Science.gov

Sample records for air gap distance

  1. Unifying Paschen Curve Conditions across Pressure and Gap Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Amanda; Garner, Allen; Valfells, Agust

    2015-11-01

    The Paschen curve (PC) predicts the breakdown voltage of a gas by relating it to the product of pressure and gap distance (pd). Recent experiments deviate from the PC for microscale gaps at low pd. A scaling law incorporating field emission-driven breakdown and field enhancement to the macroscale Paschen law yields more accurate predictions for microscale gaps (A. Venkattraman and A. A. Alexeenko, Phys. Plasmas 19, 123515 (2012).). While many studies consider low pd, deviations from the PC also arise at high pd, as demonstrated for gap distances between 0.0508 and 0.254 cm and pressures between 96.5 and 6900 kPa (W. J. Carey, A. J. Wiebe, R. D. Nord, and L. L. Altgilbers, in Proc. IEEE Pulsed Power Conf., 2011, pp. 741-744). High pd values are relevant for ongoing high voltage plasma experiments for food treatment and combustion. We attempt to elucidate the impact of large gap distances (~ 5 cm) and higher pressures (~ 200-300 kPa) on these deviations by connecting recent work at low pd to high pd by assessing scaling laws, analyzing field emission models, and using particle-in-cell codes. Implications on experimental design will be discussed, and the development of a universal Paschen curve will be explored.

  2. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  3. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  4. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  5. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  6. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  7. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  8. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  9. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  10. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  11. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  12. Temperature Tunable Air-Gap Etalon Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Stephen, Mark A.; Lunt, David L.

    1998-01-01

    We report on experimental measurements of a temperature tuned air-gap etalon filter. The filter exhibits temperature dependent wavelength tuning of 54 pm/C. It has a nominal center wavelength of 532 nm. The etalon filter has a 27 pm optical bandpass and 600 pm free spectral range (finesse approximately 22). The experimental results are in close agreement with etalon theory.

  13. Vertical hydraulic generators experience with dynamic air gap monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, G.B.; Lyles, J.F )

    1992-12-01

    Until recently, dynamic monitoring of the rotor to stator air gap of hydraulic generators was not practical. Cost effective and reliable dyamic air gap monitoring equipment has been developed in recent years. Dynamic air gap monitoring was originally justified because of the desire of the owner to minimize the effects of catastrophic air gap failure. However, monitoring air gaps on a time basis has been shown to be beneficial by assisting in the assessment of hydraulic generator condition. The air gap monitor provides useful information on rotor and stator condition and generator vibration. The data generated by air gap monitors will assist managers in the decision process with respect to the timing and extent of required maintenance for a particular generating unit.

  14. Mapping forest canopy gaps using air-photo interpretation and ground surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, T.J.; Knutson, M.G.; Hines, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    Canopy gaps are important structural components of forested habitats for many wildlife species. Recent improvements in the spatial accuracy of geographic information system tools facilitate accurate mapping of small canopy features such as gaps. We compared canopy-gap maps generated using ground survey methods with those derived from air-photo interpretation. We found that maps created from high-resolution air photos were more accurate than those created from ground surveys. Errors of omission were 25.6% for the ground-survey method and 4.7% for the air-photo method. One variable of inter est in songbird research is the distance from nests to gap edges. Distances from real and simulated nests to gap edges were longer using the ground-survey maps versus the air-photo maps, indicating that gap omission could potentially bias the assessment of spatial relationships. If research or management goals require location and size of canopy gaps and specific information about vegetation structure, we recommend a 2-fold approach. First, canopy gaps can be located and the perimeters defined using 1:15,000-scale or larger aerial photographs and the methods we describe. Mapped gaps can then be field-surveyed to obtain detailed vegetation data.

  15. Air Gap Effects in LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Ault, S; Avara, R; Bahl, K L; Boat, R; Cunningham, B; Gidding, D; Janzen, J; Kuklo, D; Lee, R; Lauderbach, L; Weingart, W C; Wu, B; Winer, K

    2005-09-26

    Three experiments done over twenty years on gaps in LX-17 are reported. For the detonation front moving parallel to the gaps, jets of gas products were seen coming from the gaps at velocities greater than the detonation velocity. A case can be made that the jet velocity increased with gap thickness but the data is scattered. For the detonation front moving transverse to the gap, time delays were seen. The delays roughly increase with gap width, going from 0-70 ns at 'zero gap' to around 300 ns at 0.5-1 mm gap. Larger gaps of up to 6 mm width almost certainly stopped the detonation, but this was not proved. Real-time resolution of the parallel jets and determination of the actual re-detonation or failure in the transverse case needs to be done in future experiments.

  16. An air gap moderates the performance of nanowire array transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tong; Mehta, Jeremy S.; Mativetsky, Jeffrey M.

    2017-03-01

    Solution-processed nanowires are promising for low-cost and flexible electronics. When depositing nanowires from solution, due to stacking of the nanowires, an air gap exists between the substrate and much of the active material. Here, using confocal Raman spectroscopy, we quantify the thickness of the air gap in transistors comprising organic semiconductor nanowires. The average air gap thickness is found to be unexpectedly large, being at least three times larger than the nanowire diameter, leading to a significant impact on transistor performance. The air gap acts as an additional dielectric layer that reduces the accumulation of charge carriers due to a gate voltage. Conventional determination of the charge carrier mobility ignores the presence of an air gap, resulting in an overestimate of charge carrier accumulation and an underestimate of charge carrier mobility. It is shown that the larger the air gap, the larger the mobility correction (which can be greater than an order of magnitude) and the larger the degradation in on–off current ratio. These results demonstrate the importance of minimizing the air gap and of taking the air gap into consideration when analyzing the electrical performance of transistors consisting of stacked nanowires. This finding is applicable to all types of stacked one-dimensional materials including organic and inorganic nanowires, and carbon nanotubes.

  17. An air gap moderates the performance of nanowire array transistors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tong; Mehta, Jeremy S; Mativetsky, Jeffrey M

    2017-03-24

    Solution-processed nanowires are promising for low-cost and flexible electronics. When depositing nanowires from solution, due to stacking of the nanowires, an air gap exists between the substrate and much of the active material. Here, using confocal Raman spectroscopy, we quantify the thickness of the air gap in transistors comprising organic semiconductor nanowires. The average air gap thickness is found to be unexpectedly large, being at least three times larger than the nanowire diameter, leading to a significant impact on transistor performance. The air gap acts as an additional dielectric layer that reduces the accumulation of charge carriers due to a gate voltage. Conventional determination of the charge carrier mobility ignores the presence of an air gap, resulting in an overestimate of charge carrier accumulation and an underestimate of charge carrier mobility. It is shown that the larger the air gap, the larger the mobility correction (which can be greater than an order of magnitude) and the larger the degradation in on-off current ratio. These results demonstrate the importance of minimizing the air gap and of taking the air gap into consideration when analyzing the electrical performance of transistors consisting of stacked nanowires. This finding is applicable to all types of stacked one-dimensional materials including organic and inorganic nanowires, and carbon nanotubes.

  18. Avoiding the Goulash: Closing Gaps and Bridging Distances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shillington, Sandi; Brown, Mark; MacKay, Andrea; Paewai, Shelley; Suddaby, Gordon; White, Frances

    2012-01-01

    Not many universities provide both distance and on-campus study options for study. Massey University has been delivering both for more than 50 years. In this time there has been a significant change from paper-based to increasingly online delivery (both on-campus and at a distance). Services provided to students have also changed and adapted to…

  19. Variation of plasma parameters of vacuum arc column with gap distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen; Yuan, Zhao; He, Junjia

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of a two-dimensional (2D) magneto-hydrodynamic model, we studied long-gap-distance vacuum arcs in a uniform axial magnetic field and determined the effect of gap distance varying in a large range on plasma parameters. Simulation results showed that with increasing gap distance, the parameters of the plasma near the cathode are almost invariant, except for ion number density, but the parameters of the plasma in front of the anode clearly vary; meanwhile, joule heat gradually becomes the main source of energy for the arc column. In a short gap, a clear current constriction can be found in the entire arc column. Whereas when the gap distance exceeds a certain value, a sharp contraction of the current only arises in front of the anode.

  20. Air gap sparkover and gap factors: Analysis of published data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gela, G.

    1994-12-01

    This report is an account of a literature search on air gap sparkover which was conducted as part of the Live Working 2000 project. The objective of this literature search was to locate and analyze published data on sparkover of air gaps which are relevant to live working. The sparkover data form the basis for determination of gap factors for live working situations. Data dating back to 1930`s were located in published papers and reports, extracted and analyzed for a variety of air gaps, including: rod-to-plane, rod-to-rod, sphere-to-plane, bundle-to-plane, hoop-to-plane, bundle-to-tower window, bundle-to-tower outside phase, and worker-to-tower air gap. The rod-to-plane air gap has been analyzed extensively in the literature, and several accurate empirical formulae have been developed to calculate the 50% sparkover voltage of the gap when subjected to transient overvoltages with the critical wave shape. The terms, such as gap factor, transient overvoltage (TOV), critical wave shape, and other relevant terms, are defined in this report for completeness. The CRIEPI formula is used as the reference in this report, since this formula has been adopted by several technical organizations (IEC, IEEE). Comparisons are also made with the second popular formula, the Gallet formula. All sparkover data obtained from the literature are presented in tables and graphs. In addition, where applicable and available, data for the critical wave shape are identified and placed in separate tables for ready reference. The calculated gap factors are based on the CRIEPI formula. Detailed comparisons of the CRIEPI and the Gallet formulae allow easy determination of the gap factors based on the Gallet formula, should one desire to compute these numbers. The calculated gap factors are summarized in tables and compared with the gap factor values tentatively suggested for use by IEC TC 78 WG 10.

  1. On the Spectral Gap of a Square Distance Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xinyu; Li, Dong; Shirokoff, David; Wetton, Brian

    2017-02-01

    We consider a square distance matrix which arises from a preconditioned Jacobian matrix for the numerical computation of the Cahn-Hilliard problem. We prove strict negativity of all but one associated eigenvalues. This solves a conjecture in Christieb et al. (J Comput Phys 257:193-215, 2014).

  2. Femtosecond frequency comb based distance measurement in air.

    PubMed

    Balling, Petr; Kren, Petr; Masika, Pavel; van den Berg, S A

    2009-05-25

    Interferometric measurement of distance using a femtosecond frequency comb is demonstrated and compared with a counting interferometer displacement measurement. A numerical model of pulse propagation in air is developed and the results are compared with experimental data for short distances. The relative agreement for distance measurement in known laboratory conditions is better than 10(-7). According to the model, similar precision seems feasible even for long-distance measurement in air if conditions are sufficiently known. It is demonstrated that the relative width of the interferogram envelope even decreases with the measured length, and a fringe contrast higher than 90% could be obtained for kilometer distances in air, if optimal spectral width for that length and wavelength is used. The possibility of comb radiation delivery to the interferometer by an optical fiber is shown by model and experiment, which is important from a practical point of view.

  3. Distance-near disparity esotropia: can we shrink the gap?

    PubMed

    Burke, J P

    2015-02-01

    Distance-near disparity esotropias are a group of heterogenous usually acquired strabismus disorders, where the angle of misalignment at near exceeds that at distance by 10 prism diopters or more, where the accurate correction of refractive errors and ambylopia are important early objectives. These aetiologically diverse entities respond non-uniformally to strabismus surgery and bifocals. The management challenge is one of 'shrinking' the disparity so that the affected individuals can develop and comfortably maintain binocular single vision and/or optimal alignment. Surgical procedures have continued to evolve but none of the current operative procedures are superior for all patients. Subclassifying this strabismus and highlighting publication data from more homogenous clinical series may assist with the optimisation of future management and treatment outcomes.

  4. Ultrasonic system for accurate distance measurement in the air.

    PubMed

    Licznerski, Tomasz J; Jaroński, Jarosław; Kosz, Dariusz

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a system that accurately measures the distance travelled by ultrasound waves through the air. The simple design of the system and its obtained accuracy provide a tool for non-contact distance measurements required in the laser's optical system that investigates the surface of the eyeball.

  5. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S.

    2013-03-05

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  6. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S

    2012-02-07

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  7. Thickness and air gap measurement of assembled IR objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueerss, B.; Langehanenberg, P.

    2015-05-01

    A growing number of applications like surveillance, thermography, or automotive demand for infrared imaging systems. Their imaging performance is significantly influenced by the alignment of the individual lens elements. Besides the lateral orientation of lenses, the air spacing between the lenses is a crucial parameter. Because of restricted mechanical accessibility within an assembled objective, a non-contact technique is required for the testing of these parameters. So far commercial measurement systems were not available for testing of IR objectives since many materials used for infrared imaging are non-transparent at wavelengths below 2 μm. We herewith present a time-domain low coherent interferometer capable of measuring any kind of infrared material (e.g., Ge, Si, etc.) as well as VIS materials. The fiber-optic set-up is based on a Michelson-Interferometer in which the light from a broadband super-luminescent diode is split into a reference arm with a variable optical delay and a measurement arm where the sample is placed. On a photo detector, the reflected signals from both arms are superimposed and recorded as a function of the variable optical path. Whenever the group delay difference is zero, a coherence peak occurs and the relative lens' surface distances are derived from the optical delay. In order to penetrate IR materials, the instrument operates at 2.2 μm. The set-up allows the contactless determination of thicknesses and air gaps inside of assembled infrared objective lenses with accuracy in the micron range. It therefore is a tool for the precise manufacturing or quality control.

  8. An ultrasonic air pump using an acoustic traveling wave along a small air gap.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Yuji; Nakamura, Kentaro; Nishikawa, Masato; Nakagawa, Tatsuyuki; Kihara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic air pump that uses a traveling wave along a small air gap between a bending vibrator and a reflector is discussed. The authors investigate ultrasonic air pumps that make use of bending vibrators and reflectors and confirm that air can be induced to flow by generating an asymmetric acoustic standing wave along an air gap. In this paper, we proposed a novel ultrasonic air pump in which a traveling wave along an air gap induces acoustic streaming and achieves one-way airflow. Two new reflector configurations, stepped and tapered, were designed and used to generate traveling waves. To predict airflow generation, sound pressure distribution in the air gap was calculated by means of finite element analysis (FEA). As a preliminary step, 2 FEA models were compared: one piezoelectric-structure-acoustic model and one piezoelectric- structure-fluid model, which included the viscosity effect of the fluid. The sound pressure distribution in the air gap, including fluid viscosity, was calculated by the FEA because it is expected to be dominant and thus have a strong effect on the sound pressure field in such a thin fluid layer. Based on the FEA results of the stepped and the tapered reflectors, it was determined that acoustic traveling waves could propagate along the gaps. Experiments were carried out with the designed bending vibrator and the reflectors. The acoustic fields in the air gap were measured via a fiber optic probe, and it was determined that the sound pressure and the phase distribution tendencies corresponded well with the results computed by FEA. Through our experiments, one-way airflow generation, in the same direction of the traveling wave and with the maximum flow velocity of 5.6 cm/s, was achieved.

  9. The effect of body postures on the distribution of air gap thickness and contact area.

    PubMed

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M

    2017-02-01

    The heat and mass transfer in clothing is predominantly dependent on the thickness of air layer and the magnitude of contact area between the body and the garment. The air gap thickness and magnitude of the contact area can be affected by the posture of the human body. Therefore, in this study, the distribution of the air gap and the contact area were investigated for different body postures of a flexible manikin. In addition, the effect of the garment fit (regular and loose) and style (t-shirts, sweatpants, jacket and trousers) were analysed for the interaction between the body postures and the garment properties. A flexible manikin was scanned using a three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique, and the scans were post-processed in dedicated software. The body posture had a strong effect on the air gap thickness and the contact area for regions where the garment had a certain distance from the body. Furthermore, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the possible heat transfer coefficient for the observed air layers and their change with posture. The outcome of this study can be used to improve the design of the protective and functional garments and predict their effect on the human body.

  10. The effect of body postures on the distribution of air gap thickness and contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2017-02-01

    The heat and mass transfer in clothing is predominantly dependent on the thickness of air layer and the magnitude of contact area between the body and the garment. The air gap thickness and magnitude of the contact area can be affected by the posture of the human body. Therefore, in this study, the distribution of the air gap and the contact area were investigated for different body postures of a flexible manikin. In addition, the effect of the garment fit (regular and loose) and style (t-shirts, sweatpants, jacket and trousers) were analysed for the interaction between the body postures and the garment properties. A flexible manikin was scanned using a three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique, and the scans were post-processed in dedicated software. The body posture had a strong effect on the air gap thickness and the contact area for regions where the garment had a certain distance from the body. Furthermore, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the possible heat transfer coefficient for the observed air layers and their change with posture. The outcome of this study can be used to improve the design of the protective and functional garments and predict their effect on the human body.

  11. Control of membrane gaps by synaptotagmin-Ca2+ measured with a novel membrane distance ruler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chao-Chen; Seikowski, Jan; Pérez-Lara, Angel; Jahn, Reinhard; Höbartner, Claudia; Walla, Peter Jomo

    2014-12-01

    Fast synchronous neurotransmitter release is triggered by calcium that activates synaptotagmin-1 (syt-1), resulting in fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. Syt-1 possesses two Ca2+-binding C2 domains that tether membranes via interactions with anionic phospholipids. It is capable of crosslinking membranes and has recently been speculated to trigger fusion by decreasing the gap between them. As quantitative information on membrane gaps is key to understanding general cellular mechanisms, including the role of syt-1, we developed a fluorescence-lifetime based inter-membrane distance ruler using membrane-anchored DNAs of various lengths as calibration standards. Wild-type and mutant data provide evidence that full-length syt-1 indeed regulates membrane gaps: without Ca2+, syt-1 maintains membranes at distances of ~7-8 nm. Activation with 100 μM Ca2+ decreases the distance to ~5 nm by binding the C2 domains to opposing membranes, respectively. These values reveal that activated syt-1 adjusts membrane distances to the level that promotes SNARE complex assembly.

  12. Distance fields on unstructured grids: Stable interpolation, assumed gradients, collision detection and gap function.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Sebastian; Bucher, Christian

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a novel approach to collision detection based on distance fields. A novel interpolation ensures stability of the distances in the vicinity of complex geometries. An assumed gradient formulation is introduced leading to a [Formula: see text]-continuous distance function. The gap function is re-expressed allowing penalty and Lagrange multiplier formulations. The article introduces a node-to-element integration for first order elements, but also discusses signed distances, partial updates, intermediate surfaces, mortar methods and higher order elements. The algorithm is fast, simple and robust for complex geometries and self contact. The computed tractions conserve linear and angular momentum even in infeasible contact. Numerical examples illustrate the new algorithm in three dimensions.

  13. Improved Antishock Air-Gap Control Algorithm with Acceleration Feedforward Control for High-Numerical Aperture Near-Field Storage System Using Solid Immersion Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Gon; Shin, Won-Ho; Hwang, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Jun; Park, Kyoung-Su; Park, No-Cheol; Yang, Hyunseok; Park, Young-Pil; Moo Park, Jin; Son, Do Hyeon; Kyo Seo, Jeong; Choi, In Ho

    2010-08-01

    A near-field storage system using a solid immersion lens (SIL) has been studied as a high-density optical disc drive system. The major goal of this research is to improve the robustness of the air-gap controller for a SIL-based near-field recording (NFR) system against dynamic disturbances, such as external shocks. The servo system is essential in near-field (NF) technology because the nanogap distance between the SIL and the disc is 50 nm or less. Also, the air-gap distance must be maintained without collision between the SIL and the disc to detect a stable gap error and read-out signals when an external shock is applied. Therefore, we propose an improved air-gap control algorithm using only an acceleration feedforward controller (AFC) to maintain the air-gap distance without contact for a 4.48 G at 10 ms shock. Thus, the antishock control performance for the SIL-based NF storage system in the presence of external shocks is markedly improved. Furthermore, to enhance the performance of the antishock air-gap control, we use the AFC with a double disturbance observer and a dead-zone nonlinear controller. As a result, the air-gap distance is maintained without contact for a 6.56 G@10 ms shock.

  14. Direct control of air gap flux in permanent magnet machines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for field weakening in PM machines uses field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72) to produce flux in one or more stators (34, 49, 63, 64), including a flux which counters flux normally produced in air gaps between the stator(s) (34, 49, 63, 64) and the rotor (20, 21, 41, 61) which carries the PM poles. Several modes of operation are introduced depending on the magnitude and polarity of current in the field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72). The invention is particularly useful for, but not limited to, the electric vehicle drives and PM generators.

  15. Sparkover performance and gap factors of air gaps below 1 meter: Analysis of published data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gela, G.

    1998-03-01

    This report is an account of a literature search on sparkover performance of various air gaps shorter than 1 meter. The report is a part of the Live Working 2000 project. The objective of the literature search was to locate and analyze published data on sparkover performance of air gaps below 1 meter, with special emphasis on live working. Published data dating back to 1930`s are analyzed for a variety of air gaps: rod-to-plane; rod-to-rod; sphere-to-plane; bundle-to-plane; hoop-to-plane, conductor-to-rod; and worker-to-tower. Data for all voltage types, and both polarities (where applicable) are analyzed: power frequency alternating current; direct current; lightning; fast front impulse; and switching impulse. As is the case for longer air gaps and higher voltages, several accurate empirical formulae for calculation of the sparkover voltage have been developed, and are analyzed. Also, the rod-to-plane air gap is used in this report as the reference gap for calculation of gap factors.

  16. Electric field step in air gap streamer discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Rong; Zhuang Chijie; Yu Zhanqing; Li Zhizhao; Geng Yinan

    2011-11-28

    Electric field (E-field) in air gap streamer discharges under positive lightning impulse was measured by specifically developed integrated electro-optic sensors. An E-field step phenomenon was observed. The E-field firstly agreed with the Laplace field, then suddenly increased with a rise time of {mu}s. The occurrence probability of this phenomenon increased as the applied voltage increased. The discharge current waveforms and photos taken by a fast camera prove the E-field step was caused by the space net charge. From the E-step rise time and the corona area range, the average electron drift speed under the experiment situation was estimated about 0.2 x 10{sup 6} - 0.6x 10{sup 6} m/s.

  17. Experimental verification of the capillary plasma triggered long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, D.; Yang, L. J. Ma, J. B.; Liu, S.; Wang, W.; Ding, W. D.; Huo, P.; Li, G.; Yao, S. L.

    2016-01-15

    The paper has proposed a new triggering method for long spark gap based on capillary plasma ejection and conducted the experimental verification under the extremely low working coefficient, which represents that the ratio of the spark gap charging voltage to the breakdown voltage is particularly low. The quasi-neutral plasma is ejected from the capillary and develops through the axial direction of the spark gap. The electric field in the spark gap is thus changed and its breakdown is incurred. It is proved by the experiments that the capillary plasma ejection is effective in triggering the long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air. The study also indicates that the breakdown probabilities, the breakdown delay, and the delay dispersion are all mainly determined by the characteristics of the ejected plasma, including the length of the plasma flow, the speed of the plasma ejection, and the ionization degree of the plasma. Moreover, the breakdown delay and the delay dispersion increase with the length of the long spark gap, and the polarity effect exists in the triggering process. Lastly, compared with the working patterns of the triggering device installed in the single electrode, the working pattern of the devices installed in both the two electrodes, though with the same breakdown process, achieves the ignition under longer gap distance. To be specific, at the gap length of 14 cm and the working coefficient of less than 2%, the spark gap is still ignited accurately.

  18. Field assessment of induction motor efficiency through air-gap torque

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Sorenson, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    Induction motors are the most popular motors used in industry. This paper further suggests the use of air-gap torque method to evaluate their efficiency and load changes. The fundamental difference between Method E and the air-gap torque method is discussed. Efficiency assessments conducted on induction motors under various conditions show the accuracy and potential of the air-gap torque method.

  19. Development of a highly efficient brushless dc motor utilizing both radial and axial air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, K. J.; Jang, G. H.; Sung, S. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    This research proposes an effective structure for a brushless dc motor utilizing both radial and axial air gaps. The proposed motor generates torque in both the radial and axial air gaps, while the conventional motor generates torque only in the radial air gap. The proposed motor was optimized to minimize the electromagnetic loss of the motor to increase the effective air gap length and fill-factor of the coil while decreasing the saturation of the core at the same time. The electromagnetic loss was reduced by 35% in comparison with a conventional motor.

  20. Distribution Characteristics of Air-Bone Gaps – Evidence of Bias in Manual Audiometry

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard H.; Popelka, Gerald R.; Eikelboom, Robert H.; Swanepoel, De Wet; Saly, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Five databases were mined to examine distributions of air-bone gaps obtained by automated and manual audiometry. Differences in distribution characteristics were examined for evidence of influences unrelated to the audibility of test signals. Design The databases provided air- and bone-conduction thresholds that permitted examination of air-bone gap distributions that were free of ceiling and floor effects. Cases with conductive hearing loss were eliminated based on air-bone gaps, tympanometry, and otoscopy, when available. The analysis is based on 2,378,921 threshold determinations from 721,831 subjects from five databases. Results Automated audiometry produced air-bone gaps that were normally distributed suggesting that air- and bone-conduction thresholds are normally distributed. Manual audiometry produced air-bone gaps that were not normally distributed and show evidence of biasing effects of assumptions of expected results. In one database, the form of the distributions showed evidence of inclusion of conductive hearing losses. Conclusions Thresholds obtained by manual audiometry show tester bias effects from assumptions of the patient’s hearing loss characteristics. Tester bias artificially reduces the variance of bone-conduction thresholds and the resulting air-bone gaps. Because the automated method is free of bias from assumptions of expected results, these distributions are hypothesized to reflect the true variability of air- and bone-conduction thresholds and the resulting air-bone gaps. PMID:26627469

  1. Magnitude of GAP-43 induction following peripheral axotomy of adult rat dorsal root ganglion neurons is independent of lesion distance.

    PubMed

    Liabotis, S; Schreyer, D J

    1995-09-01

    Regenerative axon growth in peripheral neurons is accompanied by increased expression of the growth-associated protein GAP-43. We examined the increase of GAP-43 immunoreactivity in DRG neurons following lesions at different distances along the sciatic nerve, using immunocytochemistry. To control for the variable involvement of DRG axons following injury at different sites, injured neurons were identified by retrograde labeling with Fluoro-Gold. GAP-43 labeling was similar for proximal, distal, and far-distal injuries when only injured neurons are considered. Our results stand in contrast to studies which show that GAP-43 upregulation in neurons of the central nervous system occurs only when lesions are made close to the cell body. This suggests that the mechanisms which control GAP-43 expression following injury differ between central and peripheral neurons.

  2. Air bearing center cross gap of neutron stress spectrometer sample table support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Wu, Yunxin; Gong, Hai; Feng, Xiaolei

    2016-12-01

    A support system is the main load-bearing component of sample table for neutron stress spectrometer, and air bearing is an important element of a support system. The neutron stress spectrometer sample table was introduced, and the scheme for air bearing combination was selected. To study the performance of air bearing center cross gap, finite element models (FEMs) were established based on air motion and Reynolds equations, effects of air supply pressure, and gap parameters on the overturning moment and bearing capacity of air bearing center cross gap were analyzed. Results indicate that the width, depth, and height differences of the marble floor gap played important roles in the performance of the air bearing. When gap width is lesser than 1 mm and gap depth is lower than 0.4 mm, bearing capacity and overturning moment would vary rapidly with the variation of the width and depth. A gap height difference results in the bearing capacity dropping rapidly. The FEM results agree well with experimental results. Further, findings of the study could guide the design of the support system and marble floor.

  3. Tunable mode-locked laser with micro-air gap cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Aidit, S. N.; Hassan, N. A.; Ooi, S. I.; Tiu, Z. C.

    2017-02-01

    A tunable mode-locked laser with a micro-air gap cavity acting as a high resolution tuning is proposed and demonstrated. The laser utilizes the nonlinear polarization technique in the cavity to obtain a reliable and stable mode locking over the whole tuning range at a resolution of 1 nm. The micro-air gap is constructed by aligning two fiber facets coaxially, and the variation of micro-air gap introduces a tuning mechanism where it changes the gain saturation compensation in the gain medium and thus induces wavelength shifting on the generated solitons.

  4. Aging and the 4-kHz Air-Bone Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nondahl, David M.; Tweed, Ted S.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Wiley, Terry L.; Dalton, Dayna S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors assessed age- and sex-related patterns in the prevalence and 10-year incidence of 4-kHz air-bone gaps and associated factors. Method: Data were obtained as part of the longitudinal, population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study ( Cruickshanks et al., 1998). An air-bone gap at 4 kHz was defined as an…

  5. Effect of soldering techniques and gap distance on tensile strength of soldered Ni-Cr alloy joint

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Yeob

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The present study was intended to evaluate the effect of soldering techniques with infrared ray and gas torch under different gap distances (0.3 mm and 0.5 mm) on the tensile strength and surface porosity formation in Ni-Cr base metal alloy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty five dumbbell shaped Ni-Cr alloy specimens were prepared and assigned to 5 groups according to the soldering method and the gap distance. For the soldering methods, gas torch (G group) and infrared ray (IR group) were compared and each group was subdivided by corresponding gap distance (0.3 mm: G3 and IR3, 0.5 mm: G5, IR5). Specimens of the experimental groups were sectioned in the middle with a diamond disk and embedded in solder blocks according to the predetermined distance. As a control group, 7 specimens were prepared without sectioning or soldering. After the soldering procedure, a tensile strength test was performed using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed 1 mm/min. The proportions of porosity on the fractured surface were calculated on the images acquired through the scanning electronic microscope. RESULTS Every specimen of G3, G5, IR3 and IR5 was fractured on the solder joint area. However, there was no significant difference between the test groups (P > .05). There was a negative correlation between porosity formation and tensile strength in all the specimens in the test groups (P < .05). CONCLUSION There was no significant difference in ultimate tensile strength of joints and porosity formations between the gas-oxygen torch soldering and infrared ray soldering technique or between the gap distance of 0.3 mm and 0.5 mm. PMID:21264189

  6. Novel Approach for Modeling of Nonuniform Slag Layers and Air Gap in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xudong; Kong, Lingwei; Yao, Man; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-02-01

    Various kinds of surface defects on the continuous casting slab usually originate from nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behavior, especially during the initial solidification inside the mold. In this article, a model-coupled inverse heat transfer problem incorporating the effect of slag layers and air gap is developed to study the nonuniform distribution of liquid slag, solid slag, and air gap layers. The model considers not only the formation and evolution of slag layers and air gap but also the temperatures in the mold copper as measured by thermocouples. The simulation results from the model and the measured temperatures from experiments are shown to be in good agreement with each other. At the casting speed of 0.65 m/min, the liquid slag film disappears and transforms into solid slag entirely at about 400 mm away from meniscus, and an air gap begins to form. Until the mold exit, the maximum thickness of the solid slag layer and air gap gradually increases to 1.34 and 0.056 mm, respectively. The results illustrate that the magnitude and nonuniform distribution of the slag layers and air gap along the cross direction, correlating with heat flux between the shell and mold, eventually determine the temperature profiles of the mold hot face and slab surface. The proposed model may provide a convenient approach for analyzing nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behaviors between the mold and slab in the real casting process.

  7. Effect of air gap variation on the performance of single stator single rotor axial flux permanent magnet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasim, Muhammad; Irasari, Pudji; Hikmawan, M. Fathul; Widiyanto, Puji; Wirtayasa, Ketut

    2017-02-01

    The axial flux permanent magnet generator (AFPMG) has been widely used especially for electricity generation. The effect of the air gap variation on the characteristic and performances of single rotor - single stator AFPMG has been described in this paper. Effect of air gap length on the magnetic flux distribution, starting torque and MMF has been investigated. The two dimensional finite element magnetic method has been deployed to model and simulated the characteristics of the machine which is based on the Maxwell equation. The analysis has been done for two different air gap lengths which were 2 mm and 4 mm using 2D FEMM 4.2 software at no load condition. The increasing of air gap length reduces the air-gap flux density. For air gap 2 mm, the maximum value of the flux density was 1.04 T while 0.73 T occured for air gap 4 mm.. Based on the experiment result, the increasing air gap also reduced the starting torque of the machine with 39.2 Nm for air gap 2 mm and this value decreased into 34.2 Nm when the air gap increased to 4 mm. Meanwhile, the MMF that was generated by AFPMG decreased around 22% at 50 Hz due to the reduction of magnetic flux induced on stator windings. Overall, the research result showed that the variation of air gap has significant effect on the machine characteristics.

  8. High-accuracy long-distance measurements in air with a frequency comb laser.

    PubMed

    Cui, M; Zeitouny, M G; Bhattacharya, N; van den Berg, S A; Urbach, H P; Braat, J J M

    2009-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a femtosecond frequency comb laser can be applied as a tool for long-distance measurement in air. Our method is based on the measurement of cross correlation between individual pulses in a Michelson interferometer. From the position of the correlation functions, distances of up to 50 m have been measured. We have compared this measurement to a counting laser interferometer, showing an agreement with the measured distance within 2 microm (4x10(-8) at 50 m).

  9. Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Health Outcomes: Conference Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources to Health Outcomes,” an international specialty conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research, was held to address key uncertainties in our understanding of adverse health effects related to air po...

  10. 30 CFR 285.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 285.659 Section 285.659 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply with the Clean Air...

  11. Influence of the air gap between protective clothing and skin on clothing performance during flash fire exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazy, Ahmed; Bergstrom, Donald J.

    2011-10-01

    A finite volume model was developed to simulate transient heat transfer in protective clothing during flash fire exposure. The model accounts for the combined conduction-radiation heat transfer in the air gap between the fabric and skin. The variation in the fabric and air gap properties with temperature and the thermochemical reactions in the fabric are also considered. This study investigates the influence of the air gap in protective clothing on the energy transfer through the clothing and hence on its performance. Different parameters that affect the conduction-radiation heat transfer through the air gap such as the air gap absorption coefficient and the air gap width were studied. Finally, the paper demonstrates that an innovative and potentially significant way to improve protective clothing performance is to reduce the emissivity on the backside of the fabric.

  12. Air gap resonant tunneling bandpass filter and polarizer.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, A; Bitarafan, M H; Allen, T W; DeCorby, R G

    2016-04-15

    We describe a bandpass filter based on resonant tunneling through an air layer in the frustrated total internal reflection regime, and show that the concept of induced transmission can be applied to the design of thin film matching stacks. Experimental results are reported for Si/SiO2-based devices exhibiting a polarization-dependent passband, with bandwidth on the order of 10 nm in the 1550 nm wavelength range, peak transmittance on the order of 80%, and optical density greater than 5 over most of the near infrared region.

  13. Bridging the Gap--Taking the Distance out of e-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsudd, Peter; Tågerud, Yael

    2008-01-01

    In order to promote closer relations between two existing academic environments--on-campus and distance learning--a pedagogical intervention was made aiming to raise the level of competence and awareness among faculty regarding flexible learning and the use of ICT in higher education. The intervention was a process-oriented pedagogical effort…

  14. Real-time compensation of the refractive index of air in distance measurement.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Jay; Chun, Byung Jae; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2015-10-05

    A two-color scheme of heterodyne laser interferometer is devised for distance measurements with the capability of real-time compensation of the refractive index of the ambient air. A fundamental wavelength of 1555 nm and its second harmonic wavelength of 777.5 nm are generated, with stabilization to the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser, to provide fractional stability of the order of 3.0 × 10(-12) at 1 s averaging. Achieved uncertainty is of the order of 10(-8) in measuring distances of 2.5 m without sensing the refractive index of air in adverse environmental conditions.

  15. Absolute distance measurement with correction of air refractive index by using two-color dispersive interferometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hanzhong; Zhang, Fumin; Liu, Tingyang; Li, Jianshuang; Qu, Xinghua

    2016-10-17

    Two-color interferometry is powerful for the correction of the air refractive index especially in the turbulent air over long distance, since the empirical equations could introduce considerable measurement uncertainty if the environmental parameters cannot be measured with sufficient precision. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for absolute distance measurement with high-accuracy correction of air refractive index using two-color dispersive interferometry. The distances corresponding to the two wavelengths can be measured via the spectrograms captured by a CCD camera pair in real time. In the long-term experiment of the correction of air refractive index, the experimental results show a standard deviation of 3.3 × 10-8 for 12-h continuous measurement without the precise knowledge of the environmental conditions, while the variation of the air refractive index is about 2 × 10-6. In the case of absolute distance measurement, the comparison with the fringe counting interferometer shows an agreement within 2.5 μm in 12 m range.

  16. Dispersal in microbes: fungi in indoor air are dominated by outdoor air and show dispersal limitation at short distances.

    PubMed

    Adams, Rachel I; Miletto, Marzia; Taylor, John W; Bruns, Thomas D

    2013-07-01

    The indoor microbiome is a complex system that is thought to depend on dispersal from the outdoor biome and the occupants' microbiome combined with selective pressures imposed by the occupants' behaviors and the building itself. We set out to determine the pattern of fungal diversity and composition in indoor air on a local scale and to identify processes behind that pattern. We surveyed airborne fungal assemblages within 1-month time periods at two seasons, with high replication, indoors and outdoors, within and across standardized residences at a university housing facility. Fungal assemblages indoors were diverse and strongly determined by dispersal from outdoors, and no fungal taxa were found as indicators of indoor air. There was a seasonal effect on the fungi found in both indoor and outdoor air, and quantitatively more fungal biomass was detected outdoors than indoors. A strong signal of isolation by distance existed in both outdoor and indoor airborne fungal assemblages, despite the small geographic scale in which this study was undertaken (<500 m). Moreover, room and occupant behavior had no detectable effect on the fungi found in indoor air. These results show that at the local level, outdoor air fungi dominate the patterning of indoor air. More broadly, they provide additional support for the growing evidence that dispersal limitation, even on small geographic scales, is a key process in structuring the often-observed distance-decay biogeographic pattern in microbial communities.

  17. Study on the wide-angle Michelson interferometer with large air gap.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haiyang; Tang, Yuanhe; Hua, Dengxin; Liu, Hanchen

    2011-10-10

    A wide-angle Michelson interferometer with large air gap is proposed to effectively reduce the size of the glass arms and constraint on material. It provides a novel and practical instrument for ground based wind measurement of the upper atmosphere. The field widening conditions for the large air gap are calculated in theory. For the five spectral lines of 557.7 nm, 630.0 nm, 732.0 nm, 834.6 nm, and 865.7 nm, the optimal results under ideal condition are obtained with air gaps of 1.0 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2.0 cm, respectively. With the fixed optical path difference (OPD) of 7.495 cm, three pairs of glass arms are optimized. The pair with length of 1.5 cm for air gap, 5.765 cm for H-ZF12, and 2.956 cm for H-ZLaF54, has better effect of field widening than the other two pairs and its OPD variation is only within 0.30 wavelengths at incident angle of 3°. For developing a more practical wide-angle Michelson interferometer, the H-K9L glass with size of 4.445 cm is employed as the arm material of solid interferometer. The experiment for field of view of 3° is designed and the data processing and analysis for 60 images show the agreement between experimental results and theoretical simulation. The OPD variations are only within 0.27 wavelengths for image edge. The feasibility and practicality of the wide-angle Michelson interferometer with large air gap is proved by means of theory and experiment.

  18. 30 CFR 585.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 585.659 Section 585.659 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply...

  19. 30 CFR 585.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 585.659 Section 585.659 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply...

  20. 30 CFR 285.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 285.659 Section 285.659 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... Pipeline Deviations § 285.659 What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air...

  1. 30 CFR 585.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 585.659 Section 585.659 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply...

  2. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge.

  3. Investigation of a single barrier discharge in submillimeter air gaps. Nonuniform field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, P. N.; Emel'yanov, O. A.; Shemet, M. V.

    2014-08-01

    Pulse characteristics of single barrier discharges as well as parameters of charges accumulated on the surface of a dielectric under the atmospheric pressure in the "needle-(0.1-2.0)-mm air gap-polymer barrier-plane" system are investigated. It is found experimentally that for the positive polarity of the needle, the voltage for the discharge initiation is higher than in the case of the negative polarity by ˜25-35%. The reversal of the needle polarity from negative to positive increases the amplitude of the discharge current and the accumulated surface charge by ˜1.5-3 times. For the positive polarity of the needle, the discharge is governed by a streamer mechanism, while for the negative polarity, the discharge is initiated by the formation of a single Trichel pulse. The single pulse regime is observed for the discharge current up to a certain electrode gap d CR. For the positive needle and for air gap width d air > d CR ≈ 1.5 mm, a multipulse burst corona is formed, while for the negative needle and d air > d CR ≈ 0.9 mm, a damped sequence of Trichel pulses evolves in the system.

  4. Mind the gap: a flow instability controlled by particle-surface distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Michelle; Delmotte, Blaise; Youssef, Mena; Sacanna, Stefano; Donev, Aleksandar; Chaikin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Does a rotating particle always spin in place? Not if that particle is near a surface: rolling leads to translational motion, as well as very strong flows around the particle, even quite far away. These large advective flows strongly couple the motion of neighboring particles, giving rise to strong collective effects in groups of rolling particles. Using a model experimental system, weakly magnetic colloids driven by a rotating magnetic field, we observe that driving a compact group of microrollers leads to a new kind of flow instability. First, an initially uniformly-distributed strip of particles evolves into a shock structure, and then it becomes unstable, emitting fingers with a well-defined wavelength. Using 3D large-scale simulations in tandem with our experiments, we find that the instability wavelength is controlled not by the driving torque or the fluid viscosity, but a geometric parameter: the microroller's distance above the container floor. Furthermore, we find that the instability dynamics can be reproduced using only one ingredient: hydrodynamic interactions near a no-slip boundary.

  5. Primary Beam Air Kerma Dependence on Distance from Cargo and People Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.; Cerra, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The distance dependence of air kerma or dose rate of the primary radiation beam is not obvious for security scanners of cargo and people in which there is relative motion between a collimated source and the person or object being imaged. To study this problem, one fixed line source and three moving-source scan-geometry cases are considered, each characterized by radiation emanating perpendicular to an axis. The cases are 1) a stationary line source of radioactive material, e.g., contaminated solution in a pipe; 2) a moving, uncollimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; 3) a moving, collimated point source of radiation that is shuttered or off when it is stationary; and 4) a translating, narrow “pencil” beam emanating in a flying-spot, raster pattern. Each case is considered for short and long distances compared to the line source length or path traversed by a moving source. The short distance model pertains mostly to dose to objects being scanned and personnel associated with the screening operation. The long distance model pertains mostly to potential dose to bystanders. For radionuclide sources, the number of nuclear transitions that occur a) per unit length of a line source, or b) during the traversal of a point source, is a unifying concept. The “universal source strength” of air kerma rate at a meter from the source can be used to describe x-ray machine or radionuclide sources. For many cargo and people scanners with highly collimated fan or pencil beams, dose varies as the inverse of the distance from the source in the near field and with the inverse square of the distance beyond a critical radius. Ignoring the inverse square dependence and using inverse distance dependence is conservative in the sense of tending to overestimate dose.

  6. Hybrid plasmonic microcavity with an air-filled gap for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Binbin; Wu, Genzhu; Chen, Daru

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid plasmonic microcavity with air-filled regions in the low-permittivity dielectric gap is proposed for sensing applications. Compared with the conventional structure with homogeneous gap, the introduced air-filled regions could improve the key modal characteristics of the hybrid mode. Simulation results reveal that this kind of hybrid microcavity maintains low loss with high quality factor ∼3062, and high field confinement with small mode volume 0.891 μm3. Moreover, in the sensing applications, this hybrid microcavity features simultaneously large refractive index sensitivity of 100 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and relatively high quality factor of 3062. Hence, it shows that the hybrid plasmonic microcavity has potential applications in ultra-compact refractive index sensor.

  7. Observations of the Valley of Mexico Basin Ventilation Through the Tenango del Aire- Amecameca Geographical Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Suarez, G.; Torres-Jarón, R.; Steinbrecher, R.; Junkermann, W.; Torres-Jaramillo, A.; Garcia, A. R.; Mar-Morales, B.

    2007-05-01

    Past air quality modeling exercises have suggested the existence of basin drainage flows which may transport Mexico City Metropolitan Area's air pollution plume outside the Valley of Mexico Basin. The MCMA-2006 field campaign offered the opportunity to study the basin ventilation through a geographical gap in the southeast mountains of the basin. A mobile monitoring lab was placed at the Tenango del Aire town, a unique site located in this gap for measuring the pass of air masses from (and towards) the MCMA to (and from) the Cuautla Valley. O3, CO, NOx, NOy, CH2O global and UV radiation and MLH were measured continuously during MILAGRO from March 2 until April 6, together with other chemical species. Complementary backward and forward trajectories were constructed for the site using MCCM in prognostic mode during MILAGRO. An exploratory analysis of the air pollution roses measured at Tenango showed a sharp dominance of two flow patterns: one from the north well associated with relatively higher levels of primary pollutants and ozone levels; and another one from the south typically associated with lower levels primary pollutants but not so low of secondary ones as ozone. On the other hand, measured CO data at Tenango were compared with CO data measured at one local monitoring station in the town of Ocuituco in the State of Morelos. Ocuituco is located to the south of Tenango towards the Cuautla Valley. The preliminary results suggest that the back and forth pass of air masses through the Tenango del Aire - Amecameca area can be an important process in the regional transport of air pollution between two valleys and their metropolitan areas within the Central Mexico region.

  8. Label-free measurement of cell-electrode cleft gap distance with high spatial resolution surface plasmon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Toma, Koji; Kano, Hiroshi; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2014-12-23

    Understanding the interface between cells or tissues and artificial materials is of critical importance for a broad range of areas. For example, in neurotechnology, the interfaces between neurons and external devices create a link between technical and the nervous systems by stimulating or recording from neural tissue. Here, a more effective interface is required to enhance the electrical characteristics of neuronal recordings and stimulations. Up to now, the lack of a systematic characterization of cell-electrode interaction turns out to be the major bottleneck. In this work, we employed a recently developed surface plasmon microscope (SPM) to monitor in real-time the cell-metal interface and to measure in situ the gap distance of the cleft with the spatial resolution reaching to the optical diffraction limit. The SPM allowed determination of the distance of human embryonic kidney 293 cells cultured on gold surfaces coated with various peptides or proteins without any labeling. This method can dramatically simplify the interaction investigation at metal-living cell interface and should be incorporated into systematic characterization methods.

  9. Local droplet etching – Nanoholes, quantum dots, and air-gap heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Heyn, Ch.; Sonnenberg, D.; Graf, A.; Kerbst, J.; Stemmann, A.; Hansen, W.

    2014-05-15

    Local droplet etching (LDE) allows the self-organized generation of nanoholes in semiconductor surfaces and is fully compatible with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The influence of the process parameters as well as of droplet and substrate materials on the LDE nanohole morphology is discussed. Furthermore, recent applications of LDE, the fabrication of quantum dots by hole filling and the creation of air-gap heterostructures are addressed.

  10. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungan, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2008-02-05

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in 0 reactive flow JWL++ and Linked Cheetah V4, mostly at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. The physical basis of the input parameters is considered.

  11. Increasing the object recognition distance of compact open air on board vision system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirillov, Sergey; Kostkin, Ivan; Strotov, Valery; Dmitriev, Vladimir; Berdnikov, Vadim; Akopov, Eduard; Elyutin, Aleksey

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work was developing an algorithm eliminating the atmospheric distortion and improves image quality. The proposed algorithm is entirely software without using additional hardware photographic equipment. . This algorithm does not required preliminary calibration. It can work equally effectively with the images obtained at a distances from 1 to 500 meters. An algorithm for the open air images improve designed for Raspberry Pi model B on-board vision systems is proposed. The results of experimental examination are given.

  12. Force versus current and air gap calibration of a double acting magnetic thrust bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Baun, D.O.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Force versus current and air gap measurements were obtained for a double acting thrust bearing. Static force measurements were made for various air gap settings and bearing current combinations. The resulting data was reduced and an optimized expression representing the force versus current and air gap relationship of the bearing was found. In addition, a theoretical force model was developed using simple magnetic circuit theory and magnetic properties obtained from standard magnetic material tests. The theoretical and the experimentally derived force models were compared. Hysteresis tests were conducted with the thrust disk in the centered position for various current perturbation amplitudes about the design bias current. Hysteresis effects were shown to cause a difference between the measured force as the current was increasing as compared to when the current was decreasing. A second order polynomial expression was developed to express the coercive force as a function of the perturbation current amplitude. The bearing frequency response was examined by injecting sinusoidal currents of varying frequencies into the bearing. A maximum actuator bandwidth of approximately 700 Hz was determined. Above 700 Hz the bearing frequency response could not be distinguished from the test fixture frequency response.

  13. Dynamic analysis of a BLDC motor with mechanical and electromagnetic interaction due to air gap variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hyungbin; Yoo, Hong Hee; Chung, Jintai

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic behaviors of a BLDC motor are analyzed, when the motor undergoes mechanical and electromagnetic interaction due to an air gap variation between the stator and rotor. When considering the air gap variation caused by the translational motion of the rotor relative to the stator, the kinetic and potential energies, Rayleigh dissipation function, and the magnetic coenergy are expressed in terms of the rotor displacements and stator currents. With these energies and function, new equations of motion are derived using Lagrange's equation. The equations for the proposed model are nonlinear equations in which the displacements and currents are coupled. The time responses for the displacements and currents are computed for the proposed and previous models. Furthermore, the effects of rotor eccentricity are also investigated. It is found that, when the air gap varies with time, the time responses for the proposed and previous models have small differences in the stator currents, electromagnetic torques, and rotating speeds. However, the time responses have large differences in the rotor displacements. Therefore, this paper claims that the proposed model describes the dynamic behaviors of the motor more accurately than the previous model. It is also shown that rotor eccentricity increases the stator current period and the electromagnetic torque, while it decreases the rotating speed of the rotor.

  14. Dynamics of air gap formation around roots with changing soil water content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetterlein, D.; Carminati, A.; Weller, U.; Oswald, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Most models regarding uptake of water and nutrients from soil assume intimate contact between roots and soil. However, it is known for a long time that roots may shrink under drought conditions. Due to the opaque nature of soil this process could not be observed in situ until recently. Combining tomography of the entire sample (field of view of 16 x 16 cm, pixel side 0.32 mm) with local tomography of the soil region around roots (field of view of 5 x 5 cm, pixel side 0.09 mm), the high spatial resolution required to image root shrinkage and formation of air-filled gaps around roots could be achieved. Applying this technique and combining it with microtensiometer measurements, measurements of plant gas exchange and microscopic assessment of root anatomy, a more detailed study was conducted to elucidate at which soil matric potential roots start to shrink in a sandy soil and which are the consequences for plant water relations. For Lupinus albus grown in a sandy soil tomography of the entire root system and of the interface between taproot and soil was conducted from day 11 to day 31 covering two drying cycles. Soil matric potential decreased from -36 hPa at day 11 after planting to -72, -251, -429 hPa, on day 17, 19, 20 after planting. On day 20 an air gap started to occur around the tap root and extended further on day 21 with matric potential below -429 hPa (equivalent to 5 v/v % soil moisture). From day 11 to day 21 stomatal conductivity decreased from 467 to 84 mmol m-2 s-1, likewise transpiration rate decreased and plants showed strong wilting symptoms on day 21. Plants were watered by capillary rise on day 21 and recovered completely within a day with stomatal conductivity increasing to 647 mmol m-2 s-1. During a second drying cycle, which was shorter as plants continuously increased in size, air gap formed again at the same matric potential. Plant stomatal conductance and transpiration decreased in a similar fashion with decreasing matric potential and

  15. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment.

    PubMed

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42%. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  16. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42 %. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  17. Materials, processes, and characterization of extended air-gaps for the intra-level interconnection of integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongho

    The integration of an air-gap as an ultra low dielectric constant material in an infra-metal dielectric region of interconnect structure in integrated circuits was investigated in terms of material properties of a thermally decomposable sacrificial polymer, fabrication processes and electrical performance. Extension of the air-gap into the inter-layer dielectric region reduces the interconnect capacitance. In order to enhance the hardness of a polymer for the better process reliabilities, a conventional norbornene-based sacrificial polymer was electron-beam irradiated. Although the hardness of the polymer increased, the thermal properties degraded. A new high modulus tetracyclododecene-based sacrificial polymer was characterized and compared to the norbornene-based polymer in terms of hardness, process reliability and thermal properties. The tetracyclododecene-based polymer was harder and showed better process reliability than the norbomene-based sacrificial polymer. Using the tetracyclododecene-based sacrificial polymer, a single layer Cu/air-gap and extended Culair-gap structures were fabricated. The effective dielectric constant of the air-gap and extended air-gap structures were 2.42 and 2.17, respectively. This meets the requirements for the 32 nm node. Moisture uptake of the extended Cu/air-gap structure increased the effective dielectric constant. The exposure of the structure to hexamethyldisilazane vapor removed the absorbed moisture and changed the structure hydrophobic, improving the integration reliability. The integration processes of the air-gap and the extended air-gap into a dual damascene Cu metallization process has been proposed and compared to state-of-the-art integration approaches.

  18. Surface dose measurements from air gaps under a bolus by using a MOSFET dosimeter in clinical oblique photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, In-Ah; Lee, Jeong-Woo

    2012-10-01

    This study is intended to investigate the effects of surface dose from air gaps under the bolus in clinically used oblique photon beams by using a Markus parallel-plate chamber and a metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter. To evaluate the performances of the two detectors, the percentage surface doses of the MOSFET dosimeters in without an air gap under the bolus material were measured and compared with those of the Markus parallel-plate chamber. MOSFET dosimeters at the surface provided results mostly in good agreement with the parallelplate chamber. The MOSFET dosimeters seemed suitable for surface dose measurements having excellent accuracy for clinical used photon beams. The relative surface doses were measured with air gaps (2, 5, 10 mm) and without an air gap under 3 different bolus setups: (1) unbolused (no bolus), (2) 5-mm bolus, and (3) 10-mm bolus. The reductions in the surface dose substantially increased with small field size, thick bolus, and large air gap. The absolute difference in the reductions of the surface dose between the MOSFET dosimeter and the Markus parallel-plate chamber was less than 1.1%. Results at oblique angles of incidence showed larger reductions in surface dose with increasing angle of incidence. The largest reduction in surface dose was recorded for a 6 × 6 cm2 field at a 60° angle of incidence with an 10-mm air gap under a 10-mm bolus. When a 10-mm bolus was used, a reduction in the surface dose with an air gap of up to 10.5% could be achieved by varying the field size and the incident angle. Therefore, air gaps under the bolus should be avoided in radiotherapy treatment, especially for photon beam with highly oblique angles of incidence.

  19. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    PubMed Central

    Théberge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-François; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, François; Châteauneuf , Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electric pulse from a Tesla coil allowed to stimulate and maintain the highly conductive channel during few milliseconds in order to guide a subsequent 500 times more energetic discharge from a 30-kV DC source. This DC discharge was laser-guided over an air gap length of two metres, which is more than two orders of magnitude longer than the expected natural discharge length. Long plasma channel induced by laser pulses and stimulated by an external high-voltage source opens the way for wireless and efficient transportation of energetic current pulses over long air gaps and potentially for guiding lightning. PMID:28053312

  20. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Théberge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-François; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, François; Châteauneuf, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electric pulse from a Tesla coil allowed to stimulate and maintain the highly conductive channel during few milliseconds in order to guide a subsequent 500 times more energetic discharge from a 30-kV DC source. This DC discharge was laser-guided over an air gap length of two metres, which is more than two orders of magnitude longer than the expected natural discharge length. Long plasma channel induced by laser pulses and stimulated by an external high-voltage source opens the way for wireless and efficient transportation of energetic current pulses over long air gaps and potentially for guiding lightning.

  1. [Health risks of long-distance air travel. Role of the general practitioner].

    PubMed

    Bazex, Jacques; Cabanis, Emmanuel Alain

    2010-06-01

    Air transport is seeing an increase in long-distance flights (12-16 hours average flight time), greater seating capacity, and a higher proportion of elderly, and hence more fragile, passengers. The French Academy of Medicine recommends that medical care be reinforced, particularly on long-distance flights, through the following measures: (i) passengers should be informed in advance of potential risks, through a Passenger's Guide, (ii) all future passengers should be encouraged to seek health advice and information from their general practitioner, (iii) flight crew members should receive training as "in-flight medical correspondents", and (iv) airlines and plane designers should reserve a "medical space" on the plane, equipped with appropriate medical materials.

  2. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungen, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2007-05-30

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in the Linked Cheetah V4.0 reactive flow code at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. A report card of 25 tests run with the same settings on LX-17 is shown, possibly the most extensive simultaneous calibration yet tried with an explosive. The physical basis of some of the input parameters is considered.

  3. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser based on gallium arsenide/air-gap distributed Bragg reflectors: From concept to working devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Qingwei

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have created new opportunities in optoelectronics. However, VCSELs have so far been commercialized mainly for operation at 0.85 mum, despite their potential importance at other wavelengths, such as 1.3 mum and 1.55 mum. The limitations at these longer wavelengths come from material characteristics, such as a low contrast ratio in mirror materials, lower mirror reflectivity, and smaller optical gain for longer wavelength materials versus AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wells. A similar situation, insufficient gain relative to the cavity loss, existed in the past for shorter wavelength VCSELs before high quality epitaxial mirrors were developed. Semiconductor/air-gap Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBRs) are attractive due to their high index contrast, which leads to a high reflectivity, wide stop band and low optical loss mirror with a small number of pairs. This concept is ready to be integrated into material systems other than AlGaAs/GaAs, which is studied in this work. Therefore, the impact of these DBRs can be extended into both visible and longer infrared wavelengths as a solution to the trade-off between DBR and active region materials. Air-gap DBRs can also be used as basic building blocks of micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS). The high Q microcavity formed by the air-gap DBRs also provide a good platform for microcavity physics study. Air-gap DBRs are modeled using the transmission matrix formulae of the Maxwell equations. A comparison to existing DBR technology shows the great advantage and potential that the air-gap DBR possesses. Two types of air-gap are proposed and developed. The first one includes multiple GaAs/air pairs while the second one combines a single air-gap with metal and dielectric mirrors. New device structures and processing designs, especially an all-epitaxial lateral current and optical confinement technique, are carried out to incorporate air-gap DBRs into VCSEL structures. The first VCSEL

  4. Control of deformable mirrors including a nonlinear modal model for air gap damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present nonlinear pressure dynamics as an extension to a linear distributed parameters model of a deformable mirror. The original, undamped model is recalled and measurement results are shown supporting the need for a damping model which includes the pressure dynamics of the air gap behind the mirror membrane. We will derive the damping coefficients to match our measurement results. Based on the mew model, we will derive a modal feedforward and feedback control law for 88 actuators based on only 3 position sensors and show simulation results to support the algorithm's effectiveness.

  5. Multi-Reflex Propulsion Systems for Space and Air Vehicles and Energy Transfer for Long Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolonkin, A.

    The purpose of this article is to call attention to the revolutionary idea of light multi-reflection. This idea allows the design of new engines, space and air propulsion systems, storage (of a beam and solar energy), transmitters of energy (to millions of kilometers), creation of new weapons, etc. This method and the main innovations were offered by the author in 1983 in the former USSR. Now the author shows in a series of articles the immense possibilities of this idea in many fields of engineering - astronautics, aviation, energy, optics, direct converter of light (laser beam) energy to mechanical energy (light engine), to name a few. This article considers the multi-reflex propulsion systems for space and air vehicles and energy transmitter for long distances in space.

  6. Filamentation of femtosecond laser pulse influenced by the air turbulence at various propagation distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuze; Nie, Jinsong; Sun, Ke; Wang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    The spatial and temporal features of femtosecond laser filamentation, which are induced by a laser with power several times higher than the critical power, influenced by strong air turbulence at various propagation distances have been studied numerically. First, a strong turbulence occurring right before focal lens induces a few counter-balanced energy spikes which prevent the filament generation. Second, with the turbulence right before the filamentation, side filaments formed in the periphery towards the outside area leads the filament to be slightly short. Third, with the turbulence right after the lens, numerous energy spikes of the wave profile arise, but they will merge into one filament gradually, leading to a delayed filamentation onset and a shorter filamentation length. The deformation of temporal pulse shape become more sensitive and the supercontinuum (SC) can be weakened more significantly when strong turbulence takes place in air more previously.

  7. Toward a global network for persistent organic pollutants in air: results from the GAPS study.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karla; Harner, Tom; Wania, Frank; Muir, Derek C G; Jones, Kevin C; Barrie, Leonard A

    2006-08-15

    The Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of using passive samplers to assess the spatial distribution of persistent organic pollutants on a worldwide basis. The GAPS network includes more than 40 sites on 7 continents, mainly in background locations, with some representation of urban and agricultural areas. Here we present concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in polyurethane foam disk samplers, deployed from December 2004 to March 2005. Legacy OCPs such as alpha-HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane), Chlordanes (trans- and cis-Chlordane and trans-Nonachlor), Dieldrin, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane isomers were detected at most sites with some high values that may be related to possible continued use and/or re-emissions related to historic use. Geometric mean (GM) air concentrations (pg/m3) were: 8.5 for sigmaHCH (sum of alpha- and gamma-isomers), 2.6 for sigmaChlordanes, 0.8 for Dieldrin, and 0.8 for p,p'-DDE. Current-use pesticides such as gamma-HCH (lindane) and especially Endosulfan I exhibited more variable and higher concentrations with GMs of 5 and 58, respectively. PCBs and PBDEs were elevated at urban/suburban sites consistent with their historical use pattern. GM concentrations (pg/m3) were 17 for PCBs and 4 for PBDEs. Sampling under GAPS will continue and will eventually allow seasonality effects and longer-term temporal and spatial trends to be evaluated.

  8. Root-soil air gap and resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Zhang, W J; Wang, X Y; Cai, Y J; Chang, J G

    2015-12-01

    During periods of water deficit, growing roots may shrink, retaining only partial contact with the soil. In this study, known mathematical models were used to calculate the root-soil air gap and water flow resistance at the soil-root interface, respectively, of Robinia pseudoacacia L. under different water conditions. Using a digital camera, the root-soil air gap of R. pseudoacacia was investigated in a root growth chamber; this root-soil air gap and the model-inferred water flow resistance at the soil-root interface were compared with predictions based on a separate outdoor experiment. The results indicated progressively greater root shrinkage and loss of root-soil contact with decreasing soil water potential. The average widths of the root-soil air gap for R. pseudoacacia in open fields and in the root growth chamber were 0.24 and 0.39 mm, respectively. The resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface in both environments increased with decreasing soil water potential. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that soil water potential and soil temperature were the best predictors of variation in the root-soil air gap. A combination of soil water potential, soil temperature, root-air water potential difference and soil-root water potential difference best predicted the resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface.

  9. Numerical modeling of the thermoelectric cooler with a complementary equation for heat circulation in air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, En; Wu, Xiaojie; Yu, Yuesen; Xiu, Junrui

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical model is developed by combining thermodynamics with heat transfer theory. Taking inner and external multi-irreversibility into account, it is with a complementary equation for heat circulation in air gaps of a steady cooling system with commercial thermoelectric modules operating in refrigeration mode. With two modes concerned, the equation presents the heat flowing through air gaps which forms heat circulations between both sides of thermoelectric coolers (TECs). In numerical modelling, a TEC is separated as two temperature controlled constant heat flux reservoirs in a thermal resistance network. In order to obtain the parameter values, an experimental apparatus with a commercial thermoelectric cooler was built to characterize the performance of a TEC with heat source and sink assembly. At constant power dissipation, steady temperatures of heat source and both sides of the thermoelectric cooler were compared with those in a standard numerical model. The method displayed that the relationship between Φf and the ratio Φ_{c}'/Φ_{c} was linear as expected. Then, for verifying the accuracy of proposed numerical model, the data in another system were recorded. It is evident that the experimental results are in good agreement with simulation(proposed model) data at different heat transfer rates. The error is small and mainly results from the instabilities of thermal resistances with temperature change and heat flux, heat loss of the device vertical surfaces and measurements.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of air gap motion with respect to wind load and mooring system for semi-submersible platform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fa-li; Nie, Yan; Yang, De-qing; Dong, Gang; Cui, Jin

    2016-07-01

    A design of semi-submersible platform is mainly based on the extreme response analysis due to the forces experienced by the components during lifetime. The external loads can induce the extreme air gap response and potential deck impact to the semi-submersible platform. It is important to predict air gap response of platforms accurately in order to check the strength of local structures which withstand the wave slamming due to negative air gap. The wind load cannot be simulated easily by model test in towing tank whereas it can be simulated accurately in wind tunnel test. Furthermore, full scale simulation of the mooring system in model test is still a tuff work especially the stiffness of the mooring system. Owing to the above mentioned problem, the model test results are not accurate enough for air gap evaluation. The aim of this paper is to present sensitivity analysis results of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load for the design of semi-submersible platform. Though the model test results are not suitable for the direct evaluation of air gap, they can be used as a good basis for tuning the radiation damping and viscous drag in numerical simulation. In the presented design example, a numerical model is tuned and validated by ANSYS AQWA based on the model test results with a simple 4 line symmetrical horizontal soft mooring system. According to the tuned numerical model, sensitivity analysis studies of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load are performed in time domain. Three mooring systems and five simulation cases about the presented platform are simulated based on the results of wind tunnel tests and sea-keeping tests. The sensitivity analysis results are valuable for the floating platform design.

  11. Twisted trees and inconsistency of tree estimation when gaps are treated as missing data - The impact of model mis-specification in distance corrections.

    PubMed

    McTavish, Emily Jane; Steel, Mike; Holder, Mark T

    2015-12-01

    Statistically consistent estimation of phylogenetic trees or gene trees is possible if pairwise sequence dissimilarities can be converted to a set of distances that are proportional to the true evolutionary distances. Susko et al. (2004) reported some strikingly broad results about the forms of inconsistency in tree estimation that can arise if corrected distances are not proportional to the true distances. They showed that if the corrected distance is a concave function of the true distance, then inconsistency due to long branch attraction will occur. If these functions are convex, then two "long branch repulsion" trees will be preferred over the true tree - though these two incorrect trees are expected to be tied as the preferred true. Here we extend their results, and demonstrate the existence of a tree shape (which we refer to as a "twisted Farris-zone" tree) for which a single incorrect tree topology will be guaranteed to be preferred if the corrected distance function is convex. We also report that the standard practice of treating gaps in sequence alignments as missing data is sufficient to produce non-linear corrected distance functions if the substitution process is not independent of the insertion/deletion process. Taken together, these results imply inconsistent tree inference under mild conditions. For example, if some positions in a sequence are constrained to be free of substitutions and insertion/deletion events while the remaining sites evolve with independent substitutions and insertion/deletion events, then the distances obtained by treating gaps as missing data can support an incorrect tree topology even given an unlimited amount of data.

  12. A distance-decay variable selection strategy for land use regression modeling of ambient air pollution exposures.

    PubMed

    Su, J G; Jerrett, M; Beckerman, B

    2009-06-01

    Land use regression (LUR) has emerged as an effective and economical means of estimating air pollution exposures for epidemiological studies. To date, no systematic method has been developed for optimizing the variable selection process. Traditionally, a limited number of buffer distances assumed having the highest correlations with measured pollutant concentrations are used in the manual stepwise selection process or a model transferred from another urban area. In this paper we propose a novel and systematic way of modeling long-term average air pollutant concentrations through "A Distance Decay REgression Selection Strategy" (ADDRESS). The selection process includes multiple steps and, at each step, a full spectrum of correlation coefficients and buffer distance decay curves are used to select a spatial covariate of the highest correlation (compared to other variables) at its optimized buffer distance. At the first step, the series of distance decay curves is constructed using the measured concentrations against the chosen spatial covariates. A variable with the highest correlation to pollutant levels at its optimized buffer distance is chosen as the first predictor of the LUR model from all the distance decay curves. Starting from the second step, the prediction residuals are used to construct new series of distance decay curves and the variable of the highest correlation at its optimized buffer distance is chosen to be added to the model. This process continues until a variable being added does not contribute significantly (p>0.10) to the model performance. The distance decay curve yields a visualization of change and trend of correlation between the spatial covariates and air pollution concentrations or their prediction residuals, providing a transparent and efficient means of selecting optimized buffer distances. Empirical comparisons suggested that the ADDRESS method produced better results than a manual stepwise selection process of limited buffer distances

  13. Measurement of the air gap width between double-deck metal layers based on surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pao-Tung; Wu, Meng-Chyi; Wu, Chien-Ming

    2010-04-01

    In this article, we verify that the traditional Kretschmann-Raether configuration of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) could be used to measure the air gap width between a gold-plated prism and another gold-plated glass slide. Due to the presence of double-deck metal layers, the Fabry-Perot resonance and surface plasmon tunnel-coupled effects could occur, which would cause the SPR angle to begin to shift at a larger air gap width of about 700 nm as compared to the case of single metal layer with an air gap width of about 350 nm. The simulated results reveal that the SPR angle begins monotonically to shift initially from 44.5° to 46° when the air gap width between double-deck metal layers decreases from 700 to 500 nm. The smallest air gap width is measured to be 539 nm, in which the SPR angle is 45.5°, by fitting the simulated curves to the experimental results.

  14. Potential benefits of long-distance electricity transmission in China for air quality and climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, W.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Yuan, J.; Zhao, Y.; Lin, M.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-01

    China is expanding west-to-east long-distance electricity transmission capacity with the aim of reducing eastern coal power production and resulting air pollution. In addition to coal power, this new grid capacity can be used to transport renewable-generated electricity with resulting climate co-benefits. Here we use an integrated assessment to evaluate the air quality and climate benefits of twelve proposed transmission lines in China, and compare two energy-by-wire strategies that transmit 1) only coal power (Coal-by-wire, CbW) or 2) combined renewable plus coal power (Renewable and coal-by-wire, (RE+C)bW), with 3) the current practice of transporting coal by rail for conversion to electricity near eastern demand centers (Coal-by-rail, CbR). Based on a regional atmospheric chemistry model, WRF-Chem, electricity transmission through the proposed lines leads to 2-3 μg/m3 (2-7%) reduction in the annual mean concentrations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the eastern provinces relative to 2010 levels, roughly ~1 μg/m3 greater than the reduction achieved in CbR where dirty coal units are locally replaced with efficient ones. Although the eastern air quality improvement is similar irrespective of the fuel source to power the lines, adding coal generation results in up to 3% increase in annual mean PM2.5 levels in some exporting provinces, whereas such increase is not observed when most added capacity is renewable-based. Counting both the economic value of reduced carbon emissions and the health-related air quality benefits can significantly improve the cost-effectiveness of transmitting both renewable and coal power. Comparing (RE+C)bW with the two coal-based options, we find not only 20% larger reduction in air-pollution-related deaths, but also three times greater reduction in CO2 emissions. Our study hence demonstrates the significance of coordinating renewable energy planning with transmission planning to simultaneously tackle air pollution and climate

  15. The air quality impact of cordon and distance based road user charging: An empirical study of Leeds, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Gordon; Namdeo, Anil; Milne, David

    Traffic assignment, pollutant emission and dispersion models were applied to a major UK city so as to assess the air quality impacts of five road pricing schemes. Schemes were evaluated with reference to: exceedence of air quality standards for six pollutants; greenhouse gas emission; redistribution of pollution, an environmental justice concern; and road network performance as traffic speed and trip distance. Results were compared to alternatives of do nothing, network development and clean fuel promotion. The air quality benefits of a modest distance-based charge are highlighted. However, whilst road pricing shows potential as an air quality management tool, its value and suitability are strongly sensitive to prior air quality and emission source apportionment in the application city.

  16. Water desalination by air-gap membrane distillation using meltblown polypropylene nanofiber membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalam, S.; Chiam, C. K.; Widyaparamitha, S.; Chang, Y. W.; Lee, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a study of air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) using meltblown polypropylene (PP) nanofiber membrane to produce fresh water via desalination process. PP nanofiber membranes with the effective area 0.17 m2 are tested with NaCl solutions (0.5 - 4.0 wt.%) and seawater as the feed solutions (9400 - 64800 μS/cm) in a tubular membrane module. Results show that the flux decreases with increasing the membrane thickness from 547 to 784 μm. The flux increases with the feed flow rate and temperature difference across the membrane. The feed concentration affects the flux insignificantly. The AGMD system can reject the salts at least 96%. Water vapor permeation rate is relatively higher than solute permeation rate resulting in the conductivity value of permeate decreases when the corresponding flux increases. The AGMD system produces the fresh water (200 - 1520 μS/cm) that is suitable for drinking, fisheries or irrigation.

  17. A fiber inclinometer using a fiber microtaper with an air-gap microcavity fiber interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhongyao; Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Qiao, Xueguang; Liu, Nan; Rong, Qiangzhou

    2016-04-01

    A micro-inclinometer is proposed and demonstrated experimentally; the device consists of a micro-fiber taper followed by an air-gap microcavity. A part of the core mode can couple to cladding modes via the taper. These cladding modes and residual core modes transmitted to downstream of the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer. A fraction of these modes are reflected back to the SMF by two surfaces of the FP cavity and eventually recoupled to the leading-in SMF, resulting in a well-defined interference spectrum. The fringe contrast of the interferometer is highly sensitive to fiber bending with direction-independence and thus is capable of measuring tilt angles in high resolution. In addition, the interference wavelength always remains unchanged during the fiber bending.

  18. Tuneable polaritonics at room temperature with strongly coupled Tamm plasmon polaritons in metal/air-gap microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, C.; Coulson, C.; Christmann, G.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Baumberg, J. J.

    2011-06-01

    We report strong coupling between Tamm plasmons and excitons in III-V quantum wells at room temperature in ultracompact sample designs. A high refractive index contrast air-gap mirror together with optical Tamm states at a metal/semiconductor interface tightly confines the intracavity field leading to substantial local field enhancements. Angular-resolved reflectivity spectra give clear evidence for anticrossing in the dispersion relation. Room temperature Rabi splittings of 10 meV are found in excellent agreement with simulations. Electrical control of the polariton modes is realized without need for doped mirror layers. Such air-gap microcavities open innovative possibilites for electrically tunable microcavities and polaritonic microelectromechanics.

  19. Air-gap gating of MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tambo, T.; Falson, J. Kozuka, Y.; Maryenko, D.; Tsukazaki, A.; Kawasaki, M.

    2014-08-28

    The adaptation of “air-gap” dielectric based field-effect transistor technology to controlling the MgZnO/ZnO heterointerface confined two-dimensional electron system (2DES) is reported. We find it possible to tune the charge density of the 2DES via a gate electrode spatially separated from the heterostructure surface by a distance of 5 μm. Under static gating, the observation of the quantum Hall effect suggests that the charge carrier density remains homogeneous, with the 2DES in the 3 mm square sample the sole conductor. The availability of this technology enables the exploration of the charge carrier density degree of freedom in the pristine sample limit.

  20. Study of Various Slanted Air-Gap Structures of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Leon M; Lee, Seong T

    2010-01-01

    This paper shows how to maximize the effect of the slanted air-gap structure of an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor with brushless field excitation (BFE) for application in a hybrid electric vehicle. The BFE structure offers high torque density at low speed and weakened flux at high speed. The unique slanted air-gap is intended to increase the output torque of the machine as well as to maximize the ratio of the back-emf of a machine that is controllable by BFE. This irregularly shaped air-gap makes a flux barrier along the d-axis flux path and decreases the d-axis inductance; as a result, the reluctance torque of the machine is much higher than a uniform air-gap machine, and so is the output torque. Also, the machine achieves a higher ratio of the magnitude of controllable back-emf. The determination of the slanted shape was performed by using magnetic equivalent circuit analysis and finite element analysis (FEA).

  1. Parasitic effects of air-gap through-silicon vias in high-speed three-dimensional integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxian; Zhu, Zhangming; Yang, Yintang; Ding, Ruixue; Li, Yuejin

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, ground-signal-ground type through-silicon vias (TSVs) exploiting air gaps as insulation layers are designed, analyzed and simulated for applications in millimeter wave. The compact wideband equivalent-circuit model and passive elements (RLGC) parameters based on the physical parameters are presented with the frequency up to 100 GHz. The parasitic capacitance of TSVs can be approximated as the dielectric capacitance of air gaps when the thickness of air gaps is greater than 0.75 μm. Therefore, the applied voltage of TSVs only needs to achieve the flatband voltage, and there is no need to indicate the threshold voltage. This is due to the small permittivity of air gaps. The proposed model shows good agreement with the simulation results of ADS and Ansoft’s HFSS over a wide frequency range. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB339900) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376039, 61334003, 61574104, and 61474088).

  2. Plasma treatment of polyethersulfone membrane for benzene removal from water by air gap membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Sara; Mortaheb, Hamid Reza; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2017-03-13

    In order to obtain a durable cost-effective membrane for membrane distillation (MD) process, flat sheet polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were modified by an atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma generated using a dielectric barrier discharge in a mixture of argon and hexamethyldisiloxane as the organosilicon precursor. The surface properties of the plasma-modified membranes were characterized by water contact angle (CA), liquid entry pressure, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The water CA of the membrane was increased from 64° to 104° by depositing a Si(CH3)-rich thin layer. While the pristine PES membrane was not applicable in the MD process, the modified PES membrane could be applied for the first time in an air gap membrane distillation setup for the removal of benzene as a volatile organic compound from water. The experimental design using central composite design and response surface methodology was applied to study the effects of feed temperature, concentration, and flow rate as well as their binary interactions on the overall permeate flux and separation factor. The separation factor and permeation flux of the modified PES membrane at optimum conditions were comparable with those of commercial polytetrafluoroethylene membrane.

  3. Design and performance of an axial air-gap solution pump motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawsey, R. A.; Sohns, C. W.; Daniel, D. S.; Bailey, J. M.

    1990-05-01

    An axial air gap, permanent magnet, brushless dc motor was designed and was evaluated on a dynamometer to measure operating characteristics. The motor must deliver 0.167 hp (approx. 120 W) to the pump rotor at 1800 rpm. Initial performance data with a half-bridge, Hall-probe synchronized drive system and a dry motor bearing did not achieve the desired motor performance. Subsequently, a commercial full-bridge, speed regulated sensorless drive system was used to test the motor. The motor delivered the required 90 oz-in. of torque at 1800 rpm. These data revealed the need for rewinding the stator core to improve motor efficiency. A second stator core, with deeper slots and additional turns of wire, was subsequently fabricated and tested. At 1800 rpm, the drive system could produce only 60 oz-in. of torque due to an unexpectedly high generated voltage. Motor efficiency was 60 to 70 pct. at this torque level when the data were corrected for bearing and coupling drag.

  4. New Communication Practices, Identity and the Psychological Gap: The Affective Function of E-mail on a Distance Doctoral Programme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunderland, Jane

    2002-01-01

    Examined e-mail messages sent by Romanian Ph.D. students over the first 2 years of a (largely) distance education program based in the United Kingdom. Found that participants used e-mail to obtain support, inscribe their multiple identities within their messages, and adapt the medium for their own needs; these uses have particular value for…

  5. Characterization of Air-Gap Sealing with Organic Dielectric Using Spin-Coating Film Transfer and Hot-Pressing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Norio; Machida, Katsuyuki; Ishii, Hiromu; Ishimura, Yoji; Saito, Hidenori; Asakuma, Sumitoshi; Kawagoe, Masafumi; Adachi, Hideki

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a dielectric material and its application to sealing air gaps using spin-coating film transfer and hot-pressing (STP) technology. STP technology is a new film-formation process that consists of spin coating a dielectric material on a base film, hot pressing the dielectric film on a wafer with gaps in a vacuum chamber, and peeling the base film off the dielectric adhered to the wafer. In order to seal the gaps with thin dielectric films, it is necessary to prevent the dielectric from breaking during the peel-off step. Thus, a dielectric of poly(benzoxazole) (PBO) with additives for reducing the adhesion strength between the dielectric and the base film is proposed. The experimental results show that 0.3-μm-wide gaps can be sealed with dielectric films as thin as 0.25 μm without film breaking. The mechanism by which adhesion strength decreases in the peel-off step is discussed in terms of its dependence on the proportion of additives. The synergy of the STP process and the type of dielectric material used paves the way for the development of future interconnect schemes using air gaps.

  6. Band gaps in bubble phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, V.; Bretagne, A.; Lanoy, M.; Tourin, A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the interaction between Bragg and hybridization effects on the band gap properties of bubble phononic crystals. These latter consist of air cavities periodically arranged in an elastomer matrix and are fabricated using soft-lithography techniques. Their transmission properties are affected by Bragg effects due to the periodicity of the structure as well as hybridization between the propagating mode of the embedding medium and bubble resonance. The hybridization gap survives disorder while the Bragg gap requires a periodic distribution of bubbles. The distance between two bubble layers can be tuned to make the two gaps overlap or to create a transmission peak in the hybridization gap.

  7. The effects of gaseous bubble composition and gap distance on the characteristics of nanosecond discharges in distilled water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Ahmad; Cha, Min Suk

    2016-06-01

    Electric discharge in liquids with bubbles can reduce the energy consumption, which increases treatment efficiency. We present an experimental study of nanosecond discharges in distilled water bubbled with the monoatomic gas argon and with the polyatomic gases methane, carbon dioxide, and propane. We monitor the time evolution of the voltage and current waveforms, and calculate the injected charges to characterize the discharge. We establish a relationship between the injected charges and the shape of the plasma by time-resolved imaging to find that increasing the size of the gap reduces the injected charges. Moreover, we determine the plasma characteristics, including electron density, excitation temperatures (for atoms and ions), and rotational temperature of the OH and C2 radicals found in the plasma. Our space- and time-averaged measurements allow us to propose a spatial distribution of the plasma that is helpful for understanding the plasma dynamics necessary to develop and optimize applications based on nanosecond discharges in bubbled liquids.

  8. High efficient OLED displays prepared with the air-gapped bridges on quantum dot patterns for optical recycling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jun; Shin, Min-Ho; Kim, Joo-Suc; Kim, Se-Eun; Kim, Young-Joo

    2017-02-17

    An optically efficient structure was proposed and fabricated to realize high brightness organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays based on a white OLED prepared with the air-gapped bridges on the quantum dot (QD) patterns. Compared with a conventional white OLED display, in our experiments, the optical intensity of the proposed OLED display shows the enhancement of 58.2% in the red color and 16.8% in the green color after applying the air-gapped bridge structure on QD patterns of 20 wt% concentration. This enhancement comes from the two facts that the QD patterns downconvert unnecessary blue or blue/green light to the required green or red light and the air-gapped bridges increase the color conversion efficiency of QDs by optical recycling using total internal reflection (TIR) at the interface. In addition, the color gamut of the proposed OLED display increases from 65.5 to 75.9% (NTSC x, y ratio) due to the narrow emission spectra of QDs.

  9. High efficient OLED displays prepared with the air-gapped bridges on quantum dot patterns for optical recycling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jun; Shin, Min-Ho; Kim, Joo-Suc; Kim, Se-Eun; Kim, Young-Joo

    2017-01-01

    An optically efficient structure was proposed and fabricated to realize high brightness organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays based on a white OLED prepared with the air-gapped bridges on the quantum dot (QD) patterns. Compared with a conventional white OLED display, in our experiments, the optical intensity of the proposed OLED display shows the enhancement of 58.2% in the red color and 16.8% in the green color after applying the air-gapped bridge structure on QD patterns of 20 wt% concentration. This enhancement comes from the two facts that the QD patterns downconvert unnecessary blue or blue/green light to the required green or red light and the air-gapped bridges increase the color conversion efficiency of QDs by optical recycling using total internal reflection (TIR) at the interface. In addition, the color gamut of the proposed OLED display increases from 65.5 to 75.9% (NTSC x, y ratio) due to the narrow emission spectra of QDs. PMID:28211516

  10. High efficient OLED displays prepared with the air-gapped bridges on quantum dot patterns for optical recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo-Jun; Shin, Min-Ho; Kim, Joo-Suc; Kim, Se-Eun; Kim, Young-Joo

    2017-02-01

    An optically efficient structure was proposed and fabricated to realize high brightness organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays based on a white OLED prepared with the air-gapped bridges on the quantum dot (QD) patterns. Compared with a conventional white OLED display, in our experiments, the optical intensity of the proposed OLED display shows the enhancement of 58.2% in the red color and 16.8% in the green color after applying the air-gapped bridge structure on QD patterns of 20 wt% concentration. This enhancement comes from the two facts that the QD patterns downconvert unnecessary blue or blue/green light to the required green or red light and the air-gapped bridges increase the color conversion efficiency of QDs by optical recycling using total internal reflection (TIR) at the interface. In addition, the color gamut of the proposed OLED display increases from 65.5 to 75.9% (NTSC x, y ratio) due to the narrow emission spectra of QDs.

  11. Optimum Design for Noncontact Ultrasonic Motor with Flexurally Vibrating Disk Using an Equivalent Circuit Considering Viscosity of Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamayoshi, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Hideki; Hirose, Seiji

    2009-07-01

    The optimum design for a noncontact ultrasonic motor with a flexurally vibrating disk has been investigated by analyzing the sound pressure in the air gap using an equivalent circuit considering the viscosity of air. The calculated results indicate that the sound pressure is affected by the viscosity and mass effect in the air gap, which are changed by the gap distance. The experimental results of revolution speed measured at various gap distances agree qualitatively with the sound pressure calculated using the equivalent circuit. In the case of wider gaps, a design satisfying the resonant condition of the air gap is necessary for optimizing the motor because the air gap resonates by the mass effect. However, in motors with an air gap narrower than about 50 µm, a higher speed rotation can be obtained for a wide range of rotor diameters and for a wide frequency range without consideration of the air gap resonance because the air viscosity effect becomes dominant.

  12. Long-distance remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmaszczyk, Kamil; Rohwetter, Philipp; Méjean, Guillaume; Yu, Jin; Salmon, Estelle; Kasparian, Jérôme; Ackermann, Roland; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Wöste, Ludger

    2004-11-01

    We demonstrate remote elemental analysis at distances up to 90m, using a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy scheme based on filamentation induced by the nonlinear propagation of unfocused ultrashort laser pulses. A detailed signal analysis suggests that this technique, remote filament-induced breakdown spectroscopy, can be extended up to the kilometer range.

  13. Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources to Health Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for six principal air pollutants (“criteria” pollutants): carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter (PM) in two size ranges [...

  14. Closing the Irregular Warfare Air Capability Gap. The Missing Puzzle Piece: Rugged Utility Aircraft and Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Army Air Forces initially found itself unprepared. In the Pacific theater, the First Air Commando Group performed a daring glider operation in...hatch with a trainable gun and hanging standoff weap- ons under the wings (or both) convert it into a gunship. The Pilatus has almost limit- less

  15. Air-Gapped Structures as Magnetic Elements for Use in Power Processing Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohri, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Methodical approaches to the design of inductors for use in LC filters and dc-to-dc converters using air gapped magnetic structures are presented. Methods for the analysis and design of full wave rectifier LC filter circuits operating with the inductor current in both the continuous conduction and the discontinuous conduction modes are also described. In the continuous conduction mode, linear circuit analysis techniques are employed, while in the case of the discontinuous mode, the method of analysis requires computer solutions of the piecewise linear differential equations which describe the filter in the time domain. Procedures for designing filter inductors using air gapped cores are presented. The first procedure requires digital computation to yield a design which is optimized in the sense of minimum core volume and minimum number of turns. The second procedure does not yield an optimized design as defined above, but the design can be obtained by hand calculations or with a small calculator. The third procedure is based on the use of specially prepared magnetic core data and provides an easy way to quickly reach a workable design.

  16. Air pollution and lung cancer in Trieste, Italy: spatial analysis of risk as a function of distance from sources.

    PubMed Central

    Biggeri, A; Barbone, F; Lagazio, C; Bovenzi, M; Stanta, G

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between four sources of environmental pollution (shipyard, iron foundry, incinerator, and city center) and lung cancer risk, we conducted a case-control study of decreased men in Trieste, Italy. We identified 755 cases of lung cancer and 755 controls through the local autopsy registry. Information on smoking habits, occupational history, and place of residence were obtained from the subject's next of kin. The case-control design was used to properly account for subject-specific confounders, which represent a major problem in geographical analysis. Spatial models were used to evaluate the effect of sources of pollution on lung cancer after adjustment for age, smoking habits, likelihood of exposure to occupational carcinogens, and levels of air particulate. The models are based on distance from the sources and enable estimation of the risk gradient and directional effects separately for each source. The risk of lung cancer was highly related to the city center (p = 0.0243), with an excess relative risk at zero distance of 2.2 and a smooth decrease moving away from the source (-0.015), and related to the incinerator (p = 0.0098), with an excess relative risk of 6.7 in the source and a very steep decrease (-0.176). These results are consistent with findings of previous analyses and provide further evidence that air pollution is a moderate risk factor of lung cancer. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3 PMID:8841761

  17. Design of single-winding energy-storage reactors for dc-to-dc converters using air-gapped magnetic-core structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohri, A. K.; Wilson, T. G.; Owen, H. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for designing air-gapped energy-storage reactors for nine different dc-to-dc converters resulting from combinations of three single-winding power stages for voltage stepup, current stepup and voltage stepup/current stepup and three controllers with control laws that impose constant-frequency, constant transistor on-time and constant transistor off-time operation. The analysis, based on the energy-transfer requirement of the reactor, leads to a simple relationship for the required minimum volume of the air gap. Determination of this minimum air gap volume then permits the selection of either an air gap or a cross-sectional core area. Having picked one parameter, the minimum value of the other immediately leads to selection of the physical magnetic structure. Other analytically derived equations are used to obtain values for the required turns, the inductance, and the maximum rms winding current. The design procedure is applicable to a wide range of magnetic material characteristics and physical configurations for the air-gapped magnetic structure.

  18. Dual rotor single- stator axial air gap PMSM motor/generator drive for high torque vehicles applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutelea, L. N.; Deaconu, S. I.; Boldea, I.; Popa, G. N.

    2014-03-01

    The actual e - continuously variable transmission (e-CVT) solution for the parallel Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) requires two electric machines, two inverters, and a planetary gear. A distinct electric generator and a propulsion electric motor, both with full power converters, are typical for a series HEV. In an effort to simplify the planetary-geared e-CVT for the parallel HEV or the series HEV we hereby propose to replace the basically two electric machines and their two power converters by a single, axial-air-gap, electric machine central stator, fed from a single PWM converter with dual frequency voltage output and two independent PM rotors, destined for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and military vehicles applications. The proposed topologies and the magneto-motive force analysis are the core of the paper.

  19. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10−5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers. PMID:26923610

  20. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-02-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10-5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers.

  1. Prediction of DC Corona Onset Voltage for Rod-Plane Air Gaps by a Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuo; Ruan, Jiangjun; Du, Zhiye; Zhu, Lin; Shu, Shengwen

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method to predict the corona onset voltage for a rod-plane air gap, based on the support vector machine (SVM). Because the SVM is not limited by the size, dimension and nonlinearity of the samples, this method can realize accurate prediction with few training data. Only electric field features are chosen as the input; no geometric parameter is included. Therefore, the experiment data of one kind of electrode can be used to predict the corona onset voltages of other electrodes with different sizes. With the experimental data obtained by ozone detection technology, and experimental data provided by the reference, the efficiency of the proposed method is validated. Accurate predicted results with an average relative less than 3% are obtained with only 6 experimental data. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51477120)

  2. Analysis and Design Considerations of a High-Power Density, Dual Air Gap, Axial-Field Brushless, Permanent Magnet Motor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chahee Peter

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, brush dc motors have been the dominant drive system because they provide easily controlled motor speed over a wide range, rapid acceleration and deceleration, convenient control of position, and lower product cost. Despite these capabilities, the brush dc motor configuration does not satisfy the design requirements for the U.S. Navy's underwater propulsion applications. Technical advances in rare-earth permanent magnet materials, in high-power semiconductor transistor technology, and in various rotor position-sensing devices have made using brushless permanent magnet motors a viable alternative. This research investigates brushless permanent magnet motor technology, studying the merits of dual-air gap, axial -field, brushless, permanent magnet motor configuration in terms of power density, efficiency, and noise/vibration levels. Because the design objectives for underwater motor applications include high-power density, high-performance, and low-noise/vibration, the traditional, simplified equivalent circuit analysis methods to assist in meeting these goals were inadequate. This study presents the development and verification of detailed finite element analysis (FEA) models and lumped parameter circuit models that can calculate back electromotive force waveforms, inductance, cogging torque, energized torque, and eddy current power losses. It is the first thorough quantification of dual air-gap, axial -field, brushless, permanent magnet motor parameters and performance characteristics. The new methodology introduced in this research not only facilitates the design process of an axial field, brushless, permanent magnet motor but reinforces the idea that the high-power density, high-efficiency, and low-noise/vibration motor is attainable.

  3. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a photoelectrochemically etched air-gap aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J. T. Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Megalini, L.; Speck, J. S.; Lee, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-01-18

    We demonstrate a III-nitride nonpolar vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a photoelectrochemically (PEC) etched aperture. The PEC lateral undercut etch is used to selectively remove the multi-quantum well (MQW) region outside the aperture area, defined by an opaque metal mask. This PEC aperture (PECA) creates an air-gap in the passive area of the device, allowing one to achieve efficient electrical confinement within the aperture, while simultaneously achieving a large index contrast between core of the device (the MQW within the aperture) and the lateral cladding of the device (the air-gap formed by the PEC etch), leading to strong lateral confinement. Scanning electron microscopy and focused ion-beam analysis is used to investigate the precision of the PEC etch technique in defining the aperture. The fabricated single mode PECA VCSEL shows a threshold current density of ∼22 kA/cm{sup 2} (25 mA), with a peak output power of ∼180 μW, at an emission wavelength of 417 nm. The near-field emission profile shows a clearly defined single linearly polarized (LP) mode profile (LP{sub 12,1}), which is in contrast to the filamentary lasing that is often observed in III-nitride VCSELs. 2D mode profile simulations, carried out using COMSOL, give insight into the different mode profiles that one would expect to be displayed in such a device. The experimentally observed single mode operation is proposed to be predominantly a result of poor current spreading in the device. This non-uniform current spreading results in a higher injected current at the periphery of the aperture, which favors LP modes with high intensities near the edge of the aperture.

  4. SU-E-T-454: Impact of Air Gap On PDDs of 6 MV Photon Beam for Various Field Sizes in Inhomogeneous Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Oyewale, S; Pokharel; Singh, H; Islam, M; Rana, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how the shape of air gap and its size will impact the percent depth doses (PDDs) of a 6MV photon beam for various field sizes. Methods: Two in-house phantoms were manufactured containing rectangular (phantom A) and circular (phantom B) air gaps. Both phantoms A and B were composed of same top layer (solid-water; 30×30cm{sup 2},5cm thickness) and bottom layer (solid-water; 30×30cm {sup 2},8cm thickness), but middle layer was varied to observe air gap effects and scatter contribution to the measurement point. In phantom A, a rectangular shaped air gap (30×30cm{sup 2},7cm thickness) was created by placing Styrofoam blocks between top and bottom layers of the phantom. In phantom B, middle layer was replaced by “inhomogenous block”, composed of acrylic plate (30×30cm{sup 2}, 4cm thickness) followed by PVC(30×30cm{sup 2},3cm thickness). Additionally, circular air gap was created by drilling a hole (diameter=2.8cm, length=7cm) at the center of “inhomogenous block”. In both phantoms, measurement readings were obtained at 13cm depth (i.e., 1cm after air gap) and depth of maximum dose(6MV energy; 100 MUs; field sizes ranged from 3×3cm{sup 2} to 10×10cm{sup 2}). The PDDs at 13cm depth were compared in both phantoms. Results: The measurements in both phantoms A and B showed an almost linear increase in PDDs with increasing field size, especially for smaller field sizes (from 3×3 to 7×7cm{sup 2}). For each field size, the PDD in phantom A was smaller compared to the one in phantom B. The difference in PDDs between two phantoms decreased with an increase in field size as the PDD difference decreased from 9.0% to 6.4%. Conclusion: The shape and size of air gap affect the PDD measurements in secondary build-up region as 6 MV primary beam traverses through the center of air gap. The scatter contribution due to increase in field size was more noticeable for field sizes ≤7×7cm{sup 2}.

  5. Resistance modulation in VO2 nanowires induced by an electric field via air-gap gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Teruo; Chikanari, Masashi; Wei, Tingting; Tanaka, Hidekazu; The Institute of Scientific; Industrial Research Team

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) shows huge resistance change with metal-insulator transition (MIT) at around room temperature. Controlling of the MIT by applying an electric field is a topical ongoing research toward the realization of Mott transistor. In this study, we have successfully switched channel resistance of VO2 nano-wire channels by a pure electrostatic field effect using a side-gate-type field-effect transistor (SG-FET) viaair gap and found that single crystalline VO2 nanowires and the channels with narrower width enhance transport modulation rate. The rate of change in resistance ((R0-R)/R, where R0 and R is the resistance of VO2 channel with off state and on state gate voltage (VG) , respectively) was 0.42 % at VG = 30 V in in-plane poly-crystalline VO2 channels on Al2O3(0001) substrates, while the rate in single crystalline channels on TiO2 (001) substrates was 3.84 %, which was 9 times higher than that using the poly-crystalline channels. With reducing wire width from 3000 nm to 400 nm of VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrate, furthermore, resistance modulation ratio enhanced from 0.67 % to 3.84 %. This change can not be explained by a simple free-electron model. In this presentation, we will compare the electronic properties between in-plane polycrystalline VO2 on Al2O3 (0001) and single crystalline VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrates, and show experimental data in detail..

  6. Detection of air-gap eccentricity and broken-rotor bar conditions in a squirrel-cage induction motor using the radial flux sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Don-Ha; Woo, Byung-Chul; Sun, Jong-Ho; Kang, Dong-Sik; Han, Sang-Bo; Kim, Byung-Kuk; Cho, Youn-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    A new method for detecting eccentricity and broken rotor bar conditions in a squirrel-cage induction motor is proposed. Air-gap flux variation analysis is done using search coils, which are inserted at stator slots. Using this method, the leakage flux in radial direction can be directly detected. Using finite element method, the air-gap flux variation is accurately modeled and analyzed. From the results of the simulation, a motor under normal condition shows maximum magnetic flux density of 1.3 T. On the other hand, the eccentric air-gap condition displays about 1.1 T at 60 deg. and 1.6 T at 240 deg. A difference of flux density is 0.5 T in the abnormal condition, whereas no difference is detected in the normal motor. In the broken rotor bar conditions, the flux densities at 65 deg. and 155 deg. are about 0.4 T and 0.8 T, respectively. These simulation results are coincided with those of experiment. Consequently, the measurement of the magnetic flux at air gap is one of effective ways to discriminate the faulted conditions of the eccentricity and broken rotor bars.

  7. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  8. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    PubMed

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-04-18

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  9. A comparative study on the effects of air gap wind and walking motion on the thermal properties of Arabian Thawbs and Chinese Cheongsams.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiying; Fan, Jintu; Wu, Yuenshing

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports on an experimental investigation on the effects of air gap, wind and walking motion on the thermal properties of traditional Arabian thawbs and Chinese cheongsams. Total thermal resistance (It) and vapour resistance (Re) were measured using the sweating fabric manikin - 'Walter', and the air gap volumes of the garments were determined by a 3D body scanner. The results showed the relative changes of It and Re of thawbs due to wind and walking motion are greater than those of cheongsams, which provided an explanation of why thawbs are preferred in extremely hot climate. It is further shown that thermal insulation and vapour resistance of thawbs increase with the air gap volume up to about 71,000 cm(3) and then decrease gradually. Thawbs with higher air permeability have significantly lower evaporative resistance particularly under windy conditions demonstrating the advantage of air permeable fabrics in body cooling in hot environments. Practitioner Summary: This paper aims to better understand the thermal insulation and vapour resistance of traditional Arabian thawbs and Chinese cheongsams, and the relationship between the thermal properties and their fit and design. The results of this study provide a scientific basis for designing ethnic clothing used in hot environments.

  10. School of the Air by Satellite. A Study of the Improvement of Distance Education in North-west Queensland Using the Australian Communications Satellite System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitt, John; And Others

    As part of an assessment of the educational uses of the Australian Communications Satellite System to be launched in mid-1985, this report focuses on the Mount Isa School of the Air. A general discussion assesses the mechanisms for delivery of distance education for isolated students in Northwest Queensland and considers possible functional…

  11. Strong coupling in non-polar GaN/AlGaN microcavities with air-gap/III-nitride distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Renchun; Arita, Munetaka; Kako, Satoshi; Kamide, Kenji; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-01

    Strong coupling between excitons and photons is experimentally demonstrated in m-plane GaN/AlGaN microcavities (MCs) with air/AlGaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) at room temperature. Strong coupling is confirmed by momentum space spectroscopy, and a Rabi splitting (Ω) of 84 meV is estimated. A Rabi splitting of 84 meV is the largest value reported in a III-nitride DBR MC to date and is mainly attributed to the shortened effective cavity length resulting from the high index contrast in the air-gap DBRs used here. These results show that III-nitride air-gap DBR MCs have a high potential for realizing high Ω / κ systems (where κ is the cavity loss).

  12. The health impacts of exposure to indoor air pollution from solid fuels in developing countries: knowledge, gaps, and data needs.

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati, Majid; Kammen, Daniel M

    2002-01-01

    Globally, almost 3 billion people rely on biomass (wood, charcoal, crop residues, and dung) and coal as their primary source of domestic energy. Exposure to indoor air pollution (IAP) from the combustion of solid fuels is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the relationship between IAP exposure and disease and on interventions for reducing exposure and disease. We take an environmental health perspective and consider the details of both exposure and health effects that are needed for successful intervention strategies. We also identify knowledge gaps and detailed research questions that are essential in successful design and dissemination of preventive measures and policies. In addition to specific research recommendations, we conclude that given the interaction of housing, household energy, and day-to-day household activities in determining exposure to indoor smoke, research and development of effective interventions can benefit tremendously from integration of methods and analysis tools from a range of disciplines in the physical, social, and health sciences. PMID:12417475

  13. Temperature dependence of beat-length and confinement loss in an air-core photonic band-gap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Hong, Yong; Liu, Pan; Yang, Hanrui; Ling, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of polarization-maintaining (PM) property and loss in a highly-birefringent air-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is investigated. The effects of temperature variation on the effective index, beat-length and confinement loss are studied numerically by using the full-vector finite element method (FEM). It is found that, the PM property of this PBF is insensitive to the temperature, and the temperature-dependent beat-length coefficient can be as low as 2.86×10-8 m/°C, which is typically 200 times less than those of conventional panda fibers, the PBF has a stable confinement loss of 0.01 dB/m over the temperature range of -30 to 20 °C for the slow axis at the wavelength of 1.55 μm. The PBF with ultra-low temperature-dependent PM property and low loss can reduce the thermally induced polarization instability apparently in interferometric applications such as resonant fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG), optical fiber sensors, and so on.

  14. Indium phosphide all air-gap Fabry-Pérot filters for near-infrared spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, A.; Butt, M. A.; Fomchenkov, S. A.; Khonina, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    Food quality can be characterized by noninvasive techniques such as spectroscopy in the Near Infrared wavelength range. For example, 930 -1450 nm wavelength range can be used to detect diseases and differentiate between meat samples. Miniaturization of such NIR spectrometers is useful for quick and mobile characterization of food samples. Spectrometers can be miniaturized, without compromising the spectral resolution, using Fabry-Pérot (FP) filters consisting of two highly reflecting mirrors with a central cavity in between. The most commonly used mirrors in the design of FP filters are Distributed Bragg Reflections (DBRs) consisting of alternating high and low refractive index material pairs, due to their high reflectivity compared to metal mirrors. However, DBRs have high reflectivity for a selected range of wavelengths known as the stopband of the DBR. This range is usually much smaller than the sensitivity range of the spectrometer detector. Therefore, a bandpass filter is usually required to restrict wavelengths outside the stopband of the FP DBRs. Such bandpass filters are difficult to design and implement. Alternatively, high index contrast materials must be can be used to broaden the stopband width of the FP DBRs. In this work, Indium phosphide all air-gap filters are proposed in conjunction with InGaAs based detectors. The designed filter has a wide stopband covering the entire InGaAs detector sensitivity range. The filter can be tuned in the 950-1450 nm with single mode operation. The designed filter can hence be used for noninvasive meat quality control.

  15. Disrupting the Implementation Gap with Digital Technology in Healthcare Distance Education: Critical Insights from an e-Mentoring Intensional Network Practitioner Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Gurmit

    2013-01-01

    Effective professional distance education is urgently needed to develop a well-trained workforce and improve impact on healthcare. However, distance education initiatives have had mixed results in improving practice. Often, successful implementation fails to leverage insights on the social and emergent nature of learning in networks. This paper…

  16. Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Childhood Asthma: Recent Advances and Remaining Gaps in the Exposure Assessment Methods.

    PubMed

    Khreis, Haneen; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2017-03-17

    Background: Current levels of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) are associated with the development of childhood asthma, although some inconsistencies and heterogeneity remain. An important part of the uncertainty in studies of TRAP-associated asthma originates from uncertainties in the TRAP exposure assessment and assignment methods. In this work, we aim to systematically review the exposure assessment methods used in the epidemiology of TRAP and childhood asthma, highlight recent advances, remaining research gaps and make suggestions for further research. Methods: We systematically reviewed epidemiological studies published up until 8 September 2016 and available in Embase, Ovid MEDLINE (R), and "Transport database". We included studies which examined the association between children's exposure to TRAP metrics and their risk of "asthma" incidence or lifetime prevalence, from birth to the age of 18 years old. Results: We found 42 studies which examined the associations between TRAP and subsequent childhood asthma incidence or lifetime prevalence, published since 1999. Land-use regression modelling was the most commonly used method and nitrogen dioxide (NO₂) was the most commonly used pollutant in the exposure assessments. Most studies estimated TRAP exposure at the residential address and only a few considered the participants' mobility. TRAP exposure was mostly assessed at the birth year and only a few studies considered different and/or multiple exposure time windows. We recommend that further work is needed including e.g., the use of new exposure metrics such as the composition of particulate matter, oxidative potential and ultra-fine particles, improved modelling e.g., by combining different exposure assessment models, including mobility of the participants, and systematically investigating different exposure time windows. Conclusions: Although our previous meta-analysis found statistically significant associations for various TRAP exposures and

  17. Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Childhood Asthma: Recent Advances and Remaining Gaps in the Exposure Assessment Methods

    PubMed Central

    Khreis, Haneen; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current levels of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) are associated with the development of childhood asthma, although some inconsistencies and heterogeneity remain. An important part of the uncertainty in studies of TRAP-associated asthma originates from uncertainties in the TRAP exposure assessment and assignment methods. In this work, we aim to systematically review the exposure assessment methods used in the epidemiology of TRAP and childhood asthma, highlight recent advances, remaining research gaps and make suggestions for further research. Methods: We systematically reviewed epidemiological studies published up until 8 September 2016 and available in Embase, Ovid MEDLINE (R), and “Transport database”. We included studies which examined the association between children’s exposure to TRAP metrics and their risk of “asthma” incidence or lifetime prevalence, from birth to the age of 18 years old. Results: We found 42 studies which examined the associations between TRAP and subsequent childhood asthma incidence or lifetime prevalence, published since 1999. Land-use regression modelling was the most commonly used method and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was the most commonly used pollutant in the exposure assessments. Most studies estimated TRAP exposure at the residential address and only a few considered the participants’ mobility. TRAP exposure was mostly assessed at the birth year and only a few studies considered different and/or multiple exposure time windows. We recommend that further work is needed including e.g., the use of new exposure metrics such as the composition of particulate matter, oxidative potential and ultra-fine particles, improved modelling e.g., by combining different exposure assessment models, including mobility of the participants, and systematically investigating different exposure time windows. Conclusions: Although our previous meta-analysis found statistically significant associations for various TRAP exposures and

  18. Research on the water hammer protection of the long distance water supply project with the combined action of the air vessel and over-pressure relief valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, D. D.; Jiang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Yi, W. S.; Lan, G.

    2013-12-01

    We take a concrete pumping station as an example in this paper. Through the calculation of water hammer protection with a specific pumping station water supply project, and the analysis of the principle, mathematical models and boundary conditions of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve we show that the air vessel can protect the water conveyance system and reduce the transient pressure damage due to various causes. Over-pressure relief valve can effectively reduce the water hammer because the water column re-bridge suddenly stops the pump and prevents pipeline burst. The paper indicates that the combination set of air vessel and over-pressure relief valve can greatly reduce the quantity of the air valve and can eliminate the water hammer phenomenon in the pipeline system due to the vaporization and water column separation and re-bridge. The conclusion could provide a reference for the water hammer protection of long-distance water supply system.

  19. Experimental method to reveal the effect of rotor magnet size and air gap on artificial heart driving motor torque and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Yuan, H Y; Ru, W M; Zeng, P

    2002-01-01

    To investigate experimentally the effect of rotor magnet design on artificial heart driving motor performance, seven rotors with different magnet lengths or thicknesses, as well as different peripheral angles, were manufactured and tested in the same motor stator with different rotating speeds. The input power (voltage and current) and output torque were measured and the motor efficiency was computed. The results demonstrated that the reduction of rotor magnet size and the enlargement of the air gap between the rotor magnets and the stator coil core have no significant effect on motor efficiency, but will reduce the torque value on which the motor achieves the highest efficiency; it could be remedied however by increasing the rotating speed, because the torque at the high efficiency point will increase along with the rotating speed. These results may provide a basis for developing small rotor magnets, large air gap and high efficiency motors for driving an artificial heart pump.

  20. Large gap control in electromagnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Subrata; Prasad, Dinkar; Pal, Jayanta

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes design and implementation of a single axis dc attraction type electromagnetic suspension system where an electromagnet of 2.6 kg mass is levitated over a large gap under a fixed ferromagnetic guide-way. The electromagnet exhibits nonlinear force-current-distance characteristics, and if controllers are to be designed by using linear analysis, the air-gap is restricted to a small region around the chosen nominal operating point. In this work, an attempt has been made to increase the operating range of an electromagnetic suspension system by using the concept of piecewise linear control where the nonlinear force-current-airgap relationships of the magnetic suspension system have been successively linearized at several operating points with a suitable controller designed for each operating point. A novel analog switching scheme has been designed and implemented to automatically switch to the relevant controller depending on the actual air-gap.

  1. Static air-gap eccentricity fault diagnosis using rotor slot harmonics in line neutral voltage of three-phase squirrel cage induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumaamar, Mohamed El Kamel; Maouche, Yassine; Boucherma, Mohamed; Khezzar, Abdelmalek

    2017-02-01

    The mixed eccentricity fault detection in a squirrel cage induction motor has been thoroughly investigated. However, a few papers have been related to pure static eccentricity fault and the authors focused on the RSH harmonics presented in stator current. The main objective of this paper is to present an alternative method based on the analysis of line neutral voltage taking place between the supply and the stator neutrals in order to detect air-gap static eccentricity, and to highlight the classification of all RSH harmonics in line neutral voltage. The model of squirrel cage induction machine relies on the rotor geometry and winding layout. Such developed model is used to analyze the impact of the pure static air-gap eccentricity by predicting the related frequencies in the line neutral voltage spectrum. The results show that the line neutral voltage spectrum are more sensitive to the air-gap static eccentricity fault compared to stator current one. The theoretical analysis and simulated results are confirmed by experiments.

  2. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  3. Climatology of wintertime long-distance transport of surface-layer air masses arriving urban Beijing in 2001-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Xiang-De, XU

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the FLEXPART-WRF coupled modeling system is used to conduct 12-year Lagrangian modeling over Beijing, China, for the winters of 2001-2012. Based on large trajectory tracking ensembles, the long-range air transport properties, in terms of geographic source regions within the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) and large-scale ventilation, and its association with air quality levels were quantified from a climatological perspective. The results show the following: (1) The air masses residing in the near-surface layer over Beijing potentially originate from broader atmospheric boundary-layer regions, which cover vast areas with the backward tracking time elapsed. However, atmospheric transport from northeastern China and, to a lesser extent, from the surrounding regions of Beijing is important. (2) The evolution of air quality over Beijing is negatively correlated with large-scale ventilation conditions, particularly at a synoptic timescale. Thus, the simple but robust backward-trajectory ventilation (BV) index defined in this study could facilitate operational forecasting of severe air pollution events. (3) By comparison, the relatively short-range transport occurring over transport timescales of less than 3 days from southern and southeastern Beijing and its surrounding areas plays a vital role in the formation of severe air pollution events during the wintertime. (4) Additionally, an interannual trend analysis suggests that the geographic sources and ventilation conditions also changed, at least over the last decade, corresponding to the strength variability of the winter East Asian monsoon.

  4. SU-E-T-777: Use of Tennis Racket and Air Gap Between the Body and Carbon Fiber Couch for Skin Sparing in Radiation Therapy of Prone Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lief, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To reduce the skin dose from the carbon fiber couch scatter in radiation treatment of breast cancer in the prone position. If this issue is not addressed, the prone breast touching the solid carbon fiber couch can absorb significant dose to the skin and cause the skin reaction. Methods: 1. Use of “tennis racket” instead of the solid couch. To check this hypothesis, we measured the dose at the depth of 5 mm in solid water phantom placed on the couch, using a Farmer chamber. A plan for a patient with 6MV beams, gantry angles of 113 and 286 degrees Varian scale was used. It was found that treatment with “tennis racket” instead of the solid carbon fiber couch reduces the surface dose by 5–7%, depending on the beam direction. 2. Use of the air gap between the couch and the body was analyzed using radiochromic film on the surface of the solid water phantom 10 cm thick. Initially the phantom was placed on the couch with the film sandwiched in between. Two fields at the angles of 135 and 315 degrees were used. The measurements were repeated for the air gap of 2 and 5 cm and 6 and 15 MV beams. Results: It was found that a 2-cm gap decreased the surface dose by 3% for a 6 MV beam and by 5.5% for a 15 MV beam. A 5-cm gap reduced the dose by 9% for 6 MV and 13.5% for 15 MV. Conclusion: Use of both methods (combined if possible) can significantly reduce the surface dose in radiation therapy of the prone breast and possible skin reaction. We plan to explore dependence of the dose reduction upon the angle of incidence.

  5. Introduction: Special Issue of Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health for Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Source-to-Health Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for six principal air pollutants (criteria pollutants): carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter in two size ranges [less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and less ...

  6. Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Daisuke

    1998-11-01

    Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field*, Daisuke Okano, Kyushu Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, Japan. -----We have studied on guiding discharge path by weak ionized region between plasmas produced by a visible laser, that is, a YAG laser with wavelength 532nm, in an atmospheric air gap with DC non-uniform electric field using a rod-to-plate electrode. We succeeded in capturing the framing images in the temporal evolution on guiding discharge along the YAG laser light path. From the results of experiments, the region between two plasmas produced by a YAG laser can guide a discharge path, and the region between two plasmas on the laser light path is considered as well as a weak ionized one [1] produced by an excimer laser. [1]J.Sasaki, S.Kubodera, R.Ozaki and T.Uchiyama, J. Appl. Phys., 60 (1986) 3845. *This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)-no.10650295 of The Ministry of education, Science Sports and Culture in japan.

  7. X-ray and runaway electron generation in repetitive pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure air with a point-to-plane gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Tao; Yan Ping; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Shut'ko, Yuliya V.; Zhang Cheng

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, using two repetitive nanosecond generators, x-rays were detected in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a point-to- plane gap. The rise times of the generators were about 15 and 1 ns. The x-rays were directly measured by various dosimeters and a NaI scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. X-rays were detected in the continuous mode at pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz and a voltage pulse rise time of {approx}15 ns. It is shown that the maximum x-ray intensity is attainable at different pulse repetition frequencies depending on the voltage pulse parameters and cathode design. In atmospheric pressure air the x-ray intensity is found to increase with increasing the pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz. It is confirmed that the maximum x-ray intensity is attained in a diffuse discharge in a point-to-plane gap.

  8. UAS in the NAS Air Traffic Controller Acceptability Study-1: The Effects of Horizontal Miss Distances on Simulated UAS and Manned Aircraft Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghatas, Rania W.; Comstock, James R., Jr.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined air traffic controller acceptability ratings based on the effects of differing horizontal miss distances (HMDs) for encounters between UAS and manned aircraft. In a simulation of the Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) East-side airspace, the CAS-1 experiment at NASA Langley Research Center enlisted fourteen recently retired DFW air traffic controllers to rate well-clear volumes based on differing HMDs that ranged from 0.5 NM to 3.0 NM. The controllers were tasked with rating these HMDs from "too small" to "too excessive" on a defined, 1-5, scale and whether these distances caused any disruptions to the controller and/or to the surrounding traffic flow. Results of the study indicated a clear favoring towards a particular HMD range. Controller workload was also measured. Data from this experiment and subsequent experiments will play a crucial role in the FAA's establishment of rules, regulations, and procedures to safely and efficiently integrate UAS into the NAS.

  9. Air Force Officer Accession Planning: Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements for Nonrated Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-09

    Integration and AF/A1P Force Management Policy and conducted within the Manpower, Personnel, and Training Program of RAND Project AIR FORCE as part...website: http://www.rand.org/paf/ iv Table of Contents Preface...Nonrated Line OR Production ................................................................................. 56 7.10. History, Foreign Language

  10. Noncontact ultrasonic transportation of small objects over long distances in air using a bending vibrator and a reflector.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2010-05-01

    Ultrasonic manipulation of small particles, including liquid droplets, over long distances is discussed. It is well known that particles can be trapped at the nodal points of an acoustic standing wave if the particles are much smaller than the wavelength of the standing wave. We used an experimental setup consisting of a 3-mm-thick, 605-mm-long duralumin bending vibrating plate and a reflector. A bolt-clamped Langevin transducer with horn was attached to each end of the vibrating plate to generate flexural vibrations along the plate. A plane reflector with the same dimensions as the vibrating plate was installed parallel to the plate at a distance of approximately 17 mm to generate an ultrasonic standing wave between them and to trap the small particles at the nodal lines. The acoustic field and acoustic radiation force between the vibrator and reflector were calculated by finite element analysis to predict the positions of the trapped particles. The sound pressure distribution was measured experimentally using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer. By controlling the driving phase difference between the two transducers, a flexural traveling wave can be generated along the vibrating plate, and the vertical nodal lines of the standing wave and the trapped particles can be moved. The flexural wave was excited along the vibrator at 22.5 kHz. A lattice standing wave with a wavelength of 35 mm in the length direction could be excited between the vibrator and the reflector, and polystyrene spheres with diameters of several millimeters could be trapped at the nodal lines of the standing wave. The experimental and calculated results showed good agreement for the relationship between the driving phase difference and the positions of the trapped particles. Noncontact transportation of the trapped particles over long distances could be achieved by changing the driving phase difference. The position of the trapped particles could be controlled to an accuracy of 0.046 mm/deg. An

  11. Towards a regional passive air sampling network and strategy for new POPs in the GRULAC region: Perspectives from the GAPS Network and first results for organophosphorus flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Rauert, Cassandra; Harner, Tom; Schuster, Jasmin K; Quinto, Karen; Fillmann, Gilberto; Castillo, Luisa Eugenia; Fentanes, Oscar; Ibarra, Martín Villa; Miglioranza, Karina S B; Rivadeneira, Isabel Moreno; Pozo, Karla; Puerta, Andrea Padilla; Zuluaga, Beatriz Helena Aristizábal

    2016-12-15

    A discussion is presented on the limitations for air monitoring studies around the Group of Latin American and Caribbean Countries (GRULAC), highlighting key issues requiring further attention, and reports on how a special initiative is addressing these limitations. Preliminary results are presented for the first reported data on organophosphorus flame retardant (OPFR) concentrations in outdoor air from the GRULAC region. At the majority of sites the concentrations and the profile of the OPFRs detected were similar with tris (chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) dominating (air levels. This preliminary study of only 7 sites highlights how extensive regional passive sampling networks (such as GAPS) can provide important new information to support risk assessment of these and similar chemicals. Finally, the various challenges with implementing a regional monitoring program are discussed, including harmonizing data from various monitoring programs for reporting to the GMP.

  12. In depth analysis of the role of the mountain gap south of the Valley of Mexico on the air quality in Mexico City.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardo Ruiz Suarez, Luis

    2010-05-01

    38 days of air quality observations in Tenango del Aire (TENAI), south of Mexico City during MILAGRO were analyzed. That site was managed by FQA-CCA-UNAM's team with a mobile laboratory equipped with standard air quality monitors: O3, NOx, NOy, CO, SO2 and surface meteorological parameters. Hosted additional instruments were: CH2O, column NO2 (DOAS), backscatter (Lidar) and pilot balloons. Also, an ultra light plane from IMK-IFU, equipped with O3, PM10, CN, Dew Point monitors flew around the Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl volcanoes and above of TENAI some days during MILAGRO. Atop of TENAI, the ultra light descended in spiral until near ground and ascended to resume its path. In addition to these measurements, UNAM team ran air quality numerical simulations using the Mesoscale Climate and Chemistry Model (MCCM) and an online coupled Wind Erosion Processor to MCCM we call WEPS-MCCM. The combined observations on the ground, the ultra light plane and the models results enabled us to carry out an in depth analysis of air quality in such important region south of Mexico City. Comparison were made with the episodes classification proposed by De Foy; Ozone North and South, Convection North and South, Cold Surge and South Venting to characterize dynamics in the Valley of Mexico. The aim was to define how well connected is TENAI with the air quality network in the MCMA. The influence of the mountain gap on ozone and PM10 levels in Mexico City is analyzed by episode type. Also, the impact of the mega city of Mexico on the nearby region to the south can be understood by observations in TENAI. More polluted episode types in TENAI are those called: Cold Surge, Ozone South and South Venting due to a wind shift occurring in early afternoon that brings back polluted air that was drained south during the morning and returns back to TENAI rich in aged air parcels. March 17 was chosen to show the integrated analysis of all variables observed and modeled (MCCM) in TENAI. In that day

  13. Characterization of the NOx-Ox relationship in a mountain gap rural area of interchange of air masses southeast of the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Suarez, L.; Garcia-Yee, J.; Torres-JArdon, R.; Barrera Huertas, H.; Torres-Jaramillo, A.; Ortinez, A.

    2013-05-01

    Varying levels of oxidants (Ox = O3 + NO2) with respect to NOx were registered at three sites in a mountain southeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) in February and March 2011. The Ox-NOx ratio was used to gain a better understanding of the photochemical and transport processes happening over this mountain pass. Relatively high concentrations of O3 (moving average concentrations of 8 hours) exceeded maximum levels of the World Health Organization, and the European Union. The cumulative exceedances above background level of O3 in the one month-long campaign also exceeded the three months accumulative UN-ECE AOT40 critical level for crop protection. It was observed that the level of Ox in the mountain gap sites consisted of two contributions: One, independent of NOx emissions, extremely dominant and considered equivalent to the regional background O3 concentration; the second and much smaller was dependent of NOx local concentrations. Evidence was found that the oxidation of NO provided the major contribution of NO2 to Ox, rather than direct NO2 emissions. The contribution of regional Ox dominated from midmorning to noon when the boundary layer height began to increase due to sunlight heating of the surface leading to the mixing of higher concentrations of O3 above the nighttime thermal inversion. After noon, when the ozone vertical distribution was uniform, the Ox and O3 concentrations reached their maximum; they were very similar with very low levels of NO2. The analysis of wind data collected at the monitoring sites showed that from mid-morning to early afternoon, a northerly weak flow was common. Afterwards stronger southerly winds became dominant bringing in O3 rich air parcels into the atmospheric basin where MCMA is located. The high regional ozone concentrations add evidence for the need of coordinated air quality management policies for the complete central part of Mexico. Keywords: mountain gap, oxidant, ground level ozone, Central Mexico

  14. Normal impingement loads due to small air jets issuing from a base plate and reflecting off a platform for various jet Mach numbers, separation distances, and ambient pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in a 12.5-meter-diameter vacuum sphere to determine the impingement loads due to air jets issuing from and perpendicular to a circular base and reflecting off a square platform, that is, a simulation of rendezvous maneuvering, docking, launch, impact dampers etc. The nozzles had exit Mach numbers of 1, 3, 5, and 7. The ambient pressures were 0.0006, 5, 225, and 760 torr. Under near-field separation distances and at 0.0006 torr, reflections were significant; and ratios of the impingement force to thrust on both plates in the biplane arrangement varied from about 750 for exit Mach number 1 to 120 for exit Mach number 7. The far-field force ratios were near unity for the platform and zero for the base and indicated few, if any, reflections. Some reversals and rapid changes in loads were obtained at transition distances between the near and far fields. In general, increasing the exit Mach number or ambient pressure reduced the impingement loads.

  15. Geodetic distance measuring apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.

    1980-12-01

    A geodetic distance measuring apparatus which compensates for the refractive index of the atmosphere is discussed. A mode locked laser system with a laser device and its peripheral components is utilized to derive two mutually phase locked optical wavelength signals and one phase locked microwave CW signal which respectively traverse the same distance measurement path. The optical signals are comprised of pulse type signals. Phase comparison of the two optical wavelength pulse signals is used to provide the dry air density while phase comparison of one of the optical wavelength pulse signals and the microwave CW signal issued to provide wet or water vapor density of the air. The distance to be measured corrected for the atmospheric dry air and water vapor densities in the measurement path is computed from these measurements. A time interval unit is included for measuring transit time of individual optical pulses for resolving the phase ambiguity needed with the phase measurements to give the true target distance.

  16. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  17. Effect of lens focusing distance on laser-produced copper plasma in air in the presence of static transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Khwairakpam Shantakumar; Sharma, Ashwini Kumar

    2016-12-01

    We report on the role of lens focusing conditions on laser-produced copper plasma in air at atmospheric pressure in the presence of magnetic field using optical emission spectroscopy. From the time integrated and temporal optical emission spectroscopy, we observed that the copper neutral/ionic line showed a higher intensity when the focal point of the lens was below the target surface in the absence of the magnetic field. In the presence of magnetic field, significant intensity enhancement was observed when the focal point was below the target surface which is attributed to an increase in the plasma-magnetic field interaction at this focusing condition. When the focal point was above the target surface, the intensity of neutral line was quite low and the effect of magnetic field was insignificant. This is because of air breakdown which caused lesser laser-matter interaction and eventually plasma-magnetic field interaction. Based on heat conduction equation, we also simulated the laser heating of copper target using a finite element method to predict the expansion velocity at different laser focusing conditions and the stopping radius of plasma and found that it depends on the distance between the focal point and the target surface. The intensity enhancement in the presence of magnetic field occurred at a stopping radius where the density of plasma was high due to considerable deceleration of the plasma by magnetic field.

  18. USAF Initiatives in Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the expansive growth of distance learning in the United States Air Force (USAF). Highlights include interactive television and the Air Technology Network that uses satellites; computer-based instruction; online electronic campus; multimedia interactive courseware; CD-ROM; distance learning benefits; data collection; administration; and…

  19. Propagation or failure of detonation across an air gap in an LX-17 column: continuous time-dependent detonation or shock speed using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D E; Chandler, J B; Compton, S M; Garza, R G; Grimsley, D A; Hernandez, A; Villafana, R J; Wade, J T; Weber, S R; Wong, B M; Souers, P C

    2008-01-16

    The detailed history of the shock/detonation wave propagation after crossing a room-temperature-room-pressure (RTP) air gap between a 25.4 mm diameter LX-17 donor column and a 25.4 mm diameter by 25.4 mm long LX-17 acceptor pellet is investigated for three different gap widths (3.07, 2.08, and 0.00 mm) using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique. The 2.08 mm gap propagated and the 3.07 mm gap failed and this can be seen clearly and unambiguously in the EFO data even though the 25.4 mm-long acceptor pellet would be considered quite short for a determination by more traditional means such as pins.

  20. Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orey, Michael; Koenecke, Lynne; Snider, Richard C.; Perkins, Ross A.; Holmes, Glen A.; Lockee, Barbara B.; Moller, Leslie A.; Harvey, Douglas; Downs, Margaret; Godshalk, Veronica M.

    2003-01-01

    Contains four articles covering trends and issues on distance learning including: the experience of two learners learning via the Internet; a systematic approach to determining the scalability of a distance education program; identifying factors that affect learning community development and performance in asynchronous distance education; and…

  1. Fabrication of macromolecular gradients in aligned fiber scaffolds using a combination of in-line blending and air-gap electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Alysha P; Robbins, Andrew B; Mohiuddin, Sahar F; Jiang, Mingliang; Moreno, Michael R; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2016-12-22

    Although a variety of fabrication methods have been developed to generate electrospun meshes with gradient properties, no platform has yet to achieve fiber alignment in the direction of the gradient that mimics the native tendon-bone interface. In this study, we present a method combining in-line blending and air-gap electrospinning to address this limitation in the field. A custom collector with synced rotation permitted fiber collection with uniform mesh thickness and periodic copper wires were used to induce fiber alignment. Two poly(ester urethane ureas) with different hard segment contents (BPUR 50, BPUR 10) were used to generate compositional gradient meshes with and without fiber alignment. The compositional gradient across the length of the mesh was characterized using a fluorescent dye and the results indicated a continuous transition from the BPUR 50 to the BPUR 10. As expected, the fiber alignment of the gradient meshes induced a corresponding alignment of adherent cells in static culture. Tensile testing of the sectioned meshes confirmed a graded transition in mechanical properties and an increase in anisotropy with fiber alignment. Finite element modeling was utilized to illustrate the gradient mechanical properties across the full length of the mesh and lay the foundation for future computational development work. Overall, these results indicate that this electrospinning method permits the fabrication of macromolecular gradients in the direction of fiber alignment and demonstrate its potential for use in interfacial tissue engineering.

  2. Performance and emission characteristics of a low heat rejection engine with different air gap thicknesses with Jatropha oil based bio-diesel.

    PubMed

    Murali Krishna, M V S; Sarita, G; Seshagiri Rao, V V R; Chowdary, R P; Ramana Reddy, Ch V

    2010-04-01

    The research work on alternate fuels has been the topic of wider interest in the context of depletion of fossil fuels and increasing of pollution levels of the engines with conventional fossil fuels. Alcohols and vegetable oils are considered to replace diesel fuels as they are renewable in nature. However, use of alcohols in internal combustion engines is limited in India, as these fuels are diverted to PetroChemical industries and hence much emphasis is given to the non-edible vegetable oils as alternate fuels in internal combustion engines. However, the drawbacks of low volatility and high viscosity associated with non-edible vegetable oils call for hot combustion chamber, provided by low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine. Investigations are carried out on a LHR diesel engine with varied air gap thicknesses and injection pressures with jatropha oil based bio-diesel at normal temperature. Performance is improved with high degree of insulation with LHR engine with vegetable oil in comparison with conventional engine (CE) with pure diesel operation.

  3. Simulation-based conceptual design of an acoustic metamaterial with full band gap using an air-based 1-3 piezoelectric composite for ultrasonic noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Shahrokh; Eskandari-Ghadi, Morteza; Rahimian, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims at proposing a novel type of acoustic metamaterials with complete band gap composed of piezoelectric rods with square array as inclusions embedded in an air background (matrix). A modified plane wave expansion method accompanied with the principles of the Bloch-Floquet method with electromechanical coupling effect and also impedance spectra are used to get a band frequency and to investigate the passband for the selected cut of piezoelectric rods. We investigate both the electromechanical coupling coefficient and mechanical quality factor and their dependency to passband and bandwidth, which depends on both the density and the wave impedance of the matrix and the inclusions (rods). The ratio of the volume of inclusion to the matrix is used to define the fill factor or the so-called inclusion ratio, to introduce the bandwidth as a function of that. Furthermore, the fabrication method is presented in this paper. The results make a suitable foundation for design purposes and may develop an inherently passive ultrasonic noise control. In addition, the results provide the required guidance for a simulation-based design of elastic wave filters or wave guide that might be useful in high-precision mechanical systems operated in certain frequency ranges and switches made of piezoelectric materials; they also propose a novel type of elastic metamaterials, which is independent of the wave direction and has an equal sensitivity in all directions in which it reacts omnidirectionally and mitigates the occupational noise exposure.

  4. AIR VEHICLE INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic Structural Response and Life Prediction: Phase 1-Identification of Knowledge Gaps, Volume 1: Nonproprietary Version

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    AFRL-RB-WP-TR-2010-3068,V1 AIR VEHICLE INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic ...Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic Structural Response and Life Prediction: Phase 1-Identification of Knowledge Gaps, Volume 1...AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION The Boeing Company M/C 110-SK56 2600 Westminster Avenue Seal Beach , CA 90740 REPORT NUMBER 9

  5. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  6. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  7. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  8. Geodetic distance measuring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A mode locked laser system including a laser device and its peripheral components is utilized for deriving two mutually phase locked optical wavelength signals and one phase locked microwave CW signal which respectively traverse the same distance measurement path. Preferably the optical signals are comprised of pulse type signals. Phase comparison of the two optical wavelength pulse signals is used to provide a measure of the dry air density while phase comparison of one of the optical wavelength pulse signals and the microwave CW signal is used to provide a measure of the wet or water vapor density of the air. From these measurements is computed in means of the distance to be measured corrected for the atmospheric dry and water vapor densities in the measurement path.

  9. [Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Teri, Ed.; Weatherman, Dick, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue on distance education serving individuals with disabilities considers historical developments, technology, staff training strategies, and staff training materials. It is noted that improving access to training for staff members can improve the quality of services for individuals with disabilities. The following articles…

  10. Development of a Distance Education Network in the OECS. Feasibility Study. Filling a Gap in a Way that Makes Sense. Report of a Consultancy to the Commonwealth of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Judy

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of a distance education network in the Eastern Caribbean. Two types of consultations were completed: a brief site survey of four Eastern Caribbean states (Grenada, Dominica, Antigua, and Saint Lucia) and a workshop in Saint Lucia to which education officials from government agencies and higher…

  11. Stereo-photography of streamers in air

    SciTech Connect

    Nijdam, S.; Moerman, J. S.; Briels, T. M. P.; Veldhuizen, E. M. van; Ebert, U.

    2008-03-10

    Standard photographs of streamer discharges show a two-dimensional projection. Here, we present stereophotographic images that resolve their three-dimensional structure. We describe the stereoscopic setup and evaluation, and we present results for positive streamer discharges in air at 0.2-1 bar in a point-plane geometry with a gap distance of 14 cm and a voltage pulse of 47 kV. In this case, an approximately Gaussian distribution of branching angles of 43 deg. {+-}12 deg. is found; these angles do not significantly depend on the distance from the needle or on the gas pressure.

  12. Obtaining oblique technique source-to-skin distances for irregular field (Clarkson) calculations: The Mayo Off-axis Distance Indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, W.N. )

    1988-09-01

    Significant dose inhomogeneities may exist between the supraclavicular fossa (SCF) and the internal mammary chain (IMC) regions in the irregular L-shaped (hockey stick) field associated with breast cancer treatments. This dose inhomogeneity exists, in part, because of a positive air gap in the SCF and a negative air gap in the IMC locations. Independent of treatment technique, (i.e., whether anterior-posterior (AP) or oblique fields are used), accurate source-to-skin distance (SSD) values for the SCF, IMC, and axilla are necessary when doing an irregular field (Clarkson) dose calculation. However, when an oblique technique is used to treat the hockey stick field, obtaining non-central-axis SSDs is not as straightforward as when an AP technique is employed. The Mayo Off-axis Distance Indicator was constructed to slide into the blocking tray slot of the simulator or treatment machine. This mechanical measuring device provides quick and accurate SSD measurements for non-central-axis points under either AP or, more importantly, oblique treatment conditions.

  13. Who Graduates from Irish Distance University Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines results from an online survey of recent distance graduates. The study, based in Dublin City University (DCU) addresses a gap in the research on this cohort of graduates. Findings indicate that distance graduates are primarily from lower socio economic backgrounds, a group largely under-represented in full-time university…

  14. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagdal, Karl T.; King, Edward L.; Follstaedt, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment.

  15. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagdal, K.T.; King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment. 6 figs.

  16. Vocational Education at a Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Tony

    1973-01-01

    As a case study of the potential of teaching from a distance for technical and vocational training, the author has described the new, experimental Mauritius College of the Air, located on an island in the Indian Ocean, which promotes education through radio and television broadcasts, correspondence, and occasional face-to-face tuition. (EA)

  17. AIR VEHICLES INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic Structural Response and Life Prediction Phase 1 - Identification of Knowledge Gaps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    rudder, all-moving horizontal tails, and body flap were “beefed up ” based on preliminary flutter assessment. The all-moving tail/ wing carry-through...external surface temperatures on the fuselage and wings of up to 640°F, and the acreage surface and structural temperatures in the engine nacelle area...edge to rotate up into the air-stream inducing a heating amplification on the panel edge as well as on the adjacent panels. In the X-33 program the

  18. An examination of boundary layer structure under the influence of the gap winds in Urumqi, China, during air pollution episode in winter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Xia, Xiangao; Xin, Yu; Ma, Yufen; Yang, Jing; Li, Jinglin; Yang, Xinghua

    2012-01-01

    Tethered-sonde measurements of atmospheric profiles were performed at Urumuqi, capital of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, from 29 December 2008 to 14 January 2009. The data were used to examine the boundary layer structure during this severe air pollution period. Diurnal evolution of local wind flow near Urumqi was simulated using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5). Measurements from operational radiosonde data showed that a southeasterly elevated low-level jet often intruded upon Urumqi through the middle Tianshan Mountain pass to the south of the city. The tethered-sonde measurements showed that calm and northwesterly winds prevailed near the surface in Urumqi, whereas the southeasterly winds of relatively higher speed were dominant above approximately 400 m. Both temperature inversion and humidity inversion frequently occured during day and nighttime. Temperature inversion intensity could sharply rise as the stronger elevated southeasterly gale (ESEG) happened. Model simulations showed that the winds near the surface around Urumqi remained calm during nighttime and developed toward the mountains during daytime. As cool airflow in the basin confronted the southeasterly winds from the pass in the lower layer, they formed a convergence line around Urumqi city, which was not favor for dilution of air pollutants.

  19. Spectroscopic thermometry for long-distance surveying.

    PubMed

    Tomberg, Teemu; Fordell, Thomas; Jokela, Jorma; Merimaa, Mikko; Hieta, Tuomas

    2017-01-10

    Electronic distance meters are routinely used to accurately determine the distance between two points. To reach relative measurement uncertainties of 10-7, the average temperature along the beam has to be known within 100 mK since it is a key component in determining the refractive index of air. Temperature measurements at this level are extremely challenging over long distances and especially in an outdoor environment. This paper presents a thermometer for accurate temperature measurements over distances up to a few km. The thermometer is based on direct laser absorption spectroscopy of oxygen near 770 nm. The thermometer yields a spatially continuous measurement of air temperature, and it can provide spatially and temporally well-matching data with an actual distance-measuring laser beam. A field measurement campaign at the 864-m Nummela standard baseline demonstrates applicability of the developed thermometer for improving the refractive index compensation of current high-performance electronic distance meters.

  20. Small Multiples with Gaps.

    PubMed

    Meulemans, Wouter; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay; Wood, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Small multiples enable comparison by providing different views of a single data set in a dense and aligned manner. A common frame defines each view, which varies based upon values of a conditioning variable. An increasingly popular use of this technique is to project two-dimensional locations into a gridded space (e.g. grid maps), using the underlying distribution both as the conditioning variable and to determine the grid layout. Using whitespace in this layout has the potential to carry information, especially in a geographic context. Yet, the effects of doing so on the spatial properties of the original units are not understood. We explore the design space offered by such small multiples with gaps. We do so by constructing a comprehensive suite of metrics that capture properties of the layout used to arrange the small multiples for comparison (e.g. compactness and alignment) and the preservation of the original data (e.g. distance, topology and shape). We study these metrics in geographic data sets with varying properties and numbers of gaps. We use simulated annealing to optimize for each metric and measure the effects on the others. To explore these effects systematically, we take a new approach, developing a system to visualize this design space using a set of interactive matrices. We find that adding small amounts of whitespace to small multiple arrays improves some of the characteristics of 2D layouts, such as shape, distance and direction. This comes at the cost of other metrics, such as the retention of topology. Effects vary according to the input maps, with degree of variation in size of input regions found to be a factor. Optima exist for particular metrics in many cases, but at different amounts of whitespace for different maps. We suggest multiple metrics be used in optimized layouts, finding topology to be a primary factor in existing manually-crafted solutions, followed by a trade-off between shape and displacement. But the rich range of possible

  1. Defining Distance Learning and Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Frederick B.; Young, Michael F.; Drivere-Richmond, Kelly; Schrader, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper offers precise definitions of distance learning and distance education, and their interrelationship. First, a single definition of learning is proposed, and then the concept of learning is broken down into three subcategories: instruction, exploration, and serendipity. Each is defined and the concepts of distance learning and distance…

  2. Groundlayer vegetation gradients across oak woodland canopy gaps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pavlovic, N.B.; Grundel, R.; Sluis, W.

    2006-01-01

    Frequency of groundlayer plants was measured across oak woodland canopy gaps at three sites in northwest Indiana to examine how vegetation varied with gap size, direction along the gap edge, and microhabitat. Microhabitats were defined as under the canopy adjacent to the gap, along the gap edge, and within the gap. Gap-sites consisted of gaps plus adjacent tree canopy. Gaps were classified as small (16 ± 1 m2), medium (97 ± 8), and large (310 ± 32). Neither richness nor diversity differed among microhabitats, gap sizes, or edges. Similarity between microhabitats wthin a gap-site increased as the distance between plots decreased and as the difference in PAR decreased, the latter explaining twice the variation in percent dissimilarity compared to Mg concentration, A horizon depth, and litter cover. Diervilla lonicera, Frageria virginiana, Helianthus divaricatus, Polygonatum pubescens, Quercus velutina, Smilacena stellata, and Tradescantia ohiensis decreased, whileTephrosia virginiana and legumes increased in frequency, from canopy to gap, and C4 grasses peaked at the gap edge, independent of gap size. Additional species frequency varied across the microhabitat gradient within specific sites. Sorghastrum nutans was three times more frequent in gaps at large sites than elsewhere. The vegetation in medium-sized gap-sites was more variable than within small and large gap-sites, suggesting greater environmental heterogeneity at that scale. Within gap-sites, vegetation was more heterogeneous within edges and canopies than in gaps. Edges were more similar in composition to gaps than to canopy groundlayer within gap-sites. Few species varied significantly in frequency around the gap edge. The oak woodland groundlayer on sandy substrates can be characterized as a mosaic of forb dominated vegetation that varies across light gradients associated with canopy gaps, transitioning to islands of grassland vegetation when gaps exceed 160 m2.

  3. Air-Plasma Bullets Propagating Inside Microcapillaries and in Ambient Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, Deanna A.; Bourdon, Anne; Kuribara, Koichi; Urabe, Keiichiro; Stauss, Sven; Terashima, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    We report on the characterization of air-plasma bullets formed inside microcapillary tubes and in ambient air, obtained without the use of inert or noble gases. The bullets are produced by nanosecond discharges, applied at 1 kHz in a dielectric barrier discharge configuration. The anode consists of a tungsten wire with a 50- μm diameter, centered in the microcapillary, while the cathode is a silver ring, fixed on the outer surface of the fused silica tube. The gap distance is kept constant at 1.35 mm. The microcapillary is fed with a 4-sccm flow of air at atmospheric pressure. In the tubes and in ambient air, the propagation of air plasma bullets is observed. The temporal evolution of the bullet propagation has been studied with the aid of an ICCD camera. The effect of the applied voltage (from 5.2 to 8.2 kV) and the inner diameter of the microcapillaries (from 100 to 500 μm) on the discharge dynamics are investigated. Inside the tubes, while the topology of the bullets seems to be strongly dependent on the diameter, their velocity (on the order of 1 to 5 ×105 ms-1) is only a function of the applied voltage. In ambient air, the air-plasma bullets propagate at a velocity of 1 . 25 ×105 ms-1. Possible mechanisms for the propagation of air-plasma bullets in ambient air are discussed.

  4. Distance Education Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indira Gandhi National Open University, New Delhi (India). Distance Education Council.

    Since its inception in India in 1962, distance education has grown in popularity. The Distance Education Council (DEC) directs distance learning within India's higher education system. The DEC's promotion, coordination, and maintenance of standards for distance education are its three major roles. Its initiatives include grants, support for…

  5. Facilitating Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossman, Mark H., Ed.; Rossman, Maxine E., Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This collection of articles on distance learning reflects the perspectives and concerns of the learner and the facilitator of learning in distance education setting. Eight chapters are included: (1) "The Evolution and Advantages of Distance Education" (John E. Cantelon) traces the history of distance education and demonstrates how it transcends…

  6. Training for Distance Teaching through Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadorath, Jill; Harris, Simon; Encinas, Fatima

    2002-01-01

    Describes a mixed-mode bachelor degree course in English language teaching at the Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico) that was designed to help practicing teachers write appropriate distance education materials by giving them the experience of being distance students. Includes a course outline and results of a course evaluation. (Author/LRW)

  7. Electronic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.S.; King, E.L.; Campbell, S.L.

    1991-08-06

    Disclosed are an apparatus and method for regulating the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel in which the gap between the casting nozzle and the casting wheel is monitored by means of at least one sensing element protruding from the face of the casting nozzle. The sensing element is preferably connected to a voltage source and the casting wheel grounded. When the sensing element contacts the casting wheel, an electric circuit is completed. The completion of the circuit can be registered by an indicator, and the presence or absence of a completed circuit indicates the relative position of the casting nozzle to the casting wheel. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. 5 figures.

  8. Electronic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Robert S.; King, Edward L.; Campbell, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus and method for regulating the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel in which the gap between the casting nozzle and the casting wheel is monitored by means of at least one sensing element protruding from the face of the casting nozzle. The sensing element is preferably connected to a voltage source and the casting wheel grounded. When the sensing element contacts the casting wheel, an electric circuit is completed. The completion of the circuit can be registered by an indicator, and the presence or absence of a completed circuit indicates the relative position of the casting nozzle to the casting wheel. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces.

  9. 2. SOUTHEAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST REAR. SHOP BUILDING IN DISTANCE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTHEAST SIDE AND NORTHEAST REAR. SHOP BUILDING IN DISTANCE. NOTE CONCRETE PROTECTION SLAB FOR UNDERGROUND CONTROL ROOM AND ESCAPE HATCH ON GROUND AT RIGHT MIDDLE DISTANCE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Firing Control Building, Test Area 1-100, northeast end of Test Area 1-100 Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  10. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Robert W.; Maroone, James P.; Tipping, Donald W.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1986-01-01

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  11. Flows of gas through a protoplanetary gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassus, Simon; van der Plas, Gerrit; M, Sebastian Perez; Dent, William R. F.; Fomalont, Ed; Hagelberg, Janis; Hales, Antonio; Jordán, Andrés; Mawet, Dimitri; Ménard, Francois; Wootten, Al; Wilner, David; Hughes, A. Meredith; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Girard, Julien H.; Ercolano, Barbara; Canovas, Hector; Román, Pablo E.; Salinas, Vachail

    2013-01-01

    The formation of gaseous giant planets is thought to occur in the first few million years after stellar birth. Models predict that the process produces a deep gap in the dust component (shallower in the gas). Infrared observations of the disk around the young star HD 142527 (at a distance of about 140 parsecs from Earth) found an inner disk about 10 astronomical units (AU) in radius (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance), surrounded by a particularly large gap and a disrupted outer disk beyond 140 AU. This disruption is indicative of a perturbing planetary-mass body at about 90 AU. Radio observations indicate that the bulk mass is molecular and lies in the outer disk, whose continuum emission has a horseshoe morphology. The high stellar accretion rate would deplete the inner disk in less than one year, and to sustain the observed accretion matter must therefore flow from the outer disk and cross the gap. In dynamical models, the putative protoplanets channel outer-disk material into gap-crossing bridges that feed stellar accretion through the inner disk. Here we report observations of diffuse CO gas inside the gap, with denser HCO+ gas along gap-crossing filaments. The estimated flow rate of the gas is in the range of 7 × 10-9 to 2 × 10-7 solar masses per year, which is sufficient to maintain accretion onto the star at the present rate.

  12. Flows of gas through a protoplanetary gap.

    PubMed

    Casassus, Simon; van der Plas, Gerrit; Sebastian Perez, M; Dent, William R F; Fomalont, Ed; Hagelberg, Janis; Hales, Antonio; Jordán, Andrés; Mawet, Dimitri; Ménard, Francois; Wootten, Al; Wilner, David; Hughes, A Meredith; Schreiber, Matthias R; Girard, Julien H; Ercolano, Barbara; Canovas, Hector; Román, Pablo E; Salinas, Vachail

    2013-01-10

    The formation of gaseous giant planets is thought to occur in the first few million years after stellar birth. Models predict that the process produces a deep gap in the dust component (shallower in the gas). Infrared observations of the disk around the young star HD 142527 (at a distance of about 140 parsecs from Earth) found an inner disk about 10 astronomical units (AU) in radius (1 AU is the Earth-Sun distance), surrounded by a particularly large gap and a disrupted outer disk beyond 140 AU. This disruption is indicative of a perturbing planetary-mass body at about 90 AU. Radio observations indicate that the bulk mass is molecular and lies in the outer disk, whose continuum emission has a horseshoe morphology. The high stellar accretion rate would deplete the inner disk in less than one year, and to sustain the observed accretion matter must therefore flow from the outer disk and cross the gap. In dynamical models, the putative protoplanets channel outer-disk material into gap-crossing bridges that feed stellar accretion through the inner disk. Here we report observations of diffuse CO gas inside the gap, with denser HCO(+) gas along gap-crossing filaments. The estimated flow rate of the gas is in the range of 7 × 10(-9) to 2 × 10(-7) solar masses per year, which is sufficient to maintain accretion onto the star at the present rate.

  13. Behind the Pay Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey, Judy Goldberg; Hill, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Women have made remarkable gains in education during the past three decades, yet these achievements have resulted in only modest improvements in pay equity. The gender pay gap has become a fixture of the U.S. workplace and is so ubiquitous that many simply view it as normal. "Behind the Pay Gap" examines the gender pay gap for college graduates.…

  14. The Distance Learning of Foreign Languages: A Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Research into the distance learning of languages is now established as a significant avenue of enquiry in language teaching, with evident research trajectories in several domains. This article selects and analyses significant areas of investigation in distance language learning and teaching to identify new and emerging gaps, along with research…

  15. Making Distance Education Borderless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srisa-An, Wichit

    1997-01-01

    Begins with a tribute to Professor G. Ram Reddy (founder of Indira Gandhi National Open University), then focuses on enhancing the role of open universities in providing borderless distance education. Highlights include the need for open distance-education; philosophy and vision; the distance teaching system; the role of information technology;…

  16. Going the Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2012-01-01

    Whoever said "Distance education begins in the 10th row" was taking a jab at the comatose kids at the back of his classroom, but the comment also taps into the old image of distance learners as disengaged themselves. That was then. Today, distance-learning programs are booming, in part due to demographic realities but also because recent advances…

  17. Ab initio approach for gap plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenester, Ulrich; Draxl, Claudia

    2016-10-01

    Gap plasmonics deals with the properties of surface plasmons in the narrow region between two metallic nanoparticles forming the gap. For subnanometer gap distances, electrons can tunnel between the nanoparticles, leading to the emergence of novel charge-transfer plasmons. These are conveniently described within the quantum corrected model by introducing an artificial material with a tunnel conductivity inside the gap region. Here we develop a methodology for computing such tunnel conductivities within the first-principles framework of density functional theory and apply our approach to a jellium model representative for sodium. We show that the frequency dependence of the tunnel conductivity at infrared and optical frequencies can be significantly more complicated than previously thought.

  18. Transitions between corona, glow, and spark regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David Z.; Lacoste, Deanna A.; Laux, Christophe O.

    2010-05-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and interelectrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. In particular, the experimental conditions necessary for the glow regime of NRP discharges have been determined, with the notable result that there exists a minimum and maximum gap distance for its existence at a given ambient gas temperature. The minimum gap distance increases with decreasing gas temperature, whereas the maximum does not vary appreciably. To explain the experimental results, an analytical model is developed to explain the corona-to-glow (C-G) and glow-to-spark (G-S) transitions. The C-G transition is analyzed in terms of the avalanche-to-streamer transition and the breakdown field during the conduction phase following the establishment of a conducting channel across the discharge gap. The G-S transition is determined by the thermal ionization instability, and we show analytically that this transition occurs at a certain reduced electric field for the NRP discharges studied here. This model shows that the electrode geometry plays an important role in the existence of the NRP glow regime at a given gas temperature. We derive a criterion for the existence of the NRP glow regime as a function of the ambient gas temperature, pulse repetition frequency, electrode radius of curvature, and interelectrode gap distance.

  19. Confined PBX 9501 gap reinitiation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Salyer, Terry R; Hill, Larry G; Lam, Kin

    2009-01-01

    For explosive systems that exhibit gaps or cracks between their internal components (either by design or mechanical failure), measurable time delays exist for detonation waves crossing them. Reinitiation across such gaps is dependent on the type of explosive, gap width, gap morphology, confinement, and temperature effects. To examine this reinitiation effect, a series of tests has been conducted to measure the time delay across a prescribed gap within an 'infinitely' confined PBX 9501 system. Detonation breakout along the explosive surface is measured with a streak camera, and flow features are examined during reinitiation near the gap. Such tests allow for quantitative determination of the time delay corresponding to the time of initiation across a given gap oriented normal to the direction of the detonation wave. Measured time delays can be compared with numerical calculations, making it possible to validate initiation models as well as estimate detonation run-up distances. Understanding this reinitiation behavior is beneficial for the design and evaluation of explosive systems that require precision timing and performance.

  20. Method and radial gap machine for high strength undiffused brushless operation

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2006-10-31

    A radial gap brushless electric machine (30) having a stator (31) and a rotor (32) and a main air gap (34) also has at least one stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) separated from the rotor (32) by a secondary air gap (35e, 35f, 36e, 36f) so as to induce a secondary flux in the rotor (32) which controls a resultant flux in the main air gap (34). Permanent magnetic (PM) material (38) is disposed in spaces between the rotor pole portions (39) to inhibit the second flux from leaking from the pole portions (39) prior to reaching the main air gap (34). By selecting the direction of current in the stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) both flux enhancement and flux weakening are provided for the main air gap (34). A method of non-diffused flux enhancement and flux weakening for a radial gap machine is also disclosed.

  1. The Extragalactic Distance Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Donahue, Megan; Panagia, Nino

    1997-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Foreword; Early history of the distance scale problem, S. van den Bergh; Cosmology: From Hubble to HST, M. S. Turner; Age constraints nucleocosmochronology, J. Truran; The ages of globular clusters, P. Demarque; The linearity of the Hubble flow M. Postman; Gravitational lensing and the extragalactic distance scale, R. D. Blandford andT . Kundic; Using the cosmic microwave background to constrain the Hubble constant A. Lasenby and T M. Jones; Cepheids as distance indicators, N. R. Tanvir; The I-band Tully-Fisher relation and the Hubble constant, R. Giovanell; The calibration of type 1a supernovae as standard candles, A. Saha; Focusing in on the Hubble constant, G. A. Tammann & M. Federspiel; Interim report on the calibration of the Tully-Fisher relation in the HST Key Project to measure the Hubble constant, J. Mould et al.; Hubble Space Telescope Key Project on the extragalactic distance scale, W. L. Freedman, B. F. Madore and T R. C. Kennicutt; Novae as distance indicators, M. Livio; Verifying the planetary nebula luminosity function method, G. H. Jacoby; On the possible use of radio supernovae for distance determinations, K. W. Weiler et al.; Post-AGB stars as standard candles, H. Bond; Helium core flash at the tip of the red giant branch: a population II distance indicator, B. F. Madore, W. L. Freedman and T S. Sakai; Globular clusters as distance indicators, B. C. Whitmore; Detached eclipsing binaries as primary distance and age indicators, B. Paczynski; Light echoes: geometric measurement of galaxy distances, W. B. Sparks; The SBF survey of galaxy distances J. L. Tonry; Extragalactic distance scales: The long and short of it, V. Trimble.

  2. Closing the Pay Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    the pay gap has been narrowed, hut only to just under 10 percent. And current military compensation legislation does not close the gap until 2026. There...will continue to be a pay gap until 2026 unless the next administration and the next Congress provide more for pay above the 1999 legislated ramp- up...of .5 percent (one half of one percent) per year to attain pay equality . That means that soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and Coast Guardsmen

  3. Influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechereau, François; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of an atmospheric pressure air discharge in a point-to-plane geometry with a dielectric layer parallel to the cathode plane. Experimentally, a discharge reignition in the air gap below the dielectrics has been observed. With a 2D fluid model, it is shown that due to the fast rise of the high voltage applied and the sharp point used, a first positive spherical discharge forms around the point. Then this discharge propagates axially and impacts the dielectrics. As the first discharge starts spreading on the upper dielectric surface, in the second air gap with a low preionization density of {{10}4}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , the 2D fluid model predicts a rapid reignition of a positive discharge. As in experiments, the discharge reignition is much slower, a discussion on physical processes to be considered in the model to increase the reignition delay is presented. The limit case with no initial seed charges in the second air gap has been studied. First, we have calculated the time to release an electron from the cathode surface by thermionic and field emission processes for a work function φ \\in ≤ft[3,4\\right] eV and an amplification factor β \\in ≤ft[100,220\\right] . Then a 3D Monte Carlo model has been used to follow the dynamics of formation of an avalanche starting from a single electron emitted at the cathode. Due to the high electric field in the second air gap, we have shown that in a few nanoseconds, a Gaussian cloud of seed charges is formed at a small distance from the cathode plane. This Gaussian cloud has been used as the initial condition of the 2D fluid model in the second air gap. In this case, the propagation of a double headed discharge in the second air gap has been observed and the reignition delay is in rather good agreement with experiments.

  4. Gap Shape Classification using Landscape Indices and Multivariate Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chih-Da; Cheng, Chi-Chuan; Chang, Che-Chang; Lin, Chinsu; Chang, Kun-Cheng; Chuang, Yung-Chung

    2016-11-01

    This study proposed a novel methodology to classify the shape of gaps using landscape indices and multivariate statistics. Patch-level indices were used to collect the qualified shape and spatial configuration characteristics for canopy gaps in the Lienhuachih Experimental Forest in Taiwan in 1998 and 2002. Non-hierarchical cluster analysis was used to assess the optimal number of gap clusters and canonical discriminant analysis was used to generate the discriminant functions for canopy gap classification. The gaps for the two periods were optimally classified into three categories. In general, gap type 1 had a more complex shape, gap type 2 was more elongated and gap type 3 had the largest gaps that were more regular in shape. The results were evaluated using Wilks’ lambda as satisfactory (p < 0.001). The agreement rate of confusion matrices exceeded 96%. Differences in gap characteristics between the classified gap types that were determined using a one-way ANOVA showed a statistical significance in all patch indices (p = 0.00), except for the Euclidean nearest neighbor distance (ENN) in 2002. Taken together, these results demonstrated the feasibility and applicability of the proposed methodology to classify the shape of a gap.

  5. Gap Shape Classification using Landscape Indices and Multivariate Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Da; Cheng, Chi-Chuan; Chang, Che-Chang; Lin, Chinsu; Chang, Kun-Cheng; Chuang, Yung-Chung

    2016-01-01

    This study proposed a novel methodology to classify the shape of gaps using landscape indices and multivariate statistics. Patch-level indices were used to collect the qualified shape and spatial configuration characteristics for canopy gaps in the Lienhuachih Experimental Forest in Taiwan in 1998 and 2002. Non-hierarchical cluster analysis was used to assess the optimal number of gap clusters and canonical discriminant analysis was used to generate the discriminant functions for canopy gap classification. The gaps for the two periods were optimally classified into three categories. In general, gap type 1 had a more complex shape, gap type 2 was more elongated and gap type 3 had the largest gaps that were more regular in shape. The results were evaluated using Wilks’ lambda as satisfactory (p < 0.001). The agreement rate of confusion matrices exceeded 96%. Differences in gap characteristics between the classified gap types that were determined using a one-way ANOVA showed a statistical significance in all patch indices (p = 0.00), except for the Euclidean nearest neighbor distance (ENN) in 2002. Taken together, these results demonstrated the feasibility and applicability of the proposed methodology to classify the shape of a gap. PMID:27901127

  6. Experimental Test Of Whether Electrostatically Charged Micro-organisms And Their Spores Contribute To The Onset Of Arcs Across Vacuum Gaps

    SciTech Connect

    none,; Grisham, Larry R.

    2014-02-24

    Recently it was proposed [L.R. Grisham, A. vonHalle, A.F. Carpe, Guy Rossi, K.R. Gilton, E.D. McBride, E.P. Gilson, A. Stepanov, T.N. Stevenson, Physics of Plasma 19 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between condu cting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which tnen become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. The note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maxium operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance

  7. Experimental test of whether electrostatically charged micro-organisms and their spores contribute to the onset of arcs across vacuum gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L. R.; Halle, A. von; Carpe, A. F.; Gilton, K. R.; Rossi, Guy; Stevenson, T. N.

    2013-12-15

    Recently it was proposed [L. R. Grisham et al. Phys. Plasmas 19, 023107 (2012)] that one of the initiators of vacuum voltage breakdown between conducting electrodes might be micro-organisms and their spores, previously deposited during exposure to air, which then become electrostatically charged when an electric potential is applied across the vacuum gap. This note describes a simple experiment to compare the number of voltage-conditioning pulses required to reach the nominal maximum operating voltage across a gap between two metallic conductors in a vacuum, comparing cases in which biological cleaning was done just prior to pump-down with cases where this was not done, with each case preceded by exposure to ambient air for three days. Based upon these results, it does not appear that air-deposited microbes and their spores constitute a major pathway for arc initiation, at least for exposure periods of a few days, and for vacuum gaps of a few millimeters, in the regime where voltage holding is usually observed to vary linearly with gap distance.

  8. Biomechanics of Distance Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Peter R., Ed.

    Contributions from researchers in the field of running mechanics are included in the 13 chapters of this book. The following topics are covered: (1) "The Mechanics of Distance Running: A Historical Perspective" (Peter Cavanagh); (2) "Stride Length in Distance Running: Velocity, Body Dimensions, and Added Mass Effects" (Peter Cavanagh, Rodger…

  9. Technology and Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lumsden, Bruce; And Others

    The impact of the computer on education may be greater than the impact of any other technological innovation since the development of the printing press. Although distance education has relied more extensively on technological means for delivering education to its students than has traditional classroom-centered education, most distance programs…

  10. A Distance Education Exemption?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomon, Kenneth D.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the U.S. Copyright Office's May 25, 1999 Report on Copyright and Digital Distance Education. Presents the Register of Copyrights' recommendations to Congress as to how to "promote distance education through networks, while maintaining an appropriate balance between the rights of copyright owners and the needs of users of copyrighted…

  11. Distance, Education and Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamnett, Chris; Butler, Tim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role which distance, in a variety of forms, can play in the reproduction, intensification or reduction of educational inequality in different types of school systems in different countries. This is a very broad issue, and in the paper we examine the ways in which distance to school has emerged as an important factor in…

  12. Distance Education in Entwicklungslandern.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    German Foundation for International Development, Bonn (West Germany).

    Seminar and conference reports and working papers on distance education of adults, which reflect the experiences of many countries, are presented. Contents include the draft report of the 1979 International Seminar on Distance Education held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, which was jointly sponsored by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa…

  13. Distance Perception within Europe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eysberg, Cees D.

    1985-01-01

    A distance perception survey was used to get college students enrolled in a human geography course involved and interested in the topic of perception. Students were asked to arrange 12 European capitals in sequence according to their distance from Amsterdam. Survey results are presented. (RM)

  14. Miss distance geometry estimation for maneuvering bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlin, Baruch E.

    1994-02-01

    The end game of air-to-air missiles is characterized by high velocities (Mach 2 and higher), high accelerations (30 g and higher) and small miss distances (less than 20 m.) Event analysis of this phase requires knowledge of the intercept geometry: minimum-distance time, miss-distance vector, velocities, angles, range and range rate. Separate trajectory estimation for each object is usually unsuitable for this purpose owing to systematic errors. A technique is described for miss-distance geometry estimation which is based on reference trajectory data and on missile-target image offsets photodigitized from high-speed cameras (over 300 fps.) The method includes calculation of the line-of-sight to the reference trajectory and the transformation angles to the required point, estimation of the required trajectory by three-dimensional triangulation, identification of the minimum-distance point, and calculation of the miss-distance parameters. The method is robust and not sensitive to bias errors in the reference trajectory or camera positions. It requires accurate data synchronization. Suitable setups within 15-km ranges give end-game geometry of violently maneuvering bodies with 0.1-0.3 m accuracy.

  15. Senseless Extravagance, Shocking Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissbourd, Richard; Dodge, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Although most people in the United States believe, at least theoretically, in educational equality, fewer and fewer appear to care about the resource gaps between affluent and poor schools, says Weissbourd. He illustrates these gaps with vivid descriptions of what he calls an "opulence arms race" among affluent independent schools, but…

  16. Information Gap Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicekdag, Mehmet Ali

    1995-01-01

    Focuses on a real world technique used to teach language proficiency in the classroom. This method involves creating deliberate information and opinion gaps by administering pop quizzes and other communicative games and filling those gaps through cooperative action. Use of this technique generated heated discussion among students. (nine…

  17. Bridging a Cultural Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviatan, Talma

    2008-01-01

    There has been a broad wave of change in tertiary calculus courses in the past decade. However, the much-needed change in tertiary pre-calculus programmes--aimed at bridging the gap between high-school mathematics and tertiary mathematics--is happening at a far slower pace. Following a discussion on the nature of the gap and the objectives of a…

  18. Narrowing Participation Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Kirtley, Karmen; Matassa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shrinking the achievement gap in mathematics is a tall order. One way to approach this challenge is to think about how the achievement gap manifests itself in the classroom and take concrete action. For example, opportunities to participate in activities that involve mathematical reasoning and argumentation in a safe and supportive manner are…

  19. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  20. The National "Expertise Gap"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's report, "Diversity and the Ph.D.," released in May, which documents in troubling detail the exact dimensions of what the foundation's president, Dr. Robert Weisbuch, is calling the national "expertise gap." Weisbuch states that the expertise gap extends beyond the…

  1. The Parenting Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Richard V.; Howard, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    The parenting gap is a big factor in the opportunity gap. The chances of upward social mobility are lower for children with parents struggling to do a good job--in terms of creating a supportive and stimulating home environment. Children lucky enough to have strong parents are more likely to succeed at all the critical life stages, which means…

  2. Which Achievement Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sharon; Medrich, Elliott; Fowler, Donna

    2007-01-01

    From the halls of Congress to the local elementary school, conversations on education reform have tossed around the term "achievement gap" as though people all know precisely what that means. As it's commonly used, "achievement gap" refers to the differences in scores on state or national achievement tests between various…

  3. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  4. Updated Starshade Technology Gap List

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crill, Brendan P.; Siegler, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program (ExEP) guides the development of technology that enables the direct imaging and characterization of exo-Earths in the habitable zone of their stars, for future space observatories. Here we present the Starshade portion of the 2017 ExEP Enabling Technology Gap List, an annual update to ExEP's list of of technology to be advanced in the next 1-5 years. A Starshade is an external occulter on an independent spacecraft, allowing a space telescope to achieve exo-Earth imaging contrast requirements by blocking starlight before it enters the telescope. Building and operating a Starshade requires new technology: the occulter is a structure tens of meters in diameter that must be positioned precisely at a distance of tens of thousands of kilometers from the telescope. We review the current state-of-the-art performance and the performance level that must be achieved for a Starshade.

  5. Measuring the Flow Through the Kerama Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    Jae-Hun Park Graduate School of Oceanography University of Rhode Island Narragansett, RI 02882-1197 Phone: 401-874-6515 & 401-874-6610 Fax...The principal flows in and out of the East China Sea (ECS) are through channels penetrating the Ryukyu Ridge (Figure 1). Since ~20 Sv of Kuroshio...Figure 1. The Ryukyu ridgeline, from Taiwan (on the left) to Kyushu, Japan (on the right). The Kerama Gap at Distance = 600 km from

  6. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  7. Review of Distance Education Research (2000 to 2008): Analysis of Research Areas, Methods, and Authorship Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Backer, Eva Maria; Vogt, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a review of distance education literature to describe the status thereof and to identify gaps and priority areas in distance education research based on a validated classification of research areas. The articles (N = 695) published in five prominent distance education journals between 2000 and 2008 were reviewed for this study.…

  8. Automobile Stopping Distances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logue, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the effect of vehicle mass on stopping distances. Analyzes an example of a sample vehicle and tire, and calculates the braking acceleration showing the effect of different factors on the stopping performance of the tires. (GA)

  9. Technology and Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, J. N.; Bates, A. W.

    1991-01-01

    Two articles evaluate the impact of new transmission and information technologies on education: "Technology and Education--Friend or Foe?" (Pelton) and "Third Generation Distance Education: The Challenge of New Technology" (Bates). (SK)

  10. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Effects of Ventricular Gap

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Karnell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Supraglottic compression is frequently observed in individuals with dysphonia. It is commonly interpreted as an indication of excessive circumlaryngeal muscular tension and ventricular medialization. The purpose of this study was to describe the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of varying ventricular medialization in a canine model. Methods Subglottal air pressure, glottal airflow, electroglottograph, acoustic signals and high-speed video images were recorded in seven excised canine larynges mounted in vitro for laryngeal vibratory experimentation. The degree of gap between the ventricular folds was adjusted and measured using sutures and weights. Data was recorded during phonation when the ventricular gap was narrow, neutral, and large. Glottal resistance was estimated by measures of subglottal pressure and glottal flow. Results Glottal resistance increased systematically as ventricular gap became smaller. Wide ventricular gaps were associated with increases in fundamental frequency and decreases in glottal resistance. Sound pressure level did not appear to be impacted by the adjustments in ventricular gap used in this research. Conclusions Increases in supraglottic compression and associated reduced ventricular width may be observed in a variety of disorders that affect voice quality. Ventricular compression may interact with true vocal fold posture and vibration resulting in predictable changes in aerodynamic, physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual measures of phonation. The data from this report supports the theory that narrow ventricular gaps may be associated with disordered phonation. In vitro and in vivo human data are needed to further test this association. PMID:24321590

  11. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Billy E.; Groves, Scott E.; Larsen, Greg J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.

    2006-11-14

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  12. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  13. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  14. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  15. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  16. 49 CFR 372.243 - Controlling distances and population data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Controlling distances and population data. 372.243... population data. In the application of § 372.241: (a) Air-line distances or mileages about corporate limits of municipalities shall be used. (b) The population of any municipality shall be deemed to be...

  17. Designing, Developing and Implementing WWW-Based Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Peter C.

    The rapid advancement of communication technologies is resulting in a wide array of design and development choices for distance learning projects. The 58th Special Operations Wing at Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico, is developing a prototype distance learning project designed to serve geographically separated learner populations. Project staff…

  18. The Effect of Air Plasma on Sterilization of Escherichia coli in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Miao; Guo, Yun

    2012-08-01

    In this work, a Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) air plasma was used to sterilize Escherichia coli (E. coli) on the surface of medical Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) film. The leakage of cellular DNA and protein by optical absorbance measurement at 260 nm and 280 nm, together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) about cell morphology were performed after sterilization to analyse inactivation mechanisms. The results indicated that the DBD air plasma was very effective in E. coli sterilization. The plasma germicidal efficiency depended on the plasma treatment time, the air-gap distance, and the applied voltage. Within 5 min of plasma treatment, the germicidal efficiency against E. coli could reach 99.99%. An etching action on cell membranes by electrons, ions and radicals is the primary mechanism for DBD air plasma sterilization, which leads to the effusion of cellular contents (DNA and protein) and bacterial death.

  19. Long distance entanglement distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadfoot, Stuart Graham

    Developments in the interdisciplinary field of quantum information open up previously impossible abilities in the realms of information processing and communication. Quantum entanglement has emerged as one property of quantum systems that acts as a resource for quantum information processing and, in particular, enables teleportation and secure cryptography. Therefore, the creation of entangled resources is of key importance for the application of these technologies. Despite a great deal of research the efficient creation of entanglement over long distances is limited by inevitable noise. This problem can be overcome by creating entanglement between nodes in a network and then performing operations to distribute the entanglement over a long distance. This thesis contributes to the field of entanglement distribution within such quantum networks. Entanglement distribution has been extensively studied for one-dimensional networks resulting in "quantum repeater" protocols. However, little work has been done on higher dimensional networks. In these networks a fundamentally different scaling, called "long distance entanglement distribution", can appear between the resources and the distance separating the systems to be entangled. I reveal protocols that enable long distance entanglement distribution for quantum networks composed of mixed state and give a few limitations to the capabilities of entanglement distribution. To aid in the implementation of all entanglement distribution protocols I finish by introducing a new system, composed of an optical nanofibre coupled to a carbon nanotube, that may enable new forms of photo-detectors and quantum memories.

  20. Distance Education: A Cost Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Judy I.; And Others

    This report provides administrators, school boards, and policymakers with data to help them in the decision making process related to distance education systems. A literature review covers theories of distance education, distance education today, the economics of distance education, distance education and technology, transmission systems, and…

  1. Theoretical Principles of Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, Desmond, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers examining the didactic, academic, analytic, philosophical, and technological underpinnings of distance education: "Introduction"; "Quality and Access in Distance Education: Theoretical Considerations" (D. Randy Garrison); "Theory of Transactional Distance" (Michael G. Moore);…

  2. Generation of megawatt optical solitons in hollow-core photonic band-gap fibers.

    PubMed

    Ouzounov, Dimitre G; Ahmad, Faisal R; Müller, Dirk; Venkataraman, Natesan; Gallagher, Michael T; Thomas, Malcolm G; Silcox, John; Koch, Karl W; Gaeta, Alexander L

    2003-09-19

    The measured dispersion of a low-loss, hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber is anomalous throughout most of the transmission band, and its variation with wavelength is large compared with that of a conventional step-index fiber. For an air-filled fiber, femtosecond self-frequency--shifted fundamental solitons with peak powers greater than 2megawatts can be supported. For Xe-filled fibers, nonfrequency-shifted temporal solitons with peak powers greater than 5.5 megawatts can be generated, representing an increase in the power that can be propagated in an optical fiber of two orders of magnitude. The results demonstrate a unique capability to deliver high-power pulses in a single spatial mode over distances exceeding 200 meters.

  3. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  4. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  5. Encyclopedia of Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Caroline, Ed.; Boettecher, Judith, Ed.; Justice, Lorraine, Ed.; Schenk, Karen, Ed.; Rogers, Patricia, Ed.; Berg, Gary, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The innovations in computer and communications technologies combined with on-going needs to deliver educational programs to students regardless of their physical locations, have lead to the innovation of distance education programs and technologies. To keep up with recent developments in both areas of technologies and techniques related to…

  6. Focus on Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenzky, Janet; Maitland, Christine

    2001-01-01

    As a followup to a survey of distance education faculty, the National Education Association conducted two 3-hour focus groups with 12 higher education faculty members in June 2000. The purpose of the groups was to gain more understanding of the complexity of feelings and opinions expressed in a telephone survey conducted in March 2000. The…

  7. Long Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villeneuve, Phyllis, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    This report, from the Faculty Association of Community and Technical Colleges (FACTC) in Washington, focuses on various distance learning courses offered by the state's two-year colleges. The report contains 16 articles from faculty members and students, including: (1) "The Emperor's New Tutor: A Confession" (Sydney Wallace Stegall); (2)…

  8. Rapport in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Rodriguez-Manzanares, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    Rapport has been recognized as important in learning in general but little is known about its importance in distance education (DE). The study we report on in this paper provides insights into the importance of rapport in DE as well as challenges to and indicators of rapport-building in DE. The study relied on interviews with 42 Canadian…

  9. Misconceptions of Astronomical Distances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Brian W.; Brewer, William F.

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical studies using multiple-choice procedures have suggested that there are misconceptions about the scale of astronomical distances. The present study provides a quantitative estimate of the nature of this misconception among US university students by asking them, in an open-ended response format, to make estimates of the distances…

  10. Technology & Distance Learning Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Human Resources Development, Inc., Gainesville.

    A survey was conducted to assess the current state of technology and distance learning awareness and usage in Florida's adult education and community-based programs. Data were gathered through a survey of 350 adult practitioners, literacy providers, community-based organizations and libraries throughout the state (125 responses [36 percent return…

  11. Advances in Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains three symposium papers on advances in distance learning. "The Adoption of Computer Technology and Telecommunications: A Case Study" (Larry M. Dooley, Teri Metcalf, Ann Martinez) reports on a study of the possible applications of two theoretical models (Rogers' Diffusion of Innovations model and the Concerns-Based…

  12. Distance Learning Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Bruce O.

    The Office of Technology Assessment authorized a series of case studies in 1989 to investigate how technologies, services, and programs are implemented in distance education projects. The studies were also intended to look at the role of local, state, and federal agencies, and other public and private entities in providing educational services to…

  13. Learning across Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    A 2008 report, "Keeping Pace with K-12 Online Learning," commissioned by North American Council for Online Learning (NACOL) and others, defines online learning as "teacher-led education that takes place over the Internet, with the teacher and student separated geographically." The term "distance learning" includes online education, but is…

  14. Going the Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barack, Lauren

    2005-01-01

    Sixty years ago, distance education probably involved a pen, paper, and secretarial classes conducted via snail mail. Today, students in ever-increasing numbers are more likely to link to the Internet to learn how to conjugate French verbs or dissect frogs in Advanced Placement courses, according to a new landmark study from the U. S. Department…

  15. On Defining Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumble, Greville

    1989-01-01

    Reviews past definitions of distance education and offers a new five-part definition of the concept. Topics discussed include the roles of the teachers and students; physical separation of teachers and learners; the influence of an educational organization; communication between teachers and students; and the use of technical media. (22…

  16. Prospect of Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Monsurur; Karim, Reza; Byramjee, Framarz

    2015-01-01

    Many educational institutions in the United States are currently offering programs through distance learning, and that trend is rising. In almost all spheres of education a developing country like Bangladesh needs to make available the expertise of the most qualified faculty to her distant people. But the fundamental question remains as to whether…

  17. Celebrating Distance Teaching Innovations: The Certificate in Distance Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Colin; Tuovinen, Juhani

    Charles Sturt University (Riverina, Australia) has initiated the Certificate in Distance Teaching course for rural teachers working in a distance education setting to extend their understandings about rural and distance education topics. Two semester-long subjects constitute the course: pedagogy of distance teaching and organization of distance…

  18. Distance Training as Part of a Distance Consulting Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulantelli, Giovanni; Chiazzese, Giuseppe; Allegra, Mario

    "Distance Training" models, when integrated in a more complex framework, such as a "Distance Consulting" model, present specific features and impose a revision of the strategies commonly adopted in distance training experiences. This paper reports on the distance training strategies adopted in a European funded project aimed at…

  19. Effect of Geographic Distance on Distance Education: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Heng; Robinson, Anthony C.; Detwiler, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of geographic distance on students' distance learning experience with the aim to provide tentative answers to a fundamental question--does geographic distance matter in distance education? Using educational outcome data collected from an online master's program in Geographic Information Systems, this study…

  20. A Gap in TW Hydrae's Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Located a mere 176 light-years away, TW Hydrae is an 8-million-year-old star surrounded by a nearly face-on disk of gas and dust. Recent observations have confirmed the existence of a gap within that disk a particularly intriguing find, since gaps can sometimes signal the presence of a planet.Gaps and PlanetsNumerical simulations have shown that newly-formed planets orbiting within dusty disks can clear the gas and dust out of their paths. This process results in pressure gradients that can be seen in the density structure of the disk, in the form of visible gaps, rings, or spirals.For this reason, finding a gap in a protoplanetary disk can be an exciting discovery. Previous observations of the disk around TW Hydrae had indicated that there might be a gap present, but they were limited in their resolution; despite TW Hydraes relative nearness, attempting to observe the dim light scattered off dust particles in a disk surrounding a distant, bright star is difficult!But a team led by Valerie Rapson (Rochester Institute of Technology, Dudley Observatory) recently set out to follow up on this discovery using a powerful tool: the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI).New ObservationsComparison of the actual image of TW Hydraes disk from GPI (right) to a simulated scattered-light image from a model of a ~0.2 Jupiter-mass planet orbiting in the disk at ~21 AU (left) in two different bands (top: J, bottom: K1).[Adapted from Rapson et al. 2015]GPI is an instrument on the Gemini South Telescope in Chile. Its near-infrared imagers, equipped with extreme adaptive optics, allowed it to probe the disk from ~80 AU all the way in to ~10 AU from the central star, with an unprecedented resolution of ~1.5 AU.These observations from GPI allowed Rapson and collaborators to unambiguously confirm the presence of a gap in TW Hydraes disk. The gap lies at a distance of ~23 AU from the central star (roughly the same distance as Uranus to the Sun), and its ~5 AU wide.Modeled PossibilitiesThere are a

  1. Rho GAPs and GEFs

    PubMed Central

    van Buul, Jaap D; Geerts, Dirk; Huveneers, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Within blood vessels, endothelial cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions are crucial to preserve barrier function, and these adhesions are tightly controlled during vascular development, angiogenesis, and transendothelial migration of inflammatory cells. Endothelial cellular signaling that occurs via the family of Rho GTPases coordinates these cell adhesion structures through cytoskeletal remodelling. In turn, Rho GTPases are regulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). To understand how endothelial cells initiate changes in the activity of Rho GTPases, and thereby regulate cell adhesion, we will discuss the role of Rho GAPs and GEFs in vascular biology. Many potentially important Rho regulators have not been studied in detail in endothelial cells. We therefore will first overview which GAPs and GEFs are highly expressed in endothelium, based on comparative gene expression analysis of human endothelial cells compared with other tissue cell types. Subsequently, we discuss the relevance of Rho GAPs and GEFs for endothelial cell adhesion in vascular homeostasis and disease. PMID:24622613

  2. Closing the Performance Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Cheryl G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the principal of a K-2, 400-student suburban elementary school near Flint, Michigan, worked with her staff and superintendent to develop and implement a strategic plan to close the student achievement gap. Reports significant improvement in reading and math scores after 1 year. (PKP)

  3. STEMMING the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Jim; Valentine, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    America has a gap when it comes to youth pursuing science and technology careers. In an effort to improve the knowledge and application of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), after-school programs can work in conjunction with formal in-school curriculum to improve science education. One organization that actively addresses this…

  4. Confronting the Autonomy Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamowski, Steven; Petrilli, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    "The Autonomy Gap," a recent study by the American Institute for Research and the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, found that many public elementary school principals feel constrained by a bureaucracy that impedes their ability to raise student achievement. Unfortunately, those principals are still held accountable for their school's results--even…

  5. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  6. Structuring the Information Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Julian

    1984-01-01

    Describes an information gap procedure to teach a new structure which requires students to look for and exchange information in order to complete a task in an English as a second language class. Illustrates the method with a set of materials and suggests ways for teachers to produce similar materials. (SED)

  7. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  8. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  9. California: Emigrant Gap

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of the Central Valley and the Sierra Nevada Mountains show several smoke plumes from wildfires ... from the Emigrant Gap Fire, located about 40 kilometers west of Lake Tahoe. The animated panorama uses different MISR cameras to enable ...

  10. Bridging a Communication Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Ethel

    1972-01-01

    Description of a community program in cooperation with a regional extension service. The goals were to explore the generation gap, and conflict in life values, understand family role, increase self awareness, improve adult-youth communication, and understand the individual and his relationship to basic social principles. (Author/JB)

  11. Bridging the Development Gap.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    Bridging the Development Gap is contractual cooperative agreement between Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. and DARPA. This program was developed...processing, interfacing with I/O devices, memory constraints, as well as real-time throughput and latency challenges. Mercury has bridged the indicated

  12. Quality Assurance in Distance Education: The Challenges to Be Addressed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stella, Antony; Gnanam, A.

    2004-01-01

    Integration of technology in all forms of education has narrowed down the gap between the on- and off-campus students and has resulted in the use of the more broad-based term "distributed learning". Consequently, distance learning is seen as a subset of distributed learning, focusing on students who may be separated in time and space from their…

  13. The Role of Dialogue in Distance Education: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Lynette K.

    2010-01-01

    Distance education has come a long way from its first offerings of pen and paper when submissions had to be mailed and no interaction occurred between students and instructors. One concern that has remained is that of keeping students connected to peers and instructors. Moore (1973) stated this psychological and communication gap (transactional…

  14. An ERP Study of Causative Cleft Construction in Japanese: Evidence for the Preference of Shorter Linear Distance in Sentence Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yano, Masataka; Sakamoto, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the processing of two types of Japanese causative cleft constructions (subject-gap vs. object-gap) by conducting an event-related brain potential experiment to clarify the processing mechanism of long-distance dependencies. The results demonstrated that the subject-gap constructions elicited larger P600 effects than the…

  15. Distance between images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gualtieri, J. A.; Le Moigne, J.; Packer, C. V.

    1992-01-01

    Comparing two binary images and assigning a quantitative measure to this comparison finds its purpose in such tasks as image recognition, image compression, and image browsing. This quantitative measurement may be computed by utilizing the Hausdorff distance of the images represented as two-dimensional point sets. In this paper, we review two algorithms that have been proposed to compute this distance, and we present a parallel implementation of one of them on the MasPar parallel processor. We study their complexity and the results obtained by these algorithms for two different types of images: a set of displaced pairs of images of Gaussian densities, and a comparison of a Canny edge image with several edge images from a hierarchical region growing code.

  16. Novae as distance indicators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Holland C.; Ciardullo, Robin

    1988-01-01

    Nova shells are characteristically prolate with equatorial bands and polar caps. Failure to account for the geometry can lead to large errors in expansion parallaxes for individual novae. When simple prescriptions are used for deriving expansion parallaxes from an ensemble of randomly oriented prolate spheroids, the average distance will be too small by factors of 10 to 15 percent. The absolute magnitudes of the novae will be underestimated and the resulting distance scale will be too small by the same factors. If observations of partially resolved nova shells select for large inclinations, the systematic error in the resulting distance scale could easily be 20 to 30 percent. Extinction by dust in the bulge of M31 may broaden and shift the intrinsic distribution of maximum nova magnitudes versus decay rates. We investigated this possibility by projecting Arp's and Rosino's novae onto a composite B - 6200A color map of M31's bulge. Thirty two of the 86 novae projected onto a smooth background with no underlying structure due to the presence of a dust cloud along the line of sight. The distribution of maximum magnitudes versus fade rates for these unreddened novae is indistinguishable from the distribution for the entire set of novae. It is concluded that novae suffer very little extinction from the filamentary and patchy distribution of dust seen in the bulge of M31. Time average B and H alpha nova luminosity functions are potentially powerful new ways to use novae as standard candles. Modern CCD observations and the photographic light curves of M31 novae found during the last 60 years were analyzed to show that these functions are power laws. Consequently, unless the eruption times for novae are known, the data cannot be used to obtain distances.

  17. Featured Image: A Gap in TW Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-04-01

    This remarkable image (click for the full view!) is a high-resolution map of the 870 m light emitted by the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young solar analog TW Hydrae. A recent study led by Sean Andrews (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) presents these observations, obtained with the long-baseline configuration of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) at an unprecedented spatial resolution of ~1 AU. The data represent the distribution of millimeter-sized dust grains in this disk, revealing a beautiful concentric ring structure out to a radial distance of 60 AU from the host star. The apparent gaps in the disk could have anyof three origins:Chemical: apparent gaps can becaused by condensation fronts of volatilesMagnetic: apparent gaps can becaused by radial magnetic pressure variationsDynamic: actual gaps can becaused by the clearing of dust by young planets.For more information, check out the paper below!CitationSean M. Andrews et al 2016 ApJ 820 L40. doi:10.3847/2041-8205/820/2/L40

  18. Spark gap device for precise switching

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1984-10-02

    A spark gap device for precise switching of an energy storage capacitor into an exploding bridge wire load is disclosed. Niobium electrodes having a melting point of 2,415 degrees centigrade are spaced apart by an insulating cylinder to define a spark gap. The electrodes are supported by conductive end caps which, together with the insulating cylinder, form a hermetically sealed chamber filled with an inert, ionizable gas, such as pure xenon. A quantity of solid radioactive carbon-14 within the chamber adjacent the spark gap serves as a radiation stabilizer. The sides of the electrodes and the inner wall of the insulating cylinder are spaced apart a sufficient distance to prevent unwanted breakdown initiation. A conductive sleeve may envelop the outside of the insulating member from the midpoint of the spark gap to the cap adjacent the cathode. The outer metallic surfaces of the device may be coated with a hydrogen-impermeable coating to lengthen the shelf life and operating life of the device. The device breaks down at about 1,700 volts for input voltage rates up to 570 volts/millisecond and allows peak discharge currents of up to 3,000 amperes from a 0.3 microfarad energy storage capacitor for more than 1,000 operations. 3 figs.

  19. Spark gap device for precise switching

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.

    1984-01-01

    A spark gap device for precise switching of an energy storage capacitor into an exploding bridge wire load is disclosed. Niobium electrodes having a melting point of 2,415 degrees centrigrade are spaced apart by an insulating cylinder to define a spark gap. The electrodes are supported by conductive end caps which, together with the insulating cylinder, form a hermetically sealed chamber filled with an inert, ionizable gas, such as pure xenon. A quantity of solid radioactive carbon-14 within the chamber adjacent the spark gap serves as a radiation stabilizer. The sides of the electrodes and the inner wall of the insulating cylinder are spaced apart a sufficient distance to prevent unwanted breakdown initiation. A conductive sleeve may envelop the outside of the insulating member from the midpoint of the spark gap to the cap adjacent the cathode. The outer metallic surfaces of the device may be coated with a hydrogen-impermeable coating to lengthen the shelf life and operating life of the device. The device breaks down at about 1,700 volts for input voltage rates up to 570 volts/millisecond and allows peak discharge currents of up to 3,000 amperes from a 0.3 microfarad energy storage capacitor for more than 1,000 operations.

  20. Evaluating linguistic distance measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wichmann, Søren; Holman, Eric W.; Bakker, Dik; Brown, Cecil H.

    2010-09-01

    In Ref. [13], Petroni and Serva discuss the use of Levenshtein distances (LD) between words referring to the same concepts as a tool for establishing overall distances among languages which can then subsequently be used to derive phylogenies. The authors modify the raw LD by dividing the LD by the length of the longer of the two words compared, to produce what could be called LDN (normalized LD). Other scholars [7,8] have used a further modification, where they divide the LDN by the average LDN among words not referring to the same concept. This produces what could be called LDND. The authors of Ref. [13] question whether LDND is a more adequate measure of distance than LDN. Here we show empirically that LDND is the better measure in the situation where the languages compared have not already been shown, by other, more traditional methods of comparative linguistics, to be related. If automated language classification is to be used as a tool independent of traditional methods then the further modification is necessary.

  1. Nutrition for distance events.

    PubMed

    Burke, Louise M; Millet, Gregoire; Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2007-01-01

    The goal of training is to prepare the distance athlete to perform at his or her best during major competitions. Whatever the event, nutrition plays a major role in the achievement of various factors that will see a runner or walker take the starting line in the best possible form. Everyday eating patterns must supply fuel and nutrients needed to optimize their performance during training sessions and to recover quickly afterwards. Carbohydrate and fluid intake before, during, and after a workout may help to reduce fatigue and enhance performance. Recovery eating should also consider issues for adaptation and the immune system that may involve intakes of protein and some micronutrients. Race preparation strategies should include preparation of adequate fuel stores, including carbohydrate loading for prolonged events such as the marathon or 50-km walk. Fluid and carbohydrate intake during races lasting an hour or more should also be considered. Sports foods and supplements of value to distance athletes include sports drinks and liquid meal supplements to allow nutrition goals to be achieved when normal foods are not practical. While caffeine is an ergogenic aid of possible value to distance athletes, most other supplements are of minimal benefit.

  2. Health risk assessment of migrant workers' exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls in air and dust in an e-waste recycling area in China: Indication for a new wealth gap in environmental rights.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yalin; Hu, Jinxing; Lin, Wei; Wang, Ning; Li, Cheng; Luo, Peng; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Wang, Wenbo; Su, Xiaomei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Yindong; Huang, Ronglang; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Migrant workers who work and live in polluted environment are a special vulnerable group in the accelerating pace of urbanization and industrialization in China. In the electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area, for example, migrant workers' exposure to pollutants, such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), is the result of an informal e-waste recycling process. A village in an electronic waste recycling area where migrant workers gather was surveyed. The migrant workers' daily routines were simulated according to the three-space transition: work place-on the road-home. Indoor air and dust in the migrant workers' houses and workplaces and the ambient air on the roads were sampled. The PCB levels of the air and dust in the places corresponding to the migrant workers are higher than those for local residents. The migrant workers have health risks from PCBs that are 3.8 times greater than those of local residents. This is not only caused by the exposure at work but also by their activity patterns and the environmental conditions of their dwellings. These results revealed the reason for the health risk difference between the migrant workers and local residents, and it also indicated that lifestyle and economic status are important factors that are often ignored compared to occupational exposure.

  3. Heat and moisture transfer in gaps between sweating imitation skin and nonwoven cloth: effect of gap space and alignment of skin and clothing on the moisture transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozumi, Yoshio; Akaki, Kenichi; Tanabe, Naomasa

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates heat and moisture transfer between a sweating film and a nonwoven sheet both experimentally and numerically. A mathematical model based on heat conduction and moisture diffusion in both the air gap and cloth is presented. The evaporation rate and surface temperature of the sweating film are well predicted under various conditions such as air gap height, heating conditions, and sweating film orientation by evaluating the effective thermal conductivity and diffusion coefficient from the empirical equations of the Nusselt number for a fluid layer, even though the air gap height is sufficiently large to cause natural convections.

  4. Two-dimensional numerical study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in air at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wen; Sang, Chaofeng; Wang, Dezhen; Liu, Fucheng

    2014-06-15

    In this paper, a computational study of two counter-propagating helium plasma jets in ambient air is presented. A two-dimensional fluid model is applied to investigate the physical processes of the two plasma jets interaction (PJI) driven by equal and unequal voltages, respectively. In all studied cases, the PJI results in a decrease of both plasma bullets propagation velocity. When the two plasma jets are driven by equal voltages, they never merge but rather approach each other around the middle of the gas gap at a minimum approach distance, and the minimal distance decreases with the increase of both the applied voltages and initial electron density, but increases with the increase of the relative permittivity. When the two plasma jets are driven by unequal voltages, we observe the two plasma jets will merge at the position away from the middle of the gas gap. The effect of applied voltage difference on the PJI is also studied.

  5. Minding the Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Millicent Anne

    2015-02-23

    Neutron & X-ray scattering provides nano- to meso-scale details of complex fluid structure; 1D electronic density maps dervied from SAXS yield molecular level insights; Neutron reflectivity provides substructure details of substrate supported complex fluids; Complex fluids composition can be optimized to support a wide variety of both soluble and membrane proteins; The water gap dimensions can be finely tuned through polymer component.

  6. Variable Gap Conjugated Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    conducting gold interfacial layer interjected between the ITO glass electrode and the PEDOT/PSS hole transport layer . A family of low band gap, and near IR...which can be used as both electrochromics and as the hole transport layers in light emitting diodes. Hybrid electrochromic and electroluminescent (EC...MEH-PPV, P3HT, etc.) in order to blanket the solar spectrum. Initial device results on these multi-component blends are promising. In addition, we

  7. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  8. Distance to Dark Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Using the unique orbit of NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and a depth-perceiving trick called parallax, astronomers have determined the distance to an invisible Milky Way object called OGLE-2005-SMC-001. This artist's concept illustrates how this trick works: different views from both Spitzer and telescopes on Earth are combined to give depth perception.

    Our Milky Way galaxy is heavier than it looks, and scientists use the term 'dark matter' to describe all the 'heavy stuff' in the universe that seems to be present but invisible to our telescopes. While much of this dark matter is likely made up of exotic materials, different from the ordinary particles that make up the world around us, some may consist of dark celestial bodies -- like planets, black holes, or failed stars -- that do not produce light or are too faint to detect from Earth. OGLE-2005-SMC-001 is one of these dark celestial bodies.

    Although astronomers cannot see a dark body, they can sense its presence from the way light acts around it. When a dark body like OGLE-2005-SMC-001 passes in front of a bright star, its gravity causes the background starlight to bend and brighten, a process called gravitational microlensing. When the observing telescope, dark body, and star system are closely aligned, the microlensing event reaches maximum, or peak, brightness.

    A team of astronomers first sensed OGLE-2005-SMC-001's presence when it passed in front of a star in a neighboring satellite galaxy called the Small Magellanic Cloud. In this artist's rendering, the satellite galaxy is depicted as the fuzzy structure sitting to the left of Earth. Once they detected this microlensing event, the scientists used Spitzer and the principle of parallax to figure out its distance. Humans naturally use parallax to determine distance. Each eye sees the distance of an object differently. The brain takes each eye's perspective and instantaneously calculates how far away the object is.

    To determine OGLE

  9. Advanced hierarchical distance sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, Andy

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, we cover a number of important extensions of the basic hierarchical distance-sampling (HDS) framework from Chapter 8. First, we discuss the inclusion of “individual covariates,” such as group size, in the HDS model. This is important in many surveys where animals form natural groups that are the primary observation unit, with the size of the group expected to have some influence on detectability. We also discuss HDS integrated with time-removal and double-observer or capture-recapture sampling. These “combined protocols” can be formulated as HDS models with individual covariates, and thus they have a commonality with HDS models involving group structure (group size being just another individual covariate). We cover several varieties of open-population HDS models that accommodate population dynamics. On one end of the spectrum, we cover models that allow replicate distance sampling surveys within a year, which estimate abundance relative to availability and temporary emigration through time. We consider a robust design version of that model. We then consider models with explicit dynamics based on the Dail and Madsen (2011) model and the work of Sollmann et al. (2015). The final major theme of this chapter is relatively newly developed spatial distance sampling models that accommodate explicit models describing the spatial distribution of individuals known as Point Process models. We provide novel formulations of spatial DS and HDS models in this chapter, including implementations of those models in the unmarked package using a hack of the pcount function for N-mixture models.

  10. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons. PMID:27982030

  11. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-12-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons.

  12. Making the Invisible Visible: Personas and Mental Models of Distance Education Library Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Cynthia; Contrino, Jacline

    2016-01-01

    Gaps between users' and designers' mental models of digital libraries often result in adverse user experiences. This article details an exploratory user research study at a large, predominantly online university serving non-traditional distance education students with the goal of understanding these gaps. Using qualitative data, librarians created…

  13. Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Thomas L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is a method of ambient noise imaging using the solar oscillations. The basic realization that led to time-distance helioseismology was that the temporal cross correlation of the signals at two 'surface' (or photospheric) locations should show a feature at the time lag corresponding to the subsurface travel time between the locations. The temporal cross correlation, as a function of the location separation, is the Fourier transform of the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the solar oscillations, a commonly used function in helioseismology. It is therefore likely the characteristic ridge structure of the correlation function had been seen before without appreciation of its significance. Travel times are measured from the cross correlations. The times are sensitive to a number of important subsurface solar phenomena. These include sound speed variations, flows, and magnetic fields. There has been much interesting progress in the 17 years since the first paper on this subject (Duvall et al., Nature, 1993, 362, 430-432). This progress will be reviewed in this paper.

  14. Distance collaborations with industry

    SciTech Connect

    Peskin, A.; Swyler, K.

    1998-06-01

    The college industry relationship has been identified as a key policy issue in Engineering Education. Collaborations between academic institutions and the industrial sector have a long history and a bright future. For Engineering and Engineering Technology programs in particular, industry has played a crucial role in many areas including advisement, financial support, and practical training of both faculty and students. Among the most important and intimate interactions are collaborative projects and formal cooperative education arrangements. Most recently, such collaborations have taken on a new dimension, as advances in technology have made possible meaningful technical collaboration at a distance. There are several obvious technology areas that have contributed significantly to this trend. Foremost is the ubiquitous presence of the Internet. Perhaps almost as important are advances in computer based imaging. Because visual images offer a compelling user experience, it affords greater knowledge transfer efficiency than other modes of delivery. Furthermore, the quality of the image appears to have a strongly correlated effect on insight. A good visualization facility offers both a means for communication and a shared information space for the subjects, which are among the essential features of both peer collaboration and distance learning.

  15. New Ways of Learning: Comparing the Effectiveness of Interactive Online Media in Distance Education with the European Textbook Tradition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krämer, Bernd J.; Neugebauer, Jonas; Magenheim, Johannes; Huppertz, Helga

    2015-01-01

    Although many innovations exploiting web technologies have been suggested in distance higher education, very little original research exists investigating the impact of web-based learning environments on distance students' learning processes and outcomes. To close this gap, four sets of data have been collected in a distance-learning course:…

  16. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP LAND COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gap Analysis Program is a national inter-agency program that maps the distribution

    of plant communities and selected animal species and compares these distributions with land

    stewardship to identify gaps in biodiversity protection. GAP uses remote satellite imag...

  17. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  18. Plasma treatment of aqueous solutes: Some chemical properties of a gliding arc in humid air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benstaali, B.; Moussa, D.; Addou, A.; Brisset, J.-L.

    1998-11-01

    The chemical properties of the gaseous species generated in a humid air gliding arc discharge are investigated. Aqueous solutions are used as the targets exposed to the plasma, and this allows to evidence strong acid and oxidizing effects on various solutes by means of spectrometric or potentiometric methods. The influence of some working parameters such as the input gas flow, the distance from the electrodes to the target or the electrode gap is examined on the chemical transform and simple experimental laws are derived. A general feature is observed for oxidation and suggests the occurrence of an auto-catalytic step in the relevant kinetic mechanism.

  19. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  20. The global drug gap.

    PubMed

    Reich, M R

    2000-03-17

    Global inequities in access to pharmaceutical products exist between rich and poor countries because of market and government failures as well as huge income differences. Multiple policies are required to address this global drug gap for three categories of pharmaceutical products: essential drugs, new drugs, and yet-to-be-developed drugs. Policies should combine "push" approaches of subsidies to support targeted drug development, "pull" approaches of financial incentives such as market guarantees, and "process" approaches aimed at improved institutional capacity. Constructive solutions are needed that can both protect the incentives for research and development and reduce the inequities of access.

  1. Mind the gap.

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, M. S.; Krassnigg, A.; Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.; Physics; Univ. Graz; Univ. of Pittsburgh

    2007-03-01

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  2. Online Penalty: The Impact of Online Instruction on the Latino-White Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaupp, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Despite a substantial body of research on the effectiveness of distance education at the post-secondary level, little is known about the impact of online course delivery on the achievement gap. In California, the gap between white and Latino post-secondary student outcomes is significant and persistent, with Latino students overrepresented in…

  3. Algebraic distance on graphs.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Safro, I.

    2011-01-01

    Measuring the connection strength between a pair of vertices in a graph is one of the most important concerns in many graph applications. Simple measures such as edge weights may not be sufficient for capturing the effects associated with short paths of lengths greater than one. In this paper, we consider an iterative process that smooths an associated value for nearby vertices, and we present a measure of the local connection strength (called the algebraic distance; see [D. Ron, I. Safro, and A. Brandt, Multiscale Model. Simul., 9 (2011), pp. 407-423]) based on this process. The proposed measure is attractive in that the process is simple, linear, and easily parallelized. An analysis of the convergence property of the process reveals that the local neighborhoods play an important role in determining the connectivity between vertices. We demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the proposed measure through several combinatorial optimization problems on graphs and hypergraphs.

  4. Reconsidering Moore's Transactional Distance Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giossos, Yiannis; Koutsouba, Maria; Lionarakis, Antonis; Skavantzos, Kosmas

    2009-01-01

    One of the core theories of distance education is Michael Graham Moore's "Theory of Transactional Distance" that provides the broad framework of the pedagogy of distance education and allows the generation of almost infinite number of hypotheses for research. However, the review of the existing studies relating to the theory showed the use of a…

  5. Interactive Distance Learning in Connecticut.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietras, Jesse John; Murphy, Robert J.

    This paper provides an overview of distance learning activities in Connecticut and addresses the feasibility of such activities. Distance education programs have evolved from the one dimensional electronic mail systems to the use of sophisticated digital fiber networks. The Middlesex Distance Learning Consortium has developed a long-range plan to…

  6. Continuing Education for Distance Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassner, Mary; Adams, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    Distance librarians as engaged professionals work in a complex environment of changes in technologies, user expectations, and institutional goals. They strive to keep current with skills and competencies to support distance learners. This article provides a selection of continuing education opportunities for distance librarians, and is relevant…

  7. DISTANCES TO DARK CLOUDS: COMPARING EXTINCTION DISTANCES TO MASER PARALLAX DISTANCES

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Jackson, James M.; Stead, Joseph J.; Hoare, Melvin G.; Benjamin, Robert A. E-mail: jackson@bu.edu E-mail: mgh@ast.leeds.ac.uk

    2012-06-01

    We test two different methods of using near-infrared extinction to estimate distances to dark clouds in the first quadrant of the Galaxy using large near-infrared (Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey) surveys. Very long baseline interferometry parallax measurements of masers around massive young stars provide the most direct and bias-free measurement of the distance to these dark clouds. We compare the extinction distance estimates to these maser parallax distances. We also compare these distances to kinematic distances, including recent re-calibrations of the Galactic rotation curve. The extinction distance methods agree with the maser parallax distances (within the errors) between 66% and 100% of the time (depending on method and input survey) and between 85% and 100% of the time outside of the crowded Galactic center. Although the sample size is small, extinction distance methods reproduce maser parallax distances better than kinematic distances; furthermore, extinction distance methods do not suffer from the kinematic distance ambiguity. This validation gives us confidence that these extinction methods may be extended to additional dark clouds where maser parallaxes are not available.

  8. Turbine blade tip gap reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2012-09-11

    A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  9. Supportive learning in distance education.

    PubMed

    Lawton, S

    1997-05-01

    This paper argues that tutorial support should enhance the learning experience of students who enrol on a distance education programme. A rationale for such support is given as well as a definition of support for distance learners. The complex role of the tutor in distance learning is described which suggests the need for tutor preparation, particularly for tutors adapting to this mode of course delivery. The paper reports on two existing models used within distance education which have focused on the outcome of study. The paper introduces an alternative model of supportive learning which focuses on the development of the educational experience throughout the length of a distance-learning course.

  10. Elevations and Distances

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Photographs and other images of the Earth taken from the air and from space show a great deal about the planet's landforms, vegetation, and resources. Aerial and satellite images, known as remotely sensed images, permit accurate mapping of land cover and make landscape features understandable on regional, continental, and even global scales. Transient phenomena, such as seasonal vegetation vigor and contaminant discharges, can be studied by comparing images acquired at different times. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which began using aerial photographs for mapping in the 1930's, archives photographs from its mapping projects and from those of some other Federal agencies. In addition, many images from such space programs as Landsat, begun in 1972, are held by the USGS. Most satellite scenes can be obtained only in digital form for use in computer-based image processing and geographic information systems, but in some cases are also available as photographic products.

  11. Improvement of luminous efficacy in plasma display panels by a counter-type electrode configuration with a large gap

    SciTech Connect

    Hur, Min; Kim, Jae Rok; Yi, Jeong Doo; Cho, Yoon Hyoung; Song, Su Bin; Park, Jun Yong; Lee, Han Yong

    2006-06-01

    The discharge characteristics of plasma display panel with coplanar and counter-type electrode configurations are compared using the numerical modeling and experiment with respect to real and macrocells, respectively. Numerical analysis shows that the ultraviolet (UV) efficiency and driving voltage of counter type at a gap distance of 230 {mu}m are located at similar levels to those of coplanar type at a gap distance of 60 {mu}m. The UV efficiency for counter type is enhanced with the rise of xenon fraction and gap distance, between which the large gap operation is more advantageous to high UV efficiency. The measured temporal evolution of infrared emission reveals that the cathode layer plays an important role in forming the discharge current after the gas breakdown. It is found from the time-averaged visible and infrared emissions for the counter type that as the gap distance becomes larger, the positive column region increases but the sheath regime remains almost unchanged. On the other hand, the variation of gap distance gives a little influence on the average discharge current at the same applied voltage. The UV efficiency is thus greatly improved with the gap distance. When the gap becomes double, the UV efficiency is improved by 75%, which is well agreed with the results predicted in the numerical modeling.

  12. Specialized common carriers: Long distance alternatives for military installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingler, S. L.

    1984-03-01

    Specialized Common Carriers, communications carriers which came into existence offering private line microwave service, are now significant competitors in the long distance telecommunications industry. This thesis provides military installation telecommunications managers with a basic knowledge of how Specialized Common Carriers entered the telecommunications market, what services Specialized Common Carriers offer, and how to obtain these services for a military installation. It includes a case study evaluation of the potential use of long distance services of two of these competing common carriers at Naval Air Station Moffett Field, California. A computer program used to calculate the costs of using these two alternative long distance carriers is included as part of the case study.

  13. Gap Opening in 3D: Single-planet Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Giant planets can clear deep gaps when embedded in 2D (razor-thin) viscous circumstellar disks. We show by direct simulation that giant planets are just as capable of carving out gaps in 3D. Surface density maps are similar between 2D and 3D, even in detail. In particular, the scaling {{{Σ }}}{gap}\\propto {q}-2 of gap surface density with planet mass, derived from a global “zero-dimensional” balance of Lindblad and viscous torques, applies equally well to results obtained at higher dimensions. Our 3D simulations reveal extensive, near-sonic, meridional flows both inside and outside the gaps; these large-scale circulations might bear on disk compositional gradients, in dust or other chemical species. At high planet mass, gap edges are mildly Rayleigh unstable and intermittently shed streams of material into the gap—less so in 3D than in 2D.

  14. The Gap-Tpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Catalanotti, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Di Meo, P.; Longo, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Fiorillo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency.

  15. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  16. Band Gap Tuning of Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons by Using Antidotes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoghi, Milad; Goharrizi, Arash Yazdanpanah; Saremi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    The electronic properties of armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNRs) can be changed by creating antidotes within the pristine ribbons and producing antidote super lattice AGNRs (ASL-AGNRs). In the present work, band gap tuning of ASL-AGNRs is investigated by varying the width of ribbons ( d W) and the distance between antidotes ( d L) for five different antidote topologies. Numerical tight-binding model is applied to obtain the band structure of the ribbons. Based on our results, it is found that the band gap of ASL-AGNRs can be increased or decreased in different cases. Furthermore, changing the width of ribbons generally results in more predictable␣band gap profiles compared to the variation of distance between antidotes. Consequently, by opting appropriate antidote topologies and dimensional parameters ( d W and d L), it is possible to gain a desired band gap size. This can be considered as an alternative solution in design of electronic and optoelectronic devices where tunable band gap values are needed.

  17. New distances to RAVE stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binney, J.; Burnett, B.; Kordopatis, G.; McMillan, P. J.; Sharma, S.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Steinmetz, M.; Gilmore, G.; Williams, M. E. K.; Navarro, J.; Grebel, E. K.; Helmi, A.; Parker, Q.; Reid, W. A.; Seabroke, G.; Watson, F.; Wyse, R. F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Probability density functions (pdfs) are determined from new stellar parameters for the distance moduli of stars for which the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) has obtained spectra with S/N ≥ 10. Single-Gaussian fits to the pdf in distance modulus suffice for roughly half the stars, with most of the other half having satisfactory two-Gaussian representations. As expected, early-type stars rarely require more than one Gaussian. The expectation value of distance is larger than the distance implied by the expectation of distance modulus; the latter is itself larger than the distance implied by the expectation value of the parallax. Our parallaxes of Hipparcos stars agree well with the values measured by Hipparcos, so the expectation of parallax is the most reliable distance indicator. The latter are improved by taking extinction into account. The effective temperature-absolute magnitude diagram of our stars is significantly improved when these pdfs are used to make the diagram. We use the method of kinematic corrections devised by Schönrich, Binney and Asplund to check for systematic errors for general stars and confirm that the most reliable distance indicator is the expectation of parallax. For cool dwarfs and low-gravity giants, <ϖ> tends to be larger than the true distance by up to 30 per cent. The most satisfactory distances are for dwarfs hotter than 5500 K. We compare our distances to stars in 13 open clusters with cluster distances from the literature and find excellent agreement for the dwarfs and indications that we are overestimating distances to giants, especially in young clusters.

  18. Distance education: the humanization of technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Rodrigues Ferreira, Orlando

    2015-08-01

    The Distance Education [DE] presents significant growth in graduates and postgraduates programs. Regarding this fact, new challenges arise and others must be considered, as the generation gap between digital immigrants and digital natives, the establishment of a population increasingly accustomed to Information and Communication Technologies [ICT] and teaching methodologies that should be used and developed. Vygotsky’s model of social interaction related to mediation can and should be used in DE, and concerning historical, social and cultural approaches affecting Brazilian reality, Paulo Freire is still up-to-date, integrating humanization into the use of ICT. This work only proceeds with analyses of these elements, being an excerpt of the master’s dissertation of one of the authors [Ferreira], under the guidance of another [Voelzke].

  19. Terminology gap in hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    Water is central to life on Earth. People have been trying to understand how water moves in the hydrosphere throughout the human history. In the 9th century BC, the famous Greek poet Homer described the hydrological cycle in Iliad as "okeanos whose stream bends back in a circle" with a belief that rivers are ocean-fed from subterranean seas. Later, Aristotle (4th century BC) claimed that most of the water came from underground caverns in which air was transformed into water. It was only until 1674, French scientist Perrault developed the correct concept of the water cycle. In modern times, scientists are interested in understanding the individual processes of the hydrological cycle with a keen focus on runoff which supplies water to rivers, lakes, and oceans. Currently, the prevailing concepts on runoff processes include 'infiltration excess runoff' and 'saturation excess runoff'. However, there is no term to describe another major runoff due to the excess beyond the soil water holding capacity (i.e., the field capacity). We argue that a new term should be introduced to fill this gap, and it could be called 'holding excess runoff' which is compatible with the convention. This new term is significant in correcting a half-century misnomer where 'holding excess runoff' has been incorrectly named as 'saturation excess runoff', which was introduced by the Xinanjiang model in China in 1960s. Similar concept has been adopted in many well-known hydrological models such as PDM and HBV in which the saturation refers to the field capacity. The term 'holding excess runoff' resolves such a common confusion in the hydrological community.

  20. Trade-off between competition and facilitation defines gap colonization in mountains

    PubMed Central

    Lembrechts, Jonas J.; Milbau, Ann; Nijs, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental observations show that gap colonization in small-stature (e.g. grassland and dwarf shrubs) vegetation strongly depends on the abiotic conditions within them. At the same time, within-gap variation in biotic interactions such as competition and facilitation, caused by distance to the gap edge, would affect colonizer performance, but a theoretical framework to explore such patterns is missing. Here, we model how competition, facilitation and environmental conditions together determine the small-scale patterns of gap colonization along a cold gradient in mountains, by simulating colonizer survival in gaps of various sizes. Our model adds another dimension to the known effects of biotic interactions along a stress gradient by focussing on the trade-off between competition and facilitation in the within-gap environment. We show that this trade-off defines a peak in colonizer survival at a specific distance from the gap edge, which progressively shifts closer to the edge as the environment gets colder, ultimately leaving a large fraction of gaps unsuitable for colonization in facilitation-dominated systems. This is reinforced when vegetation size and temperature amelioration are manipulated simultaneously with temperature in order to simulate an elevational gradient more realistically. Interestingly, all other conditions being equal, the magnitude of the realized survival peak was always lower in large than in small gaps, making large gaps harder to colonize. The model is relevant to predict effects of non-native plant invasions and climate warming on colonization processes in mountains. PMID:26558706

  1. Ion-gap sensing for engine control

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This article reports that in addition to detecting misfire to conform with California onboard diagnostic (OBD II) regulations, Delco Electronics and Mecel AB engineers are looking at ion-gap sensing to control knock, A/F ratio, and other possible engine control parameters. The combustion of fuel in an engine cylinder produces ions. Detection of those ions by the spark plug (ion-gap sensing), and use of the resulting ion currents, has been employed in engine management systems since 1988. Saab introduced the first application, for cam-phase sensing. The main driving force for ion-gap sensing is OBD II requirements for 100% misfire detection at all speeds and loads. The technique has been expanded in subsequent applications to include misfire, knock, and pre-ignition detection and control, and more recently in combustion-ion detection using a capacitance-type, ion-current measurement method. Use of the ion current`s wave shape to control knock allows elimination of the separate piezoelectric type (PZT) sensor. Future applications could provide additional engine-control features including air/fuel ratio measurement and control.

  2. Spark Gap Electrode Erosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    between shots, leading to thermal expansion and contraction of the surface . Calculations of the temperature differen- tial between the heating and cooling...and (b) copper-tungsten iK-33) anode surfaces in nitrogen 127 36 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE. VOL. PS-I 2, NO. 1. MARCH 1984 S Air : 2t Lr o...describe the self breakdown voltage distribution ""[ * as a function of the relevant parameters (such as elec- trode surface conditions, gas type and

  3. [Effects of forest gap size and uprooted microsite on the microclimate in Pinus koraiensis-dominated broad-leaved mixed forest].

    PubMed

    Duan, Wen-biao; Du, Shan; Chen, Li-xin; Wang, Li-xia; Wei, Quan-shuai; Zhao, Jian-hui

    2013-08-01

    Three representative forest gaps with pit-mound microsites formed by uprooted trees were selected within the 2.55 hm2 plot in a Pinus koraiensis-dominated broad-leaved mixed forest in Xiao Xing'an Mountains of Northeast China. The cleared land and closed stand were set up as the controls, and the PAR, air temperature and relative humidity in the centers of different size gaps and in mound top as well as the total radiation and precipitation in the gap centers were measured between July and September, 2011 by using multichannel automatic meteorological stations. The differences of the microclimate between the gap centers and mound top in different months were compared, and the monthly and diurnal variations of the microclimatic factors in the gap centers and in the mound top under typical weather conditions were analyzed. The results showed that the mean monthly PAR and air temperature in the three gaps of different sizes were in the order of large gap > medium gap > small gap, and the mean monthly relative humidity was in the order of small gap > medium gap > large gap. For the same size gap, the mean monthly PAR and air temperature were higher in the mound top than in the gap center, whereas the mean monthly relative humidity was higher in the gap center than in the mound top. Both the mean monthly total radiation and the mean monthly air temperature in the forest gaps and in the controls were in the order of July > August > September and of cleared land > large gap > medium gap > small gap > closed stand, while the mean monthly relative humidity was in the order of closed stand > small gap > medium gap > large gap > cleared land. The differences in the mean monthly relative humidity between closed stand and various gaps and between closed stand and cleared land reached significant level. The monthly precipitation from July to September decreased in the order of cleared land > large gap > medium gap > small gap > closed stand. Whether in sunny days or in overcast

  4. Air pollution.

    PubMed

    Le, Nhu D; Sun, Li; Zidek, James V

    2010-01-01

    Toxic air pollutants are continuously released into the air supply. Various pollutants come from chemical facilities and small businesses, such as automobile service stations and dry cleaning establishments. Others, such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and other volatile organic chemicals, arise primarily from the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels (coal and petroleum) and are emitted from sources that include car exhausts, home heating and industrial power plants. Pollutants in the atmosphere also result from photochemical transformations; for example, ozone is formed when molecular oxygen or nitrogen interacts with ultraviolet radiation. An association between air pollution exposure and lung cancer has been observed in several studies. The evidence for other cancers is far less conclusive. Estimates of the population attributable risk of cancer has varied substantially over the last 40 years, reflecting the limitations of studies; these include insufficient information on confounders, difficulties in characterizing associations due to a likely lengthy latency interval, and exposure misclassification. Although earlier estimates were less than one percent, recent cohort studies that have taken into account some confounding factors, such as smoking and education amongst others, suggest that approximately 3.6% of lung cancer in the European Union could be due to air pollution exposure, particularly to sulphate and fine particulates. A separate cohort study estimated 5-7% of lung cancers in European never smokers and ex-smokers could be due to air pollution exposure. Therefore, while cigarette smoking remains the predominant risk factor, the proportion of lung cancers attributable to air pollution may be higher than previously thought. Overall, major weaknesses in all air-pollution-and-cancer studies to date have been inadequate characterization of long-term air pollution exposure and imprecise or no measurements of covariates. It has only been in the last

  5. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  6. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1984-02-16

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  7. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1986-08-19

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

  8. Investigation of the Penetration on an Air Jet Directed Perpendicularly to an Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callaghan, Edmund E; Ruggeri, Robert S

    1948-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the penetration of a circular air Jet directed perpendicularly to an air stream as a function of Jet density, Jet velocity, air-stream density, air-stream velocity, Jet diameter, and distance downstream from the Jet. The penetration was determined for nearly constant values of air-stream density at two tunnel velocities, four Jet diameters, four positions downstream of the Jet, and for a large range of Jet velocities and densities. An equation for the penetration was obtained in terms of the Jet diameter, the distance downstream from the jet, and the ratios of Jet and air-stream velocities and densities.

  9. Approximating subtree distances between phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Bonet, Maria Luisa; St John, Katherine; Mahindru, Ruchi; Amenta, Nina

    2006-10-01

    We give a 5-approximation algorithm to the rooted Subtree-Prune-and-Regraft (rSPR) distance between two phylogenies, which was recently shown to be NP-complete. This paper presents the first approximation result for this important tree distance. The algorithm follows a standard format for tree distances. The novel ideas are in the analysis. In the analysis, the cost of the algorithm uses a "cascading" scheme that accounts for possible wrong moves. This accounting is missing from previous analysis of tree distance approximation algorithms. Further, we show how all algorithms of this type can be implemented in linear time and give experimental results.

  10. Transactional Distance and Autonomy in a Distance Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasiloudis, G.; Koutsouba, M.; Giossos, Y.; Mavroidis, I.

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the transactional distance between the students and the tutor as well as the autonomy of students in a postgraduate course of the Hellenic Open University (HOU). The aim of the paper is to examine how the relation between autonomy and transactional distance evolves during an academic year and how this relation is affected by…

  11. Policy Deficit in Distance Education: A Transactional Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gokool-Ramdoo, Sushita

    2009-01-01

    This paper innovatively extends the application of transactional distance theory (TDT) to evidence-based policy development in Mauritius. In-depth interview data on student persistence from a range of stakeholders is used to understand the implications of distance education (DE) policy deficit. Policy deficit has surfaced as another dimension of…

  12. Lifelong Learning & Distance Higher Education. Perspectives on Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Christopher, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Reflecting a common objective of ensuring quality Education for All, this book is a joint initiative of UNESCO and COL and jointly published. Lifelong Learning in Distance Higher Education brings together a diverse group of experts from many countries. The book provides a clear picture of the challenges, problems and potential of distance higher…

  13. Application of Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy in Detecting Gaps with Different Widths.

    PubMed

    Bao, Rima; Wu, Zhikui; Wang, Fang; Miao, Xinyang; Feng, Chengjing

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of fractures is of vital importance for studies in many industries. In the present work, we used terahertz reflection measurements to identify simulated gaps of different widths that resemble fractures. The time interval between pulses (Δt) was proportional to the distance between the interfaces. In addition, fast Fourier transform (FFT) corresponding to the waveforms was also employed to distinguish the gaps. The widths in frequency were found to be inversely proportional to that of the gaps. In general, both terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and terahertz frequency-domain spectroscopy (THz-FDS) can achieve the measurement of the gaps of micro size.

  14. Directory of Distance Education Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhushan, Bharat, Ed.; Rausaria, R. R., Ed.

    This directory of distance education professionals in India covers personnel working in open universities, correspondence course institutes, and directorates of distance education of conventional universities and other national level research institutes. The information was derived from a set of structured questionnaires sent to all involved…

  15. Distance Education: Educational Trajectory Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaev, Andrey; Kravets, Alla; Isaeva, Ludmila; Fomenkov, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    Distance education has become a rather popular form of education recently. The advantages of this form are obvious and well-known. They include asynchronous learning, individualized learning trajectories and convenient case technologies. However, the distance form of education is not able to form the trainee's hands-on experience, especially…

  16. Faculty Attitudes about Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smidt, Esther; McDyre, Brian; Bunk, Jennifer; Li, Rui; Gatenby, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in distance learning in higher education. Given this, it is extremely important to understand faculty attitudes about distance education, not only because they can vary widely, but also because it is the faculty, through their design and implementation of online courses, that will shape the…

  17. Distance Learning: Practice and Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatkovic, Nevenka; Sehanovic, Jusuf; Ruzic, Maja

    2006-01-01

    In accordance with the European processes of integrated and homogeneous education, the paper presents the essential viewpoints and questions covering the establishment and development of "distance learning" (DL) in Republic of Croatia. It starts from the advantages of distance learning versus traditional education taking into account…

  18. Adult Education at a Distance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudet, Alphonse

    This document, which examines the use of educational technologies for distance education for adults in Canada, consists of five narrative sections and a bibliography. The first section introduces the topic and the document's objectives (to describe those technologies used in Canadian adult distance education, paying particular attention to those…

  19. Quality Content in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yildiz, Ezgi Pelin; Isman, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    In parallel with technological advances in today's world of education activities can be conducted without the constraints of time and space. One of the most important of these activities is distance education. The success of the distance education is possible with content quality. The proliferation of e-learning environment has brought a need for…

  20. The Distance to M104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen. B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-11-01

    M104 (NGC 4594; the Sombrero galaxy) is a nearby, well-studied elliptical galaxy included in scores of surveys focused on understanding the details of galaxy evolution. Despite the importance of observations of M104, a consensus distance has not yet been established. Here, we use newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging to measure the distance to M104 based on the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method. Our measurement yields the distance to M104 to be 9.55 ± 0.13 ± 0.31 Mpc equivalent to a distance modulus of 29.90 ± 0.03 ± 0.07 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian maximum likelihood technique that reduces measurement uncertainties. The most discrepant previous results are due to Tully-Fisher method distances, which are likely inappropriate for M104 given its peculiar morphology and structure. Our results are part of a larger program to measure accurate distances to a sample of well-known spiral galaxies (including M51, M74, and M63) using the TRGB method. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  1. The Distance to M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuinn, Kristen. B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Berg, Danielle; Kennicutt, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Great investments of observing time have been dedicated to the study of nearby spiral galaxies with diverse goals ranging from understanding the star formation process to characterizing their dark matter distributions. Accurate distances are fundamental to interpreting observations of these galaxies, yet many of the best studied nearby galaxies have distances based on methods with relatively large uncertainties. We have started a program to derive accurate distances to these galaxies. Here we measure the distance to M51—the Whirlpool galaxy—from newly obtained Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging using the tip of the red giant branch method. We measure the distance modulus to be 8.58 ± 0.10 Mpc (statistical), corresponding to a distance modulus of 29.67 ± 0.02 mag. Our distance is an improvement over previous results as we use a well-calibrated, stable distance indicator, precision photometry in a optimally selected field of view, and a Bayesian Maximum Likelihood technique that reduces measurement uncertainties. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  2. Virtual Bioinformatics Distance Learning Suite

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolvanen, Martti; Vihinen, Mauno

    2004-01-01

    Distance learning as a computer-aided concept allows students to take courses from anywhere at any time. In bioinformatics, computers are needed to collect, store, process, and analyze massive amounts of biological and biomedical data. We have applied the concept of distance learning in virtual bioinformatics to provide university course material…

  3. Multimedia Equipment for Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiller, Scott S.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the use of multimedia equipment for distance education. Topics addressed include use of the Internet; distance learning for educators; and cable television and/or fiber optics, including interactive television and satellite technology. A sidebar lists online and telecommunications providers. (LRW)

  4. Distance Learning: The Essential Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Marcia L.; Paprock, Kenneth; Covington, Barbara

    Intended for individuals engaged in open and distance learning activities, this guide is designed with an applications focus that provides a "quick start" for immediate work needs. Built on an intuitive set of "How do I" questions, the book presents the foundation needed to teach from a distance. The format is a multimodel approach, combining…

  5. Distance Education: A Cost Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Judy I.; Simonson, Michael

    The costs of three types of transmission technology in distance education are compared, and the costs for equipping and installing a distance education classroom are estimated. Two of the technologies--fiber optics and microwave--deliver two-way, full motion video and two-way audio. The third technology, compressed video, also delivers two-way…

  6. Interactive Television and Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Fred J.; Downs, Dennis A.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the origins and operations of the Iowa Communications Network, an interactive distance learning program. Presents several examples of how the network can benefit music educators in college and K-12 institutions. Maintains that the system can be a model for similar distance music education networks. (CFR)

  7. Blogging for the Distance Librarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pival, Paul R.

    2005-01-01

    Based on user lookups, "Merriam-Webster Online "proclaimed "Blog" the word of the year for 2004. Distance librarianship, until mid-way through 2004, was a subject that was underrepresented in the blogosphere. The inception of a blog called "The Distant Librarian: Comments on the World of Distance Librarianship" is chronicled in this article, along…

  8. Distance Education. [SITE 2001 Section].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Frank, Ed.; McBride, Ron, Ed.

    This document contains the papers on distance education from the SITE (Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education) 2001 conference. Topics covered include: the distance education degree program for the Master of Mathematics with a teaching option at Texas A&M University; the evolution of online learning; Internet-based distance…

  9. Reducing the distance in distance-caregiving by technology innovation

    PubMed Central

    Benefield, Lazelle E; Beck, Cornelia

    2007-01-01

    Family caregivers are responsible for the home care of over 34 million older adults in the United States. For many, the elder family member lives more than an hour’s distance away. Distance caregiving is a growing alternative to more familiar models where: 1) the elder and the family caregiver(s) may reside in the same household; or 2) the family caregiver may live nearby but not in the same household as the elder. The distance caregiving model involves elders and their family caregivers who live at some distance, defined as more than a 60-minute commute, from one another. Evidence suggests that distance caregiving is a distinct phenomenon, differs substantially from on-site family caregiving, and requires additional assistance to support the physical, social, and contextual dimensions of the caregiving process. Technology-based assists could virtually connect the caregiver and elder and provide strong support that addresses the elder’s physical, social, cognitive, and/or sensory impairments. Therefore, in today’s era of high technology, it is surprising that so few affordable innovations are being marketed for distance caregiving. This article addresses distance caregiving, proposes the use of technology innovation to support caregiving, and suggests a research agenda to better inform policy decisions related to the unique needs of this situation. PMID:18044143

  10. Hierarchical traits distances explain grassland Fabaceae species' ecological niches distances

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Florian; Jouany, Claire; Cruz, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Fabaceae species play a key role in ecosystem functioning through their capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen via their symbiosis with Rhizobium bacteria. To increase benefits of using Fabaceae in agricultural systems, it is necessary to find ways to evaluate species or genotypes having potential adaptations to sub-optimal growth conditions. We evaluated the relevance of phylogenetic distance, absolute trait distance and hierarchical trait distance for comparing the adaptation of 13 grassland Fabaceae species to different habitats, i.e., ecological niches. We measured a wide range of functional traits (root traits, leaf traits, and whole plant traits) in these species. Species phylogenetic and ecological distances were assessed from a species-level phylogenetic tree and species' ecological indicator values, respectively. We demonstrated that differences in ecological niches between grassland Fabaceae species were related more to their hierarchical trait distances than to their phylogenetic distances. We showed that grassland Fabaceae functional traits tend to converge among species with the same ecological requirements. Species with acquisitive root strategies (thin roots, shallow root systems) are competitive species adapted to non-stressful meadows, while conservative ones (coarse roots, deep root systems) are able to tolerate stressful continental climates. In contrast, acquisitive species appeared to be able to tolerate low soil-P availability, while conservative ones need high P availability. Finally we highlight that traits converge along the ecological gradient, providing the assumption that species with similar root-trait values are better able to coexist, regardless of their phylogenetic distance. PMID:25741353

  11. Measuring the Gap

    PubMed Central

    She, Xinshu; Zhao, Deqing; Scholnick, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    China is a large country where rapid development is accompanied by growing inequalities. How economic inequalities translate to health inequalities is unknown. Baseline health assessment is lacking among rural Chinese children. We aimed at assessing baseline student health of rural Chinese children and comparing them with those of urban children of similar ages. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2003 Global School-Based Student Health Survey among 100 students Grade 4 to 6 from rural Guizhou, China. Results were summarized and compared with public data from urban Beijing using multivariate logistic regression models. Rural children are more likely to not wash their hands before a meal (odds ratio [OR] = 5.71, P < .01) and after using the toilet (OR = 5.41, P < .01). They are more likely to feel sick or to get into trouble after drinking (OR = 7.28, P < .01). They are more likely to have used drugs (OR = 8.54, P < .01) and to have no close friends (OR = 8.23, P < .01). An alarming percentage of rural (8.22%) and urban (14.22%) children have had suicidal ideation in the past year (OR = 0.68, P > .05). Rural parents are more likely to not know their children’s whereabouts (OR = 1.81, P < .05). Rural children are more than 4 times likely to have serious injuries (OR = 4.64, P < .01) and to be bullied (OR = 4.01, P < .01). In conclusion, school-age rural Chinese children exhibit more health risk behaviors and fewer protective factors at baseline compared to their urban counterparts. Any intervention aimed at improving child health should take this distributive gap into consideration. PMID:27335999

  12. The art of descrying distance.

    PubMed

    Niall, K K

    1999-09-01

    How naive can one experiment be? Imagine asking observers to judge distance -- yes, literally asking them. And in asking them, no visual evoked potentials were measured, and changes in blood flow to the occipital cortex were ignored. But serendipity occurs even to the well-prepared: One's best thought for a new experiment can prove to be one's first unbiased, uncomplicated thought.Here's a cursory review of the events: A number of observers were asked to judge distances between marked posts in a field at night. They made their judgments with the help of night vision goggles (NVG). At first the observers underestimated the distances on average. Then an experimenter began to correct the observers after each judgment. The observers' judgments of distance became accurate. On average, the observers began to estimate those distances accurately. Is this and incredible story or a difficult one?

  13. GAP Analysis Bulletin Number 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, Jill; Gergely, Kevin; Aycrigg, Jocelyn; Canonico, Gabrielle; Davidson, Anne; Coffey, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    The Mission of the Gap Analysis Program (GAP) is to promote conservation by providing broad geographic information on biological diversity to resource managers, planners, and policy makers who can use the information to make informed decisions. As part of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) ?a collaborative program to provide increased access to data and information on the nation?s biological resources--GAP data and analytical tools have been used in hundreds of applications: from basic research to comprehensive state wildlife plans; from educational projects in schools to ecoregional assessments of biodiversity. The challenge: keeping common species common means protecting them BEFORE they become threatened. To do this on a state or regional basis requires key information such as land cover descriptions, predicted distribution maps for native animals, and an assessment of the level of protection currently given to those plants and animals. GAP works cooperatively with Federal, state, and local natural resource professionals and academics to provide this kind of information. GAP activities focus on the creation of state and regional databases and maps that depict patterns of land management, land cover, and biodiversity. These data can be used to identify ?gaps? in conservation--instances where an animal or plant community is not adequately represented on the existing network of conservation lands. GAP is administered through the U.S. Geological Survey. Through building partnerships among disparate groups, GAP hopes to foster the kind of collaboration that is needed to address conservation issues on a broad scale. For more information, contact: John Mosesso National GAP Director 703-648-4079 Kevin Gergely National GAP Operations Manager 208-885-3565

  14. High-temperature compatibility between liquid metal as PWR fuel gap filler and stainless steel and high-density concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong; Jumpee, Chayanit; Jitpukdee, Manit

    2014-08-01

    In conventional nuclear fuel rods for light-water reactors, a helium-filled as-fabricated gap between the fuel and the cladding inner surface accommodates fuel swelling and cladding creep down. Because helium exhibits a very low thermal conductivity, it results in a large temperature rise in the gap. Liquid metal (LM; 1/3 weight portion each of lead, tin, and bismuth) has been proposed to be a gap filler because of its high thermal conductivity (∼100 times that of He), low melting point (∼100 °C), and lack of chemical reactivity with UO2 and water. With the presence of LM, the temperature drop across the gap is virtually eliminated and the fuel is operated at a lower temperature at the same power output, resulting in safer fuel, delayed fission gas release and prevention of massive secondary hydriding. During normal reactor operation, should an LM-bonded fuel rod failure occurs resulting in a discharge of liquid metal into the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel, it should not corrode stainless steel. An experiment was conducted to confirm that at 315 °C, LM in contact with 304 stainless steel in the PWR water chemistry environment for up to 30 days resulted in no observable corrosion. Moreover, during a hypothetical core-melt accident assuming that the liquid metal with elevated temperature between 1000 and 1600 °C is spread on a high-density concrete basement of the power plant, a small-scale experiment was performed to demonstrate that the LM-concrete interaction at 1000 °C for as long as 12 h resulted in no penetration. At 1200 °C for 5 h, the LM penetrated a distance of ∼1.3 cm, but the penetration appeared to stop. At 1400 °C the penetration rate was ∼0.7 cm/h. At 1600 °C, the penetration rate was ∼17 cm/h. No corrosion based on chemical reactions with high-density concrete occurred, and, hence, the only physical interaction between high-temperature LM and high-density concrete was from tiny cracks generated from thermal stress. Moreover

  15. Comb-referenced laser distance interferometer for industrial nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yoon-Soo; Wang, Guochao; Hyun, Sangwon; Kang, Hyun Jay; Chun, Byung Jae; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2016-08-25

    A prototype laser distance interferometer is demonstrated by incorporating the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser for mass-production of optoelectronic devices such as flat panel displays and solar cell devices. This comb-referenced interferometer uses four different wavelengths simultaneously to enable absolute distance measurement with the capability of comprehensive evaluation of the measurement stability and uncertainty. The measurement result reveals that the stability reaches 3.4 nm for a 3.8 m distance at 1.0 s averaging, which further reduces to 0.57 nm at 100 s averaging with a fractional stability of 1.5 × 10(-10). The uncertainty is estimated to be in a 10(-8) level when distance is measured in air due to the inevitable ambiguity in estimating the refractive index, but it can be enhanced to a 10(-10) level in vacuum.

  16. Comb-referenced laser distance interferometer for industrial nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Yoon-Soo; Wang, Guochao; Hyun, Sangwon; Kang, Hyun Jay; Chun, Byung Jae; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2016-08-01

    A prototype laser distance interferometer is demonstrated by incorporating the frequency comb of a femtosecond laser for mass-production of optoelectronic devices such as flat panel displays and solar cell devices. This comb-referenced interferometer uses four different wavelengths simultaneously to enable absolute distance measurement with the capability of comprehensive evaluation of the measurement stability and uncertainty. The measurement result reveals that the stability reaches 3.4 nm for a 3.8 m distance at 1.0 s averaging, which further reduces to 0.57 nm at 100 s averaging with a fractional stability of 1.5 × 10‑10. The uncertainty is estimated to be in a 10‑8 level when distance is measured in air due to the inevitable ambiguity in estimating the refractive index, but it can be enhanced to a 10‑10 level in vacuum.

  17. Genealogical trees from genetic distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prignano, L.; Serva, M.

    2009-06-01

    In a population with haploid reproduction any individual has a single parent in the previous generation. If all genealogical distances among pairs of individuals (generations from the closest common ancestor) are known it is possible to exactly reconstruct their genealogical tree. Unfortunately, in most cases, genealogical distances are unknown and only genetic distances are available. The genetic distance between two individuals is measurable from differences in mtDNA (mitochondrial DNA) since in the case of humans or other complex organisms mtDNA is transmitted in a haploid manner. An analogous distance can be also computed for languages where it may be measured from lexical differences, in this case, nevertheless, haploid reproduction is only a raw approximation. Assuming a constant rate of mutation, these genetic distances are random and proportional only on average to genealogical ones. The reconstruction of the genealogical tree from the available genetic distances is forceful imprecise. In this paper we try to quantify the error one may commit in the reconstruction of the tree for different degrees of randomness. The errors may concern both topology of the tree (the branching hierarchy) and, in case of correct topology, the proportions of the tree (length of various branches).

  18. Propagation and localization of quantum dot emission along a gap-plasmonic transmission line.

    PubMed

    Castro-Lopez, M; Manjavacas, A; García de Abajo, J; van Hulst, N F

    2015-11-16

    Plasmonic transmission lines have great potential to serve as direct interconnects between nanoscale light spots. The guiding of gap plasmons in the slot between adjacent nanowire pairs provides improved propagation of surface plasmon polaritons while keeping strong light confinement. Yet propagation is fundamentally limited by losses in the metal. Here we show a workaround operation of the gap-plasmon transmission line, exploiting both gap and external modes present in the structure. Interference between these modes allows us to take advantage of the larger propagation distance of the external mode while preserving the high confinement of the gap mode, resulting in nanoscale confinement of the optical field over a longer distance. The performance of the gap-plasmon transmission line is probed experimentally by recording the propagation of quantum dots luminescence over distances of more than 4 μm. We observe a 35% increase in the effective propagation length of this multimode system compared to the theoretical limit for a pure gap mode. The applicability of this simple method to nanofabricated structures is theoretically confirmed and offers a realistic way to combine longer propagation distances with lateral plasmon confinement for far field nanoscale interconnects.

  19. Optical emission spectroscopy of nanosecond repetitively pulsed microplasmas generated in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orriere, Thomas; Moreau, Eric; Benard, Nicolas; Pai, David

    2015-09-01

    Nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) microplasmas are generated in room temperature air at atmospheric pressure, in order to investigate the enhanced control of discharge properties via the combined effects of spatial confinement and nanosecond repetitive pulsing. Discharges were generated using high-voltage pulses of 15-ns duration applied to a tungsten pin-to-pin reactor, with inter-electrode gap distances (d) from 2 mm down to 0.2 mm. Optical emission spectroscopy and electrical characterization performed on the discharge indicate that heat transfer and plasma chemistry are influenced by the microplasma geometry. Ultrafast gas heating is observed upon deducing the rotational temperature of N2 from the measured emission spectrum of the N2 (C -->B) (0, 2) and (1, 3) transition bands, but use of the microplasma geometry (d = 0.2 mm) results in lower gas temperatures than in larger discharge gaps (d = 2 mm), including at high pulse repetition frequency (30 kHz) where substantial steady-state gas heating can occur. The measured Stark broadening of the Hα transition is significantly greater than for previously studied NRP discharges in air at atmospheric pressure, indicating that the maximum electron number density may be correspondingly much greater, up to 1018 cm-3. Furthermore, for NRP microplasmas, the intensities of emission from excited atomic ions (O+ and N+) are much higher than those of excited neutral atoms (O and N), in contrast to NRP discharges generated in larger discharge gaps.

  20. DISK-SATELLITE INTERACTION IN DISKS WITH DENSITY GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovich, Cristobal; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-10-10

    Gravitational coupling between a gaseous disk and an orbiting perturber leads to angular momentum exchange between them that can result in gap opening by planets in protoplanetary disks and clearing of gas by binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) embedded in accretion disks. Understanding the co-evolution of the disk and the orbit of the perturber in these circumstances requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of the torque exerted by the latter on a highly non-uniform disk. Here we explore disk-satellite interaction in disks with gaps in linear approximation both in Fourier and in physical space, explicitly incorporating the disk non-uniformity in the fluid equations. Density gradients strongly displace the positions of Lindblad resonances in the disk (which often occur at multiple locations), and the waveforms of modes excited close to the gap edge get modified compared to the uniform disk case. The spatial distribution of the excitation torque density is found to be quite different from the existing prescriptions: most of the torque is exerted in a rather narrow region near the gap edge where Lindblad resonances accumulate, followed by an exponential falloff with the distance from the perturber. Despite these differences, for a given gap profile, the full integrated torque exerted on the disk agrees with the conventional uniform disk theory prediction at the level of {approx}10%. The nonlinearity of the density wave excited by the perturber is shown to decrease as the wave travels out of the gap, slowing down its nonlinear evolution and damping. Our results suggest that gap opening in protoplanetary disks and gas clearing around SMBH binaries can be more efficient than the existing theories predict. They pave the way for self-consistent calculations of the gap structure and the orbital evolution of the perturber using accurate prescription for the torque density behavior.

  1. Language distance and tree reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, Filippo; Serva, Maurizio

    2008-08-01

    Languages evolve over time according to a process in which reproduction, mutation and extinction are all possible. This is very similar to haploid evolution for asexual organisms and for the mitochondrial DNA of complex ones. Exploiting this similarity, it is possible, in principle, to verify hypotheses concerning the relationship among languages and to reconstruct their family tree. The key point is the definition of the distances among pairs of languages in analogy with the genetic distances among pairs of organisms. Distances can be evaluated by comparing grammar and/or vocabulary, but while it is difficult, if not impossible, to quantify grammar distance, it is possible to measure a distance from vocabulary differences. The method used by glottochronology computes distances from the percentage of shared 'cognates', which are words with a common historical origin. The weak point of this method is that subjective judgment plays a significant role. Here we define the distance of two languages by considering a renormalized edit distance among words with the same meaning and averaging over the two hundred words contained in a Swadesh list. In our approach the vocabulary of a language is the analogue of DNA for organisms. The advantage is that we avoid subjectivity and, furthermore, reproducibility of results is guaranteed. We apply our method to the Indo-European and the Austronesian groups, considering, in both cases, fifty different languages. The two trees obtained are, in many respects, similar to those found by glottochronologists, with some important differences as regards the positions of a few languages. In order to support these different results we separately analyze the structure of the distances of these languages with respect to all the others.

  2. Does a global DNA barcoding gap exist in Annelida?

    PubMed

    Kvist, Sebastian

    2016-05-01

    Accurate identification of unknown specimens by means of DNA barcoding is contingent on the presence of a DNA barcoding gap, among other factors, as its absence may result in dubious specimen identifications - false negatives or positives. Whereas the utility of DNA barcoding would be greatly reduced in the absence of a distinct and sufficiently sized barcoding gap, the limits of intraspecific and interspecific distances are seldom thoroughly inspected across comprehensive sampling. The present study aims to illuminate this aspect of barcoding in a comprehensive manner for the animal phylum Annelida. All cytochrome c oxidase subunit I sequences (cox1 gene; the chosen region for zoological DNA barcoding) present in GenBank for Annelida, as well as for "Polychaeta", "Oligochaeta", and Hirudinea separately, were downloaded and curated for length, coverage and potential contaminations. The final datasets consisted of 9782 (Annelida), 5545 ("Polychaeta"), 3639 ("Oligochaeta"), and 598 (Hirudinea) cox1 sequences and these were either (i) used as is in an automated global barcoding gap detection analysis or (ii) further analyzed for genetic distances, separated into bins containing intraspecific and interspecific comparisons and plotted in a graph to visualize any potential global barcoding gap. Over 70 million pairwise genetic comparisons were made and results suggest that although there is a tendency towards separation, no distinct or sufficiently sized global barcoding gap exists in either of the datasets rendering future barcoding efforts at risk of erroneous specimen identifications (but local barcoding gaps may still exist allowing for the identification of specimens at lower taxonomic ranks). This seems to be especially true for earthworm taxa, which account for fully 35% of the total number of interspecific comparisons that show 0% divergence.

  3. Characterization of polyurethane foam (PUF) and sorbent impregnated PUF (SIP) disk passive air samplers for measuring organophosphate flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Atousa; Eng, Anita; Jantunen, Liisa M; Ahrens, Lutz; Shoeib, Mahiba; Parnis, J Mark; Harner, Tom

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the uptake of organophosphate esters (OPEs) by polyurethane foam (PUF) and sorbent-impregnated polyurethane foam (SIP) disk passive air samplers (PAS). Atmospheric OPE concentrations were monitored with high-volume active air samplers (HV-AAS) that were co-deployed with passive air samplers. Samples were analyzed for tris(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCIPP), tri(phenyl) phosphate (TPhP), tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), and tris(2,3-dichloropropyl) phosphate (TDCIPP). The mean concentration of ∑OPEs in air was 2650 pg/m(3) for the HV-AAS. Sampling rates and the passive sampler medium (PSM)-air partition coefficient (KPSM-Air) were calculated for individual OPEs. The average calculated sampling rates (R) for the four OPEs were 3.6 ± 1.2 and 4.2 ± 2.0 m(3)/day for the PUF and SIP disks, respectively, and within the range of the recommended default value of 4 ± 2 m(3)/day. Since most of the OPEs remained in the linear uptake phase during the study, COSMO-RS solvation theory and an oligomer-based model were used to estimate KPUF-Air for the OPEs. The estimated values of log KPUF-Air were 7.45 (TCIPP), 9.35 (TPhP), 8.44 (TCEP), and 9.67 (TDCIPP). Finally, four configurations of the PUF and SIP disks were tested by adjusting the distance of the gap opening between the upper and lower domes of the sampler housing: i.e. 2 cm, 1 cm, no gap and 1 cm overlap. The sampling rate did not differ significantly between these four configurations (p < 0.05).

  4. Immunotoxicity of air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, J.A.; Gardner, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The most common ubiquitous air pollutants, as well as some point source (e.g. metals) air pollutants, decrease the function of pulmonary host defense mechanisms against infection. Most of this knowledge is based on animal studies and involves cellular antibacterial defenses such as alveolar macrophages and mucociliary clearance. Information on viral infectivity is more sparse. Since there is no routine treatment for viral infections which have a relatively high rate of occurrence, this gap in knowledge is of concern. Given the major gaps in knowledge, resaonably accurate assessment of the immunotoxicity of air pollutants is not possible. When the limited data base is reviewed relative to ambient levels of the common pollutants, it appears that acute exposures to O3 and H2SO4 and chronic exposures to NO2 are the major exposures of concern for immunotoxic effects. It is critical to point out, however, that until information is available for chronic exposures to low levels of metals and for exposures to common organic vapors, the immunotoxicity of air pollutants cannot be assessed adequately.

  5. Distance Learning for Special Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Rodger A.

    2012-01-01

    Distance education strategies for remotely deployed, highly mobile, or institutionalized populations are reviewed and critiqued. Specifically, asynchronous, offline responses for special military units, Native Americans on remote reservations, prison populations and other geographically, temporally or technologically isolated niche populations are…

  6. Graph distance for complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yutaka; Hirata, Yoshito; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-10-01

    Networks are widely used as a tool for describing diverse real complex systems and have been successfully applied to many fields. The distance between networks is one of the most fundamental concepts for properly classifying real networks, detecting temporal changes in network structures, and effectively predicting their temporal evolution. However, this distance has rarely been discussed in the theory of complex networks. Here, we propose a graph distance between networks based on a Laplacian matrix that reflects the structural and dynamical properties of networked dynamical systems. Our results indicate that the Laplacian-based graph distance effectively quantifies the structural difference between complex networks. We further show that our approach successfully elucidates the temporal properties underlying temporal networks observed in the context of face-to-face human interactions.

  7. Graph distance for complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yutaka; Hirata, Yoshito; Ikeguchi, Tohru; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Networks are widely used as a tool for describing diverse real complex systems and have been successfully applied to many fields. The distance between networks is one of the most fundamental concepts for properly classifying real networks, detecting temporal changes in network structures, and effectively predicting their temporal evolution. However, this distance has rarely been discussed in the theory of complex networks. Here, we propose a graph distance between networks based on a Laplacian matrix that reflects the structural and dynamical properties of networked dynamical systems. Our results indicate that the Laplacian-based graph distance effectively quantifies the structural difference between complex networks. We further show that our approach successfully elucidates the temporal properties underlying temporal networks observed in the context of face-to-face human interactions. PMID:27725690

  8. Isolation by distance, web service

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jeffrey L; Bohonak, Andrew J; Kelley, Scott T

    2005-01-01

    Background The population genetic pattern known as "isolation by distance" results from spatially limited gene flow and is a commonly observed phenomenon in natural populations. However, few software programs exist for estimating the degree of isolation by distance among populations, and they tend not to be user-friendly. Results We have created Isolation by Distance Web Service (IBDWS) a user-friendly web interface for determining patterns of isolation by distance. Using this site, population geneticists can perform a variety of powerful statistical tests including Mantel tests, Reduced Major Axis (RMA) regression analysis, as well as calculate FST between all pairs of populations and perform basic summary statistics (e.g., heterozygosity). All statistical results, including publication-quality scatter plots in Postscript format, are returned rapidly to the user and can be easily downloaded. Conclusion IBDWS population genetics analysis software is hosted at and documentation is available at . The source code has been made available on Source Forge at . PMID:15760479

  9. Advances on Genome Duplication Distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Yves; Savard, Olivier Tremblay; Bertrand, Denis; El-Mabrouk, Nadia

    Given a phylogenetic tree involving Whole Genome Duplication events, we contribute to the problem of computing the rearrangement distance on a branch of a tree linking a duplication node d to a speciation node or a leaf s. In the case of a genome G at s containing exactly two copies of each gene, the genome halving problem is to find a perfectly duplicated genome D at d minimizing the rearrangement distance with G. We generalize the existing exact linear-time algorithm for genome halving to the case of a genome G with missing gene copies. In the case of a known ancestral duplicated genome D, we develop a greedy approach for computing the distance between G and D that is shown time-efficient and very accurate for both the rearrangement and DCJ distances.

  10. Method and apparatus for wind turbine air gap control

    DOEpatents

    Grant, James Jonathan; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Qu, Ronghai

    2007-02-20

    Methods and apparatus for assembling a wind turbine generator are provided. The wind turbine generator includes a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis, a rotor rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis wherein the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to a radially outer periphery of the rotor such that an airgap is defined between the stator windings and the magnetic elements and the plurality of magnetic elements including a radially inner periphery having a first diameter. The wind turbine generator also includes a bearing including a first member in rotatable engagement with a radially inner second member, the first member including a radially outer periphery, a diameter of the radially outer periphery of the first member being substantially equal to the first diameter, the rotor coupled to the stator through the bearing such that a substantially uniform airgap is maintained.

  11. Measurement of reflection phase using thick-gap Fabry-Perot etalon.

    PubMed

    Yung, Tsz Kit; Gao, Wensheng; Leung, Ho Ming; Zhao, Qiuling; Wang, Xia; Tam, Wing Yim

    2016-09-10

    We report measurement of the reflection phase of a dielectric (glass)/titanium (Ti) surface in the visible wavelength using a thick-gap Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometry technique. Using a two-beam interference model for the reflection peaks and troughs of the FP etalon, we obtain the air-gap spacing of the etalon and, more importantly, the reflection phase of the etalon substrate. We find systematic dependence of the as-measured reflection phase on the air-gap spacing due to the numerical aperture effect of the measuring objective. However, the relative reflection phase of Ti with respect to glass is independent of the air-gap spacing. As a demonstration of our approach in the optical characterization of small metamaterial samples, we also measure the reflection phase of a micron-sized 2D Au sawtooth nanoarray. The experiment is in good agreement with the model simulation.

  12. Categorical perception of tactile distance.

    PubMed

    Knight, Frances Le Cornu; Longo, Matthew R; Bremner, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    The tactile surface forms a continuous sheet covering the body. And yet, the perceived distance between two touches varies across stimulation sites. Perceived tactile distance is larger when stimuli cross over the wrist, compared to when both fall on either the hand or the forearm. This effect could reflect a categorical distortion of tactile space across body-part boundaries (in which stimuli crossing the wrist boundary are perceptually elongated) or may simply reflect a localised increased in acuity surrounding anatomical landmarks (in which stimuli near the wrist are perceptually elongated). We tested these two interpretations across two experiments, by comparing a well-documented bias to perceive mediolateral tactile distances across the forearm/hand as larger than proximodistal ones along the forearm/hand at three different sites (hand, wrist, and forearm). According to the 'categorical' interpretation, tactile distances should be elongated selectively in the proximodistal axis thus reducing the anisotropy. According to the 'localised acuity' interpretation, distances will be perceptually elongated in the vicinity of the wrist regardless of orientation, leading to increased overall size without affecting anisotropy. Consistent with the categorical account, we found a reduction in the magnitude of anisotropy at the wrist, with no evidence of a corresponding localised increase in precision. These findings demonstrate that we reference touch to a representation of the body that is categorically segmented into discrete parts, which consequently influences the perception of tactile distance.

  13. Keeping One’s Distance

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; Bargh, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Current conceptualizations of psychological distance (e.g., construal-level theory) refer to the degree of overlap between the self and some other person, place, or point in time. We propose a complementary view in which perceptual and motor representations of physical distance influence people’s thoughts and feelings without reference to the self, extending research and theory on the effects of distance into domains where construal-level theory is silent. Across four experiments, participants were primed with either spatial closeness or spatial distance by plotting an assigned set of points on a Cartesian coordinate plane. Compared with the closeness prime, the distance prime produced greater enjoyment of media depicting embarrassment (Study 1), less emotional distress from violent media (Study 2), lower estimates of the number of calories in unhealthy food (Study 3), and weaker reports of emotional attachments to family members and hometowns (Study 4). These results support a broader conceptualization of distance-mediated effects on judgment and affect. PMID:18315805

  14. GAP Analysis. Bulletin Number 11

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    Lucas jack pine that is the habitat but rather (say) jack pine in which tree dynamics, and the test of accuracy was done at a time of high popu... testing are elaborated by Krohn [1996]). stresses) killed the birds that would have occupied them, in which Commission error (predicting the presence...thereby destroying the dove-arable correlation that would which GAP has historically been based should lead it to accept any have underlain a GAP assessment

  15. Eight electrode optical readout gap

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E.; Crain, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    A protective device for a plurality of electrical circuits includes a pluity of isolated electrodes forming a gap with a common electrode. An output signal, electrically isolated from the circuits being monitored, is obtained by a photosensor viewing the discharge gap through an optical window. Radioactive stabilization of discharge characteristics is provided for slowly changing voltages and carbon tipped dynamic starters provide desirable discharge characteristics for rapidly varying voltages. A hydrogen permeation barrier is provided on external surfaces of the device.

  16. Coaxial injector spray characterization using water/air as simulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaller, Michelle M.; Klem, Mark D.

    1991-01-01

    Quantitative information about the atomization of injector sprays is required to improve the accuracy of computational models that predict the performance and stability of liquid propellant rocket engines. An experimental program is being conducted at NASA-Lewis to measure the drop size and velocity distributions in shear coaxial injector sprays. A phase/Doppler interferometer is used to obtain drop size data in water air shear coaxial injector sprays. Droplet sizes and axial component of droplet velocities are measured at different radii for various combinations of water flow rate, air flow rate, injector liquid jet diameter, injector annular gap, and liquid post recess. Sauter mean diameters measured in the spray center 51 mm downstream of the liquid post tip range from 28 to 68 microns, and mean axial drop velocities at the same location range from 37 to 120 m/s. The shear coaxial injector sprays show a high degree of symmetry; the mean drop size and velocity profiles vary with liquid flow rate, post recess, and distance from the injector face. The drop size data can be used to estimate liquid oxygen/hydrogen spray drop sizes by correcting property differences between water-air and liquid oxygen/hydrogen.

  17. Communication, Social, and Critical Thinking Skills of Students with Low-Power-Distance Teachers in a High-Power-Distance Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muega, Michael Arthus; Acido, Maricris; Lusung-Oyzon, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at giving a clearer picture of the power gap that exists between a group of Filipino students and their teachers in a laboratory school in a state university in the Philippines. This study emerged from the assumption that power distance between Filipino students and their teachers could help explain the level of their ability…

  18. Out of the Shadow and Into the Spotlight: The Development of Distance Teaching in Norwegian Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grepperud, Gunnar; Stokken, Anne Marie; Toska, Jan Atle

    2002-01-01

    The development of distance education in Norway has had to bridge the gap between two systems: a large network of public universities and colleges and a small network of public and private agencies that included distance education and adult education organizations. This mixture of public and private sectors has led to new and more hybrid forms of…

  19. Experimental determination of gap scaling in a plasma opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, D. C.; Commisso, R. J.; Ottinger, P. F.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Weber, B. V.

    2000-09-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the coupling between a ˜0.5 μs conduction-time, ˜0.5 MA conduction-current plasma opening switch (POS), and an electron-beam (e-beam) diode. Electrical diagnostics provided measurements of the voltage at the oil-vacuum insulator and at the diode as well as anode and cathode currents on the generator and load sides of the POS. These measurements were combined with a flow impedance model to determine the POS gap over a range of conduction times and e-beam diode impedances, and for two POS-to-load distances. A comparison of the inferred POS gap at peak power with the critical gap for magnetic insulation indicates that the POS gap is always saturated in both switch-limited and load-limited regimes. This POS gap-size scaling with load impedance is consistent with an opening mechanism dominated by erosion and not J×B forces.

  20. Stacking orders induced direct band gap in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaohui; Kou, Liangzhi; Sun, Litao

    2016-01-01

    The direct band gap of monolayer semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides (STMDs) enables a host of new optical and electrical properties. However, bilayer STMDs are indirect band gap semiconductors, which limits its applicability for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. Here, we report that the direct band gap can be achieved in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures by alternating stacking orders. Specifically, when Se atoms from opposite layers are stacked directly on top of each other, AA and A’B stacked heterostructures show weaker interlayer coupling, larger interlayer distance and direct band gap. Whereas, when Se atoms from opposite layers are staggered, AA’, AB and AB’ stacked heterostructures exhibit stronger interlayer coupling, shorter interlayer distance and indirect band gap. Thus, the direct/indirect band gap can be controllable in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures. In addition, the calculated sliding barriers indicate that the stacking orders of bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures can be easily formed by sliding one layer with respect to the other. The novel direct band gap in bilayer MoSe2-WSe2 lateral heterostructures provides possible application for high-efficiency optoelectronic devices. The results also show that the stacking order is an effective strategy to induce and tune the band gap of layered STMDs. PMID:27528196

  1. Acculturative Family Distancing (AFD) and Depression in Chinese American Families

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Wei-Chin; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Fujimoto, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Objective Our knowledge of acculturative processes and their impact on immigrant families remains quite limited. Acculturative Family Distancing (AFD) is the distancing that occurs between immigrant parents and their children, and is caused by breakdowns in communication and cultural value differences. It is a more proximal and problem-focused formulation of the acculturation gap and is hypothesized to increase depression via family conflict. Method Data were collected from 105 Chinese American high school students and their mothers. Rasch modeling was used to refine the AFD measure and structural equation modeling was used to determine the effects of AFD on youth and maternal depression. Results Findings indicate that greater AFD was associated with higher depressive symptoms and risk for clinical depression. Family conflict partially mediated this relation for youth, whereas for mothers, AFD directly increased risk for depression. Greater mother-child heritage enculturation discrepancies were associated with greater mother and child AFD. Mainstream acculturation discrepancies and language gaps between mothers and youth were not significantly associated with any of the primary outcome variables. Conclusions Results highlight the need to better understand how AFD and other acculturation-gap phenomena affect immigrant mental health. They also underscore the need to develop prevention and intervention programs that target communication difficulties and intergenerational cultural value differences. PMID:20873901

  2. Three-dimensional shape optical measurement using constant gap control and error compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Kyihwan; Kim, Sangyoo; Choi, Kyosoon

    2008-03-15

    The optical laser displacement sensor is widely used for noncontact measurement of the three-dimensional (3D) shape profile of the object surface. When the surface of an object has a slope variation, the sensor gain is proportionally varied according to that of the object surface. In order to solve the sensor gain variation problem, the constant gap control method is applied to adjust the gap to the nominal distance. Control error compensation is also proposed to cope with the situation even when the gap is not perfectly controlled to the nominal distance using an additional sensor attached to the actuator. 3D shape measurement applying the proposed constant gap control method shows better performances rather than the constant sensor height method.

  3. The number and size of subhalo-induced gaps in stellar streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkal, Denis; Belokurov, Vasily; Bovy, Jo; Sanders, Jason L.

    2016-11-01

    Ample observational capabilities exist today to detect the small density perturbations that low-mass dark matter subhaloes impart on stellar streams from disrupting Galactic satellites. In anticipation of these observations, we investigate the expected number and size of gaps by combining an analytic prescription for gap evolution on circular orbits with the flux of subhaloes near the stream. We explore the distribution of gap sizes and depths for a typical cold stream around the Milky Way and find that for a given stream age and gap depth, each subhalo mass produces a characteristic gap size. For a stream with an age of a few Gyr, orbiting at a distance of 10-20 kpc from the Galactic centre, even modest subhaloes with a mass of 106-107 M⊙ produce gaps with sizes that are of the order of several degrees. We consider the number and distribution of gap sizes created by subhaloes with masses 105-109 M⊙, accounting for the expected depletion of subhaloes by the Milky Way disc, and present predictions for six cold streams around the Milky Way. For Pal 5, we forecast 0.7 gaps with a density depletion of at least 25 per cent and a typical gap size of 8°. Thus, there appears to be no tension between the recent non-detection of density depletions in the Pal 5 tidal tails and ΛCDM expectations. These predictions can be used to guide the scale of future gap searches.

  4. Stabilizers for GAP and GAP-based Propellants Interim Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-09

    the m j o r deconposit inn pathways of GAP and U P prope l lan ts i n o r d e r to i n p r o w long term storage stabi l i ty. Model c- s inw...la t i ng t h e ut ido-bear ing frmctional units of GAP ( a z i d e adjacent t o po lye ther k k b o n e , az ide sd jacent t o terminal...binder i n prope l lan t -ag ing studies has varied accord2~g t o the to t of GAP used. This v a r i a b i l i t y my k linked to residual i n p

  5. Sub-nanosecond time resolved light emission study for diffuse discharges in air under steep high voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardiveau, P.; Magne, L.; Marode, E.; Ouaras, K.; Jeanney, P.; Bournonville, B.

    2016-10-01

    Pin-to-plane discharges in centimetre air gaps and standard conditions of pressure and temperature are generated under very high positive nanosecond scale voltage pulses. The experimental study is based on recordings of sub-nanosecond time resolved and Abel-processed light emission profiles and their complete correlation to electrical current waveforms. The effects of the voltage pulse features (amplitude between 20 and 90 kV, rise time between 2 and 5.2 ns, and time rate between 4 and 40 kV · ns-1) and the electrode configuration (gap distance between 10 and 30 mm, pin radius between 10 and 200 µm, copper, molybdenum or tungsten pin material) are described. A three time period development can be found: a glow-like structure with monotonic light profiles during the first 1.5 ns whose size depends on time voltage rate, a shell-like structure with bimodal profiles whose duration and extension in space depends on rise time, and either diffuse or multi-channel regime for the connection to the cathode plane according to gap distance. The transition of the light from monotonic to bimodal patterns reveals the relative effects and dynamics of streamer space charge and external laplacian field. A classical 2D-fluid model for streamer propagation has been used and adapted for very high and steep voltage pulses. It shows the formation of a strong space charge (streamer) very close to the pin, but also a continuity of emission between the pin and the streamer, and electric fields higher than the critical ionization field (28 kV · cm-1 in air) almost in the whole gap and very early in the discharge propagation.

  6. Individual differences in distance perception.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Russell E

    2009-05-07

    Distance perception is among the most pervasive mental phenomena and the oldest research topics in behavioural science. However, we do not understand well the most pervasive finding of distance perception research, that of large individual differences. There are large individual differences in acrophobia (fear of heights), which we commonly assume consists of an abnormal fear of stimuli perceived normally. Evolved navigation theory (ENT) instead suggests that acrophobia consists of a more normal fear of stimuli perceived abnormally. ENT suggests that distance perception individual differences produce major components of acrophobia. Acrophobia tested over a broad range in the present study predicted large individual differences in distance estimation of surfaces that could produce falls. This fear of heights correlated positively with distance estimates of a vertical surface-even among non-acrophobic individuals at no risk of falling and without knowledge of being tested for acrophobia. Acrophobia score predicted magnitude of the descent illusion, which is thought to reflect the risk of falling. These data hold important implications in environmental navigation, clinical aetiology and the evolution of visual systems.

  7. Perceived distance during golf putting.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yumiko; Koyama, Satoshi; Inomata, Kimihiro

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the effect of anxiety states on the relationship between golf-putting distance and performance in an environment requiring high movement accuracy. Twenty-three amateur golfers attempted 15 putts at each of three putting distances, 1.25, 1.50, and 1.75m, under conditions characterized by both control demands and pressure. All attempts were recorded, and kinematic features were analyzed. Under conditions involving an audience and a monetary reward, the mean score on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Y-1 and the mean heart rate increased by 14 points and 11bpm, respectively. We grouped participants on an a posteriori basis using the median split. The backswing of high-anxiety performers shortened, the downswing speed declined, and the relative time to peak club-head velocity changed when putting under pressure from 1.25m. In contrast, no change in backswing or relative time to peak velocity was observed in low-anxiety performers, although impact velocity increased under this condition. These results indicate that the degree to which both low- and high-anxiety golfers were anxious about failure affected motor control at the 1.25-m distance, suggesting that a distortion in perceived distance may result from the interaction between putting distance and anxiety related to failure during golf putting.

  8. Bubble dynamics in a variable gap Hele-Shaw cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedra, Saul; Domiguez, Roberto; Ramos, Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    We present observations of the dynamics of individual air bubbles ascending in a Hele-Shaw cell filled with water. Cells with gaps of 1 mm, 1.5 and 2.5 mm are used and the volume of the bubbles is such that we observe bubbles with apparent diameter from 2 mm to 7.3 mm. Given that we work with air and water in all experiments, the Morton number is constant and equal to 2 . 5 ×10-11 . The results are given in terms of the Eotvos, Archimedes and Reynolds numbers, and the trajectories and wakes of the bubbles are described as functions of the gap. In all cases we observe a linear relationship between the Reynolds and Archimedes numbers, but the proportionality constant varies with the gap. Also, although the wake is composed of alternating vortices similar to the von Karman vortex street, the size and location of the vortices vary with the gap. The analysis of some features of the observations and the description of the shape of the bubbles and dominant forces are made with a two dimensional numerical solution of the conservation equations using a front tracking strategy.

  9. Crop yield gaps in Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Yengoh, Genesis T; Ardö, Jonas

    2014-03-01

    Although food crop yields per hectare have generally been increasing in Cameroon since 1961, the food price crisis of 2008 and the ensuing social unrest and fatalities raised concerns about the country's ability to meet the food needs of its population. This study examines the country's potential for increasing crop yields and food production to meet this food security challenge. Fuzzy set theory is used to develop a biophysical spatial suitability model for different crops, which in turn is employed to ascertain whether crop production is carried out in biophysically suited areas. We use linear regression to examine the trend of yield development over the last half century. On the basis of yield data from experimental stations and farmers' fields we assess the yield gap for major food crops. We find that yields have generally been increasing over the last half century and that agricultural policies can have significant effects on them. To a large extent, food crops are cultivated in areas that are biophysically suited for their cultivation, meaning that the yield gap is not a problem of biophysical suitability. Notwithstanding, there are significantly large yield gaps between actual yields on farmers' farms and maximum attainable yields from research stations. We conclude that agronomy and policies are likely to be the reasons for these large yield gaps. A key challenge to be addressed in closing the yield gaps is that of replenishing and properly managing soil nutrients.

  10. Explaining the Gender Wealth Gap

    PubMed Central

    Ruel, Erin; Hauser, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    To assess and explain the United States’ gender wealth gap, we use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to examine wealth accumulated by a single cohort over 50 years by gender, by marital status, and limited to the respondents who are their family’s best financial reporters. We find large gender wealth gaps between currently married men and women, and never-married men and women. The never-married accumulate less wealth than the currently married, and there is a marital disruption cost to wealth accumulation. The status-attainment model shows the most power in explaining gender wealth gaps between these groups explaining about one-third to one-half of the gap, followed by the human-capital explanation. In other words, a lifetime of lower earnings for women translates into greatly reduced wealth accumulation. A gender wealth gap remains between married men and women after controlling for the full model that we speculate may be related to gender differences in investment strategies and selection effects. PMID:23264038

  11. Field induced gap infrared detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, C. Thomas (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A tunable infrared detector which employs a vanishing band gap semimetal material provided with an induced band gap by a magnetic field to allow intrinsic semiconductor type infrared detection capabilities is disclosed. The semimetal material may thus operate as a semiconductor type detector with a wavelength sensitivity corresponding to the induced band gap in a preferred embodiment of a diode structure. Preferred semimetal materials include Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, x is less than 0.15, HgCdSe, BiSb, alpha-Sn, HgMgTe, HgMnTe, HgZnTe, HgMnSe, HgMgSe, and HgZnSe. The magnetic field induces a band gap in the semimetal material proportional to the strength of the magnetic field allowing tunable detection cutoff wavelengths. For an applied magnetic field from 5 to 10 tesla, the wavelength detection cutoff will be in the range of 20 to 50 micrometers for Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te alloys with x about 0.15. A similar approach may also be employed to generate infrared energy in a desired band gap and then operating the structure in a light emitting diode or semiconductor laser type of configuration.

  12. DEER Distance Measurements on Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeschke, Gunnar

    2012-05-01

    Distance distributions between paramagnetic centers in the range of 1.8 to 6 nm in membrane proteins and up to 10 nm in deuterated soluble proteins can be measured by the DEER technique. The number of paramagnetic centers and their relative orientation can be characterized. DEER does not require crystallization and is not limited with respect to the size of the protein or protein complex. Diamagnetic proteins are accessible by site-directed spin labeling. To characterize structure or structural changes, experimental protocols were optimized and techniques for artifact suppression were introduced. Data analysis programs were developed, and it was realized that interpretation of the distance distributions must take into account the conformational distribution of spin labels. First methods have appeared for deriving structural models from a small number of distance constraints. The present scope and limitations of the technique are illustrated.

  13. Air Leakage Rates in Typical Air Barrier Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Hun, Diana E.; Atchley, Jerald Allen; Childs, Phillip W.

    2016-11-01

    Estimates for 2010 indicate that infiltration in residential buildings was responsible for 2.85 quads of energy (DOE 2014), which is about 3% of the total energy consumed in the US. One of the mechanisms being implemented to reduce this energy penalty is the use of air barriers as part of the building envelope. These technologies decrease airflow through major leakage sites such as oriented strand board (OSB) joints, and gaps around penetrations (e.g., windows, doors, pipes, electrical outlets) as indicated by Hun et al. (2014). However, most air barrier materials do not properly address leakage spots such as wall-to-roof joints and wall-to-foundation joints because these are difficult to seal, and because air barrier manufacturers usually do not provide adequate instructions for these locations. The present study focuses on characterizing typical air leakage sites in wall assemblies with air barrier materials.

  14. Using Web-Based Distance Learning to Reduce Cultural Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, L. Fai; Trinidad, S. G.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, Web-based distance learning (WBDL) systems have become a popular learning environment for many western learners. While it has been established as an effective learning alternative, WBDL is not flourishing in Hong Kong as expected. This paper proposes that this is because Hong Kong students are not trained to learn independently…

  15. Distance Education at Arm's Length: Outsourcing of Distance Education Marking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Erica; Coombe, Kennece

    Two research projects focused on use of casual markers (graders) for correcting and grading distance education (DE) students' work. A Charles Sturt University project convened focus groups of DE students, casual DE markers, and lecturers who "managed" markers to uncover concerns. University of South Australia research focused on pedagogical issues…

  16. Solving the molecular distance geometry problem with inaccurate distance data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We present a new iterative algorithm for the molecular distance geometry problem with inaccurate and sparse data, which is based on the solution of linear systems, maximum cliques, and a minimization of nonlinear least-squares function. Computational results with real protein structures are presented in order to validate our approach. PMID:23901894

  17. Solving the molecular distance geometry problem with inaccurate distance data.

    PubMed

    Souza, Michael; Lavor, Carlile; Muritiba, Albert; Maculan, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    We present a new iterative algorithm for the molecular distance geometry problem with inaccurate and sparse data, which is based on the solution of linear systems, maximum cliques, and a minimization of nonlinear least-squares function. Computational results with real protein structures are presented in order to validate our approach.

  18. Statistical Efficiency in Distance Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Robert Graham

    2016-01-01

    Distance sampling is a technique for estimating the abundance of animals or other objects in a region, allowing for imperfect detection. This paper evaluates the statistical efficiency of the method when its assumptions are met, both theoretically and by simulation. The theoretical component of the paper is a derivation of the asymptotic variance penalty for the distance sampling estimator arising from uncertainty about the unknown detection parameters. This asymptotic penalty factor is tabulated for several detection functions. It is typically at least 2 but can be much higher, particularly for steeply declining detection rates. The asymptotic result relies on a model which makes the strong assumption that objects are uniformly distributed across the region. The simulation study relaxes this assumption by incorporating over-dispersion when generating object locations. Distance sampling and strip transect estimators are calculated for simulated data, for a variety of overdispersion factors, detection functions, sample sizes and strip widths. The simulation results confirm the theoretical asymptotic penalty in the non-overdispersed case. For a more realistic overdispersion factor of 2, distance sampling estimation outperforms strip transect estimation when a half-normal distance function is correctly assumed, confirming previous literature. When the hazard rate model is correctly assumed, strip transect estimators have lower mean squared error than the usual distance sampling estimator when the strip width is close enough to its optimal value (± 75% when there are 100 detections; ± 50% when there are 200 detections). Whether the ecologist can set the strip width sufficiently accurately will depend on the circumstances of each particular study. PMID:26950934

  19. Air Pollution and Control Legislation in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    P Bhave, Prashant; Kulkarni, Nikhil

    2015-09-01

    Air pollution in urban areas arises from multiple sources, which may vary with location and developmental activities. Anthropogenic activities as rampant industrialization, exploitation and over consumption of natural resources, ever growing population size are major contributors of air pollution. The presented review is an effort to discuss various aspects of air pollution and control legislation in India emphasizing on the history, present scenario, international treaties, gaps and drawbacks. The review also presents legislative controls with judicial response to certain landmark judgments related to air pollution. The down sides related to enforcement mechanism for the effective implementation of environmental laws for air pollution control have been highlighted.

  20. Entropy distance: New quantum phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Weis, Stephan; Knauf, Andreas

    2012-10-15

    We study a curve of Gibbsian families of complex 3 Multiplication-Sign 3-matrices and point out new features, absent in commutative finite-dimensional algebras: a discontinuous maximum-entropy inference, a discontinuous entropy distance, and non-exposed faces of the mean value set. We analyze these problems from various aspects including convex geometry, topology, and information geometry. This research is motivated by a theory of infomax principles, where we contribute by computing first order optimality conditions of the entropy distance.

  1. Long working distance interference microscope

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; DeBoer, Maarten P.; Smith, Norman F.

    2004-04-13

    Disclosed is a long working distance interference microscope suitable for three-dimensional imaging and metrology of MEMS devices and test structures on a standard microelectronics probe station. The long working distance of 10-30 mm allows standard probes or probe cards to be used. This enables nanometer-scale 3-D height profiles of MEMS test structures to be acquired across an entire wafer. A well-matched pair of reference/sample objectives is not required, significantly reducing the cost of this microscope, as compared to a Linnik microinterferometer.

  2. Perceptual constancy in auditory perception of distance to railway tracks.

    PubMed

    De Coensel, Bert; Nilsson, Mats E; Berglund, Birgitta; Brown, A L

    2013-07-01

    Distance to a sound source can be accurately estimated solely from auditory information. With a sound source such as a train that is passing by at a relatively large distance, the most important auditory information for the listener for estimating its distance consists of the intensity of the sound, spectral changes in the sound caused by air absorption, and the motion-induced rate of change of intensity. However, these cues are relative because prior information/experience of the sound source-its source power, its spectrum and the typical speed at which it moves-is required for such distance estimates. This paper describes two listening experiments that allow investigation of further prior contextual information taken into account by listeners-viz., whether they are indoors or outdoors. Asked to estimate the distance to the track of a railway, it is shown that listeners assessing sounds heard inside the dwelling based their distance estimates on the expected train passby sound level outdoors rather than on the passby sound level actually experienced indoors. This form of perceptual constancy may have consequences for the assessment of annoyance caused by railway noise.

  3. What's on Your Radar Screen? Distance-Rate-Time Problems from NASA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condon, Gregory W.; Landesman, Miriam F.; Calasanz-Kaiser, Agnes

    2006-01-01

    This article features NASA's FlyBy Math, a series of six standards-based distance-rate-time investigations in air traffic control. Sixth-grade students--acting as pilots, air traffic controllers, and NASA scientists--conduct an experiment and then use multiple mathematical representations to analyze and solve a problem involving two planes flying…

  4. ABORT GAP CLEANING IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    DREES,A.; AHRENS,L.; III FLILLER,R.; GASSNER,D.; MCINTYRE,G.T.; MICHNOFF,R.; TRBOJEVIC,D.

    2002-06-03

    During the RHIC Au-run in 2001 the 200 MHz storage cavity system was used for the first time. The rebucketing procedure caused significant beam debunching in addition to amplifying debunching due to other mechanisms. At the end of a four hour store, debunched beam could account for approximately 30%-40% of the total beam intensity. Some of it will be in the abort gap. In order to minimize the risk of magnet quenching due to uncontrolled beam losses at the time of a beam dump, a combination of a fast transverse kicker and copper collimators were used to clean the abort gap. This report gives an overview of the gap cleaning procedure and the achieved performance.

  5. Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

    2013-11-05

    A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

  6. Ethics in Distance Education: Developing Ethical Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearhart, Deb

    2001-01-01

    Examines the changing world of education through distance education and discusses the need for ethics in distance education. Explains how to ethically develop policy for distance education, including Internet ethics, good practices guidelines, and involving faculty. (LRW)

  7. Outdoor air pollution and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Guarnieri, Michael; Balmes, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Traffic and power generation are the main sources of urban air pollution. The idea that outdoor air pollution can cause exacerbations of pre-existing asthma is supported by an evidence base that has been accumulating for several decades, with several studies suggesting a contribution to new-onset asthma as well. In this Series paper, we discuss the effects of particulate matter (PM), gaseous pollutants (ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulphur dioxide), and mixed traffic-related air pollution. We focus on clinical studies, both epidemiological and experimental, published in the previous 5 years. From a mechanistic perspective, air pollutants probably cause oxidative injury to the airways, leading to inflammation, remodelling, and increased risk of sensitisation. Although several pollutants have been linked to new-onset asthma, the strength of the evidence is variable. We also discuss clinical implications, policy issues, and research gaps relevant to air pollution and asthma. PMID:24792855

  8. Want to Close the Achievement Gap? Close the Teaching Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling-Hammond, Linda

    2015-01-01

    For years now, educators have looked to international tests as a yardstick to measure how well students from the United States are learning compared with their peers. The answer has been: not so well. The United States has been falling further behind other nations and has struggled with a large achievement gap. Federal policy under No Child Left…

  9. Folk Belief Theory, the Rigor Gap, and the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torff, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Folk belief theory is suggested as a primary cause for the persistence of the achievement gap. In this research-supported theory, culturally specified folk beliefs about learning and teaching prompt educators to direct more rigorous curriculum to high-advantage students but not to low-advantage students, resulting in impoverished pedagogy in…

  10. Experimental Study on Electrical Breakdown for Devices with Micrometer Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guodong; Cheng, Yonghong; Dong, Chengye; Wu, Kai

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of electrical breakdown in atmospheric air across micrometer gaps is critically important for the insulation design of micro & nano electronic devices. In this paper, planar aluminum electrodes with gaps ranging from 2 μm to 40 μm were fabricated by microelectromechanical system technology. The influence factors including gap width and surface dielectric states were experimentally investigated using the home-built test and measurement system. Results showed that for SiO2 layers the current sustained at 2-3 nA during most of the pre-breakdown period, and then rose rapidly to 10-30 nA just before breakdown due to field electron emission, followed by the breakdown. The breakdown voltage curves demonstrated three stages: (1) a constantly decreasing region (the gap width d < 5 μm), where the field emission effect played an important role just near breakdown, supplying enough initial electrons for the breakdown process; (2) a plateau region with a near constant breakdown potential (5 μm < d < 10 μm) (3) a region for large gaps that adhered to Paschen's curve (d > 10 μm). And the surface dielectric states including the surface resistivity and secondary electron yield were verified to be related to the propagation of discharge due to the interaction between initial electrons and dielectrics.

  11. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  12. Demonstrations of Magnetic Phenomena: Measuring the Air Permeability Using Tablets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, V. O. M.; Amaral, D. F.; Faria, D.; Vieira, L. P.

    2014-01-01

    We use a tablet to experimentally determine the dependencies of the magnetic field (B) on the electrical current and the axial distance from a coil (z). Our data shows good precision on the inverse cubic dependence of the magnetic field on the axial distance, B?z[superscript -3]. We obtain the value of air permeability µ[subscript air] with good…

  13. Long-Distance, High Data-Rate Quantum Communication With Ultralow Loss Photonic Band Gap Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Theory of Bragg Fiber. Journal of the Optical Society of America 68, 1196-1201 (1978). 8.C. M. Smith , N. Venkataraman, M. T. Gallagher, D. Muller...reflected light power measured. REFERENCES [1] Sze, S. M. Semiconductor Devices: Physics and Technology (John Wiley, 2nd Ed., 2001). [2] Sedra , A. S

  14. Narrowing the Distance: Bridging the Gap between Teaching Online and Faculty Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochefort, Beth A.

    2013-01-01

    Online education is a steadily growing industry, and financial pressure at institutions, combined with the rising demand for online education, have caused many universities and colleges to rely on adjunct faculty to staff their online courses For instructors, the transition to teaching online can pose a variety of barriers not the least of which…

  15. Bridging the Gap: Causality-at-a-Distance in Children's Categorization and Inferences about Internal Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, David M.; Buchanan, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research has shown that preschoolers extend labels and internal properties of objects based on those objects' causal properties, even when the causal properties conflict with the objects' perceptual appearance [Nazzi, T., & Gopnik, A. (2000). "A shift in children's use of perceptual and causal cues to categorization." "Developmental…

  16. The Newest Air Force Core Function: Building Partnerships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-17

    Iraq Training and Advisory Mission – Air Force ( ITAM – AF) This paper investigated a DOTMLPF analysis to determine potential BP capability gaps...Iraq Training and Advisory Mission – Air Force ( ITAM -AF), Combined Air Power Transition Force (CAPTF)-Afghanistan, or even Multi-National Security

  17. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Two-Dimensional Locally Resonant Sonic Crystals Comprised of Helmholtz Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, L.; Elford, D. P.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Swallowe, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new type of sonic crystal technology offering a novel method of achieving broad acoustic band gaps. The proposed design of a locally resonating sonic crystal (LRSC) is constructed from "C"-shaped Helmholtz resonators as opposed to traditional solid scattering units. This unique construction enables a two band gap system to be generated in which the first -- a Bragg type band gap, arises due to the periodic nature of the crystal, whilst the second gap results from resonance of the air column within the resonators. The position of this secondary band gap is found to be dependent upon the dimensions of the resonating cavity. The band gap formation is investigated theoretically using finite element methods, and confirmed through experimental testing. It is noted that the resonance band gaps detected cover a much broader frequency range (in the order of kHz) than has been achieved to date. In addition the possibility of overlapping such a wide band gap with the characteristic Bragg gap generated by the structure itself could yield gaps of even greater range. A design of sonic crystal is proposed, that comprises of several resonators with differing cavity sizes. Such a structure generates multiple resonance gaps corresponding to the various resonator sizes, which may be overlapped to form yet larger band gaps. This multiple resonance gap system can occur in two configurations. Firstly a simple mixed array can be created by alternating resonator sizes in the array and secondly using a System coined the Matryoshka (Russian doll) array in which the resonators are distributed inside one another. The proposed designs of LRSC's offer a real potential for acoustic shielding using sonic crystals, as both the size and position of the band gaps generated can be controlled. This is an application which has been suggested and investigated for several years with little progress. Furthermore the frequency region attenuated by resonance is unrelated to the crystals lattice

  18. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Two-Dimensional Locally Resonant Sonic Crystals Comprised of Helmholtz Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, L.; Elford, D. P.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Swallowe, G. M.

    We present a new type of sonic crystal technology offering a novel method of achieving broad acoustic band gaps. The proposed design of a locally resonating sonic crystal (LRSC) is constructed from "C"-shaped Helmholtz resonators as opposed to traditional solid scattering units. This unique construction enables a two band gap system to be generated in which the first — a Bragg type band gap, arises due to the periodic nature of the crystal, whilst the second gap results from resonance of the air column within the resonators. The position of this secondary band gap is found to be dependent upon the dimensions of the resonating cavity. The band gap formation is investigated theoretically using finite element methods, and confirmed through experimental testing. It is noted that the resonance band gaps detected cover a much broader frequency range (in the order of kHz) than has been achieved to date. In addition the possibility of overlapping such a wide band gap with the characteristic Bragg gap generated by the structure itself could yield gaps of even greater range. A design of sonic crystal is proposed, that comprises of several resonators with differing cavity sizes. Such a structure generates multiple resonance gaps corresponding to the various resonator sizes, which may be overlapped to form yet larger band gaps. This multiple resonance gap system can occur in two configurations. Firstly a simple mixed array can be created by alternating resonator sizes in the array and secondly using a system coined the Matryoshka (Russian doll) array in which the resonators are distributed inside one another. The proposed designs of LRSC's offer a real potential for acoustic shielding using sonic crystals, as both the size and position of the band gaps generated can be controlled. This is an application which has been suggested and investigated for several years with little progress. Furthermore the frequency region attenuated by resonance is unrelated to the crystals

  19. A Distance Learning Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boord, Patricia M.

    1998-01-01

    To address diminishing resources and increased training demands, the Operational Training Unit (OTU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation has saved almost $2 million by developing a distance education course to replace one full week of training at the FBI Academy. Discussion focuses on major issues faced by OTU in designing/delivering this…

  20. Long-distance free fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallant, Joseph; Carlson, James

    1999-03-01

    We present an analysis of a situation described in Milton's epic poem "Paradise Lost" in which we calculate the distance required for a nine-day free-fall from rest to the Earth. The resulting method is completely general, and can be applied to free-fall toward other bodies and to near-Earth free-fall as well.

  1. Distance Education Clearinghouse Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Kate; Martin, Sara

    A World Wide Web site, developed by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Information Services staff and funded by a NEB*SAT (Nebraska's multiple channel satellite and optical fiber educational telecommunications network) grant, provides a clearinghouse of distance education, Internet, and Web page development information that is useful to librarians and…

  2. Student Preparedness for Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattice, Nancy J.; Dixon, Phillip Scott

    This paper presents the results of a student survey on computer-mediated distance education (DE) at the College of the Canyons. The survey queried students about whether DE fit their lifestyle, previous DE courses, access to a computer, the Internet and e-mail, and whether they would enroll in an on-line course. A total of 906 surveys were…

  3. Measuring Distances Using Digital Cameras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendal, Dave

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a generic method of calculating accurate horizontal and vertical object distances from digital images taken with any digital camera and lens combination, where the object plane is parallel to the image plane or tilted in the vertical plane. This method was developed for a project investigating the size, density and spatial…

  4. Next Generation Distance Education Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Farhad, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses next generation distance education systems, which include research in cognitive science, systems science, and communication theory to provide a learning environment with student autonomy congruent to prior learning, learning objectives, and content materials to be mastered. Describes Advanced Distributed Learning (ADL), object…

  5. The Future of Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saba, Farhad

    2000-01-01

    Examines factors that will influence how distance education is practiced in the first few decades of this new century. Discusses developments in digital technology; the exponential growth of knowledge about the brain, as well as physiology, chemistry, and psychology of learning; the system relationship between individual learners and instructors;…

  6. Ethical Considerations in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Diane; Sork, Thomas J.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses issues in distance education for adults that can affect the welfare of others and suggests ethical sensitivity is needed. Ethical issues addressed include admission and retention of students; course development and presentation; program and course marketing; administrative issues; learner/instructor interaction; and evaluation. (29…

  7. Using Podcasts in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppelman, Herman

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses three possible ways of applying podcasts in distance education: podcasts of recordings of virtual classes, podcasts produced for specific pedagogical aims, and podcasts produced by external organizations. Through a survey we gained insight in the (until now limited) experiences of our distant students with podcasts, and also…

  8. Distance Learners: Welcome to Campus!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwitzer, Alan M.; Duggan, Mary H.

    2005-01-01

    Old Dominion University's distance learning program, called TELETECHNET, brings the main-campus college experience to geographically distant learners at sites across Virginia and as far away as the state of Washington, as well as to military personnel on Navy bases, carriers, and submarines. In an interesting turnabout, the Summer Institute for…

  9. Designing a Distance Learning Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Michael P.

    1998-01-01

    Details the design of a distance-learning facility through analysis of its functions, paper-handling requirements, and current and future communications-technology needs. It also lists special features the facility should have, including up-to-date wiring capacities for telecommunications, uplink and downlink capabilities to satellites, and…

  10. Distance Education for Technology Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, P. John

    2004-01-01

    A typical definition of distance education is the delivery of instruction in a format that separates the teacher and learner, often both in time and space. It tends to be an umbrella term that may encompass more specific forms of education such as distributed learning, independent study, correspondence education, satellite education, etc. This…

  11. International Cooperation in Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Magnus

    This paper addresses some of the general issues of international cooperation within the context of distance education. Examples of the types of international cooperation are introduced in order to explain some of the pitfalls that can occur when coordinating organizations on an international level. Extensive discussion is undertaken concerning…

  12. Long distance tracking of birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, W. W.

    1972-01-01

    The application of radio telemetry techniques to the long distance tracking of birds is discussed. The types of equipment developed and methods for attachment to a bird are described. The operating range of the radio transmitter receiver system is examined, and methods for acquiring and analyzing the data are explained.

  13. Distance Education and Organizational Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Jean F.; LaMendola, Walter; Alter, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    As distance education models in social work education continue to grow, this study addresses prevalence and type of models in graduate social work programs and the perceptions of deans about the future of e-learning models of curriculum delivery. The study was an exploratory sequential mixed-methods design including a national survey of 121…

  14. Lessons in Developing Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gant, Lenora Peters

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of video teletraining (VTT) for distance learning in the Department of Defense. Topics include planning and organizing the VTT facility, staff development, site facilitators, the necessity of protocol, instructional design and development strategies, student involvement and interactivity, and evaluation and assessment. (LRW)

  15. Teacher Development through Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Anna

    1994-01-01

    About one-third of British teachers studying the Open University's short postgraduate modules for the Certificate of Professional Development in Education do not complete the assessment element of the course. The article discusses the outcome of a survey to find out why that occurs, exploring the potential of distance learning in supporting…

  16. Interaction in Distance Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boz Yuksekdag, Belgin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine psychiatry nurses' attitudes toward the interactions in distance nursing education, and also scrunize their attitudes based on demographics and computer/Internet usage. The comparative relational scanning model is the method of this study. The research data were collected through "The Scale of Attitudes of…

  17. The Ontogeny of Gap Crossing Behaviour in Bornean Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii)

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Jackie; Phillips, Abigail C.; van Noordwijk, Maria A.; Mitra Setia, Tatang; Thorpe, Susannah K. S.

    2015-01-01

    For orangutans, the largest predominantly arboreal primates, discontinuous canopy presents a particular challenge. The shortest gaps between trees lie between thin peripheral branches, which offer the least stability to large animals. The affordances of the forest canopy experienced by orangutans of different ages however, must vary substantially as adult males are an order of magnitude larger in size than infants during the early stages of locomotor independence. Orangutans have developed a diverse range of locomotor behaviour to cross gaps between trees, which vary in their physical and cognitive demands. The aims of this study were to examine the ontogeny of orangutan gap crossing behaviours and to determine which factors influence the distance orangutans crossed. A non-invasive photographic technique was used to quantify forearm length as a measure of body size. We also recorded locomotor behaviour, support use and the distance crossed between trees. Our results suggest that gap crossing varies with both physical and cognitive development. More complex locomotor behaviours, which utilized compliant trunks and lianas, were used to cross the largest gaps, but these peaked in frequency much earlier than expected, between the ages of 4 and 5 years old, which probably reflects play behaviour to perfect locomotor techniques. Smaller individuals also crossed disproportionately large gaps relative to their size, by using support deformation. Our results suggest that orangutans acquire the full repertoire of gap crossing techniques, including the more cognitively demanding ones, before weaning, but adjust the frequency of the use of these techniques to their increasing body size. PMID:26154061

  18. The Ontogeny of Gap Crossing Behaviour in Bornean Orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus wurmbii).

    PubMed

    Chappell, Jackie; Phillips, Abigail C; van Noordwijk, Maria A; Mitra Setia, Tatang; Thorpe, Susannah K S

    2015-01-01

    For orangutans, the largest predominantly arboreal primates, discontinuous canopy presents a particular challenge. The shortest gaps between trees lie between thin peripheral branches, which offer the least stability to large animals. The affordances of the forest canopy experienced by orangutans of different ages however, must vary substantially as adult males are an order of magnitude larger in size than infants during the early stages of locomotor independence. Orangutans have developed a diverse range of locomotor behaviour to cross gaps between trees, which vary in their physical and cognitive demands. The aims of this study were to examine the ontogeny of orangutan gap crossing behaviours and to determine which factors influence the distance orangutans crossed. A non-invasive photographic technique was used to quantify forearm length as a measure of body size. We also recorded locomotor behaviour, support use and the distance crossed between trees. Our results suggest that gap crossing varies with both physical and cognitive development. More complex locomotor behaviours, which utilized compliant trunks and lianas, were used to cross the largest gaps, but these peaked in frequency much earlier than expected, between the ages of 4 and 5 years old, which probably reflects play behaviour to perfect locomotor techniques. Smaller individuals also crossed disproportionately large gaps relative to their size, by using support deformation. Our results suggest that orangutans acquire the full repertoire of gap crossing techniques, including the more cognitively demanding ones, before weaning, but adjust the frequency of the use of these techniques to their increasing body size.

  19. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOEpatents

    Hysinger, C.L.; Beaman, J.J.; Melgaard, D.K.; Williamson, R.L.

    1999-07-27

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows. 17 figs.

  20. Featured Image: Simulating Planetary Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    The authors model of howthe above disk would look as we observe it in a scattered-light image. The morphology of the gap can be used to estimate the mass of the planet that caused it. [Dong Fung 2017]The above image from a computer simulation reveals the dust structure of a protoplanetary disk (with the star obscured in the center) as a newly formed planet orbits within it. A recent study by Ruobing Dong (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) and Jeffrey Fung (University of California, Berkeley) examines how we can determine mass of such a planet based on our observations of the gap that the planet opens in the disk as it orbits. The authors models help us to better understand how our observations of gaps might change if the disk is inclined relative to our line of sight, and how we can still constrain the mass of the gap-opening planet and the viscosity of the disk from the scattered-light images we have recently begun to obtain of distant protoplanetary disks. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationRuobing Dong () and Jeffrey Fung () 2017 ApJ 835 146. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/835/2/146

  1. Multiple input electrode gap controller

    DOEpatents

    Hysinger, Christopher L.; Beaman, Joseph J.; Melgaard, David K.; Williamson, Rodney L.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for controlling vacuum arc remelting (VAR) furnaces by estimation of electrode gap based on a plurality of secondary estimates derived from furnace outputs. The estimation is preferably performed by Kalman filter. Adaptive gain techniques may be employed, as well as detection of process anomalies such as glows.

  2. Large gap magnetic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelsalam, Moustafa K.; Eyssa, Y. M.

    1991-01-01

    The design of a large gap magnetic suspension system is discussed. Some of the topics covered include: the system configuration, permanent magnet material, levitation magnet system, superconducting magnets, resistive magnets, superconducting levitation coils, resistive levitation coils, levitation magnet system, and the nitrogen cooled magnet system.

  3. The Widening Income Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean F.

    2013-01-01

    Has the academic achievement gap between high-income and low-income students changed over the last few decades? If so, why? And what can schools do about it? Researcher Sean F. Reardon conducted a comprehensive analysis of research to answer these questions and came up with some striking findings. In this article, he shows that income-related…

  4. Literary Gaps Invite Creative Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jerry J.

    Literary gaps were identified by Wolfgang Iser in 1974 as "vacant pages" that invite the reader to reflect and enter into the text thereby motivating students to experience the text as reality. Arthur Applebee, in 1979, identified three categories to distinguish children's types of interaction with stories: (1) the complexity of literary…

  5. Use of Information and Communication Technology to Enhance the Information Literacy Skills of Distance Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastula, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become an integral tool in enhancing library services worldwide. This article looks at ways technology is utilized at Massey University to bridge the gap between distance students and traditional library services. There are a variety of software providers, formats and implementation practices…

  6. Strategies to Improve Retention of Postgraduate Business Students in Distance Education Courses: An Australian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, David; Ng, Eric; Birch, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    In spite of the clear value of postgraduate business students to many providers of distance education courses, the factors affecting the retention of these students have received limited attention in the literature. In addressing this gap, this paper presents the findings of a qualitative study into the factors affecting the retention of…

  7. Gaps"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of daily quizzes on the performance of college students. Students in an introductory psychology course used their own wireless-enabled devices to take short Internet-based quizzes at the beginning of every class. The quiz items were drawn approximately equally from material covered in the readings and the…

  8. Manipulating full photonic band gaps in two dimensional birefringent photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Verma, Prabhat; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Shoji, Satoru; Kawata, Satoshi

    2008-09-15

    The probability to realize a full photonic band gap in two-dimensional birefringent photonic crystals can be readily manipulated by introducing symmetry reduction or air holes in the crystal elements. The results lie in either creation of new band gaps or enlargement of existing band gaps. In particular, a combination of the two processes produces an effect much stronger than a simple summation of their individual contributions. Materials with both relatively low refractive index (rutile) and high refractive index (tellurium) were considered. The combined effect of introduction of symmetry reduction and air holes resulted in a maximum enlargement of the band gaps by 8.4% and 20.2%, respectively, for the two materials.

  9. The Air Sensor Citizen Science Toolbox: A Collaboration in Community Air Quality Monitoring and Mapping

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research in Action: Collect air quality data to characterize near-road/near-source hotspots; Determine potential impact on nearby residences & roadways; Case study of successful use of such data; Relationship between distance to roadways and industrial sources, exposure to...

  10. Continuing Engineering Education through Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baukal, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    The demand for distance continuing engineering education (CEE) is growing. This article describes the following with regard to CEE: the purpose; its importance, trends and unique challenges. Distance education can meet some of these challenges. Benefits and challenges of distance CEE are discussed along with the different types of distance CEE…

  11. Effective Teaching in Distance Education. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mielke, Dan

    Distance education is an alternative method for delivering academic course work to students unable to attend traditional campus-based classes. This Digest presents information on the many forms of distance education and keys to successful teaching with distance education. Distance education is a method of education in which the learner is…

  12. The Semantic Distance Model of Relevance Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the Semantic Distance Model (SDM) of Relevance Assessment, a cognitive model of the relationship between semantic distance and relevance assessment. Discusses premises of the model such as the subjective nature of information and the metaphor of semantic distance. Empirical results illustrate the effects of semantic distance and semantic…

  13. SISAM interferometer for distance measurements.

    PubMed

    Verrier, I; Brun, G; Goure, J P

    1997-09-01

    We measure short distances with a spectromètre interférentiel à sélection par l'amplitude de la modulation (SISAM) (interferential spectrometer by selection of amplitude modulation) interferometer that correlates optical fields. We present the method and the resolution of the system. A test with a Michelson interferometer shows SISAM's ability to detect phase change in one arm of the Michelson interferometer.

  14. Distance Probes of Dark Energy

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; ...

    2015-03-15

    We present the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). This document summarizes the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  15. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  16. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Climate Change on Children's Health: Session Two: Air Quality Impacts MODERATOR: Susan Anenberg, EPA Meredith McCormack, Johns ... University • Effects of Climate Change on Children’s Health: Air Quality Impacts Frederica Perera, Columbia University • Air quality Impacts ...

  17. Teaching Chemistry via Distance Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschmann, Erwin

    2003-06-01

    This paper describes a chemistry course taught at Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis via television, with a Web version added later. The television format is a delivery technology; the Web is an engagement technology and is preferred since it requires student participation. The distance-laboratory component presented the greatest challenge since laboratories via distance education are not a part of the U.S. academic culture. Appropriate experiments have been developed with the consultation of experts from The Open University in the United Kingdom, Athabasca University in Canada, and Monash University in Australia. The criteria used in the development of experiments are: (1) they must be credible academic experiences equal to or better than those used on campus, (2) they must be easy to perform without supervision, (3) they must be safe, and (4) they must meet all legal requirements. An evaluation of the program using three different approaches is described. The paper concludes that technology-mediated distance education students do as well as on-campus students, but drop out at a higher rate. It is very important to communicate with students frequently, and technology tools ought to be used only if good pedagogy is enhanced by their use.

  18. Ghost imaging with broad distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, De-Yang; Zhang, Lu; Du, Shao-Jiang; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present a scheme that is able to achieve the ghost imaging with broad distance. The physical nature of our scheme is that the different wavelength beams are separated in free space by an optical media according to the slow light or dispersion principle. Meanwhile, the equality of the optical distance of the two light arms is not violated. The photon correlation is achieved by the rotating ground glass plate (RGGP) and spatial light modulator (SLM), respectively. Our work shows that a monochromic ghost image can be obtained in the case of RGGP. More importantly, the position (or distance) of the object can be ascertained by the color of the image. Thus, the imaging and ranging processes are combined as one process for the first time to the best of our knowledge. In the case of SLM, we can obtain a colored image regardless of where the object is. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178012, 11204156, 11304179, and 11247240), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20133705110001 and 20123705120002), the Scientific Research Foundation for Outstanding Young Scientists of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. BS2013DX034), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2012FQ024).

  19. The Zero Exemplar Distance Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Minghui

    Given two genomes with duplicate genes, Zero Exemplar Distance is the problem of deciding whether the two genomes can be reduced to the same genome without duplicate genes by deleting all but one copy of each gene in each genome. Blin, Fertin, Sikora, and Vialette recently proved that Zero Exemplar Distance for monochromosomal genomes is NP-hard even if each gene appears at most two times in each genome, thereby settling an important open question on genome rearrangement in the exemplar model. In this paper, we give a very simple alternative proof of this result. We also study the problem Zero Exemplar Distance for multichromosomal genomes without gene order: from one direction, we show that this problem is NP-hard even if each gene appears at most two times in each genome; from the other direction, we show that this problem admits a polynomial-time algorithm if only one of the two genomes has duplicate genes, and is fixed-parameter tractable if the parameter is the maximum number of chromosomes in each genome.

  20. The Magnetotail at Lunar Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibeck, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation reviews some of the single-point observations of the magnetotail at lunar distances made by ALSEP, Explorer 33, 35, ISEE-3, and Geotail that form the framework for interpreting more recent dual-spacecraft ARTEMIS observations. Earth's distant magnetotail flaps, twists, and flattens in response to variations in the solar wind flow direction and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. It may even disappear leaving nothing more than a wake during strongly northward IMF orientations. Standing slow mode expansion fans provide for a gradual transition between magnetotail lobe and magnetosheath plasma and magnetic field parameters. The distant neutral line may at times reside at lunar distances, creating jets of sunward-streaming plasma within the cislunar plasma sheet and layers of streaming energetic particles on its boundaries. Reconnection at near-Earth neutral lines releases antisunward-moving plasmoids that transit lunar distances, briefly expanding the diameter of the plasma sheet and magnetotail. Taken as a whole, the distant magnetotail is a fascinating plasma laboratory and a region of great important to the magnetosphere.

  1. Emplacement Gantry Gap Analysis Study

    SciTech Connect

    R. Thornley

    2005-05-27

    To date, the project has established important to safety (ITS) performance requirements for structures, systems, and components (SSCs) based on the identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the ''Nuclear Safety Design Bases for License Application'' (NSDB) (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171512], Table A-11). Further, SSCs credited with performing safety functions are classified as ITS. In turn, assurance that these SSCs will perform as required is sought through the use of consensus codes and standards. This gap analysis is based on the design completed for license application only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, alternative designs currently under consideration will be discussed throughout this study. This gap analysis will evaluate each code and standard identified within the ''Emplacement Gantry ITS Standards Identification Study'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173586]) to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied, a gap is highlighted. This study will identify requirements to supplement or augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, this gap analysis will identify nonstandard areas of the design that will be subject to a design development plan. Nonstandard components and nonstandard design configurations are defined as areas of the design that do not follow standard industry practices or codes and standards. Whereby, assurance that an SSC will perform as required may not be readily sought though the use of consensus standards. This

  2. Observational Properties of Protoplanetary Disk Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnière, Peggy; Bjorkman, J. E.; Frank, Adam; Quillen, Alice C.; Carciofi, A. C.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Wood, Kenneth

    2006-02-01

    We study the effects of an annular gap induced by an embedded protoplanet on disk scattered light images and the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED). We find that the outer edge of a gap is brighter in the scattered light images than a similar location in a gap-free disk. The stellar radiation that would have been scattered by material within the gap is instead scattered by the disk wall at the outer edge of the gap, producing a bright ring surrounding the dark gap in the images. Given sufficient resolution, such gaps can be detected by the presence of this bright ring in scattered light images. A gap in a disk also changes the shape of the SED. Radiation that would have been absorbed by material in the gap is instead reprocessed by the outer gap wall. This leads to a decrease in the SED at wavelengths corresponding to the temperature at the radius of the missing gap material, and to a corresponding flux increase at longer wavelengths corresponding to the temperature of the outer wall. We note, however, that the presence of an annular gap does not change the bolometric IR flux; it simply redistributes the radiation previously produced by material within the gap to longer wavelengths. Although it will be difficult on the basis of the SED alone to distinguish between the presence of a gap and other physical effects, the level of changes can be sufficiently large to be measurable with current instruments (e.g., Spitzer).

  3. Quantum mechanical effects in plasmonic structures with subnanometre gaps

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenqi; Esteban, Ruben; Borisov, Andrei G.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Lezec, Henri J.; Aizpurua, Javier; Crozier, Kenneth B.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic structures with nanogap features have proven highly effective as building blocks for plasmonic systems, as they can provide a wide tuning range of operating frequencies and large near-field enhancements. Recent work has shown that quantum mechanical effects such as electron tunnelling and nonlocal screening become important as the gap distances approach the subnanometre length-scale. Such quantum effects challenge the classical picture of nanogap plasmons and have stimulated a number of theoretical and experimental studies. This review outlines the findings of many groups into quantum mechanical effects in nanogap plasmons, and discusses outstanding challenges and future directions. PMID:27255556

  4. Mechanically tunable sub-10 nm metal gap by stretching PDMS substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjie; Shen, Yang; Xiao, Guohui; She, Xiaoyi; Wang, Jianfang; Jin, Chongjun

    2017-02-01

    Manipulating light in sub-10 nm or subnanometer metal nanogaps is crucial to study the strong interaction between electromagnetic waves and matters. However, the fabrication of metallic nanogaps with precisely controlled size and high-throughput still remains a challenge. Here, we developed an approach to actively control the gap distance between adjacent metal nanoparticles from 140 nm to sub-10 nm or even 0 nm via mechanical stretching process. To demonstrate this method, we manufactured the gold disk arrays in a square lattice on the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate through interference lithography and gold deposition, and sub-10 nm interparticle gap was achieved as exerting a strain of 100% to the PDMS substrate. Transmission spectra show a remarkable red shift of the dipole resonance with narrowing gap from 140 nm to sub-10 nm. Importantly, a universal scaling law between the gap distance in nanoscale and the stretching amount of PDMS substrate in macroscopic scale were demonstrated experimentally and theoretically. Our method can tune the gap distance continuously and reversibly, suggesting potential applications in surface-enhanced Raman scattering, single photon emitter and quantum tunneling of electric charge.

  5. Military Pay Gaps and Caps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    RATIOS AND ENLISTED RECRUIT QUALITY AND RETENTION 27 C. MILITARY-CrVIL SERVICE PAY ADJUSTMENT LINKAGE: LEGISLATIVE BACKGROUND, 1967-1993 30...DECI), which we constructed previously and have updated to include fiscal 1992. We compare pay gaps based on the ECI versus the DECI and present DECI...do. There is no claim that the levels of military and civilian pay are equal at base point. If pay levels are equal at the base point, the divergence

  6. The Fundamental Gap of Simplices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhiqin; Rowlett, Julie

    2013-04-01

    The gap function of a domain {Ω subset {R}^n} is ξ(Ω) := d^2 (λ_2 - λ_1) , where d is the diameter of Ω, and λ1 and λ2 are the first two positive Dirichlet eigenvalues of the Euclidean Laplacian on Ω. It was recently shown by Andrews and Clutterbuck (J Amer Math Soc 24:899-916, 2011) that for any convex {Ω subset {R}^n}, ξ(Ω) ≥ 3 π^2 , where the infimum occurs for n = 1. On the other hand, the gap function on the moduli space of n-simplices behaves differently. Our first theorem is a compactness result for the gap function on the moduli space of n-simplices. Next, specializing to n = 2, our second main result proves the recent conjecture of Antunes-Freitas (J Phys A: Math Theor 41(5):055201, 2008) for any triangle {T subset {R}^2}, ξ(T) ≥ 64 π^2/9 , with equality if and only if T is equilateral.

  7. Prometheus and the Keeler gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajeddine, Radwan; Nicholson, Phillip D.; Hedman, Matthew M.; French, Richard G.; Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Burns, Joseph A.

    2014-11-01

    Linblad resonances with Saturn’s satellites are located at many radii in the rings. While some cause density or bending waves, others hold gap edges from spreading, like the 2:1 resonance with Mimas located at the B-ring edge, the 7:6 resonance with Janus at the A-ring edge, and the 32:31 resonance with Prometheus at the inner edge of the Keeler gap. The latter is the case of study here.Theoretically, the inner edge of the Keeler gap should have 32 regular sinusoidal lobes, where either the maximum or the minimum radius is expected to be aligned with Prometheus and rotating with its mean motion. We show that such is not the case. Fit of occultation data shows the presence of the 32:31 resonance, however, the fit residuals is as high as the amplitude of the resonance amplitude (about 2 km). Analysis of the ISS data, shows irregularities overlapping the lobes (Tiscareno et al. 2005, DPS), that follow Keplerian motion. These irregularities may be due to clumps of particles with different eccentricities than the rest of the edge particles. This phenomenon may be caused by the resonance, as it has not been observed at other circular edges were no resonance is present at their location. The ISS data also shows that the lobe’s minimum/maximum is not perfectly aligned with the longitude of Prometheus, which may be due to libration about the centre of the resonance.

  8. 103. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    103. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air Bellows Gap. Elevation view of concrete slab bridge built in 1937. Looking southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  9. 104. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    104. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air Bellows Gap. Detail of the stepped wing wall. Looking southwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  10. 105. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    105. North Carolina Route 1130 grade separation structure at Air Bellows Gap. View showing the access road from the parkway. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  11. Mattig's relation and dynamical distance indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teerikorpi, P.; Baryshev, Yu. V.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss how the redshift (Mattig) method in the Friedmann cosmology relates to dynamical distance indicators based on Newton's gravity (Teerikorpi 2011). It belongs to the class of indicators where the relevant length inside the system is the distance itself (in this case the proper metric distance). As the Friedmann model has a Newtonian analogy, its use to infer distances has instructive similarities to classical dynamical distance indicators. In view of the theoretical exact linear distance-velocity law, we emphasize that it is conceptually correct to derive the cosmological distance via the route: redshift (primarily observed) -> space expansion velocity (not directly observed) -> metric distance (physical length in ``cm''). Important properties of the proper metric distance are summarized.

  12. Method and apparatus for controlling electrode gap during vacuum consumable arc remelting

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, R.W.; Maroone, J.P.; Tipping, D.W.; Zanner, F.J.

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  13. Distance Measurement Solves Astrophysical Mysteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-08-01

    Location, location, and location. The old real-estate adage about what's really important proved applicable to astrophysics as astronomers used the sharp radio "vision" of the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to pinpoint the distance to a pulsar. Their accurate distance measurement then resolved a dispute over the pulsar's birthplace, allowed the astronomers to determine the size of its neutron star and possibly solve a mystery about cosmic rays. "Getting an accurate distance to this pulsar gave us a real bonanza," said Walter Brisken, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Monogem Ring The Monogem Ring, in X-Ray Image by ROSAT satellite CREDIT: Max-Planck Institute, American Astronomical Society (Click on Image for Larger Version) The pulsar, called PSR B0656+14, is in the constellation Gemini, and appears to be near the center of a circular supernova remnant that straddles Gemini and its neighboring constellation, Monoceros, and is thus called the Monogem Ring. Since pulsars are superdense, spinning neutron stars left over when a massive star explodes as a supernova, it was logical to assume that the Monogem Ring, the shell of debris from a supernova explosion, was the remnant of the blast that created the pulsar. However, astronomers using indirect methods of determining the distance to the pulsar had concluded that it was nearly 2500 light-years from Earth. On the other hand, the supernova remnant was determined to be only about 1000 light-years from Earth. It seemed unlikely that the two were related, but instead appeared nearby in the sky purely by a chance juxtaposition. Brisken and his colleagues used the VLBA to make precise measurements of the sky position of PSR B0656+14 from 2000 to 2002. They were able to detect the slight offset in the object's apparent position when viewed from opposite sides of Earth's orbit around the Sun. This effect, called parallax, provides a direct measurement of

  14. Variable Distance Angular Symbology Reader

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Corder, Eric L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A variable distance angular symbology, reader utilizes at least one light source to direct light through a beam splitter and onto a target. A target may be angled relative to the impinging light beam up to and maybe even greater than 45deg. A reflected beam from the target passes through the beam splitter and is preferably directed 90deg relative to the light source through a telecentric lens to a scanner which records an image of the target such as a direct part marking code.

  15. 1D PIC-DSMC simulations of breakdown in microscale gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Chris H.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Crozier, Paul S.; Boerner, Jeremiah J.; Musson, Lawrence C.; Hooper, Russell W.; Bettencourt, Matthew T.

    2012-11-01

    An explicit electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) code with complex boundary conditions and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) particle collisions is utilized to investigate one dimensional direct current breakdown between two electrodes separated by air at STP. The simulation model includes Auger neutralization and cold field electron emission from the cathode as well as electron-neutral elastic, ionization, and excitation interactions. The simulated breakdown voltages at various electrode gap sizes are compared to experimental data and the Paschen curve. It is found that cold field electron emission can explain the breakdown voltage deviation from the Paschen curve measured for small gaps. Breakdown in large gaps proceeds over multiple ion transit timescales as electrons created via Auger neutralization of ions at the cathode quickly stream across the gap, creating new ions which accelerate towards the cathode and release another "pulse" of electrons. If the resultant pulse of electrons is larger than the initial pulse, then this process can build up a significant quasi-neutral plasma in the gap and the voltage drop across the gap will occur primarily across the (thin) sheath. Breakdown is accelerated if the electric field at the cathode surface is large enough for significant cold field emission flux, which increases the plasma density and decreases the Debye length and thus the sheath size, further increasing the electric field and cold field emission flux from the cathode surface. Breakdown in air pressure gaps was found to be sensitive to the differential scattering cross section for electron-neutral interactions. Isotropic scattering of elastic collisions results in lower breakdown voltages at moderate gaps (several mean free paths) and higher breakdown voltages for large gap sizes compared to when more accurate forward-biased scattering distributions are used. The dependence of breakdown voltage on the scattering distribution is due to a competition

  16. Psychological distance to reward: A human replication

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jin-Pang

    1989-01-01

    Choice behavior in college students was examined in two experiments using the concurrent-chains procedure. In both experiments, the concurrent chains were presented on a microcomputer in the form of an air-defense game in which subjects used two radar systems to detect and subsequently destroy enemy aircraft. Access to one of two radar systems was controlled by a pair of independent concurrent variable-interval 60-s schedules with a 4-s changeover delay always in effect. In the terminal link, the appearance of an enemy aircraft was determined by a pair of differentially segmented fixed-time schedules (Experiment 1) or fixed-interval schedules (Experiment 2) of equal overall duration. In Experiment 1, the terminal-link duration was either 20 s or 40 s, and subjects preferred the unsegmented to the segmented intervals. In Experiment 2, the duration was either 10 s or 60 s, and the reinforcement contingencies required responding during the terminal link. Prior to the reinstatement of the initial link, subjects estimated the duration of the terminal-link schedule. Segmentation affected choice in the 60-s conditions but not in the 10-s ones. Preference for the unsegmented schedule was correlated with an overestimation of the durations for the segmented schedules. These results replicated those found in animal experiments and support the notion of increasing the psychological distance to reward by segmenting a time-based schedule of reinforcement. PMID:16812581

  17. Air Cleaning Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    , and personal protection methods. Engineering methods that are usually carried out by the building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system function to prevent the spread of airborne infectious pathogens by diluting (dilution ventilation) and removing (exhaust ventilation) contaminated air from a room, controlling the direction of airflow and the air flow patterns in a building. However, general wear and tear over time may compromise the HVAC system’s effectiveness to maintain adequate indoor air quality. Likewise, economic issues may curtail the completion of necessary renovations to increase its effectiveness. Therefore, when exposure to airborne infectious pathogens is a risk, the use of an in-room air cleaner to reduce the concentration of airborne pathogens and prevent the spread of airborne infectious diseases has been proposed as an alternative to renovating a HVAC system. Airborne transmission is the spread of infectious pathogens over large distances through the air. Infectious pathogens, which may include fungi, bacteria, and viruses, vary in size and can be dispersed into the air in drops of moisture after coughing or sneezing. Small drops of moisture carrying infectious pathogens are called droplet nuclei. Droplet nuclei are about 1 to 5μm in diameter. This small size in part allows them to remain suspended in the air for several hours and be carried by air currents over considerable distances. Large drops of moisture carrying infectious pathogens are called droplets. Droplets being larger than droplet nuclei, travel shorter distances (about 1 metre) before rapidly falling out of the air to the ground. Because droplet nuclei remain airborne for longer periods than do droplets, they are more amenable to engineering infection control methods than are droplets. Droplet nuclei are responsible for the airborne transmission of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, chicken pox (varicella), measles (rubeola), and dessiminated herpes

  18. Direct Band Gap Wurtzite Gallium Phosphide Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The main challenge for light-emitting diodes is to increase the efficiency in the green part of the spectrum. Gallium phosphide (GaP) with the normal cubic crystal structure has an indirect band gap, which severely limits the green emission efficiency. Band structure calculations have predicted a direct band gap for wurtzite GaP. Here, we report the fabrication of GaP nanowires with pure hexagonal crystal structure and demonstrate the direct nature of the band gap. We observe strong photoluminescence at a wavelength of 594 nm with short lifetime, typical for a direct band gap. Furthermore, by incorporation of aluminum or arsenic in the GaP nanowires, the emitted wavelength is tuned across an important range of the visible light spectrum (555–690 nm). This approach of crystal structure engineering enables new pathways to tailor materials properties enhancing the functionality. PMID:23464761

  19. Closing the Prescription Drug Coverage Gap

    MedlinePlus

    ... coverage gap discount work for brand-name drugs? Companies that make brand-name prescription drugs must sign ... Coverage Gap Discount Program. This program requires the companies to offer discounts on brand-name drugs to ...

  20. Resolution characteristics of graded band-gap reflection-mode AlGaAs/GaAs photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wenjuan; Zhang, Daoli; Zou, Jijun; Peng, Xincun; Wang, Weilu; Zhang, Yijun; Chang, Benkang

    2015-12-01

    The modulation transfer function (MTF) of graded band-gap AlGaAs/GaAs reflection-mode photocathodes was determined using two-dimensional Poisson and continuity equations through numerical method. Based on the MTF model, we calculated the theoretical MTF of graded and uniform band-gap reflection-mode photocathodes. We then analyzed the effects of Al composition, wavelength of incident photon, and thicknesses of AlGaAs and GaAs layer on the resolution. Calculation results show that graded band-gap structures can increase the resolution of reflection-mode photocathodes. When the spatial frequency is 800 lp/mm and wavelength is 600 nm, the resolution of graded band-gap photocathodes generally increases by 15.4-29.6%. The resolution improvement of graded band-gap photocathodes is attributed to the fact that the built-in electric field in graded band-gap photocathodes reduces the lateral diffusion distance of photoelectrons.

  1. Lightweight Distance Bounding Protocol against Relay Attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Kookrae; Yum, Dae Hyun; Hong, Sung Je; Lee, Pil Joong

    Traditional authentication protocols are based on cryptographic techniques to achieve identity verification. Distance bounding protocols are an enhanced type of authentication protocol built upon both signal traversal time measurement and cryptographic techniques to accomplish distance verification as well as identity verification. A distance bounding protocol is usually designed to defend against the relay attack and the distance fraud attack. As there are applications to which the distance fraud attack is not a serious threat, we propose a streamlined distance bounding protocol that focuses on the relay attack. The proposed protocol is more efficient than previous protocols and has a low false acceptance rate under the relay attack.

  2. Minimum distance classification in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, A. G.; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The utilization of minimum distance classification methods in remote sensing problems, such as crop species identification, is considered. Literature concerning both minimum distance classification problems and distance measures is reviewed. Experimental results are presented for several examples. The objective of these examples is to: (a) compare the sample classification accuracy of a minimum distance classifier, with the vector classification accuracy of a maximum likelihood classifier, and (b) compare the accuracy of a parametric minimum distance classifier with that of a nonparametric one. Results show the minimum distance classifier performance is 5% to 10% better than that of the maximum likelihood classifier. The nonparametric classifier is only slightly better than the parametric version.

  3. Downslope windstorms and gap winds during T-REX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, G. J.; Armi, L.

    2010-09-01

    Downslope windstorms, gap flows and foehn are ubiquituous in all mountainous areas of the world. The large observational database from the 2006 T-REX campaign is used to trace their manifestation downstream of the Sierra Nevada, California. How a stably stratified airmass upstream of the Sierra Nevada can descend as foehn into the nearly 3 km deep Owens Valley will be studied for three different cases. The simplest one is a gap flow case: While upstream conditions remained fairly stationary, strong diurnal heating on the downstream side warmed the valley air mass sufficiently to permit flow through the passes to descend to the valley floor only in the late afternoon. Potential temperatures of air crossing the crest were too warm to descend past a virtual floor formed by the strong potential temperature step at the top of the valley air mass, the height of which changed throughout the day primarily due to diurnal heating in the valley. The second case had flow descending into the valley not only through the passes but also across the crest; a situation referred to as downslope windstorm or alternatively as deep foehn. The third case was the most complicated one with four distinct layers involved. The results from the T-REX campaign will be compared with those from the Mesocale Alpine Programme.

  4. Gap Year: Time off, with a Plan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpey, Elka Maria

    2009-01-01

    A gap year allows people to step off the usual educational or career path and reassess their future. According to people who have taken a gap year, the time away can be well worth it. This article can help a person decide whether to take a gap year and how to make the most of his time off. It describes what a gap year is, including its pros and…

  5. Instructional design for distance learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdeau, Jacqueline; Bates, Anthony

    1996-12-01

    An intrinsic link exists between instructional design (ID) and distance learning (DL). Their inextricability in the real world raises specific problems of interest in the field of ID. In no other teaching/learning situation is ID so essential as in DL. The conditions of DL make it a necessity to have long-term instructional planning, cost analysis, curriculum and course development, instructional materials development and maintenance, delivery plans, and detailed evaluation rules. Without all of these components, DL simply could not happen. It took some time for this neccessity to be acknowledged, as can be seen in the history of DL. However, ID becomes even more critical as increasingly costly and complex means are used. Conditions of learning have special features in DL, such as the role of media, since the professor, teacher or instructor is replaced by media for either transmitting information or for organizing learning activities. In this paper, the term distance learning will be used to mean media-based, remote or asynchronous learning supported by an instructional system. This paper introduces general features of DL and examines essential aspects of ID for DL, with special emphasis on ID methodologies and on media selection.

  6. Time-Distance Helioseismology (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duvall, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    Time-distance helioseismology is a method of ambient noise imaging using the solar oscillations. The basic realization that led to time-distance helioseismology was that the temporal cross correlation of the signals at two 'surface' (or photospheric) locations should show a feature at the time lag corresponding to the subsurface travel time between the locations. The temporal cross correlation, as a function of the location separation, is the Fourier transform of the spatio-temporal power spectrum of the solar oscillations, a commonly used function in helioseismology. It is therefore likely the charactistic ridge structure of the correlation function had been seen before without appreciation of its significance. Travel times are measured from the cross correlations. The times are sensitive to a number of important subsurface solar phenomena. These include sound speed variations, flows, and magnetic fields. There has been much interesting progress in the 17 years since the first paper on this subject (Duvall et al., Nature, 1993, 362, 430-432). This progress will be reviewed in this paper.

  7. Aeromicrobiology/air quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Gary L.; Frisch, A.S.; Kellogg, Christina A.; Levetin, E.; Lighthart, Bruce; Paterno, D.

    2009-01-01

    The most prevalent microorganisms, viruses, bacteria, and fungi, are introduced into the atmosphere from many anthropogenic sources such as agricultural, industrial and urban activities, termed microbial air pollution (MAP), and natural sources. These include soil, vegetation, and ocean surfaces that have been disturbed by atmospheric turbulence. The airborne concentrations range from nil to great numbers and change as functions of time of day, season, location, and upwind sources. While airborne, they may settle out immediately or be transported great distances. Further, most viable airborne cells can be rendered nonviable due to temperature effects, dehydration or rehydration, UV radiation, and/or air pollution effects. Mathematical microbial survival models that simulate these effects have been developed.

  8. Closing the Achievement Gap: Four States' Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wixom, Micah Ann

    2015-01-01

    The achievement gap separating economically disadvantaged students from their more advantaged peers disproportionately affects students of color and has been the focus of discussion, research and controversy for more than 40 years. While the gap between black and white students narrowed considerably from the 1950s to the 1980s, that gap has…

  9. Calibration curves for some standard Gap Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, A.L.; Sommer, S.C.

    1989-01-01

    The relative shock sensitivities of explosive compositions are commonly assessed using a family of experiments that can be described by the generic term ''Gap Test.'' Gap tests include a donor charge, a test sample, and a spacer, or gap, between two explosives charges. The donor charge, gap material, and test dimensions are held constant within each different version of the gap test. The thickness of the gap is then varied to find the value at which 50% of the test samples will detonate. The gap tests measure the ease with a high-order detonation can be established in the test explosive, or the ''detonability,'' of the explosive. Test results are best reported in terms of the gap thickness at the 50% point. It is also useful to define the shock pressure transmitted into the test sample at the detonation threshold. This requires calibrating the gap test in terms of shock pressure in the gap as a function of the gap thickness. It also requires a knowledge of the shock Hugoniot of the sample explosive. We used the 2DE reactive hydrodynamic code with Forest Fire burn rates for the donor explosives to calculate calibration curves for several gap tests. The model calculations give pressure and particle velocity on the centerline of the experimental set-up and provide information about the curvature and pulse width of the shock wave. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Air Policing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Iraq. To provide a background for understanding why Britain commenced the policy of air policing, this paper begins with a review of contemporary...7 Omissi, Air Power, XV. 8 policing actions or the pushing home of advantages gained by the air.” Within the context of this paper , the...control operations, and therefore within the context of this paper , the term coercive airpower refers to the threat of harming a population or the threat

  11. Open and Distance Learning Today. Routledge Studies in Distance Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Fred, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers on open and distance learning today: "Preface" (Daniel); "Big Bang Theory in Distance Education" (Hawkridge); "Practical Agenda for Theorists of Distance Education" (Perraton); "Trends, Directions and Needs: A View from Developing Countries" (Koul); "American…

  12. Millimeter-Gap Magnetically Insulated Transmission Line Power Flow Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hutsel, Brian Thomas; Stoltzfus, Brian S.; Fowler, William E.; LeChien, Keith R.; Mazarakis, Michael G.; Moore, James K.; Mulville, Thomas D.; Savage, Mark E.; Stygar, William A.; McKenney, John L.; Jones, Peter A.; MacRunnels, Diego J.; Long, Finis W.; Porter, John L.

    2014-09-01

    An experiment platform has been designed to study vacuum power flow in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The platform was driven by the 400-GW Mykonos-V accelerator. The experiments conducted quantify the current loss in a millimeter-gap MITL with respect to vacuum conditions in the MITL for two different gap distances, 1.0 and 1.3 mm. The current loss for each gap was measured for three different vacuum pump down times. As a ride along experiment, multiple shots were conducted with each set of hardware to determine if there was a conditioning effect to increase current delivery on subsequent shots. The experiment results revealed large differences in performance for the 1.0 and 1.3 mm gaps. The 1.0 mm gap resulted in current loss of 40%-60% of peak current. The 1.3 mm gap resulted in current losses of less than 5% of peak current. Classical MITL models that neglect plasma expansion predict that there should be zero current loss, after magnetic insulation is established, for both of these gaps. The experiments result s indicate that the vacuum pressure or pump down time did not have a significant effect on the measured current loss at vacuum pressures between 1e-4 and 1e-5 Torr. Additionally, there was not repeatable evidence of a conditioning effect that reduced current loss for subsequent full-energy shots on a given set of hardware. It should be noted that the experiments conducted likely did not have large loss contributions due to ion emission from the anode due to the relatively small current densi-ties (25-40 kA/cm) in the MITL that limited the anode temperature rise due to ohmic heating. The results and conclusions from these experiments may have limited applicability to MITLs of high current density (>400 kA/cm) used in the convolute and load region of the Z which experience temperature increases of >400° C and generate ion emission from anode surfaces.

  13. Distance-based classification of keystroke dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran Nguyen, Ngoc

    2016-07-01

    This paper uses the keystroke dynamics in user authentication. The relationship between the distance metrics and the data template, for the first time, was analyzed and new distance based algorithm for keystroke dynamics classification was proposed. The results of the experiments on the CMU keystroke dynamics benchmark dataset1 were evaluated with an equal error rate of 0.0614. The classifiers using the proposed distance metric outperform existing top performing keystroke dynamics classifiers which use traditional distance metrics.

  14. Sleeping distance in wild wolf packs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knick, S.T.; Mech, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    Sleeping distances were observed among members of 13 wild wolf (Canis lupus) packs and 11 pairs in northeastern Minnesota to determine if the distances correlated with pack size and composition. The study utilized aerial radio-tracking and observation during winter. Pack size and number of adults per pack were inversely related to pack average sleeping distance and variability. No correlation between sleeping distance and microclimate was observed. Possible relationships between social bonding and our results are discussed.

  15. Dark-bright gap solitons in coupled-mode one-dimensional saturable waveguide arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Rong; Rueter, Christian E.; Kip, Detlef; Cuevas, Jesus; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Song Daohong; Xu Jingjun

    2011-06-15

    In the present work, we consider the dynamics of dark solitons as one mode of a defocusing photorefractive lattice coupled with bright solitons as a second mode of the lattice. Our investigation is motivated by an experiment that illustrates that such coupled states can exist with both components in the first gap of the linear band spectrum. This finding is further extended by the examination of different possibilities from a theoretical perspective, such as symbiotic ones where the bright component is supported by states of the dark component in the first or second gap, or nonsymbiotic ones where the bright soliton is also a first-gap state coupled to a first or second gap state of the dark component. While the obtained states are generally unstable, these instabilities typically bear fairly small growth rates, which enable their observation for experimentally relevant propagation distances.

  16. Distance effects in electrochemical micromachining

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lizhong; Pan, Yue; Zhao, Chuanjun

    2016-01-01

    Considering exponential dependence of currents on double-layer voltage and the feedback effect of the electrolyte resistance, a distance effect in electrochemical micromachining is found, namely that both time constant and double-layer voltage depend on the separation of electrodes. The double-layer voltage is the real voltage used in processing. Under DC voltage, the apparent voltages between two electrodes are constant for different separations, but the real voltages change with the separations. Small separations exert substantial effects on the real voltages. Accordingly, a DC-voltage small-separation electrochemical micromachining technique was proposed. The double-layer voltage drops sharply as the small separation increases. Thus, the electrochemical reactions are confined to electrode regions in very close proximity even under DC voltage. The machining precision can be significantly enhanced by reducing the voltage and separation between electrodes. With this technique, the machining of conducting materials with submicrometre precision was achieved. PMID:27581708

  17. Time delay and distance measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B. (Inventor); Sun, Xiaoli (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for measuring time delay and distance may include providing an electromagnetic radiation carrier frequency and modulating one or more of amplitude, phase, frequency, polarization, and pointing angle of the carrier frequency with a return to zero (RZ) pseudo random noise (PN) code. The RZ PN code may have a constant bit period and a pulse duration that is less than the bit period. A receiver may detect the electromagnetic radiation and calculate the scattering profile versus time (or range) by computing a cross correlation function between the recorded received signal and a three-state RZ PN code kernel in the receiver. The method also may be used for pulse delay time (i.e., PPM) communications.

  18. Distance majorization and its applications.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Lange, Kenneth

    2014-08-01

    The problem of minimizing a continuously differentiable convex function over an intersection of closed convex sets is ubiquitous in applied mathematics. It is particularly interesting when it is easy to project onto each separate set, but nontrivial to project onto their intersection. Algorithms based on Newton's method such as the interior point method are viable for small to medium-scale problems. However, modern applications in statistics, engineering, and machine learning are posing problems with potentially tens of thousands of parameters or more. We revisit this convex programming problem and propose an algorithm that scales well with dimensionality. Our proposal is an instance of a sequential unconstrained minimization technique and revolves around three ideas: the majorization-minimization principle, the classical penalty method for constrained optimization, and quasi-Newton acceleration of fixed-point algorithms. The performance of our distance majorization algorithms is illustrated in several applications.

  19. The effects of gap size on some microclimate variables during late summer and autumn in a temperate broadleaved deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Blackburn, George Alan

    2010-03-01

    The creation of gaps can strongly influence forest regeneration and habitat diversity within forest ecosystems. However, the precise characteristics of such effects depend, to a large extent, upon the way in which gaps modify microclimate and soil water content. Hence, the aim of this study was to understand the effects of gap creation and variations in gap size on forest microclimate and soil water content. The study site, in North West England, was a mixed temperate broadleaved deciduous forest dominated by mature sessile oak (Quercus petraea), beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior) with some representatives of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus). Solar radiation (I), air temperature (T(A)), soil temperature (T(S)), relative humidity (h), wind speed (v) and soil water content (Psi) were measured at four natural treefall gaps created after a severe storm in 2006 and adjacent sub-canopy sites. I, T(A), T(S), and Psi increased significantly with gap size; h was consistently lower in gaps than the sub-canopy but did not vary with gap size, while the variability of v could not be explained by the presence or size of gaps. There were systematic diurnal patterns in all microclimate variables in response to gaps, but no such patterns existed for Psi. These results further our understanding of the abiotic and consequent biotic responses to gaps in broadleaved deciduous forests created by natural treefalls, and provide a useful basis for evaluating the implications of forest management practices.

  20. Bimodal loop-gap resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, W.; Froncisz, W.; Hyde, James S.

    1996-05-01

    A bimodal loop-gap resonator for use in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at S band is described. It consists of two identical one-loop-one-gap resonators in coaxial juxtaposition. In one mode, the currents in the two loops are parallel and in the other antiparallel. By introducing additional capacitors between the loops, the frequencies of the two modes can be made to coincide. Details are given concerning variable coupling to each mode, tuning of the resonant frequency of one mode to that of the other, and adjustment of the isolation between modes. An equivalent circuit is given and network analysis carried out both experimentally and theoretically. EPR applications are described including (a) probing of the field distributions with DPPH, (b) continuous wave (cw) EPR with a spin-label line sample, (c) cw electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR), (d) modulation of saturation, and (e) saturation-recovery (SR) EPR. Bloch induction experiments can be performed when the sample extends half way through the structure, but microwave signals induced by Mx and My components of magnetization cancel when it extends completely through. This latter situation is particularly favorable for SR, modulation of saturation, and ELDOR experiments, which depend on observing Mz indirectly using a second weak observing microwave source.