersions. No clear trend could be found for the pH(iep) dependence on the anion HSAB scale.

  2. Degradation of formaldehyde at high concentrations by phenol-adapted Ralstonia eutropha closely related to pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Alireza; Vahabzadeh, Farzaneh

    2013-01-01

    The ability of the phenol-adapted Ralstonia eutropha to utilize formaldehyde (FD) as the sole source of carbon and energy was studied. Adaptation to FD was accomplished by substituting FD for glucose in a stepwise manner. The bacterium in the liquid test culture could tolerate concentrations of FD up to 900 mg L(-1). Degradation of FD was complete in 528 h at 30°C with shaking at 150 rpm (r = 1.67 mg L(-1) h(-1)), q = 0.035 g(FD) g(cell) (-1) h(-1). Substrate inhibition kinetics (Haldane and Luong equations) are used to describe the experimental data. At non-inhibitory concentrations of FD, the Monod equation was used. According to the Luong model, the values of the maximum specific growth rate (μ(max)), half-saturation coefficient (k(S)), the maximum allowable formaldehyde concentration (S(m)), and the shape factor (n) were 0.117 h(-1), 47.6 mg L(-1), 900 mg L(-1), and 2.2, respectively. The growth response of the test bacterium to consecutive FD feedings was examined, and the FD-adapted R. eutropha cells were able to degrade 1000 mg L(-1) FD in 150 h through 4 cycles of FD feeds. During FD degradation, formic acid metabolite was formed. Assimilation of FD, methanol, formic acid, and oxalate by the test bacterium was accompanied by the formation of a pink pigment. The carotenoid nature of the cellular pigment has been confirmed and the test bacterium appeared to be closely related to pink-pigmented facultative methylotrophs (PPFM). The extent of harm to soil exposed to biotreated wastewaters containing FD may be moderated due to the association between methylotrophic/oxalotrophic bacteria and plants.

  3. Observations on using inside air concentrations as a predictor of outside air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkley, Gavin; Whicker, Jeffrey; Harris, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Here, excavations of radiological material were performed within confined structures with known operational parameters, such as a filtered exhaust system with known filtration efficiency. Given the known efficiency, the assumption could be made that the air concentrations of radioactivity measured outside the structure would be proportional to the air concentrations measured inside the structure. To investigate this assumption, the inside concentration data was compared with the outside concentration data. The correlation of the data suggested that the inside concentrations were not a good predictor of the outside concentrations. This poor correlation was deemed to be a result of operational unknowns within the structures.

  4. Observations on using inside air concentrations as a predictor of outside air concentrations

    DOE PAGES

    Hawkley, Gavin; Whicker, Jeffrey; Harris, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Here, excavations of radiological material were performed within confined structures with known operational parameters, such as a filtered exhaust system with known filtration efficiency. Given the known efficiency, the assumption could be made that the air concentrations of radioactivity measured outside the structure would be proportional to the air concentrations measured inside the structure. To investigate this assumption, the inside concentration data was compared with the outside concentration data. The correlation of the data suggested that the inside concentrations were not a good predictor of the outside concentrations. This poor correlation was deemed to be a result of operational unknownsmore » within the structures.« less

  5. The formaldehyde dilemma.

    PubMed

    Salthammer, Tunga

    2015-06-01

    The IARC's 2004 classification of formaldehyde as a human carcinogen has led to intensive discussion on scientific and regulatory levels. In June 2014, the European Union followed and classified formaldehyde as a cause of cancer. This automatically triggers consequences in terms of emission minimization and the health-related assessment of building and consumer products. On the other hand, authorities are demanding and authorizing technologies and products which can release significant quantities of formaldehyde into the atmosphere. In the outdoor environment, this particularly applies to combusting fuels. The formation of formaldehyde through photochemical smog has also been a recognized problem for years. Indoors there are various processes which can contribute to increased formaldehyde concentrations. Overall, legislation faces a dilemma: primary sources are often over-regulated while a lack of consideration of secondary sources negates the regulations' effects.

  6. The formaldehyde dilemma.

    PubMed

    Salthammer, Tunga

    2015-06-01

    The IARC's 2004 classification of formaldehyde as a human carcinogen has led to intensive discussion on scientific and regulatory levels. In June 2014, the European Union followed and classified formaldehyde as a cause of cancer. This automatically triggers consequences in terms of emission minimization and the health-related assessment of building and consumer products. On the other hand, authorities are demanding and authorizing technologies and products which can release significant quantities of formaldehyde into the atmosphere. In the outdoor environment, this particularly applies to combusting fuels. The formation of formaldehyde through photochemical smog has also been a recognized problem for years. Indoors there are various processes which can contribute to increased formaldehyde concentrations. Overall, legislation faces a dilemma: primary sources are often over-regulated while a lack of consideration of secondary sources negates the regulations' effects. PMID:25772784

  7. A new system to reduce formaldehyde levels improves safety conditions during gross veterinary anatomy learning.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Víctor; Llombart, Cristina; Carretero, Ana; Navarro, Marc; Ysern, Pere; Calero, Sebastián; Fígols, Enric; Ruberte, Jesús

    2007-01-01

    Dissection is a very useful method of learning veterinary anatomy. However, formaldehyde, which is widely used to preserve cadavers, is an irritant, and it has recently been classified as a carcinogen. In 1997, the Instituto Nacional de Seguridad e Higiene en el Trabajo [National Institute of Workplace Security and Hygiene] found that the levels of formaldehyde in our dissection room were above the threshold limit values. Unfortunately, no optimal substitute for formaldehyde is currently available. Therefore, we designed a new ventilation system that combines slow propulsion of fresh air from above the dissection table and rapid aspiration of polluted air from the perimeter. Formaldehyde measurements performed in 2004, after the introduction of this new system into our dissection laboratory, showed a dramatic reduction (about tenfold, or 0.03 ppm). A suitable propelling/aspirating air system successfully reduces the concentration of formaldehyde in the dissection room, significantly improving safety conditions for students, instructors, and technical staff during gross anatomy learning.

  8. Assessment of immunotoxicity and genotoxicity in workers exposed to low concentrations of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevtap; Canpinar, Hande; Ündeğer, Ülkü; Güç, Dicle; Çolakoğlu, Mustafa; Kars, Ayşe; Başaran, Nurşen

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA), which is an important chemical with a wide commercial use, has been classified as carcinogenic to humans by International Research on Cancer (IARC). The genotoxic and carcinogenic potential of FA has been documented in mammalian cells and in rodents. A recent evaluation by the E.U. Scientific Committee for Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL) anticipated that an 8-h time-weighted average exposure to 0.2 ppm FA would not be irritating and not genotoxic in humans. In order to verify this prediction, a field study was performed that aimed at evaluating immune alterations and genetic damage in peripheral lymphocytes of workers in medium density fiberboard plants exposed to a level of FA equivalent to the OEL recommended by SCOEL (0.2 ppm). Subsets of peripheral lymphocytes, immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM), complement proteins, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels were evaluated. DNA damage of the workers was assessed by the Comet assay. The absolute numbers and the percentages of T lymphocytes and of natural killer cells, and the levels of TNF-α were higher than the controls, whereas IgG and IgM levels were found to be lower in workers. Other examined immunological parameters were not different from those of the controls. There was no increased DNA damage in the workers compared to controls.

  9. Scavenging ratios based on inflow air concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, W.E.; Dana, M.T.; Lee, R.N.; Slinn, W.G.N.; Thorp, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    Scavenging ratios were calculated from field measurements made during April 1985. Event precipitation samples were collected at the surface, but air chemistry measurements in the air mass feeding the precipitation were made from an aircraft. In contrast, ratios calculated in previous studies have used air concentration and precipitation chemistry data from only surface measurements. Average scavenging ratios were calculated for SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, total sulfate, total nitrate, and total ammonium for 5 events; the geometric mean of these scavenging ratios were 8.5 {times} 10{sup 5}, 5.6 {times} 10{sup 6}, 4.3 {times} 10{sup 5}, 3.4 {times} 10{sup 5}, 2.4 {times} 10{sup 6}, and 9.7 {times} 10{sup 4}, respectively. These means are similar to but less variable than previous ratios formed using only surface data.

  10. Exposure to formaldehyde: effects of pulmonary function

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandersson, R.; Kolmodin-Hedman, B.; Hedenstierna, G.

    1982-09-01

    Forty-seven subjects exposed to formaldehyde (mean air concentration 0.45 mg/m/sup 3/) and 20 unexposed subjects, all of whom were employed at a carpentry shop, were studied with regard to symptoms and pulmonary function. Symptoms involving eyes and throat as well as chest oppression were significantly more common in the exposed subjects than in the unexposed controls. Spirometry and single breath nitrogen washout were normal Monday morning before exposure to formaldehyde. A reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec by an average of 0.2 L (P = .002), percent forced expiratory volume by 2% (P = .04), maximum midexpiratory flow by 0.3 L/sec (P = .04) and an increase in closing volume in percentage of vital capacity by 3.4% (P = .002) were seen after a day of work and exposure to formaldehyde, suggesting bronchoconstriction. Smokers and nonsmokers displayed similar changes in spirometry and nitrogen washout.

  11. Volatile organic compound and formaldehyde emissions from Populus davidiana wood treated with low molecular weight urea-formaldehyde resin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Xian; Shen, Jun; Lei, Cheng-Shuai; Feng, Qi

    2014-09-01

    Populus davidiana wood was usually impregnated with low molecular weight thermosetting resins to improve its physical and mechanical properties. However, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and formaldehyde emitted from treated wood have lead to poor indoor air quality (IAQ). The trends of VOC and formaldehyde emissions as a function of the weight percent gain (WPG) factor were mainly investigated in this work. Aldehydes and alkanes were the predominant compositions indentified in the VOC emissions, although low amount of ketones, terpenes and alcohols were also found. With the increase in WPG, VOC and formaldehyde concentrations improved. However, their concentration began to decrease when WPG was over 44.06% (VOC) and 36.35% (formaldehyde), respectively. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) of untreated and treated wood at different WPG levels was detected. It showed that treatment of wood with UF resin significantly improved the mechanical properties. Therefore, it is probably helpful to comprehensively analyze correlations among environmental performance, mechanical performance and processing costs.

  12. Detection of low concentration formaldehyde gas by photonic crystal sensor fabricated by nanoimprint process in polymer material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, A.; van Ee, Renz J.; Stevens, Ralph S. A.; Saalmink, Milan; Charlton, Martin D. B.; Pollard, Michael E.; Chen, Ruiqi; Kontturi, Ville; Karioja, Pentti; Alajoki, Teemu

    2014-05-01

    This paper describes experimental measurement results for photonic crystal sensor devices which have been functionalized for gas sensing applications. The sensor consists of a two dimensional photonic crystal etched into a slab waveguide having a refractive index of 1.7-1.9. Test devices were fabricated from SiON material on silicon / silicon dioxide platform, and also in polymer materials on silicon platform. The inorganic photonic crystals were made using direct write electron-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The polymeric devices were made by nano-imprint lithography using the SiON structure as the imprint master. The high refractive index polymer was composed of a TiO2 - UV resin nanocomposite having a nanoparticle fraction between 50 and 60 wt%. This resulted in a tunable refractive index between 1.7 and 1.85. Devices were functionalized for gas sensing applications by coating the surface with a chemical receptor. This responsive layer reacts with the target gas and changes its refractive index. This change causes the angle of out-coupling to change slightly. In this paper we report successful detection of formaldehyde in air at sub ppm levels, and discuss details of chemical functionalization of the PC sensor.

  13. A passive sampler for airborne formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosjean, Daniel; Williams, Edwin L.

    A simple, inexpensive passive sampler is described that is capable of reliable measurements of formaldehyde at the parts per billion (ppb) levels relevant to indoor and outdoor air quality. The passive sampler consists of a modified dual filter holder in which the upper stage serves as the diffusion barrier, the lower stage includes a 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH)-coated filter which collects formaldehyde, and the space between the two stages serve as the diffusion gap. The measured sampling rate, 18.8 ± 1.8 ml min -1, was determined in experiments involving sampling of ppb levels of formaldehyde with the passive sampler and with DNPH-coated C 18 cartridges and agrees well with the value of 19.4 ± 2.0 ml min -1 calculated from theory. The measured sampling rate was independent of formaldehyde concentration (16-156 ppb) and sampling duration (1.5-72 h). The precision of the measurements for colocated passive samplers averaged 8.6% in purified and indoor air (office and museums) and 10.2% in photochemically polluted outdoor air. With a 1.2-μm pore size Teflon filter as the diffusion barrier, the detection limit is 32 ppb h, e.g. 4 ppb in an 8-h sample, 1.3 ppb in a 24-h sample, and so on. Perceived advantages and limitations of the sampler are discussed including flexibility, cost effectiveness and possible negative bias at high ambient levels of ozone.

  14. Formaldehyde release from selected consumer products: influence of chamber loading, multiple products, relative humidity, and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, J.A.; Griffis, L.C.; Mokler, B.V.; Kanapilly, G.M.; Hobbs, C.H.

    1984-09-01

    Formaldehyde release rates were measured for one sample each of a variety of consumer products under various conditions of temperature, humidity, and mass loading in a ventilated chamber. The rate of formaldehyde released from pressed wood products was much greater than from insulation material or carpeting, whether measured in a dynamic (ventilated) or static (nonventilated) chamber. Formaldehyde was released from wood products at a more rapid rate when chamber loadings (product surface area/chamber volume) and chamber concentrations of formaldehyde were reduced. Formaldehyde release from particle board and plywood was not substantially affected by the different temperatures (25-35/sup 0/C) and humidities (40-90%) tested. When particle board was paired with plywood, insulation, or carpet, the formaldehyde released was less than the sum of that released when each product was tested alone. These data suggest that these samples of plywood, insulation, or carpet (slow releasers of formaldehyde) absorbed formaldehyde released from the higher emitting particle board. Consequently, the surface area of carpet, insulation, and/or wood in a ventilated room relative to that of pressed wood products may be an important determinant of formaldehyde concentrations in the air of that room.

  15. [Development of the new desiccator system for measuring the removal effect of the formaldehyde as an indoor air pollutant by the adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Hiromu; Mihara, Yuichi; Ogawa, Norihiro; Hoshino, Toru; Kumagai, Takeshi; Yokota, Katsushi

    2005-06-01

    The new desiccator system with measures for the prevention of dew drops and the processing of the formaldehyde (FA) gas discharged from the final desiccator was produced, and the FA removal rate for various adsorbents was examined. For the prevention of dew drops in the desiccator, a hygroscopic bottle containing silica gel was used next to the FA gas generator, and humidity was adjusted by adjusting the interval between the FA gas outlet (a) and the desiccant (b). The removal of the harmful FA gas discharged from the final desiccator (n=5) is an important in the environmental preservation. To solve this problem, the FA gas was passed through an oxidation bottle containing KMnO(4)-H(2)SO(4) solution, and it was possible to confirm the complete decomposition of the FA by increase of the CO(2) and elimination of the FA. For the determination of the FA concentration in the desiccator, 100 ml air was beforehand collected using a gas collector into a 100 ml vial bottle containing 2 ml distilled water, and 50 ml of air from each desiccator was injected using a glass syringe. This was left under a slightly reduced pressure for 20 min, and the FA concentration was determined by the AHMT method. The FA removal rate after 1 h for each adsorbent (0.5 g) was 50% or more for chitin, KIMCO and silica gel. The removal efficacy for activated carbon was higher for fine particles than for coarse particles, and a dose-response relationship was established.

  16. A coupled sensor-spectrophotometric device for continuous measurement of formaldehyde in indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Carter, Ellison M; Jackson, Mark C; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2014-01-01

    Despite long-standing awareness of adverse health effects associated with chronic human exposure to formaldehyde, this hazardous air pollutant remains a challenge to measure in indoor environments. Traditional analytical techniques evaluate formaldehyde concentrations over several hours to several days in a single location in a residence, making it difficult to characterize daily temporal and spatial variation in human exposure to formaldehyde. There is a need for portable, easy-to-use devices that are specific and sensitive to gas-phase formaldehyde over short sampling periods so that dynamic processes governing formaldehyde fate, transport, and potential remediation in indoor environments may be studied more effectively. A recently developed device couples a chemical sensor element with spectrophotometric analysis for detection and quantification of part per billion (ppbv) gas-phase formaldehyde concentrations. This study established the ability of the coupled sensor-spectrophotometric device (CSSD) to report formaldehyde concentrations accurately and continuously on a 30-min sampling cycle at low ppbv concentrations previously untested for this device in a laboratory setting. Determination of the method detection limit (MDL), based on 40 samples each at test concentrations of 5 and 10 ppbv, was found to be 1.9 and 2.0 ppbv, respectively. Performance of the CSSD was compared with the dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) derivatization method for formaldehyde concentrations ranging from 5-50 ppbv, and a linear relationship with a coefficient of determination of 0.983 was found between these two analytical techniques. The CSSD was also used to monitor indoor formaldehyde concentrations in two manufactured homes. During this time, formaldehyde concentrations varied from below detection limit to 65 ppbv and were above the US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommended exposure limit (REL) of 16 ppbv, which is also the exposure limit

  17. Controlling formaldehyde emissions with boiler ash.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Jennifer; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba; Banerjee, Sujit

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized wood ash reduces formaldehyde in air from about 20 to <1 ppmv. Methanol is removed to a much lower extent. The efficiency of formaldehyde reduction increases with increasing moisture content of the ash. Sorption of formaldehyde to ash can be substantially accounted for by partitioning to the water contained in the ash followed by rate-controlling binding to the ash solids. Adsorption occurs at temperatures of up to 165 degrees C; oxidation predominates thereafter. It is proposed that formaldehyde could be stripped from an air stream in a fluidized bed containing ash, which could then be returned to a boiler to incinerate the formaldehyde.

  18. Concentrations of air toxics in motor vehicle-dominated environments.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Eric M; Campbell, David E; Zielinska, Barbara; Arnott, William P; Chow, Judith C

    2011-02-01

    We at the Desert Research Institute (DRI*) measured volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including several mobile-source air toxics (MSATs), particulate matter with a mass mean aerodynamic diameter < or = 2.5 pm (PM2.5), black carbon (BC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter (PM), and carbon monoxide (CO) on highways in Los Angeles County during summer and fall 2004, to characterize the diurnal and seasonal variations in measured concentrations related to volume and mix of traffic. Concentrations of on-road pollutants were then compared to corresponding measurements at fixed monitoring sites. The on-road concentrations of CO and MSATs were higher in the morning under stable atmospheric conditions and during periods of higher traffic volumes. In contrast, BC concentrations, measured as particulate light absorption, were higher on truck routes during the midday sampling periods despite more unstable atmospheric conditions. Compared to the measurements at the three near-road sites, the 1-hour averages of on-road BC concentrations were as much as an order of magnitude higher. The peak 1-minute average concentrations were two orders of magnitude higher for BC and were between two and six times higher for PM2.5 mass. The on-road concentrations of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during the summer were 3.5 +/- 0.7 and 1.2 +/- 0.6 times higher during morning and afternoon commuting periods, respectively, compared to annual average 24-hour concentrations measured at air toxic monitoring network sites. These ratios were higher during the fall, with smaller diurnal differences (4.8 +/- 0.7 and 3.9 +/- 0.6 for morning and afternoon commuting periods, respectively). Ratios similar to those for BTEX were obtained for 1,3-butadiene (BD) and styrene. On-road concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were up to two times higher than at air toxics monitoring sites, with fall ratios slightly higher than summer ratios. Chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor

  19. Formaldehyde emissions from ventilation filters under different relative humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Sidheswaran, Meera; Chen, Wenhao; Chang, Agatha; Miller, Robert; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas; Fisk, William J; Kumagai, Kazukiyo; Destaillats, Hugo

    2013-05-21

    Formaldehyde emissions from fiberglass and polyester filters used in building heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems were measured in bench-scale tests using 10 and 17 cm(2) coupons over 24 to 720 h periods. Experiments were performed at room temperature and four different relative humidity settings (20, 50, 65, and 80% RH). Two different air flow velocities across the filters were explored: 0.013 and 0.5 m/s. Fiberglass filters emitted between 20 and 1000 times more formaldehyde than polyester filters under similar RH and airflow conditions. Emissions increased markedly with increasing humidity, up to 10 mg/h-m(2) at 80% RH. Formaldehyde emissions from fiberglass filters coated with tackifiers (impaction oils) were lower than those from uncoated fiberglass media, suggesting that hydrolysis of other polymeric constituents of the filter matrix, such as adhesives or binders was likely the main formaldehyde source. These laboratory results were further validated by performing a small field study in an unoccupied office. At 80% RH, indoor formaldehyde concentrations increased by 48-64%, from 9-12 μg/m(3) to 12-20 μg/m(3), when synthetic filters were replaced with fiberglass filtration media in the HVAC units. Better understanding of the reaction mechanisms and assessing their overall contributions to indoor formaldehyde levels will allow for efficient control of this pollution source. PMID:23597095

  20. Assessment of diffusion parameters of new passive samplers using optical chemical sensor for on-site measuring formaldehyde in indoor air: experimental and numerical studies.

    PubMed

    Vignau-Laulhere, Jane; Mocho, Pierre; Plaisance, Hervé; Raulin, Katarzyna; Desauziers, Valérie

    2016-03-01

    New passive samplers using a sensor consisting of a sol-gel matrix entrapping Fluoral-P as sampling media were developed for the determination of formaldehyde in indoor air. The reaction between Fluoral-P and formaldehyde produces a colored compound which is quantified on-site by means of a simple optical reading module. The advantages of this sensor are selectivity, low cost, ppb level limit of detection, and on-site direct measurement. In the development process, it is necessary to determine the sampling rate, a key parameter that cannot be directly assessed in the case of diffusive samplers using optical chemical sensor. In this study, a methodology combining experimental tests and numerical modeling is proposed and applied at five different radial diffusive samplers equipped with the same optical chemical sensor to assess the sampled material flows and sampling rates. These radial diffusive samplers differ in the internal volume of the sampler (18.97 and 6.14 cm(3)), the position of sensor inside the sampler (in front and offset of 1.2 cm above the membrane) and the width of the diffusion slot (1.4 and 5.9 mm). The influences of these three parameters (internal volume, position of sensor inside the sampler, and width of the diffusion slot) were assessed and discussed with regard to the formaldehyde sampling rate and water uptake by sensor (potential interference of measure). Numerical simulations based on Fick's laws are in agreement with the experimental results and provide to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde through the membrane (3.50 × 10(-6) m(2) s(-1)). Conversion factors between the sensor response, sampled formaldehyde mass and sampling rate were also assessed.

  1. Assessment of diffusion parameters of new passive samplers using optical chemical sensor for on-site measuring formaldehyde in indoor air: experimental and numerical studies.

    PubMed

    Vignau-Laulhere, Jane; Mocho, Pierre; Plaisance, Hervé; Raulin, Katarzyna; Desauziers, Valérie

    2016-03-01

    New passive samplers using a sensor consisting of a sol-gel matrix entrapping Fluoral-P as sampling media were developed for the determination of formaldehyde in indoor air. The reaction between Fluoral-P and formaldehyde produces a colored compound which is quantified on-site by means of a simple optical reading module. The advantages of this sensor are selectivity, low cost, ppb level limit of detection, and on-site direct measurement. In the development process, it is necessary to determine the sampling rate, a key parameter that cannot be directly assessed in the case of diffusive samplers using optical chemical sensor. In this study, a methodology combining experimental tests and numerical modeling is proposed and applied at five different radial diffusive samplers equipped with the same optical chemical sensor to assess the sampled material flows and sampling rates. These radial diffusive samplers differ in the internal volume of the sampler (18.97 and 6.14 cm(3)), the position of sensor inside the sampler (in front and offset of 1.2 cm above the membrane) and the width of the diffusion slot (1.4 and 5.9 mm). The influences of these three parameters (internal volume, position of sensor inside the sampler, and width of the diffusion slot) were assessed and discussed with regard to the formaldehyde sampling rate and water uptake by sensor (potential interference of measure). Numerical simulations based on Fick's laws are in agreement with the experimental results and provide to estimate the effective diffusion coefficient of formaldehyde through the membrane (3.50 × 10(-6) m(2) s(-1)). Conversion factors between the sensor response, sampled formaldehyde mass and sampling rate were also assessed. PMID:26847188

  2. System for dosing formaldehyde vapor at the ppb level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röck, Frank; Barsan, Nicolae; Weimar, Udo

    2010-11-01

    Formaldehyde is one of the most relevant compounds for indoor air pollution. It is toxic, allergenic and carcinogenic and acts already at the ppb level. State-of-the-art detection methods are based on the wet chemical analysis of formaldehyde derivates. This is a complex and time-consuming approach and hinders the collection of real-time data. However, the use of wet chemistry allows for the simple calibration based on formalin solutions. By using gas sensors, online monitoring of indoor air quality is, in principle, possible. To find out whether their performance is good enough, calibration is the first issue to be resolved. Formaldehyde vapor at low concentrations has to be used, and temperature, humidity and flow rate have to be kept constant. This paper discusses the different possibilities of dosing formaldehyde and how to better meet the gas sensor calibration demands. The authors favor the use of an aqueous formaldehyde solution obtained by the depolymerization of paraformaldehyde in combination with a permeation tube used as external reference. Moreover, in the paper it is demonstrated that metal oxide sensors are appropriate detectors to calibrate the system for concentrations even down to 20 ppb. Consequently, the presented system is able to characterize gas sensors and can be used for the development of new devices which monitor indoor air quality.

  3. Occupational asthma due to formaldehyde.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, P S; Harries, M G; Lam, W K; O'Brien, I M; Patchett, P A

    1985-01-01

    Bronchial provocation studies on 15 workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde are described. The results show that formaldehyde exposure can cause asthmatic reactions, and suggest that these are sometimes due to hypersensitivity and sometimes to a direct irritant effect. Three workers had classical occupational asthma caused by formaldehyde fumes, which was likely to be due to hypersensitivity, with late asthmatic reactions following formaldehyde exposure. Six workers developed immediate asthmatic reactions, which were likely to be due to a direct irritant effect as the reactions were shorter in duration than those seen after soluble allergen exposure and were closely related to histamine reactivity. The breathing zone concentrations of formaldehyde required to elicit these irritant reactions (mean 4.8 mg/m3) were higher than those encountered in buildings recently insulated with urea formaldehyde foam, but within levels sometimes found in industry. Images PMID:4023975

  4. Toxicological Assessment of ISS Air Quality: September 2012 - October 2012 with Formaldehyde Supplement from May-October 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2013-01-01

    A summary of the analytical results from 6 grab sample containers (GSCs) and 12 pairs of formaldehyde badges collected on ISS and returned aboard 29S or 31 S is shown in an accompanying table. The average recoveries of the 3 surrogate standards from the GSCs were as follows: C-l3-acetone, 128%; fluorobenzene, 114%; and chlorobenzene, 78%. Recoveries of two lab-control formaldehyde badges averaged 95%.

  5. Determination of formaldehyde by HPLC as the DNPH derivative following high-volume air sampling onto bisulfite-coated cellulose filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrade, Jailson B.; Tanner, Roger L.

    A method is described for the specific collection of formaldehyde as hydroxymethanesulfonate on bisulfate-coated cellulose filters. Following extraction in aqueous acid and removal on unreacted bisulfite, the hydroxymethanesulfonate is decomposed by base, and HCHO is determined by DNPH (2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine) derivatization and HPLC. Since the collection efficiency for formaldehyde is moderately high even when sampling ambient air at high-volume flow rates, a limit of detection of 0.2 ppbv is achieved with 30 min sampling times. Interference from acetaldehyde co-collected as 1-hydroxyethanesulfonate is <5% using this procedure. The technique shows promise for both short-term airborne sampling, and as a means of collecting mg-sized samples of HCHO on an inorganic matrix for carbon isotopic analyses.

  6. Formaldehyde in the ambient atmosphere: from an indoor pollutant to an outdoor pollutant?

    PubMed

    Salthammer, Tunga

    2013-03-18

    Formaldehyde has been discussed as a typical indoor pollutant for decades. Legal requirements and ever-lower limits for formaldehyde in indoor air have led to a continual reduction in the amount of formaldehyde released from furniture, building materials, and household products over many years. Slowly, and without much attention from research on indoor air, a change of paradigm is taking place, however. Today, the formaldehyde concentrations in outdoor air, particularly in polluted urban areas, sometimes already reach indoor levels. This is largely a result of photochemical processes and the use of biofuels. In the medium term, this development might have consequences for the way buildings are ventilated and lead to a change in the way we evaluate human exposure.

  7. Long-memory property in air pollutant concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelani, Asha

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, long-memory in air pollutant concentrations is reviewed and outcome of the past studies is analyzed to provide the possible mechanism behind temporal evolution of air pollutant concentrations. It is observed that almost all the studies show air pollutant concentrations over time possess persistence up to a certain limit. Self-organized criticality of air pollution, multiplicative process of pollutant concentrations, and uniformity in emission sources leading to self-organized criticality are few of the phenomena behind the persistent property of air pollutant concentrations. The self-organized criticality of air pollution is linked to atmosphere's self-cleansing mechanism. This demonstrates that inspite of increasing anthropogenic emissions, self-organized criticality of air pollution is sustained and has low influence of human interventions. In the future, this property may, however, be perturbed due to continuous air pollution emissions, which may influence the accuracy in predictions.

  8. Air Mass Factor Formulation for Spectroscopic Measurements from Satellites: Application to Formaldehyde Retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Paul I.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Chance, Kelly; Martin, Randall V.; Spurr, Robert J. D.; Kurosu, Thomas P.; Bey, Isabelle; Yantosca, Robert; Fiore, Arlene; Li, Qinbin

    2004-01-01

    We present a new formulation for the air mass factor (AMF) to convert slant column measurements of optically thin atmospheric species from space into total vertical columns. Because of atmospheric scattering, the AMF depends on the vertical distribution of the species. We formulate the AMF as the integral of the relative vertical distribution (shape factor) of the species over the depth of the atmosphere, weighted by altitude-dependent coefficients (scattering weights) computed independently from a radiative transfer model. The scattering weights are readily tabulated, and one can then obtain the AMF for any observation scene by using shape factors from a three dimensional (3-D) atmospheric chemistry model for the period of observation. This approach subsequently allows objective evaluation of the 3-D model with the observed vertical columns, since the shape factor and the vertical column in the model represent two independent pieces of information. We demonstrate the AMF method by using slant column measurements of formaldehyde at 346 nm from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment satellite instrument over North America during July 1996. Shape factors are cumputed with the Global Earth Observing System CHEMistry (GEOS-CHEM) global 3-D model and are checked for consistency with the few available aircraft measurements. Scattering weights increase by an order of magnitude from the surface to the upper troposphere. The AMFs are typically 20-40% less over continents than over the oceans and are approximately half the values calculated in the absence of scattering. Model-induced errors in the AMF are estimated to be approximately 10%. The GEOS-CHEM model captures 50% and 60% of the variances in the observed slant and vertical columns, respectively. Comparison of the simulated and observed vertical columns allows assessment of model bias.

  9. Concentrated Solar Air Conditioning for Buildings Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaughlin, Rusty

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews project to implement the use of solar power to provide air conditioning for NASA buildings. Included is an overall conceptual schematic, and an diagram of the plumbing and instrumentation for the project. The use of solar power to power air conditioning in buildings, particularly in the Southwest, could save a significant amount of money. DOD studies have concluded that air conditioning accounts for 30-60% of total energy expenditures.

  10. Air toxics concentrations, source identification, and health risks: An air pollution hot spot in southwest Memphis, TN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chunrong; Foran, Jeffery

    2013-12-01

    Southwest Memphis is a residential region surrounded by fossil fuel burning, steel, refining, and food processing industries, and considerable mobile sources whose emissions may pose adverse health risks to local residents. This study characterizes cancer and non-cancer risks resulting from exposure to ambient air toxics in southwest Memphis. Air toxics samples were collected at a central location every 6 days from June 5, 2008 to January 8, 2010. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were collected in evacuated stainless-steel canisters and aldehydes by DNPH cartridges, and samples were analyzed for 73 target compounds. A total of 60 compounds were detected and 39 were found in over 86% of the samples. Mean concentrations of many compounds were higher than those measured in many industrial communities throughout the U.S. The cumulative cancer risk associated with exposure to 13 carcinogens found in southwest Memphis air was 2.3 × 10-4, four times higher than the national average of 5.0 × 10-5. Three risk drivers were identified: benzene, formaldehyde, and acrylonitrile, which contributed 43%, 19%, and 14% to the cumulative risk, respectively. This is the first field study to confirm acrylonitrile as a potential risk driver. Mobile, secondary, industrial, and background sources contributed 57%, 24%, 14%, and 5% of the risk, respectively. The results of this study indicate that southwest Memphis, a region of significant income, racial, and social disparities, is also a region under significant environmental stress compared with surrounding areas and communities.

  11. Genotoxic effects in occupational exposure to formaldehyde: A study in anatomy and pathology laboratories and formaldehyde-resins production

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background According to the Report on Carcinogens, formaldehyde ranks 25th in the overall U.S. chemical production, with more than 5 million tons produced each year. Given its economic importance and widespread use, many people are exposed to formaldehyde environmentally and/or occupationally. Presently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies formaldehyde as carcinogenic to humans (Group 1), based on sufficient evidence in humans and in experimental animals. Manyfold in vitro studies clearly indicated that formaldehyde can induce genotoxic effects in proliferating cultured mammalian cells. Furthermore, some in vivo studies have found changes in epithelial cells and in peripheral blood lymphocytes related to formaldehyde exposure. Methods A study was carried out in Portugal, using 80 workers occupationally exposed to formaldehyde vapours: 30 workers from formaldehyde and formaldehyde-based resins production factory and 50 from 10 pathology and anatomy laboratories. A control group of 85 non-exposed subjects was considered. Exposure assessment was performed by applying simultaneously two techniques of air monitoring: NIOSH Method 2541 and Photo Ionization Detection equipment with simultaneously video recording. Evaluation of genotoxic effects was performed by application of micronucleus test in exfoliated epithelial cells from buccal mucosa and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results Time-weighted average concentrations not exceeded the reference value (0.75 ppm) in the two occupational settings studied. Ceiling concentrations, on the other hand, were higher than reference value (0.3 ppm) in both. The frequency of micronucleus in peripheral blood lymphocytes and in epithelial cells was significantly higher in both exposed groups than in the control group (p < 0.001). Moreover, the frequency of micronucleus in peripheral blood lymphocytes was significantly higher in the laboratories group than in the factory workers (p < 0.05). A moderate positive

  12. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Müller, D.; Rieger, S.; Schmidl, G.; Triebel, W.; Paa, W.

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (414 absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure.

  13. Formaldehyde preparation methods for pressure and temperature dependent laser-induced fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Burkert, A; Müller, D; Rieger, S; Schmidl, G; Triebel, W; Paa, W

    2015-12-01

    Formaldehyde is an excellent tracer for the early phase of ignition of hydrocarbon fuels and can be used, e.g., for characterization of single droplet ignition. However, due to its fast thermal decomposition at elevated temperatures and pressures, the determination of concentration fields from laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements is difficult. In this paper, we address LIF measurements of this important combustion intermediate using a calibration cell. Here, formaldehyde is created from evaporation of paraformaldehyde. We discuss three setups for preparation of formaldehyde/air mixtures with respect to their usability for well-defined heating of formaldehyde/air mixtures. The "basic setup" uses a resist heater around the measurement cell for investigation of formaldehyde near vacuum conditions or formaldehyde/air samples after sequential admixing of air. The second setup, described for the first time in detail here, takes advantage of a constant flow formaldehyde/air regime which uses preheated air to reduce the necessary time for gas heating. We used the constant flow system to measure new pressure dependent LIF excitation spectra in the 343 nm spectral region (41 (4) absorption band of formaldehyde). The third setup, based on a novel concept for fast gas heating via excitation of SF6 (chemically inert gas) using a TEA (transverse excitation at atmospheric pressure) CO2 laser, allows to further minimize both gas heating time and thermal decomposition. Here, an admixture of CO2 is served for real time temperature measurement based on Raman scattering. The applicability of the fast laser heating system has been demonstrated with gas mixtures of SF6 + air, SF6 + N2, as well as SF6 + N2 + CO2 at 1 bar total pressure. PMID:26724008

  14. Occurrence and Concentrations of Toxic VOCs in the Ambient Air of Gumi, an Electronics-Industrial City in Korea.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sung-Ok; Suvarapu, Lakshmi Narayana; Seo, Young-Kyo

    2015-08-05

    This study was carried out to characterize the occurrence and concentrations of a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated, nitrogenous, and carbonyl compounds, in the ambient air of Gumi City, where a large number of electronics industries are found. Two field monitoring campaigns were conducted for a one year period in 2003/2004 and 2010/2011 at several sampling sites in the city, representing industrial, residential and commercial areas. More than 80 individual compounds were determined in this study, and important compounds were then identified according to their abundance, ubiquity and toxicity. The monitoring data revealed toluene, trichloroethylene and acetaldehyde to be the most significant air toxics in the city, and their major sources were mainly industrial activities. On the other hand, there was no clear evidence of an industrial impact on the concentrations of benzene and formaldehyde in the ambient air of the city. Overall, seasonal variations were not as distinct as locational variations in the VOCs concentrations, whereas the within-day variations showed a typical pattern of urban air pollution, i.e., increase in the morning, decrease in the afternoon, and an increase again in the evening. Considerable decreases in the concentrations of VOCs from 2003 to 2011 were observed. The reductions in the ambient concentrations were confirmed further by the Korean PRTR data in industrial emissions within the city. Significant decreases in the concentrations of benzene and acetaldehyde were also noted, whereas formaldehyde appeared to be almost constant between the both campaigns. The decreased trends in the ambient levels were attributed not only to the stricter regulations for VOCs in Korea, but also to the voluntary agreement of major companies to reduce the use of organic solvents. In addition, a site planning project for an eco-friendly industrial complex is believed to play a contributory role in improving

  15. Occurrence and Concentrations of Toxic VOCs in the Ambient Air of Gumi, an Electronics-Industrial City in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Sung-Ok; Suvarapu, Lakshmi Narayana; Seo, Young-Kyo

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to characterize the occurrence and concentrations of a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including aliphatic, aromatic, halogenated, nitrogenous, and carbonyl compounds, in the ambient air of Gumi City, where a large number of electronics industries are found. Two field monitoring campaigns were conducted for a one year period in 2003/2004 and 2010/2011 at several sampling sites in the city, representing industrial, residential and commercial areas. More than 80 individual compounds were determined in this study, and important compounds were then identified according to their abundance, ubiquity and toxicity. The monitoring data revealed toluene, trichloroethylene and acetaldehyde to be the most significant air toxics in the city, and their major sources were mainly industrial activities. On the other hand, there was no clear evidence of an industrial impact on the concentrations of benzene and formaldehyde in the ambient air of the city. Overall, seasonal variations were not as distinct as locational variations in the VOCs concentrations, whereas the within-day variations showed a typical pattern of urban air pollution, i.e., increase in the morning, decrease in the afternoon, and an increase again in the evening. Considerable decreases in the concentrations of VOCs from 2003 to 2011 were observed. The reductions in the ambient concentrations were confirmed further by the Korean PRTR data in industrial emissions within the city. Significant decreases in the concentrations of benzene and acetaldehyde were also noted, whereas formaldehyde appeared to be almost constant between the both campaigns. The decreased trends in the ambient levels were attributed not only to the stricter regulations for VOCs in Korea, but also to the voluntary agreement of major companies to reduce the use of organic solvents. In addition, a site planning project for an eco-friendly industrial complex is believed to play a contributory role in improving

  16. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde exposure mitigation in US residences: In-home measurements of ventilation control and source control

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin L.; Willem, Henry; Price, Phillip N.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Russell, Marion L.; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements were taken in new US residences to assess the extent to which ventilation and source control can mitigate formaldehyde exposure. Increasing ventilation consistently lowered indoor formaldehyde concentrations. However, at a reference air exchange rate of 0.35 h-1, increasing ventilation was up to 60% less effective than would be predicted if the emission rate were constant. This is consistent with formaldehyde emission rates decreasing as air concentrations increase, as observed in chamber studies. In contrast, measurements suggest acetaldehyde emission was independent of ventilation rate. To evaluate the effectiveness of source control, formaldehyde concentrations were measured in Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certified/Indoor airPLUS homes constructed with materials certified to have low emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOC). At a reference air exchange rate of 0.35 h-1, and adjusting for home age, temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde concentrations in homes built with low-VOC materials were 42% lower on average than in reference new homes with conventional building materials. Without adjustment, concentrations were 27% lower in the low-VOC homes. The mean and standard deviation of formaldehyde concentration were 33 μg m-3 and 22 μg m-3 for low-VOC homes and 45 μg m-3 and 30 μg m-3 for conventional.

  17. Water complexes of important air pollutants: geometries, complexation energies, concentrations, infrared spectra, and intrinsic reactivity.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Narciso-Lopez, Marcela; Francisco-Marquez, Misaela

    2010-05-13

    Water complexes involving methanol, ethanol, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, ammonia, acetylene, ethylene, chloroethene, trichloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, hydroxyl radical, and hydroperoxyl radical have been studied. Enthalpies, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of association have been estimated, as well as the concentrations of the complexes under lower-troposphere conditions. The influence of the relative air humidity on the complexation processes has been analyzed. The association processes yielding water complexes of methanol, ethanol, formic acid, ammonia, acetone, hydroxyl radical, and hydroperoxyl radical were found to be more exothermic than that of the water dimer. General trends for the reactivity of the studied water complexes, compared to those of the corresponding free species, are proposed based on global reactivity indexes. The previously reported increased reactivity of the (*)OOH self-reaction, when there is water present, has been explained. The IR spectra of the complexes have been analyzed and compared with those of the free species. PMID:20394451

  18. Catalytic process for formaldehyde oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); D'Ambrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing formaldehyde to carbon dioxide and water without the addition of energy. A mixture of formaldehyde and an oxidizing agent (e.g., ambient air containing formaldehyde) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  19. Formaldehyde as a basis for residential ventilation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.H.; Hodgson, A.T.

    2002-04-28

    Traditionally, houses in the U.S. have been ventilated by passive infiltration in combination with active window opening. However in recent years, the construction quality of residential building envelopes has been improved to reduce infiltration, and the use of windows for ventilation also may have decreased due to a number of factors. Thus, there has been increased interest in engineered ventilation systems for residences. The amount of ventilation provided by an engineered system should be set to protect occupants from unhealthy or objectionable exposures to indoor pollutants, while minimizing energy costs for conditioning incoming air. Determining the correct ventilation rate is a complex task, as there are numerous pollutants of potential concern, each having poorly characterized emission rates, and poorly defined acceptable levels of exposure. One ubiquitous pollutant in residences is formaldehyde. The sources of formaldehyde in new houses are reasonably understood, and there is a large body of literature on human health effects. This report examines the use of formaldehyde as a means of determining ventilation rates and uses existing data on emission rates of formaldehyde in new houses to derive recommended levels. Based on current, widely accepted concentration guidelines for formaldehyde, the minimum and guideline ventilation rates for most new houses are 0.28 and 0.5 air changes per hour, respectively.

  20. [Formaldehyde determination in tobacco smoke--studies under experimental and actual conditions].

    PubMed

    Schaller, K H; Triebig, G; Beyer, B

    1989-11-01

    The estimation of an external exposure to formaldehyde in tobacco smoke requires a reliable analytical method. The gas chromatographic determination of formaldehyde shows in comparison to photometric methods a higher sensitivity and specificity. In the main stream smoke of various kinds of cigarettes the amount of formaldehyde vary between 3.4 micrograms to 8.8 micrograms/cigarette, this is equal to concentration between 2.3 to 6.1 ppm. In the air of lounges in hospitals formaldehyde concentrations up to 0.19 ppm can be detected after smoking of 15 cigarettes over a period of 1.5 h. In kindergartens without tobacco smoke the formaldehyde concentrations in air range from 0.005 to 0.01 ppm. The smoking of 30 cigarettes and one pipe in a non ventilated room over 1.5 h exceeded formaldehyde concentrations between 0.21 to 0.45 ppm. The concentration declines to 0.08 ppm within 2h after termination of smoking. The MAK-value of 0.5 ppm is not exceeded; in contrast to this the indoor limit of 0.1 ppm recommended by the German Bundesgesundheitsamt is exceeded in the vicinity of the smoker. The formaldehyde concentrations in tobacco smoke reported in the older literature can not be confirmed; this is due to the nonspecificity of the photometric methods. On the basis of our results can be concluded that the irritating effects of tobacco smoke to the mucous membranes are the result of the sum of irritating effects caused by several compounds and particles in the smoke and not only the impact of formaldehyde.

  1. Formaldehyde in Insulation: Villain or Innocent Bystander?

    PubMed Central

    Lees, R. E. M.

    1983-01-01

    When urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) deteriorates, it produces an off-gas mixture whose major constituent is formaldehyde. Most investigative studies of UFFI have concentrated on formaldehyde. Health concerns fall into three groups: irritant characteristics, allergenic capabilities and potential carcinogenicity. Except for the first of these, formaldehyde's hazard potential is not clear. The extent to which formaldehyde may be responsible for UFFI's evil reputation is explored in this paper but the degree to which either substance is a real threat to health still appears to open to debate. PMID:21283296

  2. 40 CFR Appendix IV to Part 266 - Reference Air Concentrations*

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reference Air Concentrations* IV Appendix IV to Part 266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... MANAGEMENT FACILITIES Pt. 266, App. IV Appendix IV to Part 266—Reference Air Concentrations* Constituent...

  3. Indoor formaldehyde removal over CMK-3

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The removal of formaldehyde at low concentrations is important in indoor air pollution research. In this study, mesoporous carbon with a large specific surface area was used for the adsorption of low-concentration indoor formaldehyde. A mesoporous carbon material, CMK-3, was synthesized using the nano-replication method. SBA-15 was used as a mesoporous template. The surface of CMK-3 was activated using a 2N H2SO4 solution and NH3 gas to prepare CMK-3-H2SO4 and CMK-3-NH3, respectively. The activated samples were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The formaldehyde adsorption performance of the mesoporous carbons was in the order of CMK-3-NH3 > CMK-3-H2SO4 > CMK-3. The difference in the adsorption performance was explained by oxygen and nitrogen functional groups formed during the activation process and by the specific surface area and pore structure of mesoporous carbon. PMID:22221425

  4. Daily variations of indoor air-ion and radon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Kolarz, P M; Filipović, D M; Marinković, B P

    2009-11-01

    Air-ions and radon are two atmospheric trace constituents which have two opposite effects on human health: the ions are beneficial, and radon gas is potentially lethal as it increases the risk of lung cancer. In the lower troposphere, radon is the most important generator of the air-ions. Ionization by cosmic rays and radioactive minerals is almost constant in daily cycles, and variation of air-ion concentrations is attributed to changes of the radon activity. Air-ion and radon concentrations in outdoor and indoor space and their vertical gradients in residential buildings were measured. Gerdien type air-ion detector "CDI-06" made in our laboratory and radon monitor "RAD7" were utilized for these measurements. Correlation coefficient between positive air-ion and Rn indoor concentrations was approximately 0.7. Outdoor and indoor peak values were simultaneous while vertical gradient of concentrations in indoor measurements was evident. The indoor experiments showed that positive air-ion concentration could be an alternative method of radon activity concentration evaluation. PMID:19700332

  5. Toxicity and biodegradation of formaldehyde in anaerobic methanogenic culture.

    PubMed

    Qu, M; Bhattacharya, S K

    1997-09-01

    Formaldehyde is present in several industrial wastewaters including petrochemical wastes. In this study, the toxicity and degradability of formaldehyde in anaerobic systems were investigated. Formaldehyde showed severe toxicity to an acetate enrichment methanogenic culture. As low as 10 mg/L (0.33 mM) of formaldehyde in the reactor completely inhibited acetate utilization. Formaldehyde, however, was degraded while acetate utilization was inhibited. Degradation of formaldehyde (Initial concentration < or =30 mg/L) followed Monod model with a rate constant, k, of 0.35-0.46 d(-1). At higher initial concentrations (> or =60 mg/L), formaldehyde degradation was inhibited and partial degradation was possible. The initial formaldehyde to biomass ratio, S(0)/X(0), was useful to predict the degradation potential of high formaldehyde concentrations in batch systems. When S(0)/X(0) < or = 0.1, formaldehyde was completely degraded with initial concentration of up to 95 mg/L; when S(0)/X(0) > or = 0.29, formaldehyde at higher than 60 mg/L was only partially degraded. The inhibition of formaldehyde degradation in batch systems could be avoided by repeated additions of low concentrations of formaldehyde (up to 30 mg/L). Chemostats (14-day retention time) showed degradation of 74 mg/L-d (1110 mg/L) of influent formaldehyde with a removal capacity of 164 mg/g VSS-day. A spike of 30 mg/L (final concentration in the chemostat) formaldehyde to the chemostat caused only a small increase in effluent acetate concentration for 3 days. But a spike of 60 mg/L (final concentration in the chemostat) formaldehyde to the chemostat resulted in a dramatic increase in acetate concentration in the effluent. The results also showed that the acetate enrichment culture was not acclimated to formaldehyde even after 226 days. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 55: 727-736, 1997.

  6. Minanre Gas Concentrators For Air Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Seung Ho Hong

    2001-03-01

    The goal of this project was to demonstrate the feasibility of a compact, lightweight, gas-sampling device with rapid-cycle-time characteristics. The highlights of our Phase I work include: (1) Demonstration of a compact gas sampler with integrated heater. This device has an order of magnitude greater adsorption capacity and much faster heating/cooling times than commercial sorbent tubes. (2) Completion of computational fluid dynamics modeling of the gas sampler to determine airflow characteristics for various design options. These modeling efforts guided the development and testing of the Mesochannel Gas Sampler prototype. (3) Testing of the Mesochannel Gas Sampler in parallel with tests of two packed-bed samplers. These tests showed the Mesochannel Gas Sampler represents a substantial improvement compared with the packed-bed approach. Our mesochannel heat-exchanger/adsorber architecture allows very efficient use of adsorbent mass, high adsorbent loadings, and very low pressure drop, which makes possible very high air-sampling rates using a simple, low-power fan. This device is well-suited for collecting samples of trace-level contaminants. The integrated heater, which forms the adsorbent-coated mesochannel walls, allows direct heating of the adsorbent and results in very rapid desorption of the adsorbed species. We believe the Mesochannel Gas Sampler represents a promising technology for the improvement of trace-contaminant detection limits. In our Phase II proposal, we outline several improvements to the gas sampler that will further improve its performance.

  7. Volatile organic compounds and formaldehyde as explaining factors for sensory irritation in office environments.

    PubMed

    Salonen, H; Pasanen, A-L; Lappalainen, S; Riuttala, H; Tuomi, T; Pasanen, P; Back, B; Reijula, K

    2009-04-01

    This study's database comprised results of volatile organic compound (VOC) measurements from 176 office buildings. In 23 of the 176 buildings, formaldehyde measurements were also conducted. It was suspected that the buildings had indoor air problems, but a walk-through inspection did not reveal any clear, abnormal contaminant sources. The 50 most abundant VOCs and their concentrations in 520 air samples were analyzed. The irritation potency was estimated for 33 out of the 50 common VOCs and their mixtures, as well as for formaldehyde. This information was used to calculate the recommended indoor air levels (RILs) for the VOCs. The RILs were considerably higher than the measured mean indoor air concentrations in the buildings. However, the RIL for formaldehyde was exceeded in most of the 23 buildings studied. According to the evaluation of irritation potency, formaldehyde was a more likely cause of sensory irritation than the mixture of common nonreactive VOCs at the concentrations that occurred in the buildings without abnormal indoor sources. Furthermore, environmental symptoms of office workers were characterized in 20 office buildings (including the database of 176 office buildings) with the aid of an indoor air questionnaire. The most frequent symptoms related to the indoor environment were involved the upper respiratory tract. However, no relationship could be shown between the reported symptoms and the occurrence of VOC and formaldehyde concentrations in these buildings. Generally, the study results indicated that formaldehyde was the more likely agent causing sensory irritation than the mixture of the common nonreactive VOCs at the concentrations occurring in the buildings without abnormal indoor sources. PMID:19184725

  8. Concentrations of selected contaminants in cabin air of airbus aircrafts.

    PubMed

    Dechow, M; Sohn, H; Steinhanses, J

    1997-07-01

    The concentrations of selected air quality parameters in aircraft cabins were investigated including particle numbers in cabin air compared to fresh air and recirculation air, the microbiological contamination and the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The Airbus types A310 of Swissair and A340 of Lufthansa were used for measurements. The particles were found to be mainly emitted by the passengers, especially by smokers. Depending on recirculation filter efficiency the recirculation air contained a lower or equal amount of particles compared to the fresh air, whereas the amount of bacteria exceeded reported concentrations within other indoor spaces. The detected species were mainly non-pathogenic, with droplet infection over short distances identified as the only health risk. The concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOC) were well below threshold values. Ethanol was identified as the compound with the highest amount in cabin air. Further organics were emitted by the passengers--as metabolic products or by smoking--and on ground as engine exhaust (bad airport air quality). Cleaning agents may be the source of further compounds.

  9. CONCENTRATIONS OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS IN THE U.S. SIMULATED BY AN AIR QUALITY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the US National Air Toxics Assessment, we have applied the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model, CMAQ, to study the concentrations of twenty gas-phase, toxic, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) in the atmosphere over the continental United States. We modified the Carbo...

  10. Ambient air concentrations of particulate matter from passenger cars.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, D

    1989-01-01

    Using our measurement results on particulate emissions from passenger cars we have calculated ambient air concentrations for various US and European scenarios. This was carried out with the help of mathematical dispersion models for different traffic situations including street canyons and motorways. We have been very conservative in our choice of the scenarios, i.e. we have always used situations in which there are very high stress levels (e.g. constantly high traffic flow instead of average traffic flow). Finally, the thus determined air concentrations are compared with the corresponding air quality standard available from the literature.

  11. Ambient air concentrations of particulate matter from passenger cars.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, D

    1989-01-01

    Using our measurement results on particulate emissions from passenger cars we have calculated ambient air concentrations for various US and European scenarios. This was carried out with the help of mathematical dispersion models for different traffic situations including street canyons and motorways. We have been very conservative in our choice of the scenarios, i.e. we have always used situations in which there are very high stress levels (e.g. constantly high traffic flow instead of average traffic flow). Finally, the thus determined air concentrations are compared with the corresponding air quality standard available from the literature. PMID:2484034

  12. Versatile microanalytical system with porous polypropylene capillary membrane for calibration gas generation and trace gaseous pollutants sampling applied to the analysis of formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and ammonia in outdoor air.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Lúcia H G; Melchert, Wanessa R; Rocha, Flavio R; Rocha, Fábio R P; Gutz, Ivano G R

    2010-11-15

    The analytical determination of atmospheric pollutants still presents challenges due to the low-level concentrations (frequently in the μg m(-3) range) and their variations with sampling site and time. In this work, a capillary membrane diffusion scrubber (CMDS) was scaled down to match with capillary electrophoresis (CE), a quick separation technique that requires nothing more than some nanoliters of sample and, when combined with capacitively coupled contactless conductometric detection (C(4)D), is particularly favorable for ionic species that do not absorb in the UV-vis region, like the target analytes formaldehyde, formic acid, acetic acid and ammonium. The CMDS was coaxially assembled inside a PTFE tube and fed with acceptor phase (deionized water for species with a high Henry's constant such as formaldehyde and carboxylic acids, or acidic solution for ammonia sampling with equilibrium displacement to the non-volatile ammonium ion) at a low flow rate (8.3 nL s(-1)), while the sample was aspirated through the annular gap of the concentric tubes at 2.5 mL s(-1). A second unit, in all similar to the CMDS, was operated as a capillary membrane diffusion emitter (CMDE), generating a gas flow with know concentrations of ammonia for the evaluation of the CMDS. The fluids of the system were driven with inexpensive aquarium air pumps, and the collected samples were stored in vials cooled by a Peltier element. Complete protocols were developed for the analysis, in air, of NH(3), CH(3)COOH, HCOOH and, with a derivatization setup, CH(2)O, by associating the CMDS collection with the determination by CE-C(4)D. The ammonia concentrations obtained by electrophoresis were checked against the reference spectrophotometric method based on Berthelot's reaction. Sensitivity enhancements of this reference method were achieved by using a modified Berthelot reaction, solenoid micro-pumps for liquid propulsion and a long optical path cell based on a liquid core waveguide (LCW). All

  13. Formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Part 2. Patch test relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy, experimental provocation tests, amount of formaldehyde released, and assessment of risk to consumers allergic to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Anton; White, Ian R; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Lensen, Gerda; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan

    2010-01-01

    This is the second part of an article on formaldehyde-releasers in cosmetics. The patch test relationship between the releasers in cosmetics to formaldehyde contact allergy is reviewed and it is assessed whether products preserved with formaldehyde-releasers may contain enough free formaldehyde to pose a threat to individuals with contact allergy to formaldehyde. There is a clear relationship between positive patch test reactions to formaldehyde-releasers and formaldehyde contact allergy: 15% of all reactions to 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol and 40-60% of the reactions to the other releasers are caused by a reaction to the formaldehyde in the test material. There is only fragmented data on the amount of free formaldehyde in cosmetics preserved with formaldehyde donors. However, all releasers (with the exception of 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol, for which adequate data are lacking) can, in the right circumstances of concentration and product composition, release >200 p.p.m. formaldehyde, which may result in allergic contact dermatitis. Whether this is actually the case in any particular product cannot be determined from the ingredient labelling. Therefore, we recommend advising patients allergic to formaldehyde to avoid leave-on cosmetics preserved with quaternium-15, diazolidinyl urea, DMDM hydantoin, or imidazolidinyl urea, acknowledging that many would tolerate some products. PMID:20136876

  14. Sol-gel based sensor for selective formaldehyde determination.

    PubMed

    Bunkoed, Opas; Davis, Frank; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Thavarungkul, Panote; Higson, Séamus P J

    2010-02-01

    We report the development of transparent sol-gels with entrapped sensitive and selective reagents for the detection of formaldehyde. The sampling method is based on the adsorption of formaldehyde from the air and reaction with beta-diketones (for example acetylacetone) in a sol-gel matrix to produce a yellow product, lutidine, which was detected directly. The proposed method does not require preparation of samples prior to analysis and allows both screening by visual detection and quantitative measurement by simple spectrophotometry. The detection limit of 0.03 ppmv formaldehyde is reported which is lower than the maximum exposure concentrations recommended by both the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). This sampling method was found to give good reproducibility, the relative standard deviation at 0.2 and 1 ppmv being 6.3% and 4.6%, respectively. Other carbonyl compounds i.e. acetaldehyde, benzaldehyde, acetone and butanone do not interfere with this analytical approach. Results are provided for the determination of formaldehyde in indoor air.

  15. Results of the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of 2011-2013: Impact of natural gas appliances on air pollutant concentrations

    DOE PAGES

    Mullen, Nasim A.; Li, Jina; Russell, Marion L.; Spears, Michael; Less, Brennan D.; Singer, Brett C.

    2015-03-17

    This study was conducted to assess the current impact of natural gas appliances on air quality in California homes. Data were collected via telephone interviews and measurements inside and outside of 352 homes. Passive samplers measured time-resolved CO and time-integrated NOX, NO2, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde over ~6d periods in November 2011 - April 2012 and October 2012 - March 2013. The fraction of indoor NOX and NO2 attributable to indoor sources was estimated. NOX, NO2 and highest 1-h CO were higher in homes that cooked with gas and increased with amount of gas cooking. NOX and NO2 were higher inmore » homes with cooktop pilot burners, relative to gas cooking without pilots. Homes with a pilot burner on a floor or wall furnace had higher kitchen and bedroom NOX and NO2 compared to homes without a furnace pilot. When scaled to account for varying home size and mixing volume, indoor-attributed bedroom and kitchen NOX and kitchen NO2 were not higher in homes with wall or floor furnace pilot burners, though bedroom NO2 was higher. In homes that cooked 4 h or more with gas, self-reported use of kitchen exhaust was associated with lower NOX, NO2 and highest 1-h CO. Gas appliances were not associated with higher concentrations of formaldehyde or acetaldehyde.« less

  16. Results of the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of 2011-2013: impact of natural gas appliances on air pollutant concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mullen, N A; Li, J; Russell, M L; Spears, M; Less, B D; Singer, B C

    2016-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the current impact of natural gas appliances on air quality in California homes. Data were collected via telephone interviews and measurements inside and outside of 352 homes. Passive samplers measured time-resolved CO and time-integrated NOX , NO2 , formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde over ~6-day periods in November 2011 - April 2012 and October 2012 - March 2013. The fraction of indoor NOX and NO2 attributable to indoor sources was estimated. NOX , NO2 , and highest 1-h CO were higher in homes that cooked with gas and increased with amount of gas cooking. NOX and NO2 were higher in homes with cooktop pilot burners, relative to gas cooking without pilots. Homes with a pilot burner on a floor or wall furnace had higher kitchen and bedroom NOX and NO2 compared to homes without a furnace pilot. When scaled to account for varying home size and mixing volume, indoor-attributed bedroom and kitchen NOX and kitchen NO2 were not higher in homes with wall or floor furnace pilot burners, although bedroom NO2 was higher. In homes that cooked 4 h or more with gas, self-reported use of kitchen exhaust was associated with lower NOX , NO2 , and highest 1-h CO. Gas appliances were not associated with higher concentrations of formaldehyde or acetaldehyde.

  17. Microemulsion-assisted synthesis of hierarchical porous Ni(OH)2/SiO2 composites toward efficient removal of formaldehyde in air.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihua; Yu, Jiaguo; Liu, Gang; Cheng, Bei; Zhou, Peng; Li, Xinyang

    2013-07-28

    Ni(OH)2/SiO2 composites with hierarchical flake-like nanostructures were synthesized using water-in-oil microemulsion and characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The as-prepared hierarchical porous Ni(OH)2/SiO2 composites show an excellent performance for formaldehyde (HCHO) removal in air at an ambient temperature. It was found that the aging time had a significant impact on the pore structure, surface area and HCHO adsorption. The Ni(OH)2/SiO2 composite aged for 4 h in the presence of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) exhibited a relatively high HCHO adsorption capacity as well as good recyclability compared with Ni(OH)2, attributed to a relatively large BET surface area, an optimal pore size, a suitable proportion between Ni(OH)2 and SiO2, and a synergistic effect between Ni(OH)2 and SiO2. The results from this work not only demonstrate that hierarchical porous Ni(OH)2/SiO2 composites can act as an efficient adsorbent toward HCHO in air, but suggest a new route for the rational design of cost-effective, high-performance and environmentally benign adsorbents for indoor air cleanup.

  18. Indoor Air VOC Concentrations in Suburban and Rural New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    WEISEL, CLIFFORD P.; ALIMOKHTARI, SHAHNAZ; SANDERS, PAUL F.

    2014-01-01

    Indoor VOC air concentrations of many compounds are higher than outdoor concentrations due to indoor sources. However, most studies have measured residential indoor air in urban centers so the typical indoor air levels in suburban and rural regions have not been well characterized. Indoor VOC air concentrations were measured in 100 homes in suburban and rural areas in NJ to provide background levels for investigations of the impact from subsurface contamination sources. Of the 57 target compounds, 23 were not detected in any of the homes, and 14 compounds were detected in at least 50% of the homes with detection limits of ~1 μg/m3. The common compounds identified included aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons from mobile sources, halogenated hydrocarbons commonly used in consumer products or from chlorinated drinking water, acetone and 2-butanone emitted from cosmetic products, and Freons. Typical concentrations were in the low μg/m3 range, though values of tens, hundreds or even thousands of μg/m3 were measured in individual homes in which activities related to specific sources of VOCs were reported. Compounds with known similar sources were highly correlated. The levels observed are consistent with concentrations found in the air of urban homes. PMID:19068799

  19. Indoor air VOC concentrations in suburban and rural New Jersey.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Clifford P; Alimokhtari, Shahnaz; Sanders, Paul F

    2008-11-15

    Indoor VOC air concentrations of many compounds are higher than outdoor concentrations due to indoor sources. However, most studies have measured residential indoor air in urban centers so the typical indoor air levels in suburban and rural regions have not been well characterized. Indoor VOC air concentrations were measured in 100 homes in suburban and rural areas in NJ to provide background levels for investigations of the impact from subsurface contamination sources. Of the 57 target compounds, 23 were not detected in any of the homes, and 14 compounds were detected in at least 50% of the homes with detection limits of approximately 1 microg/m3. The common compounds identified included aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons from mobile sources, halogenated hydrocarbons commonly used in consumer products or from chlorinated drinking water, acetone and 2-butanone emitted from cosmetic products, and Freons. Typical concentrations were in the low microg/m3 range, though values of tens, hundreds or even thousands of microg/m3 were measured in individual homes in which activities related to specific sources of VOCs were reported. Compounds with known similar sources were highly correlated. The levels observed are consistent with concentrations found in the air of urban homes. PMID:19068799

  20. Ultralow Concentration Mercury Treatment Using Chemical Reduction and Air Stripping

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.

    2001-05-21

    Field, laboratory and engineering data confirmed the efficacy of chemical reduction and air stripping as an ultralow concentration mercury treatment concept for water containing Hg(II). The simple process consists of dosing the water with low levels of stannous chloride (Sn(II)) to cover the mercury to Hg degrees. This mercury species can easily be removed from the water by air stripping or sparging.

  1. Regional Sources of Atmospheric Formaldehyde and Acetaldehyde, and Implications for Atmospheric Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations over the Eastern half of the United States are simulated with a 3-D air quality model to identify the most important chemical precursors under January and July conditions. We find that both aldehydes primarily result from photochemical...

  2. Concentrations of propoxur in air following repeated indoor applications.

    PubMed

    Miller, C W; Shafik, T M

    1974-01-01

    The insecticide propoxur was applied as 2 non-overlapping bands approximately 1 m wide to the interior of houses in El Salvador once every 35 days for a period of 9 months. Air samples were collected from the interior of the houses once every seventh day during the entire period. In the study area, air temperatures remain relatively constant, while rainfall varies seasonally. It was found that volatilization of propoxur, as determined by the amounts detectable in air, represented release of the chemical from the treated surface and that the volatilization process was most influenced by the amount of moisture present in the air. Higher air concentrations of propoxur occurred during periods of high relative humidity than in periods of low relative humidity. The principles involved in this process and its bearing on the value of propoxur in malaria control programmes are discussed.

  3. Ozone concentrations in air flowing into New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksic, Nenad; Kent, John; Walcek, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Ozone (O3) concentrations measured at Pinnacle State Park (PSPNY), very close to the southern border of New York State, are used to estimate concentrations in air flowing into New York. On 20% of the ozone season (April-September) afternoons from 2004 to 2015, mid-afternoon 500-m back trajectories calculated from PSPNY cross New York border from the south and spend less than three hours in New York State, in this area of negligible local pollution emissions. One-hour (2p.m.-3p.m.) O3 concentrations during these inflowing conditions were 46 ± 13 ppb, and ranged from a minimum of 15 ppb to a maximum of 84 ppb. On average during 2004-2015, each year experienced 11.8 days with inflowing 1-hr O3 concentrations exceeding 50 ppb, 4.3 days with O3 > 60 ppb, and 1.5 days had O3 > 70 ppb. During the same period, 8-hr average concentrations (10a.m. to 6p.m.) exceeded 50 ppb on 10.0 days per season, while 3.9 days exceeded 60 ppb, and 70 ppb was exceeded 1.2 days per season. Two afternoons of minimal in-state emission influences with high ozone concentrations were analyzed in more detail. Synoptic and back trajectory analysis, including comparison with upwind ozone concentrations, indicated that the two periods were characterized as photo-chemically aged air containing high inflowing O3 concentrations most likely heavily influenced by pollution emissions from states upwind of New York including Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Ohio. These results suggest that New York state-level attempts to comply with National Ambient Air Quality Standards by regulating in-state O3 precursor NOx and organic emissions would be very difficult, since air frequently enters New York State very close to or in excess of Federal Air Quality Standards.

  4. Spectra of concentration of air pollution for turbulent convection

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, S.R.

    1996-12-31

    Very recently the study of formation and destruction of photochemical smog is increasing at both small and large scale. Also the transport of chemical species through the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) of the atmosphere is a key of the global change problem and will have to be parameterized more reliably than in the past. Further, in the air pollution modeling, the usual practice of neglecting the concentration correlation in the atmospheric photochemical reaction has recently been recognized as a source of serious error. So, it is important to study the various aspects of the concentration fluctuations (of air pollution) with chemical reaction. A model of the spectrum of concentration of air pollution with chemical reaction has been developed using the models of Hill and Hill and Clifford. The results obtained are applicable for arbitrary Schmidt number. Further, for the case of pure mixing (without chemical reaction) and the concentration replaced by temperature, the form of the spectra obtained here reduces to the form obtained by Hill and Clifford. This study also shows that, in the case of pure mixing, the concentration decays in a natural manner, but if the concentration selected is that of the chemical reactant, then the effect is that the dispersion of the concentration is much more rapid.

  5. [Formaldehyde sediment in incubators following disinfection].

    PubMed

    Wartner, R; Kegel, M; Meyer, H D; Schlüter, G; Wegner, J; Werner, E

    1983-12-01

    Measurements in incubators revealed the presence of formaldehyde concentrations involving a health risk for premature and normal newborns kept and cared for in incubators. Prior to measurements, the incubators had been disinfected by means of formaldehyde vapours in an "Aseptor" disinfecting cabinet (Drägerwerk AG, Lübeck) and then ventilated in strict adherence to operating instructions. The elevated formaldehyde concentrations found had been due to residues of paraformaldehyde and urotropin on the surfaces of the disinfected apparatus, liberating formaldehyde by hydrolysis depending on temperature and relative humidity. There should be a basic reconsideration of the present practice of incubator disinfection. From experiments with activated-carbon filters in incubators it would seem that there is a chance of reducing such formaldehyde concentrations.

  6. Temperature and concentration transients in the aluminum-air battery

    SciTech Connect

    Homsy, R.V.

    1981-08-26

    Coupled conservation equations of heat and mass transfer are solved, that predict temperature and concentration of the electrolyte of an aluminum-air battery system upon start-up and shutdown. Results of recent laboratory studies investigating the crystallization kinetics and solubility of the caustic-aluminate electrolyte system are used in the predictions. Temperature and concentration start-up transients are short, while during standby conditions, temperature increases to a maximum and decreases slowly.

  7. Electron concentration distribution in a glow discharge in air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhamedzianov, R. B.; Gaisin, F. M.; Sabitov, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    Electron concentration distributions in a glow discharge in longitudinal and vortex air flows are determined from the attenuation of the electromagnetic wave passing through the plasma using microwave probes. An analysis of the distribution curves obtained indicates that electron concentration decreases in the direction of the anode. This can be explained by charge diffusion toward the chamber walls and electron recombination and sticking within the discharge.

  8. Measuring radon concentration in air using a diffusion cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cases, R.; Ros, E.; Zúñiga, J.

    2011-09-01

    Radon concentration in air is a major concern in lung cancer studies. A traditional technique used to measure radon abundance is the charcoal canister method. We propose a novel technique using a diffusion cloud chamber. This technique is simpler and can easily be used for physics demonstrations for high school and university students.

  9. Auditing and assessing air quality in concentrated feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potential adverse effects of concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) on the environment are a growing concern. The air quality issues of most concerns to CAFO vary, but generally include ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, particulate matter (PM), volatile organic compounds (VOC), green house gase...

  10. Evaluation of cost-effective sol-gel-based sensor for monitoring of formaldehyde in workplace environment and cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Bunkoed, Opas; Thavarungkul, Panote; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde was monitored in the workplace environment of an adhesive manufacturer producing formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde resin using a cost-effective sol-gel-based sensor. The sensor was first evaluated by comparing its performance to the conventional 2,4-dinitrophynylhydrazine-devivatization method (2,4-DNPH) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a UV detector. The formaldehyde concentrations obtained by both techniques were not significantly different. The cost-effective sol-gel-based sensor was then used for monitoring formaldehyde levels in the laboratories, production areas and storage room. Formaldehyde concentrations in this adhesive manufacturer workplace environment were lower than the limit value of, 0.75 ppm for an 8-h time weight average and 2 ppm for a short-term exposure (15 min). However, the cancer risk for employees who worked in the laboratories, (1.7±0.7)×10(-4)-(5±2)×10(-4), were higher than the acceptable cancer risk recommended by the US EPA (10(-6)). Therefore, some precaution should be taken to reduce the risk, such as an increase of ventilation to dilute the levels of formaldehyde and use air cleaners to remove formaldehyde.

  11. Evaluation of cost-effective sol-gel-based sensor for monitoring of formaldehyde in workplace environment and cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Bunkoed, Opas; Thavarungkul, Panote; Thammakhet, Chongdee; Kanatharana, Proespichaya

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde was monitored in the workplace environment of an adhesive manufacturer producing formaldehyde and urea-formaldehyde resin using a cost-effective sol-gel-based sensor. The sensor was first evaluated by comparing its performance to the conventional 2,4-dinitrophynylhydrazine-devivatization method (2,4-DNPH) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to a UV detector. The formaldehyde concentrations obtained by both techniques were not significantly different. The cost-effective sol-gel-based sensor was then used for monitoring formaldehyde levels in the laboratories, production areas and storage room. Formaldehyde concentrations in this adhesive manufacturer workplace environment were lower than the limit value of, 0.75 ppm for an 8-h time weight average and 2 ppm for a short-term exposure (15 min). However, the cancer risk for employees who worked in the laboratories, (1.7±0.7)×10(-4)-(5±2)×10(-4), were higher than the acceptable cancer risk recommended by the US EPA (10(-6)). Therefore, some precaution should be taken to reduce the risk, such as an increase of ventilation to dilute the levels of formaldehyde and use air cleaners to remove formaldehyde. PMID:23245301

  12. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  14. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  15. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  16. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  17. Growth of Bacillus methanolicus in 2 M methanol at 50 °C: the effect of high methanol concentration on gene regulation of enzymes involved in formaldehyde detoxification by the ribulose monophosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Bozdag, Ahmet; Komives, Claire; Flickinger, Michael C

    2015-07-01

    Bacillus methanolicus MGA3 is a Gram-positive aerobic methylotroph growing optimally at 50-53°C. Methylotrophy in B. methanolicus is encoded on pBM19 and by two chromosomal copies of the methanol dehydrogenase (mdh), hexulose phosphate synthase (hps) and phosphohexuloisomerase (phi) genes. However, there are no published studies on the regulation of methylotrophy or the dominant mechanism of detoxification of intracellular formaldehyde in response to high methanol concentration. The µ max of B. methanolicus MGA3 was assessed on methanol, mannitol and glucose. B. methanolicus achieved a µ max at 25 mM initial methanol of 0.65 ± 0.007 h(-1), which decreased to 0.231 ± 0.004 h(-1) at 2 M initial methanol. Slow growth was also observed with initial methanol concentrations of >2 M. The µ max on mannitol and glucose are 0.532 ± 0.002 and 0.336 ± 0.003 h(-1), respectively. Spiking cultures with additional methanol (100 mM) did not disturb the growth rate of methanol-grown cells, whereas, a 50 mM methanol spike halted the growth in mannitol. Surprisingly, growth in methanol was inhibited by 1 mM formaldehyde, while mannitol-grown cells tolerated 2 mM. Moreover, mannitol-grown cells removed formaldehyde faster than methanol-grown cells. Further, we show that methanol oxidation in B. methanolicus MGA3 is mainly carried out by the pBM19-encoded mdh. Formaldehyde and formate addition down-regulate the mdh and hps genes in methanol-grown cells. Similarly, they down-regulate mdh genes in mannitol-grown cells, but up-regulate hps. Phosphofructokinase (pfk) is up-regulated in both methanol and mannitol-grown cells, which suggests that pfk may be a possible synthetic methylotrophy target to reduce formaldehyde growth toxicity at high methanol concentrations.

  18. Determination of partition and diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde in selected building materials and impact of relative humidity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jing; Zhang, Jianshun S; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Zhi

    2012-06-01

    The partition and effective diffusion coefficients of formaldehyde were measured for three materials (conventional gypsum wallboard, "green" gypsum wallboard, and "green" carpet) under three relative humidity (RH) conditions (20%, 50%, and 70% RH). The "green" materials contained recycled materials and were friendly to environment. A dynamic dual-chamber test method was used. Results showed that a higher relative humidity led to a larger effective diffusion coefficient for two kinds of wallboards and carpet. The carpet was also found to be very permeable resulting in an effective diffusion coefficient at the same order of magnitude with the formaldehyde diffusion coefficient in air. The partition coefficient (K(ma)) of formaldehyde in conventional wallboard was 1.52 times larger at 50% RH than at 20% RH, whereas it decreased slightly from 50% to 70% RH, presumably due to the combined effects of water solubility of formaldehyde and micro-pore blocking by condensed moisture at the high RH level. The partition coefficient of formaldehyde increased slightly with the increase of relative humidity in "green" wallboard and "green" carpet. At the same relative humidity level, the "green" wallboard had larger partition coefficient and effective diffusion coefficient than the conventional wallboard, presumably due to the micro-pore structure differences between the two materials. The data generated could be used to assess the sorption effects of formaldehyde on building materials and to evaluate its impact on the formaldehyde concentration in buildings.

  19. Evaluation of Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) forIndoor Air Applications: Conversion of Volatile Organic Compounds at LowPart-per-Billion Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2005-09-30

    Efficient removal of indoor generated airborne particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in office buildings and other large buildings may allow for a reduction in outdoor air supply rates with concomitant energy savings while still maintaining acceptable indoor air quality in these buildings. Ultra-Violet Photocatalytic Oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaners have the potential to achieve the necessary reductions in indoor VOC concentrations at relatively low cost. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted with a scaled, prototype UVPCO device designed for use in a duct system. The experimental UVPCO contained two 30 by 30-cm honeycomb monoliths coated with titanium dioxide and 3% by weight tungsten oxide. The monoliths were irradiated with 12 UVC lamps arranged in four banks. The UVPCO was challenged with four mixtures of VOCs typical of mixtures encountered in indoor air. A synthetic office mixture contained 27 VOCs commonly measured in office buildings. A cleaning product mixture contained three cleaning products with high market shares. A building product mixture was created by combining sources including painted wallboard, composite wood products, carpet systems, and vinyl flooring. A fourth mixture contained formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Steady-state concentrations were produced in a classroom laboratory or a 20-m{sup 3} environmental chamber. Air was drawn through the UVPCO, and single pass conversion efficiencies were measured from replicate air samples collected upstream and downstream of the reactor section. Concentrations of the mixtures were manipulated, with concentrations of individual VOCs mostly maintained below 10 ppb. Device flow rates were varied between 165 and 580 m{sup 3}/h. Production of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, formic acid, and acetic acid as reaction products was investigated. Conversion efficiency data were generated for 48 individual VOCs or groups of closely related compounds. Alcohols and glycol ethers were the

  20. Predicting indoor pollutant concentrations, and applications to air quality management

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, David M.

    2002-10-01

    Because most people spend more than 90% of their time indoors, predicting exposure to airborne pollutants requires models that incorporate the effect of buildings. Buildings affect the exposure of their occupants in a number of ways, both by design (for example, filters in ventilation systems remove particles) and incidentally (for example, sorption on walls can reduce peak concentrations, but prolong exposure to semivolatile organic compounds). Furthermore, building materials and occupant activities can generate pollutants. Indoor air quality depends not only on outdoor air quality, but also on the design, maintenance, and use of the building. For example, ''sick building'' symptoms such as respiratory problems and headaches have been related to the presence of air-conditioning systems, to carpeting, to low ventilation rates, and to high occupant density (1). The physical processes of interest apply even in simple structures such as homes. Indoor air quality models simulate the processes, such as ventilation and filtration, that control pollutant concentrations in a building. Section 2 describes the modeling approach, and the important transport processes in buildings. Because advection usually dominates among the transport processes, Sections 3 and 4 describe methods for predicting airflows. The concluding section summarizes the application of these models.

  1. Estimating the radon concentration in water and indoor air.

    PubMed

    Maged, A F

    2009-05-01

    The paper presents the results of radon concentration measurements in the vicinity of water, indoor air and in contact to building walls. The investigations were carried out using CR-39 track detectors. Samples of ground water flowing out of many springs mostly in Arabian Gulf area except one from Germany have been studied. The results are compared with international recommendations and the values are found to be lower than the recommended value. Measuring the mean indoor radon concentrations in air and in contact to building walls in the dwellings of Kuwait University Campus were found 24.2 +/- 7.7, and 462 +/- 422 Bq m(-3) respectively. These values lead to average effective dose equivalent rates of 1.3 +/- 0.4 and 23 +/- 21 mSv year(-1), respectively.

  2. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Atmospheric Formaldehyde Levels in an Academic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clausz, John C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Determined whether improved ventilation and use of "formaldehyde-free" biological specimens could reduce the levels of formaldehyde in air to which students and faculty would be exposed. Both methods were found to be effective in reducing formaldehyde levels in air. (JN)

  3. A portable system for on-site quantification of formaldehyde in air based on G-quadruplex halves coupled with A smartphone reader.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Wang, Yanru; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yuhuan; Zheng, Fangqing; Wang, Shuaixing; Zhang, Daohong; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-01-15

    A portable colorimetric determination system based on G-quadruplex DNAzyme integrated with a smartphone was developed to quantitatively detect formaldehyde (FA). The method is based on the oxidation of FA by H2O2, which prevents the 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS)–H2O2 reaction catalyzed by G-quadruplex halves. With the addition of FA, the amount of the blue-green-colored free-radical cation (ABTS+) was reduced. The concentration of FA can be determined by monitoring this competitive reaction with a UV-vis spectrometer. Response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design (BBD) were applied for optimization of the colorimetric assay. A smartphone-based colorimetric reader was also developed, which could display FA responses and report the concentration in real-time. The system could detect FA as low as 0.01 µM with a linear range of 1-600 µM. Taking advantages of smartphone and DNAzyme, the assay provides great potential for its practical application as a home testing or on-site analysis with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  4. Variability of air ion concentrations in urban Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, V. N.; Herrmann, E.; Manninen, H. E.; Hussein, T.; Hakala, J.; Nieminen, T.; Aalto, P. P.; Merkel, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Hämeri, K.

    2015-12-01

    Air ion concentrations influence new particle formation and consequently the global aerosol as potential cloud condensation nuclei. We aimed to evaluate air ion concentrations and characteristics of new particle formation events (NPF) in the megacity of Paris, France, within the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric Pollution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) project. We measured air ion number size distributions (0.8-42 nm) with an air ion spectrometer and fine particle number concentrations (> 6 nm) with a twin differential mobility particle sizer in an urban site of Paris between 26 June 2009 and 4 October 2010. Air ions were size classified as small (0.8-2 nm), intermediate (2-7 nm), and large (7-20 nm). The median concentrations of small and large ions were 670 and 680 cm-3, respectively, (sum of positive and negative polarities), whereas the median concentration of intermediate ions was only 20 cm-3, as these ions were mostly present during new particle formation bursts, i.e. when gas-to-particle conversion produced fresh aerosol particles from gas phase precursors. During peaks in traffic-related particle number, the concentrations of small and intermediate ions decreased, whereas the concentrations of large ions increased. Seasonal variations affected the ion population differently, with respect to their size and polarity. NPF was observed in 13 % of the days, being most frequent in spring and late summer (April, May, July, and August). The results also suggest that NPF was favoured on the weekends in comparison to workdays, likely due to the lower levels of condensation sinks in the mornings of weekends (CS weekdays 09:00: 18 × 10-3 s-1; CS weekend 09:00: 8 × 10-3 s-1). The median growth rates (GR) of ions during the NPF events varied between 3 and 7 nm h-1, increasing with the ion size and being higher on workdays than on weekends for intermediate and large ions. The median GR of

  5. Air radon concentration decrease in a waste water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Ortiz, J; Verdú, G; Martorell, S

    2015-06-01

    (222)Rn is a naturally occurring gas created from the decay of (226)Ra. The long-term health risk of breathing radon is lung cancer. One particular place where indoor radon concentrations can exceed national guidelines is in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where treatment processes may contribute to ambient airborne concentrations. The aim of this paper was to study the radon concentration decrease after the application of corrective measures in a Spanish WWTP. According to first measures, air radon concentration exceeded International Commission Radiologica1 Protection (ICRP) normative (recommends intervention between 400 and 1000 Bq m(-3)). Therefore, the WWTP improved mechanical forced ventilation to lower occupational exposure. This measure allowed to increase the administrative controls, since the limitation of workers access to the plant changed from 2 h d(-1) (considering a maximum permissible dose of 20 mSv y(-1) averaged over 5 y) to 7 h d(-1).

  6. Air radon concentration decrease in a waste water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Ortiz, J; Verdú, G; Martorell, S

    2015-06-01

    (222)Rn is a naturally occurring gas created from the decay of (226)Ra. The long-term health risk of breathing radon is lung cancer. One particular place where indoor radon concentrations can exceed national guidelines is in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where treatment processes may contribute to ambient airborne concentrations. The aim of this paper was to study the radon concentration decrease after the application of corrective measures in a Spanish WWTP. According to first measures, air radon concentration exceeded International Commission Radiologica1 Protection (ICRP) normative (recommends intervention between 400 and 1000 Bq m(-3)). Therefore, the WWTP improved mechanical forced ventilation to lower occupational exposure. This measure allowed to increase the administrative controls, since the limitation of workers access to the plant changed from 2 h d(-1) (considering a maximum permissible dose of 20 mSv y(-1) averaged over 5 y) to 7 h d(-1). PMID:25971342

  7. New formaldehyde base disinfectants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, R.; Lindell, K. F.

    1973-01-01

    Preparations of formaldehyde in various organic liquids - ethylene glycol, glycerol, and propylene glycol - serve as effective disinfectants towards microbial vegetative cells and spores. This disinfection is a temperature-dependent process and is manifest when these formaldehyde base disinfectants are dissolved in water. The irritating vapors associated with formaldehyde disinfection are not present in either of these new formaldehyde base disinfectants or in aqueous solutions of them.

  8. Unusual formaldehyde-induced hypersensitivity in two schoolgirls

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B. ); Hanna, W.T.; Painter, P.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Two schoolgirls developed a syndrome resembling Henoch-Schonlein purpura while attending a recently opened school insulated with urea-formaldehyde foam (UFFI). Skin rashes and swellings were accompanied by bizarre, blue-green discoloration of the skin. Subsequent investigations by county, state and federal authorities, and low measured concentrations of formaldehyde, prompted initial conclusions that in-school formaldehyde exposures were not responsible for the girls' problems. Subsequent controlled exposures to UFFI and formaldehyde while in hospital elicited the whole cascade of symptoms. The chronology of the onset and amplification of systems make it probable that the formaldehyde exposures precipitating the girls' hypersensitivity, occurred in the school. 3 refs.

  9. Results of the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of 2011-2013: Impact of natural gas appliances on air pollutant concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, Nasim A.; Li, Jina; Russell, Marion L.; Spears, Michael; Less, Brennan D.; Singer, Brett C.

    2015-03-17

    This study was conducted to assess the current impact of natural gas appliances on air quality in California homes. Data were collected via telephone interviews and measurements inside and outside of 352 homes. Passive samplers measured time-resolved CO and time-integrated NOX, NO2, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde over ~6d periods in November 2011 - April 2012 and October 2012 - March 2013. The fraction of indoor NOX and NO2 attributable to indoor sources was estimated. NOX, NO2 and highest 1-h CO were higher in homes that cooked with gas and increased with amount of gas cooking. NOX and NO2 were higher in homes with cooktop pilot burners, relative to gas cooking without pilots. Homes with a pilot burner on a floor or wall furnace had higher kitchen and bedroom NOX and NO2 compared to homes without a furnace pilot. When scaled to account for varying home size and mixing volume, indoor-attributed bedroom and kitchen NOX and kitchen NO2 were not higher in homes with wall or floor furnace pilot burners, though bedroom NO2 was higher. In homes that cooked 4 h or more with gas, self-reported use of kitchen exhaust was associated with lower NOX, NO2 and highest 1-h CO. Gas appliances were not associated with higher concentrations of formaldehyde or acetaldehyde.

  10. Energy yields for hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde syntheses - The HCN and amino acid concentrations in the primitive ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stribling, Roscoe; Miller, Stanley L.

    1987-01-01

    Simulated prebiotic atmospheres containing either CH4, CO, or CO2, in addition to N2, H2O, and variable amounts of H2, were subjected to the spark from a high-frequency Tesla coil, and the energy yields for the syntheses of HCN and H2CO were estimated from periodic (every two days) measurements of the compound concentrations. The mixtures with CH4 were found to yield the highest amounts of HCN, whereas the CO mixtures produced the highest yields of H2CO. These results model atmospheric corona discharges. From the yearly energy yields calculated and the corona discharge available on the earth, the yearly production rate of HCN was estimated; using data on the HCN production rates and the experimental rates of decomposition of amino acids through the submarine vents, the steady state amino acid production rate in the primitive ocean was calculated to be about 10 nmoles/sq cm per year.

  11. A PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS OF THE CLEAN AIR STATUS AND TRENDS NETWORK (CASTNET) AIR CONCENTRATION DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spatial and temporal variability of ambient air concentrations of SO2, SO42-, NO3, HNO3, and NH4+ obtained from EPA's CASTNet was examined using an objective, statistically based technique...

  12. BOREAS TGB-7 Ambient Air Herbicide and Organochlorine Concentration Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, Don; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB)-7 team measured the concentration and flux of several agricultural pesticides in air, rainwater, and dry deposition samples in order to determine the associated yearly deposition rates. This data set contains information on the ambient air concentration of seven herbicides [2,4- dichlorophenoxyacidic_acid (2,4-D), bromoxynil, dicamb, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA), triallate, trifluralin, and diclop-methyl] known to appear in the atmosphere of the Canadian prairies. Also, the concentration of three herbicides (atrazine, alachlor, and metolachlor), two groups of insecticides (lindane and breakdown products and dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and breakdown products), and several polychlorinated biphenyls commonly used in the central United States was measured. All of these chemicals are reported, in the literature, to be transported in the atmosphere. Many have been reported to occur in boreal and arctic food chains. The sampling was carried out from 16-Jun to 13-Aug-1993 and 04-May to 20-Jul-1994 at the BOREAS site in the Prince Albert National Park (Waskesiu). The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  13. Effect of backyard burning on dioxin deposition and air concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wevers, M; De Fré, R; Desmedt, M

    2004-03-01

    The influence from open burning of garden and household waste on locally measured dioxin deposition and air concentrations was evaluated in three sets of experiments: the combustion of garden waste in barrels and in open fires, and the incineration of household waste in an empty oil drum. Each set was composed of eight individual experiments over 4 h. Deposition gauges were located 20 m NE, SE, SW and NW with respect to the source and on a background location at 400 m SW. Air samples were taken in the plume with a medium volume sampler equipped with a quartz filter and a polyurethane plug. The results illustrate deposition increments in the wind direction at a distance of 20 m from the source of 0.8 pg TEQ/m2 day for garden waste and 2.5 pg TEQ/m2 day for household waste. Concentrations in the plume were increased by 160-580 fg TEQ/m3 over a period of 12 and 31 h respectively. Expressed at a reference CO2 concentration of 9% this corresponds with a range from 0.8 to 3.6 ng TEQ/m3, which is comparable with a poorly controlled MSWI. Emission factors in the order of magnitude of 4.5 ng TEQ/kg combusted garden waste and 35 ng TEQ/kg burned municipal waste were determined.

  14. Indoor formaldehyde removal by thermal catalyst: kinetic characteristics, key parameters, and temperature influence.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiujian; Zhang, Yinping; Mo, Jinhan; Li, Xinxiao

    2011-07-01

    Thermal catalytic oxidation (TCO) technology can continuously degrade formaldehyde at room temperature without added energy. However, there is very little knowledge on the TCO kinetic reaction mechanism, which is necessary in developing such air cleaners and in comparison with other air cleaning techniques. This paper addresses the problem of a novel TCO catalyst, Pt/MnO(x)-CeO(2). The experiments measuring the outlet concentrations of formaldehyde and other possible byproducts were conducted at temperatures of 25, 40, 60, 100, and 180 °C and at a series of inlet formaldehyde concentrations (280-3000 ppb). To measure the concentrations precisely and real timely, proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used. We found the following from the experimental results: (1) no byproducts were detected; (2) the bimolecular L-H kinetic model best described the catalytic reaction rate; (3) the activation energy of the oxidation was about 25.8 kJ mol(-1); (4) TCO is most energy efficient at room temperature without auxiliary heating; (5) compared with photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) which needs ultraviolet light radiation, the reaction area of TCO can be much larger for a given volume so that TCO can perform much better not only in formaldehyde removal efficiency but also in energy saving.

  15. Is exposure to formaldehyde in air causally associated with leukemia?—A hypothesis-based weight-of-evidence analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rhomberg, Lorenz R; Bailey, Lisa A; Goodman, Julie E; Hamade, Ali K; Mayfield, David

    2011-01-01

    Recent scientific debate has focused on the potential for inhaled formaldehyde to cause lymphohematopoietic cancers, particularly leukemias, in humans. The concern stems from certain epidemiology studies reporting an association, although particulars of endpoints and dosimetry are inconsistent across studies and several other studies show no such effects. Animal studies generally report neither hematotoxicity nor leukemia associated with formaldehyde inhalation, and hematotoxicity studies in humans are inconsistent. Formaldehyde's reactivity has been thought to preclude systemic exposure following inhalation, and its apparent inability to reach and affect the target tissues attacked by known leukemogens has, heretofore, led to skepticism regarding its potential to cause human lymphohematopoietic cancers. Recently, however, potential modes of action for formaldehyde leukemogenesis have been hypothesized, and it has been suggested that formaldehyde be identified as a known human leukemogen. In this article, we apply our hypothesis-based weight-of-evidence (HBWoE) approach to evaluate the large body of evidence regarding formaldehyde and leukemogenesis, attending to how human, animal, and mode-of-action results inform one another. We trace the logic of inference within and across all studies, and articulate how one could account for the suite of available observations under the various proposed hypotheses. Upon comparison of alternative proposals regarding what causal processes may have led to the array of observations as we see them, we conclude that the case fora causal association is weak and strains biological plausibility. Instead, apparent association between formaldehyde inhalation and leukemia in some human studies is better interpreted as due to chance or confounding. PMID:21635189

  16. Designing, construction, assessment, and efficiency of local exhaust ventilation in controlling crystalline silica dust and particles, and formaldehyde in a foundry industry plant.

    PubMed

    Morteza, Mortezavi Mehrizi; Hossein, Kakooi; Amirhossein, Matin; Naser, Hasheminegad; Gholamhossein, Halvani; Hossein, Fallah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design and assess the efficiency of a local exhaust ventilation system used in a foundry operation to control inhalable dust and particles, microcrystal particles, and noxious gases and vapours affecting workers during the foundry process. It was designed based on recommendations from the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene. After designing a local exhaust ventilation system (LEV), we prepared and submitted the implementation plan to the manufacturer. High concentrations of crystalline silica dust and formaldehyde, which are common toxic air pollutants in foundries, were ultimately measured as an indicator for studying the efficiency of this system in controlling inhalable dust and particles as well as other air pollutants. The level of occupational exposure to silica and formaldehyde as major air pollutants was assessed in two modes: first, when the LEV was on, and second, when it was off. Air samples from the exposure area were obtained using a personal sampling pump and analysed using the No. 7601 method for crystal silica and the No. 2541 method for formaldehyde of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Silica and formaldehyde concentrations were determined by visible absorption spectrophotometry and gas chromatography. The results showed that local exhaust ventilation was successful in preserving the crystal silica particles in the work environment at a level below the NIOSH maximum allowed concentration (0.05 mg m-3). In contrast, formaldehyde exceeded the NIOSH limit (1 ppm or 1.228 mg m-3). PMID:23585164

  17. Designing, construction, assessment, and efficiency of local exhaust ventilation in controlling crystalline silica dust and particles, and formaldehyde in a foundry industry plant.

    PubMed

    Morteza, Mortezavi Mehrizi; Hossein, Kakooi; Amirhossein, Matin; Naser, Hasheminegad; Gholamhossein, Halvani; Hossein, Fallah

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to design and assess the efficiency of a local exhaust ventilation system used in a foundry operation to control inhalable dust and particles, microcrystal particles, and noxious gases and vapours affecting workers during the foundry process. It was designed based on recommendations from the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygiene. After designing a local exhaust ventilation system (LEV), we prepared and submitted the implementation plan to the manufacturer. High concentrations of crystalline silica dust and formaldehyde, which are common toxic air pollutants in foundries, were ultimately measured as an indicator for studying the efficiency of this system in controlling inhalable dust and particles as well as other air pollutants. The level of occupational exposure to silica and formaldehyde as major air pollutants was assessed in two modes: first, when the LEV was on, and second, when it was off. Air samples from the exposure area were obtained using a personal sampling pump and analysed using the No. 7601 method for crystal silica and the No. 2541 method for formaldehyde of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Silica and formaldehyde concentrations were determined by visible absorption spectrophotometry and gas chromatography. The results showed that local exhaust ventilation was successful in preserving the crystal silica particles in the work environment at a level below the NIOSH maximum allowed concentration (0.05 mg m-3). In contrast, formaldehyde exceeded the NIOSH limit (1 ppm or 1.228 mg m-3).

  18. Formaldehyde-induced shrinkage of rat thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Hiromi; Umebayashi, Chisato; Nakata, Mami; Nishizaki, Yasutaka; Noda, Katuhiko; Okano, Yoshiro; Oyama, Yasuo

    2003-01-01

    To test the possibility that micromolar formaldehyde, a metabolite of methanol derived from aspartame, exerts cytotoxicity, its effect on rat thymocytes was examined under the in vitro condition using a flow cytometer. Incubation of thymocytes with formaldehyde at 100 micro M or more for 24 h significantly increased the populations of shrunken cells and cells with hypodiploid DNA. The peak blood concentration of methanol in human subjects administered abuse doses of aspartame has been reported to exceed 2 mg/dL (625 micro M). It would increase the population of thymocytes undergoing apoptosis if formaldehyde at 100 micro M or more appears in the blood after administration of aspartame.

  19. Air Pollution in China: Mapping of Concentrations and Sources

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Robert A.; Muller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    China has recently made available hourly air pollution data from over 1500 sites, including airborne particulate matter (PM), SO2, NO2, and O3. We apply Kriging interpolation to four months of data to derive pollution maps for eastern China. Consistent with prior findings, the greatest pollution occurs in the east, but significant levels are widespread across northern and central China and are not limited to major cities or geologic basins. Sources of pollution are widespread, but are particularly intense in a northeast corridor that extends from near Shanghai to north of Beijing. During our analysis period, 92% of the population of China experienced >120 hours of unhealthy air (US EPA standard), and 38% experienced average concentrations that were unhealthy. China’s population-weighted average exposure to PM2.5 was 52 μg/m3. The observed air pollution is calculated to contribute to 1.6 million deaths/year in China [0.7–2.2 million deaths/year at 95% confidence], roughly 17% of all deaths in China. PMID:26291610

  20. Air Pollution in China: Mapping of Concentrations and Sources.

    PubMed

    Rohde, Robert A; Muller, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    China has recently made available hourly air pollution data from over 1500 sites, including airborne particulate matter (PM), SO2, NO2, and O3. We apply Kriging interpolation to four months of data to derive pollution maps for eastern China. Consistent with prior findings, the greatest pollution occurs in the east, but significant levels are widespread across northern and central China and are not limited to major cities or geologic basins. Sources of pollution are widespread, but are particularly intense in a northeast corridor that extends from near Shanghai to north of Beijing. During our analysis period, 92% of the population of China experienced >120 hours of unhealthy air (US EPA standard), and 38% experienced average concentrations that were unhealthy. China's population-weighted average exposure to PM2.5 was 52 μg/m3. The observed air pollution is calculated to contribute to 1.6 million deaths/year in China [0.7-2.2 million deaths/year at 95% confidence], roughly 17% of all deaths in China. PMID:26291610

  1. Production of Melamine-Formaldehyde PCM Microcapsules with Ammonia Scavenger used for Residual Formaldehyde Reduction.

    PubMed

    Sumiga, Boštjan; Knez, Emil; Vrtačnik, Margareta; Ferk-Savec, Vesna; Starešinič, Marica; Boh, Bojana

    2011-03-01

    Paraffinic phase change materials (PCM) were microencapsulated by in situ polymerization of melamine-formaldehyde prepolymers. Partly methylated trimethylolmelamine was used as an aminoaldehyde prepolymer for the microcapsule wall, a styrene-maleic acid anhydride copolymer as an emulsifier and modifying agent, and ammonia as a scavenger for reducing residual formaldehyde. For the determination of residual formaldehyde in a ppm concentration range, EDANA and malachite green analytical methods were studied, and the EDANA 210.1-99 was applied for the determination of residual formaldehyde in 25 samples of microcapsules, produced in a 200-L reactor. A linear correlation was observed between the added ammonia scavenger concentration and the reduction of residual formaldehyde concentration. Compared with 0.45% (4500 ppm) formaldehyde in a non-treated microcapsule suspension, with ammonia scavenger concentrations 0.80, 0.90 and 1.35%, the concentration of residual formaldehyde dropped to 0.27, 0.20 and 0.09% (i.e. 2700, 2000 and 900 ppm), respectively. Morphological characterisation of microcapsules by SEM and microcapsule wall permeability measurements by gravimetry / mass loss at an elevated temperature (135 °C) suggested that ammonia positively contributed to the wall elasticity / durability, while microcapsules with no ammonia scavenger added tended to have more brittle walls, and were more prone to cracking.

  2. Inhaled formaldehyde induces bone marrow toxicity via oxidative stress in exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang-Yan; Song, Xiang-Fu; Liu, Ying; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an economically important chemical, and has been found to cause various types of toxic damage to the body. Formaldehyde-induced toxic damage involves reactive oxygen species (ROS) that trigger subsequent toxic effects and inflammatory responses, which may increase risk of cancer. Therefore, in the present study, we aimed to investigate the possible toxic mechanism in bone marrow caused by formaldehyde. In accordance with the principle of randomization, the mice were divided into four groups of 6 mice per group. One group was exposed to ambient air and the other three groups were exposed to different concentrations of formaldehyde (20, 40, 80 mg/m3) for 15 days in the respective inhalation chambers, 2h a day. At the end of the 15-day experimental period, all mice were killed. Bone marrow cells were obtained. Some of those were used for the determination of blood cell numbers, bone marrow karyote numbers, CFU-F, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content; others were used for the determination of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cell cycle and Bcl-2, Bax, CytC protein expression. WBC and PLT numbers in median and high dose groups were obvious reduced, but there was no change on RBC numbers. There was also reduced numbers of bone marrow karyotes and CFU-F in the high dose group. SOD activity was decreased, but MDA content was increased. MMP and Bcl-2 expression were decreased with increasing formaldehyde concentration, while expression of Bax and Cyt C was increased. We also observed change in cell cycling, and found that there was S phase arrest in the high dose group. Our study suggested that a certain concentration of formaldehyde could have toxic effects on the hematopoietic system, with oxidative stress as a critical effect.

  3. Catalytic wet air oxidation of high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Wei; Wang, Xiaocong; Li, Daosheng; Ren, Yongzheng; Liu, Dongqi; Kang, Jianxiong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pretreatment of a high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Different experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the catalyst type, operating temperature, initial system pH, and oxygen partial pressure on the oxidation of the wastewater. Results show that the catalysts prepared by the co-precipitation method have better catalytic activity compared to others. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) conversion increased with the increase in temperature from 160 to 220 °C and decreased with the increase in pH. Moreover, the effect of the oxygen partial pressure on the COD conversion was significant only during the first 20 min of the reaction. Furthermore, the biodegradability of the wastewater improved greatly after CWAO, the ratio of BOD5/COD increased less than 0.1-0.75 when treated at 220 °C (BOD: biochemical oxygen demand). PMID:23676399

  4. Catalytic wet air oxidation of high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Wei; Wang, Xiaocong; Li, Daosheng; Ren, Yongzheng; Liu, Dongqi; Kang, Jianxiong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pretreatment of a high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Different experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the catalyst type, operating temperature, initial system pH, and oxygen partial pressure on the oxidation of the wastewater. Results show that the catalysts prepared by the co-precipitation method have better catalytic activity compared to others. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) conversion increased with the increase in temperature from 160 to 220 °C and decreased with the increase in pH. Moreover, the effect of the oxygen partial pressure on the COD conversion was significant only during the first 20 min of the reaction. Furthermore, the biodegradability of the wastewater improved greatly after CWAO, the ratio of BOD5/COD increased less than 0.1-0.75 when treated at 220 °C (BOD: biochemical oxygen demand).

  5. Threshold for occluded formaldehyde patch test in formaldehyde-sensitive patients. Relationship to repeated open application test with a product containing formaldehyde releaser.

    PubMed

    Flyvholm, M A; Hall, B M; Agner, T; Tiedemann, E; Greenhill, P; Vanderveken, W; Freeberg, F E; Menné, T

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate the eliciting threshold concentration of formaldehyde in formaldehyde-sensitive individuals in the occluded and non-occluded patch test, and to evaluate the relationship to repeated open application test (ROAT) with a product containing a formaldehyde releaser. 20 formaldehyde-sensitive patients and a control group of 20 healthy volunteers were included in the study. Occluded and non-occluded patch tests with formaldehyde solutions from 25 to 10,000 ppm, and ROAT for 1 week with a leave-on cosmetic product containing on average 300 ppm formaldehyde, were carried out simultaneously on each subject. In the occluded patch test, 1/2 of the 20 patients only reacted to 10,000 ppm formaldehyde, 9 reacted to 5,000 ppm, 3 reacted to 1,000 ppm, 2 reacted to 500 ppm and 1 reacted to 250 ppm. No definite positive reactions were observed in the non-occluded patch test or in the ROAT. No positive reactions were observed in the control group to any of the test procedures. We concluded that the threshold concentration for occluded patch test to formaldehyde in formaldehyde-sensitive patients was 250 ppm. The threshold in occluded patch test corresponded to the degree of sensitivity. Definite positive reactions in the ROAT were not seen, either indicating that they are unlikely to happen with the type of product used or that the exposure time was too short.

  6. Formaldehyde: a comparative evaluation of four monitoring methods

    SciTech Connect

    Coyne, L.B.; Cook, R.E.; Mann, J.R.; Bouyoucos, S.; McDonald, O.F.; Baldwin, C.L.

    1985-10-01

    The performances of four formaldehyde monitoring devices were compared in a series of laboratory and field experiments. The devices evaluated included the DuPont C-60 formaldehyde badge, the SKC impregnated charcoal tube, an impinger/polarographic method and the MDA Lion formaldemeter. The major evaluation parameters included: concentration range, effects of humidity, sample storage, air velocity, accuracy, precision, interferences from methanol, styrene, 1,3-butadiene, sulfur dioxide and dimethylamine. Based on favorable performances in the laboratory and field, each device was useful for monitoring formaldehyde in the industrial work environment; however, these devices were not evaluated for residential exposure assessment. The impinger/polarographic method had a sensitivity of 0.06 ppm, based on a 20-liter air sample volume, and accurately determined the short-term excursion limit (STEL). It was useful for area monitoring but was not very practical for time-weighted average (TWA) personal monitoring measurements. The DuPont badge had a sensitivity of 2.8 ppm-hr and accurately and simply determined TWA exposures. It was not sensitive enough to measure STEL exposures, however, and positive interferences resulted if 1,3-butadiene was present. The SKC impregnated charcoal tube measured both TWA and STEL concentrations and had a sensitivity of 0.06 ppm based on a 25-liter air sample volume. Lightweight and simple to use, the MDA Lion formaldemeter had a sensitivity of 0.2 ppm. It had the advantage of giving an instantaneous reading in the field; however, it must be used with caution because it responded to many interferences. The method of choice depended on the type of sampling required, field conditions encountered during sampling and an understanding of the limitations of each monitoring device.

  7. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    DOEpatents

    Pekala, Richard W.

    1992-01-01

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepa from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porsity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity.

  8. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Pekala, R.W.

    1992-01-14

    Organic aerogels that are transparent and essentially colorless are prepared from the aqueous, sol-gel polymerization of melamine with formaldehyde. The melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels have low densities, high surface areas, continuous porosity, ultrafine cell/pore sizes, and optical clarity. 3 figs.

  9. Formaldehyde in Our Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojanlatva, Ansa; Weeks, Charlie A.

    During the energy crisis of the early 1970s, there was a drive to conserve energy in every segment of society. Citizens were encouraged to insulate their homes and tighten them up to avoid loss of energy. One of the products to emerge from this crisis was urea formaldehyde foam insulation. (Urea formaldehyde is a well-known agent for preserving…

  10. Preliminary evaluation of formaldehyde mitigation studies in unoccupied research homes

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, T.G.; Dreibelbis, W.G.; Thompson, C.V.; Hawthorne, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The effetiveness of retrofit formaldehyde (CH/sub 2/O) mitigation measures for energy efficient homes is being investigated in unoccupied research houses constructed according to East Tennessee building codes. Formaldehyde emissions from carpet-covered, particleboard underlayment throughout these houses have frequently caused indoor CH/sub 2/O concentrations to exceed 0.1 ppM comfort guidelines, particularly during warm and humid seasons. The effectiveness of carpet and cushion, vinyl linoleum, and polyethylene vapor barriers over the underlayment have been compared with increased ventilation for reduction of indoor CH/sub 2/O concentrations under controlled 23/sup 0/C and 50% relative humidity (RH) conditions. Approximate 2 to 2.5 fold reductions in CH/sub 2/O concentrations were achieved with the linoleum and polyethylene barriers. Simple steady-state models predict that sevenfold increases in air exchange rate would be required for comparable improvements in air exchange rate would be required for comparable improvements in CH/sub 2/O levels. In contrast, common nylon carpet and urethane foam cushion flooring materials were ineffective in reducing CH/sub 2/O levels.

  11. Microbial Formaldehyde Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy J. Donohue

    2004-12-09

    This project analyzed how cells sense and generate energy from formaldehyde oxidation. Formaldehyde is a toxin that is produced naturally, chemically or by metabolism of a wide variety of methyl-containing compounds. Our goals are to identify how cells sense the presence of this toxic compound and determine how they generate energy and nutrients from the oxidation of formaldehyde. This research capitalizes on the role of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides glutathione dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (GSH FDH) in a formaldehyde oxidation pathway that is apparently found in a wide variety of microbes, plants and animals. Thus, our findings illustrate what is required for a large variety of cells to metabolize this toxic compound. A second major focus of our research is to determine how cells sense the presence of this toxic compound and control the expression of gene products required for its detoxification.

  12. Degradation of formaldehyde in anaerobic sequencing batch biofilm reactor (ASBBR).

    PubMed

    Pereira, N S; Zaiat, M

    2009-04-30

    The present study evaluated the degradation of formaldehyde in a bench-scale anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, which contained biomass immobilized in polyurethane foam matrices. The reactor was operated for 212 days at 35 degrees C with 8h sequential cycles, under different affluent formaldehyde concentrations ranging from 31.6 to 1104.4 mg/L (formaldehyde loading rates from 0.08 to 2.78 kg/m(3)day). The results indicate excellent reactor stability and over 99% efficiency in formaldehyde removal, with average effluent formaldehyde concentration of 3.6+/-1.7 mg/L. Formaldehyde degradation rates increased from 204.9 to 698.3mg/Lh as the initial concentration of formaldehyde was increased from around 100 to around 1100 mg/L. However, accumulation of organic matter was observed in the effluent (chemical oxygen demand (COD) values above 500 mg/L) due to the presence of non-degraded organic acids, especially acetic and propionic acids. This observation poses an important question regarding the anaerobic route of formaldehyde degradation, which might differ substantially from that reported in the literature. The anaerobic degradation pathway can be associated with the formation of long-chain oligomers from formaldehyde. Such long- or short-chain polymers are probably the precursors of organic acid formation by means of acidogenic anaerobic microorganisms. PMID:18715712

  13. IMPACT OF AN OZONE GENERATOR AIR CLEANER ON STYRENE CONCENTRATIONS IN AN INDOOR AIR QUALITY RESEARCH CHAMBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an investigation of the impact of an ozone generator air cleaner on vapor-phase styrene concentrations in a full-scale indoor air quality test chamber. The time history of the concentrations of styrene and ozone is well predicted by a simulation model u...

  14. Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part II. The effects of temperature and humidity on free formaldehyde, extractable formaldehyde, formaldehyde emission, and physical characteristics of the foam

    SciTech Connect

    Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

    1981-02-01

    Results of testing with two products of urea-formaldehyde based foams are described. Results of three products have previously been reported. Methods for detection and quantitative determination of formaldehyde, design of the experimental chambers, and the procedures are described. Samples of Product D were monitored for about 29 days and samples of Product E were monitored for 60 days in chambers and results are tabulated for formaldehyde emission. Additional tests performed on the two products are: extractable formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); free formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); comparison of free formaldehyde concentration; density (high and low temperature conditions); shrinkage (high and low temperature conditions). Control panels were constructed to simulate a wall in a home and observations were made and compared with results of the experimental products.

  15. 78 FR 34820 - Formaldehyde Emissions Standards for Composite Wood Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ...: Cindy Wheeler, National Program Chemicals Division, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics...-based resins (Ref. 3). Formaldehyde is an irritant and the National Toxicology Program recently... plywood and composite wood products (PCWP) National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air...

  16. Gypsum Wallboard as a sink for formaldehyde

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) has been of special concern as an indoor air pollutant because of its presence in a wide range of consumer products and its adverse health effects. Materials acting as HCHO sinks, such as painted gypsum wallboard, can become emission sources. However, adsorpti...

  17. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209... External Exposure § 835.209 Concentrations of radioactive material in air. (a) The derived air... exposures to airborne radioactive material. (b) The estimation of internal dose shall be based on...

  18. Microfabricated Formaldehyde Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Flueckiger, Jonas; Ko, Frank K.; Cheung, Karen C.

    2009-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a volatile organic compound that is widely used in textiles, paper, wood composites, and household materials. Formaldehyde will continuously outgas from manufactured wood products such as furniture, with adverse health effects resulting from prolonged low-level exposure. New, microfabricated sensors for formaldehyde have been developed to meet the need for portable, low-power gas detection. This paper reviews recent work including silicon microhotplates for metal oxide-based detection, enzyme-based electrochemical sensors, and nanowire-based sensors. This paper also investigates the promise of polymer-based sensors for low-temperature, low-power operation. PMID:22291561

  19. Partially-irreversible sorption of formaldehyde in five polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wei; Cox, Steven S.; Zhao, Xiaomin; Frazier, Charles E.; Little, John C.

    2014-12-01

    Due to its environmental ubiquity and concern over its potential toxicity, the mass-transfer characteristics of formaldehyde are of critical importance to indoor air quality research. Previous studies have suggested that formaldehyde mass transfer in polymer is partially irreversible. In this study, mechanisms that could cause the observed irreversibility were investigated. Polycarbonate and four other polymeric matrices were selected and subjected to formaldehyde sorption/desorption cycles. Mass transfer of formaldehyde was partially irreversible in all cases, and three potential mechanisms were evaluated. First, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analysis was used to investigate possible formaldehyde polymerization on polymer surfaces. ATR-FTIR showed no detectable paraformaldehyde or formaldehyde on the film surfaces that had been exposed to formaldehyde and air. ATR-FTIR did detect aliphatic acids suggesting oxidation had occurred on film surfaces as a result of exposure to formaldehyde. However, additional study suggested that air is not the primary cause for irreversibility. Second, statistical physics theory was tested as a possible explanation. According to this theory, reversible and irreversible sorption could be taking place simultaneously. The irreversible fraction should be constant during sorption and the fraction could be determined by performing a complete sorption/desorption test. The sorption/desorption data was consistent with this theory. Third, chemisorption was considered as another possible cause for irreversibility. Extraction/fluorimetry testing of post-sorption and post-desorption polymer films showed measurable quantities of formaldehyde suggesting that some of the chemisorbed formaldehyde was reversible at the higher extraction temperature. Further quantitative study on chemical reaction products is needed.

  20. Amended safety assessment of formaldehyde and methylene glycol as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Ivan J; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde and methylene glycol may be used safely in cosmetics if established limits are not exceeded and are safe for use in nail hardeners in the present practices of use and concentration, which include instructions to avoid skin contact. In hair-smoothing products, however, in the present practices of use and concentration, formaldehyde and methylene glycol are unsafe. Methylene glycol is continuously converted to formaldehyde, and vice versa, even at equilibrium, which can be easily shifted by heating, drying, and other conditions to increase the amount of formaldehyde. This rapid, reversible formaldehyde/methylene glycol equilibrium is distinguished from the slow, irreversible release of formaldehyde resulting from the so-called formaldehyde releaser preservatives, which are not addressed in this safety assessment (formaldehyde releasers may continue to be safely used in cosmetics at the levels established in their individual Cosmetic Ingredient Review safety assessments). PMID:24335968

  1. Formaldehyde exposure and health status in households.

    PubMed Central

    Broder, I; Corey, P; Brasher, P; Lipa, M; Cole, P

    1991-01-01

    This report describes a case study concerned with acute and subacute health effects of formaldehyde in the indoor air, which is based on a large group of control houses and houses retroinsulated 4 to 5 years earlier with urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI). Both groups underwent an environmental and health assessment on two occasions separated by an interval of 12 months, during which about one-half of the UFFI group performed remedial work on their houses. The results show that in the first survey of the study population, before remedial work, there was a moderate excess of many adverse health status indicators among the UFFI subset relative to the controls. This was associated with the presence of direct exposure-response relationships between formaldehyde levels in the UFFI houses and the prevalence of a number of symptoms. No comparable relationships were seen among the controls. At the second survey, performed following the removal of the UFFI, there was an appreciable reduction in the excess of most adverse health status indicators among the UFFI subjects. This improvement in health status among the UFFI removal subset was not associated with any significant diminution of formaldehyde exposures, although the previously observed exposure-response relationships had vanished. These observations imply that the findings obtained in the preremedial stage of the study cannot be explained by formaldehyde exposure alone. PMID:1821362

  2. [Level and characteristics of indoor air pollutants in a furniture mall in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chuan-Jia; Li, Shen-Shen; Zhang, Peng-Yi; Wang, Juan

    2010-12-01

    Concentrations of BTX (benzene, toluene and xylene), total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), formaldehyde and other carbonyl compounds were measured in different sections of a furniture mall in Beijing. The overall indoor concentrations (mean +/- standard deviation) of formaldehyde, benzene, toluene, xylene, and TVOC were (0.37 +/- 0.08), (0.04 +/- 0.03), (0.19 +/- 0.16), (0.47 +/- 0.57), and (2.76 +/- 2.18) mg/m3, respectively. Indoor concentrations of formaldehyde, xylene and TVOC were 22, 46 and 34 times higher than the corresponding outdoor concentrations respectively. Concentrations of formaldehyde, xylene and TVOC were much higher than the standard limits regulated in the national "indoor air quality standard" (GB/T 18883-2002), and the highest concentrations of formaldehyde and TVOC exceeded the standard limit 5.1 and 14.8 times respectively. Total concentration of carbonyl compounds was (689.3 +/- 94.8) microg/m3, which was 5 times higher than that outdoors. Of the carbonyls, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were found to be the most abundant, together accounting for over 75% of the total carbonyl concentrations. Acetone, C4 carbonyls (methacrolein, methyl ethyl ketone, butanal), and hexanal also occurred at relatively high concentrations. In conclusion, indoor air pollution is serious in the furniture mall.

  3. Fabrication of hollow melamine-formaldehyde microcapsules from microbubble templates.

    PubMed

    Daiguji, Hirofumi; Makuta, Toshinori; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Oyabu, Takayuki; Takemura, Fumio

    2007-08-01

    A fabrication method for hollow melamine-formaldehyde microcapsules from microbubble templates is presented. This method is based on the direct encapsulation of microbubbles, and thus does not require a liquid- or solid-core decomposition process. This study determined the conditions for controlling the surface morphology, shell thickness, and diameter distribution of hollow microcapsules. Results showed that the surface morphology of these hollow microcapsules depended on the reaction time, glycine concentration (pH of aqueous continuous phase) and pre-polymer concentration. The capsule shell thickness could be controlled by adjusting the concentration of aniline that had adsorbed on the microbubble surface and reacted with pre-polymer. The capsule diameter depended on the dissolution rate of gases, and the diameter of the hollow microcapsules fabricated from air microbubble templates ranged from 5 to 200 microm.

  4. Atmospheric light air ion concentrations and related meteorologic factors in Rezekne city, Latvia.

    PubMed

    Skromulis, Andris; Noviks, Gotfrids

    2012-04-01

    The well-minded impact of light negative air ions on human organism is still under discussion. The measurements of air ions are not widespread in Latvia yet. The paper presents new results of air pollution evaluation in Rezekne city. Measurements of positive and negative air ion concentrations in Rezekne city were taken during the spring, summer and autumn 2009 and during the winter 2010. Measurements were taken by portative air ions counter "Sapfir-3M" in eight different points of Rezekne city thrice a day. The concentrations of positive and negative air ions with mobility factor k > or = 0.4 cm2 V(-1) s(-1) were measured. Temperature, relative humidity, wind velocity, direction, etc., were also taken into account. The approximate interconnection between ionization and chemical and mechanical air pollution in relation with meteorological conditions was analyzed. The highest level of air ion concentration was observed in mornings, whereas in afternoons this concentration level decreased due to the growth of anthropogenic air pollution in the city, as light air ions, because of their charge, promoted the coagulation and the settlement of pollution particles. This regularity is typical for summer, whereas in spring, autumn and winter it is not characteristic. The unipolarity factor was usually less than 1 in mornings, but usually larger than 1 in afternoons especially in the most polluted city areas where minor concentration of air ions was detected. The ionization level is an original indicator of energetic saturation and aerosol pollution of atmospheric air.

  5. Long-term, continuous formaldehyde measurements in a rural Mid-Western location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorris, M. R.; Skog, K.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2014-12-01

    The oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leads to the formation of secondary pollutants, such as ozone and secondary organic aerosol. Formaldehyde, which has an atmospheric lifetime of a few hours, is a ubiquitous VOC oxidation product so is widely used as a tracer of local to regional VOC processing. Although formaldehyde measurements are widely used, there are few long-term, high-time resolution measurements available. During the spring of 2013 and summer and fall of 2014, the UW-Madison fiber laser induced fluorescence instrument monitored formaldehyde concentration at the Horicon Wildlife Refuge, which houses Wisconsin's National Core Monitoring and National Air Toxics Trends Station. We will present work that uses the formaldehyde measurements in conjunction with other data available at the Horicon site to evaluate different sources of anthropogenic influence on atmospherically rural areas. Particular attention will be paid to implications for SOA and ozone formation in this biogenically controlled area with regularly changing types and amounts of anthropogenic influence.

  6. Modeling Airborne Beryllium Concentrations From Open Air Dynamic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. M.

    2003-12-01

    A heightened awareness of airborne beryllium contamination from industrial activities was reestablished during the late 1980's and early 1990's when it became recognized that Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD) had not been eradicated, and that the Occupational Health and Safety Administration standards for occupational air exposure to beryllium may not be sufficiently protective. This was in response to the observed CBD increase in multiple industrial settings where beryllium was manufactured and/or machined, thus producing beryllium particulates which are then available for redistribution by airborne transport. Sampling and modeling design activities were expanded at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico to evaluate potential airborne beryllium exposure to workers who might be exposed during dynamic testing activities associated with nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship. Herein is presented the results of multiple types of collected air measurements that were designed to characterize the production and dispersion of beryllium used in components whose performance is evaluated during high explosive detonation at open air firing sites. Data from fallout, high volume air, medium volume air, adhesive film, particle size impactor, and fine-particulate counting techniques will be presented, integrated, and applied in dispersion modeling to assess potential onsite and offsite personal exposures resulting from dynamic testing activities involving beryllium.

  7. Global Ammonia Concentrations Seen by the 13-years AIRS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Juying; Wei, Zigang; Larrabee Strow, L.; Dickerson, Russell; Nowak, John; Wang, Yuxuan

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia is an integral part of the nitrogen cycle and is projected to be the largest single contributor to each of acidification, eutrophication and secondary particulate matter in Europe by 2020 (Sutton et al., 2008). The impacts of NH3 also include: aerosol production affecting global radiative forcing, increases in emissions of the greenhouse gases nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), and modification of the transport and deposition patterns of SO2 and NOx. Therefore, monitoring NH3 global distribution of sources is vitally important to human health with respect to both air and water quality and climate change. We have developed new daily and global ammonia (NH3) products from AIRS hyperspectral measurements. These products add value to AIRS's existing products that have made significant contributions to weather forecasts, climate studies, and air quality monitoring. With longer than 13 years of data records, these measurements have been used not only for daily monitoring purposes but also for inter-annual variability and short-term trend studies. We will discuss the global NH3 emission sources from biogenic and anthropogenic activities over many emission regions captured by AIRS. We will focus their variability in the last 13 years.

  8. LARGE-SCALE PREDICTIONS OF MOBILE SOURCE CONTRIBUTIONS TO CONCENTRATIONS OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation shows concentrations and deposition of toxic air pollutants predicted by a 3-D air quality model, the Community Multi Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Contributions from both on-road and non-road mobile sources are analyzed.

  9. Time variations of 222Rn concentration and air exchange rates in a Hungarian cave.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Hedvig Éva; Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Jordán, Gyozo; Szabó, Csaba; Horváth, Akos; Kiss, Attila

    2012-09-01

    A long-term radon concentration monitoring was carried out in the Pál-völgy cave, Budapest, Hungary, for 1.5 years. Our major goal was to determine the time dependence of the radon concentration in the cave to characterise the air exchange and define the most important environmental parameters that influence the radon concentration inside the cave. The radon concentration in the cave air was measured continuously by an AlphaGuard radon monitor, and meteorological parameters outside the cave were collected simultaneously. The air's radon concentration in the cave varied between 104 and 7776 Bq m(-3), the annual average value was 1884±85 Bq m(-3). The summer to winter radon concentration ratio was as high as 21.8. The outside air temperature showed the strongest correlation with the radon concentration in the cave, the correlation coefficient (R) was 0.76. PMID:22462600

  10. Solid phase microextraction method development for measuring Henry's Law constants of formaldehyde in aqueous solutions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) has been of special concern as an indoor air pollutant because of its existence in a wide range of products and its adverse health effects. The air-water partitioning behavior of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as formaldehyde is an important process th...

  11. Formaldehyde Surface Distributions and Variability in the Mexico City Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkermann, W.; Mohr, C.; Steinbrecher, R.; Ruiz Suarez, L.

    2007-05-01

    Formaldehyde ambient air mole fractions were measured throughout the dry season in March at three different locations in the Mexico City basin. The continuously running instruments were operated at Tenago del Aire, a site located in the Chalco valley in the southern venting area of the basin, at the Intituto Mexicano del Petroleo (IMP) in the northern part of the city and about 30 km north of the city at the campus of the Universidad Tecnològica de Tecamac (UTTEC). The technique used is the Hantzsch technology with a time resolution of 2 minutes and a detection limit of 100 ppt. Daily maxima peaked at 35 ppb formaldehyde in the city and about 15 to 20 ppb at the other sites. During night formaldehyde levels dropped to about 5 ppb or less. It is evident that the observed spatial and temporal variability in near surface formaldehyde distributions is strongly affected by local and regional advection processes.

  12. A mathematical model for the absorption and metabolism of formaldehyde vapour by humans

    SciTech Connect

    Franks, S.J. . E-mail: Susan.Franks@hsl.gov.uk

    2005-08-15

    Epidemiological studies of occupational exposure to formaldehyde gas (HCHO) have suggested possible links between concentration and duration of exposure, and elevated risks of leukaemia and other cancers at sites distant from the site of contact. Formaldehyde is a highly water soluble gas which, when inhaled, reacts rapidly at the site of contact and is quickly metabolised by enzymes in the respiratory tissue. Inhaled formaldehyde is almost entirely absorbed in the respiratory tract and, for formaldehyde induced toxicity to occur at distant sites, HCHO must enter the blood and be transported to systemic tissues via the circulatory system. A mathematical model describing the absorption and removal of inhaled formaldehyde in the nasal tissue is therefore formulated to predict the proportion of formaldehyde entering into the blood. Accounting for the spatial distribution of the formaldehyde concentration and the metabolic activity within the mucosa, the concentration of formaldehyde in the mucus, the epithelium and the blood has been determined and was found to attain a steady-state profile within a few seconds of exposure. The increase of the formaldehyde concentration in the blood was predicted to be insignificant compared with the existing pre-exposure levels in the body, indicating that formaldehyde is rapidly removed in the nasal tissue. The results of the model thus suggest that it is highly unlikely that following inhalation by the nose, formaldehyde itself will cause toxicity at sites other than the initial site of contact in the respiratory tract.

  13. Release of formaldehyde and melamine from tableware made of melamine-formaldehyde resin.

    PubMed

    Sugita, T; Ishiwata, H; Yoshihira, K

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between the concentrations of formaldehyde and melamine released into 4% acetic acid from dishes and bowls made of melamine-formaldehyde resin was determined. The average concentrations in the migration solution after the sample had been treated at 60, 80, and 95 degrees C for 30 min with 4% acetic acid were 0.0 +/- 0.1, 0.5 +/- 0.4 and 3.0 +/- 2.2 ppm, respectively for formaldehyde and 0.04 +/- 0.07, 0.21 +/- 0.20 and 1.19 +/- 1.18 ppm, respectively for melamine. The correlation between the concentrations of formaldehyde and melamine released at 95 degrees C was y=0.4858x-0.2728 (r=0.8860), where y is melamine concentration (ppm), x is formaldehyde concentration (ppm) and r is the correlation coefficient. The molar concentration ratios of formaldehyde to melamine (F/M ratio) were 15.4 +/- 11.6 at 80 degrees C and 14.9 +/- 10.1 at 95 degrees C. Hence the release of both migrants was affected by temperature but the F/M ratio was not affected. The release of both compounds was was increased on repetition of the migration test at 95 degrees C but their concentrations remained constant after the tenth and seventeenth repetitions of the treatment. During this period, the F/M ratio decreased according to the equation 1n y=-1.4344 1n x+3.7814 (r=-0.9984) for a sample before the tenth repetition of the treatment and remained between 1.7 and 1.9 after the twelfth repetition, where y is the F/M ratio and x is the number of repetitions of the treatment.

  14. The concentrations of culturable microorganisms in relation to particulate matter in urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, D.; Galler, H.; Luxner, J.; Zarfel, G.; Buzina, W.; Friedl, H.; Marth, E.; Habib, J.; Reinthaler, F. F.

    2013-02-01

    The ambient air consists not only of gases but also of bioaerosols and particulate matter. The concentrations of particulate matter in relation to the culturable microorganisms in the urban ambient air and their dependence on air temperature and relative humidity were investigated. The seasonal distribution of particles sizes, the concentrations of aerobic mesophilic bacteria and xerophilic fungi in the air were evaluated. Moreover, the identification of the fungal genera Cladosporium, Aspergillus and Penicillium were conducted. Within one year at 177 days particle and microorganism concentrations in the ambient air were recorded in the city centre of Graz/Austria. The results show that the concentrations of fine particles and coarse particles were the highest in winter and decreased continuously to a minimum in the summer months depending on temperature and air humidity. The concentrations of xerophilic fungi showed no correlation to the different particle concentrations. The spore concentrations of Cladosporium spp. showed the same results of xerophilic fungi whereas the genera Penicillium and Aspergillus increased with the increase of fine particles. The concentrations of mesophilic bacteria were positively correlated with all particle counts. The maximum mesophilic bacteria concentrations were found in the winter months. Further studies are required to evaluate the concentrations of specific microorganisms in the natural environment in relation to the particulate matter.

  15. AN INDOOR PESTICIDE AIR AND SURFACE CONCENTRATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A thorough assessment of human exposure to environmental chemicals requires consideration of all processes in the sequence from source to dose. For assessment of exposure to pesticides following their use indoors, data and models are needed to estimate pesticide concentrations...

  16. Melamine-formaldehyde aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1991-04-01

    The ability to tailor the structure and properties of aerogels at the nanometer scale opens up exciting possibilities for these unique, low density materials. Traditional inorganic aerogels have been formed from the hydrolysis and condensation of metal alkoxides (e.g. tetramethoxy silane). Previously, we reported the synthesis of organic aerogels based upon the aqueous, polycondensation of resorcinol with formaldehyde. Although these aerogels exhibit minimal light scattering, their dark red color limits their use in certain optical applications. In this paper, we discuss the synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels -- a new type of organic aerogel that is both colorless and transparent. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Inter-comparison of air pollutant concentrations in different indoor environments in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shun-Cheng; Guo, Hai; Li, Wai-Ming; Chan, Lo-Yin

    Indoor air quality in selected indoor environments in Hong Kong such as homes, offices, schools, shopping malls and restaurants were investigated. Average CO 2 levels and total bacteria counts in air-conditioned classrooms, shopping malls and restaurants were comparatively higher than those measured in occupied offices and homes. Elevated CO 2 levels exceeding 1000 ppm and total bacteria counts resulted from high occupancy combined with inadequate ventilation. Average PM 10 levels were usually higher indoors than outdoors in homes, shopping malls and restaurants. The highest indoor PM 10 levels were observed at investigated restaurants due to the presence of cigarette smoking and extensive use of gas stoves for cooking. The restaurants and shopping malls investigated had higher formaldehyde levels than other indoor environments when building material, smoking and internal renovation work were present. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in both indoor and outdoor environments mainly resulted from vehicle exhaust emissions. It was observed that interior decoration work and the use of industrial solvents in an indoor environment could significantly increase the indoor levels of VOCs.

  18. Brain Formaldehyde is Related to Water Intake behavior

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Su, Tao; He, Yingge; Lu, Jihui; Mo, Weichuan; Wei, Yan; He, Rongqiao

    2016-01-01

    A promising strategy for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the identification of age-related changes that place the brain at risk for the disease. Additionally, AD is associated with chronic dehydration, and one of the significant changes that are known to result in metabolic dysfunction is an increase in the endogenous formaldehyde (FA) level. Here, we demonstrate that the levels of uric formaldehyde in AD patients were markedly increased compared with normal controls. The brain formaldehyde levels of wild-type C57 BL/6 mice increased with age, and these increases were followed by decreases in their drinking frequency and water intake. The serum arginine vasopressin (AVP) concentrations were also maintained at a high level in the 10-month-old mice. An intravenous injection of AVP into the tail induced decreases in the drinking frequency and water intake in the mice, and these decreases were associated with increases in brain formaldehyde levels. An ELISA assay revealed that the AVP injection increased both the protein level and the enzymatic activity of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO), which is an enzyme that produces formaldehyde. In contrast, the intraperitoneal injection of formaldehyde increased the serum AVP level by increasing the angiotensin II (ANG II) level, and this change was associated with a marked decrease in water intake behavior. These data suggest that the interaction between formaldehyde and AVP affects the water intake behaviors of mice. Furthermore, the highest concentration of formaldehyde in vivo was observed in the morning. Regular water intake is conducive to eliminating endogenous formaldehyde from the human body, particularly when water is consumed in the morning. Establishing good water intake habits not only effectively eliminates excess formaldehyde and other metabolic products but is also expected to yield valuable approaches to reducing the risk of AD prior to the onset of the disease. PMID:27699080

  19. Brain Formaldehyde is Related to Water Intake behavior

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Su, Tao; He, Yingge; Lu, Jihui; Mo, Weichuan; Wei, Yan; He, Rongqiao

    2016-01-01

    A promising strategy for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the identification of age-related changes that place the brain at risk for the disease. Additionally, AD is associated with chronic dehydration, and one of the significant changes that are known to result in metabolic dysfunction is an increase in the endogenous formaldehyde (FA) level. Here, we demonstrate that the levels of uric formaldehyde in AD patients were markedly increased compared with normal controls. The brain formaldehyde levels of wild-type C57 BL/6 mice increased with age, and these increases were followed by decreases in their drinking frequency and water intake. The serum arginine vasopressin (AVP) concentrations were also maintained at a high level in the 10-month-old mice. An intravenous injection of AVP into the tail induced decreases in the drinking frequency and water intake in the mice, and these decreases were associated with increases in brain formaldehyde levels. An ELISA assay revealed that the AVP injection increased both the protein level and the enzymatic activity of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO), which is an enzyme that produces formaldehyde. In contrast, the intraperitoneal injection of formaldehyde increased the serum AVP level by increasing the angiotensin II (ANG II) level, and this change was associated with a marked decrease in water intake behavior. These data suggest that the interaction between formaldehyde and AVP affects the water intake behaviors of mice. Furthermore, the highest concentration of formaldehyde in vivo was observed in the morning. Regular water intake is conducive to eliminating endogenous formaldehyde from the human body, particularly when water is consumed in the morning. Establishing good water intake habits not only effectively eliminates excess formaldehyde and other metabolic products but is also expected to yield valuable approaches to reducing the risk of AD prior to the onset of the disease.

  20. Effect of air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke on serum hyaluronate concentrations in school children

    PubMed Central

    Fuji, Y; Shima, M; Ando, M; Adachi, M; Tsunetoshi, Y

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate serum hyaluronate concentrations relative to air pollution, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), and respiratory health in Japanese school children. Methods: Respiratory symptoms and serum IgE concentrations were examined in 1037 school children living in four communities in Japan with differing levels of air pollution. Serum hyaluronate concentrations were assayed in 230 children, consisting of all the children who had symptoms of either asthma or wheeze (65 and 50 subjects, respectively) and normal controls adjusted for sex, school grade, and school without these symptoms (115 subjects). Results: Although serum hyaluronate concentrations did not differ for either asthma or wheeze, the concentrations were significantly higher in children living in communities with higher levels of air pollution. Children with asthma or wheeze and those with serum IgE concentrations of 250 IU/ml or above showed differences in hyaluronate concentrations that related to the degree of air pollution in the communities. In children with higher serum IgE concentrations, the hyaluronate concentrations among subjects exposed to ETS were significantly higher than among those without exposure to ETS. Conclusions: The present results suggest that serum hyaluronate concentration is related to the degree of air pollution and exposure to ETS. Children with asthma or wheeze and children with higher IgE concentrations are considered to be more susceptible to environmental factors. PMID:11850556

  1. Effect of air preheat temperature and oxygen concentration on flame structure and emission

    SciTech Connect

    Bolz, S.; Gupta, A.K.

    1998-07-01

    The structure of turbulent diffusion flames with highly preheated combustion air (air preheat temperature in excess of 1,150 C) has been obtained using a specially designed regenerative combustion furnace. Propane gas was used as the fuel. Data have been obtained on the global flame features, spectral emission characteristics, spatial distribution of OH, CH and C{sub 2} species, and pollutants emission from the flames. The results have been obtained for various degrees of air preheat temperatures and O{sub 2} concentration in the air. The color of the flame was found to change from yellow to blue to bluish-green to green over the range of conditions examined. In some cases a hybrid color flame was also observed. The recorded images of the flame photographs were analyzed using color-analyzing software. The results show that thermal and chemical flame behavior strongly depends on the air preheat temperature and oxygen content in the air. The flame color was found to be bluish-green or green at very high air preheat temperatures and low-oxygen concentration. However, at high oxygen concentration the flame color was yellow. The flame volume was found to increase with increase in air-preheat temperature and decrease in oxygen concentration. The flame length showed a similar behavior. The concentrations of OH, CH and C{sub 2} increased with an increase in air preheat temperatures. These species exhibited a two-stage combustion behavior at low oxygen concentration and single stage combustion behavior at high oxygen concentration in the air. Stable flames were obtained for remarkably low equivalence ratios, which would not be possible with normal combustion air. Pollutants emission, including CO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} , was much lower with highly preheated combustion air at low O{sub 2} concentration than the normal air. The results also suggest uniform flow and flame thermal characteristics with conditioned highly preheated air. Highly preheated air combustion provides much

  2. Allergic contact dermatitis from formaldehyde textile resins in surgical uniforms and nonwoven textile masks.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jeff; Skotnicki-Grant, Sandy

    2007-03-01

    Despite a trend for reduction in the concentration of free formaldehyde in textiles, formaldehyde textile resin (FTR) allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) remains an important clinical issue and is likely underdiagnosed. Patients with FTR ACD may react to formaldehyde released from the resin or to the resin itself. Screening with formaldehyde and ethyleneurea/melamine formaldehyde resin will uncover most cases. Patch testing with the suspected offending fabric most often leads to false-negative results. We present a case of a 49-year-old pediatrician who developed a severe widespread dermatitis caused by contact with FTRs from her hospital "greens" ("scrubs") and mask.

  3. Exposure of farm laborers and dairy cattle to formaldehyde from footbath use at a dairy farm in New York State.

    PubMed

    Doane, M; Sarenbo, S

    2014-07-15

    Formalin footbaths are commonly used in the dairy industry to prevent cattle hoof diseases. Although formalin is a well-documented disinfectant, it is also a carcinogen and irritant. The aim of this study was to estimate the exposure of farm workers and dairy cattle to formaldehyde from footbaths located in a milking facility and a heifer facility at a dairy farm in western New York, USA. The dairy farm included approximately 3900 dairy cattle including young stock; of these, 1670 cows were milked three times per day in a 60-stall carousel milking parlor, and approximately 800 heifers were located at the heifer facility where footbaths with formalin were in use. The formaldehyde concentration of the air was measured using a Formaldemeter™ htV approximately 50cm above the 3% formalin footbaths in the milking (one footbath location) and heifer (three footbath locations) facilities on three consecutive days. The measured formaldehyde concentrations varied between 0.00 and 2.28ppm, falling within the safety guidelines established by the Occupation Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of the United States. Significant differences were found in the formaldehyde concentrations at the different footbath locations in the heifer facility, potentially due to the varying levels of ventilation at each location. Changes in the ambient temperature during the 3-day sampling period did not significantly affect the concentrations. We believe that the substantial ventilation at both the heifer and milking facilities ensured that the formaldehyde concentrations did not exceed OSHA guidelines, thus permitting the safe use of formalin footbaths in this farm. PMID:24768913

  4. Daily and seasonal variations in radon activity concentration in the soil air.

    PubMed

    Műllerová, Monika; Holý, Karol; Bulko, Martin

    2014-07-01

    Radon activity concentration in the soil air in the area of Faculty of Mathematics, Physics and Informatics (FMPI) in Bratislava, Slovak Republic, has been continuously monitored since 1994. Long-term measurements at a depth of 0.8 m and short-term measurements at a depth of 0.4 m show a high variability in radon activity concentrations in the soil. The analysis of the data confirms that regular daily changes in radon activity concentration in the soil air depend on the daily changes in atmospheric pressure. It was also found that the typical annual courses of the radon activity concentration in the soil air (with summer minima and winter maxima) were disturbed by mild winter and heavy summer precipitation. Influence of precipitation on the increase in the radon activity concentration in the soil air was observed at a depth of 0.4 m and subsequently at a depth of 0.8 m.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart Hhhh... - Method for Determining Free-Formaldehyde in Urea-Formaldehyde Resins by Sodium Sulfite (Iced...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Method for Determining Free-Formaldehyde in Urea-Formaldehyde Resins by Sodium Sulfite (Iced & Cooled) A Appendix A to Subpart HHHH of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS...

  6. Formaldehyde from GOME-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comyn-Platt, Edward; Hewson, Will; Bösch, Hartmut; Barkley, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Isoprene is the most abundant non-methane biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emitted into the atmosphere with emissions roughly equal to global methane emissions from all sources. Isoprene strongly influences the oxidation capacity in the troposphere hence influences levels of methane and tropospheric ozone, and is also a precursor to secondary organic aerosol. Isoprene, therefore, plays a significant role in radiative forcing and determining Earth's climate trends. However, the exact mechanisms of isoprene emission from vegetation are poorly understood and current land-surface models often use different parameterisation and meteorological fields to drive such schemes. Furthermore, isoprene emissions measurements are rare and are difficult to extrapolate to regional and continental scales thus resulting in large uncertainties in the total global emissions. Formaldehyde (HCHO) is formed as an intermediate product during the isoprene oxidation process and can be used as a proxy for isoprene emission. Global satellite observations of formaldehyde are now available from a number of satellite sensors which offer a unique ability to study isoprene emissions over large regions. Here, we use formaldehyde observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) instrument retrieved with the University of Leicester retrieval (Hewson et al. 2013) to: 1) test state-of-the-art model calculations using the GEOS-CHEM global transport model; 2) investigate the key drivers for regional year-to-year anomalies in formaldehyde (or isoprene) emissions and 3) assess the ability of current land surface models (MEGAN, JULES) to reproduce the observed anomalies and their dependence on climate variations.

  7. Analysis of Mobile Source Air Toxics (MSATS)–Near-Road VOC and CarbonylConcentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation examines data from a year-long study of measured near-road mobile source air toxic (MSAT) concentrations and compares these data with modeled 2005 National Air Toxic Assessment (NATA) results. Field study measurements were collected during a field campaign in ...

  8. EFFECTS OF METAL COMPONENTS IN CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR PARTICLES ON PULMONARY INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EFFECTS OF METAL COMPONENTS IN CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR PARTICLES ON PULMONARY INJURY. Yuh-Chin Huang, Jackie Stonehuerner, Jackie Carter, Andrew J. Ghio, Robert B. Devlin. NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, NC.
    The mechanisms for cardiopulmonary morbidity associated with exposure to air po...

  9. ACTION OF FORMALDEHYDE ON ENZYMES AND ON CERTAIN PBOTEIDS

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, C. L.; Novy, F. G.

    1899-01-01

    The following general conclusions may be drawn from the preceding work: Fibrin is altered by formaldehyde and is then less easily digested by pepsin and by trypsin. Papaïn is apparently unable to digest fibrin even when this is exposed to very weak formaldehyde (1:1000) for a very short time. The casein of milk, on contact with formaldehyde, undergoes rapid alteration and is as a result not coagulated by rennet, or but very slowly. Such altered casein, like similar fibrin, is not readily digested by the proteolytic ferments. The longer the formaldehyde acts on casein and on fibrin the more marked is the result. Pepsin is not affected by a one per cent solution of formaldehyde, even when the mixture has stood for four weeks. Even a five per cent solution of formaldehyde acting for three weeks has no effect on pepsin. Contrary results obtained by others are due to an alteration of the fibrin by the formaldehyde. A putrid solution of pepsin in distilled water one month old digests fibrin as readily as a fresh solution. Rennet is not affected even by a four per cent solution of formaldehyde acting for several weeks. The absence of coagulation at times is due to the action of formaldehyde on the casein of the milk and not on the rennet ferment. Papaïn is very quickly altered by formaldehyde, even in very dilute solution. Moreover, it is unable to digest fibrin that has been exposed to the action of a very dilute solution of formaldehyde for a short time. Trypsin is altered by formaldehyde to such an extent that digestion of fibrin will not take place, or but very slowly. The extent to which trypsin is affected by formaldehyde depends largely upon the amount of organic matter present, as well as on the amount of ferment in the solution. Amylopsin is not destroyed by very dilute solutions of formaldehyde, but stronger solutions decrease the activity of the ferment, and if used in sufficient concentration will destroy it completely. Ptyalin, like the diastatic ferment of

  10. Concentrations in air of organobromine, organochlorine and organophosphate flame retardants in Toronto, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoeib, Mahiba; Ahrens, Lutz; Jantunen, Liisa; Harner, Tom

    2014-12-01

    Concentrations of organobromine (BFRs), organochlorine (CFRs) and organophosphate esters flame retardants and plasticizers (PFRs) in air were monitored for over one year at an urban site in Toronto, Canada during 2010-2011. The mean value for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) (gas + particle phase) was 38 pg/m3 with BDE-47 and BDE-99 as the dominant congeners. The mean concentrations in air for ∑non-BDE (BFRs and CFRs), was 9.6 pg/m3 - about four times lower than the BDEs. The brominated FRs: TBP-AE, BTBPE, EH-TBB, BEH-TEBP and the chlorinated syn- and anti-DP were detected frequently, ranging from 87% to 96%. Highest concentrations in air among all flame retardant classes were observed for the Σ-PFRs. The yearly mean concentration in air for ΣPFRs was 2643 pg/m3 with detection frequency higher than 80%. Except for TBP-AE and b- DBE-DBCH, non-BDEs (BFRs, CFRs and PFRs) were mainly associated with the particle phase. BDE concentrations in air were positively correlated with temperature indicating that volatilization from local sources was an important factor controlling levels in air. This correlation did not hold for most BFRs, CFRs and PFRs which were mainly on particles. For these compounds, air concentrations in Toronto are likely related to emissions from point sources and advective inputs. This study highlights the importance of urban air monitoring for FRs. Urban air can be considered a sentinel for detecting changes in the use and application of FRs in commercial products.

  11. Formaldehyde: a chemical of concern in the vicinity of MBT plants of municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Vilavert, Lolita; Figueras, María J; Schuhmacher, Marta; Nadal, Martí; Domingo, José L

    2014-08-01

    The mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) has a number of advantages in comparison to other MSW management possibilities. However, adverse health effects related to this practice are not well known yet, as a varied typology of microbiological and chemical agents may be generated and released. In 2010, we initiated an environmental monitoring program to control air levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and microbiological pollutants near an MBT plant in Montcada i Reixac (Catalonia, Spain). In order to assess any temporal and seasonal trends, four 6-monthly campaigns were performed. Important fluctuations were observed in the levels of different biological indicators (total and Gram-negative bacteria, fungi grown at 25 °C and 37 °C, and more specifically, Aspergillus fumigatus). Although overall bioaerosols concentrations were rather low, a certain increase in the mean values of bacteria and fungi was observed in summer. In contrast, higher concentrations of VOCs were found in winter, with the only exception of formaldehyde. Interestingly, although this compound was not detected in one of the sampling campaigns, current airborne levels of formaldehyde were higher than those previously reported in urban areas across Europe. Furthermore, the non-carcinogenic risks (Hazard Quotient), particularly in winter, as well as the cancer risks associated with the inhalation of VOCs, exceeded the threshold values (1 and 10(-5), respectively), reaffirming the need of continuing with the monitoring program, with special emphasis on formaldehyde, a carcinogenic/mutagenic substance.

  12. Effect of Key Parameters on the Photocatalytic Oxidation of Toluene at Low Concentrations in Air under 254 + 185 nm UV Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Quici, Natalia; Vera, Maria L.; Choi, Hyeok; Puma, Gianluca Li; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.; Litter, Marta I.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2009-07-01

    The effect of key experimental parameters on the removal of toluene under 254 + 185 nm irradiation was investigated using a benchtop photocatalytic flow reactor. Toluenewas introduced at low concentrations between 10 and 500 ppbv, typical of indoorenvironments, and reacted on TiO2-coated Raschig rings. Two different TiO2-coated rings were prepared: in one case, by dip-coating using a P25 aqueous suspension and, on the other, using an organic/inorganic sol-gel method that produced thin films of mesoporous anatase. Flow rates in the photoreactor varied between 4 L min-1 and 125 mL min-1, leading to residence times in the range 100 ms< tau< 2 s. For these conditions, toluene removal efficiencies were between 30 and 90percent, indicating that the system did not achieve total conversion in any case. For each air flow rate, the conversion oftoluene was significantly higher when the reactor length was 10 cm, as compared with 5 cm; however, only marginal increases in conversions were achieved in the two reactor lengths at equal residence time and different concentration of toluene, suggesting that that the reactor is effectively behaving as an ideal reactor and that the reaction is first-order in the concentration of toluene. Experiments were carried out between 0 and 66percent relative humidity (RH), the fastest reaction rate being observed at moderately low humidity conditions (10percent RH), with respect to both dry air and higher humidity levels. Formaldehyde was formed as a partial oxidation byproduct at low and at high residence times (240 and 960 ms), although higher formaldehyde molar yields (up to 20percent) were observed at low tau (240 ms) and moderate humidity conditions (10 and 33percent), suggesting that both tau and RH can be optimized toreduce the formation of harmful intermediates. Toluene removal efficiency increased with the TiO2 thickness (i.e., mass) until a maximum value of 500 nm, beyond which the removal efficiency decreased. This should be

  13. LIF measurements of oxygen concentration gradients along flat and wavy air-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Philip T., Jr.; Duke, Steve R.

    Instantaneous spatially-varying measurements of concentration gradients occurring during aeration for flat, stagnant air-water interfaces and for interfaces with mechanically-generated waves are presented. Measurements were obtained in a laboratory wave tank using a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique that images planar oxygen concentration fields near air-water interfaces. Pulsed nitrogen laser light focused to a thin sheet induces the fluorescence of pyrene butyric acid (in micromolar concentration) in deoxygenated water. The PBA fluorescence is quenched by dissolved oxygen. A high-resolution CCD camera images in two dimensions the intensities of the fluorescence field, providing spatial measurements of oxygen concentration with magnification of 7 μm per pixel. The concentration fields, gradients, and boundary layer thicknesses along the flat and wavy air-water interfaces are quantified and compared to previous measurements associated with sheared gas-liquid interfaces and with wind-generated waves.

  14. Trend and climate signals in seasonal air concentration of organochlorine pesticides over the Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Hong; Ma, Jianmin; Cao, Zuohao; Dove, Alice; Zhang, Lisheng

    2010-08-01

    Following worldwide bans or restrictions, the atmospheric level of many organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) over the Great Lakes exhibited a decreasing trend since the 1980s in various environmental compartments. Atmospheric conditions also influence variation and trend of OCPs. In the present study a nonparametric Mann-Kendall test with an additional process to remove the effect of temporal (serial) correlation was used to detect the temporal trend of OCPs in the atmosphere over the Great Lakes region and to examine the statistical significance of the trends. Using extended time series of measured air concentrations over the Great Lakes region from the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network, this study also revisits relationships between seasonal mean air concentration of OCPs and major climate variabilities in the Northern Hemisphere. To effectively extract climate signals from the temporal trend of air concentrations, we detrended air concentrations through removing their linear trend, which is driven largely by their respective half-lives in the atmosphere. The interannual variations of the extended time series show a good association with interannual climate variability, notably, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. This study demonstrates that the stronger climate signals can be extracted from the detrended time series of air concentrations of some legacy OCPs. The detrended concentration time series also help to interpret, in addition to the connection with interannual variation of the NAO, the links between atmospheric concentrations of OCPs and decadal or interdecadal climate change.

  15. An assessment of ozone concentrations within and near the Lake Tahoe Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolislager, Leon J.; VanCuren, Richard; Pederson, James R.; Lashgari, Ash; McCauley, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    The Lake Tahoe Atmospheric Deposition Study (LTADS) was conducted by the Air Resources Board of the State of California (CARB) primarily to generate refined estimates of the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen, phosphorous, and particulate matter directly to Lake Tahoe, which straddles the border between the states of California and Nevada near Reno, Nevada. The enhanced air quality monitoring during LTADS also included ozone measurements, which yielded additional insights into atmospheric processes and the role of transport in determining ozone concentrations within the Lake Tahoe Air Basin. The Lake Tahoe Air Basin is located generally downwind of air basins with major emissions of ozone precursors (e.g., VOCs, NOx), capable of generating significant ozone concentrations. Furthermore, vegetation on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada contribute biogenic organic compounds to the air mass. Ozone concentrations within the Tahoe Basin infrequently exceed the local 1-h threshold set to protect forest health (0.08 ppm) and the California 8-h ambient air quality standard (0.070 ppm). A concern then is the potential contribution of regional emission sources to the ozone concentrations observed in the Tahoe Basin. The ozone data collected during LTADS helped to better characterize the relative contribution of local and regional pollution sources to ozone air quality within the Tahoe Basin. The data indicate potential 1- or 2-day intact transport on rare occasions but generally the mixing of the atmosphere over the Sierra Nevada disperses the anthropogenic ozone throughout the boundary layer, which is generally more than a kilometer or two deep during the day. The data analysis indicates that emissions from upwind air basins add to the atmospheric burden of ozone concentrations, raising the regional concentrations in the Sierra Nevada. Given the large background and upwind enhancements relative to the ambient air quality standards, the local contribution does not need to

  16. A fluorescence bioassay to detect residual formaldehyde from clinical materials sterilized with low-temperature steam and formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Mariscal, Alberto; Carnero-Varo, Manuel; Gomez, Enrique; Fernandez-Crehuet, Joaquin

    2005-09-01

    A microtiter plate toxicity test based on fluorescence was developed to determine the residual concentration of formaldehyde on medical items after LTSF sterilization. The residual formaldehyde on eight common materials, some of which are used in different clinical instruments and devices were analysed after sterilization with LTSF. Formaldehyde residues were detected on cotton, filter paper, natural rubber, PVC, and silicone-coated latex, but not on polyurethane, silicone or glass. Formaldehyde never exceeded the recommended maximum concentration on clinical devices of about 5 microg/cm2. The results were compared with those obtained by means of a chemical method, the correlation being good (R2=0.9396). The biological method proposed here is fast and can be automated, which means that it could be used as a screening method when there are doubts as to the accumulation of residues on clinical materials or instruments that are going to be sterilized with LTSF.

  17. Modeling indoor air concentrations near emission sources in imperfectly mixed rooms.

    PubMed

    Furtaw, E J; Pandian, M D; Nelson, D R; Behar, J V

    1996-09-01

    Assessments of exposure to indoor air pollutants usually employ spatially well-mixed models which assume homogeneous concentrations throughout a building or room. However, practical experience and experimental data indicate that concentrations are not uniform in rooms containing point sources of emissions; concentrations tend to be greater in close proximity to the source than they are further from it. This phenomenon could account for the observation that "personal air" monitors frequently yield higher concentrations than nearby microenvironmental monitors (i.e., the so-called "personal cloud" effect). In this project, we systematically studied the concentrations of a tracer gas at various distances from its emission source in a controlled-environment, room-size chamber under a variety of ventilation conditions. Measured concentrations in the proximity of the source deviated significantly above the predictions of a conventional well-mixed single-compartment mass balance model. The deviation was found to be a function of distance from the source and total room air flow rate. At typical air flow rates, the average concentration at arm's length (approximately 0.4 meters) from the source exceeds the theoretical well-mixed concentration by a ratio of about 2:1. However, this ratio is not constant; the monitored concentration appears to vary randomly from near the theoretical value to several times above it. Concentration data were fitted to a two-compartment model with the source located in a small virtual compartment within the room compartment. These two compartments were linked with a stochastic air transfer rate parameter. The resulting model provides a more realistic simulation of exposure concentrations than does the well-mixed model for assessing exposure to emissions from active sources. Parameter values are presented for using the enhanced model in a variety of typical situations. PMID:8925388

  18. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... concentration (DAC) values given in appendices A and C of this part shall be used in the control of occupational... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209 Section 835.209 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Standards for Internal...

  19. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... concentration (DAC) values given in appendices A and C of this part shall be used in the control of occupational... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209 Section 835.209 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Standards for Internal...

  20. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... concentration (DAC) values given in appendices A and C of this part shall be used in the control of occupational... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209 Section 835.209 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Standards for Internal...

  1. 10 CFR 835.209 - Concentrations of radioactive material in air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... concentration (DAC) values given in appendices A and C of this part shall be used in the control of occupational... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Concentrations of radioactive material in air. 835.209 Section 835.209 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Standards for Internal...

  2. COMPARISON OF MOLD CONCENTRATIONS IN INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR SAMPLED SIMULTANEOUSLY AND THEN QUANTIFIED BY MSQPCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mold specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) was used to measure the concentrations of the 36 mold species in indoor and outdoor air samples that were taken simultaneously for 48 hours in and around 17 homes in Cincinnati, Ohio. The total spore concentrations of 353 per m3...

  3. Developing a Reference Material for Diffusion-Controlled Formaldehyde Emissions Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emissions of formaldehyde from building materials can contaminate indoor air and create significant risks to human health. The need to control formaldehyde emissions from indoor materials is made more urgent by the prevailing drive to improve building energy by decreasing ventil...

  4. CHARACTERIZATION AND REDUCTION OF FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS FROM A LOW-VOC LATEX PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the measurment and analysis of the patterns of formaldehyde emission from a low volatile organic compound (VOC) latex paint applied to gypsum board, using small environmental chamber tests. The formaldehyde emissions resulted in sharp increase of chamber air...

  5. CHARACTERIZATION AND REDUCTION OF FORMALDEHYDE EMISSIONS FROM A LOW-VOC LATEX PAINT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patterns of formaldehyde emission from a low volatile organic compound (VOC) latex paint applied to gypsum board were measured and analyzed by small environmental chamber tests. It was found that the formaldehyde emissions resulted in sharp increase of chamber air formaldehy...

  6. Levels, sources, and health risks of carbonyls in residential indoor air in Hangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Weng, Mili; Zhu, Lizhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Shuguang

    2010-04-01

    Concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, propionaldehyde, i-pentanal, and butyraldehyde in residential indoor air in Hangzhou were determined. The mean concentration of the total carbonyl compounds in summer was 222.6 microg/m(3), higher than that in winter (68.5 microg/m(3)). The concentration of a specific carbonyl in indoor air was higher than the outdoor air measurement, indicating the release of carbonyls from the indoor sources. Formaldehyde and acetone were the most abundant carbonyls detected in summer and winter, respectively. Multiple regression analysis indicated that carbonyl concentrations in residential indoor air depended on the age of decoration and furniture, as well as their concentrations in outdoor air. In addition, a primary estimation showed that the health risks of carbonyls in summer were higher than those in winter.

  7. High Resolution Formaldehyde Photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernest, C. T.; Bauer, D.; Hynes, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant and most important organic carbonyl compound in the atmosphere. The sources of formaldehyde are the oxidation of methane, isoprene, acetone, and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs); fossil fuel combustion; and biomass burning. The dominant loss mechanism for formaldehyde is photolysis which occurs via two pathways: (R1) HCHO + hv → HCO + H (R2) HCHO + hv → H2 + CO The first pathway (R1) is referred to as the radical channel, while the second pathway (R2) is referred to as the molecular channel. The products of both pathways play a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. The CO that is produced in the molecular channel undergoes further oxidation to produce CO2. Under atmospheric conditions, the H atom and formyl radical that are produced in the radical channel undergo rapid reactions with O2 to produce the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) via (R3) and (R4). (R3) HCO + O2 → HO2 + CO (R4) H + O2 → HO2 Thus, for every photon absorbed, the photolysis of formaldehyde can contribute one CO2 molecule to the global greenhouse budget or two HO2 radicals to the tropospheric HOx (OH + HO2) cycle. The HO2 radicals produced during formaldehyde photolysis have also been implicated in the formation of photochemical smog. The HO2 radicals act as radical chain carriers and convert NO to NO2, which ultimately results in the catalytic production of O3. Constraining the yield of HO2 produced via HCHO photolysis is essential for improving tropospheric chemistry models. In this study, both the absorption cross section and the quantum yield of the radical channel (R1) were measured at high resolution over the tropospherically relevant wavelength range 304-330 nm. For the cross section measurements a narrow linewidth Nd:YAG pumped dye laser was used with a multi-pass cell. Partial pressures of HCHO were kept below 0.3 torr. Simultaneous measurement of OH LIF in a flame allowed absolute calibration of the wavelength scale. Pressure

  8. Inactivation kinetics of formaldehyde on N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Ni; Bai, Ding-Ping; Lin, Xin-Yu; Chen, Qing-Xi; Huang, Xiao-Hong; Huang, Yi-Fan

    2014-04-01

    Formaldehyde is a widely used sanitizer in aquaculture in China, while the appropriate concentration is not available to be used effectively and without damage to tilapia much less to its reproductive function. N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52, NAGase), hydrolyzing the oligomers of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosamine into monomer, is proved to be correlated with reproduction of male animals. In this paper, NAGase from spermary of tilapia was chosen as the material to study the effects of formaldehyde on its activity in order to further investigate the effects of formaldehyde use on tilapia reproduction. The results showed the relationship between the residual enzyme activity and the concentration of formaldehyde was concentration dependent, and the IC50 value was estimated to be 3.2 ± 0.1 %. Appropriate concentration of formaldehyde leaded to competitive reversible inhibition on tilapia NAGase. Moreover, formaldehyde could reduce the thermal and pH stability of the enzyme. The inactivation kinetics of formaldehyde on the enzyme was studied using the kinetic method of substrate reaction. The inactivation model was setup, and the rate constants were determined. The results showed that the inactivation of formaldehyde on tilapia NAGase was a slow, reversible reaction with partially residual activity. The results will give some basis to determine the concentration of formaldehyde used in tilapia culture.

  9. Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries--Part II: Gaseous pollutants' assessment.

    PubMed

    Branco, P T B S; Nunes, R A O; Alvim-Ferraz, M C M; Martins, F G; Sousa, S I V

    2015-10-01

    This study, Part II of the larger study "Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries", aimed to: (i) evaluate nursery schools' indoor concentrations of several air pollutants in class and lunch rooms; and (ii) analyse them according to guidelines and references. Indoor continuous measurements were performed, and outdoor concentrations were obtained to determine indoor/outdoor ratios. The influence of outdoor air seemed to be determinant on carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) indoor concentrations. The peak concentrations of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOC) registered (highest concentrations of 204 and 2320 µg m(-3) respectively), indicated the presence of specific indoor sources of these pollutants, namely materials emitting formaldehyde and products emitting VOC associated to cleaning and children's specific activities (like paints and glues). For formaldehyde, baseline constant concentrations along the day were also found in some of the studied rooms, which enhances the importance of detailing the study of children's short and long-term exposure to this indoor air pollutant. While CO, NO2 and O3 never exceeded the national and international reference values for IAQ and health protection, exceedances were found for formaldehyde and VOC. For this reason, a health risk assessment approach could be interesting for future research to assess children's health risks of exposure to formaldehyde and to VOC concentrations in nursery schools. Changing cleaning schedules and materials emitting formaldehyde, and more efficient ventilation while using products emitting VOC, with the correct amount and distribution of fresh air, would decrease children's exposure. PMID:26342590

  10. Variations of 210Pb concentrations in surface air at Thessaloniki, Greece (40°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, A.; Kotsopoulou, E.; Karanatsiou, A.; Papastefanou, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of 210Pb were measured over the year 2009 in ground level air at Thessaloniki, Northern Greece (40°62' N, 22°95'E). The mean activity concentrations of 210Pb in surface air have been found to be 671 ± 213 μBq m-3. The highest values of monthly atmospheric concentrations of 210Pb were observed in the autumn and the lowest in the spring period. The higher values of 210Pb during autumn were attributed to frequent inversion conditions of the surface layers, resulting in an enrichment of radon and its decay products in surface air. The lower values during the winter months might be due to the low emanation of radon from the frozen or snow-covered soil. The minima of 210Pb concentrations during spring might reflect on higher washout during this period, which results in less emanation of radon from saturated with water soil, resulting in less production of 210Pb near ground-level air. The relative high values during summer are probably due to the higher 222Rn exhalation from the ground and due to the higher air mixing within the troposphere, which has as a result to carry down to the surface layer 210Pb whose origin is older air masses which entered into the free troposphere.

  11. Effects of formaldehyde on mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zerin, Tamanna; Kim, Jin-Sun; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Song, Ho-Yeon; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2015-12-01

    Methanol ingestion is neurotoxic in humans due to its metabolites, formaldehyde and formic acid. Here, we compared the cytotoxicity of methanol and its metabolites on different types of cells. While methanol and formic acid did not affect the viability of the cells, formaldehyde (200-800 μg/mL) was strongly cytotoxic in all cell types tested. We investigated the effects of formaldehyde on oxidative stress, mitochondrial respiratory functions, and apoptosis on the sensitive neuronal SK-N-SH cells. Oxidative stress was induced after 2 h of formaldehyde exposure. Formaldehyde at a concentration of 400 μg/mL for 12 h of treatment greatly reduced cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels. Confocal microscopy indicated that the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was dose-dependently reduced by formaldehyde. A marked and dose-dependent inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, viz., NADH dehydrogenase (complex I), cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), and oxidative stress-sensitive aconitase was also detected following treatment with formaldehyde. Furthermore, formaldehyde caused a concentration-dependent increase in nuclear fragmentation and in the activities of the apoptosis-initiator caspase-9 and apoptosis-effector caspase-3/-7, indicating apoptosis progression. Our data suggests that formaldehyde exerts strong cytotoxicity, at least in part, by inducing oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and eventually apoptosis. Changes in mitochondrial respiratory function and oxidative stress by formaldehyde may therefore be critical in methanol-induced toxicity.

  12. Kinetic analysis of photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase formaldehyde over titanium dioxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongmin; Lian, Zhiwei; Ye, Xiaojiang; Shangguan, Wenfeng

    2005-07-01

    Degradation of formaldehyde with different initial concentration over titanium dioxide was carried out in a photocatalytic reactor. Photocatalytic rates were well described by the simplified Langmuir-Hinshelwood model. The kinetic analysis shows that the apparent first-order reaction coefficient is lower and half-life of photocatalysis is longer for low concentration than for high concentration formaldehyde. A network formation model of the photocatalytic products was established. Experimental results and analysis demonstrate that carbon dioxide concentration and carbon monoxide concentration in gas phase vary exponentially with the illumination time and may be even higher than gas-phase formaldehyde concentration if there is much pre-adsorbed formaldehyde in adsorption equilibrium on catalysts before illumination. Carbon monoxide is found to be one of the by-products during formaldehyde photooxidation.

  13. Historical Occupational Trichloroethylene Air Concentrations Based on Inspection Measurements From Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Melissa C.; Locke, Sarah J.; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Coble, Joseph B.; Stewart, Patricia A.; Ji, Bu-Tian; Bassig, Bryan; Lu, Wei; Xue, Shouzheng; Chow, Wong-Ho; Lan, Qing; Purdue, Mark P.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a carcinogen that has been linked to kidney cancer and possibly other cancer sites including non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Its use in China has increased since the early 1990s with China’s growing metal, electronic, and telecommunications industries. We examined historical occupational TCE air concentration patterns in a database of TCE inspection measurements collected in Shanghai, China to identify temporal trends and broad contrasts among occupations and industries. Methods: Using a database of 932 short-term, area TCE air inspection measurements collected in Shanghai worksites from 1968 through 2000 (median year 1986), we developed mixed-effects models to evaluate job-, industry-, and time-specific TCE air concentrations. Results: Models of TCE air concentrations from Shanghai work sites predicted that exposures decreased 5–10% per year between 1968 and 2000. Measurements collected near launderers and dry cleaners had the highest predicted geometric means (GM for 1986 = 150–190mg m−3). The majority (53%) of the measurements were collected in metal treatment jobs. In a model restricted to measurements in metal treatment jobs, predicted GMs for 1986 varied 35-fold across industries, from 11mg m−3 in ‘other metal products/repair’ industries to 390mg m–3 in ‘ships/aircrafts’ industries. Conclusions: TCE workplace air concentrations appeared to have dropped over time in Shanghai, China between 1968 and 2000. Understanding differences in TCE concentrations across time, occupations, and industries may assist future epidemiologic studies in China. PMID:25180291

  14. Indoor air polychlorinated biphenyl concentrations in three communities along the Upper Hudson River, New York.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Lloyd R; Palmer, Patrick M; Belanger, Erin E; Cayo, Michael R; Durocher, Lorie A; Hwang, Syni-An A; Fitzgerald, Edward F

    2011-10-01

    Indoor air polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations were measured in upstate New York as part of a nonoccupational exposure investigation. The adjacent study communities contain numerous sites of current and former PCB contamination, including two capacitor-manufacturing facilities. Indoor air PCB concentrations in the study area homes were not significantly different than in the comparison area homes. Total PCB concentrations in the study area homes ranged from 0.3 to 114.3 ng/m(3) (median 7.9). For the comparison area homes, concentrations ranged from 0.3 to 233.3 ng/m(3) (median 6.8). No correlations were found between PCB concentrations in indoor and outdoor air, with indoor concentrations generally 20 times higher than outdoor concentrations. Of the home characteristics cataloged, the presence of fluorescent lights was significantly associated with total PCB concentration in the study area only. The indoor PCB concentrations measured in this study are similar to those in other communities with known PCB-contaminated sites and similar to levels reported in other locations from the northeastern United States. PMID:21136249

  15. Successful reduction of morticians' exposure to formaldehyde during embalming procedures.

    PubMed

    Hiipakka, D W; Dyrdahl, K S; Garcia Cardenas, M

    2001-01-01

    A case study of the effectiveness of upgraded ventilation engineering controls in a military mortuary facility was performed. Worst-case mortician formaldehyde exposures generated during the use of highly concentrated embalming fluid (required to meet a 2-week preservation standard for overseas case processing and return of the deceased to the continental United States) were documented. A detailed exposure evaluation via consecutive short-term exposure limit (STEL) samples facilitated characterization of the hazard potential for each distinct phase of the embalming process. After baseline screening with 3M passive formaldehyde dosimeters, a total of 145 personal and area STEL sorbent tube samples were collected during six embalming cases between 1994 and 1998. Prior to the installation of local exhaust ventilation controls, personal time-weighted average (TWA) exposure values during embalming activities were 3.19-7.69 ppm for a mean of 4.80 ppm (calculated 8-hour TWA exposures for mortician workshifts were 1.32-2.86 ppm, mean 1.93 ppm). Initial STEL exposures ranged from a low of 0.14 during preembalming body preparation to 20.89 ppm during aspiration of arterial fluids (mean = 4.16 ppm). Embalming room general area samples revealed a mean concentration of 0.76 ppm. With ventilation upgrades installed in 1997, calculated personal 8-hour TWA exposure values during embalming procedures were reduced. STEL exposures decreased to between 0.11 to 3.44 ppm (mean of 0.55 ppm); embalming room general area sample concentrations decreased to a mean of 0.089 ppm. Because occasional 15-min peak exposures continued to exceed the 2.0 ppm Occupational Safety and Health Administration STEL during tasks involving large volumes of embalming fluid or direct contact with paraformaldehyde preservative powders, general room ventilation was further upgraded to 25 room air changes per hour.

  16. Air-vegetation exchange of SOCs as a control of atmospheric concentrations and residence times

    SciTech Connect

    Hornbuckle, K.C.; Eisenreich, S.J.

    1994-12-31

    Semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) such as the polychlorinated biphenyls exhibit seasonal maxima in atmospheric concentrations with highest values in the warm summer. This generally believed to result from the effect of temperature on SOC vapor pressure with direct and important implications to global transport. The authors have conducted a series of field experiments whereby air samples were collected above an ombrotrophic, forested bog in northern MN at a frequency of 6 day{sup {minus}1} during the fall, winter, spring and summer. Samples of Sphagnum moss and other vegetation were also collected on each occasion. All samples were analyzed for PCBs, low MW PAHs, gaseous hydrocarbons and selected pesticides. Meteorological and soils data were collected during all experiments (air and soil temperature, wind direction and velocity, RH). Diurnal concentration data, air-plant and air-soil partition coefficients and probable mechanisms and kinetics of SOC-plant interactions will be presented.

  17. Residual formaldehyde after low-temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, G. L.; Johnston, H. P.; Turkington, V. E.

    1968-01-01

    The levels of formaldehyde remaining in various articles have been estimated immediately after a low-temperature steam and formaldehyde sterilizing process and after various periods of aeration. These levels have been compared with the levels of ethylene oxide remaining after exposure to an ethylene oxide sterilizing process. In rubber and polythene and a plastic, formaldehyde levels are low and slowly fall even further. Ethylene oxide levels are relatively much higher even after seven days' aeration. It is not considered that the residual levels of formaldehyde in rubber, polythene, and a plastic should constitute a danger. Residual levels of formaldehyde in fabrics and paper are higher but this may be of value by giving a self-disinfecting action on storage. PMID:5717551

  18. A Modeling Investigation of Human Exposure to Select Traffic-Related Air Pollutants in the Tampa Area: Spatiotemporal Distributions of Concentrations, Social Distributions of Exposures, and Impacts of Urban Design on Both

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haofei

    , on air quality, pollution exposure, and exposure inequality were explored. Major findings include slightly higher pollutant emissions, with the exception of hydrocarbons, due to the managed lane project. Results also show that ambient concentration contributions from on-road mobile sources are disproportionate to their emissions. Additionally, processes not captured by the CALPUFF model, such as atmospheric formation, contribute substantially to ambient concentration levels of the secondary pollutants such as acetaldehyde and formaldehyde. Exposure inequalities for NOx, 1,3-butadiene, and benzene air pollution were found for black, Hispanic, and low income (annual household income less than $20,000) subgroups at both short-term and long-term temporal scales, which is consistent with previous findings. Exposure disparities among the subgroups are complex, and sometimes reversed for acetaldehyde and formaldehyde, due primarily to their distinct concentration distributions. Compact urban form was found to result in lower average NOx and benzene concentrations, but higher exposure for all pollutants except for NOx when compared to sprawl urban form. Evidence suggests that exposure inequalities differ between sprawl and compact urban forms, and also differ by pollutants, but are generally consistent at both short and long-term temporal scales. In addition, vehicle fleet electrification was found to result in generally lower average pollutant concentrations and exposures, except for NOx. However, the elimination of on-road mobile source emissions does not substantially reduce exposure inequality. Results and findings from this work can be applied to assist transportation infrastructure and urban planning. In addition, method developed here can be applied elsewhere for better characterization of air pollution concentrations, exposure and related inequalities.

  19. Modeling the Concentrations of On-Road Air Pollutants in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lianfa; Wu, Jun; Hudda, Neelakshi; Sioutas, Constantinos; Fruin, Scott A.; Delfino, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    High concentrations of air pollutants on roadways, relative to ambient concentrations, contribute significantly to total personal exposure. Estimation of these exposures requires measurements or prediction of roadway concentrations. Our study develops, compares and evaluates linear regression and non-linear generalized additive models (GAMs) to estimate on-road concentrations of four key air pollutants, particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PB-PAH), particle number count (PNC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate matter with diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) using traffic, meteorology, and elevation variables. Critical predictors included wind speed and direction for all the pollutants, traffic-related variables for PB-PAH, PNC, and NOx, and air temperatures and relative humidity for PM2.5. GAMs explained 50%, 55%, 46%, and 71% of the variance for log or square-root transformed concentrations of PB-PAH, PNC, NOx, and PM2.5 respectively, an improvement of 5 to over 15% over the linear models. Accounting for temporal autocorrelation in the GAMs further improved the prediction, explaining 57-89% of the variance. We concluded that traffic and meteorological data are good predictors in estimating on-road traffic-related air pollutant concentrations and GAMs perform better for non-linear variables, such as meteorological parameters. PMID:23859442

  20. Health risks from indoor formaldehyde exposures in northwest weatherized residences

    SciTech Connect

    Mellinger, P.J.; Sever, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    Conflicting opinions on the potential hazards associated with formaldehyde exposure triggered a national workshop to address the toxicological questions concerning the health effects of formaldehyde. Since quantitative human data are not available to derive a dose-response curve for formaldehyde risk assessment, nonhuman data are used. In the case of formaldehyde, data from animals exposed to high concentrations are used to estimate human risk at much lower concentrations. This study presents the several steps that make up a risk assessment and examines any additional data that might alter significantly the risk estimates presented in the 1984 EIS. Rat inhalation chronic bioassay data from a study sponsored by the Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology (CIIT) have been used to develop a risk equation that was subsequently used by BPA in its EIS. The CIIT data base remains the only acceptable animal data that can support the estimation of a dose-response curve. The development of mathematical models continues with a great deal of energy, and the use of different models is largely responsible for the great variability of the formaldehyde risk estimates. While one can calculate different values for carcinogenic risk associated with formaldehyde exposure than were presented earlier in the BPA EIS, they are not likely to be any better.

  1. Respiratory morbidity induced by occupational inhalation exposure to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Neghab, Masoud; Soltanzadeh, Ahmad; Choobineh, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    The potential of formaldehyde to produce chronic respiratory tract disease remains a controversial issue. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the respiratory effects, if any, of long term occupational exposure to formaldehyde. This cross-sectional study was carried out at a local melamine-formaldehyde resin producing plant. The study population consisted of seventy exposed and 24 non-exposed (referent) employees. Using respiratory questionnaire, data on respiratory symptoms were gathered. Atmospheric concentrations of formaldehyde were measured at different contaminated areas of the plant. Similarly, the parameters of pulmonary function were measured at the beginning (preshift) and at the end (postshift) of the first working day of the week. The results showed that airborne concentrations of formaldehyde exceeded current permissible levels. Additionally, significant decrements in some preshift and postshift parameters of pulmonary function of exposed workers were noted. However, a relative recovery in lung functional capacity observed following temporary cessation of exposure (preshift values). Furthermore, exposed workers had higher prevalence rates of regular cough, wheezing, phlegm, shortness of breath, chest tightness and episodes of chest illness associated with cold. The findings of this study collectively indicate that exposure to formaldehyde may induce respiratory symptoms, acute partially reversible and chronic irreversible functional impairments of the lungs.

  2. Effects of the Deregulation on the Concentration of the Brazilian Air Transportation Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guterres, Marcelo Xavier; Muller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses the effects of the deregulation of the Brazilian air transportation industry in terms of the concentration of the market. We will show some metrics that are commonly used to study the concentration of the industry. This paper uses the Herfindhal- Hirschman Index. This index tends to zero in the competitive scenario, with a large number of small firms, and to one in case of a monopolistic scenario. The paper analyses the dynamics of the concentration of the Brazilian domestic air transportation market, in order to evaluate the effects of deregulation. We conclude that the Brazilian market presents oligopoly characteristics and aspects in its current structure that maintain the market concentrated in spite of the Deregulation measures adopted by the aeronautical authority. Keywords: Herfindhal-Hirschman Index, concentration, Deregulation

  3. Effect of outside air ventilation rate on VOC concentrations and emissions in a call center

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Faulkner, D.; Sullivan, D.P.; DiBartolomeo, D.L.; Russell, M.L.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of VOCs generated indoors was conducted in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated in the building's four air handling units (AHUs). Concentrations of VOCs in the AHU returns were measured on 7 days during a 13-week period. Indoor minus outdoor concentrations and emission factors were calculated. The emission factor data was subjected to principal component analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds based on source type. One vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. Another vector identified occupant sources. Direct relationships between ventilation rate and concentrations were not observed for most of the abundant VOCs. This result emphasizes the importance of source control measures for limiting VOC concentrations in buildings.

  4. Influence of indoor air conditions on radon concentration in a detached house.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Keramatollah; Mahmoudi, Jafar; Ghanbari, Mahdi

    2013-02-01

    Radon is released from soil and building materials and can accumulate in residential buildings. Breathing radon and radon progeny for extended periods hazardous to health and can lead to lung cancer. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence indoor radon concentrations. This paper focuses on effects of air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity on indoor radon concentrations in a one family detached house in Stockholm, Sweden. In this study a heat recovery ventilation system unit was used to control the ventilation rate and a continuous radon monitor (CRM) was used to measure radon levels. FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package was used to simulate radon entry into the building and air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity effects using a numerical approach. The results from analytical solution, measurements and numerical simulations showed that air change rate, indoor temperature and moisture had significant effects on indoor radon concentration. Increasing air change rate reduces radon level and for a specific air change rate (in this work Ach = 0.5) there was a range of temperature and relative humidity that minimized radon levels. In this case study minimum radon levels were obtained at temperatures between 20 and 22 °C and a relative humidity of 50-60%.

  5. Influence of indoor air conditions on radon concentration in a detached house.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Keramatollah; Mahmoudi, Jafar; Ghanbari, Mahdi

    2013-02-01

    Radon is released from soil and building materials and can accumulate in residential buildings. Breathing radon and radon progeny for extended periods hazardous to health and can lead to lung cancer. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence indoor radon concentrations. This paper focuses on effects of air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity on indoor radon concentrations in a one family detached house in Stockholm, Sweden. In this study a heat recovery ventilation system unit was used to control the ventilation rate and a continuous radon monitor (CRM) was used to measure radon levels. FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package was used to simulate radon entry into the building and air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity effects using a numerical approach. The results from analytical solution, measurements and numerical simulations showed that air change rate, indoor temperature and moisture had significant effects on indoor radon concentration. Increasing air change rate reduces radon level and for a specific air change rate (in this work Ach = 0.5) there was a range of temperature and relative humidity that minimized radon levels. In this case study minimum radon levels were obtained at temperatures between 20 and 22 °C and a relative humidity of 50-60%. PMID:23159846

  6. The effects of forced air flow and oxygen concentration on flammability, smoke density, and pyrolytic toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauers, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    The question is posed whether forced air flow should be incorporated into flammability tests as a relevant variable. A test apparatus is described which permits tests to be conducted on small test specimens in a forced flow which is (continuously) variable over flow velocities from zero to 300 feet per minute (1.52 m/s). The effects of air-flow rate and oxygen concentration on flame propagation rate, maximum smoke density, and pyrolytic product toxicity were measured for a single material and were statistically evaluated. Regression analysis was used to graph the resulting relationships. It is concluded that air velocity is an important variable for laboratory flammability testing.

  7. Preliminary assessment of BTEX concentrations in indoor air of residential buildings and atmospheric ambient air in Ardabil, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazrati, Sadegh; Rostami, Roohollah; Farjaminezhad, Manoochehr; Fazlzadeh, Mehdi

    2016-05-01

    BTEX concentrations in indoor and outdoor air of 50 homes were studied in Ardabil city and their influencing parameters including; heating system, using gas stove and samovar, tobacco smoking, the floors in which the monitored homes were located, and kitchen plan were considered in the study. Risk assessment analysis was carried out with the obtained concentrations based on EPA IRIS reference doses. BTEX compounds were sampled by charcoal tubes and the samples were analyzed by a GC-FID. Concentrations of benzene (15.18 μg/m3 vs. 8.65 μg/m3), toluene (69.70 μg/m3 vs. 40.56 μg/m3), ethylbenzene (12.07 μg/m3 vs. 4.92 μg/m3) and xylene (48.08 μg/m3 vs. 7.44 μg/m3) in indoor air were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than the levels quantified for outdoor air. The obtained concentrations of benzene were considerably higher than the recommended value of 5 μg/m3 established by Iran environmental protection organization. Among the BTEX compounds, benzene (HQ = 0.51) and xylene (HQ = 0.47) had notable hazard quotient and were the main pollutants responsible for high hazard index in the monitored homes (HI = 1.003). The results showed considerably high cancer risk for lifetime exposure to the indoor (125 × 10-6) and outdoor (71 × 10-6) benzene. Indoor benzene concentrations in homes were significantly influenced by type of heating system, story, and natural gas appliances.

  8. Passive flux sampler for measurement of formaldehyde emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Fujii, Minoru; Yamasaki, Akihiro; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    A new passive flux sampler (PFS) was developed to measure emission rates of formaldehyde and to determine emission sources in indoor environments. The sampler consisted of a glass Petri dish containing a 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine (DNPH)-impregnated sheet. At the start of sampling, the PFS was placed with the open face of the dish on each of the indoor materials under investigation, such as flooring, walls, doors, closets, desks, beds, etc. Formaldehyde emitted from a source material diffused through the inside of the PFS and was adsorbed onto the DNPH sheet. The formaldehyde emission rates could be determined from the quantities adsorbed. The lower determination limits were 9.2 and 2.3 μg m -2 h -1 for 2- and 8-h sampling periods. The recovery rate and the precision of the PFS were 82.9% and 8.26%, respectively. The emission rates measured by PFS were in good agreement with the emission rates measured by the chamber method ( R2=0.963). This shows that it is possible to take measurements of the formaldehyde emission rates from sources in a room and to compare them. In addition, the sampler can be used to elucidate the emission characteristics of a source by carrying out emission measurements with different air-layer thicknesses inside the PFS and at different temperatures. The dependency of the emission rate on the thickness of the air layer inside the PFS indicated whether the internal mass transfer inside the source material or the diffusion in the gas-phase boundary layer controlled the formaldehyde emission rate from a material. In addition, as a pilot study, the formaldehyde emission rates were measured, and the largest emission source of formaldehyde could be identified from among several suspected materials in a model house by using the PFS.

  9. Determination of Formaldehyde in Cigarette Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jon W.; Ngim, Kenley K.; Eiserich, Jason P.; Yeo, Helen C. H.; Shibamoto, Takayuki; Mabury, Scott A.

    1997-09-01

    Formaldehdye is considered a hazardous air pollutant with numerous sources that include environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). With the increasing interest regarding ETS and public health the measurement of formaldehyde readily lends itself to a laboratory experiment comparing methods of analysis. This experiment involves the collection, derivatization, extraction, and analysis of formaldehyde from cigarette smoke using two methods. Formaldehyde is extracted from smoke and derivitized with a solution of 2,4-DNPH with subsequent cleanup by solid-phase extraction and analysis of the hydrazone by HPLC with UV detection; additionally a solution of cysteamine yields the corresponding thiazolidine derivative that is liquid/liquid extracted and subsequently analyzed by either GC with NPD or FPD (sulfur mode). Reasonable agreement among the methods was obtained by lab demonstrators with spike recoveries yielding 94.7 + 6.8 (n=5) and 89.2 (n = 4) % for NPD and FPD, respectively while HPLC spiked recoveries were 83.6 + 3.2 (n = 5) %; mean class spike recoveries ranged from 80-100%. Student results (in mg/cigarette) from smoke samples were similar to literature values with 163.2 + 69.2 (n = 7) and 149.4 (n = 7) % for NPD and FPD, respectively; the HPLC result was significantly lower at 45.1 + 23.7(n = 7) with losses presumably due to hydrazone precipitating from the smoke extracted solution. Students particularly benefited from the "real world" nature of the analysis and the experience evaluating disparate methods of determining a common analyte.

  10. Determination of particulate-bound formaldehyde from burning incense by solid phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Liou, S W; Chen, C Y; Yang, T T; Lin, J M

    2008-04-01

    This work studied the feasibility of using a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber for sampling and analysis of gaseous formaldehyde as well as particulate-bound formaldehyde from burning Chinese incense. The SPME fiber with PDMS/DVB coating were partially coated with o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)-hydroxylamine hydrochloride (PFBHA), and used for sampling formaldehyde. The sampling rate for formaldehyde and its dependence on temperature, relative humidity and sampling time were observed. The same PFBHA treated fibers were, in parallel, exposed to incense burning smoke with pre-filtration and without pre- filtration for 0.5-1 min. The NIOSH method 2541 using an XAD-2 tube at a flow rate of 0.1 Lpm was also applied for sampling simultaneously. The results demonstrate that commercially available PDMS/DVB fibers partially coated with PFBHA are capable of sampling the gas phase of formaldehyde as well as particulate-bound formaldehyde. The determined level of formaldehyde was close to the result obtained by the NIOSH method 2541. However, a reduction of the fiber's formaldehyde loading capacity in the aerosol sampling in comparison with gas sampling was noticed. This indicates that the particulate characteristics, and their bound chemicals other than formaldehyde may influence the maximum loading capacity of formaldehyde, and some characteristic particulates in high concentrations may even deteriorate the fiber coating.

  11. [Estimation of average traffic emission factor based on synchronized incremental traffic flow and air pollutant concentration].

    PubMed

    Li, Run-Kui; Zhao, Tong; Li, Zhi-Peng; Ding, Wen-Jun; Cui, Xiao-Yong; Xu, Qun; Song, Xian-Feng

    2014-04-01

    On-road vehicle emissions have become the main source of urban air pollution and attracted broad attentions. Vehicle emission factor is a basic parameter to reflect the status of vehicle emissions, but the measured emission factor is difficult to obtain, and the simulated emission factor is not localized in China. Based on the synchronized increments of traffic flow and concentration of air pollutants in the morning rush hour period, while meteorological condition and background air pollution concentration retain relatively stable, the relationship between the increase of traffic and the increase of air pollution concentration close to a road is established. Infinite line source Gaussian dispersion model was transformed for the inversion of average vehicle emission factors. A case study was conducted on a main road in Beijing. Traffic flow, meteorological data and carbon monoxide (CO) concentration were collected to estimate average vehicle emission factors of CO. The results were compared with simulated emission factors of COPERT4 model. Results showed that the average emission factors estimated by the proposed approach and COPERT4 in August were 2.0 g x km(-1) and 1.2 g x km(-1), respectively, and in December were 5.5 g x km(-1) and 5.2 g x km(-1), respectively. The emission factors from the proposed approach and COPERT4 showed close values and similar seasonal trends. The proposed method for average emission factor estimation eliminates the disturbance of background concentrations and potentially provides real-time access to vehicle fleet emission factors.

  12. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration fields near air bubble surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sabita; Duke, Steve R.

    2000-09-01

    This article describes a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for measuring dissolved oxygen concentration gradients in water near the surface of an air bubble. Air bubbles are created at the tip of a needle in a rectangular bubble column filled with water that contains pyrenebutyric acid (PBA). The fluorescence of the PBA is induced by a planar pulse of nitrogen laser light. Oxygen transferring from the air bubble to the deoxygenated water quenches the fluorescence of the PBA. Images of the instantaneous and two-dimensional fluorescence field are obtained by a UV-intensified charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. Quenching of fluorescence intensity is determined at each pixel in the CCD image to measure dissolved oxygen concentration. Two-dimensional concentration fields are presented for a series of measurements of oxygen transfer from 1.6 mm bubbles suspended on the tip of a needle in a quiescent fluid. The images show the spatially varying concentration profiles, gradients, and boundary layer thicknesses at positions around the bubble surfaces. These direct and local measurements of concentration behavior within the mass transfer boundary layer show the potential of this LIF technique for the development of general and mechanistic models for oxygen transport across the air-water interface.

  13. [Concentrations and influencing factors of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in residential air in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhi-cheng; Chang, Biao; Qiu, Wei-xun; Wang, Yi; Wu, Shi-min; Xing, Bao-shan; Liu, Wen-xin; Tao, Shu

    2007-09-01

    7 gas phase PAHs components in indoor air collected from 38 families were investigated by modified passive air samplers in Beijing areas during the local heating and non-heating seasons, and the influencing factors were discussed as well. The analytical results indicate that the gasous PAHs in local indoor air are dominated by 2 and 3 rings compounds, the mean concentrations for the 7 individual gaseous components range from 1 to 40 ng/m3, and the average concentration of total gaseous PAHs is about 100 ng/m3. There is no significant difference in total gaseous PAHs concentrations between the heating and the non-heating seasons, while some apparent seasonal changes occur in ACY and FLA concentrations. Compared with heating season, contribution of 2 rings compounds decreases while the proportions of 3 and 4 rings species increase during the non-heating season. Based on household activity questionnaires and actual analytical concentrations, the main influencing factors accounted for gaseous PAHs in indoor air, identified by multifactor analysis of variance, include cigarette smoking, use of moth ball, intensity of draft, cuisine frequency and built age.

  14. Comparison of mold concentrations quantified by MSQPCR in indoor and outdoor air sampled simultaneously

    SciTech Connect

    Meklin, Teija; Reponen, Tina; McKinstry, Craig A.; Cho, Seung H.; Grinshpun, Sergey A.; Nevalainen, Aino; Vepsalainen, Asko; Haugland, Richard A.; Lemasters, Grace; Vesper, Sephen J.

    2007-08-15

    Mold specific quantitative PCR (MSQPCR) was used to measure the concentrations of 36 mold species in dust and in indoor and in outdoor air samples that were taken simultaneously in 17 homes in Cincinnati with no-known water damage. The total spore concentrations in the indoor (I) and outdoor (O) air samples were statistically significantly different and the concentrations in the three sample types of many of the individual species were significantly different (p < 0.05 based on the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test). The I/O ratios of the averages or geometric means of the individual species were generally less than 1; but these I/O ratios were quite variable ranging from 0.03 for A. sydowii to 1.2 for Acremonium strictum. There were no significant correlations for the 36 specific mold concentrations between the dust samples and the indoor or outdoor air samples (based on the Spearman’s Rho test). The indoor and outdoor air concentrations of 32 of the species were not correlated. Only Aspergillus penicillioides, C. cladosporioides types 1 and 2 and C. herbarum had sufficient data to estimate a correlation at rho > 0.5 with signicance (p < 0.05) In six of these homes, a previous dust sample had been collected and analyzed 2 years earlier. The ERMI© values for the dust samples taken in the same home two years apart were not significantly different (p=0.22) based on Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test.

  15. Human performance during experimental formaldehyde exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, B.; Pedersen, O.F.; Moelhave, L. )

    1990-01-01

    Sixty-one subjects were exposed in a climate chamber for 5.5 hours to a controlled atmospheric environment. Formaldehyde vapors were added in concentrations of 0, 0.15, 0.40, or 1.20 mg/m{sup 3}. The exposures were arranged in a 4 x 4, balanced latin square design, involving four days in each of four weeks. The subjects were all males. Of these 32 had occupational exposure to formaldehyde in industrial productions of than five years. Twenty-nine were randomly selected, matched controls from the normal population. The hypothesis tested was that significant, but different dose-response relations exist in a number of performance tests for these two groups of subjects. The results indicate such differences in reactions to tests of short term memory and ability to concentrate (digit span tests, digit symbol test, graphic continuous performance test) and an addition test. Whether these results indicate chronic or acute CNS effects or they are caused by distractive sensory irritation due to formaldehyde exposure is discussed.

  16. Houseplants, Indoor Air Pollutants, and Allergic Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.

    1986-01-01

    The technology of using houseplant leaves for reducing volatile organics inside closed facilities has been demonstrated with formaldehyde and benzene. Philodendrons are among the most effective plants tested to date. Philodendron domesticum had demonstrated the ability to remove formaldehyde from small experimental chambers at a rate of 4.31 micro-g/sq cm leaf surface area with initial starting concentrations of 22 ppm. At initial starting concentrations of 2.3 ppm a formaldehyde removal rate of 0.57 micro-g/sq cm was achieved during a 24 hour test. Aleo vera demonstrated a much higher formaldehyde efficiency removal rate than Philodendron domesticum at low formaldehyde concentrations. During a 24 hour exposure period 5 ppm of formaldehyde were reduced to 0.5 ppm demonstrating a removal efficiency rate of 3.27 micro-g/sq cm. Removal efficiency rates can be expected to decrease with concentration levels because fewer molecules of chemicals come in contact with the leaf surface area. Several centimeters of small washed gravel should be used to cover the surface of pot plants when large numbers of plants are kept in the home. The reason for this is to reduce the exposed area of damp potting soil which encourages the growth of molds (fungi). The leaves of Philodendron domesticum and golden pothos (Scindapsus aureus) have also demonstrated their ability to remove benzene and carbon monoxide from closed chambers. A combination of activated carbon and plant roots have demonstrated the greatest potential for removing large volumes of volatile organics along with smoke and possible radon from closed systems. Although fewer plants are required for this concept a mechanical blower motor must be used to pull or push the air through the carbon-root filter. NASA studies on motor sizes and bioregeneration rates should be completed by 1988.

  17. Monitor of the concentration of particles of dense radioactive materials in a stream of air

    DOEpatents

    Yule, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    A monitor of the concentration of particles of radioactive materials such as plutonium oxide in diameters as small as 1/2 micron includes in combination a first stage comprising a plurality of virtual impactors, a second stage comprising a further plurality of virtual impactors, a collector for concentrating particulate material, a radiation detector disposed near the collector to respond to radiation from collected material and means for moving a stream of air, possibly containing particulate contaminants, through the apparatus.

  18. Application of hybrid coagulation microfiltration with air backflushing to direct sewage concentration for organic matter recovery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhengyu; Gong, Hui; Wang, Kaijun

    2015-01-01

    The idea of sewage concentration is gradually being accepted as a promising and sustainable way of wastewater resource recovery. In this study, Hybrid coagulation microfiltration (HCM) with air backflushing (AB) was investigated to effectively concentrate organic matter. Compared to direct sewage microfiltration, the addition of coagulation process improved the filtration performance with less fouling trends and better concentration efficiency. The use of AB exhibited even better performance within the same 7-h preliminary concentration period by reducing to one tenth of the resistance and collecting around four times as much organic matter into the product concentrate as in direct sewage microfiltration. During 93-h lab-scale continuous concentration by HCM with AB, a product concentrate with the COD concentration over 15,000 mg/L was achieved and around 70% of total influent organic matter could be recovered. Compared to Direct Membrane Filtration (DMF) with Chemically Enhanced Backwash (CEB), HCM with AB achieved better concentration efficiency with higher concentration extent and concentration velocity along with less organic matter mineralization and the more concentrated product despite with lower organic matter retention. HCM with AB could be a promising effective sewage organic matter concentration for resource recovery under optimization.

  19. A Comparison of Statistical Techniques for Combining Modeled and Observed Concentrations to Create High-Resolution Ozone Air Quality Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality surfaces representing pollutant concentrations across space and time are needed for many applications, including tracking trends and relating air quality to human and ecosystem health. The spatial and temporal characteristics of these surfaces may reveal new informat...

  20. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

  1. Effect of geocoding errors on traffic-related air pollutant exposure and concentration estimates

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to traffic-related air pollutants is highest very near roads, and thus exposure estimates are sensitive to positional errors. This study evaluates positional and PM2.5 concentration errors that result from the use of automated geocoding methods and from linearized approx...

  2. Performance of the Proposed New Federal Reference Methods for Measuring Ozone Concentrations in Ambient Air

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current Federal Reference Method (FRM) for measuring concentrations of ozone in ambient air, described in EPA regulations at 40 CFR Part 50, Appendix D, is based on the dry, gas-phase, chemiluminescence reaction between ethylene (C2H4) and any ozone (O

  3. Modeling and Impacts of Traffic Emissions on Air Toxics Concentrations near Roadways

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dispersion formulation incorporated in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s AERMOD regulatory dispersion model is used to estimate the contribution of traffic-generated emissions of select VOCs – benzene, 1,3-butadiene, toluene – to ambient air concentrations at downwin...

  4. Evaluation and Comparison of Chemiluminescence and UV Photometric Methods for Measuring Ozone Concentrations in Ambient Air

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current Federal Reference Method (FRM) for measuring concentrations of ozone in ambient air is based on the dry, gas-phase, chemiluminescence reaction between ethylene (C2H4) and any ozone (O3) that may be p...

  5. Ozone concentrations and damage for realistic future European climate and air quality scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriks, Carlijn; Forsell, Nicklas; Kiesewetter, Gregor; Schaap, Martijn; Schöpp, Wolfgang

    2016-11-01

    Ground level ozone poses a significant threat to human health from air pollution in the European Union. While anthropogenic emissions of precursor substances (NOx, NMVOC, CH4) are regulated by EU air quality legislation and will decrease further in the future, the emissions of biogenic NMVOC (mainly isoprene) may increase significantly in the coming decades if short-rotation coppice plantations are expanded strongly to meet the increased biofuel demand resulting from the EU decarbonisation targets. This study investigates the competing effects of anticipated trends in land use change, anthropogenic ozone precursor emissions and climate change on European ground level ozone concentrations and related health and environmental impacts until 2050. The work is based on a consistent set of energy consumption scenarios that underlie current EU climate and air quality policy proposals: a current legislation case, and an ambitious decarbonisation case. The Greenhouse Gas-Air Pollution Interactions and Synergies (GAINS) integrated assessment model was used to calculate air pollutant emissions for these scenarios, while land use change because of bioenergy demand was calculated by the Global Biosphere Model (GLOBIOM). These datasets were fed into the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS to calculate the impact on ground level ozone concentrations. Health damage because of high ground level ozone concentrations is projected to decline significantly towards 2030 and 2050 under current climate conditions for both energy scenarios. Damage to plants is also expected to decrease but to a smaller extent. The projected change in anthropogenic ozone precursor emissions is found to have a larger impact on ozone damage than land use change. The increasing effect of a warming climate (+2-5 °C across Europe in summer) on ozone concentrations and associated health damage, however, might be higher than the reduction achieved by cutting back European ozone precursor emissions. Global

  6. Respiratory response to formaldehyde and off-gas of urea formaldehyde foam insulation.

    PubMed Central

    Day, J H; Lees, R E; Clark, R H; Pattee, P L

    1984-01-01

    In 18 subjects, 9 of whom had previously complained of various nonrespiratory adverse effects from the urea formaldehyde foam insulation (UFFI) in their homes, pulmonary function was assessed before and after exposure in a laboratory. On separate occasions formaldehyde, 1 part per million (ppm), and UFFI off-gas yielding a formaldehyde concentration of 1.2 ppm, were delivered to each subject in an environmental chamber for 90 minutes and a fume hood for 30 minutes respectively. None of the measures of pulmonary function used (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second or maximal midexpiratory flow rate) showed any clinically or statistically significant response to the exposure either immediately after or 8 hours after its beginning. There were no statistically significant differences between the responses of the group that had previously complained of adverse effects and of the group that had not. There was no evidence that either formaldehyde or UFFI off-gas operates as a lower airway allergen or important bronchospastic irritant in this heterogeneous population. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6388780

  7. Field Derived Emission Factors For Formaldehyde and other Volatile Organic Compounds in FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    Sixteen previously occupied temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess emissions of volatile organic compounds. The whole trailer emission factors wereevaluated for 36 VOCs including formaldehyde. Indoor sampling was carried out in the THUs located in Purvis staging yard in Mississippi, USA. Indoor temperature andrelative humidity (RH) were also measured in all the trailers during sampling. Indoor temperatures were varied (increased or decreased) in a selection of THUs using theheating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Indoor temperatures during sampling ranged from 14o C to 33o C, and relative humidity (RH) varied between 35percentand 74percent. Ventilation rates were increased in some trailers using bathroom fans and vents during some of the sampling events. Ventilation rates measured during some aselection of sampling events varied from 0.14 to 4.3 h-1. Steady state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 10 mu g-m-3 to 1000 mu g-m-3. The formaldehyde concentrations in the trailers were of toxicological significance. The effects of temperature, humidity and ventilation rates were also studied. A linearregression model was built using log of percentage relative humidity, inverse of temperature (in K-1), and inverse log ACH as continuous independent variables, trailermanufacturer as a categorical independent variable, and log of the chemical emission factors as the dependent variable. The coefficients of inverse temperature, log relativehumidity, log inverse ACH with log emission factor were found to be statistically significant for all the samples at the 95percent confidence level. The regression model wasfound to explain about 84percent of the variation in the dependent variable. Most VOC concentrations measured indoors in the Purvis THUs were mostly found to be belowvalues reported in earlier studies by Maddalena et al.,1,2 Hodgson et al.,3 and Hippelein4. Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found

  8. Formaldehyde impairs transepithelial sodium transport

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yong; Li, Huiming; Wu, Sihui; Zhao, Runzhen; Du, Deyi; Ding, Yan; Nie, Hongguang; Ji, Hong-Long

    2016-01-01

    Unsaturated oxidative formaldehyde is a noxious aldehyde in cigarette smoke that causes edematous acute lung injury. However, the mechanistic effects of formaldehyde on lung fluid transport are still poorly understood. We examined how formaldehyde regulates human epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in H441 and expressed in Xenopus oocytes and exposed mice in vivo. Our results showed that formaldehyde reduced mouse transalveolar fluid clearance in vivo. Formaldehyde caused a dose-dependent inhibition of amiloride-sensitive short-circuit Na+ currents in H441 monolayers and of αβγ-ENaC channel activity in oocytes. α-ENaC protein was reduced, whereas phosphorylation of the extracellular regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) increased significantly post exposure. Moreover, both α- and γ-ENaC transcripts were down-regulated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was elevated significantly by formaldehyde in addition to markedly augmented membrane permeability of oocytes. These data suggest that formaldehyde contributes to edematous acute lung injury by reducing transalveolar Na+ transport, through decreased ENaC activity and enhanced membrane depolarization, and by elevating ROS production over long-term exposure. PMID:27762337

  9. Autism spectrum disorder prevalence and associations with air concentrations of lead, mercury, and arsenic.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Aisha S; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Bakian, Amanda V; Bilder, Deborah A; Harrington, Rebecca A; Pettygrove, Sydney; Kirby, Russell S; Durkin, Maureen S; Han, Inkyu; Moyé, Lemuel A; Pearson, Deborah A; Wingate, Martha Slay; Zahorodny, Walter M

    2016-07-01

    Lead, mercury, and arsenic are neurotoxicants with known effects on neurodevelopment. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder apparent by early childhood. Using data on 4486 children with ASD residing in 2489 census tracts in five sites of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network, we used multi-level negative binomial models to investigate if ambient lead, mercury, and arsenic concentrations, as measured by the US Environmental Protection Agency National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (EPA-NATA), were associated with ASD prevalence. In unadjusted analyses, ambient metal concentrations were negatively associated with ASD prevalence. After adjusting for confounding factors, tracts with air concentrations of lead in the highest quartile had significantly higher ASD prevalence than tracts with lead concentrations in the lowest quartile (prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.36; 95 '% CI: 1.18, 1.57). In addition, tracts with mercury concentrations above the 75th percentile (>1.7 ng/m(3)) and arsenic concentrations below the 75th percentile (≤0.13 ng/m(3)) had a significantly higher ASD prevalence (adjusted RR = 1.20; 95 % CI: 1.03, 1.40) compared to tracts with arsenic, lead, and mercury concentrations below the 75th percentile. Our results suggest a possible association between ambient lead concentrations and ASD prevalence and demonstrate that exposure to multiple metals may have synergistic effects on ASD prevalence.

  10. Total internal reflection-based planar waveguide solar concentrator with symmetric air prisms as couplers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Peng; Lin, Huichuan; Liu, Yong; Li, Baojun

    2014-10-20

    We present a waveguide coupling approach for planar waveguide solar concentrator. In this approach, total internal reflection (TIR)-based symmetric air prisms are used as couplers to increase the coupler reflectivity and to maximize the optical efficiency. The proposed concentrator consists of a line focusing cylindrical lens array over a planar waveguide. The TIR-based couplers are located at the focal line of each lens to couple the focused sunlight into the waveguide. The optical system was modeled and simulated with a commercial ray tracing software (Zemax). Results show that the system used with optimized TIR-based couplers can achieve 70% optical efficiency at 50 × geometrical concentration ratio, resulting in a flux concentration ratio of 35 without additional secondary concentrator. An acceptance angle of ± 7.5° is achieved in the x-z plane due to the use of cylindrical lens array as the primary concentrator.

  11. Deposition and air concentrations of permethrin and naled used for adult mosquito management.

    PubMed

    Schleier, Jerome J; Peterson, Robert K D

    2010-01-01

    One of the most effective ways of managing adult mosquitoes that vector human and animal pathogens is the use of ultra-low-volume (ULV) insecticides. Because of the lack of environmental fate studies and concerns about the safety of the insecticides used for the management of adult mosquitoes, we conducted an environmental fate study after truck-mounted applications of permethrin and naled. One hour after application, concentrations of permethrin on cotton dosimeters placed at ground level 25, 50, and 75 m from the spray source were 2, 4, and 1 ng/cm2 in 2007 and 5, 2, and 0.9 ng/cm2 in 2008, respectively. One hour after application, concentrations of naled 25, 50, and 75 m were 47, 66, and 67 ng/cm2 in 2007 and 15, 6.1, and 0 (nondetectable) ng/cm2 in 2008, respectively. Deposition concentrations 12 h after application were not significantly different than 1 h after application for permethrin and naled either year. During 2007 and 2008 permethrin applications, two quantifiable air concentrations of 375 and 397 ng/m3 were observed 1 h after application. In 2007 and 2008, naled air concentrations ranged from 2300 to 4000 ng/m3 1 h after application. There were no quantifiable air concentrations between 1 and 12 h after application in either 2007 or 2008 for both naled and permethrin. Environmental concentrations observed in this study demonstrate that models used in previous risk assessments were sufficiently conservative (i.e., the models overestimated environmental concentrations). However, we also demonstrate inadequacies of models such as AgDrift and AGDISP, which currently are used by the US Environmental Protection Agency to estimate environmental concentrations of ULV insecticides. PMID:19536586

  12. Soil air carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide concentrations in profiles under tallgrass prairie and cultivation

    SciTech Connect

    Sotomayor, D.; Rice, C.W.

    1999-05-01

    Assessing the dynamics of gaseous production in soils is of interest because they are important sources and sinks of greenhouse gases. Changes in soil air carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) concentrations were studied in a Reading silt loam under prairie and cultivation. Concentrations were measured in situ over a 17-mo period to a depth of 3 m. Multilevel samples permitted collection of gases with subsequent measurement by gas chromatography in the laboratory. Soil air N{sub 2}O concentrations were near atmospheric levels for a majority of the study period in the prairie site but were significantly higher in the cultivated site. Annual mean N{sub 2}O concentrations were 0.403 and 1.09 {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} in the prairie and cultivated sites, respectively. Soil air CO{sub 2} annual mean concentrations were 1.56 {times} 10{sup 4} and 1.10 {times} 10{sup 4} {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} and ranged from 0.096 {times} 10{sup 4} to 6.45 {times} 10{sup 4} {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} and 0.087 {times} 10{sup 4} to 3.59 {times} 10{sup 4} {micro}L L{sup {minus}1} in the prairie and cultivated sites, respectively. Concentrations generally increased with depth, with maximum soil air N{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations at 1.0 m in the prairie site and 0.5 m in the cultivated site. Nitrous oxide in the cultivated site and CO{sub 2} at both sites did not change markedly over winter months, but CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O concentrations reached maximums during the summer months and decreased as the year progressed. Although soil air concentrations peaked and decreased faster at shallower depths, deeper depths exhibited relative maximum concentrations for longer time periods.

  13. Ozone concentration in leaf intercellular air spaces is close to zero

    SciTech Connect

    Laisk, A.; Moldau, H. ); Kull, O. )

    1989-07-01

    Transpiration and ozone uptake rates were measured simultaneously in sunflower leaves at different stomatal openings and various ozone concentrations. Ozone uptake rates were proportional to the ozone concentration up to 1500 nanoliters per liter. The leaf gas phase diffusion resistance (stomatal plus boundary layer) to water vapor was calculated and converted to the resistance to ozone multiplying it by the theoretical ratio of diffusion coefficients for water vapor and ozone in air (1.67). The ozone concentration in intercellular air spaces calculated from the ozone uptake rate and diffusion resistance to ozone scattered around zero. The ozone concentration in intercellular air spaces was measured directly bu supplying ozone to the leaf from one side and measuring the equilibrium concentration above the other side, and it was found to be zero. The total leaf resistance to ozone was proportional to the gas phase resistance to water vapor with a coefficient of 1.68. It is concluded that ozone enters the leaf by diffusion through the stomata, and is rapidly decomposed in cell walls and plasmalemma.

  14. Ozone concentration in leaf intercellular air spaces is close to zero.

    PubMed

    Laisk, A; Kull, O; Moldau, H

    1989-07-01

    Transpiration and ozone uptake rates were measured simultaneously in sunflower leaves at different stomatal openings and various ozone concentrations. Ozone uptake rates were proportional to the ozone concentration up to 1500 nanoliters per liter. The leaf gas phase diffusion resistance (stomatal plus boundary layer) to water vapor was calculated and converted to the resistance to ozone multiplying it by the theoretical ratio of diffusion coefficients for water vapor and ozone in air (1.67). The ozone concentration in intercellular air spaces calculated from the ozone uptake rate and diffusion resistance to ozone scattered around zero. The ozone concentration in intercellular air spaces was measured directly by supplying ozone to the leaf from one side and measuring the equilibrium concentration above the other side, and it was found to be zero. The total leaf resistance to ozone was proportional to the gas phase resistance to water vapor with a coefficient of 1.68. It is concluded that ozone enters the leaf by diffusion through the stomata, and is rapidly decomposed in cell walls and plasmalemma.

  15. Sporostatic and Sporocidal Properties of Aqueous Formaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Ralph; David, Thomas J.

    1972-01-01

    Aqueous formaldehyde is shown to exert both sporostatic and sporocidal effects on Bacillus subtilis spores. The sporostatic effect is a result of the reversible inhibition of spore germination occasioned by aqueous formaldehyde; the sporocidal effect is due to temperature-dependent inactivation of these spores in aqueous formaldehyde. The physicochemical state of formaldehyde in solution provides a framework with which to interpret both the sporostatic and sporocidal properties of aqueous formaldehyde. PMID:4623282

  16. Study of a cave's air exchange pattern based on radon concentration and the time dependence of radon concentration in Pál-völgy Cave (Budapest, Hungary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, H. E.; Horvath, A.; Jordan, Gy.; Szabo, Cs.; Kiss, A.

    2012-04-01

    A long-term (one year and a half), high resolution, with an integration time of one hour, radon concentration monitoring was carried out in Pál-völgy Cave (Budapest, Hungary). Our major goal was to determine the time dependence of radon concentration in the cave and to understand the exchange pattern of the cave air with the outdoor air based on radon concentrations, and to determine the factors that affect the radon concentration in the cave air. Pál-völgy Cave is situated in the Buda Hills, which is the NE part of the Transdanubian Central Range. The wall rock of the cave is dominantly Eocene Szépvölgy Limestone Formation. Above the limestone Eocene Buda Marl and Oligocene Tard Clay are deposited. A huge multiphase hydrothermal cave system developed in the Szépvölgy Limestone and partially in the Buda Marl resulted in a long-term complex paleokarstic evolution from the Late Eocene to the Quaternary. The radon concentration in the cave air was measured continuously by an AlphaGuard radon monitor, and meteorological parameters outside the cave were also collected simultaneously. The arithmetic mean of the annual radon concentration was 1.9 kBq/m3 and the radon concentration varied between 104-7,776 Bq/m3. In addition, the results indicate a clear seasonal variability of radon concentration in the cave air: in winter the radon concentration fluctuates around a low mean value of 253 Bq/m3, in summer it oscillates around a high mean value of 5,504 Bq/m3, whereas in spring and autumn the radon level varies between the winter and summer values. The summer to winter radon concentration ratio (radon concentration in summer/radon concentration in winter) was high, 21.8. The outside air temperature showed the strongest correlation with the radon concentration in the cave, Pierson's linear correlation coefficient is 0.76. If the outdoor air temperature is lower than the cave air temperature (12 °C), especially in autumn and winter the air flows from outside into the

  17. Chlorinated paraffins in indoor air and dust: concentrations, congener patterns, and human exposure.

    PubMed

    Fridén, Ulrika E; McLachlan, Michael S; Berger, Urs

    2011-10-01

    Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are large production volume chemicals used in a wide variety of commercial applications. They are ubiquitous in the environment and humans. Human exposure via the indoor environment has, however, been barely investigated. In the present study 44 indoor air and six dust samples from apartments in Stockholm, Sweden, were analyzed for CPs, and indoor air concentrations are reported for the first time. The sumCP concentration (short chain CPs (SCCPs) and medium chain CPs (MCCPs)) in air ranged from <5-210 ng m(-3) as quantified by gas chromatography coupled to electron ionization tandem mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS/MS). Congener group patterns were studied using GC with electron capture negative ionization MS (GC/ECNI-MS). The air samples were dominated by the more volatile SCCPs compared to MCCPs. SumCPs were quantified by GC/EI-MS/MS in the dust samples at low μg g(-1) levels, with a chromatographic pattern suggesting the prevalence of longer chain CPs compared to air. The median exposure to sumCPs via the indoor environment was estimated to be ~1 μg day(-1) for both adults and toddlers. Adult exposure was dominated by inhalation, while dust ingestion was suggested to be more important for toddlers. Comparing these results to literature data on dietary intake indicates that human exposure to CPs from the indoor environment is not negligible. PMID:21612825

  18. Fungal spore concentrations in two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) units containing distinct air control systems.

    PubMed

    Brun, C P; Miron, D; Silla, L M R; Pasqualotto, A C

    2013-04-01

    Invasive fungal diseases have emerged as important causes of morbidity and mortality in haematological patients. In this study air samples were collected in two haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) units, in which distinct air-control systems were in place. In hospital 1 no high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter was available whereas in hospital 2 HSCT rooms were equipped with HEPA filters, with positive air pressure in relation to the corridor. A total of 117 samples from rooms, toilets and corridors were obtained during December 2009 to January 2011, using a six-stage Andersen sampler. In both hospitals, the concentration of potentially pathogenic fungi in the air was reduced in patients' rooms compared to corridors (P < 0·0001). Despite the presence of a HEPA filter in hospital 2, rooms in both hospitals showed similar concentrations of potentially pathogenic fungi (P = 0·714). These findings may be explained by the implementation of additional protective measures in hospital 1, emphasizing the importance of such measures in protected environments. PMID:22691688

  19. Investigation of air pollution concentration in Kathmandu valley during winter season.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Akir; Kaga, Akikazu; Imamura, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Yoshio; Sugisawa, Masahiko; Shrestha, Manohar Lal; Sapkota, Balkrishan

    2005-01-01

    The monthly concentrations of NO2, NOx, SO2 and O3 measured by a passive sampler from February 2003 to January 2004 showed that the air pollution during the winter season in Kathmandu valley was higher than the summer season. The O3 level was found the highest during April, May and June due to strong radiation. The hourly concentrations of NO2, NOx, O3 and suspended particulate matter (SPM) were also measured by automatic instruments on December 2003. Temperature at the height of 60 m and 400 m at Raniban Mountain in the northwest of Kathmandu valley was measured on February 2001 in the winter season and the average potential temperature gradient was estimated from observed temperature. Wind speed was also measured at the department of hydrology, airport section, from 18 February to 6 March 2001. It was found that the stable layer and the calm condition in the atmosphere strongly affected the appearance of the maximum concentrations of NO2 and SPM in the morning, and that the unstable layer and the windy condition in the atmosphere was considerably relevant to the decrease of air pollution concentrations at daytime. The emission amounts of NOx, HCs and total suspended particle(TSP) from transport sector in 2003 were estimated from the increasing rate of vehicles on the basis of the emission amounts in 1993 to be 3751 t/a, 30570 t/a and 1317 t/a, respectively. The diurnal concentrations in 2003 calculated by the two-layers box model reproduced the characteristics of air pollution in Kathmandu valley such as the maximum value of O3 and its time, the maximum value of NO in the morning, and the decrease of NO and NO2 at daytime. The comparison with the concentrations in 1993 calculated suggested that the main cause of air pollution was the emission from transport sector.

  20. Air concentrations of PBDEs on in-flight airplanes and assessment of flight crew inhalation exposure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joseph G; Sumner, Ann Louise; Nishioka, Marcia G; Vallarino, Jose; Turner, Douglas J; Saltman, Hannah K; Spengler, John D

    2013-07-01

    To address the knowledge gaps regarding inhalation exposure of flight crew to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) on airplanes, we measured PBDE concentrations in air samples collected in the cabin air at cruising altitudes and used Bayesian Decision Analysis (BDA) to evaluate the likelihood of inhalation exposure to result in the average daily dose (ADD) of a member of the flight crew to exceed EPA Reference Doses (RfDs), accounting for all other aircraft and non-aircraft exposures. A total of 59 air samples were collected from different aircraft and analyzed for four PBDE congeners-BDE 47, 99, 100 and 209 (a subset were also analyzed for BDE 183). For congeners with a published RfD, high estimates of ADD were calculated for all non-aircraft exposure pathways and non-inhalation exposure onboard aircraft; inhalation exposure limits were then derived based on the difference between the RfD and ADDs for all other exposure pathways. The 95th percentile measured concentrations of PBDEs in aircraft air were <1% of the derived inhalation exposure limits. Likelihood probabilities of 95th percentile exposure concentrations >1% of the defined exposure limit were zero for all congeners with published RfDs.

  1. Biomimetic air sampling for detection of low concentrations of molecules and bioagents : LDRD 52744 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Robert Clark

    2003-12-01

    Present methods of air sampling for low concentrations of chemicals like explosives and bioagents involve noisy and power hungry collectors with mechanical parts for moving large volumes of air. However there are biological systems that are capable of detecting very low concentrations of molecules with no mechanical moving parts. An example is the silkworm moth antenna which is a highly branched structure where each of 100 branches contains about 200 sensory 'hairs' which have dimensions of 2 microns wide by 100 microns long. The hairs contain about 3000 pores which is where the gas phase molecules enter the aqueous (lymph) phase for detection. Simulations of diffusion of molecules indicate that this 'forest' of hairs is 'designed' to maximize the extraction of the vapor phase molecules. Since typical molecules lose about 4 decades in diffusion constant upon entering the liquid phase, it is important to allow air diffusion to bring the molecule as close to the 'sensor' as possible. The moth acts on concentrations as low as 1000 molecules per cubic cm. (one part in 1e16). A 3-D collection system of these dimensions could be fabricated by micromachining techniques available at Sandia. This LDRD addresses the issues involved with extracting molecules from air onto micromachined structures and then delivering those molecules to microsensors for detection.

  2. Air conditioning impact on the dynamics of radon and its daughters concentration.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Krzysztof; Grządziel, Dominik; Połednik, Bernard; Mazur, Jadwiga; Dudzińska, Marzenna R; Mroczek, Mariusz

    2014-12-01

    Radon and its decay products are harmful pollutants present in indoor air and are responsible for the majority of the effective dose due to ionising radiation that people are naturally exposed to. The paper presents the results of the series of measurements of radon and its progeny (in unattached and attached fractions) as well as indoor air parameters: temperature, relative humidity, number and mass concentrations of fine aerosol particles. The measurements were carried out in the auditorium (lecture hall), which is an indoor air quality laboratory, in controlled conditions during two periods of time: when air conditioning (AC) was switched off (unoccupied auditorium) and when it was switched on (auditorium in normal use). The significant influence of AC and of students' presence on the dynamics of radon and its progeny was confirmed. A decrease in the mean value of radon and its attached progeny was found when AC was working. The mean value of radon equilibrium factor F was also lower when AC was working (0.49) than when it was off (0.61). The linear correlations were found between attached radon progeny concentration and particle number and mass concentration only when the AC was switched off. This research is being conducted with the aim to study the variability of radon equilibrium factor F which is essential to determine the effective dose due to radon and its progeny inhalation.

  3. Air concentrations of PBDEs on in-flight airplanes and assessment of flight crew inhalation exposure.

    PubMed

    Allen, Joseph G; Sumner, Ann Louise; Nishioka, Marcia G; Vallarino, Jose; Turner, Douglas J; Saltman, Hannah K; Spengler, John D

    2013-07-01

    To address the knowledge gaps regarding inhalation exposure of flight crew to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) on airplanes, we measured PBDE concentrations in air samples collected in the cabin air at cruising altitudes and used Bayesian Decision Analysis (BDA) to evaluate the likelihood of inhalation exposure to result in the average daily dose (ADD) of a member of the flight crew to exceed EPA Reference Doses (RfDs), accounting for all other aircraft and non-aircraft exposures. A total of 59 air samples were collected from different aircraft and analyzed for four PBDE congeners-BDE 47, 99, 100 and 209 (a subset were also analyzed for BDE 183). For congeners with a published RfD, high estimates of ADD were calculated for all non-aircraft exposure pathways and non-inhalation exposure onboard aircraft; inhalation exposure limits were then derived based on the difference between the RfD and ADDs for all other exposure pathways. The 95th percentile measured concentrations of PBDEs in aircraft air were <1% of the derived inhalation exposure limits. Likelihood probabilities of 95th percentile exposure concentrations >1% of the defined exposure limit were zero for all congeners with published RfDs. PMID:22739680

  4. Air conditioning impact on the dynamics of radon and its daughters concentration.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Krzysztof; Grządziel, Dominik; Połednik, Bernard; Mazur, Jadwiga; Dudzińska, Marzenna R; Mroczek, Mariusz

    2014-12-01

    Radon and its decay products are harmful pollutants present in indoor air and are responsible for the majority of the effective dose due to ionising radiation that people are naturally exposed to. The paper presents the results of the series of measurements of radon and its progeny (in unattached and attached fractions) as well as indoor air parameters: temperature, relative humidity, number and mass concentrations of fine aerosol particles. The measurements were carried out in the auditorium (lecture hall), which is an indoor air quality laboratory, in controlled conditions during two periods of time: when air conditioning (AC) was switched off (unoccupied auditorium) and when it was switched on (auditorium in normal use). The significant influence of AC and of students' presence on the dynamics of radon and its progeny was confirmed. A decrease in the mean value of radon and its attached progeny was found when AC was working. The mean value of radon equilibrium factor F was also lower when AC was working (0.49) than when it was off (0.61). The linear correlations were found between attached radon progeny concentration and particle number and mass concentration only when the AC was switched off. This research is being conducted with the aim to study the variability of radon equilibrium factor F which is essential to determine the effective dose due to radon and its progeny inhalation. PMID:24375376

  5. Building ventilation and indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Hollowell, C.D.; Berk, J.V.; Boegel, M.L.; Miksch, R.R.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Traynor, G.W.

    1980-01-01

    Rising energy prices, among other factors, have generated an incentive to reduce ventilation rates and thereby reduce the cost of heating and cooling buildings. Reduced infiltration and ventilation in buildings may significantly increase exposure to indoor contaminants and perhaps have adverse effects on occupant health and comfort. Four indoor air contaminants - carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide from gas appliances; formaldehyde from particleboard, plywood, urea-formaldehyde foam insulation, and gas appliances; and radon from building materials, soil, and ground water - are currently receiving considerable attention in the context of potential health risks associated with reduced infiltration and ventilation rates. These air contaminants in conventional and energy efficient buildings were measured and analyzed with a view to assessing their potential health risks and various control strategies capable of lowering pollutant concentrations. Preliminary findings suggest that further intensive studies are needed in order to develop criteria for maintaining acceptable indoor air quality without compromising energy efficiency.

  6. Measurements of benzene and formaldehyde in a medium sized urban environment. Indoor/outdoor health risk implications on special population groups.

    PubMed

    Pilidis, Georgios A; Karakitsios, Spyros P; Kassomenos, Pavlos A; Kazos, Elias A; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, the results of a measurement campaign aiming to assess cancer risk among two special groups of population: policemen and laboratory technicians exposed to the toxic substances, benzene and formaldehyde are presented. The exposure is compared to general population risk. The results show that policemen working outdoor (traffic regulation, patrol on foot or in vehicles, etc.) are exposed at a significantly higher benzene concentration (3-5 times) than the general population, while the exposure to carbonyls is in general lower. The laboratory technicians appear to be highly exposed to formaldehyde while no significant variation of benzene exposure in comparison to the general population is recorded. The assessment revealed that laboratory technicians and policemen run a 20% and 1% higher cancer risk respectively compared to the general population. Indoor working place air quality is more significant in assessing cancer risk in these two categories of professionals, due to the higher Inhalation Unit Risk (IUR) of formaldehyde compared to benzene. Since the origin of the danger to laboratory technicians is clear (use of chemicals necessary for the experiments), in policemen the presence of carbonyls in indoor air concentrations due to smoking or used materials constitute a danger equal to the exposure to traffic originated air pollutants. PMID:18386150

  7. Measurements of benzene and formaldehyde in a medium sized urban environment. Indoor/outdoor health risk implications on special population groups.

    PubMed

    Pilidis, Georgios A; Karakitsios, Spyros P; Kassomenos, Pavlos A; Kazos, Elias A; Stalikas, Constantine D

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, the results of a measurement campaign aiming to assess cancer risk among two special groups of population: policemen and laboratory technicians exposed to the toxic substances, benzene and formaldehyde are presented. The exposure is compared to general population risk. The results show that policemen working outdoor (traffic regulation, patrol on foot or in vehicles, etc.) are exposed at a significantly higher benzene concentration (3-5 times) than the general population, while the exposure to carbonyls is in general lower. The laboratory technicians appear to be highly exposed to formaldehyde while no significant variation of benzene exposure in comparison to the general population is recorded. The assessment revealed that laboratory technicians and policemen run a 20% and 1% higher cancer risk respectively compared to the general population. Indoor working place air quality is more significant in assessing cancer risk in these two categories of professionals, due to the higher Inhalation Unit Risk (IUR) of formaldehyde compared to benzene. Since the origin of the danger to laboratory technicians is clear (use of chemicals necessary for the experiments), in policemen the presence of carbonyls in indoor air concentrations due to smoking or used materials constitute a danger equal to the exposure to traffic originated air pollutants.

  8. The Impact of Future Emissions Changes on Air Pollution Concentrations and Related Human Health Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolajczyk, U.; Suppan, P.; Williams, M.

    2015-12-01

    Quantification of potential health benefits of reductions in air pollution on the local scale is becoming increasingly important. The aim of this study is to conduct health impact assessment (HIA) by utilizing regionally and spatially specific data in order to assess the influence of future emission scenarios on human health. In the first stage of this investigation, a modeling study was carried out using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with Chemistry to estimate ambient concentrations of air pollutants for the baseline year 2009, and for the future emission scenarios in southern Germany. Anthropogenic emissions for the baseline year 2009 are derived from the emission inventory provided by the Netherlands Organization of Applied Scientific Research (TNO) (Denier van der Gon et al., 2010). For Germany, the TNO emissions were replaced by gridded emission data with a high spatial resolution of 1/64 x 1/64 degrees. Future air quality simulations are carried out under different emission scenarios, which reflect possible energy and climate measures in year 2030. The model set-up included a nesting approach, where three domains with horizontal resolution of 18 km, 6 km and 2 km were defined. The simulation results for the baseline year 2009 are used to quantify present-day health burdens. Concentration-response functions (CRFs) for PM2.5 and NO2 from the WHO Health risks of air Pollution in Europe (HRAPIE) project were applied to population-weighted mean concentrations to estimate relative risks and hence to determine numbers of attributable deaths and associated life-years lost. In the next step, future health impacts of projected concentrations were calculated taking into account different emissions scenarios. The health benefits that we assume with air pollution reductions can be used to provide options for future policy decisions to protect public health.

  9. Detonation propagation in hydrogen-air mixtures with transverse concentration gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeck, L. R.; Berger, F. M.; Hasslberger, J.; Sattelmayer, T.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of transverse concentration gradients on detonation propagation in H_2-air mixtures is investigated experimentally in a wide parameter range. Detonation fronts are characterized by means of high-speed shadowgraphy, OH* imaging, pressure measurements, and soot foils. Steep concentration gradients at low average H_2 concentrations lead to single-headed detonations. A maximum velocity deficit compared to the Chapman-Jouguet velocity of 9 % is observed. Significant amounts of mixture seem to be consumed by turbulent deflagration behind the leading detonation. Wall pressure measurements show high local pressure peaks due to strong transverse waves caused by the concentration gradients. Higher average H_2 concentrations or weaker gradients allow for multi-headed detonation propagation.

  10. Concentrations and patterns of polychlorinated naphthalenes in urban air in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lingnan; Zhang, Lifei; Yan, Yan; Dong, Liang; Huang, Yeru; Li, Xiaoxiu

    2016-11-01

    Air samples were collected, using a high-volume air sampler, at an urban site in Beijing from April 2014 to March 2015. The polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) concentration in the atmosphere in each season was determined. The total PCN (total target tri- to octachloronaphthalene congeners) concentrations were 1.99-19.0 pg/m(3), and the mean was 7.20 pg/m(3). The PCN concentrations were higher in fall than summer, indicating that the concentrations varied significantly over time. The trichloronaphthalene homolog was the predominant PCN homolog in all four seasons. The PCN toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations were 0.42-6.89 fg/m(3), and the mean was 1.74 fg/m(3). The CN-66/67 and CN-73 congeners were the predominant contributors to the TEQ concentrations. The mean seasonal TEQ concentration decreased in the order fall (3.18 fg/m(3)) > winter (1.41 fg/m(3)) > summer (1.11 fg/m(3)) > spring (1.03 fg/m(3)). The TEQ concentrations and the PCN concentrations did not follow the same seasonal trends, but the highest TEQ and PCN concentrations were both found in fall. Correlation analysis, ratio analysis, and principal component analysis were used to investigate the sources of PCNs to the Beijing atmosphere. The results suggested that combustion processes may be the main sources of PCNs to the Beijing atmosphere.

  11. Concentrations and patterns of polychlorinated naphthalenes in urban air in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xue, Lingnan; Zhang, Lifei; Yan, Yan; Dong, Liang; Huang, Yeru; Li, Xiaoxiu

    2016-11-01

    Air samples were collected, using a high-volume air sampler, at an urban site in Beijing from April 2014 to March 2015. The polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) concentration in the atmosphere in each season was determined. The total PCN (total target tri- to octachloronaphthalene congeners) concentrations were 1.99-19.0 pg/m(3), and the mean was 7.20 pg/m(3). The PCN concentrations were higher in fall than summer, indicating that the concentrations varied significantly over time. The trichloronaphthalene homolog was the predominant PCN homolog in all four seasons. The PCN toxic equivalent (TEQ) concentrations were 0.42-6.89 fg/m(3), and the mean was 1.74 fg/m(3). The CN-66/67 and CN-73 congeners were the predominant contributors to the TEQ concentrations. The mean seasonal TEQ concentration decreased in the order fall (3.18 fg/m(3)) > winter (1.41 fg/m(3)) > summer (1.11 fg/m(3)) > spring (1.03 fg/m(3)). The TEQ concentrations and the PCN concentrations did not follow the same seasonal trends, but the highest TEQ and PCN concentrations were both found in fall. Correlation analysis, ratio analysis, and principal component analysis were used to investigate the sources of PCNs to the Beijing atmosphere. The results suggested that combustion processes may be the main sources of PCNs to the Beijing atmosphere. PMID:27497350

  12. Seasonal change of persistent organic pollutant concentrations in air at Niigata area, Japan.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Hitoshi; Takase, Yuuya; Mitobe, Hideko; Mukai, Hiroyuki; Ohzeki, Toshiharu; Shimizu, Ken-ichi; Kitayama, Yoshie

    2003-07-01

    The concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), such as HCB, alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-HCH, trans- and cis-chlordane (t-CHL, c-CHL), DDE, DDD and DDT, in ambient air have been measured at five sampling points in Niigata area, Japan (Niigata, Maki, Tsubame, Jouzo and Yahiko) during the period from September 1999 to November 2001. HCB, alpha-HCH, t-CHL and c-CHL showed higher concentrations than the other chemicals in all locations. All the POPs except t-CHL and c-CHL collected at urban sites of the Niigata Plain was almost the same in their concentration levels. Higher concentrations of t-CHL and c-CHL in residential areas should be attributed to the past usage of the chemical as a termiticide. At Yahiko (remote site), most of the POPs showed lower concentrations than those measured at the other sampling sites, although alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH were comparable with the concentrations found at the other sampling sites. All POPs except alpha-HCH and gamma-HCH tend to decrease 41-80% in their concentrations from 2000 to 2001. The lower POPs concentrations in winter and the higher POPs concentrations in summer at every sampling point can be partly explained by temperature differences. Applying the equation of the logarithm of the POP partial pressure in air versus reciprocal temperature (lnPa=m/T+b) to our data, linear relations were observed. HCB gave a poor linearity and the smallest slope, while beta-HCH, t-CHL and c-CHL gave good linearities and large slopes in the equation. The results suggest that HCB level is influenced by not only the emission from terrestrial sources but the global-scale background pollution. A peculiar observation is that beta-HCH concentration measured in our study showed large temperature dependence, indicating there could be a source of contamination in the surrounding areas. PMID:12738282

  13. Assessment of regional air quality by a concentration-dependent Pollution Permeation Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chun-Sheng; Liu, Huan; He, Ke-Bin; Ma, Yong-Liang

    2016-10-01

    Although air quality monitoring networks have been greatly improved, interpreting their expanding data in both simple and efficient ways remains challenging. Therefore, needed are new analytical methods. We developed such a method based on the comparison of pollutant concentrations between target and circum areas (circum comparison for short), and tested its applications by assessing the air pollution in Jing-Jin-Ji, Yangtze River Delta, Pearl River Delta and Cheng-Yu, China during 2015. We found the circum comparison can instantly judge whether a city is a pollution permeation donor or a pollution permeation receptor by a Pollution Permeation Index (PPI). Furthermore, a PPI-related estimated concentration (original concentration plus halved average concentration difference) can be used to identify some overestimations and underestimations. Besides, it can help explain pollution process (e.g., Beijing’s PM2.5 maybe largely promoted by non-local SO2) though not aiming at it. Moreover, it is applicable to any region, easy-to-handle, and able to boost more new analytical methods. These advantages, despite its disadvantages in considering the whole process jointly influenced by complex physical and chemical factors, demonstrate that the PPI based circum comparison can be efficiently used in assessing air pollution by yielding instructive results, without the absolute need for complex operations.

  14. BTEX in indoor air of waterpipe cafés: Levels and factors influencing their concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hazrati, Sadegh; Rostami, Roohollah; Fazlzadeh, Mehdi

    2015-08-15

    BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) concentrations, factors affecting their levels, and the exposure risks related to these compounds were studied in waterpipe (Ghalyun/Hookah) cafés of Ardabil city in Islamic Republic of Iran. 81 waterpipe cafés from different districts of Ardabil city were selected and their ambient air was monitored for BTEX compounds. Air samples were taken from standing breathing zone of employees, ~150 cm above the ground level, and were analyzed using GC-FID. In each case, the types of smoked tobacco (regular, fruit flavored), types of ventilation systems (natural/artificial), and the floor level at which the café was located were investigated. A high mean concentration of 4.96±2.63 mg/m(3) corresponding to long term exposure to benzene-related cancer risk of 4314×10(-6) was estimated. The levels of the remaining compounds were lower than the national guideline limits, but their hazard quotients (HQ) for long term exposure to ethylbenzene (1.15) and xylene (17.32) exceeded the HQ unit value. Total hazard indices (HI) of 63.23 were obtained for non-cancer risks. Type of the smoked tobacco was the most important factor influencing BTEX concentrations in the cafés. BTEX concentrations in indoor ambient air of Ardabil waterpipe cafés were noticeably high, and therefore may pose important risks for human health on both short and long term exposures. PMID:25912530

  15. Quantile regression of indoor air concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOC).

    PubMed

    Schlink, Uwe; Thiem, Alexander; Kohajda, Tibor; Richter, Matthias; Strebel, Kathrin

    2010-08-15

    There are many factors determining the concentration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air. On the basis of 601 population-based measurements we develop an explicit exposure model that includes factors, such as renovation, furniture, flat size, smoking, and education level of the occupants. As a novel method for the evaluation of concentrations of indoor air pollutants we use quantile regression, which has the advantages of robustness against non-Gaussian distributions (and outliers) and can adjust for unbalanced frequencies of observations. The applied bi- and multivariate quantile regressions provide (1) the VOC burden that is representative for the population of Leipzig, Germany, and (2) an inter-comparison of the effects of the studied factors and their levels. As a result, we find strong evidence for factors of general impact on most VOC components, such as the season, flooring, the type of the room, and the size of the apartment. Other impact factors are very specific to the VOC components. For example, wooden flooring (parquet) and new furniture increase the concentration of terpenes as well as the modifying factors high education and sampling in the child's room. Smokers ventilate their flats in an extent that in general reduces the VOC concentrations, except for benzene (contained in tobacco smoke), which is still higher in smoking than in non-smoking flats. Very often dampness is associated with an increased VOC burden in indoor air. An investigation of mixtures emphasises a high burden of co-occurring terpenes in very small and very large apartments.

  16. Volatile organic compound concentrations in ambient air of Kaohsiung petroleum refinery in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tsai-Yin; Sree, Usha; Tseng, Sen-Hong; Chiu, Kong Hwa; Wu, Chien-Hou; Lo, Jiunn-Guang

    The air quality assessment for volatile organic compounds (VOC) was conducted in and around Chinese petroleum corporation (CPC) refinery at Kaohsiung, located in southern Taiwan, during 2001 by collecting air samples at 26 sites. Benzene and toluene were detected as the most abundant VOC by both gas chromatography and ultra-violet differential optical absorption spectroscopy (UV-DOAS) techniques. BTXE concentrations showed day and night variations at some of the sampling site. The highest among the 26 sites for total concentration of VOC at CPC was 2506 ppbv near waste burning stack. High concentrations of VOC were also detected at the wastewater management area and the east gate of the plant. The values were 10-18 times higher than those probed in Kaohsiung city. The meteorological parameters such as wind speed and direction played vital roles in the distribution of ambient air VOC concentrations and affected the petrochemical complex emissions. The application of UV-DOAS for online monitoring of criteria pollutants appears feasible though the accuracy of the technique is not fully controlled.

  17. Assessment of regional air quality by a concentration-dependent Pollution Permeation Index

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chun-Sheng; Liu, Huan; He, Ke-Bin; Ma, Yong-Liang

    2016-01-01

    Although air quality monitoring networks have been greatly improved, interpreting their expanding data in both simple and efficient ways remains challenging. Therefore, needed are new analytical methods. We developed such a method based on the comparison of pollutant concentrations between target and circum areas (circum comparison for short), and tested its applications by assessing the air pollution in Jing-Jin-Ji, Yangtze River Delta, Pearl River Delta and Cheng-Yu, China during 2015. We found the circum comparison can instantly judge whether a city is a pollution permeation donor or a pollution permeation receptor by a Pollution Permeation Index (PPI). Furthermore, a PPI-related estimated concentration (original concentration plus halved average concentration difference) can be used to identify some overestimations and underestimations. Besides, it can help explain pollution process (e.g., Beijing’s PM2.5 maybe largely promoted by non-local SO2) though not aiming at it. Moreover, it is applicable to any region, easy-to-handle, and able to boost more new analytical methods. These advantages, despite its disadvantages in considering the whole process jointly influenced by complex physical and chemical factors, demonstrate that the PPI based circum comparison can be efficiently used in assessing air pollution by yielding instructive results, without the absolute need for complex operations. PMID:27731344

  18. Persistence analysis of extreme CO, NO2 and O3 concentrations in ambient air of Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelani, Asha B.

    2012-05-01

    Persistence analysis of air pollutant concentration and corresponding exceedance time series is carried out to examine for temporal evolution. For this purpose, air pollutant concentrations, namely, CO, NO2 and O3 observed during 2000-2009 at a traffic site in Delhi are analyzed using detrended fluctuation analysis. Two types of extreme values are analyzed; exceeded concentrations to a threshold provided by national pollution controlling agency and time interval between two exceedances. The time series of three pollutants is observed to possess persistence property whereas the extreme value time series of only primary pollutant concentrations is found to be persistent. Two time scaling regions are observed to be significant in extreme time series of CO and NO2, mainly attributed to implementation of CNG in vehicles. The presence of persistence in three pollutant concentration time series is linked to the property of self-organized criticality. The observed persistence in the time interval between two exceeded levels is a matter of concern as persistent high concentrations can trigger health problems.

  19. Short-term exposure to formaldehyde promotes oxidative damage and inflammation in the trachea and diaphragm muscle of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luiza Fagundes; Murta, Giselle Luciane; Bandeira, Ana Carla Balthar; Nardeli, Clarissa Rodrigues; Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Bezerra, Frank Silva

    2015-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental pollutant widely used in industry. Exposure to FA causes irritation of the respiratory mucosa and is associated with inflammation and oxidative stress in the airways. This study aimed at investigating the oxidative effects on the inflammatory response in the trachea and the diaphragm muscle (DM) of rats exposed to different concentrations of formaldehyde. Twenty-eight Fischer male rats were divided into four groups: control group (CG) exposed to the ambient air; and three groups exposed to the following formaldehyde concentrations of 1% (FA1), 5% (FA5) and 10% (FA10), respectively. The exposure occurred for twenty minutes, three times a day for five days. Oxidative stress analyses were performed by carbonyl protein, lipid peroxidation and catalase activity. The assessment of inflammatory cell influx in both organs and the mucus production in the trachea was carried out. There was an increase of lipid peroxidation in the trachea and the DM of FA1 and FA5 groups compared to the CG and FA10. The oxidation of DM proteins increased in FA10 group compared to CG, FA1 and FA5. The catalase enzyme activity in the DM was reduced in FA1, FA5 and FA10 compared to the CG. Meanwhile, there was a reduction in the enzymatic activity of FA10 compared to the CG in the trachea. The morphometric analysis in the DM demonstrated an influx of inflammatory cells in FA10 compared to the CG. In FA10 group, the tracheal epithelium showed metaplasia and ulceration. In addition, the tracheal epithelium showed more mucus deposits in FA5 compared to CG, FA1 and FA10. The results demonstrated that the exposure to formaldehyde at different concentrations in a short period of time promotes oxidative damage and inflammation in the DM and the trachea and causes metaplasia, ulceration and increased mucus at the latter.

  20. Contribution of ship emissions to the concentration and deposition of air pollutants in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoyoglu, S.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Baltensperger, U.

    2015-11-01

    Emissions from the marine transport sector are one of the least regulated anthropogenic emission sources and contribute significantly to air pollution. Although strict limits were introduced recently for the maximum sulfur content in marine fuels in the SECAs (sulfur emission control areas) and in the EU ports, sulfur emissions outside the SECAs and emissions of other components in all European maritime areas have continued to increase in the last two decades. We have used the air quality model CAMx with and without ship emissions for the year 2006 to determine the effects of international shipping on the annual as well as seasonal concentrations of ozone, primary and secondary components of PM2.5 and the dry and wet deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds in Europe. Our results suggest that emissions from international shipping affect the air quality in northern and southern Europe differently and their contributions to the air concentrations vary seasonally. The largest changes in pollutant concentrations due to ship emissions were predicted for summer. Increased concentrations of the primary particle mass were found only along the shipping routes whereas concentrations of the secondary pollutants were affected over a larger area. Concentrations of particulate sulfate increased due to ship emissions in the Mediterranean (up to 60 %), in the English Channel and the North Sea (30-35 %) while increases in particulate nitrate levels were found especially in the north, around the Benelux area (20 %) where there were high NH3 land-based emissions. Our model results showed that not only the atmospheric concentrations of pollutants are affected by ship emissions, but also depositions of nitrogen and sulfur compounds increase significantly along the shipping routes. NOx emissions from the ships especially in the English Channel and the North Sea, cause a decrease in the dry deposition of reduced nitrogen at source regions by moving it from the gas-phase to the

  1. [Experimental value of formaldehyde exposure to preserve anatomical findings].

    PubMed

    Albertini, P; Mainardi, P; Mazzeo, N; Triassi, M

    2012-01-01

    Formaldehyde, already classified as potentially carcinogen and recently as "human carcinogen" by IARC, is generally used for fixing and preserving anatomical findings. This reason causes a problem of professional exposure for the operators who use the formaldehyde for this purpose. In this work we present the results of the periodical monitoring which is done for the determination of the exposure at formaldehyde in operating theatres and surgeries, where the operator fill the special container with the anatomical findings andformaldehyde for following tests. The measurements have been done using an instrument that continuously measure the concentration of formaldehyde, based on the infrared spectrometry, in 54 rooms which are operating theatres or surgeries in 9 public hospitals in Campania (Italy). The results show that the long-term exposure limits are not exceeded and that the average of the highest values of concentration obtained during its use was 0.15 +/- 0.04 ppm, that is below the limits. It is important to point out that such a limit was never exceeded during every single measurement. Finally, analyzing statistically the data, we can infer that the probability of exceeding the short-term limit is less than 0.1%, when formaldehyde is used for the purposes mentioned above.

  2. MODELING AIR TOXICS AND PM 2.5 CONCENTRATION FIELDS AS A MEANS FOR FACILITATING HUMAN EXPOSURE ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The capability of the US EPA Models-3/Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system is extended to provide gridded ambient air quality concentration fields at fine scales. These fields will drive human exposure to air toxics and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) models...

  3. Acute airway effects of airborne formaldehyde in sensitized and non-sensitized mice housed in a dry or humid environment

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Søren Thor Wolkoff, Peder Hammer, Maria Kofoed-Sørensen, Vivi Clausen, Per Axel Nielsen, Gunnar Damgård

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the role of air humidity and allergic sensitization on the acute airway response to inhaled formaldehyde (FA) vapor. Mice were sensitized to the immunogen ovalbumin (OVA) by three intraperitoneal injections followed by two aerosol challenges, giving rise to allergic airway inflammation. Control mice were sham sensitized by saline injections and challenged by saline aerosols. Once sensitized, the mice were housed at high (85–89%) or low (< 10%) relative humidity, respectively for 48 h prior to a 60-min exposure to either 0.4, 1.8 or about 5 ppm FA. Before, during and after exposure, breathing parameters were monitored. These included the specific markers of nose and lung irritations as well as the expiratory flow rate, the latter being a marker of airflow limitation. The sensory irritation response in the upper airways was not affected by allergic inflammation or changes in humidity. At high relative humidity, the OVA-sensitized mice had a decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to the saline control mice after exposure to approximately 5 ppm FA. This is in accordance with the observations that asthmatics are more sensitive than non-asthmatics to higher concentrations of airway irritants including FA. In the dry environment, the opposite trend was seen; here, the saline control mice had a significantly decreased expiratory airflow rate compared to OVA-sensitized mice when exposed to 1.8 and 4 ppm FA. We speculate that increased mucus production in the OVA-sensitized mice has increased the “scrubber effect” in the nose, consequently protecting the conducting and lower airways. - Highlights: ► Role of air humidity and allergy on sensitivity to an airway irritant was studied. ► In the humid environment, allergy amplified the effects of formaldehyde. ► In the dry environment, allergy reduced the effect of formaldehyde. ► Neither allergy nor humidity changed the formaldehyde-induced nasal irritation.

  4. Concentration and risk assessment of phthalates present in indoor air from newly decorated apartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, X. Q.; Song, M.; Guo, M.; Mo, F. F.; Shen, X. Y.

    2013-04-01

    Phthalate esters (PAEs) are ubiquitous in the indoor environment, owing to their use in consumer products. People spend a considerable amount of time indoors. As a result, human exposure to indoor contaminants is of great concern. People are exposed to phthalates through inhalation and dermal absorption of indoor air. In this study, the concentrations, characteristics and carcinogenic risks of gas-phase and particle-phase phthalates in indoor air from bedroom, living room and study room of 10 newly decorated apartments in Hangzhou, China were first investigated. The mean concentration of phthalates (gas-phase and particle-phase) present in household air was 12 096.4 ng m-3, of which diethyl phthalate (DEP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were the most abundant compounds with concentrations of 2290 ng m-3, 3975 ng m-3 and 2437 ng m-3, respectively, totally accounting for 72.0% of ∑6PAEs. Contamination levels of phthalates varied in different compartments. The concentration of phthalates was the highest 17 363.7 ng m-3 in living room, followed with 11 389.5 ng m-3 in study room, and the lowest 9739.1 ng m-3 in bedroom. It was also found that phthalates mainly accumulated in gaseous form in household air. DEHP posed the greatest health risk to children aged 1-2. Carcinogenic risk of DEHP was evaluated to be 3.912 × 10-5, and was 39 times higher than the limit set by the U.S. EPA.

  5. Particulate matter concentrations in residences: an intervention study evaluating stand-alone filters and air conditioners

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, S.; Du, L.; Mentz, G.; Mukherjee, B.; Parker, E.; Godwin, C.; Chin, J.-Y.; O'Toole, A.; Robins, T.; Rowe, Z.; Lewis, T.

    2014-01-01

    This study, a randomized controlled trial, evaluated the effectiveness of free-standing air filters and window air conditioners (ACs) in 126 low-income households of children with asthma. Households were randomized into a control group, a group receiving a free-standing HEPA filter placed in the child's sleeping area, and a group receiving the filter and a window-mounted AC. Indoor air quality (IAQ) was monitored for week-long periods over three to four seasons. High concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and carbon dioxide were frequently seen. When IAQ was monitored, filters reduced PM levels in the child's bedroom by an average of 50%. Filter use varied greatly among households and declined over time, for example, during weeks when pollutants were monitored, filter use was initially high, averaging 84 ± 27%, but dropped to 63 ± 33% in subsequent seasons. In months when households were not visited, use averaged only 34 ± 30%. Filter effectiveness did not vary in homes with central or room ACs. The study shows that measurements over multiple seasons are needed to characterize air quality and filter performance. The effectiveness of interventions using free-standing air filters depends on occupant behavior, and strategies to ensure filter use should be an integral part of interventions. PMID:22145709

  6. Natural ³⁷Ar concentrations in soil air: implications for monitoring underground nuclear explosions.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Robin A; Purtschert, Roland

    2011-10-15

    For on-site inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) measurement of the noble gas ³⁷Ar is considered an important technique. ³⁷Ar is produced underground by neutron activation of Calcium by the reaction ⁴⁰Ca(n,α)³⁷Ar. The naturally occurring equilibrium ³⁷Ar concentration balance in soil air is a function of an exponentially decreasing production rate from cosmic ray neutrons with increasing soil depth, diffusive transport in the soil air, and radioactive decay (T(1/2): 35 days). In this paper for the first time, measurements of natural ³⁷Ar activities in soil air are presented. The highest activities of ~100 mBq m⁻³ air are 2 orders of magnitude larger than in the atmosphere and are found in 1.5-2.5 m depth. At depths > 8 m ³⁷Ar activities are < 20 mBq m⁻³ air. After identifying the main ³⁷Ar production and gas transport factors the expected global activity range distribution of ³⁷Ar in shallow subsoil (0.7 m below the surface) was estimated. In high altitude soils, with large amounts of Calcium and with low gas permeability, ³⁷Ar activities may reach values up to 1 Bq m⁻³.

  7. Determination of radionuclide concentrations in ground level air using the ASS-500 high volume sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Frenzel, E.; Arnold, D.; Wershofen, H.

    1996-06-01

    A method for determination of radionuclide concentrations in air aerosol samples collected by the high volume aerosol sampler ASS-500 was elaborated. The aerosol sampling station ASS-500 is a Stand alone, all-weather proofed instrument. It is designed for representative sampling of airborne radionuclides from ground level air at a height of about 1.5 m above ground level. The ASS-500 station enables continuous air monitoring both normal and emergency Situations. The collection of aerosols on the Petrianov FPP-15-1.5 type filter out of an air volume of about 100,000 m{sup 3} (sampling period 1 wk) or of about 250,000 m{sup 3} (sampling period 3 wk) admits accurate spectrometric low level measurements of natural and artificial radionuclides. The achieved detection limit is 0.5 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} and 0.2 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} for {sup 137}Cs, respectively. A new developed air flow Meter system allows to enhance the collected air volume to about 150,000 m{sup 3} per week and lowers the detection limit to <0.4 {mu}Bq m{sup -3} for {sup 137}Cs for weekly collected aerosol samples. In Poland the CLOR uses 9 Stations ASS-500 at different sites as atmospheric radioactivity control system. On the basis of spectrometric measurements of natural and artificial radionuclides in the collected aerosol samples at the different sites, CLOR establishes a weekly report about the radiological situation at Poland for responsible authorities. The very low achievable detection limit of the Station ASS-500 due 10 the high air flow fate and the long possible sampling period were the key argument for other government radiation protection authorities in Europe to introduce the Station ASS-500 into their low level radionuclide atmospheric monitoring programs (Austria, Belarus, France, Germany, Iceland, Spain, Switzerland, Ukraine).

  8. A simple method for screening emission sources of carbonyl compounds in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Shohei; Kume, Kazunari; Horiike, Toshiyuki; Honma, Nobuyuki; Fusaya, Masahiro; Ohura, Takeshi; Amagai, Takashi

    2010-06-15

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from building and furnishing materials are frequently observed in high concentrations in indoor air. Nondestructive analytical methods that determine the main parameters influencing concentration of the chemical substances are necessary to screen for sources of VOC emissions. Toward this goal, we have developed a new flux sampler, referred to herein as an emission cell for simultaneous multi-sampling (ECSMS), that is used for screening indoor emission sources of VOCs and for determining the emission rates of these sources. Because the ECSMS is based on passive sampling, it can be easily used on-site at a low cost. Among VOCs, low-molecular-weight carbonyl compounds including formaldehyde are frequently detected at high concentrations in indoor environments. In this study, we determined the reliability of the ECSMS for the collection of formaldehyde and other carbonyl compounds emitted from wood-based composites of medium density fiberboards and particleboards. We then used emission rates determined by the ECSMS to predict airborne concentrations of formaldehyde emitted from a bookshelf in a large chamber, and these data were compared to formaldehyde concentrations that were acquired simultaneously by means of an active sampling method. The values obtained from the two methods were quite similar, suggesting that ECSMS measurement is an effective method for screening primary sources influencing indoor concentrations of formaldehyde. PMID:20149530

  9. INTERDEPENDENCIES OF MULTI-POLLUTANT CONTROL SIMULATIONS IN AN AIR QUALITY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this work, we use the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to examine the effect of several control strategies on simultaneous concentrations of ozone, PM2.5, and three important HAPs: formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and benzene.

  10. Groundwater level and nitrate concentration trends on Mountain Home Air Force Base, southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Marshall L.

    2014-01-01

    Mountain Home Air Force Base in southwestern Idaho draws most of its drinking water from the regional aquifer. The base is located within the State of Idaho's Mountain Home Groundwater Management Area and is adjacent to the State's Cinder Cone Butte Critical Groundwater Area. Both areas were established by the Idaho Department of Water Resources in the early 1980s because of declining water levels in the regional aquifer. The base also is listed by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality as a nitrate priority area. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, began monitoring wells on the base in 1985, and currently monitors 25 wells for water levels and 17 wells for water quality, primarily nutrients. This report provides a summary of water-level and nitrate concentration data collected primarily between 2001 and 2013 and examines trends in those data. A Regional Kendall Test was run to combine results from all wells to determine an overall regional trend in water level. Groundwater levels declined at an average rate of about 1.08 feet per year. Nitrate concentration trends show that 3 wells (18 percent) are increasing in nitrate concentration trend, 3 wells (18 percent) show a decreasing nitrate concentration trend, and 11 wells (64 percent) show no nitrate concentration trend. Six wells (35 percent) currently exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant limit of 10 milligrams per liter for nitrate (nitrite plus nitrate, measured as nitrogen).

  11. Formaldehyde removal in synthetic and industrial wastewater by Rhodococcus erythropolis UPV-1.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Lopategi, A; Prieto, M; Serra, J L; Llama, M J

    2002-02-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis strain UPV-1 is able to grow on phenol as the only carbon and energy source and to remove formaldehyde completely from both synthetic and industrial wastewater. The rate of formaldehyde removal is independent of either initial biomass or formaldehyde concentration. The presence of viable, intact cells is strictly necessary for this removal to take place. Discontinuous and continuous formaldehyde-feed systems were successfully tested with synthetic wastewater in shaken flasks. Once biodegradation was well established in model synthetic wastewater, a real wastewater sample was obtained from a local phenolic and melamine resin-manufacturing company. Incubation of biomass with this wastewater at subtoxic concentrations of formaldehyde resulted in the complete removal of the pollutant. Parameters, such as chemical oxygen demand and toxicity, were assessed as indicators of wastewater cleanup progress.

  12. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 835 - Derived Air Concentrations (DAC) for Controlling Radiation Exposure to Workers at DOE Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Derived Air Concentrations (DAC) for Controlling Radiation... RADIATION PROTECTION Pt. 835, App. A Appendix A to Part 835—Derived Air Concentrations (DAC) for Controlling Radiation Exposure to Workers at DOE Facilities The data presented in appendix A are to be used...

  13. Formaldehyde levels in FEMA-supplied travel trailers, park models, and mobile homes in Louisiana and Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M W; Lando, J F; Kieszak, S M; Sutter, M E; Noonan, G P; Brunkard, J M; McGeehin, M A

    2013-04-01

    In 2006, area physicians reported increases in upper respiratory symptoms in patients living in U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)-supplied trailers following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. One potential etiology to explain their symptoms included formaldehyde; however, formaldehyde levels in these occupied trailers were unknown. The objectives of our study were to identify formaldehyde levels in occupied trailers and to determine factors or characteristics of occupied trailers that could affect formaldehyde levels. A disproportionate random sample of 519 FEMA-supplied trailers was identified in Louisiana and Mississippi in November 2007. We collected and tested an air sample from each trailer for formaldehyde levels and administered a survey. Formaldehyde levels among all trailers in this study ranged from 3 parts per billion (ppb) to 590 ppb, with a geometric mean (GM) of 77 ppb [95% confidence interval (CI): 70-85; range: 3-590 ppb]. There were statistically significant differences in formaldehyde levels between trailer types (P < 0.01). The GM formaldehyde level was 81 ppb (95% CI: 72-92) among travel trailers (N = 360), 57 ppb (95% CI: 49-65) among mobile homes (N = 57), and 44 ppb (95% CI: 38-53) among park models (N = 44). Among travel trailers, formaldehyde levels varied significantly by brand. While formaldehyde levels varied by trailer type, all types tested had some levels ≥ 100 ppb.

  14. 40 CFR 63.1183 - How do I comply with the formaldehyde standards for existing, new, and reconstructed curing ovens?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) The affected production process. (3) How the resin free-formaldehyde content or binder formulation... Hazardous Air Pollutants for Mineral Wool Production Compliance with Standards § 63.1183 How do I comply... may do short-term experimental production runs using resin where the free-formaldehyde content,...

  15. Phenoxyethanol as a nontoxic substitute for formaldehyde in long-term preservation of human anatomical specimens for dissection and demonstration purposes.

    PubMed

    Frølich, K W; Andersen, L M; Knutsen, A; Flood, P R

    1984-02-01

    Formaldehyde has recently been declared a potential carcinogen. Occupational health authorities throughout the world are therefore likely to put stricter regulations to its use also within anatomical disciplines. We have been able to reduce the atmospheric concentration of formaldehyde in our dissection rooms to below the detection limit of a conventional Dräger tube multigas analyzer (i.e., below 0.5 ppm or 0.6 mg formaldehyde/m3 air), by extracting previously formaldehyde-fixed material for more than 3 months in 1% phenoxyethanol in tap water. In this fluid our material has remained soft and flexible with a consistency and color retention suitable for dissection and demonstration purposes for up to 10 years. Fungal attacks are rare and we have been unable to raise bacteria from such specimens. Even the microscopical structure of most tissues remains satisfactory after 5 years in 1% phenoxyethanol. The unpleasant and irritating smell traditionally felt in dissection rooms is almost absent in our facilities, but some of our students still mention slight odor, headache, drowsiness, and mild eye, nose, and throat irritation during their dissection practice periods.

  16. Air quality in postunification Erfurt, East Germany: associating changes in pollutant concentrations with changes in emissions.

    PubMed Central

    Ebelt, S; Brauer, M; Cyrys, J; Tuch, T; Kreyling, W G; Wichmann, H E; Heinrich, J

    2001-01-01

    The unification of East and West Germany in 1990 resulted in sharp decreases in emissions of major air pollutants. This change in air quality has provided an opportunity for a natural experiment to evaluate the health impacts of air pollution. We evaluated airborne particle size distribution and gaseous co-pollutant data collected in Erfurt, Germany, throughout the 1990s and assessed the extent to which the observed changes are associated with changes in the two major emission sources: coal burning for power production and residential heating, and motor vehicles. Continuous data for sulfur dioxide, total suspended particulates (TSP), nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and meteorologic parameters were available for 1990-1999, and size-selective particle number and mass concentration measurements were made during winters of 1991 and 1998. We used hourly profiles of pollutants and linear regression analyses, stratified by year, weekday/weekend, and hour, using NO and SO(2) as markers of traffic- and heating-related combustion sources, respectively, to study the patterns of various particle size fractions. Supplementary data on traffic and heating-related sources were gathered to support hypotheses linking these sources with observed changes in ambient air pollution levels. Substantially decreased (19-91%) concentrations were observed for all pollutants, with the exception of particles in the 0.01-0.03 microm size range (representing the smallest ultrafine particles that were measured). The number concentration for these particles increased by 115% between 1991 and 1998. The ratio of these ultrafine particles to TSP also increased by more than 500%, indicating a dramatic change in the size distribution of airborne particles. Analysis of hourly concentration patterns indicated that in 1991, concentrations of SO(2) and larger particle sizes were related to residential heating with coal. These peaks were no longer evident in 1998 due to decreases in coal consumption and

  17. Variation and balance of positive air ion concentrations in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, U.; Aalto, P. P.; Salm, J.; Komsaare, K.; Tammet, H.; Mäkelä, J. M.; Laakso, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2008-02-01

    Air ions are characterized on the basis of measurements carried out in a boreal forest at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station, Finland, during the BIOFOR III campaign in spring 1999. The air ions were discriminated as small ions (charged molecular aggregates of the diameter of less than 2.5 nm), intermediate ions (charged aerosol particles of the diameter of 2.5-8 nm), and large ions (charged aerosol particles of the diameter of 8-20 nm). Statistical characteristics of the ion concentrations and the parameters of ion balance in the atmosphere are presented separately for the nucleation event days and non-event days. In the steady state, the ionization rate is balanced with the loss of small ions, which is expressed as the product of the small ion concentration and the ion sink rate. The widely known sinks of small ions are the recombination with small ions of opposite polarity and attachment to aerosol particles. The dependence of small ion concentration on the concentration of aerosol particles was investigated applying a model of the bipolar diffusion charging of particles by small ions. When the periods of relative humidity above 95% and wind speed less than 0.6 m s-1 were excluded, then the small ion concentration and the theoretically calculated small ion sink rate were closely negatively correlated (correlation coefficient -87%). However, an extra ion loss term of the same magnitude as the ion loss onto aerosol particles is needed for a quantitative explanation of the observations. This term is presumably due to the small ion deposition on coniferous forest. The hygroscopic growth correction of the measured aerosol particle size distributions was also found to be necessary for the proper estimation of the ion sink rate. In the case of nucleation burst events, the concentration of small positive ions followed the general balance equation, no extra ion loss in addition to the deposition on coniferous forest was detected, and the hypothesis of the conversion of ions

  18. Spatial and temporal distribution of pesticide air concentrations in Canadian agricultural regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuan; Tuduri, Ludovic; Harner, Tom; Blanchard, Pierrette; Waite, Don; Poissant, Laurier; Murphy, Clair; Belzer, Wayne; Aulagnier, Fabien; Li, Yi-Fan; Sverko, Ed

    The Canadian Pesticide Air Sampling Campaign was initiated in 2003 to assess atmospheric levels of pesticides, especially currently used pesticides (CUPs) in agricultural regions across Canada. In the first campaign during the spring to summer of 2003, over 40 pesticides were detected. The spatial and temporal distribution of pesticides in the Canadian atmosphere was shown to reflect the pesticide usage in each region. Several herbicides including triallate, bromoxynil, MCPA, 2,4-D, dicamba, trifluralin and ethalfluralin were detected at highest levels at Bratt's Lake, SK in the prairie region. Strong relationships between air concentrations and dry depositions were observed at this site. Although no application occurred in the Canadian Prairies in 2003, high air concentrations of lindane ( γ-hexachlorocyclohexane) were still observed at Bratt's Lake and Hafford, SK. Two fungicides (chlorothalonil and metalaxyl) and two insecticides (endosulfan and carbofuran) were measured at highest levels at Kensington, PEI. Maximum concentrations of chlorpyrifos and metolachlor were found at St. Anicet, QC. The southern Ontario site, Egbert showed highest concentration of alachlor. Malathion was detected at the highest level at the west coast site, Abbotsford, BC. In case of legacy chlorinated insecticides, high concentrations of DDT, DDE and dieldrin were detected in British Columbia while α-HCH and HCB were found to be fairly uniform across the country. Chlordane was detected in Ontario, Québec and Prince Edward Island. This study demonstrates that the sources for the observed atmospheric occurrence of pesticides include local current pesticide application, volatilization of pesticide residues from soil and atmospheric transport. In many instances, these data represent the first measurements for certain pesticides in a given part of Canada.

  19. Does formaldehyde induce aneuploidy?

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Kühner, Stefanie; Linsenmeyer, Regina; Schütz, Petra

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) was tested for a potential aneugenic activity in mammalian cells. We employed tests to discriminate between aneugenic and clastogenic effects in accordance with international guidelines for genotoxicity testing. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus test (CBMNT) in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with a pan-centromeric probe was performed with cultured human lymphocytes and the human A549 lung cell line. FA induced micronuclei (MN) in binuclear cells of both cell types under standard in vitro test conditions following the OECD guideline 487. FISH analysis revealed that the vast majority of induced MN were centromere negative, thus indicating a clastogenic effect. A similar result was obtained for MN induced by γ-irradiation, whereas the typical aneugens colcemid (COL) and vincristine (VCR) predominantly induced centromere-positive MN. Furthermore, COL and VCR clearly enhanced the MN frequency in mononuclear lymphocytes in the CBMNT, whereas such an effect was not observed for γ-irradiation and FA. In experiments with the Chinese hamster V79 cell line, the aneugens COL and VCR clearly increased the frequency of tetraploid second division metaphases, whereas FA did not cause such an effect. Altogether, our results confirm the clastogenicity of FA in cultured mammalian cells but exclude a significant aneugenic activity. PMID:21804075

  20. Benzo(a)pyrene in Europe: Ambient air concentrations, population exposure and health effects.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, C B B; Horálek, J; de Leeuw, F; Couvidat, F

    2016-07-01

    This study estimated current benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) concentration levels, population exposure and potential health impacts of exposure to ambient air BaP in Europe. These estimates were done by combining the best available information from observations and chemical transport models through the use of spatial interpolation methods. Results show large exceedances of the European target value for BaP in 2012 over large areas, particularly in central-eastern Europe. Results also show large uncertainties in the concentration estimates in regions with a few or no measurement stations. The estimation of the population exposure to BaP concentrations and its health impacts was limited to 60% of the European population, covering only the modelled areas which met the data quality requirement for modelling of BaP concentrations set by the European directive 2004/107/EC. The population exposure estimate shows that 20% of the European population is exposed to BaP background ambient concentrations above the EU target value and only 7% live in areas with concentrations under the estimated acceptable risk level of 0.12 ng m(-3). This exposure leads to an estimated 370 lung cancer incidences per year, for the 60% of the European population included in the estimation. Emissions of BaP have increased in the last decade with the increase in emissions from household combustion of biomass. At the same time, climate mitigation policies are promoting the use of biomass burning for domestic heating. The current study shows that there is a need for more BaP measurements in areas of low measurement density, particularly where high concentrations are expected, e.g. in Romania, Bulgaria, and other Balkan states. Furthermore, this study shows that the health risk posed by PAH exposure calls for better coordination between air quality and climate mitigation policies in Europe.

  1. Inhalation of concentrated ambient air particles exacerbates myocardial ischemia in conscious dogs.

    PubMed Central

    Wellenius, Gregory A; Coull, Brent A; Godleski, John J; Koutrakis, Petros; Okabe, Kazunori; Savage, Sara T; Lawrence, Joy E; Murthy, G G Krishna; Verrier, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    Short-term increases in ambient air pollution have been associated with an increased incidence of acute cardiac events. We assessed the effect of inhalation exposure to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) on myocardial ischemia in a canine model of coronary artery occlusion. Six mongrel dogs underwent thoracotomy for implantation of a vascular occluder around the left anterior descending coronary artery and tracheostomy to facilitate particulate exposure. After recovery (5-13 weeks), pairs of subjects were exposed for 6 hr/day on 3 or 4 consecutive days. Within each pair, one subject was randomly assigned to breathe CAPs on the second exposure day and filtered air at other times. The second subject breathed CAPs on the third exposure day and filtered air at other times. Immediately after each exposure, subjects underwent 5-min coronary artery occlusion. We determined ST-segment elevation, a measure of myocardial ischemia heart rate, and arrhythmia incidence during occlusion from continuous electrocardiograms. Exposure to CAPs (median, 285.7; range, 161.3-957.3 microg/m3) significantly (p = 0.007) enhanced occlusion-induced peak ST-segment elevation in precordial leads V4 (9.4 +/- 1.7 vs. 6.2 +/- 0.9 mm, CAPs vs. filtered air, respectively) and V5 (9.2 +/- 1.3 vs. 7.5 +/- 0.9 mm). ST-segment elevation was significantly correlated with the silicon concentration of the particles and other crustal elements possibly associated with urban street dust (p = 0.003 for Si). No associations were found with CAPs mass or number concentrations. Heart rate was not affected by CAPs exposure. These results suggest that exacerbation of myocardial ischemia during coronary artery occlusion may be an important mechanism of environmentally related acute cardiac events. PMID:12676590

  2. [Airborne Fungal Aerosol Concentration and Distribution Characteristics in Air- Conditioned Wards].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-ling; Feng, He-hua; Fang, Zi-liang; Wang, Ben-dong; Li, Dan

    2015-04-01

    The effects of airborne fungus on human health in the hospital environment are related to not only their genera and concentrations, but also their particle sizes and distribution characteristics. Moreover, the mechanisms of aerosols with different particle sizes on human health are different. Fungal samples were obtained in medicine wards of Chongqing using a six-stage sampler. The airborne fungal concentrations, genera and size distributions of all the sampling wards were investigated and identified in detail. Results showed that airborne fungal concentrations were not correlated to the diseases or personnel density, but were related to seasons, temperature, and relative humidity. The size distribution rule had roughly the same for testing wards in winter and summer. The size distributions were not related with diseases and seasons, the percentage of airborne fungal concentrations increased gradually from stage I to stage III, and then decreased dramatically from stage V to stage VI, in general, the size of airborne fungi was a normal distribution. There was no markedly difference for median diameter of airborne fungi which was less 3.19 μm in these wards. There were similar dominant genera in all wards. They were Aspergillus spp, Penicillium spp and Alternaria spp. Therefore, attention should be paid to improve the filtration efficiency of particle size of 1.1-4.7 μm for air conditioning system of wards. It also should be targeted to choose appropriate antibacterial methods and equipment for daily hygiene and air conditioning system operation management.

  3. INSTRUCTIONS FOR OPERATING LBL FORMALDEHYDE SAMPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, L.Z.; Allen, J.R.; Miksch, R.R.

    1981-09-01

    The LBL formaldehyde sampler consists of two parts: 1) a pump box and 2) a small refrigerator housing sampling bubblers. The pump box contains two pumps, a timer, a flow controller, an electrical cord, and a ten-foot piece of tubing to connect the refrigerator to the pump box. The small refrigerator contains four columns of bubbler sampling trains attached to a metal plate. Two sampling trains each are plumbed in parallel to two sampling ports on the back of the refrigerator. The two sampling lines supplied are to be attached to these ports to allow two locations to be sampled at once (usually one indoor and one outdoor). The refrigerator also contains a rack for holding bubbler tubes. In the sampling process, air is drawn through a sampling line attached to the fitting at the back of the refrigerator and into a prlmary bubbler containing a trapping solution. This trapping solution can be distilled water or an aqueous solution of some compound that reacts with formaldehyde. From this bubbler the air goes through a second bubbler containing the same trapping solution as the first bubbler. (To maintain sample integrity, all parts that the air sample contacts are made of Teflon, polypropylene, and stainless steel.) The air then goes into the third bubbler, which contains no liquid. This bubbler contains a hypodermic needle that serves as a flow-control orifice. The hypodermic needle, in conjunction with the flow controller in the pump box, ensures a constant a flow rate. The refrigerator contains four columns of these sets of three bubblers. After samples have been collected, the bubbler bottoms are detached and the contents of the first and second bubblers in each column are poured together, capped, and labeled. The use of a refrigerated primary and secondary bubbler whose contents are combined at the end of a sampling period ensures 95% collection efficiency. After the bubbler tubes are capped and labeled, they are stored either in the rack supplied in the

  4. Nitrogen potential recovery and concentration of ammonia from swine manure using electrodialysis coupled with air stripping.

    PubMed

    Ippersiel, D; Mondor, M; Lamarche, F; Tremblay, F; Dubreuil, J; Masse, L

    2012-03-01

    The practice of intensive animal production in certain areas has resulted in excessive manure production for the available regional land base. Consequently, there is a need to develop treatment technologies to recover the valuable nutrients that manure contains so that the resulting product can be transported and used as fertilizer on agricultural land. The project presented here used electrodialysis in a dilution/concentration configuration to transfer the manure ammonia in the diluate solution by electromigration to an adjacent solution separated by an ion-exchange membrane under the driving force of an electrical potential. Then, air stripping from the electrodialysis-obtained concentrate solution without pH modification was used to isolate the ammonia in an acidic solution. An optimal process operating voltage of 17.5 V was first determined on the basis of current efficiency and total energy consumption. During the process, the swine manure pH varied from 8.5 to 8.2, values favourable for NH(4)(+) electromigration. Total ammonia nitrogen reached 21,352 mg/L in the concentrate solution, representing approximately seven times the concentration in the swine manure. Further increases in concentration were limited by water transfer from the diluate solution due to electroosmosis and osmosis. Applying vacuum to the concentrate reservoir was found to be more efficient than direct concentrate solution aeration for NH(3) recuperation in the acid trap, given that the ammonia recuperated under vacuum represented 14.5% of the theoretical value of the NH(3) present in the concentrate solution as compared to 6.2% for aeration. However, an excessively low concentrate solution pH (8.6-8.3) limited NH(3)volatilization toward the acid trap. These results suggest that the concentrate solution pH needs to be raised to promote the volatile NH(3) form of total ammonia nitrogen.

  5. Seasonal variation in vertical volatile compounds air concentrations within a remote hemiboreal mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noe, S. M.; Hüve, K.; Niinemets, Ü.; Copolovici, L.

    2011-05-01

    The vertical distribution of ambient biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) concentrations within a hemiboreal forest canopy was investigated over a period of one year. Variability in temporal and spatial isoprene concentrations can be mainly explained by biogenic emissions from deciduous trees, ranging from 0.1 to 7.5 μg m-3. Monoterpene concentrations exceeded isoprene largely and ranged from 0.01 to 140 μg m-3 and during winter time anthropogenic contributions are likely. Variation in monoterpene concentrations found to be largest right above the ground and the vertical profile suggest a weak mixing leading to terpene accumulation in the lower canopy. Exceptionally high values were recorded during a heat wave in July 2010 with very high midday temperatures above 30 °C for several weeks. During summer months, monoterpene exceeded isoprene concentrations 6-fold and during winter 12-fold. The relative contribution of diverse monoterpene species to the ambient concentrations revealed a dominance of α-pinene in the lower and of limonene in the upper part of the canopy, both accounting for up to 70 % of the total monoterpene concentration during summer months. The main contributing monoterpene during wintertime was Δ3-carene accounting for 60 % of total monoterpene concentration in January. Possible biogenic monoterpene sources beside the foliage are the leaf litter, the soil and also resins exuding from stems. In comparison, the hemiboreal mixed forest canopy showed similar isoprene but higher monoterpene concentrations than the boreal forest and lower isoprene but substantially higher monoterpene concentrations than the temperate mixed forest canopies. These results have major implications for simulating air chemistry and secondary organic aerosol formation within and above hemiboreal forest canopies.

  6. Formaldehyde exposure and acute health effects study

    SciTech Connect

    Quackenboss, J.J.; Lebowitz, M.D.; Michaud, J.P.; Bronnimann, D. )

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effects of formaldehyde exposures on health, exposure groups were defined using baseline exposure and health questionnaires. Formaldehyde concentrations were poorly correlated with these exposure classifications, perhaps due to the time delay between classification and monitoring. The 151 households reported here had a mean HCHO concentration of 35 (S.E. 1.5 and median 30) {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Passive samplers prepared in our lab were calibrated in a chamber to derive an estimated sampling rate of 0.311 {mu}g/(mg {center dot} m{sup {minus}3} {center dot} hr). They were also compared to commercially available samplers inside of the homes, with a correlation coefficient of 0.896 and mean difference of 2.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. In this report of initial findings from an ongoing study, daily symptoms and peak expiratory flow measurements were compared with an HCHO exposure classification based on the median measured concentrations. None of the symptoms groups were related to HCHO exposure when controlling for age and sex. There was a significant relationship between HCHO exposure and variability in peak expiratory flows that was dependent on age group. It may be especially important to assess the variability in reactive individuals and children to determine the short-term effects of HCHO exposures and possible long-term consequences.

  7. Air sampling with solid phase microextraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martos, Perry Anthony

    There is an increasing need for simple yet accurate air sampling methods. The acceptance of new air sampling methods requires compatibility with conventional chromatographic equipment, and the new methods have to be environmentally friendly, simple to use, yet with equal, or better, detection limits, accuracy and precision than standard methods. Solid phase microextraction (SPME) satisfies the conditions for new air sampling methods. Analyte detection limits, accuracy and precision of analysis with SPME are typically better than with any conventional air sampling methods. Yet, air sampling with SPME requires no pumps, solvents, is re-usable, extremely simple to use, is completely compatible with current chromatographic equipment, and requires a small capital investment. The first SPME fiber coating used in this study was poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a hydrophobic liquid film, to sample a large range of airborne hydrocarbons such as benzene and octane. Quantification without an external calibration procedure is possible with this coating. Well understood are the physical and chemical properties of this coating, which are quite similar to those of the siloxane stationary phase used in capillary columns. The log of analyte distribution coefficients for PDMS are linearly related to chromatographic retention indices and to the inverse of temperature. Therefore, the actual chromatogram from the analysis of the PDMS air sampler will yield the calibration parameters which are used to quantify unknown airborne analyte concentrations (ppb v to ppm v range). The second fiber coating used in this study was PDMS/divinyl benzene (PDMS/DVB) onto which o-(2,3,4,5,6- pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) was adsorbed for the on-fiber derivatization of gaseous formaldehyde (ppb v range), with and without external calibration. The oxime formed from the reaction can be detected with conventional gas chromatographic detectors. Typical grab sampling times were as small as 5 seconds

  8. VOCs Emissions from Multiple Wood Pellet Types and Concentrations in Indoor Air

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia; Ashley, William J.; Bregg, Sandar; Walier, Drew; LeBouf, Ryan; Hopke, Philip K.; Rossner, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Wood pellet storage safety is an important aspect for implementing woody biomass as a renewable energy source. When wood pellets are stored indoors in large quantities (tons) in poorly ventilated spaces in buildings, such as in basements, off-gassing of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can significantly affect indoor air quality. To determine the emission rates and potential impact of VOC emissions, a series of laboratory and field measurements were conducted using softwood, hardwood, and blended wood pellets manufactured in New York. Evacuated canisters were used to collect air samples from the headspace of drums containing pellets and then in basements and pellet storage areas of homes and small businesses. Multiple peaks were identified during GC/MS and GC/FID analysis, and four primary VOCs were characterized and quantified: methanol, pentane, pentanal, and hexanal. Laboratory results show that total VOCs (TVOCs) concentrations for softwood (SW) were statistically (p < 0.02) higher than blended or hardwood (HW) (SW: 412 ± 25; blended: 203 ± 4; HW: 99 ± 8, ppb). The emission rate from HW was the fastest, followed by blended and SW, respectively. Emissions rates were found to range from 10−1 to 10−5 units, depending upon environmental factors. Field measurements resulted in airborne concentrations ranging from 67 ± 8 to 5000 ± 3000 ppb of TVOCs and 12 to 1500 ppb of aldehydes, with higher concentrations found in a basement with a large fabric bag storage unit after fresh pellet delivery and lower concentrations for aged pellets. These results suggest that large fabric bag storage units resulted in a substantial release of VOCs into the building air. Occupants of the buildings tested discussed concerns about odor and sensory irritation when new pellets were delivered. The sensory response was likely due to the aldehydes. PMID:27022205

  9. Effect of geocoding errors on traffic-related air pollutant exposure and concentration estimates.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Rajiv; Batterman, Stuart; Isakov, Vlad; Snyder, Michelle; Breen, Michael; Brakefield-Caldwell, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to traffic-related air pollutants is highest very near roads, and thus exposure estimates are sensitive to positional errors. This study evaluates positional and PM2.5 concentration errors that result from the use of automated geocoding methods and from linearized approximations of roads in link-based emission inventories. Two automated geocoders (Bing Map and ArcGIS) along with handheld GPS instruments were used to geocode 160 home locations of children enrolled in an air pollution study investigating effects of traffic-related pollutants in Detroit, Michigan. The average and maximum positional errors using the automated geocoders were 35 and 196 m, respectively. Comparing road edge and road centerline, differences in house-to-highway distances averaged 23 m and reached 82 m. These differences were attributable to road curvature, road width and the presence of ramps, factors that should be considered in proximity measures used either directly as an exposure metric or as inputs to dispersion or other models. Effects of positional errors for the 160 homes on PM2.5 concentrations resulting from traffic-related emissions were predicted using a detailed road network and the RLINE dispersion model. Concentration errors averaged only 9%, but maximum errors reached 54% for annual averages and 87% for maximum 24-h averages. Whereas most geocoding errors appear modest in magnitude, 5% to 20% of residences are expected to have positional errors exceeding 100 m. Such errors can substantially alter exposure estimates near roads because of the dramatic spatial gradients of traffic-related pollutant concentrations. To ensure the accuracy of exposure estimates for traffic-related air pollutants, especially near roads, confirmation of geocoordinates is recommended.

  10. Cleaning Products and Air Fresheners: Emissions and ResultingConcentrations of Glycol Ethers and Terpenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Destaillat, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nazaroff,William W.

    2005-08-01

    Experiments were conducted to quantify emissions and concentrations of glycol ethers and terpenoids from cleaning product and air freshener use in a 50-m{sup 3} room ventilated at {approx}0.5 h{sup -1}. Five cleaning products were applied full-strength (FS); three were additionally used in dilute solution. FS application of pine-oil cleaner (POC) yielded 1-h concentrations of 10-1300 {micro}g m{sup -3} for individual terpenoids, including {alpha}-terpinene (90-120), d-limonene (1000-1100), terpinolene (900-1300), and {alpha}-terpineol (260-700). One-hour concentrations of 2-butoxyethanol and/or dlimonene were 300-6000 {micro}g m{sup -3} after FS use of other products. During FS application including rinsing with sponge and wiping with towels, fractional emissions (mass volatilized/dispensed) of 2-butoxyethanol and d-limonene were 50-100% with towels retained, {approx}25-50% when towels were removed after cleaning. Lower fractions (2-11%) resulted from dilute use. Fractional emissions of terpenes from FS use of POC were {approx}35-70% with towels retained, 20-50% with towels removed. During floor cleaning with dilute solution of POC, 7-12% of dispensed terpenes were emitted. Terpene alcohols were emitted at lower fractions: 7-30% (FS, towels retained), 2-9% (FS, towels removed), and 2-5% (dilute). During air-freshener use, d-limonene, dihydromyrcenol, linalool, linalyl acetate, and {beta}-citronellol were emitted at 35-180 mg d{sup -1} over three days while air concentrations averaged 30-160 {micro}g m{sup -3}.

  11. Effect of geocoding errors on traffic-related air pollutant exposure and concentration estimates

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Rajiv; Batterman, Stuart; Isakov, Vlad; Snyder, Michelle; Breen, Michael; Brakefield-Caldwell, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to traffic-related air pollutants is highest very near roads, and thus exposure estimates are sensitive to positional errors. This study evaluates positional and PM2.5 concentration errors that result from the use of automated geocoding methods and from linearized approximations of roads in link-based emission inventories. Two automated geocoders (Bing Map and ArcGIS) along with handheld GPS instruments were used to geocode 160 home locations of children enrolled in an air pollution study investigating effects of traffic-related pollutants in Detroit, Michigan. The average and maximum positional errors using the automated geocoders were 35 and 196 m, respectively. Comparing road edge and road centerline, differences in house-to-highway distances averaged 23 m and reached 82 m. These differences were attributable to road curvature, road width and the presence of ramps, factors that should be considered in proximity measures used either directly as an exposure metric or as inputs to dispersion or other models. Effects of positional errors for the 160 homes on PM2.5 concentrations resulting from traffic-related emissions were predicted using a detailed road network and the RLINE dispersion model. Concentration errors averaged only 9%, but maximum errors reached 54% for annual averages and 87% for maximum 24-h averages. Whereas most geocoding errors appear modest in magnitude, 5% to 20% of residences are expected to have positional errors exceeding 100 m. Such errors can substantially alter exposure estimates near roads because of the dramatic spatial gradients of traffic-related pollutant concentrations. To ensure the accuracy of exposure estimates for traffic-related air pollutants, especially near roads, confirmation of geocoordinates is recommended. PMID:25670023

  12. Pt-TiO2/MWCNTs Hybrid Composites for Monitoring Low Hydrogen Concentrations in Air

    PubMed Central

    Trocino, Stefano; Donato, Andrea; Latino, Mariangela; Donato, Nicola; Leonardi, Salvatore Gianluca; Neri, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen is a valuable fuel for the next energy scenario. Unfortunately, hydrogen is highly flammable at concentrations higher than 4% in air. This aspect makes the monitoring of H2 leaks an essential issue for safety reasons, especially in the transportation field. In this paper, nanocomposites based on Pt-doped TiO2/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have been introduced as sensitive materials for H2 at low temperatures. Pt-TiO2/MWNTs nanocomposites with different composition have been prepared by a simple wet chemical procedure and their morphological, microstructural and electrical properties were investigated. Resistive thick-film devices have been fabricated printing the hybrid nanocomposites on alumina substrates provided with Pt interdigitated electrodes. Electrical tests in air have shown that embedding MWCNTs in the TiO2 matrix modify markedly the electrical conductivity, providing a means to decrease the resistance of the sensing layer. Pt acts as a catalytic additive. Pt-TiO2/MWNTs-based sensors were found to be sensitive to hydrogen at concentrations between 0.5 and 3% in air, satisfying the requisites for practical applications in hydrogen leak detection devices.

  13. Modeling breathing-zone concentrations of airborne contaminants generated during compressed air spray painting.

    PubMed

    Flynn, M R; Gatano, B L; McKernan, J L; Dunn, K H; Blazicko, B A; Carlton, G N

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model to predict breathing-zone concentrations of airborne contaminants generated during compressed air spray painting in cross-flow ventilated booths. The model focuses on characterizing the generation and transport of overspray mist. It extends previous work on conventional spray guns to include exposures generated by HVLP guns. Dimensional analysis and scale model wind-tunnel studies are employed using non-volatile oils, instead of paint, to produce empirical equations for estimating exposure to total mass. Results indicate that a dimensionless breathing zone concentration is a nonlinear function of the ratio of momentum flux of air from the spray gun to the momentum flux of air passing through the projected area of the worker's body. The orientation of the spraying operation within the booth is also very significant. The exposure model requires an estimate of the contaminant generation rate, which is approximated by a simple impactor model. The results represent an initial step in the construction of more realistic models capable of predicting exposure as a mathematical function of the governing parameters. PMID:10028895

  14. Detonation propagation through methane-air mixtures with fuel concentration gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David; Gamezo, Vadim; Oran, Elaine

    2010-11-01

    The complex structure of a multidimensional detonation front consists of constantly changing, multiply intersecting incident shocks and Mach stems followed by growing and shrinking regions of reacted and unreacted gases. Because these flow structures change in time, the energy release in the shocked and compressed gases varies in space and time. Trajectories of triple points formed at shock intersections create cellular patterns whose size and structure are characteristic of the particular material and the background condition. In high-activation-energy fuel-air mixtures, such as methane in air, cellular patterns are relatively large, very irregular, and have complex and changing substructures. Here we use numerical simulations to study the behavior of detonations propagating through methane-air mixtures with a spatial gradient of fuel concentration. When the mixture stoichiometry varies from stoichiometric, the detonation propagation speed slows and sizes of cellular structures grow. In partially premixed systems with a nonuniform concentration of fuel -- a condition that can occur, for example, naturally in sealed underground coal mine tunnels -- both the propagation speed and the characteristic detonation cell size vary spatially.

  15. High Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in Air from Ship Breaking Activities in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nøst, Therese H; Halse, Anne K; Randall, Scott; Borgen, Anders R; Schlabach, Martin; Paul, Alak; Rahman, Atiqur; Breivik, Knut

    2015-10-01

    The beaches on the coast of Chittagong in Bangladesh are one of the most intense ship breaking areas in the world. The aim of the study was to measure the concentrations of organic contaminants in the air in the city of Chittagong, including the surrounding ship breaking areas using passive air samplers (N = 25). The compounds detected in the highest amounts were the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs), whereas dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were several orders of magnitude lower in comparison. PCBs, PAHs, and HCB were highest at sites near the ship breaking activities, whereas DDTs and SCCPs were higher in the urban areas. Ship breaking activities likely act as atmospheric emission sources of PCBs, PAHs, and HCB, thus adding to the international emphasis on responsible recycling of ships. Concentrations of PAHs, PCBs, DDTs, HCB, and SCCPs in ambient air in Chittagong are high in comparison to those found in similar studies performed in other parts of Asia. Estimated toxic equivalent quotients indicate elevated human health risks caused by inhalation of PAHs at most sites. PMID:26351879

  16. High Concentrations of Organic Contaminants in Air from Ship Breaking Activities in Chittagong, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Nøst, Therese H; Halse, Anne K; Randall, Scott; Borgen, Anders R; Schlabach, Martin; Paul, Alak; Rahman, Atiqur; Breivik, Knut

    2015-10-01

    The beaches on the coast of Chittagong in Bangladesh are one of the most intense ship breaking areas in the world. The aim of the study was to measure the concentrations of organic contaminants in the air in the city of Chittagong, including the surrounding ship breaking areas using passive air samplers (N = 25). The compounds detected in the highest amounts were the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs), whereas dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were several orders of magnitude lower in comparison. PCBs, PAHs, and HCB were highest at sites near the ship breaking activities, whereas DDTs and SCCPs were higher in the urban areas. Ship breaking activities likely act as atmospheric emission sources of PCBs, PAHs, and HCB, thus adding to the international emphasis on responsible recycling of ships. Concentrations of PAHs, PCBs, DDTs, HCB, and SCCPs in ambient air in Chittagong are high in comparison to those found in similar studies performed in other parts of Asia. Estimated toxic equivalent quotients indicate elevated human health risks caused by inhalation of PAHs at most sites.

  17. Synthesis and Thermal Degradation Studies of Melamine Formaldehyde Resins

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Sami; Bustam, M. A.; Nadeem, M.; Tan, W. L.; Shariff, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Melamine formaldehyde (MF) resins have been synthesized at different reaction temperature and pH values. Different molar ratios of melamine and formaldehyde were used to synthesize the corresponding resins. The prepared resin samples were characterized by using molecular weight determination viscometry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The maximum percentage of solid content (69.7%) was obtained at pH 8.5 and 75°C temperature. The molecular weight of MF resin was increased with an increase of melamine monomer concentration. The highest residual weight 14.125 wt.% was obtained with sample 10. PMID:25436237

  18. Synthesis and thermal degradation studies of melamine formaldehyde resins.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Sami; Bustam, M A; Nadeem, M; Naz, M Y; Tan, W L; Shariff, A M

    2014-01-01

    Melamine formaldehyde (MF) resins have been synthesized at different reaction temperature and pH values. Different molar ratios of melamine and formaldehyde were used to synthesize the corresponding resins. The prepared resin samples were characterized by using molecular weight determination viscometry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The maximum percentage of solid content (69.7%) was obtained at pH 8.5 and 75°C temperature. The molecular weight of MF resin was increased with an increase of melamine monomer concentration. The highest residual weight 14.125 wt.% was obtained with sample 10.

  19. Combining regression analysis and air quality modelling to predict benzene concentration levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachokostas, Ch.; Achillas, Ch.; Chourdakis, E.; Moussiopoulos, N.

    2011-05-01

    State of the art epidemiological research has found consistent associations between traffic-related air pollution and various outcomes, such as respiratory symptoms and premature mortality. However, many urban areas are characterised by the absence of the necessary monitoring infrastructure, especially for benzene (C 6H 6), which is a known human carcinogen. The use of environmental statistics combined with air quality modelling can be of vital importance in order to assess air quality levels of traffic-related pollutants in an urban area in the case where there are no available measurements. This paper aims at developing and presenting a reliable approach, in order to forecast C 6H 6 levels in urban environments, demonstrated for Thessaloniki, Greece. Multiple stepwise regression analysis is used and a strong statistical relationship is detected between C 6H 6 and CO. The adopted regression model is validated in order to depict its applicability and representativeness. The presented results demonstrate that the adopted approach is capable of capturing C 6H 6 concentration trends and should be considered as complementary to air quality monitoring.

  20. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  1. BIOGENIC SOURCES FOR FORMALDEHYDE AND ACETALDEHYDE DURING SUMMER MONTHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photochemical modeling estimated contributions to ambient concentrations of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde from biogenic emissions over the continental United States during January 2001 (Eos Trans. AGU, 83(47), Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract A52B-0117). Results showed that maximum co...

  2. Formaldehyde Stress Responses in Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nathan H.; Djoko, Karrera Y.; Veyrier, Frédéric J.; McEwan, Alastair G.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde is the simplest of all aldehydes and is highly cytotoxic. Its use and associated dangers from environmental exposure have been well documented. Detoxification systems for formaldehyde are found throughout the biological world and they are especially important in methylotrophic bacteria, which generate this compound as part of their metabolism of methanol. Formaldehyde metabolizing systems can be divided into those dependent upon pterin cofactors, sugar phosphates and those dependent upon glutathione. The more prevalent thiol-dependent formaldehyde detoxification system is found in many bacterial pathogens, almost all of which do not metabolize methane or methanol. This review describes the endogenous and exogenous sources of formaldehyde, its toxic effects and mechanisms of detoxification. The methods of formaldehyde sensing are also described with a focus on the formaldehyde responsive transcription factors HxlR, FrmR, and NmlR. Finally, the physiological relevance of detoxification systems for formaldehyde in bacterial pathogens is discussed. PMID:26973631

  3. Concentration, size, and density of total suspended particulates at the air exhaust of concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xufei; Lee, Jongmin; Zhang, Yuanhui; Wang, Xinlei; Yang, Liangcheng

    2015-08-01

    Total suspended particulate (TSP) samples were seasonally collected at the air exhaust of 15 commercial concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs; including swine finishing, swine farrowing, swine gestation, laying hen, and tom turkey) in the U.S. Midwest. The measured TSP concentrations ranged from 0.38 ± 0.04 mg m⁻³ (swine gestation in summer) to 10.9 ± 3.9 mg m⁻³ (tom turkey in winter) and were significantly affected by animal species, housing facility type, feeder type (dry or wet), and season. The average particle size of collected TSP samples in terms of mass median equivalent spherical diameter ranged from 14.8 ± 0.5 µm (swine finishing in winter) to 30.5 ± 2.0 µm (tom turkey in summer) and showed a significant seasonal effect. This finding affirmed that particulate matter (PM) released from CAFOs contains a significant portion of large particles. The measured particle size distribution (PSD) and the density of deposited particles (on average 1.65 ± 0.13 g cm⁻³) were used to estimate the mass fractions of PM10 and PM2.5 (PM ≤ 10 and ≤ 2.5 μm, respectively) in the collected TSP. The results showed that the PM10 fractions ranged from 12.7 ± 5.1% (tom turkey) to 21.1 ± 3.2% (swine finishing), whereas the PM2.5 fractions ranged from 3.4 ± 1.9% (tom turkey) to 5.7 ± 3.2% (swine finishing) and were smaller than 9.0% at all visited CAFOs. This study applied a filter-based method for PSD measurement and deposited particles as a surrogate to estimate the TSP's particle density. The limitations, along with the assumptions adopted during the calculation of PM mass fractions, must be recognized when comparing the findings to other studies.

  4. Seasonal variation in vertical volatile compounds air concentrations within a remote hemiboreal mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noe, S. M.; Hüve, K.; Niinemets, Ü.; Copolovici, L.

    2012-05-01

    The vertical distribution of ambient biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) concentrations within a hemiboreal forest canopy was investigated over a period of one year. Variability in temporal and spatial isoprene concentrations, ranging from 0.1 to 7.5 μg m-3, can be mainly explained by biogenic emissions from deciduous trees. Monoterpene concentrations exceeded isoprene largely and ranged from 0.01 to 140 μg m-3 and during winter time anthropogenic contributions are likely. Variation in monoterpene concentrations were found to be largest right above the ground and the vertical profiles suggest a weak mixing leading to terpene accumulation in the lower canopy. Exceptionally high values were recorded during a heat wave in July 2010 with very high midday temperatures above 30 °C for several weeks. During summer months, monoterpene exceeded isoprene concentrations 6-fold and during winter 12-fold. During summer months, dominance of α-pinene in the lower and of limonene in the upper part of the canopy was observed, both accounting for up to 70% of the total monoterpene concentration. During wintertime, Δ3-carene was the dominant species, accounting for 60% of total monoterpene concentration in January. Possible biogenic monoterpene sources beside the foliage are the leaf litter, the soil and also resins exuding from stems. In comparison, the hemiboreal mixed forest canopy showed similar isoprene but higher monoterpene concentrations than the boreal forest and lower isoprene but substantially higher monoterpene concentrations than the temperate mixed forest canopies. These results have major implications for simulating air chemistry and secondary organic aerosol formation within and above hemiboreal forest canopies. Possible effects of in-cartridge oxidation reactions are discussed as our measurement technique did not include oxidant scavenging. A comparison between measurements with and without scavenging oxidants is presented.

  5. Respiratory hazards associated with exposure to formaldehyde and solvents in acid-curing paints

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandersson, R.; Hedenstierna, G.

    1988-05-01

    Thirty-eight employees exposed to formaldehyde when working with acid-hardening lacquers and 18 nonexposed control persons employed at the same company were examined to determine lung function (spirometry and nitrogen washout), total immunoglobulin blood concentration, and work-related symptoms. The mean exposure to formaldehyde during an 8-hr workshop was 0.40 mg/m/sup 3/ air, and the mean exposure to peak values was 0.70 mg/m/sup 3/. Mean exposure to solvents was low, i.e., approximately 1/10 of the hygienic effect. Eye, nose, and throat irritation was more common in exposed persons than in controls. Monday morning, after two exposure-free days, forced vital capacity (FVC) values were found to have declined by 0.24 L and forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV/sub 1.0/) by 0.21 L, compared with normal values. There was a weak correlation between the individual concentration of IgG and decrease in FVC and FEV/sub 1.0/. No significant changes were noted in any other lung function variable before a work shift, and no lung function changes were noted over a full work shift. Deviations in FVC and FEV/sub 1.0/ values did not correlate to peaks or mean exposures or employment time.

  6. Formaldehyde exposures from tobacco smoke: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Godish, T

    1989-01-01

    Reports of formaldehyde levels in mainstream, sidestream, and environmental tobacco smoke from nine studies are reviewed. Considerable disparity exists between formaldehyde production rates determined from mainstream-sidestream studies and those reporting levels in environmental tobacco smoke. Tobacco smoke does not appear to increase vapor-phase formaldehyde levels significantly in indoor environments, but formaldehyde exposure in mainstream smoke may pose a risk of upper respiratory system cancer and increase the risk of cancer in smokers. PMID:2665532

  7. Formaldehyde exposures from tobacco smoke: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Godish, T.

    1989-08-01

    Reports of formaldehyde levels in mainstream, sidestream, and environmental tobacco smoke from nine studies are reviewed. Considerable disparity exists between formaldehyde production rates determined from mainstream-sidestream studies and those reporting levels in environmental tobacco smoke. Tobacco smoke does not appear to increase vapor-phase formaldehyde levels significantly in indoor environments, but formaldehyde exposure in mainstream smoke may pose a risk of upper respiratory system cancer and increase the risk of cancer in smokers. 18 references.

  8. Determination of lead, cations, and anions concentration in indoor and outdoor air at the primary schools in Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Awang, Normah; Jamaluddin, Farhana

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the concentration of lead (Pb), anions, and cations at six primary schools located around Kuala Lumpur. Low volume sampler (MiniVol PM10) was used to collect the suspended particulates in indoor and outdoor air. Results showed that the concentration of Pb in indoor air was in the range of 5.18 ± 1.08 μg/g-7.01 ± 0.08 μg/g. All the concentrations of Pb in indoor air were higher than in outdoor air at all sampling stations. The concentrations of cations and anions were higher in outdoor air than in indoor air. The concentration of Ca(2+) (39.51 ± 5.01 mg/g-65.13 ± 9.42 mg/g) was the highest because the cation existed naturally in soil dusts, while the concentrations of NO3 (-) and SO4 (2-) were higher in outdoor air because there were more sources of exposure for anions in outdoor air, such as highly congested traffic and motor vehicles emissions. In comparison, the concentration of NO3 (-) (29.72 ± 0.31 μg/g-32.00 ± 0.75 μg/g) was slightly higher than SO4 (2-). The concentrations of most of the parameters in this study, such as Mg(2+), Ca(2+), NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), and Pb(2+), were higher in outdoor air than in indoor air at all sampling stations.

  9. Modeling VOC emissions and air concentrations from the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, S.R. ); Drivas, P.J. )

    1993-03-01

    During the two-week period following the Exxon Valdez oil spill in March 1989 in Prince William Sound, Alaska, toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) evaporated from the surface of the oil spill and were transported and dispersed throughout the region. To estimate the air concentrations of these VOCs, emissions and dispersion modeling was conducted for each hour during the first two weeks of the spill. A multicomponent evaporative emissions model was developed and applied to the oil spill; the model considered the evaporation of 15 specific compounds, including benzene and toluene. Both mass transfer from the surface of the spill and diffusion through the oil layer were considered in the emissions model. Maximum emissions of toluene were calculated to equal about 20,000 kg/hr, or about 5 g/m[sup 2] hr, at a time of eight hours after the initial oil spill. Meteorological data were acquired from sources and used to estimate hourly-averaged wind velocity over the spill. Air concentrations of specific components were calculated using the ATDL area source diffusion model and the Offshore and Coastal Dispersion (OCD) model. Maximum hourly-averaged concentrations were predicted not to exceed 10 ppmv for any compound. 24 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Formaldehyde reactions in dark clouds.

    PubMed

    Sen, A D; Anicich, V G; Federman, S R

    1992-05-20

    The low-pressure reactions of formaldehyde (H2CO) with D+, D2+, D3+, and He+ have been studied by the ion cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potential loss processes for formaldehyde in cores of dark interstellar clouds. The deuterated reactants, which are easier to study experimentally, represent direct analogs for protons. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels have been measured. Charge transfer is observed to be the dominant reaction of H2CO with D+, D2+, and He+ ions. Only the D3+ reaction exhibits a proton transfer channel. All reactions proceed at rate coefficients near the collision limit. Proton-deuteron exchange reactions were found to be inefficient processes in the formaldehyde system.

  11. Air quality modelling : effects of emission reductions on concentrations of particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girault, L.; Roustan, Y.; Seigneur, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric particulate matter (PM) has adverse effects on human health. PM acts primarily on respiratory and cardiovascular (due to their small size they can penetrate deep into the lungs), but they are also known effects on the skin. In France, the "Particulate Plan" - developed as part of the second National Environmental Health Plan - aims to reduce by 30% fine PM (noted PM2.5because these particles have an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less) by 2015. A recent study by Airparif (the organization in charge of monitoring air quality in the Paris region, the Île-de-France) and LSCE (Laboratory of climate and the environmental science, France) has allowed, through a large measurement campaign conducted between 2009 and 2011, to quantify the proportion of PM produced in Île-de-France and those transported from the surrounding areas. The study by numerical modelling of air pollution presented here complements these results by investigating future emission scenarios. The CEREA develops and uses an air quality model which simulates the concentrations of pollutants from an emission inventory, meteorological data and boundary conditions of the area studied. After an evaluation of simulation results for the year 2005, the model is used to assess the effects of various scenarios of reductions in NOx and NH3 emissions on the concentrations of PM2.5in Île-de-France. The effects of the controls on the local pollution and the long-range pollution are considered separately. For each emitted species, three scenarios of emission reductions are identified: an emission reduction at the local level (Île-de-France), a reduction at the regional scale (France) and a reduction at the continental scale (across Europe). In each case, a 15% reduction is applied. The comparison of the results allows us to assess the respective contributions of local emissions and long-range transport to PM2.5 concentrations. For instance, the reduction of NOx emissions in Europe leads to a

  12. Contribution of ship emissions to the concentration and deposition of air pollutants in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksoyoglu, Sebnem; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2016-02-01

    Emissions from the marine transport sector are one of the least-regulated anthropogenic emission sources and contribute significantly to air pollution. Although strict limits were introduced recently for the maximum sulfur content in marine fuels in the SECAs (sulfur emission control areas) and in EU ports, sulfur emissions outside the SECAs and emissions of other components in all European maritime areas have continued to increase in the last two decades. We have used the air quality model CAMx (Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions) with and without ship emissions for the year 2006 to determine the effects of international shipping on the annual as well as seasonal concentrations of ozone, primary and secondary components of PM2.5, and the dry and wet deposition of nitrogen and sulfur compounds in Europe. The largest changes in pollutant concentrations due to ship emissions were predicted for summer. Concentrations of particulate sulfate increased due to ship emissions in the Mediterranean (up to 60 %), the English Channel and the North Sea (30-35 %), while increases in particulate nitrate levels were found especially in the north, around the Benelux area (20 %), where there were high NH3 land-based emissions. Our model results showed that not only are the atmospheric concentrations of pollutants affected by ship emissions, but also depositions of nitrogen and sulfur compounds increase significantly along the shipping routes. NOx emissions from the ships, especially in the English Channel and the North Sea, cause a decrease in the dry deposition of reduced nitrogen at source regions by moving it from the gas phase to the particle phase which then contributes to an increase in the wet deposition at coastal areas with higher precipitation. In the western Mediterranean region, on the other hand, model results show an increase in the deposition of oxidized nitrogen (mostly HNO3) due to the ship traffic. Dry deposition of SO2 seems to be significant along

  13. Extraordinary acoustic transmission through annuluses in air and its applications in acoustic beam splitter and concentrator.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yong; Sun, Hong-Xiang; Liu, Shu-Sen; Yuan, Shou-Qi; Xia, Jian-Ping; Guan, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Shu-Yi

    2016-08-01

    We report an extraordinary acoustic transmission through two layer annuluses made of metal cylinders in air both numerically and experimentally. The effect arises from the enhancement and reconstruction of the incident source induced by different Mie-resonance modes of the annuluses. The proposed system takes advantages of the consistency in the waveform between the input and output waves, the high amplitude amplification of output waves, and the easy adjustment of structure. More interestingly, we investigate the applications of the extraordinary acoustic transmission in the acoustic beam splitter and acoustic concentrator. Our finding should have an impact on ultrasonic applications. PMID:27587144

  14. Extraordinary acoustic transmission through annuluses in air and its applications in acoustic beam splitter and concentrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yong; Sun, Hong-xiang; Liu, Shu-sen; Yuan, Shou-qi; Xia, Jian-ping; Guan, Yi-jun; Zhang, Shu-yi

    2016-08-01

    We report an extraordinary acoustic transmission through two layer annuluses made of metal cylinders in air both numerically and experimentally. The effect arises from the enhancement and reconstruction of the incident source induced by different Mie-resonance modes of the annuluses. The proposed system takes advantages of the consistency in the waveform between the input and output waves, the high amplitude amplification of output waves, and the easy adjustment of structure. More interestingly, we investigate the applications of the extraordinary acoustic transmission in the acoustic beam splitter and acoustic concentrator. Our finding should have an impact on ultrasonic applications.

  15. Formaldehyde content of atmospheric aerosol.

    PubMed

    Toda, Kei; Yunoki, Satoru; Yanaga, Akira; Takeuchi, Masaki; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-06-17

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a highly soluble polar molecule with a large sticking coefficient and thus likely exists in both gaseous and particulate forms. Few studies, however, address particulate HCHO (HCHO(p)). Some report that HCHO(p) concentrations (obtained only with long duration sampling) are very low. The lack of data partly reflects the difficulty of specifically measuring HCHO(p). Long duration filter sampling may not produce meaningful results for a variety of reasons. In this work, gaseous HCHO (HCHO(g)) and (HCHO(p)) were, respectively, collected with a parallel plate wet denuder (PPWD) followed by a mist chamber/hydrophilic filter particle collector (PC). The PPWD quantitatively removed HCHO(g) and the PC then collected the transmitted aerosol. The collected HCHO from either device was alternately analyzed by Hantzsch reaction-based continuous flow fluorometry. Each gas and particle phase measurement took 5 min each, with a 10 min cycle. The limits of detection were 0.048 and 0.0033 μg m(-3), respectively, for HCHO(g) and HCHO(p). The instrument was deployed in three separate campaigns in a forest station in western Japan in March, May, and July of 2013. Based on 1296 data pairs, HCHO(p), was on the average, 5% of the total HCHO. Strong diurnal patterns were observed, with the HCHO(p) fraction peaking in the morning. The relative humidity dependence of the partition strongly suggests that it is driven by the liquid water content of the aerosol phase. However, HCHO(p) was 100× greater than that expected from Henry's law. We propose that the low water activity in the highly saline droplets lead to HCHO oligomerization.

  16. Use of dust fall filters as passive samplers for metal concentrations in air for communities near contaminated mine tailings

    PubMed Central

    Beamer, P.I.; Sugeng, A. J.; Kelly, M.D.; Lothrop, N.; Klimecki, W.; Wilkinson, S.T.; Loh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Mine tailings are a source of metal exposures in many rural communities. Multiple air samples are necessary to assess the extent of exposures and factors contributing to these exposures. However, air sampling equipment is costly and requires trained personnel to obtain measurements, limiting the number of samples that can be collected. Simple, low-cost methods are needed to allow for increased sample collection. The objective of our study was to assess if dust fall filters can serve as passive air samplers and be used to characterize potential exposures in a community near contaminated mine tailings. We placed filters in cylinders, concurrently with active indoor air samplers, in 10 occupied homes. We calculated an estimated flow rate by dividing the mass on each dust fall filter by the bulk air concentration and the sampling duration. The mean estimated flow rate for dust fall filters was significantly different during sampling periods with precipitation. The estimated flow rate was used to estimate metal concentration in the air of these homes, as well as in 31 additional homes in another rural community impacted by contaminated mine tailings. The estimated air concentrations had a significant linear association with the measured air concentrations for beryllium, manganese and arsenic (p<0.05), whose primary source in indoor air is resuspended soil from outdoors. In the second rural community, our estimated metal concentrations in air were comparable to active air sampling measurements taken previously. This passive air sampler is a simple low-cost method to assess potential exposures near contaminated mining sites. PMID:24469149

  17. Woodstoves, formaldehyde, and respiratory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, R.W.

    1984-12-01

    Telephone interviews were completed in Western Massachusetts in April 1983 for 399 households (91.5 percent) in a random sample of households with elementary school children. Woodstoves were used in 64.7 percent of the homes, but such use was not associated with acute respiratory illness. However, formaldehyde exposure was significantly related, with a risk ratio of 2.4 (95 percent confidence interval 1.7-3.4). New construction/remodeling and new upholstered furniture had additive effects. Neither woodstove use nor formaldehyde exposure were significantly associated with asthma, chronic bronchitis, or allergies.

  18. Woodstoves, formaldehyde, and respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, R W

    1984-12-01

    Telephone interviews were completed in Western Massachusetts in April 1983 for 399 households (91.5 per cent) in a random sample of households with elementary school children. Woodstoves were used in 64.7 per cent of the homes, but such use was not associated with acute respiratory illness. However, formaldehyde exposure was significantly related, with a risk ratio of 2.4 (95 per cent confidence interval 1.7-3.4). New construction/remodeling and new upholstered furniture had additive effects. Neither woodstove use nor formaldehyde exposure were significantly associated with asthma, chronic bronchitis, or allergies.

  19. Formaldehyde Reactions with Amines and Ammonia: Particle Formation and Product Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Millage, K. D.; Rodriguez, A.; Sedehi, N.; Powelson, M. H.; De Haan, D. O.

    2012-12-01

    Aqueous phase reactions between carbonyls and amines or ammonium salts have recently been implicated in secondary organic aerosol and brown carbon formation processes. Formaldehyde is ubiquitous in the atmosphere, and is present in both the gas and aqueous phases. However, the reactions of formaldehyde in the aqueous phase have not been completely characterized. This study aims to determine the interactions between formaldehyde and amines or ammonium salts present in atmospheric droplets. Bulk phase reactions of formaldehyde with these reactive nitrogen-containing compounds were monitored with ESI-MS and NMR to determine reaction kinetics and for product characterization, while UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to monitor changes in light absorption over time. Hexamethylenetetramine was found to be a major product of the formaldehyde/ammonium sulfate reaction, appearing within minutes of mixing. No products were formed that absorbed light beyond 225 nm. Mono-disperse particles containing mixtures of formaldehyde and ammonium sulfate or an amine were dried and analyzed via SMPS to determine the non-volatile fraction of the reaction products. Similarly, aqueous droplets were dried in a humid atmosphere to determine residual aerosol sizes over time as a function of formaldehyde concentration. This work indicates that formaldehyde plays a key role in aqueous-phase organic processing, as it has been observed to contribute to both an increase and reduction in the diameter and volume of residual aerosol particles.

  20. Capture of formaldehyde by adsorption on nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Bellat, Jean-Pierre; Bezverkhyy, Igor; Weber, Guy; Royer, Sébastien; Averlant, Remy; Giraudon, Jean-Marc; Lamonier, Jean-François

    2015-12-30

    The aim of this work is to assess the capability of a series of nanoporous materials to capture gaseous formaldehyde by adsorption in order to develop air treatment process and gas detection in workspaces or housings. Adsorption-desorption isotherms have been accurately measured at room temperature by TGA under very low pressure (p<2 hPa) on various adsorbents, such as zeolites, mesoporous silica (SBA15), activated carbon (AC NORIT RB3) and metal organic framework (MOF, Ga-MIL-53), exhibiting a wide range of pore sizes and surface properties. Results reveal that the NaX, NaY and CuX faujasite (FAU) zeolites are materials which show strong adsorption capacity and high affinity toward formaldehyde. In addition, these materials can be completely regenerated by heating at 200°C under vacuum. These cationic zeolites are therefore promising candidates as adsorbents for the design of air depollution process or gas sensing applications.

  1. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Nanoparticles for Formaldehyde Sensing with QCM

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Munawar; Kotova, Kira; Lieberzeit, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for detecting formaldehyde vapors in air streams. A copolymer thin film consisting of styrene, methacrylic acid, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate on quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) yielded a detection limit of 500 ppb formaldehyde in dry air. Surprisingly, these MIPs showed specific behavior when tested against a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as acetaldehyde, methanol, formic acid, and dichloromethane. Despite thus being a suitable receptor in principle, the MIPs were not useful for measurements at 50% humidity due to surface saturation by water. This was overcome by introducing primary amino groups into the polymer via allyl amine and by changing the coating morphology from thin film to nanoparticles. This led to the same limit of detection (500 ppb) and selectivity as before, but at the real-life conditions of 50% relative humidity. PMID:27376287

  2. Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Nanoparticles for Formaldehyde Sensing with QCM.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Munawar; Kotova, Kira; Lieberzeit, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) for detecting formaldehyde vapors in air streams. A copolymer thin film consisting of styrene, methacrylic acid, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate on quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) yielded a detection limit of 500 ppb formaldehyde in dry air. Surprisingly, these MIPs showed specific behavior when tested against a range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as acetaldehyde, methanol, formic acid, and dichloromethane. Despite thus being a suitable receptor in principle, the MIPs were not useful for measurements at 50% humidity due to surface saturation by water. This was overcome by introducing primary amino groups into the polymer via allyl amine and by changing the coating morphology from thin film to nanoparticles. This led to the same limit of detection (500 ppb) and selectivity as before, but at the real-life conditions of 50% relative humidity. PMID:27376287

  3. Mixing layer height measurements determines influence of meteorology on air pollutant concentrations in urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Blumenstock, Thomas; Bonn, Boris; Gerwig, Holger; Hase, Frank; Münkel, Christoph; Nothard, Rainer; von Schneidemesser, Erika

    2015-10-01

    Mixing layer height (MLH) is a key parameter to determine the influence of meteorological parameters upon air pollutants such as trace gas species and particulate concentrations near the surface. Meteorology, and MLH as a key parameter, affect the budget of emission source strengths, deposition, and accumulation. However, greater possibilities for the application of MLH data have been identified in recent years. Here, the results of measurements in Berlin in 2014 are shown and discussed. The concentrations of NO, NO2, O3, CO, PM1, PM2.5, PM10 and about 70 volatile organic compounds (anthropogenic and biogenic of origin) as well as particle size distributions and contributions of SOA and soot species to PM were measured at the urban background station of the Berlin air quality network (BLUME) in Nansenstr./Framstr., Berlin-Neukölln. A Vaisala ceilometer CL51, which is a commercial mini-lidar system, was applied at that site to detect the layers of the lower atmosphere in real time. Special software for these ceilometers with MATLAB provided routine retrievals of MLH from vertical profiles of laser backscatter data. Five portable Bruker EM27/SUN FTIR spectrometers were set up around Berlin to detect column averaged abundances of CO2 and CH4 by solar absorption spectrometry. Correlation analyses were used to show the coupling of temporal variations of trace gas compounds and PM with MLH. Significant influences of MLH upon NO, NO2, PM10, PM2.5, PM1 and toluene (marker for traffic emissions) concentrations as well as particle number concentrations in the size modes 70 - 100 nm, 100 - 200 nm and 200 - 500 nm on the basis of averaged diurnal courses were found. Further, MLH was taken as important auxiliary information about the development of the boundary layer during each day of observations, which was required for the proper estimation of CO2 and CH4 source strengths from Berlin on the basis of atmospheric column density measurements.

  4. Soil Surface Carbon Dioxide Fluxes and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Soil Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkebauer, T. J.; Billesbach, D.

    2006-12-01

    We have been monitoring soil surface CO2 fluxes at three AmeriFlux sites in eastern Nebraska for several years. Recently, we have installed soil CO2 sensors at the rainfed soybean site in order to obtain profiles of CO2 concentrations in soil air (to 0.8 m depth). Supporting data include profiles of soil water content and soil temperature, aboveground biomass, leaf area index and precipitation. Soil surface fluxes had been rather small for much of the 2006 growing season (e.g., midday values of about 5 umol/m2/s) due, in large part, to the very dry conditions in eastern Nebraska and the consequent low soil water contents. However, copious rainfall in August raised soil water contents to field capacity throughout the profile. Soil air CO2 concentrations during this period also increased and reached peaks near 10% (at 0.4 and 0.8 m depth). Through analyses of relationships between surface CO2 flux and profiles of soil parameters we seek to identify biophysical factors responsible for controlling surface fluxes as well as to begin to quantify sources and sinks of CO2 within the soil profile (e.g., plant-related production of CO2 due to root exudation and respiration). The influence of precipitation events on CO2 profiles and fluxes is of particular interest.

  5. Portable Cathode-Air Vapor-Feed Electrochemical Medical Oxygen Concentrator (OC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramanian, Ashwin

    2015-01-01

    Missions on the International Space Station and future space exploration will present significant challenges to crew health care capabilities, particularly in the efficient utilization of onboard oxygen resources. Exploration vehicles will require lightweight, compact, and portable oxygen concentrators that can provide medical-grade oxygen from the ambient cabin air. Current pressure-swing adsorption OCs are heavy and bulky, require significant start-up periods, operate in narrow temperature ranges, and require a liquid water feed. Lynntech, Inc., has developed an electrochemical OC that operates with a cathode-air vapor feed, eliminating the need for a bulky onboard water supply. Lynntech's OC is smaller and lighter than conventional pressure-swing OCs, is capable of instant start-up, and operates over a temperature range of 5-80 C. Accomplished through a unique nanocomposite proton exchange membrane and catalyst technology, the unit delivers 4 standard liters per minute of humidified oxygen at 60 percent concentration. The technology enables both ambient-pressure operating devices for portable applications and pressurized (up to 3,600 psi) OC devices for stationary applications.

  6. Coal as a catalyst in the oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Nehemia, V.; Davidi, S.; Richter, U.B.; Haenel, M.W.; Cohen, H.

    1997-12-31

    Recently it has been reported that molecular hydrogen is released in small, but appreciable concentrations as a result of the low temperature (40--120 C) oxidation of bituminous coal during long term storage. The amounts of hydrogen produced correlates linearly with the amounts of oxygen consumed. An oxidation process promoted by molecular oxygen is generally not expected to produce a reduction product such as hydrogen. It has been suggested that formaldehyde might be formed in the low temperature oxidation of the coal, and that this acts as the hydrogen precursor. Batch reactor studies have proved that formaldehyde undergoes oxidative decomposition with oxygen. The authors now propose that formaldehyde is oxidized by coal-derived hydroperoxides to form dioxirane, which subsequently decomposes into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. It is known that acetone is oxidized by potassium peroxomonosulfate (KHSO{sub 5}), ``oxone`` to dimethyldioxirane, which recently has become an important oxidant in preparative chemistry. According to a theoretical study (published in 1993) the decomposition of dioxirane yielding hydrogen and carbon dioxide is exothermic by {minus}420 kJ/mole. In order to further support their mechanistic proposal, the authors investigated the oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (BuOOH) in the absence and the presence of a German bituminous coal. It is observed that indeed hydrogen and CO{sub 2} are produced in about a 1:1 ratio. A demineralized coal sample was prepared in order to investigate the influence of the mineral matter within the coal on the oxidative decomposition of formaldehyde. The results corroborate the suggestion that the hydrogen emission in the low temperature oxidation of coal originates from formaldehyde oxidation by coal-derived hydroperoxides, both of which appeared to be formed by decomposition of surface oxides within the coal.

  7. Concentration and determinants of molds and allergens in indoor air and house dust of French dwellings.

    PubMed

    Dallongeville, Arnaud; Le Cann, Pierre; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Chevrier, Cécile; Costet, Nathalie; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Blanchard, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Molds and allergens are common indoor biocontaminants. The aims of this study were to assess the concentrations of common molds in indoor air and floor dust and the concentrations of house dust mite, cat and dog allergens in mattress dust in French dwellings, and to assess predictors of these concentrations. A sample of 150 houses in Brittany (western France) was investigated. Airborne Cladosporium and Penicillium were detected in more than 90% of the dwellings, Aspergillus in 46% and Alternaria in only 6% of the housings. Regarding floor dust samples, Cladosporium and Penicillium were detected in 92 and 80% of the housings respectively, Aspergillus in 49% and Alternaria in 14%. House dust mite allergens Der p1 and Der f1 were detected in 90% and 77% of the mattress dust samples respectively and Can f1 and Fel d1 in 37% and 89% of the homes. Airborne and dustborne mold concentrations, although not statistically correlated (except for Aspergillus) shared most of their predictors. Multivariate linear models for mold levels, explaining up to 62% of the variability, showed an influence of the season, of the age of the dwelling, of aeration habits, presence of pets, smoking, signals of dampness, temperature and relative humidity. Allergens in the dust of the mattress were strongly related to the presence of pets and cleaning practices of bedsheets, these factors accounting for 60% of the variability. This study highlights ubiquitous contamination by molds and underlines complex interaction between outdoor and indoor sources and factors. PMID:26094801

  8. LINKING AIR TOXIC CONCENTRATIONS FROM CMAQ TO THE HAPEM5 EXPOSURE MODEL AT NEIGHORHOOD SCALES FOR THE PHILADELPHIA AREA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper provides a preliminary demonstration of the EPA neighborhood scale modeling paradigm for air toxics by linking concentration from the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system to the fifth version of the Hazardous Pollutant Exposure Model (HAPEM5). For ...

  9. Effect of central ventilation and air conditioner system on the concentration and health risk from airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jinze; Zhu, Lizhong

    2013-03-01

    Central ventilation and air conditioner systems are widely utilized nowadays in public places for air exchange and temperature control, which significantly influences the transfer of pollutants between indoors and outdoors. To study the effect of central ventilation and air conditioner systems on the concentration and health risk from airborne pollutants, a spatial and temporal survey was carried out using polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as agent pollutants. During the period when the central ventilation system operated without air conditioning (AC-off period), concentrations of 2-4 ring PAHs in the model supermarket were dominated by outdoor levels, due to the good linearity between indoor air and outdoor air (r(p) > 0.769, p < 0.05), and the slopes (1.2-4.54) indicated that ventilating like the model supermarket increased the potential health risks from low molecular weight PAHs. During the period when the central ventilation and air conditioner systems were working simultaneously (AC-on period), although the total levels of PAHs were increased, the concentrations and percentage of the particulate PAHs indoors declined significantly. The BaP equivalency (BaPeq) concentration indicated that utilization of air conditioning reduced the health risks from PAHs in the model supermarket. PMID:23923426

  10. Influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Hoff, R.M.

    2000-03-15

    The influence of eutrophication on the biogeochemical cycles of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is largely unknown. In this paper, the application of a dynamic air-water-phytoplankton exchange model to Lake Ontario is used as a framework to study the influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of POPs. The results of these simulations demonstrate that air-water exchange controls phytoplankton concentrations in remote aquatic environments with little influence from land-based sources of pollutants and supports levels in even historically contaminated systems. Furthermore, eutrophication or high biomass leads to a disequilibrium between the gas and dissolved phase, enhanced air-water exchange, and vertical sinking fluxes of PCBs. Increasing biomass also depletes the water concentrations leading to lower than equilibrium PCB concentrations in phytoplankton. Implications to future trends in PCB pollution in Lake Ontario are also discussed.

  11. Formaldehyde monitor for automobile exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easley, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    Device makes use of microwave spectral absorption in low-Q resonant Stark cell, and indications are that ultimate sensitivity of instrument is within 100 parts per billion of formaldehyde. Microwave source is very small and requires only six-volt dc bias for operation. Coarse tuning is accomplished mechanically and fine tuning by adjusting dc-bias voltage.

  12. Novel silicone-based polymer containing active methylene designed for the removal of indoor formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Niu, Song; Yan, Hongxia

    2015-04-28

    Indoor air pollution is caused inevitably due to complicated home decoration, in which formaldehyde is one of the most typical pollutants. It will be a convenient, economical and effective strategy to remove indoor formaldehyde if imparting a feature of formaldehyde removal to decorative coatings. We have successfully explored a novel silicone-based polymer containing active methylene used as a formaldehyde absorbent in coatings via a straightforward transesterification process using inexpensive and easily available chemicals. The polymer has been characterized by (13)C NMR, FTIR, GC and GPC. Formaldehyde removal capacity of the coating films containing different contents of the polymer has been investigated. The results indicated that coatings incorporating 4wt% of the polymer could make the coating films exhibit significant improvement on formaldehyde removal including purificatory performance (>85%) and durability of purificatory effect (>60%), compared to those consisting of absorbents without any silicon, and improve yellowing resistance performance, while other properties, such as gloss, adhesion, pencil hardness, flexibility and impact resistance, were kept almost unaffected. The chemical absorption process of the silicone-based polymer filled in interior decorative coatings is demonstrated as a promising technology to purify indoor formaldehyde and thus can reduce the harm to individuals.

  13. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  14. Removal of formaldehyde by adsorption and plasma treatment of mineral adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saulich, K.; Müller, S.

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a harmful ambient air pollutant which can be produced by incomplete combustion processes, e.g. in power plants or automobiles. In this work a cycled adsorption and discharge process using mineral granulate in a packed bed dielectric barrier discharge plasma reactor was applied for formaldehyde (99 ppm) removal from gas streams. The mineral granulate used consisted of 80% halloysite and showed a good adsorption capacity for formaldehyde. In the discharge step, the adsorbed formaldehyde molecules were decomposed to COx and hydrocarbons in a N2 plasma at a low input discharge power of 2.2 W. The decomposition performance on adsorbed formaldehyde molecules was studied depending on space-time, a specific oxygen fraction of the carrier gas and the influence of temperature. With rising N2 space times in the discharge area, the total amount of decomposed formaldehyde molecules increased and the decomposition reaction mechanism shifted to CO2 formation. An oxygen fraction in the carrier gas further raised the oxidized amount of formaldehyde to CO2. The mineral granulate showed satisfied regeneration ability during the cycled plasma process.

  15. Concentrated ambient air particles induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Batalha, Joao R F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Clarke, Robert W; Coull, Brent A; Stearns, Rebecca C; Lawrence, Joy; Murthy, G G Krishna; Koutrakis, Petros; Godleski, John J

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether short-term exposures to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) alter the morphology of small pulmonary arteries in normal rats and rats with chronic bronchitis (CB). Sprague-Dawley male rats were exposed to CAPs, using the Harvard Ambient Particle Concentrator, or to particle-free air (sham) under identical conditions during 3 consecutive days (5 hr/day) in six experimental sets. CB was induced by exposure to 276 +/- 9 ppm of sulfur dioxide (5 hr/day, 5 days/week, 6 weeks). Physicochemical characterization of CAPs included measurements of particle mass, size distribution, and composition. Rats were sacrificed 24 hr after the last CAPs exposure. Histologic slides were prepared from random sections of lung lobes and coded for blinded analysis. The lumen/wall area (L/W) ratio was determined morphometrically on transverse sections of small pulmonary arteries. When all animal data (normal and CB) were analyzed together, the L/W ratios decreased as concentrations of fine particle mass, silicon, lead, sulfate, elemental carbon, and organic carbon increased. In separate univariate analyses of animal data, the association for sulfate was significant only in normal rats, whereas silicon was significantly associated in both CB and normal rats. In multivariate analyses including all particle factors, the association with silicon remained significant. Our results indicate that short-term CAPs exposures (median, 182.75 micro g/m3; range, 73.50-733.00 micro g/m3) can induce vasoconstriction of small pulmonary arteries in normal and CB rats. This effect was correlated with specific particle components and suggests that the pulmonary vasculature might be an important target for ambient air particle toxicity. PMID:12460797

  16. Diagnostic significance of nitric oxide concentrations in exhaled air from the airways in allergic rhinitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Krzych-Fałta, Edyta; Samoliński, Bolesław K; Zalewska, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the human body is very important due its physiological regulation of the following functions of airways: modulation of ciliary movement and maintenance of sterility in sinuses. Aim To evaluate the diagnostic significance of NO concentrations in exhaled air from the upper and lower airways in patients diagnosed with allergic rhinitis (AR). Material and methods The subjects included in the study were a group of 30 people diagnosed with sensitivity to environmental allergens and a control group consisting of 30 healthy subjects. The measurement of NO in the air exhaled from the lower and upper airways was performed using an on-line method by means of Restricted Exhaled Breath (REB), as well as using the measurement procedure (chemiluminescence) set out in the guidelines prepared in 2005 by the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society. Results In the late phase of the allergic reaction, higher values of the level of exhaled NO concentration from the lower airways were observed in the groups of subjects up to the threshold values of 25.17 ppb in the group of subjects with year-round allergic rhinitis and 21.78 ppb in the group with diagnosed seasonal allergic rhinitis. The difference in the concentration of NO exhaled from the lungs between the test group and the control group in the 4th h of the test was statistically significant (p = 0.045). Conclusions Exhaled NO should be considered as a marker of airway inflammation. It plays an important role in the differential diagnosis of allergy. PMID:27279816

  17. Detecting and preventing reversion to toxicity for a formaldehyde-treated C. difficile toxin B mutant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Wang, Su; Rustandi, Richard R; Wang, Feng; Mensch, Christopher D; Hong, Laura; Kristopeit, Adam; Secore, Susan; Dornadula, Geethanjali; Kanavage, Anthony; Heinrichs, Jon H; Mach, Henryk; Blue, Jeffrey T; Thiriot, David S

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of Clostridium difficile large clostridial toxin B (TcdB) can be reduced by many orders of magnitude by a combination of targeted point mutations. However, a TcdB mutant with five point mutations (referred to herein as mTcdB) still has residual toxicity that can be detected in cell-based assays and in-vivo mouse toxicity assays. This residual toxicity can be effectively removed by treatment with formaldehyde in solution. Storage of the formaldehyde-treated mTcdB as a liquid can result in reversion over time back to the mTcdB level of toxicity, with the rate of reversion dependent on the storage temperature. We found that for both the "forward" mTcdB detoxification reaction with formaldehyde, and the "reverse" reversion to toxicity reaction, mouse toxicity correlated with several biochemical assays including anion exchange chromatography retention time and appearance on SDS-PAGE. Maintenance of a low concentration of formaldehyde prevents reversion to toxicity in liquid formulations. However, when samples with 0.016% (v/v) formaldehyde were lyophilized and stored at 37 °C, formaldehyde continued to react with and modify the mTcdB in the lyophilized state. Lyophilization alone effectively prevented reversion to toxicity for formaldehyde-treated, formaldehyde-removed mTcdB samples stored at 37 °C for 6 months. Formaldehyde-treated, formaldehyde-removed lyophilized mTcdB showed no evidence of reversion to toxicity, appeared stable by several assays, and was immunogenic in mice, even after storage for 6 months at 37 °C.

  18. Uric formaldehyde levels are negatively correlated with cognitive abilities in healthy older adults.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jing; Su, Tao; Zhou, Ting; He, Yingge; Lu, Jing; Li, Juan; He, Rongqiao

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the abnormal accumulation of endogenous formaldehyde could be a critical factor in age-related cognitive decline. The aim of this study was to estimate the correlation between uric formaldehyde and general cognitive abilities in a community-based elderly population, and to measure the extent and direction in which the correlation varied with demographic characteristics. Using a double-blind design, formaldehyde in human urine was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (n = 604), and general cognitive abilities were measured using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA). Demographic characteristics, in terms of age, gender, residential region, and education were taken into consideration. We found that uric formaldehyde levels were inversely correlated with the MoCA score, and the concentration varied with demographic features: higher odds of a high formaldehyde level occurred among the less educated and those living in old urban or rural areas. In cytological experiments, the level of cellular formaldehyde released into the medium increased as SH-SY5Y and BV2 cells were incubated for three days. Formaldehyde in excess impaired the processes of N2a cells and neurites of primary cultured rat hippocampal cells. However, removal of formaldehyde markedly rescued and regenerated the processes of N2a cells. These results demonstrated a negative correlation between the endogenous formaldehyde and general cognitive abilities. High formaldehyde levels could be a risk factor for cognitive impairment in older adults, and could be developed as a non-invasive marker for detection and monitoring of age-related cognitive impairment.

  19. Colorimetric monitoring of formaldehyde in indoor environment using built-in camera on mobile phone.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yoshika; Katori, Risa; Tsuda, Yuko; Kitahara, Takio

    2016-01-01

    A simple monitoring system of indoor air pollution is proposed by integrating a novel colorimetric detector of formaldehyde (HCHO) and a function of a built-in camera on mobile phone. The colorimetric detector employs a solid phase colorimetric reagent made from 4-amino-3-hydrazino-5-mercapto-1,2,4-triazole, ZnO, KIO4 and agar, and changes colour from white to purple by exposure to HCHO gas. The degree of colour changes expressed in Red, Green and Blue model model responded to the HCHO concentration levels both in air and from building materials. Limit of quantitation of the detector with 24 h-exposure resulted in 0.011 mg/m(3) of air concentration which meets a requirement of methodology to detect indoor air quality guideline level of HCHO set by World Health Organization. The detector is also applicable to classify HCHO-emitting materials at least into Type 1, whose emission flux is greater than 120 μg/m(2)/h, and others. Then, variation of the acquired photo images was investigated by using various mobile phones and changing conditions of photography. As a result, the calibration of the measured colour intensity with a colour standard reduced the variation of the results and gave a significant output when the auto-focused images were taken under the condition of common indoor environment. PMID:26616679

  20. Analysis of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a radiopharmaceutical production facility based on a medical cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, M.; Tomarchio, E.; Greco, D.

    2015-11-01

    Positron emitting radionuclides are increasingly used in medical diagnostics and the number of radiopharmaceutical production facilities have been estimated to be growing worldwide. During the process of production and/or patient administration of radiopharmaceuticals, an amount of these radionuclides might become airborne and escape into the environment. Therefore, the analysis of radionuclide concentration in the air released to the stack is a very important issue to evaluate the dose to the population living around the plant. To this end, sampling and measurement of radionuclide concentration in air released through the stack of a Nuclear Medicine Center (NMC), provided with a cyclotron for radiopharmaceuticals production, must be routinely carried out with an automatic measurement system. In this work is presented the air monitoring system realized at "San Gaetano" NMC at Bagheria (Italy) besides the analysis of the recorded stack relesead air concentration data. Sampling of air was carried out continuously and gamma-ray spectrometric measurement are made on-line and for a short time by using a shielded Marinelli beaker filled with sampled air and a gamma detector. The use of this system allows to have 1440 values of air concentration per day from 2002, year of the start of operation with the cyclotron. Therefore, the concentration values are very many and an analysis software is needed to determine the dose to the population. A comparison with the results of a simulation code based on a Gaussian Plume air dispersion modelling allow us to confirm the no-radiological significance of the stack effluent releases in terms of dose to population and to evaluate possible improvements in the plant devices to reduce the air concentration at stack.

  1. Consumer inhalation exposure to formaldehyde from the use of personal care products/cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Marc-André; Meuling, Wim J A; Engel, Roel; Coroama, Manuela C; Renner, Gerald; Pape, Wolfgang; Nohynek, Gerhard J

    2012-06-01

    We measured consumer exposure to formaldehyde (FA) from personal care products (PCP) containing FA-releasing preservatives. Six study subjects applied facial moisturiser, foundation, shower gel, shampoo, deodorant, hair conditioner, hair styling gel or body lotion at the 90th percentile amount of EU PCP consumer use. FA air concentrations were measured in the empty room, in the presence of study subjects prior to PCP use, and for one hour (breathing zone, area monitoring) after PCP use. The mean FA air concentration in the empty bathroom was 1.32 ± 0.67 μg/m³, in the presence of subjects it was 2.33 ± 0.86 μg/m³). Except for body lotion and hair conditioner (6.2 ± 0.1.9 or 4.5 ± 0.1.5 μg/m³, respectively), mean 1-h FA air concentrations after PCP use were similar to background. Peak FA air concentrations, ranging from baseline values (2.2 μg/m³; shower gel) to 11.5 μg/m³ (body lotion), occurred during 0-5 to 5-10 min after PCP use. Despite of exaggerated exposure conditions, FA air levels were a fraction of those considered to be safe (120 μg/m³), occurring in indoor air (22-124 μg/m³) or expired human breath (1.4-87 μg/m³). Overall, our data yielded evidence that inhalation of FA from the use of PCP containing FA-releasers poses no risk to human health. PMID:22406137

  2. Consumer inhalation exposure to formaldehyde from the use of personal care products/cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Marc-André; Meuling, Wim J A; Engel, Roel; Coroama, Manuela C; Renner, Gerald; Pape, Wolfgang; Nohynek, Gerhard J

    2012-06-01

    We measured consumer exposure to formaldehyde (FA) from personal care products (PCP) containing FA-releasing preservatives. Six study subjects applied facial moisturiser, foundation, shower gel, shampoo, deodorant, hair conditioner, hair styling gel or body lotion at the 90th percentile amount of EU PCP consumer use. FA air concentrations were measured in the empty room, in the presence of study subjects prior to PCP use, and for one hour (breathing zone, area monitoring) after PCP use. The mean FA air concentration in the empty bathroom was 1.32 ± 0.67 μg/m³, in the presence of subjects it was 2.33 ± 0.86 μg/m³). Except for body lotion and hair conditioner (6.2 ± 0.1.9 or 4.5 ± 0.1.5 μg/m³, respectively), mean 1-h FA air concentrations after PCP use were similar to background. Peak FA air concentrations, ranging from baseline values (2.2 μg/m³; shower gel) to 11.5 μg/m³ (body lotion), occurred during 0-5 to 5-10 min after PCP use. Despite of exaggerated exposure conditions, FA air levels were a fraction of those considered to be safe (120 μg/m³), occurring in indoor air (22-124 μg/m³) or expired human breath (1.4-87 μg/m³). Overall, our data yielded evidence that inhalation of FA from the use of PCP containing FA-releasers poses no risk to human health.

  3. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde and wood dust and nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, T.; Stewart, P.; Teschke, K.; Lynch, C.; Swanson, G; Lyon, J.; Berwick, M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate whether occupational exposures to formaldehyde and wood dust increase the risk of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC).
METHODS—A multicentred, population based case-control study was carried out at five cancer registries in the United States participating in the National Cancer Institute's SEER program. Cases (n=196) with a newly diagnosed NPC between 1987 and 1993, and controls (n=244) selected over the same period from the general population through random digit dialing participated in structured telephone interviews which inquired about suspected risk factors for the disease, including a lifetime history of occupational and chemical exposure. Histological type of cancer was abstracted from clinical records of the registries. Potential exposure to formaldehyde and wood dust was assessed on a job by job basis by experienced industrial hygienists who were blinded as to case or control status.
RESULTS—For formaldehyde, after adjusting for cigarette use, race, and other risk factors, a trend of increasing risk of squamous and unspecified epithelial carcinomas was found for increasing duration (p=0.014) and cumulative exposure (p=0.033) but not for maximum exposure concentration. The odds ratio (OR) for people cumulatively exposed to >1.10 ppm-years was 3.0 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.3 to 6.6) compared with those considered unexposed. In analyses limited to jobs considered definitely exposed, these trends became stronger. The associations were most evident among cigarette smokers. By contrast, there was no association between potential exposure to formaldehyde and undifferentiated and non-keratinising carcinomas. There was little evidence that exposure to wood dust increased risk of NPC, as modest crude associations essentially disappeared after control for potential exposure to formaldehyde.
CONCLUSIONS—These results support the hypothesis that occupational exposure to formaldehyde, but not wood dust, increases risk of NPC

  4. Ag-Modified In₂O₃/ZnO Nanobundles with High Formaldehyde Gas-Sensing Performance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Bai, Lu; Song, Dongsheng; Yang, Hongping; Sun, Xiaoming; Sun, Hongyu; Zhu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles with micro/nano porous structures have been designed and synthesized with by hydrothermal method continuing with dehydration process. Each bundle consists of nanoparticles, where nanogaps of 10-30 nm are present between the nanoparticles, leading to a porous structure. This porous structure brings high surface area and fast gas diffusion, enhancing the gas sensitivity. Consequently, the HCHO gas-sensing performance of the Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles have been tested, with the formaldehyde-detection limit of 100 ppb (parts per billion) and the response and recover times as short as 6 s and 3 s, respectively, at 300 °C and the detection limit of 100 ppb, response time of 12 s and recover times of 6 s at 100 °C. The HCHO sensing detect limitation matches the health standard limitation on the concentration of formaldehyde for indoor air. Moreover, the strategy to synthesize the nanobundles is just two-step heating and easy to scale up. Therefore, the Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles are ready for industrialization and practical applications. PMID:26287205

  5. Ag-Modified In₂O₃/ZnO Nanobundles with High Formaldehyde Gas-Sensing Performance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Fang; Bai, Lu; Song, Dongsheng; Yang, Hongping; Sun, Xiaoming; Sun, Hongyu; Zhu, Jing

    2015-08-14

    Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles with micro/nano porous structures have been designed and synthesized with by hydrothermal method continuing with dehydration process. Each bundle consists of nanoparticles, where nanogaps of 10-30 nm are present between the nanoparticles, leading to a porous structure. This porous structure brings high surface area and fast gas diffusion, enhancing the gas sensitivity. Consequently, the HCHO gas-sensing performance of the Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles have been tested, with the formaldehyde-detection limit of 100 ppb (parts per billion) and the response and recover times as short as 6 s and 3 s, respectively, at 300 °C and the detection limit of 100 ppb, response time of 12 s and recover times of 6 s at 100 °C. The HCHO sensing detect limitation matches the health standard limitation on the concentration of formaldehyde for indoor air. Moreover, the strategy to synthesize the nanobundles is just two-step heating and easy to scale up. Therefore, the Ag-modified In2O3/ZnO bundles are ready for industrialization and practical applications.

  6. MTBE concentrations in ambient air in the vicinity of service stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainiotalo, Sinikka; Peltonen, Yrjö; Pfäffli, Pirkko

    Ambient air concentrations of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) were monitored in the vicinity of two self-service stations in May-June and October, 1995. These stations (one urban and one roadside) were located in southwestern Finland and were equipped with "stage I" vapour recovery systems. All the gasoline blends dispensed during the study (95, 98 and 99 RON) contained 11% MTBE. The measurements were carried out 24 h day -1 at stationary sampling points located at the four main compass points on the service station perimeter (about 50 m from the centre of the forecourt). The air samples were collected in charcoal tubes and analysed in laboratory by gas chromatography using mass-selective detection. The concentrations in individual samples ranged from 0.5 to 121 μg m -3, and the highest daily concentrations were usually obtained at the downwind sampling points. The arithmetic mean concentrations for each of the four-day sampling periods were: 7.5 μg m -3 (station 1/May-June), 4.1 μg/m 3 (station 1/October), 12.4 μg m -3 (station 2/June) and 14.1 μg m -3 (station 2/October). The mean concentrations measured in the centre of the pump island (only daytime sampling) ranged from 247 to 1347 μg m -3. The levels of MTBE are station-specific and dependent on many factors, such as volumes of gasolines sold, wind speed, exhaust emissions from passing traffic, and deliveries of gasoline to the station. The mean wind speeds were between 0.7 and 1.5 m s -1, and the temperatures were above 22°C in summer and about 10°C in October. The volume of gasoline sold at the urban service station, station 2, was twice that at the roadside service station, station 1. There was one road with high traffic density adjacent to station 1 and two such roads at station 2. Gasoline was delivered twice to station 1 and 3 times to station 2 during the study.

  7. CONTINUOUS FORMALDEHYDE MEASUREMENT SYSTEM BASED ON MODIFIED FOURIER TRANSFORM INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is developing advanced open-path and cell-based optical techniques for time-resolved measurement of priority hazardous air pollutants such as formaldehyde (HCHO). Due to its high National Air Toxics Assessment risk factor, there is increasing interest in continuous measuremen...

  8. The concentration-response relation between air pollution and daily deaths.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, J; Ballester, F; Saez, M; Pérez-Hoyos, S; Bellido, J; Cambra, K; Arribas, F; Cañada, A; Pérez-Boillos, M J; Sunyer, J

    2001-01-01

    Studies on three continents have reported associations between various measures of airborne particles and daily deaths. Sulfur dioxide has also been associated with daily deaths, particularly in Europe. Questions remain about the shape of those associations, particularly whether there are thresholds at low levels. We examined the association of daily concentrations of black smoke and SO(2) with daily deaths in eight Spanish cities (Barcelona, Bilbao, Castellón, Gijón, Oviedo, Valencia, Vitoria, and Zaragoza) with different climates and different environmental and social characteristics. We used nonparametric smoothing to estimate the shape of the concentration-response curve in each city and combined those results using a metasmoothing technique developed by Schwartz and Zanobetti. We extended their method to incorporate random variance components. Black smoke had a nearly linear association with daily deaths, with no evidence of a threshold. A 10 microg/m(3) increase in black smoke was associated with a 0.88% increase in daily deaths (95% confidence interval, 0.56%-1.20%). SO(2) had a less plausible association: Daily deaths increased at very low concentrations, but leveled off and then decreased at higher concentrations. These findings held in both one- and two-pollutant models and held whether we optimized our weather and seasonal model in each city or used the same smoothing parameters in each city. We conclude that the association with particle levels is more convincing than for SO(2), and without a threshold. Linear models provide an adequate estimation of the effect of particulate air pollution on mortality at low to moderate concentrations. PMID:11675264

  9. Trends in mercury wet deposition and mercury air concentrations across the U.S. and Canada.

    PubMed

    Weiss-Penzias, Peter S; Gay, David A; Brigham, Mark E; Parsons, Matthew T; Gustin, Mae S; Ter Schure, Arnout

    2016-10-15

    This study examined the spatial and temporal trends of mercury (Hg) in wet deposition and air concentrations in the United States (U.S.) and Canada between 1997 and 2013. Data were obtained from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) and Environment Canada monitoring networks, and other sources. Of the 19 sites with data records from 1997-2013, 53% had significant negative trends in Hg concentration in wet deposition, while no sites had significant positive trends, which is in general agreement with earlier studies that considered NADP data up until about 2010. However, for the time period 2007-2013 (71 sites), 17% and 13% of the sites had significant positive and negative trends, respectively, and for the time period 2008-2013 (81 sites) 30% and 6% of the sites had significant positive and negative trends, respectively. Non-significant positive tendencies were also widespread. Regional trend analyses revealed significant positive trends in Hg concentration in the Rocky Mountains, Plains, and Upper Midwest regions for the recent time periods in addition to significant positive trends in Hg deposition for the continent as a whole. Sulfate concentration trends in wet deposition were negative in all regions, suggesting a lower importance of local Hg sources. The trend in gaseous elemental Hg from short-term datasets merged as one continuous record was broadly consistent with trends in Hg concentration in wet deposition, with the early time period (1998-2007) producing a significantly negative trend (-1.5±0.2%year(-1)) and the recent time period (2008-2013) displaying a flat slope (-0.3±0.1%year(-1), not significant). The observed shift to more positive or less negative trends in Hg wet deposition primarily seen in the Central-Western regions is consistent with the effects of rising Hg emissions from regions outside the U.S. and Canada and the influence of long-range transport in the free troposphere. PMID:26803218

  10. In situ synthesis of manganese oxides on polyester fiber for formaldehyde decomposition at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Yunus, Rizwangul; Li, Jinge; Li, Peilin; Zhang, Pengyi; Kim, Jeonghyun

    2015-12-01

    Removal of low-level formaldehyde (HCHO) is of great interest for indoor air quality improvement. Supported materials especially those with low air pressure drop are of necessity for air purification. Manganese oxides (MnOx) was in situ deposited on the surface of fibers of a non-woven fabric made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). As-synthesized MnOx/PET were characterized by SEM, XRD, TEM, ATR-FTIR and XPS analysis. The growth of MnOx layer on PET is thought to start with partial hydrolysis of PET, followed by surface oxidation by KMnO4 and then surface-deposition of MnOx particles from the bulk phase. The MnOx particles assembled with nanosheets were uniformly coated on the PET fibers. MnOx/PET showed good activity for HCHO decomposition at room temperature which followed the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism. The removal of HCHO was kept over 94% after 10 h continuous reaction under the conditions of inlet HCHO concentration ∼0.6 mg/m3, space velocity ∼17,000 h-1 and relative humidity∼50%. This research provides a facile method to deposit active MnOx onto polymers with low air resistance, and composite MnOx/PET material is promising for indoor air purification.

  11. Spatial & temporal variations of PM10 and particle number concentrations in urban air.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Christer; Norman, Michael; Gidhagen, Lars

    2007-04-01

    The size of particles in urban air varies over four orders of magnitude (from 0.001 microm to 10 microm in diameter). In many cities only particle mass concentrations (PM10, i.e. particles <10 microm diameter) is measured. In this paper we analyze how differences in emissions, background concentrations and meteorology affect the temporal and spatial distribution of PM10 and total particle number concentrations (PNC) based on measurements and dispersion modeling in Stockholm, Sweden. PNC at densely trafficked kerbside locations are dominated by ultrafine particles (<0.1 microm diameter) due to vehicle exhaust emissions as verified by high correlation with NOx. But PNC contribute only marginally to PM10, due to the small size of exhaust particles. Instead wear of the road surface is an important factor for the highest PM10 concentrations observed. In Stockholm, road wear increases drastically due to the use of studded tires and traction sand on streets during winter; up to 90% of the locally emitted PM10 may be due to road abrasion. PM10 emissions and concentrations, but not PNC, at kerbside are controlled by road moisture. Annual mean urban background PM10 levels are relatively uniformly distributed over the city, due to the importance of long range transport. For PNC local sources often dominate the concentrations resulting in large temporal and spatial gradients in the concentrations. Despite these differences in the origin of PM10 and PNC, the spatial gradients of annual mean concentrations due to local sources are of equal magnitude due to the common source, namely traffic. Thus, people in different areas experiencing a factor of 2 different annual PM10 exposure due to local sources will also experience a factor of 2 different exposure in terms of PNC. This implies that health impact studies based solely on spatial differences in annual exposure to PM10 may not separate differences in health effects due to ultrafine and coarse particles. On the other hand

  12. Spatial & temporal variations of PM10 and particle number concentrations in urban air.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Christer; Norman, Michael; Gidhagen, Lars

    2007-04-01

    The size of particles in urban air varies over four orders of magnitude (from 0.001 microm to 10 microm in diameter). In many cities only particle mass concentrations (PM10, i.e. particles <10 microm diameter) is measured. In this paper we analyze how differences in emissions, background concentrations and meteorology affect the temporal and spatial distribution of PM10 and total particle number concentrations (PNC) based on measurements and dispersion modeling in Stockholm, Sweden. PNC at densely trafficked kerbside locations are dominated by ultrafine particles (<0.1 microm diameter) due to vehicle exhaust emissions as verified by high correlation with NOx. But PNC contribute only marginally to PM10, due to the small size of exhaust particles. Instead wear of the road surface is an important factor for the highest PM10 concentrations observed. In Stockholm, road wear increases drastically due to the use of studded tires and traction sand on streets during winter; up to 90% of the locally emitted PM10 may be due to road abrasion. PM10 emissions and concentrations, but not PNC, at kerbside are controlled by road moisture. Annual mean urban background PM10 levels are relatively uniformly distributed over the city, due to the importance of long range transport. For PNC local sources often dominate the concentrations resulting in large temporal and spatial gradients in the concentrations. Despite these differences in the origin of PM10 and PNC, the spatial gradients of annual mean concentrations due to local sources are of equal magnitude due to the common source, namely traffic. Thus, people in different areas experiencing a factor of 2 different annual PM10 exposure due to local sources will also experience a factor of 2 different exposure in terms of PNC. This implies that health impact studies based solely on spatial differences in annual exposure to PM10 may not separate differences in health effects due to ultrafine and coarse particles. On the other hand

  13. Evaluation of an adsorption system to concentrate VOC in air streams prior to catalytic incineration.

    PubMed

    Campesi, María A; Luzi, Carlos D; Barreto, Guillermo F; Martínez, Osvaldo M

    2015-05-01

    Catalytic combustion is a well-developed process for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to reduce both the amount of catalyst needed for incineration and the surface area of recuperative heat exchangers, an evaluation of the use of thermal swing adsorption as a previous step for VOC concentration is made. An air stream containing ethyl acetate and ethanol (employed as solvents in printing processes) has been taken as a case study. Based on the characteristics of the adsorption/desorption system and the properties of the stream to be treated, a monolithic rotor concentrator with activated carbon as adsorbent material is adopted. Once the temperature of the inlet desorption stream TD is chosen, the minimum possible desorption flow rate, WD,min, and the amount of adsorbent material can be properly defined according to the extent of the Mass Transfer Zone (MTZ) at the end of the adsorption stage. An approximate procedure to speed up the calculations needed for sizing the bed and predicting the operating variables is also presented. In the case studied here, the concentration of the VOC stream can reach 6 times that of the primary effluent when TD = 200 °C is chosen.

  14. Influence of precipitation on (7)Be concentrations in air as measured by CTBTO global monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J; Gheddou, A; Nikkinen, M

    2015-06-01

    Data collected by the International Monitoring System (IMS) during 2009-2012 were used to study influence of precipitation and relative humidity on changes in (7)Be concentrations in atmosphere. The significant decrease in (7)Be concentrations, corresponding to measurements collected by stations located within Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is demonstrated. This effect can be attributed to the process of enhanced wet deposition within the ITCZ. To quantify this effect data collected by IMS stations within ITCZ were thoroughly analyzed. It was found that the atmospheric content of (7)Be strongly decreases under the rain conditions. The rain mediated depletion of (7)Be to half of its before rain value, needs about 62 h in case of light precipitation, while in the case of moderate precipitation about 38 h is needed. In addition the evaluated impact of humidity showed that increase in relative humidity by 20%, for example from 70% ± 5% to 90% ± 5% causes almost a double decrease in beryllium concentration in surface air.

  15. Evaluation of an adsorption system to concentrate VOC in air streams prior to catalytic incineration.

    PubMed

    Campesi, María A; Luzi, Carlos D; Barreto, Guillermo F; Martínez, Osvaldo M

    2015-05-01

    Catalytic combustion is a well-developed process for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In order to reduce both the amount of catalyst needed for incineration and the surface area of recuperative heat exchangers, an evaluation of the use of thermal swing adsorption as a previous step for VOC concentration is made. An air stream containing ethyl acetate and ethanol (employed as solvents in printing processes) has been taken as a case study. Based on the characteristics of the adsorption/desorption system and the properties of the stream to be treated, a monolithic rotor concentrator with activated carbon as adsorbent material is adopted. Once the temperature of the inlet desorption stream TD is chosen, the minimum possible desorption flow rate, WD,min, and the amount of adsorbent material can be properly defined according to the extent of the Mass Transfer Zone (MTZ) at the end of the adsorption stage. An approximate procedure to speed up the calculations needed for sizing the bed and predicting the operating variables is also presented. In the case studied here, the concentration of the VOC stream can reach 6 times that of the primary effluent when TD = 200 °C is chosen. PMID:25734958

  16. Evaluation of optical source-detector configurations for tomographic reconstruction of chemical concentrations in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Todd, L; Ramachandran, G

    1994-12-01

    This article reports on numerical studies to evaluate and compare optical remote sensing configurations for tomographically reconstructing pollutant concentrations in indoor air. With a remote sensing/computed tomography system, two-dimensional maps of pollutant concentrations with good spatial resolution can be created for an entire room. The successful use of such a system for exposure assessment, ventilation assessment, or source monitoring depends on the remote sensing configuration. A systematic method was developed to evaluate the performance of 10 configurations. One hundred and twenty test maps were reconstructed with an algebraic reconstruction method using all 10 configurations; reconstruction quality was evaluated using 4 criteria. Reconstruction quality was related to the number and location of detectors in the room and the complexity of the test maps. Configurations using the same number of detectors placed in different locations resulted in reconstructions that differed in quality. The effect of reducing the number density of rays on reconstruction quality was studied. Based on these simulations, two configurations that used four detectors to scan the room were selected, and their performance was evaluated in the presence of various levels of measurement noise. Two configurations that used four detectors were most suited for exposure assessment. It was found that when designing a configuration, the number and independence of rays should be maximized. Results underscored the need to thoroughly test configurations through numerical studies prior to field implementation; a wide variety of concentration maps, relevant to the application, should be tested under both ideal and nonideal sampling conditions. PMID:7825513

  17. Seasonal variations in concentrations, distributions, and air-soil exchange fluxes of dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yajun; Nie, Zhiqiang; He, Jie; Die, Qingqi; Fang, Yanyan; Liu, Feng; Yang, Yufei; Gao, Xingbao; Huang, Qifei

    2016-02-01

    Dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (dl-PCB) concentrations in ambient air and soil in Shanghai, China, were measured to allow seasonal and spatial differences in the dl-PCB concentrations, profiles, distributions, fugacity fractions, and air-soil fluxes to be determined. The toxic equivalent (TEQ) DL-PCB concentrations in the air were higher in summer (mean 9.46 fg m(-3), range 1.32-26.3 fg m(-3)) than in winter (mean 4.57 fg m(-3), range 1.55-10.9 fg m(-3)). The DL-PCB concentrations in air were different in different areas, and the concentrations decreased in the order industrial areas > commercial and residential areas > suburban areas > rural area. The mean DL-PCB concentration in soil was 0.25 pg TEQ g(-1) dry weight (dw) and the range was 0.05-0.90 pg TEQ g(-1) dw. The highest DL-PCB concentration in soil was found in a sample from a commercial/residential area. The DL-PCB fluxes were negative (-216 pg m(-2) h(-1) in summer and -41.1 pg m(-2) h(-1) in winter), and the fugacity fractions were below 0.5, indicating that dl-PCBs in Shanghai are deposited from the air to the soil in all seasons. The net fluxes were higher in summer than in winter, and the deposition fluxes were higher in industrial areas than in other areas in both summer and winter.

  18. Patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis to cigarettes: smoked/unsmoked components and formaldehyde factors.

    PubMed

    Carew, Benjamin; Muir, Jim

    2014-08-01

    A patient with hand dermatitis reported that switching her smoking hand resulted in reduced symptoms. When allergy to cigarettes is suspected the literature supports standard allergy testing as well as testing the individual components of cigarettes. Initial standard patch testing revealed an allergy to formaldehyde and the formaldehyde releasing agent, quaternium-15. The patient did not react to her usual roll-your-own cigarette components but reacted to the smoked filter paper of a particular brand of cigarette she frequently borrowed from a friend. Possible explanations include either a variation of ingredients between cigarettes that alters the formaldehyde concentration or another unidentified allergen in the branded cigarette causing allergic contact dermatitis.

  19. Formaldehyde and TVOC emission behavior of laminate flooring by structure of laminate flooring and heating condition.

    PubMed

    An, Jae-Yoon; Kim, Sumin; Kim, Hyun-Joong

    2011-03-15

    Formaldehyde was measured with a desiccator, a 20 L chamber and the FLEC method. The formaldehyde emission rate from laminate was the highest at 32 °C using the desiccator, which then decreased with time. The formaldehyde emission using the 20 L small chamber and FLEC showed a similar tendency. There was a strong correlation between the formaldehyde and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) with both types of floorings using the two different methods. The formaldehyde emission rate and TVOC results were higher when tested using the FLEC method than with the 20 L small chamber method. The emission rate was affected by the joint edge length in laminate flooring. Toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene were the main VOCs emitted from laminate flooring, and there were more unidentified VOCs emitted than identified VOCs. The samples heated with a floor heating system emitted more formaldehyde than those heated using an air circulation system due to the temperature difference between the bottom panel and flooring. The TVOC emission level of the samples was higher when an air circulation system was used than when a floor heating system was used due to the high ventilation rate.

  20. [Concentration of allergic fungi spores in the air of flats in Lódź].

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, P; Kowalski, M L; Ochecka-Szymańska, A

    1999-01-01

    The real contribution of moulds to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases remains unknown, although positive skin prick tests and/or specific serum IgE to moki allergens can be detected in 1-5% of atopic patients. A significant problem in assesment of exposure to mould allergens, resulting with difficulty in standarization of methods. The aim of this work was to assess the concentration of spores of 8 mould species in flats inhabited by peoples who Bont show any symptoms of allergy. The Open Petri Dish (OPD) method involving sedimentation of participles contained in the column of air over the dish was used to assess the number of spores in 1 m3 of indoor atmospheres. All colonies were counted, but only 8 mould species implicated in inhaled allergy were identified, ie.: Alternaria tenuis, Cladosporium herbarum, Helminthosporum halodes, Pullularia pullulans, Penicillium notatam, Rhizopus nigricans, Mucor mucedo, Aspergillus fumigatus. The tests were carried out in 10 flats located in various quarters of the cify of Lodź during three consecutive days of September 1995 between 5:00 pm and 6:04 pm. In analyzing the percentage of spores of each of the eight mould species tested we determined that, independent of fiat and test day, C. herbarum predominated. It is good agreement with the observations of other authors who report that among large quantities of fungi that are detected in late summer, usually C. herbarum spores dominate. This is the season when the incidence of the Cladosporium spores in the atmospheric air increases. Spores of H. halodes were detected least frequently. Our study demonstrated the presence of substantial amounts of mould spores in indoor air of houses in Lódź. The spores belong to species with documented allergenicity, suggesting that they may play a role in development of allergic sensitization in susceptible subjects.

  1. Effects of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants on surface ozone concentrations over Western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Walters, Stacy; Horowitz, Larry W.; Tao, Shu

    2014-11-01

    Due to a lack of industrialization in Western China, surface air there was, until recently, believed to be relatively unpolluted. However, recent measurements and modeling studies have found high levels of ozone (O3) there. Based on the state-of-the-science global chemical transport model MOZART-4, we identify the origin, pathway, and mechanism of trans-Eurasian transport of air pollutants to Western China in 2000. MOZART-4 generally simulates well the observed surface O3 over inland areas of China. Simulations find surface ozone concentrations over Western China on average to be about 10 ppbv higher than Eastern China. Using sensitivity studies, we find that anthropogenic emissions from all Eurasian regions except China contribute 10-15 ppbv surface O3 over Western China, superimposed upon a 35-40 ppbv natural background. Transport from European anthropogenic sources to Northwestern China results in 2-6 ppbv O3 enhancements in spring and summer. Indian anthropogenic sources strongly influence O3 over the Tibetan Plateau during the summer monsoon. Transport of O3 originating from emissions in the Middle East occasionally reach Western China and increase surface ozone there by about 1-4 ppbv. These influences are of similar magnitude as trans-Pacific and transatlantic transport of O3 and its precursors, indicating the significance of trans-Eurasian ozone transport in hemispheric transport of air pollution. Our study further indicates that mitigation of anthropogenic emissions from Europe, the Indian subcontinent, and the Middle East could benefit public health and agricultural productivity in Western China.

  2. [Concentration of allergic fungi spores in the air of flats in Lódź].

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, P; Kowalski, M L; Ochecka-Szymańska, A

    1999-01-01

    The real contribution of moulds to the pathogenesis of allergic diseases remains unknown, although positive skin prick tests and/or specific serum IgE to moki allergens can be detected in 1-5% of atopic patients. A significant problem in assesment of exposure to mould allergens, resulting with difficulty in standarization of methods. The aim of this work was to assess the concentration of spores of 8 mould species in flats inhabited by peoples who Bont show any symptoms of allergy. The Open Petri Dish (OPD) method involving sedimentation of participles contained in the column of air over the dish was used to assess the number of spores in 1 m3 of indoor atmospheres. All colonies were counted, but only 8 mould species implicated in inhaled allergy were identified, ie.: Alternaria tenuis, Cladosporium herbarum, Helminthosporum halodes, Pullularia pullulans, Penicillium notatam, Rhizopus nigricans, Mucor mucedo, Aspergillus fumigatus. The tests were carried out in 10 flats located in various quarters of the cify of Lodź during three consecutive days of September 1995 between 5:00 pm and 6:04 pm. In analyzing the percentage of spores of each of the eight mould species tested we determined that, independent of fiat and test day, C. herbarum predominated. It is good agreement with the observations of other authors who report that among large quantities of fungi that are detected in late summer, usually C. herbarum spores dominate. This is the season when the incidence of the Cladosporium spores in the atmospheric air increases. Spores of H. halodes were detected least frequently. Our study demonstrated the presence of substantial amounts of mould spores in indoor air of houses in Lódź. The spores belong to species with documented allergenicity, suggesting that they may play a role in development of allergic sensitization in susceptible subjects. PMID:16886472

  3. A critical review of reported air concentrations of organic compounds in aircraft cabins.

    PubMed

    Nagda, N L; Rector, H E

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a review and assessment of aircraft cabin air quality studies with measured levels of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs). VOC and SVOC concentrations reported for aircraft cabins are compared with those reported for residential and office buildings and for passenger compartments of other types of transportation. An assessment of measurement technologies and quality assurance procedures is included. The six studies reviewed in the paper range in coverage from two to about 30 flights per study. None of the monitored flights included any unusual or episodic events that could affect cabin air quality. Most studies have used scientifically sound methods for measurements. Study results indicate that under routine aircraft operations, contaminant levels in aircraft cabins are similar to those in residential and office buildings, with two exceptions: (1). levels of ethanol and acetone, indicators of bioeffluents and chemicals from consumer products are higher in aircraft than in home or office environments, and (2). levels of certain chlorinated hydrocarbons and fuel-related contaminants are higher in residential/office buildings than in aircraft. Similarly, ethanol and acetone levels are higher in aircraft than in other transportation modes but the levels of some pollutants, such as m-/p-xylenes, tend to be lower in aircraft.

  4. Determination of the concentration and isotopic composition of uranium in environmental air filters

    SciTech Connect

    Russ, G.P. III; Bazan, J.M.

    1994-08-26

    For many years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has collected monthly air-particulate filter samples from a variety of environmental monitoring stations on and off site. Historically the concentration and isotopic composition of uranium collected on these filters was determined by isotope dilution using a {sup 233}U spike and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). For samples containing as little as 10 nanograms of uranium, ICP-MS is now used to make these measurements to the required level of precision, about 5% in the measured 235/238 and 233/238. Unless particular care is taken to control bias in the mass filter, variable mass bias limits accuracy to a few percent. Measurements of the minor isotopes 236 (if present) and 234 are also possible and provide useful information for identifying the source of the uranium. The advantage of ICP-MS is in rapid analysis, {approximately}12 minutes of instrument time per sample.

  5. A new airborne formaldehyde instrument: Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Bailey, S. A.; Swanson, A. K.; Wolfe, G. M., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We present the operating principles of a new instrument designed for operation on small aircraft. The instrument uses a new non-resonant fluorescence technique to take advantage of compact industrial lasers to make a small, robust package that can measure formaldehyde at sensitivities better than 100 ppt in 1 second integration. The instrument is designed to fly on the Alphajet at NASA Ames but can be modified to fly on other small aircraft.

  6. Evaluation of a Combined Ultraviolet Photocatalytic Oxidation(UVPCO)/Chemisorbent Air Cleaner for Indoor Air Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, Alfred T.; Destaillats, Hugo; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Fisk,William J.

    2007-02-01

    We previously reported that gas-phase byproducts of incomplete oxidation were generated when a prototype ultraviolet photocatalytic oxidation (UVPCO) air cleaner was operated in the laboratory with indoor-relevant mixtures of VOCs at realistic concentrations. Under these conditions, there was net production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two important indoor air toxicants. Here, we further explore the issue of byproduct generation. Using the same UVPCO air cleaner, we conducted experiments to identify common VOCs that lead to the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde and to quantify their production rates. We sought to reduce the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde to acceptable levels by employing different chemisorbent scrubbers downstream of the UVPCO device. Additionally, we made preliminary measurements to estimate the capacity and expected lifetime of the chemisorbent media. For most experiments, the system was operated at 680-780 m{sup 3}/h (400-460 cfm). A set of experiments was conducted with common VOCs introduced into the UVPCO device individually and in mixture. Compound conversion efficiencies and the production of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were determined by comparison of compound concentrations upstream and downstream of the reactor. There was general agreement between compound conversions efficiencies determined individually and in the mixture. This suggests that competition among compounds for active sites on the photocatalyst surface will not limit the performance of the UVPCO device when the total VOC concentration is low. A possible exception was the very volatile alcohols, for which there were some indications of competitive adsorption. The results also showed that formaldehyde was produced from many commonly encountered VOCs, while acetaldehyde was generated by specific VOCs, particularly ethanol. The implication is that formaldehyde concentrations are likely to increase when an effective UVPCO air cleaner is used in

  7. Determinants of perceived air pollution annoyance and association between annoyance scores and air pollution (PM 2.5, NO 2) concentrations in the European EXPOLIS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotko, Tuulia; Oglesby, Lucy; Künzli, Nino; Carrer, Paolo; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Jantunen, Matti

    Apart from its traditionally considered objective impacts on health, air pollution can also have perceived effects, such as annoyance. The psychological effects of air pollution may often be more important to well-being than the biophysical effects. Health effects of perceived annoyance from air pollution are so far unknown. More knowledge of air pollution annoyance levels, determinants and also associations with different air pollution components is needed. In the European air pollution exposure study, EXPOLIS, the air pollution annoyance as perceived at home, workplace and in traffic were surveyed among other study objectives. Overall 1736 randomly drawn 25-55-yr-old subjects participated in six cities (Athens, Basel, Milan, Oxford, Prague and Helsinki). Levels and predictors of individual perceived annoyances from air pollution were assessed. Instead of the usual air pollution concentrations at fixed monitoring sites, this paper compares the measured microenvironment concentrations and personal exposures of PM 2.5 and NO 2 to the perceived annoyance levels. A considerable proportion of the adults surveyed was annoyed by air pollution. Female gender, self-reported respiratory symptoms, downtown living and self-reported sensitivity to air pollution were directly associated with high air pollution annoyance score while in traffic, but smoking status, age or education level were not significantly associated. Population level annoyance averages correlated with the city average exposure levels of PM 2.5 and NO 2. A high correlation was observed between the personal 48-h PM 2.5 exposure and perceived annoyance at home as well as between the mean annoyance at work and both the average work indoor PM 2.5 and the personal work time PM 2.5 exposure. With the other significant determinants (gender, city code, home location) and home outdoor levels the model explained 14% (PM 2.5) and 19% (NO 2) of the variation in perceived air pollution annoyance in traffic. Compared to

  8. Evaluation of ambient air concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Germany from 1990 to 1998.

    PubMed

    Fertmann, Regina; Tesseraux, Irene; Schümann, Michael; Neus, Hermann

    2002-03-01

    All available polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration data in ambient air obtained over the past 10 years in Germany were evaluated to clarify whether it is justified to use benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) as a marker compound for the total PAH exposure. The data basis comprises annual mean concentrations from 1990 to 1998 supplied by the emission protection authorities of the federal states with additional information on the region, year and site of measurement. The data are very heterogeneous with respect to sample size, the number of individual PAHs analyzed, place of origin and year. Nine of 25 individual compounds with sufficient sample size (74concentration data of BaA, BeP, BaP, DBA, BghiP, COR, BbF, BkF and INP are not normally distributed and demonstrate great variability. Location, East-West differences persisting after the German reunion and time characterize the distributive patterns, e.g., from 1991 to 1997, a significant decrease in BaP could be determined based on the data from North Rhine-Westphalia (1991, N=51, median 1.6 ng/m(3); 1997, N=45, median 0.7 ng/m(3); Pconcentrations in the new federal states in the East (N=80, median 2.2 ng/m(3)) are about twice as high compared to the ones in the old federal states in the West (N=438, median 1.1 ng/m(3); P

  9. Measurements of soot, OH, and PAH concentrations in turbulent ethylene/air jet flames

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seong-Young; Turns, Stephen R.; Santoro, Robert J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents results from an investigation of soot formation in turbulent, non-premixed, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}/air jet flames. Tests were conducted using a H{sub 2}-piloted burner with fuel issuing from a 2.18 mm i.d. tube into quiescent ambient air. A range of test conditions was studied using the initial jet velocity (16.2-94.1 m/s) as a parameter. Fuel-jet Reynolds numbers ranged from 4000 to 23,200. Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) was employed to determine soot volume fractions, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) was used to measure relative hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) concentrations. Extensive information on the structure of the soot and OH fields was obtained from two-dimensional imaging experiments. Quantitative measurements were obtained by employing the LII and LIF techniques independently. Imaging results for soot, OH, and PAH show the existence of three soot formation/oxidation regions: a rapid soot growth region, in which OH and soot particles lie in distinctly different radial locations; a mixing-dominated region controlled by large-scale motion; and a soot-oxidation region in which the OH and soot fields overlap spatially, resulting in the rapid oxidation of soot particles. Detailed quantitative analyzes of soot volume fractions and OH and soot zone thicknesses were performed along with the temperature measurement using the N{sub 2}-CARS system. Measurements of OH and soot zone thicknesses show that the soot zone thickness increases linearly with axial distance in the soot formation region, whereas the OH zone thickness is nearly constant in this region. The OH zone thickness then rapidly increases with downstream distance and approximately doubles in the soot-oxidation region. Probability density functions also were obtained for soot volume fractions and OH concentrations. These probability density functions clearly define the spatial relationships among the OH, PAH concentrations, the

  10. A modeling framework for characterizing near-road air pollutant concentration at community scales.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih Ying; Vizuete, William; Valencia, Alejandro; Naess, Brian; Isakov, Vlad; Palma, Ted; Breen, Michael; Arunachalam, Saravanan

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we combine information from transportation network, traffic emissions, and dispersion model to develop a framework to inform exposure estimates for traffic-related air pollutants (TRAPs) with a high spatial resolution. A Research LINE source dispersion model (R-LINE) is used to model multiple TRAPs from roadways at Census-block level for two U.S. regions. We used a novel Space/Time Ordinary Kriging (STOK) approach that uses data from monitoring networks to provide urban background concentrations. To reduce the computational burden, we developed and applied the METeorologically-weighted Averaging for Risk and Exposure (METARE) approach with R-LINE, where a set of selected meteorological data and annual average daily traffic (AADT) are used to obtain annual averages. Compared with explicit modeling, using METARE reduces CPU-time by 88-fold (46.8h versus 32min), while still retaining accuracy of exposure estimates. We show two examples in the Piedmont region in North Carolina (~105,000 receptors) and Portland, Maine (~7000 receptors) to characterize near-road air quality. Concentrations for NOx, PM2.5, and benzene in Portland drop by over 40% within 200m away from the roadway. The concentration drop in North Carolina is less than that in Portland, as previously shown in an observation-based study, showing the robustness of our approach. Heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) contribute over 55% of NOx and PM2.5 near interstate highways, while light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGV) contribute over 50% of benzene to urban areas where multiple roadways intersect. Normalized mean error (NME) between explicit modeling and METARE in Portland ranges from 12.6 to 14.5% and normalized mean bias (NMB) ranges from -12.9 to -11.2%. When considering a static emission rate (i.e. the emission does not have temporal variability), both NME and NMB improved (10.5% and -9.5%). Modeled concentrations in Detroit, Michigan at an array of near-road monitors are within a factor of 2

  11. A modeling framework for characterizing near-road air pollutant concentration at community scales.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih Ying; Vizuete, William; Valencia, Alejandro; Naess, Brian; Isakov, Vlad; Palma, Ted; Breen, Michael; Arunachalam, Saravanan

    2015-12-15

    In this study, we combine information from transportation network, traffic emissions, and dispersion model to develop a framework to inform exposure estimates for traffic-related air pollutants (TRAPs) with a high spatial resolution. A Research LINE source dispersion model (R-LINE) is used to model multiple TRAPs from roadways at Census-block level for two U.S. regions. We used a novel Space/Time Ordinary Kriging (STOK) approach that uses data from monitoring networks to provide urban background concentrations. To reduce the computational burden, we developed and applied the METeorologically-weighted Averaging for Risk and Exposure (METARE) approach with R-LINE, where a set of selected meteorological data and annual average daily traffic (AADT) are used to obtain annual averages. Compared with explicit modeling, using METARE reduces CPU-time by 88-fold (46.8h versus 32min), while still retaining accuracy of exposure estimates. We show two examples in the Piedmont region in North Carolina (~105,000 receptors) and Portland, Maine (~7000 receptors) to characterize near-road air quality. Concentrations for NOx, PM2.5, and benzene in Portland drop by over 40% within 200m away from the roadway. The concentration drop in North Carolina is less than that in Portland, as previously shown in an observation-based study, showing the robustness of our approach. Heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDV) contribute over 55% of NOx and PM2.5 near interstate highways, while light-duty gasoline vehicles (LDGV) contribute over 50% of benzene to urban areas where multiple roadways intersect. Normalized mean error (NME) between explicit modeling and METARE in Portland ranges from 12.6 to 14.5% and normalized mean bias (NMB) ranges from -12.9 to -11.2%. When considering a static emission rate (i.e. the emission does not have temporal variability), both NME and NMB improved (10.5% and -9.5%). Modeled concentrations in Detroit, Michigan at an array of near-road monitors are within a factor of 2

  12. Determination of formaldehyde in Romanian cosmetic products using coupled GC/MS system after SPME extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feher, I.; Schmutzer, G.; Voica, C.; Moldovan, Z.

    2013-11-01

    In this study we have made a quick review of some Romanian cosmetic products (shampoo, conditioner, face wash) in order to determine the formaldehyde content as well as other substances called "formaldehyde releasers". The process was performed based on solid-phase microextraction (SPME) followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technique. Prior to SPME extraction we used a derivation step of formaldehyde using pentafluorophenyl hydrazine. The obtained product was adsorbed on SPME devices, then injected and desorbed into the GC/MS injection port. The concentration of formaldehyde (as derived compound) was calculated using calibration curve, having a regression coefficient of 0.9938. The performance parameters of the method were calculated using samples of standard concentration. The method proved to be sensitive, having a quantification limit (LOQ) of 0.15 μg/g.

  13. Cytotoxic effects of methanol, formaldehyde, and formate on dissociated rat thymocytes: a possibility of aspartame toxicity.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Y; Sakai, H; Arata, T; Okano, Y; Akaike, N; Sakai, K; Noda, K

    2002-01-01

    Aspartame is a widely used artificial sweetener added to many soft beverages and its usage is increasing in health-conscious societies. Upon ingestion, this artificial sweetener produces methanol as a metabolite. In order to examine the possibility of aspartame toxicity, the effects of methanol and its metabolites (formaldehyde and formate) on dissociated rat thymocytes were studied by flow cytometry. While methanol and formate did not affect cell viability in the physiological pH range, formaldehyde at 1-3 mmol/L started to induce cell death. Further increase in formaldehyde concentration produced a dose-dependent decrease in cell viability. Formaldehyde at 1 mmol/L or more greatly reduced cellular content of glutathione, possibly increasing cell vulnerability to oxidative stress. Furthermore, formaldehyde at 3 mmol/L or more significantly increased intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner. Threshold concentrations of formaldehyde, a metabolite of methanol, that affected the [Ca2+]i and cellular glutathione content were slightly higher than the blood concentrations of methanol previously reported in subjects administered abuse doses of aspartame. It is suggested that aspartame at abuse doses is harmless to humans.

  14. Soil air CO2 concentration as an integrative parameter of soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebeling, Corinna; Gaertig, Thorsten; Fründ, Heinz-Christian

    2015-04-01

    The assessment of soil structure is an important but difficult issue and normally takes place in the laboratory. Typical parameters are soil bulk density, porosity, water or air conductivity or gas diffusivity. All methods are time-consuming. The integrative parameter soil air CO2 concentration ([CO2]) can be used to assess soil structure in situ and in a short time. Several studies highlighted that independent of soil respiration, [CO2] in the soil air increases with decreasing soil aeration. Therefore, [CO2] is a useful indicator of soil aeration. Embedded in the German research project RÜWOLA, which focus on soil protection at forest sites, we investigated soil compaction and recovery of soil structure after harvesting. Therefore, we measured soil air CO2 concentrations continuously and in single measurements and compared the results with the measurements of bulk density, porosity and gas diffusivity. Two test areas were investigated: At test area 1 with high natural regeneration potential (clay content approx. 25 % and soil-pH between 5 and 7), solid-state CO2-sensors using NDIR technology were installed in the wheel track of different aged skidding tracks in 5 and 10 cm soil depths. At area 2 (acidic silty loam, soil-pH between 3.5 and 4), CO2-sensors and water-tension sensors (WatermarkR) were installed in 6 cm soil depth. The results show a low variance of [CO2] in the undisturbed soil with a long term mean from May to June 2014 between 0.2 and 0.5 % [CO2] in both areas. In the wheel tracks [CO2] was consistently higher. The long term mean [CO2] in the 8-year-old-wheel track in test area 1 is 5 times higher than in the reference soil and shows a high variation (mean=2.0 %). The 18-year-old wheel track shows a long-term mean of 1.2 % [CO2]. Furthermore, there were strong fluctuations of [CO2] in the wheel tracks corresponding to precipitation and humidity. Similar results were yielded with single measurements during the vegetation period using a portable

  15. Variation of radon-222 concentration in exposure systems air under different conditions of exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamoon, A.; Abdul-Fattah, A. A.; Qari, T. M.

    1994-07-01

    Simplified, laboratory scale systems, namely ordinary laboratory desiccators and cylindrical containers were tested with regard to their reliability as exposure systems for determining certain parameters of radon emanation from locally obtained crushed granite rock samples. The samples were placed inside the exposure systems. Activity concentration of emanated radon in the exposure systems air increased with increase of mass of granite sample in the desiccator and with length of the exposure period. Activity concentration of radon was high near the granitic source but decreased with vertical distance from it when the exposure system was semiclosed but activity was homogeneous when the system was completely closed. The cylindrical exposure system was used in assessing Ra-226 content in some crushed granitic samples identified as altered alkali granite and found to be: 0.024 Bq g-1 (0.65 pCig-1). Rn-222 emanation rate from the same samples was: 0.013 Bq m-2 s-1 (0.34 pCi m-2 s-1). Saturation density thickness for a mixed sample of pure and alkali granites was found to be 116 g cm-2. The results agree in general with reported observations and support the reliability of the exposure systems used.

  16. Low pCO2 Air-Polarized CO2 Concentrator Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Franz H.

    1997-01-01

    Life Systems completed a Ground-based Space Station Experiment Development Study Program which verifies through testing the performance and applicability of the electrochemical Air-Polarized Carbon Dioxide Concentrator (APC) process technology for space missions requiring low (i.e., less than 3 mm Hg) CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the cabin atmosphere. Required test hardware was developed and testing was accomplished at an approximate one-person capacity CO2 removal level. Initially, two five-cell electrochemical modules using flight-like 0.5 sq ft cell hardware were tested individually, following by their testing at the integrated APC system level. Testing verified previously projected performance and established a database for sizing of APC systems. A four person capacity APC system was sized and compared with four candidate CO2 removal systems. At its weight of 252 lb, a volume of 7 cu ft and a power consumption of 566 W while operating at 2.2 mm Hg pCO2, the APC was surpassed only by an Electrochemical Depolarized CO2 Concentrator (EDC) (operating with H2), when compared on a total equivalent basis.

  17. Air flow and concentration fields at urban road intersections for improved understanding of personal exposure.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Abhishek; Robins, Alan; Namdeo, Anil; Bell, Margaret

    2011-07-01

    This paper reviews the state of knowledge on modelling air flow and concentration fields at road intersections. The first part covers the available literature from the past two decades on experimental (both field and wind tunnel) and modelling activities in order to provide insight into the physical basis of flow behaviour at a typical cross-street intersection. This is followed by a review of associated investigations of the impact of traffic-generated localised turbulence on the concentration fields due to emissions from vehicles. There is a discussion on the role of adequate characterisation of vehicle-induced turbulence in making predictions using hybrid models, combining the merits of conventional approaches with information obtained from more detailed modelling. This concludes that, despite advancements in computational techniques, there are crucial knowledge gaps affecting the parameterisations used in current models for individual exposure. This is specifically relevant to the growing impetus on walking and cycling activities on urban roads in the context of current drives for sustainable transport and healthy living. Due to inherently longer travel times involved during such trips, compared to automotive transport, pedestrians and cyclists are subjected to higher levels of exposure to emissions. Current modelling tools seem to under-predict this exposure because of limitations in their design and in the empirical parameters employed.

  18. Air flow and concentration fields at urban road intersections for improved understanding of personal exposure.

    PubMed

    Tiwary, Abhishek; Robins, Alan; Namdeo, Anil; Bell, Margaret

    2011-07-01

    This paper reviews the state of knowledge on modelling air flow and concentration fields at road intersections. The first part covers the available literature from the past two decades on experimental (both field and wind tunnel) and modelling activities in order to provide insight into the physical basis of flow behaviour at a typical cross-street intersection. This is followed by a review of associated investigations of the impact of traffic-generated localised turbulence on the concentration fields due to emissions from vehicles. There is a discussion on the role of adequate characterisation of vehicle-induced turbulence in making predictions using hybrid models, combining the merits of conventional approaches with information obtained from more detailed modelling. This concludes that, despite advancements in computational techniques, there are crucial knowledge gaps affecting the parameterisations used in current models for individual exposure. This is specifically relevant to the growing impetus on walking and cycling activities on urban roads in the context of current drives for sustainable transport and healthy living. Due to inherently longer travel times involved during such trips, compared to automotive transport, pedestrians and cyclists are subjected to higher levels of exposure to emissions. Current modelling tools seem to under-predict this exposure because of limitations in their design and in the empirical parameters employed. PMID:21435722

  19. Removal of low-concentration BTX in air using a combined plasma catalysis system.

    PubMed

    Fan, X; Zhu, T L; Wang, M Y; Li, X M

    2009-06-01

    The behavior of non-thermal plasma (NTP) and combined plasma catalysis (CPC) was investigated for removal of low-concentration benzene, toluene and p-xylene (BTX mixture) in air using a link tooth wheel-cylinder plasma reactor. Combining NTP with MnO(x)/Al(2)O(3) catalyst after the discharge zone (CPC) significantly promoted BTX conversion and improved the energy efficiency. For a specific input energy (SIE) of 10 JL(-1), the conversion of benzene, toluene and p-xylene reached 94%, 97% and 95%, respectively. The introduction of MnO(x)/Al(2)O(3) catalyst also moved the BTX conversion towards total oxidation and reduced the emission of O(3) and NO(2) as compared to NTP alone. For an SIE of 10 JL(-1), the O(3) outlet concentration decreased from 46.7 for NTP alone to 1.9 ppm for CPC, while the NO(2) emission correspondingly decreased from 1380 to 40 ppb.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Novel Polyaniline Nanosensor for Sensitive Detection of Formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Omara, Wessam; Amin, Rehab; Elhaes, Hanan; Ibrahim, Medhat; Elfeky, Souad A

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are promising in the field of optical sensors due to their unique properties. Emeraldine base of polyaniline (Nano EB-PANI) was prepared, characterized and applied as an optical formaldehyde sensor. FTIR data confirm the formation of the EB-PANI. TEM and SEM revealed the size and shape of the nanoscale EB-PANI. XRD showed that the obtained nano EB-PANI has a partial crystalline nature. The sensing mechanism is based on the reaction of formaldehyde with Nano EB-PANI- to form a complex as described by molecular modeling HF/3-21G** level of theory. Results showed that Nano EB-PANI- detect low concentrations of formaldehyde ranging from 0.0003 to 0.9 ppm in a dose-dependent manner. The molecular modeling theory analysis showed that formaldehyde could interact with the amine of EB-PANI in, ring 3 or 4 or both together. The binding energy and dipole moment of the interaction between formaldehyde and polyaniline nanosensor were calculated by HF/3-21g** level of theory. The interaction with ring 3-NH gives a less stable product with a high dipole moment 6.978 Debye comparing with 1.678 Debye for the product of formaldehyde interaction with the terminal ring 4-NH. The development of such novel EB-PANI nanosensor can be used as, reliable and sensitive formaldehyde sensor.

  1. Effect of chimneys on indoor air concentrations of PM 10 and benzo[a]pyrene in Xuan Wei, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Linwei; Lan, Qing; Yang, Dong; He, Xingzhou; Yu, Ignatius T. S.; Hammond, S. Katharine

    This paper reports the effect of chimneys in reducing indoor air pollution in a lung cancer epidemic area of rural China. Household indoor air pollution concentrations were measured during unvented burning (chimneys blocked) and vented burning (chimneys open) of bituminous coal in Xuan Wei, China. Concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM 10) and of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) were measured in 43 homes during normal activities. The use of chimneys led to significant decreases in indoor air concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 μm or less (PM 10) by 66% and of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) by 84%. The average BaP content of PM 10 also decreased by 55% with the installation of a chimney. The reduction of indoor pollution levels by the installation of a chimney supports the epidemiology findings on the health benefits of stove improvement. However, even in the presence of a chimney, the indoor air concentrations for both PM 10 and BaP still exceeded the indoor air quality standards of China. Movement up the energy ladder to cleaner liquid or gaseous fuels is probably the only sustainable indoor air pollution control measure.

  2. Collisional excitation of interstellar formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, S.; Garrison, B. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.; Miller, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Previous calculations for rates of excitation of ortho-H2CO by collisions with He have been extended to higher rotational levels and kinetic temperatures to 80 K. Rates for para-H2CO have also been computed. Pressure-broadening widths for several spectral lines have been obtained from these calculations and are found to agree with recent data within the experimental uncertainty of 10%. Excitation of formaldehyde by collisions with H2 molecules is also discussed.

  3. Air pollutants in rural homes in Guizhou, China - Concentrations, speciation, and size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuxiao; Wei, Wei; Li, Du; Aunan, Kristin; Hao, Jiming

    2010-11-01

    Several types of fuels, including coal, fuel wood, and biogas, are commonly used for cooking and heating in Chinese rural households, resulting in indoor air pollution and causing severe health impacts. In this paper, we report a study monitoring multiple pollutants including PM 10, PM 2.5, CO, CO 2, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from fuel combustion at households in Guizhou province of China. The results showed that most pollutants exhibited large variability for different type of fuels except for CO 2. Among these fuels, wood combustion caused the most serious indoor air pollution, with the highest concentrations of particulate matters (218˜417 μg m -3 for PM 10 and 201˜304 μg m -3 for PM 2.5), and higher concentrations of CO (10.8 ± 0.8 mg m -3) and TVOC (about 466.7 ± 337.9 μg m -3). Coal combustion also resulted in higher concentrations of particulate matters (220˜250 μg m -3 for PM 10 and 170˜200 μg m -3 for PM 2.5), but different levels for CO (respectively 14.5 ± 3.7 mg m -3 for combustion in brick stove and 5.5 ± 0.7 mg m -3 for combustion in metal stove) and TVOC (170 mg m -3 for combustion in brick stove and 700 mg m -3 for combustion in metal stove). Biogas was the cleanest fuel, which brought about the similar levels of various pollutants with the indoor case of non-combustion, and worth being promoted in more areas. Analysis of the chemical profiles of PM 2.5 indicated that OC and EC were dominant components for all fuels, with the proportions of 30˜48%. A high fraction of SO 42- (31˜34%) was detected for coal combustion. The cumulative percentages of these chemical species were within the range of 0.7˜1.3, which was acceptable for the assessment of mass balance.

  4. Concentrations of legacy and emerging flame retardants in air and soil on a transect in the UK West Midlands.

    PubMed

    Drage, Daniel S; Newton, Seth; de Wit, Cynthia A; Harrad, Stuart

    2016-04-01

    Passive air samples were collected monthly for 6 months from 8 sites along a transect of Birmingham, United Kingdom between June 2012 and January 2013. Soil samples were collected once at each site. Average concentrations of BDE-209, ΣPBDEs17:183 and ΣPBDEs in ambient air were 150, 49, and 180 pg m(-3), respectively. Atmospheric concentrations of PBDEs were negatively correlated with distance from the city centre, exhibiting an "urban pulse". The average ΣHBCDD air concentration was 100 pg m(-3), however concentrations were not correlated with distance from the city centre. Several emerging flame retardants (EFRs) were identified in air and/or soil samples: 2,3,4,5-tetrabromo-bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (BEH-TEBP), 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2 dibromoethyl)cyclohexane (TBECH or DBE-DBCH), allyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl 2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), and dechlorane plus (DP or DDC-CO). Average concentrations of BDE-209, ΣPBDEs17:183 and ΣPBDEs in soil were 11, 3.6, and 15 ng g(-1) soil organic matter. PBDE concentrations in soil were higher at sites closest to the city centre, however correlations with distance from the city centre were not significant. BDEs-47 and -99 contributed more to ΣPBDEs in soil samples than air samples, but in both, the predominant congener was BDE-209. BATE was more abundant in air than soil but ATE was abundant in soil but not air. PMID:26807939

  5. Effects of air current speed, light intensity and co2 concentration on photosynthesis and transpiration of plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaya, Y.; Tsuruyama, J.; Shibuya, T.; Kiyota, M.

    To obtain basic data for adequate air circulation to promote gas exchange and growth of plants in closed plant culture modules in bioregenerative life support systems in space, the effects of air current speeds less than 0.8 m s-1 on transpiration (Tr) and net photosynthetic rates (Pn) of sweetpotato and barley leaves were determined using a leaf chamber method under different photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFDs) and CO_2 concentrations. The air current speed inside the leaf chamber was controlled by controlling the input voltages for an air circulation fan. The leaf surface boundary layer resistance was determined by the evaporation rate of wet paper and the water vapor pressure difference between the paper and surrounding air in the leaf chamber. The Tr and Pn of leaves rapidly increased as the air current speed increased from 0.01 to 0.1 m s-1 and gradually increased from 0.1 to 0.8 m s-1. These changes are correspondent to the change of the leaf surface boundary layer resistance. The depression of Tr by low air current speeds was greater than that of Pn. Tr and Pn decreased by 0.5 and 0.7 times, respectively, as the air current speed decreased from 0.8 to 0.01 m s-1. The depressions of Tr and Pn by low air current speeds were most notable at PPFDs of 500 and 250 μmol m-2 s-1, respectively. The air current speeds affected Tr and Pn at a CO_2 concentration of 700 μmol mol-1 as well as at 400 μmol mol-1. The results confirmed the importance of controlling air movement for enhancing Tr and Pn under the relatively high PPFD and elevated CO_2 levels likely in plant culture systems in space.

  6. Spatial variability in levels of benzene, formaldehyde, and total benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in New York City: a land-use regression study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hazardous air pollutant exposures are common in urban areas contributing to increased risk of cancer and other adverse health outcomes. While recent analyses indicate that New York City residents experience significantly higher cancer risks attributable to hazardous air pollutant exposures than the United States as a whole, limited data exist to assess intra-urban variability in air toxics exposures. Methods To assess intra-urban spatial variability in exposures to common hazardous air pollutants, street-level air sampling for volatile organic compounds and aldehydes was conducted at 70 sites throughout New York City during the spring of 2011. Land-use regression models were developed using a subset of 59 sites and validated against the remaining 11 sites to describe the relationship between concentrations of benzene, total BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes) and formaldehyde to indicators of local sources, adjusting for temporal variation. Results Total BTEX levels exhibited the most spatial variability, followed by benzene and formaldehyde (coefficient of variation of temporally adjusted measurements of 0.57, 0.35, 0.22, respectively). Total roadway length within 100 m, traffic signal density within 400 m of monitoring sites, and an indicator of temporal variation explained 65% of the total variability in benzene while 70% of the total variability in BTEX was accounted for by traffic signal density within 450 m, density of permitted solvent-use industries within 500 m, and an indicator of temporal variation. Measures of temporal variation, traffic signal density within 400 m, road length within 100 m, and interior building area within 100 m (indicator of heating fuel combustion) predicted 83% of the total variability of formaldehyde. The models built with the modeling subset were found to predict concentrations well, predicting 62% to 68% of monitored values at validation sites. Conclusions Traffic and point source emissions

  7. Microencapsulated fragrances in melamine formaldehyde resins.

    PubMed

    Bône, Stéphane; Vautrin, Claire; Barbesant, Virginie; Truchon, Stéphane; Harrison, Ian; Geffroy, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    The process for making melamine formaldehyde microcapsules containing fragrant oil is well-known. Recently, this technology has been used to enhance the olfactory performance on fabrics. However keeping the fragrance in the capsule during storage, improving the olfactory benefit and releasing a low amount of formaldehyde is highly challenging. To answer these challenges, Givaudan has developed its own melamine formaldehyde microcapsule, called Mechacaps, which is described in this article.

  8. Gaseous reference standards of formaldehyde from trioxane.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Paul J; di Meane, Elena Amico; Vargha, Gergely M; Brown, Richard J C; Milton, Martin J T

    2013-04-15

    We have developed a dynamic reference standard of gaseous formaldehyde based on diffusion of the sublimate of trioxane and thermal conversion to formaldehyde in the gas phase. We have also produced a gravimetric standard for formaldehyde in a nitrogen matrix, also by thermal conversion of the sublimate of trioxane. Analysis of the gravimetric standard with respect to the dynamic standard has confirmed the comparability of the static and dynamic gravimetric values.

  9. Reduced-Rank Spatio-Temporal Modeling of Air Pollution Concentrations in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis and Air Pollution1

    PubMed Central

    Olives, Casey; Sheppard, Lianne; Lindström, Johan; Sampson, Paul D.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Szpiro, Adam A.

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence in the epidemiologic literature of the relationship between air pollution and adverse health outcomes. Prediction of individual air pollution exposure in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funded Multi-Ethnic Study of Atheroscelerosis and Air Pollution (MESA Air) study relies on a flexible spatio-temporal prediction model that integrates land-use regression with kriging to account for spatial dependence in pollutant concentrations. Temporal variability is captured using temporal trends estimated via modified singular value decomposition and temporally varying spatial residuals. This model utilizes monitoring data from existing regulatory networks and supplementary MESA Air monitoring data to predict concentrations for individual cohort members. In general, spatio-temporal models are limited in their efficacy for large data sets due to computational intractability. We develop reduced-rank versions of the MESA Air spatio-temporal model. To do so, we apply low-rank kriging to account for spatial variation in the mean process and discuss the limitations of this approach. As an alternative, we represent spatial variation using thin plate regression splines. We compare the performance of the outlined models using EPA and MESA Air monitoring data for predicting concentrations of oxides of nitrogen (NOx)—a pollutant of primary interest in MESA Air—in the Los Angeles metropolitan area via cross-validated R2. Our findings suggest that use of reduced-rank models can improve computational efficiency in certain cases. Low-rank kriging and thin plate regression splines were competitive across the formulations considered, although TPRS appeared to be more robust in some settings. PMID:27014398

  10. Concentration, temperature, and density in a hydrogen-air flame by excimer-induced Raman scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.; Bowling, John M.; Pitz, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) is an attractive laser diagnostic for the study of supersonic hydrogen-air combustion. The VRS technique gives a complete thermodynamic description of the gas mixture at a point in the reacting flow. Single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering can simultaneously provide independent measurements of density, temperature, and concentration of each major species (H2, H2O, O2 and N2) in a hydrogen/air turbulent combustor. Also the pressure can be calculated using the ideal gas law. However, single-pulse VRS systems in current use for measurement of turbulent combustion have a number of shortcomings when applied to supersonic flows: (1) slow repetition rate (1 to 5 Hz), (2) poor spatial resolution (0.5x0.3x0.3 cu mm), and (3) marginal time resolution. Most of these shortcomings are due to the use of visible wavelength flash-lamp pumped dye lasers. The advent of UV excimer laser allows the possibility of dramatic improvements in the single-pulse, vibrational Raman scattering. The excimer based VRS probe will greatly improve repetition rate (100 to 500 Hz), spatial resolution (0.1x0.1x0.1 cu mm) and time resolution (30ns). These improvements result from the lower divergence of the UV excimer, higher repetition rate, and the increased Raman cross-sections (15 to 20 times higher) at ultra-violet (UV) wavelengths. With this increased capability, single-pulse vibrational Raman scattering promises to be an ideal non-intrusive probe for the study of hypersonic propulsion flows.

  11. [Research on detecting trace formaldehyde gas by the multi-wavelengths characteristics method].

    PubMed

    Li, Yang-jun; Wang, Gao

    2011-12-01

    In order to overcome the slow speed of detecting trace formaldehyde in the sample gas, material consumption by chemical reaction, and the limitations of the sampling area in the detection of trace formaldehyde, a multi-wavelength characteristics method for getting the exact concentration of formaldehyde quickly was designed. According to the spectrum characteristics of formaldehyde and the main interfering gases the system chose multiple wavelengths with the minimum degree of coherence (the number of characteristic wavelengths were selected to be 3, 4 and 5), in conjunction with the corresponding groups of narrow-band filters. With the infrared light of the light source through the chamber windows and narrow-band filters, the infrared light was collected by the PCI-2TE-13 infrared detectors, and the concentration of formaldehyde in the sample gas was calculated by the characteristics spectrum absorption algorithm. In the experiments, the system analyzed and calculated the concentration of formaldehyde in four gas samples collected in the newly renovated house, building materials market, supermarkets and outdoor parks. Experimental results of the system and test results of ARCSpectro-AMIR infrared spectrometer were compared, the results show that test data above 10 mg x m(-3) were close to true value by the multi-wavelengths characteristics method, and the average error is less than 5%. So the system meets the requirements of practical applications, and it has the advantages of real-time detection, not poisoning so on.

  12. Formation, Accumulation, and Hydrolysis of Endogenous and Exogenous Formaldehyde-Induced DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Hartwell, Hadley J; Moeller, Benjamin C; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Kracko, Dean; Bodnar, Wanda M; Starr, Thomas B; Swenberg, James A

    2015-07-01

    Formaldehyde is not only a widely used chemical with well-known carcinogenicity but is also a normal metabolite of living cells. It thus poses unique challenges for understanding risks associated with exposure. N(2-)hydroxymethyl-dG (N(2)-HOMe-dG) is the main formaldehyde-induced DNA mono-adduct, which together with DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) and toxicity-induced cell proliferation, play important roles in a mutagenic mode of action for cancer. In this study, N(2)-HOMe-dG was shown to be an excellent biomarker for direct adduction of formaldehyde to DNA and the hydrolysis of DPCs. The use of inhaled [(13)CD2]-formaldehyde exposures of rats and primates coupled with ultrasensitive nano ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry permitted accurate determinations of endogenous and exogenous formaldehyde DNA damage. The results show that inhaled formaldehyde only reached rat and monkey noses, but not tissues distant to the site of initial contact. The amounts of exogenous adducts were remarkably lower than those of endogenous adducts in exposed nasal epithelium. Moreover, exogenous adducts accumulated in rat nasal epithelium over the 28-days exposure to reach steady-state concentrations, followed by elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 7.1 days. Additionally, we examined artifact formation during DNA preparation to ensure the accuracy of nonlabeled N(2)-HOMe-dG measurements. These novel findings provide critical new data for understanding major issues identified by the National Research Council Review of the 2010 Environmental Protection Agency's Draft Integrated Risk Information System Formaldehyde Risk Assessment. They support a data-driven need for reflection on whether risks have been overestimated for inhaled formaldehyde, whereas underappreciating endogenous formaldehyde as the primary source of exposure that results in bone marrow toxicity and leukemia in susceptible humans and rodents deficient in DNA repair.

  13. Formation, Accumulation, and Hydrolysis of Endogenous and Exogenous Formaldehyde-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Rui; Lai, Yongquan; Hartwell, Hadley J.; Moeller, Benjamin C.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Kracko, Dean; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Starr, Thomas B.; Swenberg, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Formaldehyde is not only a widely used chemical with well-known carcinogenicity but is also a normal metabolite of living cells. It thus poses unique challenges for understanding risks associated with exposure. N2-hydroxymethyl-dG (N2-HOMe-dG) is the main formaldehyde-induced DNA mono-adduct, which together with DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) and toxicity-induced cell proliferation, play important roles in a mutagenic mode of action for cancer. In this study, N2-HOMe-dG was shown to be an excellent biomarker for direct adduction of formaldehyde to DNA and the hydrolysis of DPCs. The use of inhaled [13CD2]-formaldehyde exposures of rats and primates coupled with ultrasensitive nano ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry permitted accurate determinations of endogenous and exogenous formaldehyde DNA damage. The results show that inhaled formaldehyde only reached rat and monkey noses, but not tissues distant to the site of initial contact. The amounts of exogenous adducts were remarkably lower than those of endogenous adducts in exposed nasal epithelium. Moreover, exogenous adducts accumulated in rat nasal epithelium over the 28-days exposure to reach steady-state concentrations, followed by elimination with a half-life (t1/2) of 7.1 days. Additionally, we examined artifact formation during DNA preparation to ensure the accuracy of nonlabeled N2-HOMe-dG measurements. These novel findings provide critical new data for understanding major issues identified by the National Research Council Review of the 2010 Environmental Protection Agency’s Draft Integrated Risk Information System Formaldehyde Risk Assessment. They support a data-driven need for reflection on whether risks have been overestimated for inhaled formaldehyde, whereas underappreciating endogenous formaldehyde as the primary source of exposure that results in bone marrow toxicity and leukemia in susceptible humans and rodents deficient in DNA repair. PMID:25904104

  14. Comparison of indoor and outdoor concentrations of CO at a public school. Evaluation of an indoor air quality model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaloulakou, A.; Mavroidis, I.

    A field study was carried out to investigate the internal and external carbon monoxide (CO) concentration levels of a public school building in Athens, Greece. Simultaneous measurements of indoor and outdoor CO concentrations were conducted using a non-dispersive infrared analyzer. Measurements of mean hourly CO concentrations inside and outside the sampling room were conducted on a 24-h basis for 13 consecutive days during May and June 1999 and for 14 consecutive days during December 1999. The aim of the study was to investigate the attenuation pattern of external pollution levels within the building. The diurnal concentration variations reported for different days during the week show that indoor CO concentrations are in general lower than the respective outdoor levels, and that the morning peaks of indoor concentrations show a delay of 1 h or less compared to the morning peaks of outdoor concentrations. The measured indoor to outdoor concentration ratios show a seasonal variation. An indoor air quality model for the prediction of indoor concentration levels developed by Hayes (J. Air Pollut. Control Assoc. 39 (11) (1989) 1453; J. Air Waste Manage. Assoc. 41 (2) (1991) 161) is coded as a computer program and evaluated using the experimental data. The model results are in good agreement with the indoor concentration measurements, although in some cases the model cannot respond adequately to sharp outdoor concentration changes. The ratio between measured and predicted daily maximum indoor concentration ranges between 0.88 and 1.23. The regression curve between predicted by the model and measured hourly indoor concentrations, for a continuous period of 96 h, has a slope of 0.64 and a coefficient of determination ( R2) of 0.69.

  15. Liquid products from oxidative thermal treatment of oil sludge with different oxygen concentrations of air.

    PubMed

    Shie, J L; Chang, C Y; Lin, J P; Le, D J; Wu, C H

    2001-01-01

    Oxidative thermal treatment of oil sludge with different oxygen concentrations of air by using a dynamic thermogravimetric (TG) reaction system is investigated. The experimental conditions employed are: gas flow rate of 50 cm3/min (value at 298 K) for 300 mg dry waste, a constant heating rate of 5.2 K/min, the oxygen concentrations in air of 1.09, 8.62 and 20.95 vol. % O2, and the temperature (T) range of 378-873 K. From the experimental results, the residual mass fractions (M) are about 78.95, 28.49, 8.77 and 4.13 wt. % at the oxidative T of 563, 713, 763 and 873 K for the case with 20.95 vol. % O2, respectively. The values of M with 8.62 and 1.09 vol. % O2 at T of 873 K are 4.87 and 9.44 wt. %, respectively. The distillation characteristics of the oil portion of liquid products (condensates of gas at 298 K) from the oxidative thermal treatment of oil sludge with 20.95 vol. % O2 at T of 378-873 K is close to those of commercial gasoline. Nevertheless, the liquid product contains a large amount of water. The distillation characteristics of the oil portions of liquid products with 8.62 and 1.09 vol. % O2 at T of 378-873 K are close to those of diesel and fuel oils, respectively. The oil quality with 8.62 vol. % O2 is better than that with 1.09 vol. % O2. However, the liquid product with 8.62 vol. % O2 still contains a large amount of water; nonetheless, that with 1.09 vol. % O2 is with negligible water. Compared with the oil product of nitrogen pyrolysis, the oil quality with 1.09 vol. % O2 is better. Certainly, low oxygen conditions (i.e. 1.09 vol. % O2) not only accelerate the thermal reaction of oil sludge, but also at the same time avoid or reduce the production of water. Further, from the analysis of benzene (B), ethylbenzene (E), toluene (T) and iso-xylene (X) concentrations of the oil portion of liquid products, the BETX concentrations of oil with 20.95 vol. % O2 are higher than those with 8.62 and 1.09 vol. % O2. The yields of liquid products with 20.95, 8

  16. Influences of ambient air PM₂.₅ concentration and meteorological condition on the indoor PM₂.₅ concentrations in a residential apartment in Beijing using a new approach.

    PubMed

    Han, Yang; Qi, Meng; Chen, Yilin; Shen, Huizhong; Liu, Jing; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Liu, Wenxin; Wang, Xilong; Liu, Junfeng; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2015-10-01

    PM2.5 concentrations in a typical residential apartment in Beijing and immediately outside of the building were measured simultaneously during heating and non-heating periods. The objective was to quantitatively explore the relationship between indoor and outdoor PM2.5 concentrations. A statistical method for predicting indoor PM2.5 concentrations was proposed. Ambient PM2.5 concentrations were strongly affected by meteorological conditions, especially wind directions. A bimodal distribution was identified during the heating season due to the frequent and rapid transition between severe pollution events and clean days. Indoor PM2.5 concentrations were significantly correlated with outdoor PM2.5 concentrations but with 1-2 h delay, and the differences can be explained by ambient meteorological features, such as temperature, humidity, and wind direction. These results indicate the potential to incorporate indoor exposure features to the regional air quality model framework and to more accurately estimate the epidemiological relationship between human mortality and air pollution exposure.

  17. Sulfate concentrations as an indicator of ambient particulate matter air pollution for health risk evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, M; Thurston, G D

    1996-01-01

    Retrospective population studies that have compared regression coefficients for mortality and morbidity for sulfate (SO4(2-), fine particles (PM2.5; aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 microns), thoracic particles (PM10; aerodynamic diameter < 10 microns), and total suspended particulates (TSP; undefined and variable upper cut-size) generally have found SO4(2-) concentrations to be correlated with effects as well as or better than PM2.5. In addition, both SO4(2-) and PM2.5 have yielded somewhat stronger associations with adverse health effects than PM10, and much stronger associations than TSP. Sulfate has advantages over PM2.5 for retrospective epidemiology, at least in the United States, because considerably more data on sulfate have been collected in recent decades, and there is a broader epidemiological database in the literature for comparison to other studies. While SO4(2-), per se, is an unlikely causal factor for mortality or morbidity, it often is correlated closely with variations in the strong acid component of ambient particulate matter (H+) and PM2.5 concentrations (especially in summer), which are more likely causal factors. A detailed analysis of the SO4(2-) epidemiological database is presented in this paper. In addition, drawing on our substantial archives of SO4(2-) and H+ data, we show that SO4(2-) and H+ correlate, both spatially and over time, in the eastern United States. We demonstrate the utility of SO4(2-) as a useful surrogate for ambient PM2.5 and H+ in epidemiological studies and as an index of PM exposure in ambient air quality guidelines and standards.

  18. Assessing the impact of the forthcoming decrease in diesel exhaust particulate matter emissions on air quality: implications for black carbon concentrations in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Y.; Rodríguez, S.; Cuevas, E.; Ramos, R.; Abreu-Afonso, J.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    Forthcoming regulations (e.g. EURO 5 and EURO 6) are planned to reduce particulate matter emissions (PM) in the exhaust of forthcoming vehicles. In this study we assess the impact of such reduction in the diesel PM exhaust emissions on the urban ambient air PM concentrations. This has been done by studying the relationship between black carbon (BC) and carbon monoxide (CO) in urban ambient air and in the exhaust of current and forthcoming vehicles. The slope of the BC-vs-CO linear relationship is mainly affected by the percentage (%) of diesel automobiles in the urban vehicles fleet. This slope is a better indicator of the diesel PM emissions than bulk BC concentrations in urban ambient air. BC-vs-CO slopes within the range 1-3 and 7-14 ngBC/µgCO are typically observed in urban areas with low (<25%) and high (≥50%) proportions of diesel-fuel consumption for on road transportation, respectively. The entry into force of forthcoming regulations will decrease the BC-vs-CO slope in urban ambient air from about 10 to 5 ngBC/µgCO in the next decade, according to calculations based on the current data on diesel vehicles in urban fleets in Spanish cities. However, this will not necessary prompt a significant decrease in the urban BC concentrations if road traffic volume follows the increasing trend of the last decade. The results of this study shows that the analysis of the BC-vs-CO slope trend in ambient air is an useful tool for understanding the involvement "of the changes in the vehicle exhaust emissions rates" and "of the changes in the road traffic volume" in the BC and PMx trends in urban ambient air.

  19. Formaldehyde-releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Part 2. Formaldehyde-releasers in clothes: durable press chemical finishes.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Anton C; Le Coz, Christophe J; Lensen, Gerda J; Flyvholm, Mari-Ann; Maibach, Howard I; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan

    2010-07-01

    This is the second part of a review article on formaldehyde-releasers used as durable press chemical finishes (DPCF) in textiles. The early finishes contained large amounts of free formaldehyde, which led to many cases of allergic contact dermatitis to clothes in the 1950s and 1960s. Currently, most finishes are based on modified dimethylol dihydroxyethyleneurea, which releases less formaldehyde. Nevertheless, recent studies in the United States and Israel have identified patients reacting to DPCF, considered to have allergic contact reactions to clothes, either from formaldehyde released by the DPCF therein or from the DPCF per se (in patients negative to formaldehyde). However, all studies had some weaknesses in design or interpretation and in not a single case has the clinical relevance been proven. The amount of free formaldehyde in most garments will likely be below the threshold for the elicitation of dermatitis for all but the most sensitive patients. The amount of free cyclized urea DPCF in clothes is unlikely to be high enough to cause sensitization. Patch test reactions to formaldehyde-releasing DPCF will in most cases represent a reaction to formaldehyde released from the test material.

  20. BTEX air concentrations and self-reported common health problems in gasoline sellers from Cotonou, Benin.

    PubMed

    Tohon, Honesty Gbèdolo; Fayomi, Benjamin; Valcke, Mathieu; Coppieters, Yves; Bouland, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    To examine the relation between BTEX exposure levels and common self-reported health problems in 140 gasoline sellers in Cotonou, Benin, a questionnaire documenting their socioeconomic status and their health problems was used, whereas 18 of them went through semi-directed qualitative individual interviews and 17 had air samples taken on their workplace for BTEX analysis. Median concentrations for BTEX were significantly lower on official (range of medians: 54-207 μg/m³, n = 9) vs unofficial (148-1449 μg/m³, n = 8) gasoline-selling sites (p < 0.05). Self-reported health problems were less frequently reported in sellers from unofficial vs official selling sites (p < 0.05), because, as suggested by the semi-directed interviews, of their fear of losing their important, but illegal, source of income. Concluding, this study has combined quantitative and qualitative methodological approaches to account for the complex socioeconomic and environmental conditions of the investigated sellers, leading to their, in some cases, preoccupying BTEX exposure.

  1. Radical Concentrations and Prompt NO Formation in Hydrocarbon-Air Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusi, Yasuji; Yuuki, Akimasa

    1985-05-01

    Hydroxyl radical concentrations in laminar, premixed CH4-air flat-flames were measured by a conventional absorption method in the flame temperature range T{=}2200-1700 K. The OH mole fractions in the reaction zone POH were found to be insensitive to the flame temperature and the maximum POH to be about 6× 10-3 at T{=}2000 K in a stoichiometric flame. The rate constant for the prompt NO formation, CH+N2→HCN+N\\dashrightarrow2NO (4), is modified as k4{=}1.2× 1012\\exp (-13600/RT) by the relation between the amount of prompt NO and the saturation ion current Is. It is also shown from the measurements of NOx, unburnt hydrocarbons H.C., and Is, that the chemical kinetics are not significantly influenced by the flame temperature, and NO emission is reduced by reactions among NO, H.C., and N-containing intermediate species in low-temperature flames, even in stoichiometric and fuel-lean mixtures.

  2. [Volatile organic compounds concentrations and sources inside new air-conditioned bus].

    PubMed

    You, Ke-Wei; Ge, Yun-Shan; Qian, Yi-Xin; Liu, Wei; Feng, Bo; Zhang, Yan-Ni; Ning, Zhan-Wu; Hu, Bin; Zhao, Shou-Tang

    2008-05-01

    The distributing profile and concentration level inside new air-conditioned buses with 53 seats have been determined using the method of thermal desorption-capillary GC/MS under vehicle static conditions. Compounds were identified from their mass spectral data by using US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST02). The total numbers of identified components were 33 inside buses, including alkenes (15,45.4%), aromatic compounds (9,27.3%), alcohols (4,12.1%), ketones (3,9.1%) and esters (2,6.1%), especially in the range of C6-C10. The top 5 compounds measured inside buses were decane (8.01 mg/m3), 3-methylhexane (7.10 mg/m3), heptane (5.10 mg/m3), isoheptane (4.20 mg/m3) and 1-Methyl-3-ethylbenzene (3.56 mg/m3), and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC) > 52.5 mg/m3. The main sources of in-vehicle hydrocarbons and aromatic compounds comes from cabin components and interior trim materials (e.g., sealants, carpets, adhesives, paints, leather, plastics, PU foam and PE foam) that may retain certain VOCs during manufacturing, and/or emit these compounds over an extended period of time from off-gassing, aging-related breakdown products, heating/cooling and so on.

  3. Assessment of Air Quality in the International Space Station (ISS) and Space Shuttle Based on Samples Returned Aboard STS-110 (ISS-8A) in April 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2002-01-01

    The toxicological assessment of grab sample canisters (GSCs) returned aboard STS-110 is reported. Analytical methods have not changed from earlier reports, and surrogate standard recoveries from the GSCs were 77-121%, with one exception. Pressure tracking indicated no leaks in the canisters. Recoveries from lab and trip controls for formaldehyde analyses ranged from 87 to 96%. The two general criteria used to assess air quality are the total-non-methane-volatile organic hydrocarbons (NMVOCs) and the total T-value (minus the CO2 and formaldehyde contributions). Because of the inertness of Freon 218 (octafluoropropane, OFP), its contribution to the NMVOC is subtracted and tabulated separately. Control of atmospheric alcohols is important to the water recovery system engineers, hence total alcohols are also shown for each sample. Because formaldehyde is quantified from sorbent badges, its concentration is listed separately. These five indices of air quality are summarized.

  4. The Effects of Ferulic Acid Against Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Formaldehyde-Induced Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gerin, Fethullah; Erman, Hayriye; Erboga, Mustafa; Sener, Umit; Yilmaz, Ahsen; Seyhan, Hatice; Gurel, Ahmet

    2016-08-01

    This study was designed to elucidate the protective effects of ferulic acid (FA) on formaldehyde-induced hepatotoxicity by measuring some routine biochemical parameters, cytokine levels, and oxidative stress-related parameters in addition to YKL-40 in male Wistar albino rats. Tissue superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured. Also, serum YKL-40, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, total protein, albumin, total bilirubin concentrations, and AST, ALT, ALP, and LDH activities were measured. Histological specimens were examined in light microscopy. Formaldehyde significantly increased tissue MDA, and serum cytokine levels and also decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes. FA treatment decreased MDA and cytokine levels and increased activities of antioxidant enzymes. FA also alleviated degeneration due to formaldehyde toxicity. We suggested that FA can be used as a promising hepatoprotective agent against formaldehyde toxicity because of the obvious beneficial effects on oxidative stress parameters.

  5. The fabrication and characterization of a formaldehyde odor sensor using molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Liang; Liu, Yongjun; Zhou, Xiaodong; Hu, Jiming

    2005-04-15

    The fabrication and characterization of odor sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymers is reported as the first case of imprinting formaldehyde. A quartz crystal microbalance is employed as a sensitive apparatus of a sensor for the determination of odor formaldehyde. An equation is deduced to characterize the interaction between molecularly imprinted films and the template. A linear relationship between the frequency shifts and the concentration of analyte in the range of 1.25 to 14.25 microM is found. The detection limit is about 20.5 microM. The sensor can selectively distinguish gaseous formaldehyde. It is envisaged that this novel and handy method could be employed to determine formaldehyde gas in the atmosphere.

  6. Antibody production in rats after long-term exposure to formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Holmstroem, M.R.; Rynnel-Dagoeoe, B.Wi.; Wilhelmsson, B. )

    1989-09-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were vaccinated with pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens and tetanus toxoid to evaluate the immunologic effects of long-term formaldehyde exposure. The antibody response to vaccination was measured 3 to 4 weeks later by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An IgG response to pneumococcal polysaccharides and to tetanus toxoid was found in both the formaldehyde-exposed group and a control group of rats not exposed to formaldehyde. The IgM response to tetanus toxoid was significant in both groups but neither group showed a significant IgM response to pneumococcal polysaccharides. There were thus no signs of impaired B-cell function in rats exposed to a high concentration (12.6 ppm) of formaldehyde for nearly 2 years.

  7. Indoor air quality study of forty east Tennessee homes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Hingerty, B.E.; Schuresko, D.D.; Parzyck, D.C.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; White, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    Over a one-year period, measurements of indoor air pollutants (CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, formaldehyde, volatile organics, particulates, and radon) were made in 40 homes in East Tennessee. The houses were of various ages with different types of insulation and heating. Over one-half of the houses exceeded the ASHRAE indoor ceiling guideline of 0.1 ppM for formaldehyde on at least one occasion. Over the duration of the study, older houses averaged 0.04 ppM of formaldehyde while houses less than 5 years old averaged 0.08 ppM (P < 0.01). The highest concentration of formaldehyde measured was 0.4 ppM in a new home. Diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in levels of formaldehyde in some homes were as much as twofold and tenfold, respectively. The highest levels of formaldehyde were usually recorded during summer months. The concentration in indoor air of various organics was at least tenfold higher than in outdoor air. Carbon monoxide and nitrgen oxides were usually <2 and <0.02 ppM, respectively, except when gas stoves or kerosene space heaters were operating, or when a car was running in the garage. In 30% of the houses, the annual indoor guideline for radon, 4 pCi/L, was exceeded. The mean radon level in houses built on the ridgelines was 4.4 pCi/L, while houses located in the valleys had a mean level of 1.7 pCi/L (P < 0.01). The factor having the most impact on infiltration was operation of the central duct fan of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The mean rate of air exchange increased from 0.39 to 0.74 h/sup -1/ when the duct fan was operated (measurements prior to December 1982). This report presents the study design and implementation, describes the monitoring protocols, and provides a complete set of the data collected during the project. 25 references, 29 figures, 42 tables.

  8. Effect of the implosion and demolition of a hospital building on the concentration of fungi in the air.

    PubMed

    Barreiros, Gloria; Akiti, Tiyomi; Magalhães, Ana Cristina Gouveia; Nouér, Simone A; Nucci, Marcio

    2015-12-01

    Building renovations increase the concentration of Aspergillus conidia in the air. In 2010, one wing of the hospital building was imploded due to structural problems. To evaluate the impact of building implosion on the concentration of fungi in the air, the demolition was performed in two phases: mechanical demolition of 30 m of the building, followed by implosion of the wing. Patients at high risk for aspergillosis were placed in protected wards. Air sampling was performed during mechanical demolition, on the day of implosion and after implosion. Total and specific fungal concentrations were compared in the different areas and periods of sampling, using the anova test. The incidence of IA in the year before and after implosion was calculated. The mean concentration of Aspergillus increased during mechanical demolition and on the day of implosion. However, in the most protected areas, there was no significant difference in the concentration of fungi. The incidence of invasive aspergillosis (cases per 1000 admissions) was 0.9 in the 12 months before, 0.4 during, and 0.5 in the 12 months after mechanical demolition (P > 0.05). Continuous monitoring of the quality of air and effective infection control measures are important to minimize the impact of building demolition. PMID:26449634

  9. NMR studies of the equilibria and reaction rates in aqueous solutions of formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Rivlin, Michal; Eliav, Uzi; Navon, Gil

    2015-03-26

    Formaldehyde has an important role in the chemical industry and in biological sciences. In dilute aqueous solutions of formaldehyde only traces of the molecular formaldehyde are present and the predominant species are methylene glycol and in lower concentrations, dimethylene glycol. The chemical equilibria and reaction rates of the hydration of formaldehyde in H2O and D2O solutions at low concentrations were studied by (1)H and (13)C NMR at various conditions of pH (1.8-7.8) and temperature (278-333 K). These measurements became possible by direct detection of formaldehyde (13)C and (1)H peaks. The equilibrium and rate constants of the dimerization reaction of methylene glycol were also measured. The rate constants for both the hydration and the dimerization reactions were measured by a new version of the conventional selective inversion transfer method. This study, together with previous published work, completes the description of dynamics and equilibria of all the processes occurring in dilute aqueous formaldehyde solutions.

  10. Isolation and characterization of formaldehyde-degrading fungi and its formaldehyde metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Diansi; Song, Lili; Wang, Wei; Guo, Changhong

    2014-05-01

    Formaldehyde is classified as a human carcinogen that may cause nasopharyngeal cancer and probably leukemia. The effects of environmental and nutritional factors on fungal growth and the biodegradation of formaldehyde were investigated. Fungal strains SGFA1 and SGFA3 isolated from untreated sewage sediment samples collected from heavily formaldehyde-contaminated areas were identified using morphological characteristics and molecular techniques and named as Aspergillus nomius SGFA1 and Penicillium chrysogenum SGFA3. Results indicate that SGFA1 and SGFA3 completely consumed 3,000 and 900 mg l(-1) of formaldehyde, respectively, within 7 days under optimized conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses and enzyme activity analyses demonstrated that glutathione-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase (GDFADH) and formate dehydrogenase (FDH) pathway may play a functional role in enhancing formaldehyde-degrading capability in SGFA1. Both fungi have potential use for remediation of formaldehyde pollution.

  11. Background concentrations of individual and total volatile organic compounds in residential indoor air of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.

    PubMed

    Hippelein, Martin

    2004-09-01

    During a monitoring campaign concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured in indoor air of 79 dwellings where occupants had not complained about health problems or unpleasant odour. Parameters monitored were the individual concentration of 68 VOCs and the total concentration of all VOCs inside the room. VOCs adsorbed by Tenax TA were then analysed by means of thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The analytical procedure and quantification was done according to the recommendation of the ECA-IAQ Working Group 13 which gave a definition of the total volatile organic compound (TVOC) concentration. Using this recommendation TVOC-concentrations ranged between 33 and 1600 microg m(-3) with a median of 289 microg m(-3). Compounds found in every sample and with the highest concentrations were 2-propanol, alpha-pinene and toluene. Save for a few samples, all concentrations measured have been a factor 2 to 10 lower, compared to data from similar studies. Only a few terpenes and aldehydes were found exceeding published reference data or odour threshold concentrations. However, it has been found that sampling and analysing methods do have a considerable impact on the results, making direct comparisons of studies somewhat questionable. 47% of all samples revealed concentrations exceeding the threshold value of 300 microg TVOC m(-3) set by the German Federal Environmental Agency as a target for indoor air quality. Using the TVOC concentration as defined in the ECA-IAQ methodology is instrumental in assessing exposure to VOCs and identifying sources of VOCs. The background concentrations determined in this study can be used to discuss and interpret target values for individual and total volatile organic compounds in indoor air.

  12. Seasonal variability of tritium and ion concentrations in rain at Kumamoto, Japan and back-trajectory analysis of air mass

    SciTech Connect

    Momoshima, N.; Sugihara, S.; Toyoshima, T.; Nagao, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Nakamura, Y.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium and major ion concentrations in rain were analyzed in Kumamoto (Japan)) between 2001 and 2006 to examine present tritium concentration and seasonal variation. The average tritium concentration was 0.36 {+-} 0.19 Bq/L (n=104) and higher tritium concentrations were observed in spring than the other seasons. Among the ions, non-sea-salt (nss) SO{sub 4}{sup 2}'- showed higher concentration in winter while other ions did not show marked increase in winter. Based on the back-trajectory analyses of air masses, the increase in tritium concentrations in spring arises from downward movement of naturally produced tritium from stratosphere to troposphere, while the increase of the nss-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations in winter is due to long range transport of pollutants from China to Japan. (authors)

  13. Optimal Modeling of Urban Ambient Air Ozone Concentration Based on Its Precursors' Concentrations and Temperature, Employing Genetic Programming and Genetic Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Seyed Mahmoud; Husseinzadeh, Danial; Alikhani, Sadegh

    2014-04-01

    Efficient models are required to predict the optimum values of ozone concentration in different levels of its precursors' concentrations and temperatures. A novel model based on the application of a genetic programming (GP) optimization is presented in this article. Ozone precursors' concentrations and run time average temperature have been chosen as model's parameters. Generalization performances of two different homemade models based on genetic programming and genetic algorithm (GA), which can be used for calculating theoretical ozone concentration, are compared with conventional semi-empirical model performance. Experimental data of Mashhad city ambient air have been employed to investigate the prediction ability of properly trained GP, GA, and conventional semi-empirical models. It is clearly demonstrated that the in-house algorithm which is used for the model based on GP, provides better generalization performance over the model optimized with GA and the conventional semi-empirical ones. The proposed model is found accurate enough and can be used for urban air ozone concentration prediction.

  14. Formaldehyde, aspartame, and migraines: a possible connection.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Stechschulte, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Aspartame is a widely used artificial sweetener that has been linked to pediatric and adolescent migraines. Upon ingestion, aspartame is broken, converted, and oxidized into formaldehyde in various tissues. We present the first case series of aspartame-associated migraines related to clinically relevant positive reactions to formaldehyde on patch testing.

  15. Simple high-performance liquid chromatography method for formaldehyde determination in human tissue through derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bilal; Asci, Ali; Kucukoglu, Kaan; Albayrak, Mevlut

    2016-08-01

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatography method has been developed for the determination of formaldehyde in human tissue. FA Formaldehyde was derivatized with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. It was extracted from human tissue with ethyl acetate by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The calibration curve was linear in the concentration range of 5.0-200 μg/mL. Intra- and interday precision values for formaldehyde in tissue were <6.9%, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 6.5%. The extraction recoveries of formaldehyde from human tissue were between 88 and 98%. The limits of detection and quantification of formaldehyde were 1.5 and 5.0 μg/mL, respectively. Also, this assay was applied to liver samples taken from a biopsy material.

  16. Uncertainty-weighted time averaging of mercury vapour concentrations in ambient air: application to measurements in the United kingdom.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard J C; Muhunthan, Dharsheni

    2011-02-03

    Uncertainty-weighted time averaging of total gaseous mercury concentrations in ambient air, with associated robust uncertainties, has been performed for concentrations measured by the U.K. Heavy Metals Monitoring Network between 2007 and 2009. The results have been compared with averages produced using standard time-averaging methods with a view to investigating the properties of the new method and whether it represents an improvement over current practice.

  17. Blocking of the water-lunar fines reaction by air and water concentration effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammage, R. B.; Holmes, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    The elements of air, if adsorbed in conjunction with water vapor or liquid water, are able to impede severely the attack of lunar fines. Thus is explained the stability of lunar fines in moisture laden air, and their small solubility in liquid, aerated water. In the absence of air, liquid water is more effective than water vapor in attacking the grains; the channels formed are wider and the expansion of area is greater.

  18. Selective and mild hydrogen production using water and formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Heim, Leo E; Schlörer, Nils E; Choi, Jong-Hoo; Prechtl, Martin H G

    2014-04-08

    With the increased efforts in finding new energy storage systems for mobile and stationary applications, an intensively studied fuel molecule is dihydrogen owing to its energy content, and the possibility to store it in the form of hydridic and protic hydrogen, for example, in liquid organic hydrogen carriers. Here we show that water in the presence of paraformaldehyde or formaldehyde is suitable for molecular hydrogen storage, as these molecules form stable methanediol, which can be easily and selectively dehydrogenated forming hydrogen and carbon dioxide. In this system, both molecules are hydrogen sources, yielding a theoretical weight efficiency of 8.4% assuming one equivalent of water and one equivalent of formaldehyde. Thus it is potentially higher than formic acid (4.4 wt%), as even when technical aqueous formaldehyde (37 wt%) is used, the diluted methanediol solution has an efficiency of 5.0 wt%. The hydrogen can be efficiently generated in the presence of air using a ruthenium catalyst at low temperature.

  19. Comparison of background levels of culturable fungal spore concentrations in indoor and outdoor air in southeastern Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, D.; Habib, J.; Luxner, J.; Galler, H.; Zarfel, G.; Schlacher, R.; Friedl, H.; Reinthaler, F. F.

    2014-12-01

    Background concentrations of airborne fungi are indispensable criteria for an assessment of fungal concentrations indoors and in the ambient air. The goal of this study was to define the natural background values of culturable fungal spore concentrations as reference values for the assessment of moldy buildings. The concentrations of culturable fungi were determined outdoors as well as indoors in 185 dwellings without visible mold, obvious moisture problems or musty odor. Samples were collected using the MAS-100® microbiological air sampler. The study shows a characteristic seasonal influence on the background levels of Cladosporium, Penicillium and Aspergillus. Cladosporium sp. had a strong outdoor presence, whereas Aspergillus sp. and Penicillium sp. were typical indoor fungi. For the region of Styria, the median outdoor concentrations are between 100 and 940 cfu/m³ for culturable xerophilic fungi in the course of the year. Indoors, median background levels are between 180 and 420 cfu/m³ for xerophilic fungi. The I/O ratios of the airborne fungal spore concentrations were between 0.2 and 2.0. For the assessment of indoor and outdoor air samples the dominant genera Cladosporium, Penicillium and Aspergillus should receive special consideration.

  20. Formaldehyde exposure in gross anatomy laboratory of Suranaree University of Technology: a comparison of area and personal sampling.

    PubMed

    Saowakon, Naruwan; Ngernsoungnern, Piyada; Watcharavitoon, Pornpun; Ngernsoungnern, Apichart; Kosanlavit, Rachain

    2015-12-01

    Cadavers are usually preserved by embalming solution which is composed of formaldehyde (FA), phenol, and glycerol. Therefore, medical students and instructors have a higher risk of exposure to FA inhalation from cadavers during dissection. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the FA exposure in indoor air and breathing zone of medical students and instructors during dissection classes in order to investigate the relationship between them. The indoor air and personal air samples in breathing zone were collected three times during anatomy dissection classes (in January, August, and October of 2014) with sorbent tubes, which were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The air cleaner machines were determined by weight measurement. Pulmonary function tests and irritation effects were also investigated. The mean of FA concentrations ranged from 0.117 to 0.415 ppm in the indoor air and from 0.126 to 1.176 ppm in the breathing zone of students and instructors. All the personal exposure data obtained exceeded the threshold limit of NIOSH and WHO agencies. The air cleaner machines were not significant difference. The pulmonary function of instructors showed a decrease during attention of classes and statistically significant decreasing in the instructors more than those of the students. Clinical symptoms that were observed in nose and eyes were irritations with general fatigue. We suggested that the modified exhaust ventilation and a locally ventilated dissection work table were considered for reducing FA levels in the gross anatomy dissection room.

  1. LOCATING NEARBY SOURCES OF AIR POLLUTION BY NONPARAMETRIC REGRESSION OF ATMOSPHERIC CONCENTRATIONS ON WIND DIRECTION. (R826238)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship of the concentration of air pollutants to wind direction has been determined by nonparametric regression using a Gaussian kernel. The results are smooth curves with error bars that allow for the accurate determination of the wind direction where the concentrat...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 20 - Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) and Derived Air Concentrations (DACs) of Radionuclides for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...,” and “Water,” are applicable to the assessment and control of dose to the public, particularly in the...). Consideration of non-stochastic limits has not been included in deriving the air and water effluent... water concentrations were derived by taking the most restrictive occupational stochastic oral...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix B to Part 20 - Annual Limits on Intake (ALIs) and Derived Air Concentrations (DACs) of Radionuclides for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...,” and “Water,” are applicable to the assessment and control of d