Science.gov

Sample records for air gap flux

  1. Direct control of air gap flux in permanent magnet machines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for field weakening in PM machines uses field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72) to produce flux in one or more stators (34, 49, 63, 64), including a flux which counters flux normally produced in air gaps between the stator(s) (34, 49, 63, 64) and the rotor (20, 21, 41, 61) which carries the PM poles. Several modes of operation are introduced depending on the magnitude and polarity of current in the field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72). The invention is particularly useful for, but not limited to, the electric vehicle drives and PM generators.

  2. Effect of air gap variation on the performance of single stator single rotor axial flux permanent magnet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasim, Muhammad; Irasari, Pudji; Hikmawan, M. Fathul; Widiyanto, Puji; Wirtayasa, Ketut

    2017-02-01

    The axial flux permanent magnet generator (AFPMG) has been widely used especially for electricity generation. The effect of the air gap variation on the characteristic and performances of single rotor - single stator AFPMG has been described in this paper. Effect of air gap length on the magnetic flux distribution, starting torque and MMF has been investigated. The two dimensional finite element magnetic method has been deployed to model and simulated the characteristics of the machine which is based on the Maxwell equation. The analysis has been done for two different air gap lengths which were 2 mm and 4 mm using 2D FEMM 4.2 software at no load condition. The increasing of air gap length reduces the air-gap flux density. For air gap 2 mm, the maximum value of the flux density was 1.04 T while 0.73 T occured for air gap 4 mm.. Based on the experiment result, the increasing air gap also reduced the starting torque of the machine with 39.2 Nm for air gap 2 mm and this value decreased into 34.2 Nm when the air gap increased to 4 mm. Meanwhile, the MMF that was generated by AFPMG decreased around 22% at 50 Hz due to the reduction of magnetic flux induced on stator windings. Overall, the research result showed that the variation of air gap has significant effect on the machine characteristics.

  3. Detection of air-gap eccentricity and broken-rotor bar conditions in a squirrel-cage induction motor using the radial flux sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Don-Ha; Woo, Byung-Chul; Sun, Jong-Ho; Kang, Dong-Sik; Han, Sang-Bo; Kim, Byung-Kuk; Cho, Youn-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    A new method for detecting eccentricity and broken rotor bar conditions in a squirrel-cage induction motor is proposed. Air-gap flux variation analysis is done using search coils, which are inserted at stator slots. Using this method, the leakage flux in radial direction can be directly detected. Using finite element method, the air-gap flux variation is accurately modeled and analyzed. From the results of the simulation, a motor under normal condition shows maximum magnetic flux density of 1.3 T. On the other hand, the eccentric air-gap condition displays about 1.1 T at 60 deg. and 1.6 T at 240 deg. A difference of flux density is 0.5 T in the abnormal condition, whereas no difference is detected in the normal motor. In the broken rotor bar conditions, the flux densities at 65 deg. and 155 deg. are about 0.4 T and 0.8 T, respectively. These simulation results are coincided with those of experiment. Consequently, the measurement of the magnetic flux at air gap is one of effective ways to discriminate the faulted conditions of the eccentricity and broken rotor bars.

  4. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S.

    2013-03-05

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  5. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, John S

    2012-02-07

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  6. An improved spectral analysis of the stray flux component for the detection of air-gap irregularities in squirrel cage motors.

    PubMed

    Salah, Mohamed; Bacha, Khmais; Chaari, Abdelkader

    2014-05-01

    For machines׳ monitoring purpose, the classical motor current signature analysis has shown its weakness in distinguishing the eccentricity occurrence in presence of others mechanical faults. Although Park׳s vector approach can cover this drawback, the high cost due to the requirement to use three current sensors associated with an advanced processing technique, makes it less desired by industrialists. In this paper, we suggest an alternative diagnosis method based on a suitable processing of the stray flux data. The experimental results have revealed the potential of a simple search coil for the detection and the distinction of the accurate eccentricity nature even in presence of similar mechanical faults.

  7. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  8. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  9. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  10. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  11. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  12. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  13. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  14. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  15. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  17. Temperature Tunable Air-Gap Etalon Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Stephen, Mark A.; Lunt, David L.

    1998-01-01

    We report on experimental measurements of a temperature tuned air-gap etalon filter. The filter exhibits temperature dependent wavelength tuning of 54 pm/C. It has a nominal center wavelength of 532 nm. The etalon filter has a 27 pm optical bandpass and 600 pm free spectral range (finesse approximately 22). The experimental results are in close agreement with etalon theory.

  18. Gap-filling strategies for annual VOC flux data sets.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, I; Hörtnagl, L; Walser, M; Hansel, A; Wohlfahrt, G

    2013-11-01

    Up to now the limited knowledge about the exchange of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) between the biosphere and the atmosphere is one of the factors which hinders more accurate climate predictions. Complete long-term flux data sets of several VOCs to quantify the annual exchange and validate recent VOC models are basically not available. In combination with long-term VOC flux measurements the application of gap-filling routines is inevitable in order to replace missing data and make an important step towards a better understanding of the VOC ecosystem-atmosphere exchange on longer time scales. We performed VOC flux measurements above a mountain meadow in Austria during two complete growing seasons (from snowmelt in spring to snow reestablishment in late autumn) and used this data set to test the performance of four different gap-filling routines, mean diurnal variation (MDV), mean gliding window (MGW), look up tables (LUT) and linear interpolation (LIP), in terms of their ability to replace missing flux data in order to obtain reliable VOC sums. According to our findings the MDV routine was outstanding with regard to the minimization of the gap-filling error for both years and all quantified VOCs. The other gap-filling routines, which performed gap-filling on 24 h average values, introduced considerably larger uncertainties. The error which was introduced by the application of the different filling routines increased linearly with the number of data gaps. Although average VOC fluxes measured during the winter period (complete snow coverage) were close to zero, these were highly variable and the filling of the winter period resulted in considerably higher uncertainties compared to the application of gap-filling during the measurement period. The annual patterns of the overall cumulative fluxes for the quantified VOCs showed a completely different behavior in 2009, which was an exceptional year due to the occurrence of a severe hailstorm, compared to 2011. Methanol

  19. Impact of flux gap upon dynamic resistance of a rotating HTS flux pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenan; Bumby, Chris W.; Badcock, Rodney A.; Sung, Hae-Jin; Long, Nicholas J.; Amemiya, Naoyuki

    2015-11-01

    HTS flux pumps enable superconducting currents to be directly injected into a magnet coil without the requirement for thermally inefficient current leads. Here, we present results from an experimental mechanically rotating HTS flux pump employing a coated-conductor stator and operated at 77 K. We show the effect of varying the size of the flux gap between the rotor magnets and coated conductor stator from 1 to 7.5 mm. This leads to a corresponding change in the peak applied perpendicular magnetic field at the stator from approximately 350 to 50 mT. We observe that our experimental device ceases to maintain a measurable output at flux gaps above 7.5 mm, which we attribute to the presence of screening currents in the stator wire. We show that our mechanically rotating flux pump is well described by a simple circuit model which enables the output performance to be described using two simple parameters, the open-circuit voltage V oc and the internal resistance, R d. Both of these parameters are found to be directly proportional to magnet-crossing frequency and decrease with increasing flux gap. We show that the trend in R d can be understood by considering the dynamic resistance experienced at the stator due to the oscillating amplitude of the applied rotor field. We adopt a literature model for the dynamic resistance within our coated-conductor stator and show that this gives good agreement with the experimentally measured internal resistance of our flux pump.

  20. Vertical hydraulic generators experience with dynamic air gap monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, G.B.; Lyles, J.F )

    1992-12-01

    Until recently, dynamic monitoring of the rotor to stator air gap of hydraulic generators was not practical. Cost effective and reliable dyamic air gap monitoring equipment has been developed in recent years. Dynamic air gap monitoring was originally justified because of the desire of the owner to minimize the effects of catastrophic air gap failure. However, monitoring air gaps on a time basis has been shown to be beneficial by assisting in the assessment of hydraulic generator condition. The air gap monitor provides useful information on rotor and stator condition and generator vibration. The data generated by air gap monitors will assist managers in the decision process with respect to the timing and extent of required maintenance for a particular generating unit.

  1. Air Gap Effects in LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Ault, S; Avara, R; Bahl, K L; Boat, R; Cunningham, B; Gidding, D; Janzen, J; Kuklo, D; Lee, R; Lauderbach, L; Weingart, W C; Wu, B; Winer, K

    2005-09-26

    Three experiments done over twenty years on gaps in LX-17 are reported. For the detonation front moving parallel to the gaps, jets of gas products were seen coming from the gaps at velocities greater than the detonation velocity. A case can be made that the jet velocity increased with gap thickness but the data is scattered. For the detonation front moving transverse to the gap, time delays were seen. The delays roughly increase with gap width, going from 0-70 ns at 'zero gap' to around 300 ns at 0.5-1 mm gap. Larger gaps of up to 6 mm width almost certainly stopped the detonation, but this was not proved. Real-time resolution of the parallel jets and determination of the actual re-detonation or failure in the transverse case needs to be done in future experiments.

  2. An air gap moderates the performance of nanowire array transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tong; Mehta, Jeremy S.; Mativetsky, Jeffrey M.

    2017-03-01

    Solution-processed nanowires are promising for low-cost and flexible electronics. When depositing nanowires from solution, due to stacking of the nanowires, an air gap exists between the substrate and much of the active material. Here, using confocal Raman spectroscopy, we quantify the thickness of the air gap in transistors comprising organic semiconductor nanowires. The average air gap thickness is found to be unexpectedly large, being at least three times larger than the nanowire diameter, leading to a significant impact on transistor performance. The air gap acts as an additional dielectric layer that reduces the accumulation of charge carriers due to a gate voltage. Conventional determination of the charge carrier mobility ignores the presence of an air gap, resulting in an overestimate of charge carrier accumulation and an underestimate of charge carrier mobility. It is shown that the larger the air gap, the larger the mobility correction (which can be greater than an order of magnitude) and the larger the degradation in on–off current ratio. These results demonstrate the importance of minimizing the air gap and of taking the air gap into consideration when analyzing the electrical performance of transistors consisting of stacked nanowires. This finding is applicable to all types of stacked one-dimensional materials including organic and inorganic nanowires, and carbon nanotubes.

  3. An air gap moderates the performance of nanowire array transistors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tong; Mehta, Jeremy S; Mativetsky, Jeffrey M

    2017-03-24

    Solution-processed nanowires are promising for low-cost and flexible electronics. When depositing nanowires from solution, due to stacking of the nanowires, an air gap exists between the substrate and much of the active material. Here, using confocal Raman spectroscopy, we quantify the thickness of the air gap in transistors comprising organic semiconductor nanowires. The average air gap thickness is found to be unexpectedly large, being at least three times larger than the nanowire diameter, leading to a significant impact on transistor performance. The air gap acts as an additional dielectric layer that reduces the accumulation of charge carriers due to a gate voltage. Conventional determination of the charge carrier mobility ignores the presence of an air gap, resulting in an overestimate of charge carrier accumulation and an underestimate of charge carrier mobility. It is shown that the larger the air gap, the larger the mobility correction (which can be greater than an order of magnitude) and the larger the degradation in on-off current ratio. These results demonstrate the importance of minimizing the air gap and of taking the air gap into consideration when analyzing the electrical performance of transistors consisting of stacked nanowires. This finding is applicable to all types of stacked one-dimensional materials including organic and inorganic nanowires, and carbon nanotubes.

  4. Novel Approach for Modeling of Nonuniform Slag Layers and Air Gap in Continuous Casting Mold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xudong; Kong, Lingwei; Yao, Man; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2017-02-01

    Various kinds of surface defects on the continuous casting slab usually originate from nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behavior, especially during the initial solidification inside the mold. In this article, a model-coupled inverse heat transfer problem incorporating the effect of slag layers and air gap is developed to study the nonuniform distribution of liquid slag, solid slag, and air gap layers. The model considers not only the formation and evolution of slag layers and air gap but also the temperatures in the mold copper as measured by thermocouples. The simulation results from the model and the measured temperatures from experiments are shown to be in good agreement with each other. At the casting speed of 0.65 m/min, the liquid slag film disappears and transforms into solid slag entirely at about 400 mm away from meniscus, and an air gap begins to form. Until the mold exit, the maximum thickness of the solid slag layer and air gap gradually increases to 1.34 and 0.056 mm, respectively. The results illustrate that the magnitude and nonuniform distribution of the slag layers and air gap along the cross direction, correlating with heat flux between the shell and mold, eventually determine the temperature profiles of the mold hot face and slab surface. The proposed model may provide a convenient approach for analyzing nonuniform heat transfer and mechanical behaviors between the mold and slab in the real casting process.

  5. Air gap sparkover and gap factors: Analysis of published data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gela, G.

    1994-12-01

    This report is an account of a literature search on air gap sparkover which was conducted as part of the Live Working 2000 project. The objective of this literature search was to locate and analyze published data on sparkover of air gaps which are relevant to live working. The sparkover data form the basis for determination of gap factors for live working situations. Data dating back to 1930`s were located in published papers and reports, extracted and analyzed for a variety of air gaps, including: rod-to-plane, rod-to-rod, sphere-to-plane, bundle-to-plane, hoop-to-plane, bundle-to-tower window, bundle-to-tower outside phase, and worker-to-tower air gap. The rod-to-plane air gap has been analyzed extensively in the literature, and several accurate empirical formulae have been developed to calculate the 50% sparkover voltage of the gap when subjected to transient overvoltages with the critical wave shape. The terms, such as gap factor, transient overvoltage (TOV), critical wave shape, and other relevant terms, are defined in this report for completeness. The CRIEPI formula is used as the reference in this report, since this formula has been adopted by several technical organizations (IEC, IEEE). Comparisons are also made with the second popular formula, the Gallet formula. All sparkover data obtained from the literature are presented in tables and graphs. In addition, where applicable and available, data for the critical wave shape are identified and placed in separate tables for ready reference. The calculated gap factors are based on the CRIEPI formula. Detailed comparisons of the CRIEPI and the Gallet formulae allow easy determination of the gap factors based on the Gallet formula, should one desire to compute these numbers. The calculated gap factors are summarized in tables and compared with the gap factor values tentatively suggested for use by IEC TC 78 WG 10.

  6. Technical note: Dynamic INtegrated Gap-filling and partitioning for OzFlux (DINGO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beringer, Jason; McHugh, Ian; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Isaac, Peter; Kljun, Natascha

    2017-03-01

    Standardised, quality-controlled and robust data from flux networks underpin the understanding of ecosystem processes and tools necessary to support the management of natural resources, including water, carbon and nutrients for environmental and production benefits. The Australian regional flux network (OzFlux) currently has 23 active sites and aims to provide a continental-scale national research facility to monitor and assess Australia's terrestrial biosphere and climate for improved predictions. Given the need for standardised and effective data processing of flux data, we have developed a software suite, called the Dynamic INtegrated Gap-filling and partitioning for OzFlux (DINGO), that enables gap-filling and partitioning of the primary fluxes into ecosystem respiration (Fre) and gross primary productivity (GPP) and subsequently provides diagnostics and results. We outline the processing pathways and methodologies that are applied in DINGO (v13) to OzFlux data, including (1) gap-filling of meteorological and other drivers; (2) gap-filling of fluxes using artificial neural networks; (3) the u* threshold determination; (4) partitioning into ecosystem respiration and gross primary productivity; (5) random, model and u* uncertainties; and (6) diagnostic, footprint calculation, summary and results outputs. DINGO was developed for Australian data, but the framework is applicable to any flux data or regional network. Quality data from robust systems like DINGO ensure the utility and uptake of the flux data and facilitates synergies between flux, remote sensing and modelling.

  7. Eddy Covariance Measurements Over a Maize Field: The Contribution of Minor Flux Terms to the Energy Balance Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, J.; Ingwersen, J.; Streck, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lack of energy balance closure is a long-standing problem in eddy covariance (EC) measurements. The energy balance equation is defined as Rn - G = H + λE, where Rn is net radiation, G is the ground heat flux, H is the sensible heat flux and λE is the latent heat flux. In most cases of energy imbalance, either Rn is overestimated or the ground heat and turbulent fluxes are underestimated. Multiple studies have shown that calculations, incorrect instrument installation/calibration and measurement errors alone do not entirely account for this imbalance. Rather, research is now focused on previously neglected sources of heat storage in the soil, biomass and air beneath the EC station. This project examined the potential of five "minor flux terms" - soil heat storage, biomass heat storage, energy consumption by photosynthesis, air heat storage and atmospheric moisture change, to further close the energy balance gap. Eddy covariance measurements were conducted at a maize (Zea mays) field in southwest Germany during summer 2014. Soil heat storage was measured for six weeks at 11 sites around the field footprint. Biomass and air heat storage were measured for six subsequent weeks at seven sites around the field footprint. Energy consumption by photosynthesis was calculated using the CO2 flux data. Evapotranspiration was calculated using the water balance method and then compared to the flux data processed with three post-closure methods: the sensible heat flux, the latent heat flux and the Bowen ratio post-closure methods. An energy balance closure of 66% was achieved by the EC station measurements over the entire investigation period. During the soil heat flux campaign, EC station closure was 74.1%, and the field footprint soil heat storage contributed 3.3% additional closure. During the second minor flux term measurement period, closure with the EC station data was 91%. Biomass heat storage resulted in 1.1% additional closure, the photosynthesis flux closed the gap

  8. Water desalination by air-gap membrane distillation using meltblown polypropylene nanofiber membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalam, S.; Chiam, C. K.; Widyaparamitha, S.; Chang, Y. W.; Lee, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a study of air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) using meltblown polypropylene (PP) nanofiber membrane to produce fresh water via desalination process. PP nanofiber membranes with the effective area 0.17 m2 are tested with NaCl solutions (0.5 - 4.0 wt.%) and seawater as the feed solutions (9400 - 64800 μS/cm) in a tubular membrane module. Results show that the flux decreases with increasing the membrane thickness from 547 to 784 μm. The flux increases with the feed flow rate and temperature difference across the membrane. The feed concentration affects the flux insignificantly. The AGMD system can reject the salts at least 96%. Water vapor permeation rate is relatively higher than solute permeation rate resulting in the conductivity value of permeate decreases when the corresponding flux increases. The AGMD system produces the fresh water (200 - 1520 μS/cm) that is suitable for drinking, fisheries or irrigation.

  9. Surface Flux Modeling for Air Quality Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    For many gasses and aerosols, dry deposition is an important sink of atmospheric mass. Dry deposition fluxes are also important sources of pollutants to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The surface fluxes of some gases, such as ammonia, mercury, and certain volatile organic c...

  10. Novel dynamic flux chamber for measuring air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils.

    PubMed

    Lin, Che-Jen; Zhu, Wei; Li, Xianchang; Feng, Xinbin; Sommar, Jonas; Shang, Lihai

    2012-08-21

    Quantifying the air-surface exchange of Hg(o) from soils is critical to understanding the cycling of mercury in different environmental compartments. Dynamic flux chambers (DFCs) have been widely employed for Hg(o) flux measurement over soils. However, DFCs of different sizes, shapes, and sampling flow rates yield distinct measured fluxes for a soil substrate under identical environmental conditions. In this study, we performed an integrated modeling, laboratory and field study to design a DFC capable of producing a steady and uniform air flow over a flat surface. The new DFC was fabricated using polycarbonate sheets. The internal velocity field was experimentally verified against model predictions using both theoretical and computational fluid dynamics techniques, suggesting fully developed flow with velocity profiles in excellent agreement with model results. Laboratory flux measurements demonstrated that the new design improves data reproducibility as compared to a conventional DFC, and reproduces the model-predicted flux trend with increasing sampling flow. A mathematical relationship between the sampling flow rate and surface friction velocity, a variable commonly parametrized in atmospheric models, was developed for field application. For the first time, the internal shear property of a DFC can be precisely controlled using the sampling flow rate, and the flux under atmospheric condition can be inferred from the measured flux and surface shear property. The demonstrated methodology potentially bridges the gap in measured fluxes obtained by the DFC method and the micrometeorological methods.

  11. An ultrasonic air pump using an acoustic traveling wave along a small air gap.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Yuji; Nakamura, Kentaro; Nishikawa, Masato; Nakagawa, Tatsuyuki; Kihara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic air pump that uses a traveling wave along a small air gap between a bending vibrator and a reflector is discussed. The authors investigate ultrasonic air pumps that make use of bending vibrators and reflectors and confirm that air can be induced to flow by generating an asymmetric acoustic standing wave along an air gap. In this paper, we proposed a novel ultrasonic air pump in which a traveling wave along an air gap induces acoustic streaming and achieves one-way airflow. Two new reflector configurations, stepped and tapered, were designed and used to generate traveling waves. To predict airflow generation, sound pressure distribution in the air gap was calculated by means of finite element analysis (FEA). As a preliminary step, 2 FEA models were compared: one piezoelectric-structure-acoustic model and one piezoelectric- structure-fluid model, which included the viscosity effect of the fluid. The sound pressure distribution in the air gap, including fluid viscosity, was calculated by the FEA because it is expected to be dominant and thus have a strong effect on the sound pressure field in such a thin fluid layer. Based on the FEA results of the stepped and the tapered reflectors, it was determined that acoustic traveling waves could propagate along the gaps. Experiments were carried out with the designed bending vibrator and the reflectors. The acoustic fields in the air gap were measured via a fiber optic probe, and it was determined that the sound pressure and the phase distribution tendencies corresponded well with the results computed by FEA. Through our experiments, one-way airflow generation, in the same direction of the traveling wave and with the maximum flow velocity of 5.6 cm/s, was achieved.

  12. The Measurement of Air-Sea Fluxes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-09

    induced by the motion of the wave (in a wave following coordinate system the rotor appears as an eddy in the wave trough). Strictly speaking, this is a...Droplet distribution and dispersion processes on breaking wind waves . jai. e . Tohoku University er. , Geophysics, 21, 1-25. Lai R.J. and O.H. Shemdin ...seaspray, Chapter 10 in Surface Waves and Fluxes: Current Theory ana Remote Sensing, G. Geernaert and W. Plant, Ed., Reidel, Holland. -4- 1 I 3. Fairall

  13. Evaluation and gap-filling of soil NO flux dataset measured at a Hungarian semi-arid grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Laszlo; Hidy, Dora; Weidinger, Tamas

    2015-04-01

    An Integrated Project ÉCLAIRE (http://www.eclaire-fp7.eu/) started in 2011 among others to study the effect of climate change on air pollution impacts. One of the main measurement tasks of this project was the continuous monitoring of soil NO emission at different kinds of lands (forest, arable, grass). Among the tree grass stations Bugacpuszta (central part of Hungary between the Danube and the Tisza) was selected to monitor and report soil NO fluxes continuously for 17 months on hourly basis. The climate is semi-arid temperate continental, the mean annual temperature is 10.7 ° C, and the average annual precipitation is around 550 mm. Nitric oxide soil emission flux was measured by 2-2 parallel manual and auto dynamic chambers on hourly basis above a semi-arid, sandy grassland between August 2012 and January 2014. Each chamber was sampled for 10 minutes at a flow rate of 2 L min-1 in sequence each hour all together for 40 minutes; in the remaining 20 minutes concentration gradients were measured by a mast at two heights. Soil temperature and moisture were measured a few meters apart from the chambers. A computer controlled valve system was switched the different channels in turn. The output concentrations of nitric oxide and ozone were measured by HORIBA gas monitors through Teflon tubing. Micrometeorological measurements (energy budget components, CO2 and O3 fluxes) were also provided. The initial NO flux datasets covered 43-85% of time period depending on chambers. Measured flux data ranges within 0-6 nmol m-2 s-1. We applied a gap-filling method based on multivariable analysis (Sigma Plot) combined with maximum likelihood method using the soil temperature and moisture data. Trend of gap-filled flux dataset shows large peaks mostly in summer and early fall. When soil parameters are far from the optimum (dry, warm conditions) the fluxes are negligible. Application of manual chambers closed for longer period results in substantial positive bias in flux

  14. Study of Various Slanted Air-Gap Structures of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Leon M; Lee, Seong T

    2010-01-01

    This paper shows how to maximize the effect of the slanted air-gap structure of an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor with brushless field excitation (BFE) for application in a hybrid electric vehicle. The BFE structure offers high torque density at low speed and weakened flux at high speed. The unique slanted air-gap is intended to increase the output torque of the machine as well as to maximize the ratio of the back-emf of a machine that is controllable by BFE. This irregularly shaped air-gap makes a flux barrier along the d-axis flux path and decreases the d-axis inductance; as a result, the reluctance torque of the machine is much higher than a uniform air-gap machine, and so is the output torque. Also, the machine achieves a higher ratio of the magnitude of controllable back-emf. The determination of the slanted shape was performed by using magnetic equivalent circuit analysis and finite element analysis (FEA).

  15. Gap-filling of flux measurements over a heterogeneous urban landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzer, O.; McFadden, J.

    2012-12-01

    A small, but growing, number of urban flux towers measure surface-atmospheric exchanges of energy, water, and greenhouse gases by the eddy covariance method. Imputation of gaps in these measurements caused by low turbulence conditions and system failures is essential for obtaining annual sums of CO2 exchange and evaporation. Yet most gap-filling methods were designed for natural measurement sites such as forests and grasslands. In the urban environment, however, the assumptions on which those approaches are based are violated and well known temperature or light response models are not applicable because of urban footprint heterogeneity and localized CO2 emissions. Observation-based methods of machine learning can reveal intrinsic mechanisms by using inputs such as wind direction, footprint size, and continuous traffic data, making gap-filling results more accurate. Here, we report preliminary gap-filling results using such empirical approaches for >3 years of flux measurements from the KUOM tall tower in a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. We also ran one of the most common gap-filling methods that has been used for natural systems as a baseline or null model. We found that CO2 and water vapor fluxes from the urban landscape showed higher variability than those from a nearby turfgrass lawn, in which fluxes closely followed environmental drivers of light and temperature. Higher variability was found in NEE measurements as compared to LE, due to the relatively greater heterogeneity of sources and sinks that influenced CO2 exchange in the urban landscape.

  16. An automatic flux chamber for investigating gas flux at water - air interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, N. T.; Silverstein, S.; Lundmark, L.; Reyier, H.; Crill, P. M.; Bastviken, D.

    2011-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) and representative measurements of GHG fluxes from aquatic ecosystems to the atmosphere are vital in climate related biogeochemistry. One of the most important fluxes, ebullition (bubble flux) of methane (CH4) is episodic, with large fluxes during short time periods. To properly capture such fluxes long term measurement approaches are necessary which is labor intensive for manual flux chamber based methods, or require expensive equipment with e.g. eddy correlation methods. An inexpensive and easily mobile automatic flux chamber for long-term measurements has been designed to approach these drawbacks. This device includes a flux chamber, with a controller/datalogger, valves, a pump, a 12 V battery and a solar cell. Sensors used so far record CH4 concentration in the chamber headspace, temperature in water and air, barometric pressure. Other sensors for e.g. CO2 and weather variables can be attached. The unit can be programmed to measure in situ accumulation of gas in the chamber and also to collect gas samples in an array of sample bottles for subsequent analysis in the laboratory. Simultaneous deployment of many such units represent a cost efficient and easily managed solution for local long term flux monitoring.

  17. Numerical modeling of the thermoelectric cooler with a complementary equation for heat circulation in air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, En; Wu, Xiaojie; Yu, Yuesen; Xiu, Junrui

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical model is developed by combining thermodynamics with heat transfer theory. Taking inner and external multi-irreversibility into account, it is with a complementary equation for heat circulation in air gaps of a steady cooling system with commercial thermoelectric modules operating in refrigeration mode. With two modes concerned, the equation presents the heat flowing through air gaps which forms heat circulations between both sides of thermoelectric coolers (TECs). In numerical modelling, a TEC is separated as two temperature controlled constant heat flux reservoirs in a thermal resistance network. In order to obtain the parameter values, an experimental apparatus with a commercial thermoelectric cooler was built to characterize the performance of a TEC with heat source and sink assembly. At constant power dissipation, steady temperatures of heat source and both sides of the thermoelectric cooler were compared with those in a standard numerical model. The method displayed that the relationship between Φf and the ratio Φ_{c}'/Φ_{c} was linear as expected. Then, for verifying the accuracy of proposed numerical model, the data in another system were recorded. It is evident that the experimental results are in good agreement with simulation(proposed model) data at different heat transfer rates. The error is small and mainly results from the instabilities of thermal resistances with temperature change and heat flux, heat loss of the device vertical surfaces and measurements.

  18. Computational simulations of asymmetric fluxes of large molecules through gap junction channel pores.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Abhijit; Appadurai, Daniel A; Akoum, Nazem W; Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-07

    Gap junction channels are formed out of connexin isoforms, which enable molecule and ion selective diffusion amongst neighboring cells. HeLa cells expressing distinct connexins (Cx) allow the formation of heterotypic channels, where we observed a molecular charge-independent preferential flux of large fluorescent molecules in the Cx45 to Cx43 direction. We hypothesize that the pore's shape is a significant factor along-side charge and transjunctional voltages for this asymmetric flux. To test this hypothesis, we developed a 3D computational model simulating Brownian diffusion of large molecules in a gap junction channel pore. The basic pore contour was derived from x-ray crystallographic structures of Cx43 and Cx26 and approximated using basic geometric shapes. Lucifer yellow dye molecules and cesium counter-ions were modeled as spheres using their respective Stokes radii. Our simulation results from simple diffusion and constant concentration gradient experiments showed that only charged particles yield asymmetric fluxes in heterotypic pores. While increasing the inner mouth size resulted in a near-quadratic rise in flux, the rise was asymptotic for outer mouth radii increase. Probability maps and average force per particle per pore section explain the asymmetric flux with variation in pore shape. Furthermore, the simulation results are in agreement with our in vitro experimental results with HeLa cells in Cx43-Cx45 heterotypic configurations. The presence of asymmetric fluxes can help us to understand effects of the molecular structure of the pore and predict potential differences in vivo.

  19. Sparkover performance and gap factors of air gaps below 1 meter: Analysis of published data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gela, G.

    1998-03-01

    This report is an account of a literature search on sparkover performance of various air gaps shorter than 1 meter. The report is a part of the Live Working 2000 project. The objective of the literature search was to locate and analyze published data on sparkover performance of air gaps below 1 meter, with special emphasis on live working. Published data dating back to 1930`s are analyzed for a variety of air gaps: rod-to-plane; rod-to-rod; sphere-to-plane; bundle-to-plane; hoop-to-plane, conductor-to-rod; and worker-to-tower. Data for all voltage types, and both polarities (where applicable) are analyzed: power frequency alternating current; direct current; lightning; fast front impulse; and switching impulse. As is the case for longer air gaps and higher voltages, several accurate empirical formulae for calculation of the sparkover voltage have been developed, and are analyzed. Also, the rod-to-plane air gap is used in this report as the reference gap for calculation of gap factors.

  20. The Luther-Emery liquid: Spin gap and anomalous flux period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Alexander; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of the ground state energy on an applied Aharonov-Bohm flux Φ for the Luttinger model with large momentum scattering. Employing the method of finite size bosonization, we show that for systems with a spin gap but with gapless charge degrees of freedom, the ground state energy has an exact period of hc/2e , i.e., half a flux quantum, in the limit of large system size L . Finite size corrections are found to vanish exponentially in L . This behavior is contrasted to that of the spin gapless case, for both even and odd particle number. Generalizations to finite temperature are also discussed.

  1. Electric field step in air gap streamer discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Rong; Zhuang Chijie; Yu Zhanqing; Li Zhizhao; Geng Yinan

    2011-11-28

    Electric field (E-field) in air gap streamer discharges under positive lightning impulse was measured by specifically developed integrated electro-optic sensors. An E-field step phenomenon was observed. The E-field firstly agreed with the Laplace field, then suddenly increased with a rise time of {mu}s. The occurrence probability of this phenomenon increased as the applied voltage increased. The discharge current waveforms and photos taken by a fast camera prove the E-field step was caused by the space net charge. From the E-step rise time and the corona area range, the average electron drift speed under the experiment situation was estimated about 0.2 x 10{sup 6} - 0.6x 10{sup 6} m/s.

  2. Controlled heat flux measurement across a closing nanoscale gap and its comparison to theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Ghafari, A.; Budaev, B. V.; Bogy, D. B.

    2016-05-01

    We present here a controlled measurement of heat flux across a closing gap that is initially less than 10 nm wide between two solid surfaces at different temperatures. The measured heat transfer is compared with our published theoretical analyses of this phenomenon that show thermal radiation dominates the heat transfer for gaps wider than about 1-2 nm, but phonon conduction dominates between 1 and 2 nm and contact. The experiments employ a thermal actuator mounted on a rocking base block for coarse positioning that supplies Joule heating to an embedded element to cause thermal expansion of a localized region for less than 10 nm spacing control, together with an embedded near-surface resistive temperature sensor to measure its temperature change due to the heat flux across the gap. The measured results are in general agreement with the theoretical predictions, and they also agree with common sense expectations. This paper not only shows nano-scale heat transfer measurement across a closing gap, it also lends additional strong support to the validity of the referenced theoretical developments. The proposed experimental approach can provide support to design of future devices for nano-scale heat transfer measurement.

  3. Field assessment of induction motor efficiency through air-gap torque

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, J.S.; Sorenson, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    Induction motors are the most popular motors used in industry. This paper further suggests the use of air-gap torque method to evaluate their efficiency and load changes. The fundamental difference between Method E and the air-gap torque method is discussed. Efficiency assessments conducted on induction motors under various conditions show the accuracy and potential of the air-gap torque method.

  4. Anomalous flux flow resistivity in the two-gap superconductor MgB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, A.; Matsumoto, M.; Izawa, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Lee, S.; Tajima, S.

    2003-08-01

    The flux flow resistivity ρf associated with purely viscous motion of vortices in high-quality MgB2 was measured by microwave surface impedance. Flux flow resistivity exhibits unusual field dependence with strong enhancement at low field, which is markedly different to conventional s-wave superconductors. A crossover field which separates two distinct flux flow regimes having different ρf slopes was clearly observed in H‖ab plane. The unusual H dependence indicates that two very differently sized superconducting gaps in MgB2 manifest in the vortex dynamics and almost equally contribute to energy dissipation. The carrier scattering rate in two different bands is also discussed with the present results, compared to heat-capacity and thermal-conductivity results.

  5. The atmospheric footprint of preindustrial, anthropogenic, and contemporary air-sea fluxes of CO2 estimated from an ocean inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaloff Fletcher, S. E.; Gruber, N. P.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Jacobson, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    Air-sea exchange is a primary determinant of the spatial pattern of atmospheric carbon dioxide, yet there are substantial gaps in our understanding of the impact of the oceans on these gradients. Recent inverse modeling studies have used ocean interior observations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and other tracers and Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs) to estimate separately the natural air-sea flux that already existed in preindustrial times and the component of the air-sea flux that is due to the anthropogenic perturbation of atmospheric CO2. The sum of these components is the contemporary air-sea flux. Furthermore, the results from the ocean inversion have been combined with an analogous atmospheric inversion using surface observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations and atmospheric transport models to estimate air- sea and air-land fluxes. This work suggested that there might be an unexpectedly large source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere from tropical land regions. We use the air-sea fluxes estimated from this ocean inversion together with estimates of the seasonal cycle of these fluxes from ΔpCO2 observations and bulk parameterizations as boundary conditions for the Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART). The effects of preindustrial, anthropogenic, and contemporary air-sea fluxes on the spatial pattern of atmospheric CO2 are analyzed and the implications for ocean interior transport are discussed. In addition, we use atmospheric observations of 13C/12C isotopic ratios in carbon dioxide to independently test the finding of a large terrestrial source in the tropics, since the terrestrial biosphere discriminates against 13C much more strongly than the oceans.

  6. Development of a highly efficient brushless dc motor utilizing both radial and axial air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, K. J.; Jang, G. H.; Sung, S. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    This research proposes an effective structure for a brushless dc motor utilizing both radial and axial air gaps. The proposed motor generates torque in both the radial and axial air gaps, while the conventional motor generates torque only in the radial air gap. The proposed motor was optimized to minimize the electromagnetic loss of the motor to increase the effective air gap length and fill-factor of the coil while decreasing the saturation of the core at the same time. The electromagnetic loss was reduced by 35% in comparison with a conventional motor.

  7. ACRIM-gap and TSI trend issue resolved using a surface magnetic flux TSI proxy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, Nicola; Willson, Richard C.

    2009-03-01

    The ACRIM-gap (1989.5-1991.75) continuity dilemma for satellite TSI observations is resolved by bridging the satellite TSI monitoring gap between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 results with TSI derived from Krivova et al.'s (2007) proxy model based on variations of the surface distribution of solar magnetic flux. `Mixed' versions of ACRIM and PMOD TSI composites are constructed with their composites' original values except for the ACRIM gap, where Krivova modeled TSI is used to connect ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 results. Both `mixed' composites demonstrate a significant TSI increase of 0.033 %/decade between the solar activity minima of 1986 and 1996, comparable to the 0.037 % found in the ACRIM composite. The finding supports the contention of Willson (1997) that the ERBS/ERBE results are flawed by uncorrected degradation during the ACRIM gap and refutes the Nimbus7/ERB ACRIM gap adjustment Fröhlich and Lean (1998) employed in constructing the PMOD.

  8. Parameterization of air sea gas fluxes at extreme wind speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, Craig; D'Asaro, Eric

    2007-06-01

    Air-sea flux measurements of O 2 and N 2 obtained during Hurricane Frances in September 2004 [D'Asaro, E. A. and McNeil, C. L., 2006. Measurements of air-sea gas exchange at extreme wind speeds. Journal Marine Systems, this edition.] using air-deployed neutrally buoyant floats reveal the first evidence of a new regime of air-sea gas transfer occurring at wind speeds in excess of 35 m s - 1 . In this regime, plumes of bubbles 1 mm and smaller in size are transported down from near the surface of the ocean to greater depths by vertical turbulent currents with speeds up to 20-30 cm s - 1 . These bubble plumes mostly dissolve before reaching a depth of approximately 20 m as a result of hydrostatic compression. Injection of air into the ocean by this mechanism results in the invasion of gases in proportion to their tropospheric molar gas ratios, and further supersaturation of less soluble gases. A new formulation for air-sea fluxes of weakly soluble gases as a function of wind speed is proposed to extend existing formulations [Woolf, D.K, 1997. Bubbles and their role in gas exchange. In: Liss, P.S., and Duce, R.A., (Eds.), The Sea Surface and Global Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 173-205.] to span the entire natural range of wind speeds over the open ocean, which includes hurricanes. The new formulation has separate contributions to air-sea gas flux from: 1) non-supersaturating near-surface equilibration processes, which include direct transfer associated with the air-sea interface and ventilation associated with surface wave breaking; 2) partial dissolution of bubbles smaller than 1 mm that mix into the ocean via turbulence; and 3) complete dissolution of bubbles of up to 1 mm in size via subduction of bubble plumes. The model can be simplified by combining "surface equilibration" terms that allow exchange of gases into and out of the ocean, and "gas injection" terms that only allow gas to enter the ocean. The model was tested against the

  9. Influence of surface kinematics on air-sea heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veron, Fabrice; Melville, Ken

    2004-11-01

    The top few meters of the oceanic boundary layer play a critical role in the transfers of momentum, gas, mass and heat between the atmosphere and the ocean. These exchanges must necessarily transfer through the surface, and presumably, the rates at which they do are influence by the dynamics of the surface layer. Heat flux in particular is regulated by the thin surface thermal layer which, at most, is only a few millimeter thick. We are specifically interested in the influence of small coherent structures of the surface turbulence on the heat flux. Using active and passive infrared imaging, we measured the evolution the surface velocity and temperature fields over small areas of a few square meters. High-resolution surface Eulerian velocity fields using cross-correlation techniques (PIV) are obtained. Using active marking of the surface with an infrared CO2 laser, we have not only shown that it is possible to directly recover the Langrangian surface velocity, but also, by marking appropriate patterns on the surface we have been able to measure the shear strain, vorticity, and surface divergence. With the penetration depth of infrared radiation at these wavelengths being a few microns, these techniques appear to be quite apt for direct measurements of ocean surface turbulence. We have also found that the flux of heat through the surface appears to be influenced by the surface wave field. We will discuss the results in the context of air sea heat flux and ocean surface turbulence.

  10. Gap-filling methods to impute eddy covariance flux data by preserving variance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunwor, S.; Staudhammer, C. L.; Starr, G.; Loescher, H. W.

    2015-12-01

    To represent carbon dynamics, in terms of exchange of CO2 between the terrestrial ecosystem and the atmosphere, eddy covariance (EC) data has been collected using eddy flux towers from various sites across globe for more than two decades. However, measurements from EC data are missing for various reasons: precipitation, routine maintenance, or lack of vertical turbulence. In order to have estimates of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) with high precision and accuracy, robust gap-filling methods to impute missing data are required. While the methods used so far have provided robust estimates of the mean value of NEE, little attention has been paid to preserving the variance structures embodied by the flux data. Preserving the variance of these data will provide unbiased and precise estimates of NEE over time, which mimic natural fluctuations. We used a non-linear regression approach with moving windows of different lengths (15, 30, and 60-days) to estimate non-linear regression parameters for one year of flux data from a long-leaf pine site at the Joseph Jones Ecological Research Center. We used as our base the Michaelis-Menten and Van't Hoff functions. We assessed the potential physiological drivers of these parameters with linear models using micrometeorological predictors. We then used a parameter prediction approach to refine the non-linear gap-filling equations based on micrometeorological conditions. This provides us an opportunity to incorporate additional variables, such as vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and volumetric water content (VWC) into the equations. Our preliminary results indicate that improvements in gap-filling can be gained with a 30-day moving window with additional micrometeorological predictors (as indicated by lower root mean square error (RMSE) of the predicted values of NEE). Our next steps are to use these parameter predictions from moving windows to gap-fill the data with and without incorporation of potential driver variables

  11. Distribution Characteristics of Air-Bone Gaps – Evidence of Bias in Manual Audiometry

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard H.; Popelka, Gerald R.; Eikelboom, Robert H.; Swanepoel, De Wet; Saly, George L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Five databases were mined to examine distributions of air-bone gaps obtained by automated and manual audiometry. Differences in distribution characteristics were examined for evidence of influences unrelated to the audibility of test signals. Design The databases provided air- and bone-conduction thresholds that permitted examination of air-bone gap distributions that were free of ceiling and floor effects. Cases with conductive hearing loss were eliminated based on air-bone gaps, tympanometry, and otoscopy, when available. The analysis is based on 2,378,921 threshold determinations from 721,831 subjects from five databases. Results Automated audiometry produced air-bone gaps that were normally distributed suggesting that air- and bone-conduction thresholds are normally distributed. Manual audiometry produced air-bone gaps that were not normally distributed and show evidence of biasing effects of assumptions of expected results. In one database, the form of the distributions showed evidence of inclusion of conductive hearing losses. Conclusions Thresholds obtained by manual audiometry show tester bias effects from assumptions of the patient’s hearing loss characteristics. Tester bias artificially reduces the variance of bone-conduction thresholds and the resulting air-bone gaps. Because the automated method is free of bias from assumptions of expected results, these distributions are hypothesized to reflect the true variability of air- and bone-conduction thresholds and the resulting air-bone gaps. PMID:26627469

  12. Thickness and air gap measurement of assembled IR objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueerss, B.; Langehanenberg, P.

    2015-05-01

    A growing number of applications like surveillance, thermography, or automotive demand for infrared imaging systems. Their imaging performance is significantly influenced by the alignment of the individual lens elements. Besides the lateral orientation of lenses, the air spacing between the lenses is a crucial parameter. Because of restricted mechanical accessibility within an assembled objective, a non-contact technique is required for the testing of these parameters. So far commercial measurement systems were not available for testing of IR objectives since many materials used for infrared imaging are non-transparent at wavelengths below 2 μm. We herewith present a time-domain low coherent interferometer capable of measuring any kind of infrared material (e.g., Ge, Si, etc.) as well as VIS materials. The fiber-optic set-up is based on a Michelson-Interferometer in which the light from a broadband super-luminescent diode is split into a reference arm with a variable optical delay and a measurement arm where the sample is placed. On a photo detector, the reflected signals from both arms are superimposed and recorded as a function of the variable optical path. Whenever the group delay difference is zero, a coherence peak occurs and the relative lens' surface distances are derived from the optical delay. In order to penetrate IR materials, the instrument operates at 2.2 μm. The set-up allows the contactless determination of thicknesses and air gaps inside of assembled infrared objective lenses with accuracy in the micron range. It therefore is a tool for the precise manufacturing or quality control.

  13. Excitation of gap discrete breathers in an A3B crystal with a flux of particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, P. V.; Starostenkov, M. D.; Eremin, A. M.; Korznikova, E. A.; Dmitriev, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    The generation of discrete breathers in an A3B crystal has been modeled by the method of molecular dynamics using Pt3Al as an example via the application of random unidirectional momenta, which simulate the action of a particle flux, to atoms. Two possible mechanisms of the excitation of gap discrete breathers with a soft type of nonlinearity have been revealed depending on the energy of particles in a flux. If a particle is able to transfer energy of more than 1.4 eV to the Al atom, a discrete breather can be excited by the only particle. Otherwise, a discrete breather is formed upon numerous particle-Al atom collisions, which are possible only at a sufficiently high density of particles, as each following particle must transfer its momentum to the Al atom before its oscillations provoked by previous particles attenuate.

  14. Plasma treatment of polyethersulfone membrane for benzene removal from water by air gap membrane distillation.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Sara; Mortaheb, Hamid Reza; Arefi-Khonsari, Farzaneh

    2017-03-13

    In order to obtain a durable cost-effective membrane for membrane distillation (MD) process, flat sheet polyethersulfone (PES) membranes were modified by an atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasma generated using a dielectric barrier discharge in a mixture of argon and hexamethyldisiloxane as the organosilicon precursor. The surface properties of the plasma-modified membranes were characterized by water contact angle (CA), liquid entry pressure, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The water CA of the membrane was increased from 64° to 104° by depositing a Si(CH3)-rich thin layer. While the pristine PES membrane was not applicable in the MD process, the modified PES membrane could be applied for the first time in an air gap membrane distillation setup for the removal of benzene as a volatile organic compound from water. The experimental design using central composite design and response surface methodology was applied to study the effects of feed temperature, concentration, and flow rate as well as their binary interactions on the overall permeate flux and separation factor. The separation factor and permeation flux of the modified PES membrane at optimum conditions were comparable with those of commercial polytetrafluoroethylene membrane.

  15. Air bearing center cross gap of neutron stress spectrometer sample table support system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Wu, Yunxin; Gong, Hai; Feng, Xiaolei

    2016-12-01

    A support system is the main load-bearing component of sample table for neutron stress spectrometer, and air bearing is an important element of a support system. The neutron stress spectrometer sample table was introduced, and the scheme for air bearing combination was selected. To study the performance of air bearing center cross gap, finite element models (FEMs) were established based on air motion and Reynolds equations, effects of air supply pressure, and gap parameters on the overturning moment and bearing capacity of air bearing center cross gap were analyzed. Results indicate that the width, depth, and height differences of the marble floor gap played important roles in the performance of the air bearing. When gap width is lesser than 1 mm and gap depth is lower than 0.4 mm, bearing capacity and overturning moment would vary rapidly with the variation of the width and depth. A gap height difference results in the bearing capacity dropping rapidly. The FEM results agree well with experimental results. Further, findings of the study could guide the design of the support system and marble floor.

  16. Tunable mode-locked laser with micro-air gap cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Aidit, S. N.; Hassan, N. A.; Ooi, S. I.; Tiu, Z. C.

    2017-02-01

    A tunable mode-locked laser with a micro-air gap cavity acting as a high resolution tuning is proposed and demonstrated. The laser utilizes the nonlinear polarization technique in the cavity to obtain a reliable and stable mode locking over the whole tuning range at a resolution of 1 nm. The micro-air gap is constructed by aligning two fiber facets coaxially, and the variation of micro-air gap introduces a tuning mechanism where it changes the gain saturation compensation in the gain medium and thus induces wavelength shifting on the generated solitons.

  17. Mapping forest canopy gaps using air-photo interpretation and ground surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, T.J.; Knutson, M.G.; Hines, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    Canopy gaps are important structural components of forested habitats for many wildlife species. Recent improvements in the spatial accuracy of geographic information system tools facilitate accurate mapping of small canopy features such as gaps. We compared canopy-gap maps generated using ground survey methods with those derived from air-photo interpretation. We found that maps created from high-resolution air photos were more accurate than those created from ground surveys. Errors of omission were 25.6% for the ground-survey method and 4.7% for the air-photo method. One variable of inter est in songbird research is the distance from nests to gap edges. Distances from real and simulated nests to gap edges were longer using the ground-survey maps versus the air-photo maps, indicating that gap omission could potentially bias the assessment of spatial relationships. If research or management goals require location and size of canopy gaps and specific information about vegetation structure, we recommend a 2-fold approach. First, canopy gaps can be located and the perimeters defined using 1:15,000-scale or larger aerial photographs and the methods we describe. Mapped gaps can then be field-surveyed to obtain detailed vegetation data.

  18. Aging and the 4-kHz Air-Bone Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nondahl, David M.; Tweed, Ted S.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Wiley, Terry L.; Dalton, Dayna S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors assessed age- and sex-related patterns in the prevalence and 10-year incidence of 4-kHz air-bone gaps and associated factors. Method: Data were obtained as part of the longitudinal, population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study ( Cruickshanks et al., 1998). An air-bone gap at 4 kHz was defined as an…

  19. Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Health Outcomes: Conference Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources to Health Outcomes,” an international specialty conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research, was held to address key uncertainties in our understanding of adverse health effects related to air po...

  20. Using Empirical Mode Decomposition to Filter Out Non-turbulent Contributions to Air-Sea Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Luís Gustavo N.; Miller, Scott D.; Acevedo, Otávio C.

    2017-04-01

    A methodology based on Empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was used to filter out non-turbulent motions from measurements of atmospheric turbulence over the sea, aimed at reducing their contribution to eddy-covariance (EC) estimates of turbulent fluxes. The proposed methodology has two main objectives: (1) to provide more robust estimates of the fluxes of momentum, heat and CO_2; and (2) to reduce the number of flux intervals rejected due to non-stationarity criteria when using traditional EC data processing techniques. The method was applied to measurements from a 28-day cruise (HALOCAST 2010) in the Eastern Pacific region. Empirical mode decomposition was applied to 4-h long time series data and used to determine the cospectral gap time scale, T_{gap}. Intrinsic modes of oscillation with characteristic periods longer than the gap scale due to non-turbulent motions were assumed and filtered out. Turbulent fluxes were then calculated for sub-intervals of length T_{gap} from the filtered 4-h time series. In the HALOCAST data, the gap scale was successfully identified in 89% of the 4-h periods and had a mean of 37 s. The EMD approach resulted in the rejection of 11% of the flux intervals, which was much less than the 68% rejected when using standard filtering methods based on data non-stationarity. For momentum and sensible heat fluxes, the averaged difference in flux magnitude between the traditional and EMD approaches was small (3 and 1%, respectively). For the CO_2 flux, the magnitude of EMD flux estimates was on average 16% less than fluxes estimated from linear detrended 10-min time series. These results provide evidence that the EMD method can be used to reduce the effects of non-turbulent correlations from flux estimates.

  1. A Gap Junction Protein, Inx2, Modulates Calcium Flux to Specify Border Cell Fate during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Ritabrata; Deshpande, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Intercellular communication mediated by gap junction (GJ) proteins is indispensable during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and wound healing. Here we report functional analysis of a gap junction protein, Innexin 2 (Inx2), in cell type specification during Drosophila oogenesis. Our data reveal a novel involvement of Inx2 in the specification of Border Cells (BCs), a migratory cell type, whose identity is determined by the cell autonomous STAT activity. We show that Inx2 influences BC fate specification by modulating STAT activity via Domeless receptor endocytosis. Furthermore, detailed experimental analysis has uncovered that Inx2 also regulates a calcium flux that transmits across the follicle cells. We propose that Inx2 mediated calcium flux in the follicle cells stimulates endocytosis by altering Dynamin (Shibire) distribution which is in turn critical for careful calibration of STAT activation and, thus for BC specification. Together our data provide unprecedented molecular insights into how gap junction proteins can regulate cell-type specification. PMID:28114410

  2. Method and radial gap machine for high strength undiffused brushless operation

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2006-10-31

    A radial gap brushless electric machine (30) having a stator (31) and a rotor (32) and a main air gap (34) also has at least one stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) separated from the rotor (32) by a secondary air gap (35e, 35f, 36e, 36f) so as to induce a secondary flux in the rotor (32) which controls a resultant flux in the main air gap (34). Permanent magnetic (PM) material (38) is disposed in spaces between the rotor pole portions (39) to inhibit the second flux from leaking from the pole portions (39) prior to reaching the main air gap (34). By selecting the direction of current in the stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) both flux enhancement and flux weakening are provided for the main air gap (34). A method of non-diffused flux enhancement and flux weakening for a radial gap machine is also disclosed.

  3. Estimating ocean-air heat fluxes during cold air outbreaks by satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, S. H.; Atlas, D.

    1981-01-01

    Nomograms of mean column heating due to surface sensible and latent heat fluxes were developed. Mean sensible heating of the cloud free region is related to the cloud free path (CFP, the distance from the shore to the first cloud formation) and the difference between land air and sea surface temperatures, theta sub 1 and theta sub 0, respectively. Mean latent heating is related to the CFP and the difference between land air and sea surface humidities q sub 1 and q sub 0 respectively. Results are also applicable to any path within the cloud free region. Corresponding heat fluxes may be obtained by multiplying the mean heating by the mean wind speed in the boundary layer. The sensible heating estimated by the present method is found to be in good agreement with that computed from the bulk transfer formula. The sensitivity of the solutions to the variations in the initial coastal soundings and large scale subsidence is also investigated. The results are not sensitive to divergence but are affected by the initial lapse rate of potential temperature; the greater the stability, the smaller the heating, other things being equal. Unless one knows the lapse rate at the shore, this requires another independent measurement. For this purpose the downwind slope of the square of the boundary layer height is used, the mean value of which is also directly proportional to the mean sensible heating. The height of the boundary layer should be measurable by future spaceborn lidar systems.

  4. Effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC flux rates from CAFO manure and wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers are often used to estimate volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of wind tunnel air velocity on VOC emission ...

  5. 30 CFR 285.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 285.659 Section 285.659 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply with the Clean Air...

  6. Influence of the air gap between protective clothing and skin on clothing performance during flash fire exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazy, Ahmed; Bergstrom, Donald J.

    2011-10-01

    A finite volume model was developed to simulate transient heat transfer in protective clothing during flash fire exposure. The model accounts for the combined conduction-radiation heat transfer in the air gap between the fabric and skin. The variation in the fabric and air gap properties with temperature and the thermochemical reactions in the fabric are also considered. This study investigates the influence of the air gap in protective clothing on the energy transfer through the clothing and hence on its performance. Different parameters that affect the conduction-radiation heat transfer through the air gap such as the air gap absorption coefficient and the air gap width were studied. Finally, the paper demonstrates that an innovative and potentially significant way to improve protective clothing performance is to reduce the emissivity on the backside of the fabric.

  7. Air gap resonant tunneling bandpass filter and polarizer.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, A; Bitarafan, M H; Allen, T W; DeCorby, R G

    2016-04-15

    We describe a bandpass filter based on resonant tunneling through an air layer in the frustrated total internal reflection regime, and show that the concept of induced transmission can be applied to the design of thin film matching stacks. Experimental results are reported for Si/SiO2-based devices exhibiting a polarization-dependent passband, with bandwidth on the order of 10 nm in the 1550 nm wavelength range, peak transmittance on the order of 80%, and optical density greater than 5 over most of the near infrared region.

  8. Ocean Winds and Turbulent Air-Sea Fluxes Inferred From Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, Mark A.; Gille, Sarah T.; Jackson, Daren L.; Roberts, J. Brent; Wick, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Air-sea turbulent fluxes determine the exchange of momentum, heat, freshwater, and gas between the atmosphere and ocean. These exchange processes are critical to a broad range of research questions spanning length scales from meters to thousands of kilometers and time scales from hours to decades. Examples are discussed (section 2). The estimation of surface turbulent fluxes from satellite is challenging and fraught with considerable errors (section 3); however, recent developments in retrievals (section 3) will greatly reduce these errors. Goals for the future observing system are summarized in section 4. Surface fluxes are defined as the rate per unit area at which something (e.g., momentum, energy, moisture, or CO Z ) is transferred across the air/sea interface. Wind- and buoyancy-driven surface fluxes are called surface turbulent fluxes because the mixing and transport are due to turbulence. Examples of nonturbulent processes are radiative fluxes (e.g., solar radiation) and precipitation (Schmitt et al., 2010). Turbulent fluxes are strongly dependent on wind speed; therefore, observations of wind speed are critical for the calculation of all turbulent surface fluxes. Wind stress, the vertical transport of horizontal momentum, also depends on wind direction. Stress is very important for many ocean processes, including upper ocean currents (Dohan and Maximenko, 2010) and deep ocean currents (Lee et al., 2010). On short time scales, this horizontal transport is usually small compared to surface fluxes. For long-term processes, transport can be very important but again is usually small compared to surface fluxes.

  9. Transpiration's inhibition of air pollution fluxes to substomatal cavities. [PRECP

    SciTech Connect

    Slinn, W.G.N.

    1987-05-01

    This report presents an estimate for the resistance to transport through stomatal openings, accounting for the counterflowing flux of water vapor associated with transpiration. The specific goal of this report is to estimate the influence of transpiration on the stomatal resistance, r/sub sto/; others have estimated the substomatal and mesophyll resistances r/sub ssc/ and r/sub mes/. It might be expected that any influence of the water-vapor flux on pollutant transport would be a maximum at the stomatal opening since, at the constricted area of the stoma, the water flux is a maximum. Transpiration through stomata appears to insigifnicantly inhibit the passage of relatively small molecules (e.g., SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, HNO/sub 3/, PAN, etc.) through the stomata, and therefore, by entering the substomatal cavity, such pollutants have greater potential for threatening plan survival, if their concentrations are excessive. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Control of GaP nanowire morphology by group V flux in gas source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuyanov, P.; Boulanger, J.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2017-03-01

    GaP nanowires (NWs) were grown on a Si substrate by gas source molecular beam epitaxy using self-assisted growth. Selective-area growth was achieved using a patterned oxide mask. Periodic GaAsP marker layers were introduced during growth to study the growth progression using transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate control of the NW morphology via the V/III flux ratio, the pattern pitch, and the oxide hole diameter. As the V/III flux ratio was increased from 1 to 6, the NWs showed a reduced top diameter and increased height. Reduced oxide hole diameter and increased V/III flux ratio caused the Ga droplet to be consumed partway through the growth for some NWs, leading to a switch from VLS group V limited growth to diffusion limited growth.

  11. Study on the wide-angle Michelson interferometer with large air gap.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haiyang; Tang, Yuanhe; Hua, Dengxin; Liu, Hanchen

    2011-10-10

    A wide-angle Michelson interferometer with large air gap is proposed to effectively reduce the size of the glass arms and constraint on material. It provides a novel and practical instrument for ground based wind measurement of the upper atmosphere. The field widening conditions for the large air gap are calculated in theory. For the five spectral lines of 557.7 nm, 630.0 nm, 732.0 nm, 834.6 nm, and 865.7 nm, the optimal results under ideal condition are obtained with air gaps of 1.0 cm, 1.5 cm, and 2.0 cm, respectively. With the fixed optical path difference (OPD) of 7.495 cm, three pairs of glass arms are optimized. The pair with length of 1.5 cm for air gap, 5.765 cm for H-ZF12, and 2.956 cm for H-ZLaF54, has better effect of field widening than the other two pairs and its OPD variation is only within 0.30 wavelengths at incident angle of 3°. For developing a more practical wide-angle Michelson interferometer, the H-K9L glass with size of 4.445 cm is employed as the arm material of solid interferometer. The experiment for field of view of 3° is designed and the data processing and analysis for 60 images show the agreement between experimental results and theoretical simulation. The OPD variations are only within 0.27 wavelengths for image edge. The feasibility and practicality of the wide-angle Michelson interferometer with large air gap is proved by means of theory and experiment.

  12. The effect of body postures on the distribution of air gap thickness and contact area.

    PubMed

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M

    2017-02-01

    The heat and mass transfer in clothing is predominantly dependent on the thickness of air layer and the magnitude of contact area between the body and the garment. The air gap thickness and magnitude of the contact area can be affected by the posture of the human body. Therefore, in this study, the distribution of the air gap and the contact area were investigated for different body postures of a flexible manikin. In addition, the effect of the garment fit (regular and loose) and style (t-shirts, sweatpants, jacket and trousers) were analysed for the interaction between the body postures and the garment properties. A flexible manikin was scanned using a three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique, and the scans were post-processed in dedicated software. The body posture had a strong effect on the air gap thickness and the contact area for regions where the garment had a certain distance from the body. Furthermore, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the possible heat transfer coefficient for the observed air layers and their change with posture. The outcome of this study can be used to improve the design of the protective and functional garments and predict their effect on the human body.

  13. The effect of body postures on the distribution of air gap thickness and contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2017-02-01

    The heat and mass transfer in clothing is predominantly dependent on the thickness of air layer and the magnitude of contact area between the body and the garment. The air gap thickness and magnitude of the contact area can be affected by the posture of the human body. Therefore, in this study, the distribution of the air gap and the contact area were investigated for different body postures of a flexible manikin. In addition, the effect of the garment fit (regular and loose) and style (t-shirts, sweatpants, jacket and trousers) were analysed for the interaction between the body postures and the garment properties. A flexible manikin was scanned using a three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique, and the scans were post-processed in dedicated software. The body posture had a strong effect on the air gap thickness and the contact area for regions where the garment had a certain distance from the body. Furthermore, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the possible heat transfer coefficient for the observed air layers and their change with posture. The outcome of this study can be used to improve the design of the protective and functional garments and predict their effect on the human body.

  14. Air-to-sea fluxes of lipids at Enewetak Atoll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafiriou, Oliver C.; Gagosian, Robert B.; Peltzer, Edward T.; Alford, Jane B.; Loder, T.

    1985-02-01

    We report data for the Enewetak site of the SEAREX program from the rainy season in 1979. The concentrations of n-alkanes, n-alkanols, sterols, n-alkanoic acids and their salts, and total organic compounds in rain are reported, as well as the apparent gaseous hydrocarbon concentrations. These data and information on the particulate forms are analyzed in conjunction with ancillary chemical and meteorological data to draw inferences about sources, fluxes, and chemical speciations. While the higher molecular weight lipid biomarker components are exclusively terrestrial, the organic carbon in rain may be derived from atmospheric transformations of terrestrial carbon. Distinctively marine components are nearly absent. Comparison of the scavenging ratios of the organic components in rain vs. those for clays reveals that the alkanoic acids and the higher molecular weight alkanols behave as essentially particulate materials, whereas lower alkanols and most hydrocarbons show much higher scavenging ratios, probably due to the involvement of a gaseous phase or sampling artifact. Vaporization in the atmosphere and scavenging of a gas phase would lead to higher scavenging ratios; vaporization during sampling would give low aerosol concentrations and high gas-phase concentrations, leading to high scavenging ratios. The major fluxes at Enewetak result from rain rather than dry deposition, and extrapolating the measured values to meaningful annual averages requires adjustment for seasonally varying source intensity and rain dynamics. Aerosol data for other seasons and other substances are used to correct for source-strength intensity variations, and a 210Pb/organic compound correlation is established and extrapolated to adjust for rainfall volume effects. These corrections, assumed independent and applied together, yield inferred fluxes 2.5-9 times larger than the fluxes calculated for mean concentrations. The inferred fluxes to the ocean, while small compared to primary

  15. 30 CFR 585.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 585.659 Section 585.659 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply...

  16. 30 CFR 585.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 585.659 Section 585.659 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply...

  17. 30 CFR 285.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 285.659 Section 285.659 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... Pipeline Deviations § 285.659 What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air...

  18. 30 CFR 585.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 585.659 Section 585.659 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply...

  19. A micro-gap, air-filled ionisation chamber as a detector for criticality accident dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Ł; Zielczyński, M; Golnik, N; Gryziński, M A

    2014-10-01

    A micro-gap air-filled ionisation chamber was designed for criticality dosimetry. The special feature of the chamber is its very small gap between electrodes of only 0.3 mm. This prevents ion recombination at high dose rates and minimises the influence of gas on secondary particles spectrum. The electrodes are made of polypropylene because of higher content of hydrogen in this material, when compared with soft tissue. The difference between neutron and gamma sensitivity in such chamber becomes practically negligible. The chamber's envelope contains two specially connected capacitors, one for polarising the electrodes and the other for collecting the ionisation charge.

  20. Comparisons of Ship-based Observations of Air-Sea Energy Budgets with Gridded Flux Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairall, C. W.; Blomquist, B.

    2015-12-01

    Air-surface interactions are characterized directly by the fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture, trace gases, and particles near the interface. In the last 20 years advances in observation technologies have greatly expanded the database of high-quality direct (covariance) turbulent flux and irradiance observations from research vessels. In this paper, we will summarize observations from the NOAA sea-going flux system from participation in various field programs executed since 1999 and discuss comparisons with several gridded flux products. We will focus on comparisons of turbulent heat fluxes and solar and IR radiative fluxes. The comparisons are done for observing programs in the equatorial Pacific and Indian Oceans and SE subtropical Pacific.

  1. Investigation of a single barrier discharge in submillimeter air gaps. Nonuniform field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, P. N.; Emel'yanov, O. A.; Shemet, M. V.

    2014-08-01

    Pulse characteristics of single barrier discharges as well as parameters of charges accumulated on the surface of a dielectric under the atmospheric pressure in the "needle-(0.1-2.0)-mm air gap-polymer barrier-plane" system are investigated. It is found experimentally that for the positive polarity of the needle, the voltage for the discharge initiation is higher than in the case of the negative polarity by ˜25-35%. The reversal of the needle polarity from negative to positive increases the amplitude of the discharge current and the accumulated surface charge by ˜1.5-3 times. For the positive polarity of the needle, the discharge is governed by a streamer mechanism, while for the negative polarity, the discharge is initiated by the formation of a single Trichel pulse. The single pulse regime is observed for the discharge current up to a certain electrode gap d CR. For the positive needle and for air gap width d air > d CR ≈ 1.5 mm, a multipulse burst corona is formed, while for the negative needle and d air > d CR ≈ 0.9 mm, a damped sequence of Trichel pulses evolves in the system.

  2. Air-Sea Fluxes in Hurricanes From GPS Dropsondes and a Fully Coupled Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desflots, M.; Chen, S.; Zhao, W.; Bao, J.

    2006-12-01

    The importance of the surface fluxes for tropical cyclone (TC) intensity has long been recognized. However, accurate surface fluxes under extreme high-wind conditions are difficult to determine due to the lack of direct observations. The physical processes controlling the air-sea fluxes and the exchange coefficients for the enthalpy and momentum fluxes are not well understood. Furthermore, a large amount of sea spray produced by the breaking waves in high winds further complicates the processes at the air-sea interface. To understand the behaviour of the surface fluxes and the atmospheric and upper ocean boundary layers in a hurricane, we use a high-resolution (1-2 km grid spacing), fully coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean model. The components of the coupled model system are the 5th generation Pennsylvania State University/ National Center for Atmospheric Research non-hydrostatic Mesoscale Model (MM5), WAVEWATCH III (WW3), and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution three-dimensional upper ocean model (WHOI 3DPWP). The coupled model used in this study includes the CBLAST wind-wave coupling parameterization and a sea spray parameterization that include the effects of the surface waves. The sea spray parameterization was initially developed by Fairall et al. (1994) and modified by Bao et al. (2000). The model simulated air-sea fluxes and atmospheric profiles from several numerical experiments of a 5-day simulation of Hurricane Frances (2004) are compared with the Global Positioning System (GPS) dropsonde data. The coupled model simulations of Frances reproduce the observed storm track and intensity quite well. The observed cold wake at the ocean surface and the asymmetry in the air-sea fluxes are also evident in the model simulations. More detailed analysis is currently underway to better understand the physical processes affecting air-sea fluxes in hurricanes as well as their contribution to the storm structure and intensity.

  3. Modeling of Particle Transport on Channels and Gaps Exposed to Plasma Fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Nieto-Perez, Martin

    2008-04-07

    Many problems in particle transport in fusion devices involve the transport of plasma or eroded particles through channels or gaps, such as in the case of trying to assess damage to delicate optical diagnostics collecting light through a slit or determining the deposition and codeposition on the gaps between tiles of plasma-facing components. A dynamic-composition Monte Carlo code in the spirit of TRIDYN, previously developed to study composition changes on optical mirrors subject to ion bombardment, has been upgraded to include motion of particles through a volume defined by sets of plane surfaces. Particles sputtered or reflected from the walls of the channel/gap can be tracked as well, allowing the calculation of wall impurity transport, either back to the plasma (for the case of a gap) or to components separated from the plasma by a channel/slit (for the case of optical diagnostics). Two examples of the code application to particle transport in fusion devices will be presented in this work: one will evaluate the erosion/impurity deposition rate on a mirror separated from a plasma source by a slit; the other case will look at the enhanced emission of tile material in the region of the gap between two tiles.

  4. Hybrid plasmonic microcavity with an air-filled gap for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Meng; Liu, Binbin; Wu, Genzhu; Chen, Daru

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel hybrid plasmonic microcavity with air-filled regions in the low-permittivity dielectric gap is proposed for sensing applications. Compared with the conventional structure with homogeneous gap, the introduced air-filled regions could improve the key modal characteristics of the hybrid mode. Simulation results reveal that this kind of hybrid microcavity maintains low loss with high quality factor ∼3062, and high field confinement with small mode volume 0.891 μm3. Moreover, in the sensing applications, this hybrid microcavity features simultaneously large refractive index sensitivity of 100 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and relatively high quality factor of 3062. Hence, it shows that the hybrid plasmonic microcavity has potential applications in ultra-compact refractive index sensor.

  5. Observations of the Valley of Mexico Basin Ventilation Through the Tenango del Aire- Amecameca Geographical Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Suarez, G.; Torres-Jarón, R.; Steinbrecher, R.; Junkermann, W.; Torres-Jaramillo, A.; Garcia, A. R.; Mar-Morales, B.

    2007-05-01

    Past air quality modeling exercises have suggested the existence of basin drainage flows which may transport Mexico City Metropolitan Area's air pollution plume outside the Valley of Mexico Basin. The MCMA-2006 field campaign offered the opportunity to study the basin ventilation through a geographical gap in the southeast mountains of the basin. A mobile monitoring lab was placed at the Tenango del Aire town, a unique site located in this gap for measuring the pass of air masses from (and towards) the MCMA to (and from) the Cuautla Valley. O3, CO, NOx, NOy, CH2O global and UV radiation and MLH were measured continuously during MILAGRO from March 2 until April 6, together with other chemical species. Complementary backward and forward trajectories were constructed for the site using MCCM in prognostic mode during MILAGRO. An exploratory analysis of the air pollution roses measured at Tenango showed a sharp dominance of two flow patterns: one from the north well associated with relatively higher levels of primary pollutants and ozone levels; and another one from the south typically associated with lower levels primary pollutants but not so low of secondary ones as ozone. On the other hand, measured CO data at Tenango were compared with CO data measured at one local monitoring station in the town of Ocuituco in the State of Morelos. Ocuituco is located to the south of Tenango towards the Cuautla Valley. The preliminary results suggest that the back and forth pass of air masses through the Tenango del Aire - Amecameca area can be an important process in the regional transport of air pollution between two valleys and their metropolitan areas within the Central Mexico region.

  6. Local droplet etching – Nanoholes, quantum dots, and air-gap heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Heyn, Ch.; Sonnenberg, D.; Graf, A.; Kerbst, J.; Stemmann, A.; Hansen, W.

    2014-05-15

    Local droplet etching (LDE) allows the self-organized generation of nanoholes in semiconductor surfaces and is fully compatible with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The influence of the process parameters as well as of droplet and substrate materials on the LDE nanohole morphology is discussed. Furthermore, recent applications of LDE, the fabrication of quantum dots by hole filling and the creation of air-gap heterostructures are addressed.

  7. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungan, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2008-02-05

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in 0 reactive flow JWL++ and Linked Cheetah V4, mostly at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. The physical basis of the input parameters is considered.

  8. A Numerical Study of the Role of Air-Sea Fluxes in Extratropical Cyclogenesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    Extratropical Cyclogenesis; Air-sea Fluxes; Surface Fluxes; Ocean Cyclogenesis; Polar Low;KDiabatic Processes 20. \\#@SYrNACY (Coie. on Po~wes li It nRaea@inF...parameterization scheme and the Randall version of the Deardorff planetary boundary layer parameterization. Idealized initial conditions are speci- fied ...hydo- static equation. The reference geopotential profile is speci- fied at 300S (spring regime) in the balance routine to match the temperature field

  9. Force versus current and air gap calibration of a double acting magnetic thrust bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Baun, D.O.; Fittro, R.L.; Maslen, E.H.

    1995-12-31

    Force versus current and air gap measurements were obtained for a double acting thrust bearing. Static force measurements were made for various air gap settings and bearing current combinations. The resulting data was reduced and an optimized expression representing the force versus current and air gap relationship of the bearing was found. In addition, a theoretical force model was developed using simple magnetic circuit theory and magnetic properties obtained from standard magnetic material tests. The theoretical and the experimentally derived force models were compared. Hysteresis tests were conducted with the thrust disk in the centered position for various current perturbation amplitudes about the design bias current. Hysteresis effects were shown to cause a difference between the measured force as the current was increasing as compared to when the current was decreasing. A second order polynomial expression was developed to express the coercive force as a function of the perturbation current amplitude. The bearing frequency response was examined by injecting sinusoidal currents of varying frequencies into the bearing. A maximum actuator bandwidth of approximately 700 Hz was determined. Above 700 Hz the bearing frequency response could not be distinguished from the test fixture frequency response.

  10. Dynamic analysis of a BLDC motor with mechanical and electromagnetic interaction due to air gap variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Hyungbin; Yoo, Hong Hee; Chung, Jintai

    2011-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic behaviors of a BLDC motor are analyzed, when the motor undergoes mechanical and electromagnetic interaction due to an air gap variation between the stator and rotor. When considering the air gap variation caused by the translational motion of the rotor relative to the stator, the kinetic and potential energies, Rayleigh dissipation function, and the magnetic coenergy are expressed in terms of the rotor displacements and stator currents. With these energies and function, new equations of motion are derived using Lagrange's equation. The equations for the proposed model are nonlinear equations in which the displacements and currents are coupled. The time responses for the displacements and currents are computed for the proposed and previous models. Furthermore, the effects of rotor eccentricity are also investigated. It is found that, when the air gap varies with time, the time responses for the proposed and previous models have small differences in the stator currents, electromagnetic torques, and rotating speeds. However, the time responses have large differences in the rotor displacements. Therefore, this paper claims that the proposed model describes the dynamic behaviors of the motor more accurately than the previous model. It is also shown that rotor eccentricity increases the stator current period and the electromagnetic torque, while it decreases the rotating speed of the rotor.

  11. Methods, fluxes and sources of gas phase alkyl nitrates in the coastal air.

    PubMed

    Dirtu, Alin C; Buczyńska, Anna J; Godoi, Ana F L; Favoreto, Rodrigo; Bencs, László; Potgieter-Vermaak, Sanja S; Godoi, Ricardo H M; Van Grieken, René; Van Vaeck, Luc

    2014-10-01

    The daily and seasonal atmospheric concentrations, deposition fluxes and emission sources of a few C3-C9 gaseous alkyl nitrates (ANs) at the Belgian coast (De Haan) on the Southern North Sea were determined. An adapted sampler design for low- and high-volume air-sampling, optimized sample extraction and clean-up, as well as identification and quantification of ANs in air samples by means of gas chromatography mass spectrometry, are reported. The total concentrations of ANs ranged from 0.03 to 85 pptv and consisted primarily of the nitro-butane and nitro-pentane isomers. Air mass backward trajectories were calculated by the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model to determine the influence of main air masses on AN levels in the air. The shorter chain ANs have been the most abundant in the Atlantic/Channel/UK air masses, while longer chain ANs prevailed in continental air. The overall mean N fluxes of the ANs were slightly higher for summer than those for winter-spring, although their contributions to the total nitrogen flux were low. High correlations between AN and HNO₂ levels were observed during winter/spring. During summer, the shorter chain ANs correlated well with precipitation. Source apportionment by means of principal component analysis indicated that most of the gas phase ANs could be attributed to traffic/combustion, secondary photochemical formation and biomass burning, although marine sources may also have been present and a contributing factor.

  12. Air-to-sea fluxes of lipids at enewetak atoll

    SciTech Connect

    Zafiriou, O.C.; Gagosian, R.B.; Peltzer, E.T.; Alford, J.B.; Loder, T.

    1985-02-20

    We report data for the Enewetak site of the SEAREX program from the rainy season in 1979. The concentrations of n-alkanes, n-alkanols, sterols, n-alkanoic acids and their salts, and total organic compounds in rain are reported, as well as the apparent gaseous hydrocarbon concentrations. These data and information on the particulate forms are analyzed in conjunction with ancillary chemical and meterological data to draw inferences about sources, fluxes, and chemical speciations. While the higher molecular weight lipid biomarker components are exclusively terrestrial, the organic carbon in rain may be derived from atmospheric transformations of terrestrial carbon. Distinctively marine components are nearly absent. Comparison of the scavenging ratios of the organic components in rain vs. those for clays reveals that the alkanoic acids and the higher molecular weight alkanols behave as essentially particulate materials, whereas lower alkanols and most hydrocarbons show much higher scavenging ratios, probably due to the involvement of a gaseous phase or sampling artifact. Vaporization in the atmosphere and scaveging of a gas phase would lead to higher scaveging ratios; vaporization during sampling would give low aerosol concentrations and high gas-phase concentrations, leading to high scavening ratios. The major fluxes at Enewetak result from rain rather than dry deposition, and extrapolating the measured values to meaningful annual averages requires adjustment for seasonally varying source intensity and rain dynamics. Aerosol data for other seasons and other substances are used to correct for source-strength intensity variations, and a /sup 210/Pb/organic compound correlation is established and extrapolated to adjust for rainfall volume effects.

  13. Air-Sea Fluxes in Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica from In Situ Aircraft Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, S. L.; Cassano, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    In September 2009, the first unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) were flown over Terra Nova Bay, Antarctica to collect information regarding air-sea interactions over a wintertime coastal polynya. The UAVs measured wind, temperature, pressure, and relative humidity in flights parallel to the downslope wind flow over the polynya, and in a series of vertical profiles at varying distances from the coast. During three flights on three different days, sufficient measurements were collected to calculate sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum fluxes over varying oceanic surface states, including frazil, pancake, and rafted ice, with background winds greater than 15 ms-1. During the three flights, sensible heat fluxes upwards of 600 Wm-2 were estimated near the coast, with maximum latent heat fluxes near 160 Wm-2 just downwind of the coast. The calculated accelerations due to the momentum flux divergence were on the order of 10-3 ms-2. In addition to the fluxes, changes in the overall momentum budget, including the horizontal pressure gradient force, were also calculated during the three flights. This presentation will summarize the methodology for calculating the fluxes from the UAV data, present the first ever in situ estimates of sensible heat, latent heat, and momentum fluxes and overall momentum budget estimates over Terra Nova Bay, and compare the UAV flux calculations to flux measurements taken during other field campaigns in other regions of the Antarctic, as well as to model estimates over Terra Nova Bay.

  14. Measurement of air and VOC vapor fluxes during gas-driven soil remediation: bench-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heonki; Kim, Taeyun; Shin, Seungyeop; Annable, Michael D

    2012-09-04

    In this laboratory study, an experimental method was developed for the quantitative analyses of gas fluxes in soil during advective air flow. One-dimensional column and two- and three-dimensional flow chamber models were used in this study. For the air flux measurement, n-octane vapor was used as a tracer, and it was introduced in the air flow entering the physical models. The tracer (n-octane) in the gas effluent from the models was captured for a finite period of time using a pack of activated carbon, which then was analyzed for the mass of n-octane. The air flux was calculated based on the mass of n-octane captured by the activated carbon and the inflow concentration. The measured air fluxes are in good agreement with the actual values for one- and two-dimensional model experiments. Using both the two- and three-dimensional models, the distribution of the air flux at the soil surface was measured. The distribution of the air flux was found to be affected by the depth of the saturated zone. The flux and flux distribution of a volatile contaminant (perchloroethene) was also measured by using the two-dimensional model. Quantitative information of both air and contaminant flux may be very beneficial for analyzing the performance of gas-driven subsurface remediation processes including soil vapor extraction and air sparging.

  15. Development and evaluation of an ammonia bidirectional flux parameterization for air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pleim, Jonathan E.; Bash, Jesse O.; Walker, John T.; Cooter, Ellen J.

    2013-05-01

    is an important contributor to particulate matter in the atmosphere and can significantly impact terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Surface exchange between the atmosphere and biosphere is a key part of the ammonia cycle. New modeling techniques are being developed for use in air quality models that replace current ammonia emissions from fertilized crops and ammonia dry deposition with a bidirectional surface flux model including linkage to a detailed biogeochemical and farm management model. Recent field studies involving surface flux measurements over crops that predominate in North America have been crucial for extending earlier bidirectional flux models toward more realistic treatment of NH3 fluxes for croplands. Comparisons of the ammonia bidirection flux algorithm to both lightly fertilized soybeans and heavily fertilized corn demonstrate that the model can capture the magnitude and dynamics of observed ammonia fluxes, both net deposition and evasion, over a range of conditions with overall biases on the order of the uncertainty of the measurements. However, successful application to the field experiment in heavily fertilized corn required substantial modification of the model to include new parameterizations for in-soil diffusion resistance, ground quasi-laminar boundary layer resistance, and revised cuticular resistance that is dependent on in-canopy NH3 concentration and RH at the leaf surface. This new bidirectional flux algorithm has been incorporated in an air quality modeling system, which also includes an implementation of a soil nitrification model.

  16. Dynamics of air gap formation around roots with changing soil water content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetterlein, D.; Carminati, A.; Weller, U.; Oswald, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Most models regarding uptake of water and nutrients from soil assume intimate contact between roots and soil. However, it is known for a long time that roots may shrink under drought conditions. Due to the opaque nature of soil this process could not be observed in situ until recently. Combining tomography of the entire sample (field of view of 16 x 16 cm, pixel side 0.32 mm) with local tomography of the soil region around roots (field of view of 5 x 5 cm, pixel side 0.09 mm), the high spatial resolution required to image root shrinkage and formation of air-filled gaps around roots could be achieved. Applying this technique and combining it with microtensiometer measurements, measurements of plant gas exchange and microscopic assessment of root anatomy, a more detailed study was conducted to elucidate at which soil matric potential roots start to shrink in a sandy soil and which are the consequences for plant water relations. For Lupinus albus grown in a sandy soil tomography of the entire root system and of the interface between taproot and soil was conducted from day 11 to day 31 covering two drying cycles. Soil matric potential decreased from -36 hPa at day 11 after planting to -72, -251, -429 hPa, on day 17, 19, 20 after planting. On day 20 an air gap started to occur around the tap root and extended further on day 21 with matric potential below -429 hPa (equivalent to 5 v/v % soil moisture). From day 11 to day 21 stomatal conductivity decreased from 467 to 84 mmol m-2 s-1, likewise transpiration rate decreased and plants showed strong wilting symptoms on day 21. Plants were watered by capillary rise on day 21 and recovered completely within a day with stomatal conductivity increasing to 647 mmol m-2 s-1. During a second drying cycle, which was shorter as plants continuously increased in size, air gap formed again at the same matric potential. Plant stomatal conductance and transpiration decreased in a similar fashion with decreasing matric potential and

  17. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment.

    PubMed

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42%. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  18. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42 %. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  19. Optimization of Magneto-Rheological Damper for Maximizing Magnetic Flux Density in the Fluid Flow Gap Through FEA and GA Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Hemanth; Kumar, Hemantha; Gangadharan, Kalluvalappil

    2016-06-01

    A magneto rheological (MR) fluid damper offers cost effective solution for semiactive vibration control in an automobile suspension. The performance of MR damper is significantly depends on the electromagnetic circuit incorporated into it. The force developed by MR fluid damper is highly influenced by the magnetic flux density induced in the fluid flow gap. In the present work, optimization of electromagnetic circuit of an MR damper is discussed in order to maximize the magnetic flux density. The optimization procedure was proposed by genetic algorithm and design of experiments techniques. The result shows that the fluid flow gap size less than 1.12 mm cause significant increase of magnetic flux density.

  20. Band gap tunability of molecular beam epitaxy grown lateral composition modulated GaInP structures by controlling V/III flux ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Park, K. W.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, Y. T.

    2012-07-30

    Lateral composition modulated (LCM) GaInP structures were grown on (001) GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy with different V/III flux ratios. Band gap of LCM structures could be tuned from 1.93 eV to 1.83 eV by decreasing flux ratio while maintaining the same photoluminescence intensity, enhanced light absorption, and widened absorption spectrum. It is shown that for band gap tuning of LCM structures, flux ratio adjustment is a more viable method compared to growth temperature adjustment.

  1. Materials, processes, and characterization of extended air-gaps for the intra-level interconnection of integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seongho

    The integration of an air-gap as an ultra low dielectric constant material in an infra-metal dielectric region of interconnect structure in integrated circuits was investigated in terms of material properties of a thermally decomposable sacrificial polymer, fabrication processes and electrical performance. Extension of the air-gap into the inter-layer dielectric region reduces the interconnect capacitance. In order to enhance the hardness of a polymer for the better process reliabilities, a conventional norbornene-based sacrificial polymer was electron-beam irradiated. Although the hardness of the polymer increased, the thermal properties degraded. A new high modulus tetracyclododecene-based sacrificial polymer was characterized and compared to the norbornene-based polymer in terms of hardness, process reliability and thermal properties. The tetracyclododecene-based polymer was harder and showed better process reliability than the norbomene-based sacrificial polymer. Using the tetracyclododecene-based sacrificial polymer, a single layer Cu/air-gap and extended Culair-gap structures were fabricated. The effective dielectric constant of the air-gap and extended air-gap structures were 2.42 and 2.17, respectively. This meets the requirements for the 32 nm node. Moisture uptake of the extended Cu/air-gap structure increased the effective dielectric constant. The exposure of the structure to hexamethyldisilazane vapor removed the absorbed moisture and changed the structure hydrophobic, improving the integration reliability. The integration processes of the air-gap and the extended air-gap into a dual damascene Cu metallization process has been proposed and compared to state-of-the-art integration approaches.

  2. Controls on air-sea CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean east of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, J.; Strutton, P. G.

    2014-12-01

    The temperate latitudes of the world oceans (~30-50° north and south) are strong sinks for atmospheric CO2 on a mean annual basis. Due to sparse data, the Southern Ocean is the least understood of these CO2 sink regions, with estimates of the annual air-sea CO2 flux varying by as much as 100%, depending upon the calculation method. This work investigates processes regulating air-sea CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean, with a focus on the Pacific sector east of Australia. We quantify the effects of temperature, biological drawdown, and the large-scale general circulation on seawater pCO2 on seasonal and annual timescales, and discuss the balance of these forcings. We expressly consider the impact of the general circulation on the air-sea CO2 flux, which we showed in a previous study to determine the location of the North Pacific carbon sink region. Worldwide, the regions of strong atmospheric CO2 uptake are all located in deep western boundary currents and their extensions, suggesting a larger role for the general circulation in forcing these sinks than is currently acknowledged or understood. Understanding the processes regulating air-sea CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean is critical for predicting how this gas exchange will change in the future.

  3. Narrowing the spread in CMIP5 model projections of air-sea CO2 fluxes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Jianbin; Luo, Yong; Zhao, Zongci

    2016-01-01

    Large spread appears in the projection of air-sea CO2 fluxes using the latest simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Here, two methods are applied to narrow this spread in 13 CMIP5 models. One method involves model selection based on the ability of models to reproduce the observed air-sea CO2 fluxes from 1980 to 2005. The other method involves constrained estimation based on the strong relationship between the historical and future air-sea CO2 fluxes. The estimated spread of the projected air-sea CO2 fluxes is effectively reduced by using these two approaches. These two approaches also show great agreement in the global ocean and three regional oceans of the equatorial Pacific Ocean, the North Atlantic Ocean and the Southern Ocean, including the average state and evolution characteristics. Based on the projections of the two approaches, the global ocean carbon uptake will increase in the first half of the 21st century then remain relatively stable and is projected to be 3.68–4.57 PgC/yr at the end of 21st century. The projections indicate that the increase in the CO2 uptake by the oceans will cease at the year of approximately 2070. PMID:27892473

  4. Surface dose measurements from air gaps under a bolus by using a MOSFET dosimeter in clinical oblique photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jin-Beom; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, In-Ah; Lee, Jeong-Woo

    2012-10-01

    This study is intended to investigate the effects of surface dose from air gaps under the bolus in clinically used oblique photon beams by using a Markus parallel-plate chamber and a metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter. To evaluate the performances of the two detectors, the percentage surface doses of the MOSFET dosimeters in without an air gap under the bolus material were measured and compared with those of the Markus parallel-plate chamber. MOSFET dosimeters at the surface provided results mostly in good agreement with the parallelplate chamber. The MOSFET dosimeters seemed suitable for surface dose measurements having excellent accuracy for clinical used photon beams. The relative surface doses were measured with air gaps (2, 5, 10 mm) and without an air gap under 3 different bolus setups: (1) unbolused (no bolus), (2) 5-mm bolus, and (3) 10-mm bolus. The reductions in the surface dose substantially increased with small field size, thick bolus, and large air gap. The absolute difference in the reductions of the surface dose between the MOSFET dosimeter and the Markus parallel-plate chamber was less than 1.1%. Results at oblique angles of incidence showed larger reductions in surface dose with increasing angle of incidence. The largest reduction in surface dose was recorded for a 6 × 6 cm2 field at a 60° angle of incidence with an 10-mm air gap under a 10-mm bolus. When a 10-mm bolus was used, a reduction in the surface dose with an air gap of up to 10.5% could be achieved by varying the field size and the incident angle. Therefore, air gaps under the bolus should be avoided in radiotherapy treatment, especially for photon beam with highly oblique angles of incidence.

  5. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    PubMed Central

    Théberge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-François; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, François; Châteauneuf , Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electric pulse from a Tesla coil allowed to stimulate and maintain the highly conductive channel during few milliseconds in order to guide a subsequent 500 times more energetic discharge from a 30-kV DC source. This DC discharge was laser-guided over an air gap length of two metres, which is more than two orders of magnitude longer than the expected natural discharge length. Long plasma channel induced by laser pulses and stimulated by an external high-voltage source opens the way for wireless and efficient transportation of energetic current pulses over long air gaps and potentially for guiding lightning. PMID:28053312

  6. Laser-guided energetic discharges over large air gaps by electric-field enhanced plasma filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Théberge, Francis; Daigle, Jean-François; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Vidal, François; Châteauneuf, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Recent works on plasma channels produced during the propagation of ultrashort and intense laser pulses in air demonstrated the guiding of electric discharges along the laser path. However, the short plasma lifetime limits the length of the laser-guided discharge. In this paper, the conductivity and lifetime of long plasma channels produced by ultrashort laser pulses is enhanced efficiently over many orders of magnitude by the electric field of a hybrid AC-DC high-voltage source. The AC electric pulse from a Tesla coil allowed to stimulate and maintain the highly conductive channel during few milliseconds in order to guide a subsequent 500 times more energetic discharge from a 30-kV DC source. This DC discharge was laser-guided over an air gap length of two metres, which is more than two orders of magnitude longer than the expected natural discharge length. Long plasma channel induced by laser pulses and stimulated by an external high-voltage source opens the way for wireless and efficient transportation of energetic current pulses over long air gaps and potentially for guiding lightning.

  7. [Verification of exhaled air temperature and heat flux in respiratory diseases as useful biomarker].

    PubMed

    Ito, Wataru; Chihara, Junichi

    2008-12-01

    Asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diffuse panbronchiolitis are syndromes associated with chronic airway inflammation. In the conventional definition of inflammation, local pyrexia at the site of inflammation should be observed. However, there are very few reports that have evaluated the "heat" in inflammatory respiratory diseases. We considered that the evaluation of allergic airway inflammation such as asthma might be possible by measuring the exhaled air temperature, and devised an original device that stabilizes the flow rate, which is a very important factor for the direct measurement of heat. Moreover, an expiratory heat flux meter, which can detect a change in air temperature more precisely and immediately, was also incorporated into our original device. As a result, we succeeded in the measurement and evaluation of the heat flux and air temperature in healthy subjects and asthmatic patients, and, further, the air temperature was straightforwardly evaluated by a portable spirometer including a temperature sensor. These findings suggest that the heat flux and temperature of exhaled air can be used to objectively monitor airway inflammation noninvasively, and assist in the diagnosis/monitoring of inflammatory respiratory diseases, including asthma.

  8. Air-sea fluxes and surface layer turbulence around a sea surface temperature front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friehe, C. A.; Shaw, W. J.; Davidson, K. L.; Rogers, D. P.; Large, W. G.; Stage, S. A.; Crescenti, G. H.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Greenhut, G. K.; Li, F.

    1991-01-01

    The observed effects of sharp changes in sea surface temperature (SST) on the air-sea fluxes, surface roughness, and the turbulence structure in the surface layer and the marine atmospheric boundary layer are discussed. In situ flux and turbulence observations were carried out from three aircraft and two ships within the FASINEX framework. Three other aircraft used remote sensors to measure waves, microwave backscatter, and lidar signatures of cloud tops. Descriptions of the techniques, intercomparison of aircraft and ship flux data, and use of different methods for analyzing the fluxes from the aircraft data are described. Changing synoptic weather on three successive days yielded cases of wind direction both approximately parallel and perpendicular to a surface temperature front. For the wind perpendicular to the front, wind over both cold-to-warm and warm-to-cold surface temperatures occurred. Model results consistent with the observations suggest that an internal boundary layer forms at the SST.

  9. Effect of Wind Tunnel Air Velocity on VOC Flux from Standard Solutions and CAFO Manure/Wastewater

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used wind tunnels and flux chambers to quantify the flux of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), ammonia, and hydrogen sulfide and estimate emission factors from animal feeding operations (AFOs) without accounting for effects of air velocity or sweep air flow rate. L...

  10. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungen, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2007-05-30

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in the Linked Cheetah V4.0 reactive flow code at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. A report card of 25 tests run with the same settings on LX-17 is shown, possibly the most extensive simultaneous calibration yet tried with an explosive. The physical basis of some of the input parameters is considered.

  11. An assessment of air-sea heat fluxes from ocean and coupled reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, Maria; Haines, Keith; Balmaseda, Magdalena; Chang, You-Soon; Drevillon, Marie; Ferry, Nicolas; Fujii, Yosuke; Köhl, Armin; Storto, Andrea; Toyoda, Takahiro; Wang, Xiaochun; Waters, Jennifer; Xue, Yan; Yin, Yonghong; Barnier, Bernard; Hernandez, Fabrice; Kumar, Arun; Lee, Tong; Masina, Simona; Andrew Peterson, K.

    2015-10-01

    Sixteen monthly air-sea heat flux products from global ocean/coupled reanalyses are compared over 1993-2009 as part of the Ocean Reanalysis Intercomparison Project (ORA-IP). Objectives include assessing the global heat closure, the consistency of temporal variability, comparison with other flux products, and documenting errors against in situ flux measurements at a number of OceanSITES moorings. The ensemble of 16 ORA-IP flux estimates has a global positive bias over 1993-2009 of 4.2 ± 1.1 W m-2. Residual heat gain (i.e., surface flux + assimilation increments) is reduced to a small positive imbalance (typically, +1-2 W m-2). This compensation between surface fluxes and assimilation increments is concentrated in the upper 100 m. Implied steady meridional heat transports also improve by including assimilation sources, except near the equator. The ensemble spread in surface heat fluxes is dominated by turbulent fluxes (>40 W m-2 over the western boundary currents). The mean seasonal cycle is highly consistent, with variability between products mostly <10 W m-2. The interannual variability has consistent signal-to-noise ratio (~2) throughout the equatorial Pacific, reflecting ENSO variability. Comparisons at tropical buoy sites (10°S-15°N) over 2007-2009 showed too little ocean heat gain (i.e., flux into the ocean) in ORA-IP (up to 1/3 smaller than buoy measurements) primarily due to latent heat flux errors in ORA-IP. Comparisons with the Stratus buoy (20°S, 85°W) over a longer period, 2001-2009, also show the ORA-IP ensemble has 16 W m-2 smaller net heat gain, nearly all of which is due to too much latent cooling caused by differences in surface winds imposed in ORA-IP.

  12. Sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Indian Ocean between 1990 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Lenton, A.; Law, R.; Metzl, N.; Patra, P. K.; Doney, S.; Lima, I. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ramonet, M.; Valsala, V.

    2013-07-01

    The Indian Ocean (44° S-30° N) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet remains one of the most poorly sampled ocean regions. Several approaches have been used to estimate net sea-air CO2 fluxes in this region: interpolated observations, ocean biogeochemical models, atmospheric and ocean inversions. As part of the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes) project, we combine these different approaches to quantify and assess the magnitude and variability in Indian Ocean sea-air CO2 fluxes between 1990 and 2009. Using all of the models and inversions, the median annual mean sea-air CO2 uptake of -0.37 ± 0.06 Pg C yr-1, is consistent with the -0.24 ± 0.12 Pg C yr-1 calculated from observations. The fluxes from the Southern Indian Ocean (18° S-44° S; -0.43 ± 0.07 Pg C yr-1) are similar in magnitude to the annual uptake for the entire Indian Ocean. All models capture the observed pattern of fluxes in the Indian Ocean with the following exceptions: underestimation of upwelling fluxes in the northwestern region (off Oman and Somalia), over estimation in the northeastern region (Bay of Bengal) and underestimation of the CO2 sink in the subtropical convergence zone. These differences were mainly driven by a lack of atmospheric CO2 data in atmospheric inversions, and poor simulation of monsoonal currents and freshwater discharge in ocean biogeochemical models. Overall, the models and inversions do capture the phase of the observed seasonality for the entire Indian Ocean but over estimate the magnitude. The predicted sea-air CO2 fluxes by Ocean BioGeochemical Models (OBGM) respond to seasonal variability with strong phase lags with reference to climatological CO2 flux, whereas the atmospheric inversions predict an order of magnitude higher seasonal flux than OBGMs. The simulated interannual variability by the OBGMs is weaker than atmospheric inversions. Prediction of such weak interannual variability in CO2 fluxes by atmospheric inversions

  13. Sea-air CO2 fluxes in the Indian Ocean between 1990 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma, V. V. S. S.; Lenton, A.; Law, R. M.; Metzl, N.; Patra, P. K.; Doney, S.; Lima, I. D.; Dlugokencky, E.; Ramonet, M.; Valsala, V.

    2013-11-01

    The Indian Ocean (44° S-30° N) plays an important role in the global carbon cycle, yet it remains one of the most poorly sampled ocean regions. Several approaches have been used to estimate net sea-air CO2 fluxes in this region: interpolated observations, ocean biogeochemical models, atmospheric and ocean inversions. As part of the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes) project, we combine these different approaches to quantify and assess the magnitude and variability in Indian Ocean sea-air CO2 fluxes between 1990 and 2009. Using all of the models and inversions, the median annual mean sea-air CO2 uptake of -0.37 ± 0.06 PgC yr-1 is consistent with the -0.24 ± 0.12 PgC yr-1 calculated from observations. The fluxes from the southern Indian Ocean (18-44° S; -0.43 ± 0.07 PgC yr-1 are similar in magnitude to the annual uptake for the entire Indian Ocean. All models capture the observed pattern of fluxes in the Indian Ocean with the following exceptions: underestimation of upwelling fluxes in the northwestern region (off Oman and Somalia), overestimation in the northeastern region (Bay of Bengal) and underestimation of the CO2 sink in the subtropical convergence zone. These differences were mainly driven by lack of atmospheric CO2 data in atmospheric inversions, and poor simulation of monsoonal currents and freshwater discharge in ocean biogeochemical models. Overall, the models and inversions do capture the phase of the observed seasonality for the entire Indian Ocean but overestimate the magnitude. The predicted sea-air CO2 fluxes by ocean biogeochemical models (OBGMs) respond to seasonal variability with strong phase lags with reference to climatological CO2 flux, whereas the atmospheric inversions predicted an order of magnitude higher seasonal flux than OBGMs. The simulated interannual variability by the OBGMs is weaker than that found by atmospheric inversions. Prediction of such weak interannual variability in CO2 fluxes by atmospheric

  14. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser based on gallium arsenide/air-gap distributed Bragg reflectors: From concept to working devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Qingwei

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have created new opportunities in optoelectronics. However, VCSELs have so far been commercialized mainly for operation at 0.85 mum, despite their potential importance at other wavelengths, such as 1.3 mum and 1.55 mum. The limitations at these longer wavelengths come from material characteristics, such as a low contrast ratio in mirror materials, lower mirror reflectivity, and smaller optical gain for longer wavelength materials versus AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wells. A similar situation, insufficient gain relative to the cavity loss, existed in the past for shorter wavelength VCSELs before high quality epitaxial mirrors were developed. Semiconductor/air-gap Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBRs) are attractive due to their high index contrast, which leads to a high reflectivity, wide stop band and low optical loss mirror with a small number of pairs. This concept is ready to be integrated into material systems other than AlGaAs/GaAs, which is studied in this work. Therefore, the impact of these DBRs can be extended into both visible and longer infrared wavelengths as a solution to the trade-off between DBR and active region materials. Air-gap DBRs can also be used as basic building blocks of micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS). The high Q microcavity formed by the air-gap DBRs also provide a good platform for microcavity physics study. Air-gap DBRs are modeled using the transmission matrix formulae of the Maxwell equations. A comparison to existing DBR technology shows the great advantage and potential that the air-gap DBR possesses. Two types of air-gap are proposed and developed. The first one includes multiple GaAs/air pairs while the second one combines a single air-gap with metal and dielectric mirrors. New device structures and processing designs, especially an all-epitaxial lateral current and optical confinement technique, are carried out to incorporate air-gap DBRs into VCSEL structures. The first VCSEL

  15. Control of deformable mirrors including a nonlinear modal model for air gap damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we present nonlinear pressure dynamics as an extension to a linear distributed parameters model of a deformable mirror. The original, undamped model is recalled and measurement results are shown supporting the need for a damping model which includes the pressure dynamics of the air gap behind the mirror membrane. We will derive the damping coefficients to match our measurement results. Based on the mew model, we will derive a modal feedforward and feedback control law for 88 actuators based on only 3 position sensors and show simulation results to support the algorithm's effectiveness.

  16. Distribution and air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide on the Chukchi Sea shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipko, I. I.; Pugach, S. P.; Repina, I. A.; Dudarev, O. V.; Charkin, A. N.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the results of long-term studies of the dynamics of carbonate parameters and air-sea carbon dioxide fluxes on the Chukchi Sea shelf during the summer. As a result of the interaction of physical and biological factors, the surface waters on the west of Chukchi Sea were undersaturated with carbon dioxide when compared with atmospheric air; the partial pressure of CO2 varied in the range from 134 to 359 μatm. The average value of CO2 flux in the Chukchi Sea per unit area varied in the range from-2.4 to-22.0 mmol /(m2 day), which is significantly higher than the average value of CO2 flux in the World Ocean. It has been estimated that the minimal mass of C absorbed by the surface of Chukchi Sea from the atmosphere during ice-free season is 13 × 1012 g; a great part of this carbon is transported to the deeper layers of sea and isolated from the atmosphere for a long period of time. The studies of the carbonate system of the Chukchi Sea, especially of its western part, will provide some new data on the fluxes of carbon dioxide in the Arctic Ocean and their changes. Our analysis can be used for an interpretation of the satellite assessment of CO2 fluxes and dissolved CO2 distribution in the upper layers of the ocean.

  17. Toward a global network for persistent organic pollutants in air: results from the GAPS study.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Karla; Harner, Tom; Wania, Frank; Muir, Derek C G; Jones, Kevin C; Barrie, Leonard A

    2006-08-15

    The Global Atmospheric Passive Sampling (GAPS) study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of using passive samplers to assess the spatial distribution of persistent organic pollutants on a worldwide basis. The GAPS network includes more than 40 sites on 7 continents, mainly in background locations, with some representation of urban and agricultural areas. Here we present concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in polyurethane foam disk samplers, deployed from December 2004 to March 2005. Legacy OCPs such as alpha-HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane), Chlordanes (trans- and cis-Chlordane and trans-Nonachlor), Dieldrin, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane isomers were detected at most sites with some high values that may be related to possible continued use and/or re-emissions related to historic use. Geometric mean (GM) air concentrations (pg/m3) were: 8.5 for sigmaHCH (sum of alpha- and gamma-isomers), 2.6 for sigmaChlordanes, 0.8 for Dieldrin, and 0.8 for p,p'-DDE. Current-use pesticides such as gamma-HCH (lindane) and especially Endosulfan I exhibited more variable and higher concentrations with GMs of 5 and 58, respectively. PCBs and PBDEs were elevated at urban/suburban sites consistent with their historical use pattern. GM concentrations (pg/m3) were 17 for PCBs and 4 for PBDEs. Sampling under GAPS will continue and will eventually allow seasonality effects and longer-term temporal and spatial trends to be evaluated.

  18. Root-soil air gap and resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Zhang, W J; Wang, X Y; Cai, Y J; Chang, J G

    2015-12-01

    During periods of water deficit, growing roots may shrink, retaining only partial contact with the soil. In this study, known mathematical models were used to calculate the root-soil air gap and water flow resistance at the soil-root interface, respectively, of Robinia pseudoacacia L. under different water conditions. Using a digital camera, the root-soil air gap of R. pseudoacacia was investigated in a root growth chamber; this root-soil air gap and the model-inferred water flow resistance at the soil-root interface were compared with predictions based on a separate outdoor experiment. The results indicated progressively greater root shrinkage and loss of root-soil contact with decreasing soil water potential. The average widths of the root-soil air gap for R. pseudoacacia in open fields and in the root growth chamber were 0.24 and 0.39 mm, respectively. The resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface in both environments increased with decreasing soil water potential. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that soil water potential and soil temperature were the best predictors of variation in the root-soil air gap. A combination of soil water potential, soil temperature, root-air water potential difference and soil-root water potential difference best predicted the resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of air gap motion with respect to wind load and mooring system for semi-submersible platform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fa-li; Nie, Yan; Yang, De-qing; Dong, Gang; Cui, Jin

    2016-07-01

    A design of semi-submersible platform is mainly based on the extreme response analysis due to the forces experienced by the components during lifetime. The external loads can induce the extreme air gap response and potential deck impact to the semi-submersible platform. It is important to predict air gap response of platforms accurately in order to check the strength of local structures which withstand the wave slamming due to negative air gap. The wind load cannot be simulated easily by model test in towing tank whereas it can be simulated accurately in wind tunnel test. Furthermore, full scale simulation of the mooring system in model test is still a tuff work especially the stiffness of the mooring system. Owing to the above mentioned problem, the model test results are not accurate enough for air gap evaluation. The aim of this paper is to present sensitivity analysis results of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load for the design of semi-submersible platform. Though the model test results are not suitable for the direct evaluation of air gap, they can be used as a good basis for tuning the radiation damping and viscous drag in numerical simulation. In the presented design example, a numerical model is tuned and validated by ANSYS AQWA based on the model test results with a simple 4 line symmetrical horizontal soft mooring system. According to the tuned numerical model, sensitivity analysis studies of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load are performed in time domain. Three mooring systems and five simulation cases about the presented platform are simulated based on the results of wind tunnel tests and sea-keeping tests. The sensitivity analysis results are valuable for the floating platform design.

  20. Advances in Linked Air Quality, Farm Management and Biogeochemistry Models to Address Bidirectional Ammonia Flux in CMAQ

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent increases in anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to air, land and water media pose a growing threat to human health and ecosystems. Modeling of air-surface N flux is one area in need of improvement. Implementation of a linked air quality and cropland management system is de...

  1. "Advances in Linked Air Quality, Farm Management and Biogeochemistry Models to Address Bidrectional Ammonia Flux in CMAQ"

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent increases in anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen to air, land and water media pose a growing threat to human health and ecosystems. Modeling of air-surface N flux is one area in need of improvement. Implementation of a linked air quality and cropland management system is de...

  2. Measurement of the air gap width between double-deck metal layers based on surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Pao-Tung; Wu, Meng-Chyi; Wu, Chien-Ming

    2010-04-01

    In this article, we verify that the traditional Kretschmann-Raether configuration of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) could be used to measure the air gap width between a gold-plated prism and another gold-plated glass slide. Due to the presence of double-deck metal layers, the Fabry-Perot resonance and surface plasmon tunnel-coupled effects could occur, which would cause the SPR angle to begin to shift at a larger air gap width of about 700 nm as compared to the case of single metal layer with an air gap width of about 350 nm. The simulated results reveal that the SPR angle begins monotonically to shift initially from 44.5° to 46° when the air gap width between double-deck metal layers decreases from 700 to 500 nm. The smallest air gap width is measured to be 539 nm, in which the SPR angle is 45.5°, by fitting the simulated curves to the experimental results.

  3. Influence of precipitation on the CO2 air-sea flux, an eddy covariance field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavarsky, Alexander; Steinhoff, Tobias; Marandino, Christa

    2016-04-01

    During the SPACES-OASIS cruise (July-August 2015) from Durban, SA to Male, MV direct fluxes of CO2 and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. The cruise covered areas of sources and sinks for atmospheric CO2, where the bulk concentration gradient measurements resembled the Takahashi (2009) climatology. Most of the time, bulk CO2 fluxes (F=k* [cwater-cair]), calculated with the parametrization (k) by Nightingale et al. 2000, were in general agreement with direct EC measurements. However, during heavy rain events, the directly measured CO2 fluxes were 4 times higher than predicted. It has been previously described that rain influences the k parametrization of air-sea gas exchange, but this alone cannot explain the measured discrepancy. There is evidence that freshwater input and a change in the carbonate chemistry causes the water side concentration of ?c=cwater-cair to decrease. Unfortunately this cannot be detected by most bulk measurement systems. Using the flux measurements of an additional gas like DMS, this rain influence can be evaluated as DMS does not react to changes in the carbonate system and has a different solubility. A pending question is if the enhanced flux of CO2 in the ocean is sequestered into the ocean mixed layer and below. This question will be tackled using the GOTM model to understand the implications for the global carbon cycle.

  4. Mechanisms controlling the SST air-sea heat flux feedback and its dependence on spatial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, Ute; Czaja, Arnaud; Marshall, John

    2017-02-01

    The turbulent air-sea heat flux feedback (α, in {W m}^{-2} { K}^{-1}) is a major contributor to setting the damping timescale of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. In this study we compare the spatial distribution and magnitude of α in the North Atlantic and the Southern Ocean, as estimated from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset. The comparison is rationalized in terms of an upper bound on the heat flux feedback, associated with "fast" atmospheric export of temperature and moisture anomalies away from the marine boundary layer, and a lower bound associated with "slow" export. It is found that regions of cold surface waters (≤10 ° C) are best described as approaching the slow export limit. This conclusion is not only valid at the synoptic scale resolved by the reanalysis data, but also on basin scales. In particular, it applies to the heat flux feedback acting as circumpolar SST anomaly scales are approached in the Southern Ocean, with feedbacks of ≤10 {W m}^{-2} { K}^{-1}. In contrast, the magnitude of the heat flux feedback is close to that expected from the fast export limit over the Gulf Stream and its recirculation with values on the order of ≈40 {W m}^{-2} { K}^{-1}. Further analysis suggests that this high value reflects a compensation between a moderate thermodynamic adjustment of the boundary layer, which tends to weaken the heat flux feedback, and an enhancement of the surface winds over warm SST anomalies, which tend to enhance the feedback.

  5. A fiber inclinometer using a fiber microtaper with an air-gap microcavity fiber interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhongyao; Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Qiao, Xueguang; Liu, Nan; Rong, Qiangzhou

    2016-04-01

    A micro-inclinometer is proposed and demonstrated experimentally; the device consists of a micro-fiber taper followed by an air-gap microcavity. A part of the core mode can couple to cladding modes via the taper. These cladding modes and residual core modes transmitted to downstream of the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer. A fraction of these modes are reflected back to the SMF by two surfaces of the FP cavity and eventually recoupled to the leading-in SMF, resulting in a well-defined interference spectrum. The fringe contrast of the interferometer is highly sensitive to fiber bending with direction-independence and thus is capable of measuring tilt angles in high resolution. In addition, the interference wavelength always remains unchanged during the fiber bending.

  6. Experimental verification of the capillary plasma triggered long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, D.; Yang, L. J. Ma, J. B.; Liu, S.; Wang, W.; Ding, W. D.; Huo, P.; Li, G.; Yao, S. L.

    2016-01-15

    The paper has proposed a new triggering method for long spark gap based on capillary plasma ejection and conducted the experimental verification under the extremely low working coefficient, which represents that the ratio of the spark gap charging voltage to the breakdown voltage is particularly low. The quasi-neutral plasma is ejected from the capillary and develops through the axial direction of the spark gap. The electric field in the spark gap is thus changed and its breakdown is incurred. It is proved by the experiments that the capillary plasma ejection is effective in triggering the long spark gap under the extremely low working coefficient in air. The study also indicates that the breakdown probabilities, the breakdown delay, and the delay dispersion are all mainly determined by the characteristics of the ejected plasma, including the length of the plasma flow, the speed of the plasma ejection, and the ionization degree of the plasma. Moreover, the breakdown delay and the delay dispersion increase with the length of the long spark gap, and the polarity effect exists in the triggering process. Lastly, compared with the working patterns of the triggering device installed in the single electrode, the working pattern of the devices installed in both the two electrodes, though with the same breakdown process, achieves the ignition under longer gap distance. To be specific, at the gap length of 14 cm and the working coefficient of less than 2%, the spark gap is still ignited accurately.

  7. Tuneable polaritonics at room temperature with strongly coupled Tamm plasmon polaritons in metal/air-gap microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, C.; Coulson, C.; Christmann, G.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Ritchie, D. A.; Baumberg, J. J.

    2011-06-01

    We report strong coupling between Tamm plasmons and excitons in III-V quantum wells at room temperature in ultracompact sample designs. A high refractive index contrast air-gap mirror together with optical Tamm states at a metal/semiconductor interface tightly confines the intracavity field leading to substantial local field enhancements. Angular-resolved reflectivity spectra give clear evidence for anticrossing in the dispersion relation. Room temperature Rabi splittings of 10 meV are found in excellent agreement with simulations. Electrical control of the polariton modes is realized without need for doped mirror layers. Such air-gap microcavities open innovative possibilites for electrically tunable microcavities and polaritonic microelectromechanics.

  8. [Diurnal variations of greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface of aquaculture ponds in the Min River estuary].

    PubMed

    Yang, Ping; Tong, Chuan; He, Qing-Hua; Huang, Jia-Fang

    2012-12-01

    Wetland reclamation and aquaculture is one of the main disturbance types in coastal wetlands. Diurnal variations of CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface were determined using a floating chambers + gas chromatography method in a shrimp pond, and a mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp in October in the Shanyutan Wetland of the Min River estuary, southeast China. Meanwhile, the meteorological indicators in ground surface and physical, chemical and biological indicators of surface water were also measured. CO2, CH4 and N2O fluxes at the water-air interface all demonstrated distinct diurnal variations. Both shrimp pond and mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp functioned as a sink of CO2 [the diurnal averaged CO2 fluxes were -48.79 and -105.25 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively], and a source of CH4 [the diurnal averaged CH4 fluxes were 1.00 and 5.74 mg x (m2 x h)(-1), respectively]; the diurnal averaged CO2 and CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture of fish and shrimp pond were higher than that of the shrimp pond. Greenhouse gas fluxes at the water-air interface from the aquaculture ponds were influenced by many factors. Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the concentration of Chlorophyll was the major factor affecting the CO2 fluxes, and the concentrations of SO4(2-) and PO4(3-) were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the shrimp pond; whereas water temperature and Chlorophyll were the major factors affecting the CO2 fluxes, and dissolved oxygen, PO4(3-) and pH were the major factors affecting the CH4 fluxes at the water-air interface of the mixed culture pond of fish and shrimp.

  9. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    Mangrove forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h−1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m−2 d−1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  10. Air-water gas exchange and CO2 flux in a mangrove-dominated estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, David T.; Ferrón, Sara; Engel, Victor C.; Larsen, Laurel G.; Barr, Jordan G.

    2014-01-01

    forests are highly productive ecosystems, but the fate of mangrove-derived carbon remains uncertain. Part of that uncertainty stems from the fact that gas transfer velocities in mangrove-surrounded waters are not well determined, leading to uncertainty in air-water CO2 fluxes. Two SF6 tracer release experiments were conducted to determine gas transfer velocities (k(600) = 8.3 ± 0.4 and 8.1 ± 0.6 cm h-1), along with simultaneous measurements of pCO2 to determine the air-water CO2 fluxes from Shark River, Florida (232.11 ± 23.69 and 171.13 ± 20.28 mmol C m-2 d-1), an estuary within the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America. The gas transfer velocity results are consistent with turbulent kinetic energy dissipation measurements, indicating a higher rate of turbulence and gas exchange than predicted by commonly used wind speed/gas exchange parameterizations. The results have important implications for carbon fluxes in mangrove ecosystems.

  11. Heat flux: thermohydraulic investigation of solar air heaters used in agro-industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati Aidinlou, H.; Nikbakht, A. M.

    2017-03-01

    A new design of solar air heater simulator is presented to comply with the extensive applications inagro-industry. A wise installation of increased heat transfer surface area provided uniform and efficient heat diffusion over the duct. Nusselt number and friction factor have been investigated based on the constant roughness parameters such as relative roughness height (e/D), relative roughness pitch (P/e), angle of attack (α) and aspect ratio with Reynolds numbers ranging from 5000 to 19,000 in the fully developed region. Heat fluxes of 800, 900 and 1000 Wm-2 were provided. The enhancement in friction factor is observed to be 3.1656, 3.47 and 3.0856 times, and for the Nusselt number either, augmentation is calculated to be 1.4437, 1.4963 and 1.535 times, respectively, over the smooth duct for 800, 900 and 1000 Wm-2 heat fluxes. Thermohydraulic performance is plotted versus the Reynolds number based on the aforementioned roughness parameters at varying heat fluxes. The results show up that thermohydraulic performance is found to be maximum for 1000 Wm-2 at the average Reynolds number of 5151. Based on the results, we can verify that the introduced solar simulator can help analyzing and developing solar collector installations at the simulated heat fluxes.

  12. An air/sea flux model including the effects of capillary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourassa, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    An improved model of the air/sea interface is developed. The improvements consist in including the effect of capillary (surface tension) waves on the tropical surface fluxes and the consideration of the sea state, both of which increase the magnitude of tropical surface fluxes. Changes in surface stress are most significant in the low wind-speed regions, which include the areas where westerly bursts occur. It is shown that the changes, from the regular wind conditions to those of a westerly burst or El-Nino, can double when the effects of capillary waves are considered. This implies a much stronger coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere than is predicted by other boundary layer models.

  13. Parasitic effects of air-gap through-silicon vias in high-speed three-dimensional integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxian; Zhu, Zhangming; Yang, Yintang; Ding, Ruixue; Li, Yuejin

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, ground-signal-ground type through-silicon vias (TSVs) exploiting air gaps as insulation layers are designed, analyzed and simulated for applications in millimeter wave. The compact wideband equivalent-circuit model and passive elements (RLGC) parameters based on the physical parameters are presented with the frequency up to 100 GHz. The parasitic capacitance of TSVs can be approximated as the dielectric capacitance of air gaps when the thickness of air gaps is greater than 0.75 μm. Therefore, the applied voltage of TSVs only needs to achieve the flatband voltage, and there is no need to indicate the threshold voltage. This is due to the small permittivity of air gaps. The proposed model shows good agreement with the simulation results of ADS and Ansoft’s HFSS over a wide frequency range. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2014CB339900) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61376039, 61334003, 61574104, and 61474088).

  14. Air-mass flux measurement system using Doppler-shifted filtered Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirley, John A.; Winter, Michael

    1993-01-01

    An optical system has been investigated to measure mass flux distributions in the inlet of a high speed air-breathing propulsion system. Rayleigh scattered light from air is proportional to the number density of molecules and hence can be used to ascertain the gas density in a calibrated system. Velocity field measurements are achieved by spectrally filtering the elastically-scattered Doppler-shifted light with an absorbing molecular filter. A novel anamorphic optical collection system is used which allows optical rays from different scattering angles, that have different Doppler shifts, to be recorded separately. This is shown to obviate the need to tune the laser through the absorption to determine velocities, while retaining the ability to make spatially-resolved measurements along a line. By properly selecting the laser tuning and filter parameters, simultaneous density measurements can be made. These properties are discussed in the paper and experiments demonstrating the velocimetry capability are described.

  15. Air-sea CO 2 fluxes in the Caribbean Sea from 2002-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanninkhof, Rik; Olsen, Are; Triñanes, Joaquin

    2007-06-01

    Air-sea fluxes in the Caribbean Sea are presented based on measurements of partial pressure of CO 2 in surface seawater, pCO 2sw, from an automated system onboard the cruise ship Explorer of the Seas for 2002 through 2004. The pCO 2sw values are used to develop algorithms of pCO 2sw based on sea surface temperature (SST) and position. The algorithms are applied to assimilated SST data and remotely sensed winds on a 1° by 1° grid to estimate the fluxes on weekly timescales in the region. The positive relationship between pCO 2sw and SST is lower than the isochemical trend suggesting counteracting effects from biological processes. The relationship varies systematically with location with a stronger dependence further south. Furthermore, the southern area shows significantly lower pCO 2sw in the fall compared to the spring at the same SST, which is attributed to differences in salinity. The annual algorithms for the entire region show a slight trend between 2002 and 2004 suggesting an increase of pCO 2sw over time. This is in accord with the increasing pCO 2sw due the invasion of anthropogenic CO 2. The annual fluxes of CO 2 yield a net invasion of CO 2 to the ocean that ranges from - 0.04 to - 1.2 mol m - 2 year - 1 over the 3 years. There is a seasonal reversal in the direction of the flux with CO 2 entering into the ocean during the winter and an evasion during the summer. Year-to-year differences in flux are primarily caused by temperature anomalies in the late winter and spring period resulting in changes in invasion during these seasons. An analysis of pCO 2sw before and after hurricane Frances (September 4-6, 2004), and wind records during the storm suggest a large local enhancement of the flux but minimal influence on annual fluxes in the region.

  16. Surface-air mercury fluxes across Western North America: A synthesis of spatial trends and controlling variables.

    PubMed

    Eckley, Chris S; Tate, Mike T; Lin, Che-Jen; Gustin, Mae; Dent, Stephen; Eagles-Smith, Collin; Lutz, Michelle A; Wickland, Kimberly P; Wang, Bronwen; Gray, John E; Edwards, Grant C; Krabbenhoft, Dave P; Smith, David B

    2016-10-15

    Mercury (Hg) emission and deposition can occur to and from soils, and are an important component of the global atmospheric Hg budget. This paper focuses on synthesizing existing surface-air Hg flux data collected throughout the Western North American region and is part of a series of geographically focused Hg synthesis projects. A database of existing Hg flux data collected using the dynamic flux chamber (DFC) approach from almost a thousand locations was created for the Western North America region. Statistical analysis was performed on the data to identify the important variables controlling Hg fluxes and to allow spatiotemporal scaling. The results indicated that most of the variability in soil-air Hg fluxes could be explained by variations in soil-Hg concentrations, solar radiation, and soil moisture. This analysis also identified that variations in DFC methodological approaches were detectable among the field studies, with the chamber material and sampling flushing flow rate influencing the magnitude of calculated emissions. The spatiotemporal scaling of soil-air Hg fluxes identified that the largest emissions occurred from irrigated agricultural landscapes in California. Vegetation was shown to have a large impact on surface-air Hg fluxes due to both a reduction in solar radiation reaching the soil as well as from direct uptake of Hg in foliage. Despite high soil Hg emissions from some forested and other heavily vegetated regions, the net ecosystem flux (soil flux+vegetation uptake) was low. Conversely, sparsely vegetated regions showed larger net ecosystem emissions, which were similar in magnitude to atmospheric Hg deposition (except for the Mediterranean California region where soil emissions were higher). The net ecosystem flux results highlight the important role of landscape characteristics in effecting the balance between Hg sequestration and (re-)emission to the atmosphere.

  17. Surface-air mercury fluxes across Western North America: A synthesis of spatial trends and controlling variables

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckley, Chris S.; Tate, Michael T.; Lin, Che-Jen; Gustin, Mae S.; Dent, Stephen; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Lutz, Michelle A; Wickland, Kimberly; Wang, Bronwen; Gray, John E.; Edwards, Grant; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Smith, David

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) emission and deposition can occur to and from soils, and are an important component of the global atmospheric Hg budget. This paper focuses on synthesizing existing surface-air Hg flux data collected throughout the Western North American region and is part of a series of geographically focused Hg synthesis projects. A database of existing Hg flux data collected using the dynamic flux chamber (DFC) approach from almost a thousand locations was created for the Western North America region. Statistical analysis was performed on the data to identify the important variables controlling Hg fluxes and to allow spatiotemporal scaling. The results indicated that most of the variability in soil-air Hg fluxes could be explained by variations in soil-Hg concentrations, solar radiation, and soil moisture. This analysis also identified that variations in DFC methodological approaches were detectable among the field studies, with the chamber material and sampling flushing flow rate influencing the magnitude of calculated emissions. The spatiotemporal scaling of soil-air Hg fluxes identified that the largest emissions occurred from irrigated agricultural landscapes in California. Vegetation was shown to have a large impact on surface-air Hg fluxes due to both a reduction in solar radiation reaching the soil as well as from direct uptake of Hg in foliage. Despite high soil Hg emissions from some forested and other heavily vegetated regions, the net ecosystem flux (soil flux + vegetation uptake) was low. Conversely, sparsely vegetated regions showed larger net ecosystem emissions, which were similar in magnitude to atmospheric Hg deposition (except for the Mediterranean California region where soil emissions were higher). The net ecosystem flux results highlight the important role of landscape characteristics in effecting the balance between Hg sequestration and (re-)emission to the atmosphere.

  18. On the Potential Impact of Daytime Surface Sensible Heat Flux on the Dissipation of Martian Cold Air Outbreaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Arritt, R. W.; Tillman, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    The Martian daytime soil surface temperature is governed primarily by the net irradiance balance and surface soil heat flux. Thus the outbreak of a cold air mass generates increased sensible heat flux that is conducive to daytime dissipation of the cold air mass thermal characteristics. Conceptual and scaling evaluations of this dissipation are provided while comparison is made with similar situations on Earth. It is estimated that sensible heat flux contribution to the dissipation of the original thermal structure of the cold air could be three times larger than the corresponding situation on Earth. Illustrative numerical model simulations provide scaling of the potential impact on the dissipation of cold air masses for various combinations of background wind speed and latitudes.

  19. Air-Sea Spray Airborne Radar Profiler Characterizes Energy Fluxes in Hurricanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Esteban-Fermandez, D.

    2010-01-01

    A report discusses ASAP (Air-sea Spray Airborne Profiler), a dual-wavelength radar profiler that provides measurement information about the droplet size distribution (DSD) of sea-spray, which can be used to estimate heat and moisture fluxes for hurricane research. Researchers have recently determined that sea spray can have a large effect on the magnitude and distribution of the air-sea energy flux at hurricane -force wind speeds. To obtain information about the DSD, two parameters of the DSD are required; for example, overall DSD amplitude and DSD mean diameter. This requires two measurements. Two frequencies are used, with a large enough separation that the differential frequency provides size information. One frequency is 94 GHz; the other is 220 GHz. These correspond to the Rayleigh and Mie regions. Above a surface wind speed of 10 m/ s, production of sea spray grows exponentially. Both the number of large droplets and the altitude they reach are a function of the surface wind speed.

  20. Formaldehyde in remote marine air and rain - Flux measurements and estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafiriou, O. C.; Alford, J.; Herrera, M.; Peltzer, E. T.; Gagosian, R. B.; Liu, S. C.

    1980-05-01

    The tropospheric trace constituent formaldehyde, HCHO, was measured in rain and in the gas phase during the wet season at Enewetak Atoll, a remote marine site in the central equatorial Pacific. Rainwater averaged 8 + or - 2 microgram/kg; the gas phase averaged 0.4 + or 0.2 ppbv (0.5 microgram/cu m). These values, especially the rain, are among the lowest reported to date. The formaldehyde flux to the sea by rainout and washout extrapolates to 0.010 g/sq m per year. The gaseous flux into the sea surface is estimated to be 0.05 g/sq m per year by an air-sea exchange calculation that takes into account enhanced uptake by hydroxide-catalyzed formaldehyde hydration. The measured mixing ratio is close to the 0.18 ppbv prediction of a tropospheric chemistry model calculation. The methane oxidation chain probably is the sole formaldehyde source in the Enewetak area. The total formaldehyde flux as carbon into the ocean is approximately 2% of the estimated total organic carbon from rainout and washout. About 2-4% of the calculated column formaldehyde production is removed from the atmosphere by these processes.

  1. Air-Sea Methane Flux after the Deepwater Horizon Oil Leak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAdoo, J.; Sweeney, C.; Kiene, R. P.; McGillis, W. R.

    2012-12-01

    One of the key questions associated with the Deepwater Horizon's (DWH) oil leak involves understanding how much of its methane is still entrained in deep waters. Analysis of air-sea fluxes reveals a slight decrease in average aqueous CH4 from 3.3 nM in June to 3.1 and 2.8 nM in August and September, respectively. The flux estimate showed higher methane flux to the atmosphere after the blowout was capped (3.8 μmol m-2 d-1 in August) compared to 0.024 μmol m-2 d-1 during the leak. Almost all observations were within the range of historical levels. The exception was one large peak to the southwest of the wellhead, but its contribution to atmospheric methane is found to be insignificant compared to the total amount of methane released by the leak. This result supports findings that DWH methane remained entrained in the deep waters and consequently is available for biological degradation and threatens to deplete oxygen, adding further stress to an area that already suffers from anoxic-induced dead zones.

  2. Design and performance of an axial air-gap solution pump motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawsey, R. A.; Sohns, C. W.; Daniel, D. S.; Bailey, J. M.

    1990-05-01

    An axial air gap, permanent magnet, brushless dc motor was designed and was evaluated on a dynamometer to measure operating characteristics. The motor must deliver 0.167 hp (approx. 120 W) to the pump rotor at 1800 rpm. Initial performance data with a half-bridge, Hall-probe synchronized drive system and a dry motor bearing did not achieve the desired motor performance. Subsequently, a commercial full-bridge, speed regulated sensorless drive system was used to test the motor. The motor delivered the required 90 oz-in. of torque at 1800 rpm. These data revealed the need for rewinding the stator core to improve motor efficiency. A second stator core, with deeper slots and additional turns of wire, was subsequently fabricated and tested. At 1800 rpm, the drive system could produce only 60 oz-in. of torque due to an unexpectedly high generated voltage. Motor efficiency was 60 to 70 pct. at this torque level when the data were corrected for bearing and coupling drag.

  3. Air-sea CO2 flux pattern along the southern Bay of Bengal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, R.; Poornima, D.; Naveen, M.; Thangaradjou, T.; Choudhury, S. B.; Rao, K. H.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2016-12-01

    Physico-chemical observations made from January 2013 to March 2015 in coastal waters of the southwest Bay of Bengal show pronounced seasonal variation in physico-chemical parameters including total alkalinity (TA: 1927.390-4088.642 μmol kg-1), chlorophyll (0.13-19.41 μg l-1) and also calculated dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC: 1574.219-3790.954 μmol kg-1), partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2: 155.520-1488.607 μatm) and air-sea CO2 flux (FCO2: -4.808 to 11.255 mmol Cm-2 d-1). Most of the physical parameters are at their maximum during summer due to the increased solar radiation at cloud free conditions, less or no riverine inputs, and lack of vertical mixing of water column which leads to the lowest nutrients concentration, dissolved oxygen (DO), biological production, pCO2 and negative flux of CO2 to the atmosphere. Chlorophyll and DO concentrations enhanced due to increased nutrients during premonsoon and monsoon season due to the vertical mixing of water column driven by the strong winds and external inputs at respective seasons. The constant positive loading of nutrients, TA, DIC, chlorophyll, pCO2 and FCO2 against atmospheric temperature (AT), lux, sea surface temperature (SST), pH and salinity observed in principal component analysis (PCA) suggested that physical and biological parameters play vital role in the seasonal distribution of pCO2 along the southwest Bay of Bengal. The annual variability of CO2 flux clearly depicted that the southwest Bay of Bengal switch from sink (2013) to source status in the recent years (2014 and 2015) and it act as significant source of CO2 to the atmosphere with a mean flux of 0.204 ± 1.449 mmol Cm-2 d-1.

  4. Characterization of Air-Gap Sealing with Organic Dielectric Using Spin-Coating Film Transfer and Hot-Pressing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Norio; Machida, Katsuyuki; Ishii, Hiromu; Ishimura, Yoji; Saito, Hidenori; Asakuma, Sumitoshi; Kawagoe, Masafumi; Adachi, Hideki

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes a dielectric material and its application to sealing air gaps using spin-coating film transfer and hot-pressing (STP) technology. STP technology is a new film-formation process that consists of spin coating a dielectric material on a base film, hot pressing the dielectric film on a wafer with gaps in a vacuum chamber, and peeling the base film off the dielectric adhered to the wafer. In order to seal the gaps with thin dielectric films, it is necessary to prevent the dielectric from breaking during the peel-off step. Thus, a dielectric of poly(benzoxazole) (PBO) with additives for reducing the adhesion strength between the dielectric and the base film is proposed. The experimental results show that 0.3-μm-wide gaps can be sealed with dielectric films as thin as 0.25 μm without film breaking. The mechanism by which adhesion strength decreases in the peel-off step is discussed in terms of its dependence on the proportion of additives. The synergy of the STP process and the type of dielectric material used paves the way for the development of future interconnect schemes using air gaps.

  5. BOREAS AFM-2 King Air 1994 Aircraft Flux and Moving Window Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Robert D.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS AFM-2 team collected pass-by-pass fluxes (and many other statistics) for a large number of level (constant altitude), straight-line passes used in a variety of flight patterns. The data were collected by the University of Wyoming King Air in 1994 BOREAS IFCs 1-3. Most of these data were collected at 60-70 m above ground level, but a significant number of passes were also flown at various levels in the planetary boundary layer, up to about the inversion height. This documentation concerns only the data from the straight and level passes that are presented as original (over the NSA and SSA) and moving window values (over the Transect). Another archive of King Air data is also available, containing data from all the soundings flown by the King Air 1994 IFCs 1-3. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1983-07-01

    Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

  7. Air-ice CO2 fluxes and pCO2 dynamics in the Arctic coastal area (Amundsen Gulf, Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilfus, Nicolas-Xavier; Tison, Jean Louis; Carnat, Gauthier; Else, Brent; Borges, Alberto V.; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth; Delille, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    Sea ice covers about 7% of the Earth surface at its maximum seasonal extent. For decades sea ice was assumed to be an impermeable and inert barrier for air - sea exchange of CO2 so that global climate models do not include CO2 exchange between the oceans and the atmosphere in the polar regions. However, uptake of atmospheric CO2 by sea ice cover was recently reported raising the need to further investigate pCO2 dynamics in the marine cryosphere realm and related air-ice CO2 fluxes. In addition, budget of CO2 fluxes are poorly constrained in high latitudes continental shelves [Borges et al., 2006]. We report measurements of air-ice CO2 fluxes above the Canadian continental shelf and compare them to previous measurements carried out in Antarctica. We carried out measurements of pCO2 within brines and bulk ice, and related air-ice CO2 fluxes (chamber method) in Antarctic first year pack ice ("Sea Ice Mass Balance in Antarctica -SIMBA" drifting station experiment September - October 2007) and in Arctic first year land fast ice ("Circumpolar Flaw Lead" - CFL, April - June 2008). These 2 experiments were carried out in contrasted sites. SIMBA was carried out on sea ice in early spring while CFL was carried out in from the middle of the winter to the late spring while sea ice was melting. Both in Arctic and Antarctic, no air-ice CO2 fluxes were detected when sea ice interface was below -10°C. Slightly above -10°C, fluxes toward the atmosphere were observed. In contrast, at -7°C fluxes from the atmosphere to the ice were significant. The pCO2 of the brine exhibits a same trend in both hemispheres with a strong decrease of the pCO2 anti-correlated with the increase of sea ice temperature. The pCO2 shifted from a large over-saturation at low temperature to a marked under-saturation at high temperature. These air-ice CO2 fluxes are partly controlled by the permeability of the air-ice interface, which depends of the temperature of this one. Moreover, air-ice CO2 fluxes are

  8. Directional gravity wave momentum fluxes in the stratosphere derived from high-resolution AIRS temperature data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, M.; Hoffmann, L.; Preusse, P.

    2017-01-01

    In order to reduce uncertainties in modeling the stratospheric circulation, global observations of gravity wave momentum flux (GWMF) vectors are required for comparison with distributions of resolved and parametrized GWMF in global models. For the first time, we derive GWMF vectors globally from data of a nadir-viewing satellite instrument: we apply a 3-D method to an Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) temperature data set that was optimized for gravity wave (GW) analysis. For January 2009, the resulting distributions of GW amplitudes and of net GWMF highlight the importance of GWs in the polar vortex and the summertime subtropics. Net GWMF is preferentially directed opposite to the background wind, and, interestingly, it is dominated by large-amplitude GWs of relatively long horizontal wavelength. For convective GW sources, these large horizontal scales are in contradiction with traditional thoughts. However, the observational filter effect needs to be kept in mind when interpreting the results.

  9. The sensitivity of latent heat flux to the air humidity approximations used in ocean circulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Niiler, Pearn P.

    1990-01-01

    In deriving the surface latent heat flux with the bulk formula for the thermal forcing of some ocean circulation models, two approximations are commonly made to bypass the use of atmospheric humidity in the formula. The first assumes a constant relative humidity, and the second supposes that the sea-air humidity difference varies linearly with the saturation humidity at sea surface temperature. Using climatological fields derived from the Marine Deck and long time series from ocean weather stations, the errors introduced by these two assumptions are examined. It is shown that the errors reach above 100 W/sq m over western boundary currents and 50 W/sq m over the tropical ocean. The two approximations also introduce erroneous seasonal and spatial variabilities with magnitudes over 50 percent of the observed variabilities.

  10. Sea-air carbon dioxide fluxes along 35°S in the South Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lencina-Avila, J. M.; Ito, R. G.; Garcia, C. A. E.; Tavano, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    The oceans play an important role in absorbing a significant fraction of the atmospheric CO2 surplus, but there are still uncertainties concerning several open ocean regions, such as the under-sampled South Atlantic Ocean. This study assessed the net sea-air CO2 fluxes and distribution of sea-surface CO2 fugacity (f C O2sw) along the 35°S latitude in the South Atlantic, during 2011 spring and early summer periods. Underway CO2 molar fraction, temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen measurements were taken continuously from South American to South African continental shelves. Values of both satellite and discrete in situ chlorophyll-a concentration along the ship's track were used as ancillary data. Both f C O2sw and difference in sea-air fugacity (ΔfCO2) showed high variability along the cruise track, with higher values found on the continental shelf and slope regions. All ΔfCO2 values were negative, implying that a sinking process was occurring during the cruise period, with an average net CO2 flux of -3.1±2.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 (using Wanninkhof, 1992). Physical variables were the main drivers of f C O2sw variability in South American continental shelf and open ocean regions, while the biological factor dominated the South African continental shelf. Algorithms for estimating fCO2 and temperature-normalized fCO2 were developed and applied separately to the three defined sub-regions: the South American shelf, the open ocean and the South African continental shelf, with the regional temperature-normalized fCO2 models showing better results.

  11. High efficient OLED displays prepared with the air-gapped bridges on quantum dot patterns for optical recycling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Jun; Shin, Min-Ho; Kim, Joo-Suc; Kim, Se-Eun; Kim, Young-Joo

    2017-02-17

    An optically efficient structure was proposed and fabricated to realize high brightness organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays based on a white OLED prepared with the air-gapped bridges on the quantum dot (QD) patterns. Compared with a conventional white OLED display, in our experiments, the optical intensity of the proposed OLED display shows the enhancement of 58.2% in the red color and 16.8% in the green color after applying the air-gapped bridge structure on QD patterns of 20 wt% concentration. This enhancement comes from the two facts that the QD patterns downconvert unnecessary blue or blue/green light to the required green or red light and the air-gapped bridges increase the color conversion efficiency of QDs by optical recycling using total internal reflection (TIR) at the interface. In addition, the color gamut of the proposed OLED display increases from 65.5 to 75.9% (NTSC x, y ratio) due to the narrow emission spectra of QDs.

  12. High efficient OLED displays prepared with the air-gapped bridges on quantum dot patterns for optical recycling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jun; Shin, Min-Ho; Kim, Joo-Suc; Kim, Se-Eun; Kim, Young-Joo

    2017-01-01

    An optically efficient structure was proposed and fabricated to realize high brightness organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays based on a white OLED prepared with the air-gapped bridges on the quantum dot (QD) patterns. Compared with a conventional white OLED display, in our experiments, the optical intensity of the proposed OLED display shows the enhancement of 58.2% in the red color and 16.8% in the green color after applying the air-gapped bridge structure on QD patterns of 20 wt% concentration. This enhancement comes from the two facts that the QD patterns downconvert unnecessary blue or blue/green light to the required green or red light and the air-gapped bridges increase the color conversion efficiency of QDs by optical recycling using total internal reflection (TIR) at the interface. In addition, the color gamut of the proposed OLED display increases from 65.5 to 75.9% (NTSC x, y ratio) due to the narrow emission spectra of QDs. PMID:28211516

  13. High efficient OLED displays prepared with the air-gapped bridges on quantum dot patterns for optical recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyo-Jun; Shin, Min-Ho; Kim, Joo-Suc; Kim, Se-Eun; Kim, Young-Joo

    2017-02-01

    An optically efficient structure was proposed and fabricated to realize high brightness organic light emitting diode (OLED) displays based on a white OLED prepared with the air-gapped bridges on the quantum dot (QD) patterns. Compared with a conventional white OLED display, in our experiments, the optical intensity of the proposed OLED display shows the enhancement of 58.2% in the red color and 16.8% in the green color after applying the air-gapped bridge structure on QD patterns of 20 wt% concentration. This enhancement comes from the two facts that the QD patterns downconvert unnecessary blue or blue/green light to the required green or red light and the air-gapped bridges increase the color conversion efficiency of QDs by optical recycling using total internal reflection (TIR) at the interface. In addition, the color gamut of the proposed OLED display increases from 65.5 to 75.9% (NTSC x, y ratio) due to the narrow emission spectra of QDs.

  14. Influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of persistent organic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Dachs, J.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Hoff, R.M.

    2000-03-15

    The influence of eutrophication on the biogeochemical cycles of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is largely unknown. In this paper, the application of a dynamic air-water-phytoplankton exchange model to Lake Ontario is used as a framework to study the influence of eutrophication on air-water exchange, vertical fluxes, and phytoplankton concentrations of POPs. The results of these simulations demonstrate that air-water exchange controls phytoplankton concentrations in remote aquatic environments with little influence from land-based sources of pollutants and supports levels in even historically contaminated systems. Furthermore, eutrophication or high biomass leads to a disequilibrium between the gas and dissolved phase, enhanced air-water exchange, and vertical sinking fluxes of PCBs. Increasing biomass also depletes the water concentrations leading to lower than equilibrium PCB concentrations in phytoplankton. Implications to future trends in PCB pollution in Lake Ontario are also discussed.

  15. Turbulent Fluxes and Pollutant Mixing during Wintertime Air Pollution Episodes in Complex Terrain.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Heather A; Sriramasamudram, Jai K; Pardyjak, Eric R; Whiteman, C David

    2015-11-17

    Cold air pools (CAPs) are stagnant stable air masses that form in valleys and basins in the winter. Low wintertime insolation limits convective mixing, such that pollutant concentrations can build up within the CAP when pollutant sources are present. In the western United States, wintertime CAPs often persist for days or weeks. Atmospheric models do not adequately capture the strength and evolution of CAPs. This is in part due to the limited availability of data quantifying the local turbulence during the formation, maintenance, and destruction of persistent CAPs. This paper presents observational data to quantify the turbulent mixing during two CAP episodes in Utah's Salt Lake Valley during February of 2004. Particulate matter (PM) concentration data and turbulence measurements for CAP and non-CAP time periods indicate that two distinct types of mixing scenarios occur depending on whether the CAP is dry or cloudy. Where cloudy, CAPs have enhanced vertical mixing due to top-down convection from the cloud layer. A comparison between the heat and momentum fluxes during 5 days of a dry CAP episode in February to those of an equivalent 5 day time period in March with no CAP indicates that the average turbulent kinetic energy during the CAP was suppressed by approximately 80%.

  16. A method of exploration of the atmosphere of Titan. [hot air balloon heated by solar radiation or planetary thermal flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blamont, J.

    1978-01-01

    A hot-air balloon, with the air heated by natural sources, is described. Buoyancy is accomplished by either solar heating or by utilizing the IR thermal flux of the planet to heat the gas in the balloon. Altitude control is provided by a valve which is opened and closed by a barometer. The balloon is made of an organic material which has to absorb radiant energy and to emit as little as possible.

  17. The Impact of the Ocean Thermal Skin Layer on Air-Sea Interfacial Heat Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, P. J.; Wong, E.

    2015-12-01

    The upper ocean heat content has been observed to be increasing over the past few decades much of which has been attributed to anthropogenic effects resulting in an increase in greenhouse gases thereby increasing the amounts of incoming longwave (LWin) radiation impinging onto the ocean's surface. However, the penetration depth of LWin extends to micrometer scales, where the ocean's thermal skin layer (TSL) exists, and does not directly heat the upper few meters of the ocean thereby raising the conundrum of how does the upper ocean warm with increasing levels of infrared (IR) radiation. The TSL consists of a strong temperature gradient on the aqueous side of the interface that sustains the upward heat flux by molecular conduction. As such, we hypothesize the heat lost through the air-sea interface which is controlled by the TSL, modulates the amount of heat stored in the upper few meters of the ocean. An analysis of properties of the retrieved TSL profiles from a shipboard IR spectrometer with heat fluxes (specifically LWin) and wind speeds from two cruises limited to night-time data are presented. We also show a comparison between these properties with current published viscous layer models. The results indicate that the data have an inherent wind speed dependence with net flux thereby requiring a segregation of the data into wind speed bins to acknowledge the effects of wind-driven shear in the analysis. The temperature differences derived from the models indicates that at low wind speeds (<2 m/s), where wind-driven shear effects are negligible and buoyancy effects dominate, the TSL profile's gradient is decreasing with increased LWin which leads to a lowered net heat flux and is in agreement with our hypothesis. However our field results show an opposite effect (higher gradient at higher LWin) which is believed to be due to the formation of a thicker TSL at low winds. The presence of a thicker TSL suggests that more of the vertical temperature gradient lies

  18. Improved Antishock Air-Gap Control Algorithm with Acceleration Feedforward Control for High-Numerical Aperture Near-Field Storage System Using Solid Immersion Lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Gon; Shin, Won-Ho; Hwang, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Jun; Park, Kyoung-Su; Park, No-Cheol; Yang, Hyunseok; Park, Young-Pil; Moo Park, Jin; Son, Do Hyeon; Kyo Seo, Jeong; Choi, In Ho

    2010-08-01

    A near-field storage system using a solid immersion lens (SIL) has been studied as a high-density optical disc drive system. The major goal of this research is to improve the robustness of the air-gap controller for a SIL-based near-field recording (NFR) system against dynamic disturbances, such as external shocks. The servo system is essential in near-field (NF) technology because the nanogap distance between the SIL and the disc is 50 nm or less. Also, the air-gap distance must be maintained without collision between the SIL and the disc to detect a stable gap error and read-out signals when an external shock is applied. Therefore, we propose an improved air-gap control algorithm using only an acceleration feedforward controller (AFC) to maintain the air-gap distance without contact for a 4.48 G at 10 ms shock. Thus, the antishock control performance for the SIL-based NF storage system in the presence of external shocks is markedly improved. Furthermore, to enhance the performance of the antishock air-gap control, we use the AFC with a double disturbance observer and a dead-zone nonlinear controller. As a result, the air-gap distance is maintained without contact for a 6.56 G@10 ms shock.

  19. Developing and Applications of a Gap-filling Model for Eddy covariance CO2 Flux: Evaluating the Net Ecosystem Exchange of a Subtropical Evergreen Forest after a Server Environmental Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; CHEN, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Successful eddy covariance (EC) applications often challenged by several difficulties, including non-ideal micrometeorological conditions, instrument failures, measurement limitations, and lacking consistent footprint area. Consequently, the resultant gaps in the time series of EC measurements limit the use of these dataset and cause the uncertainty in a range of 1 to 2 ton C/ha/yr for evaluating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) after different CO2 gap-filling procedures (Saigusa et al., 2013). It is crucial to develop a suitable gap-filling model for EC CO2 flux observations to provide reliable long-term surface fluxes for numerous applications. In this study, a gap-filling model was developed for EC CO2 flux by linking the gap-filled water vapor fluxes estimated by Chen et al. (2012) and the optimal nearest QC/QA passed CO2 fluxes for interpolating CO2 flux gaps. Considering the atmosphere characteristics and controlling mechanisms of CO2 fluxes, measured hydrometerological and flux data at the Lien-Hua-Chih (LHC) experimental watershed were separated into clear sky and cloudy/nighttime conditions. The successful applications of our gap-filling approaches were examined with various sizes of artificial CO2 gaps. Without any significant environmental disturbance in 2012, the annual NEE of this subtropical evergreen forest was estimated around 6.7 ton C/ha/yr as the amount of terrestrial CO2 sequestration. The effect of sever Typhoon Soulik (11-13, July, 2013) invasion on several ecosystem variables, such as changes of intrinsic water use efficiency, leaf area index, and canopy storage capacity, will be investigated to propose indicators for estimating NEE variations in association with environmental disturbances at this forest ecosystem.

  20. Preliminary study of osmotic membrane bioreactor: effects of draw solution on water flux and air scouring on fouling.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian-Jun; Kekre, Kiran A; Oo, Maung H; Tao, Guihe; Lay, Chee L; Lew, Cheun H; Cornelissen, Emile R; Ruiken, Chris J

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary study on a novel osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) was explored. Objective of this study was to investigate the effects of draw solution on membrane flux and air scouring at the feed side on fouling tendency in a pilot OMBR system composing the anoxic/aerobic and forward osmosis (FO) processes. Domestic sewage was the raw feed, FO membrane from HTI and NaCl/MgSO4 draw solutions were used in the experiments. Fluxes of 3 l/m2/h (LMH) and 7.2 LMH were achieved at osmotic pressure of 5 and 22.4 atm, respectively. No significant flux decline was observed at 3 LMH over 190 h and at 7.2 LMH over 150 h when air scouring was provided at the feed side of the membrane. However, without air scouring, the flux at 22.4 atm osmotic pressure declined by 30% after 195 h and then levelled off. The potential advantages of the fouling reversibility with air scouring under the operating conditions of the pilot OMBR and better water quality in OMBR over the conventional MBR were preliminarily demonstrated.

  1. Assessing recent air-sea freshwater flux changes using a surface temperature-salinity space framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grist, Jeremy P.; Josey, Simon A.; Zika, Jan D.; Evans, Dafydd Gwyn; Skliris, Nikolaos

    2016-12-01

    A novel assessment of recent changes in air-sea freshwater fluxes has been conducted using a surface temperature-salinity framework applied to four atmospheric reanalyses. Viewed in the T-S space of the ocean surface, the complex pattern of the longitude-latitude space mean global Precipitation minus Evaporation (PME) reduces to three distinct regions. The analysis is conducted for the period 1979-2007 for which there is most evidence for a broadening of the (atmospheric) tropical belt. All four of the reanalyses display an increase in strength of the water cycle. The range of increase is between 2% and 30% over the period analyzed, with an average of 14%. Considering the average across the reanalyses, the water cycle changes are dominated by changes in tropical as opposed to mid-high latitude precipitation. The increases in the water cycle strength, are consistent in sign, but larger than in a 1% greenhouse gas run of the HadGEM3 climate model. In the model a shift of the precipitation/evaporation cells to higher temperatures is more evident, due to the much stronger global warming signal. The observed changes in freshwater fluxes appear to be reflected in changes in the T-S distribution of the Global Ocean. Specifically, across the diverse range of atmospheric reanalyses considered here, there was an acceleration of the hydrological cycle during 1979-2007 which led to a broadening of the ocean's salinity distribution. Finally, although the reanalyses indicate that the warm temperature tropical precipitation dominated water cycle change, ocean observations suggest that ocean processes redistributed the freshening to lower ocean temperatures.

  2. Heat fluxes and roll circulations over the western Gulf Stream during an intense cold-air outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Ferguson, Michael P.

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence and heat fluxes in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) for three aircraft stacks near the western Gulf Stream front, observed during the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE) January 28, 1986 cold-air outbreak, has been studied using mixed-layer scaling. The GOES image and stability parameter indicates that these three stacks were in the roll vortex regime. The turbulence structure in the MABL is studied for this case, as well as the significance of roll vortices to heat fluxes. The roll circulations are shown to contribute significantly to the sensible (temperature) and latent heat (moisture) fluxes with importance increasing upward. The results suggest that the entrainment at the MABL top might affect the the budgets of temperature and humidity fluxes in the lower MABL, but not in the unstable surface layer.

  3. Mesoscale modulation of air-sea CO2 flux in Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hajoon; Marshall, John; Munro, David R.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Sweeney, Colm; McGillicuddy, D. J.; Hausmann, Ute

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the role of mesoscale eddies in modulating air-sea CO2 flux and associated biogeochemical fields in Drake Passage using in situ observations and an eddy-resolving numerical model. Both observations and model show a negative correlation between temperature and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) anomalies at the sea surface in austral summer, indicating that warm/cold anticyclonic/cyclonic eddies take up more/less CO2. In austral winter, in contrast, relationships are reversed: warm/cold anticyclonic/cyclonic eddies are characterized by a positive/negative pCO2 anomaly and more/less CO2 outgassing. It is argued that DIC-driven effects on pCO2 are greater than temperature effects in austral summer, leading to a negative correlation. In austral winter, however, the reverse is true. An eddy-centric analysis of the model solution reveals that nitrate and iron respond differently to the same vertical mixing: vertical mixing has a greater impact on iron because its normalized vertical gradient at the base of the surface mixed layer is an order of magnitude greater than that of nitrate.

  4. Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources to Health Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for six principal air pollutants (“criteria” pollutants): carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter (PM) in two size ranges [...

  5. Closing the Irregular Warfare Air Capability Gap. The Missing Puzzle Piece: Rugged Utility Aircraft and Personnel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Army Air Forces initially found itself unprepared. In the Pacific theater, the First Air Commando Group performed a daring glider operation in...hatch with a trainable gun and hanging standoff weap- ons under the wings (or both) convert it into a gunship. The Pilatus has almost limit- less

  6. pCO2 distributions and air-water CO2 fluxes in the Columbia River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Wiley; Hales, Burke; Strutton, Peter G.

    2013-01-01

    Sources of time and space variability in the distributions of surface water carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) and air-water CO2 flux were quantified in the Columbia River estuary (CRE) during five cruises in spring, summer and autumn 2007/08. The CRE is an upwelling margin river-dominated mesotidal system that is an estuary class not represented in global flux compilations. Data from the CRE show instances of pCO2 under and oversaturation with respect to the atmosphere during every season in association with tidal, wind, biological and storm-driven sources of variability. On average the CRE is a sink for atmospheric CO2 during spring and a source during summer and autumn, with large positive air-water CO2 fluxes during the snowmelt freshet coinciding with the functional transition in the estuary. It is hypothesized here that interannual variability in size of the snowmelt freshet largely influences the extent of springtime CO2 uptake in the CRE, and subsequently the magnitude of net annual CO2 emission from the estuary. Data collected during an autumn storm show that large fluxes can drop quickly, even in the presence of high gas transfer velocities, because of rapid CO2 exchange with the atmosphere in this weakly buffered system. Combining seasonal observations of CO2 exchange with an assumption of winter conditions, we estimate that the net annual emission from the CRE is approximately 1 mol C m-2 yr-1. The air-water CO2 fluxes reported here are the first from an upwelling margin river-dominated mesotidal estuary, and the estimate of net annual exchange is substantially lower than those from other tidal and/or large river systems represented in global flux compilations.

  7. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer

    Margaret Torn

    2015-01-14

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  8. Comparing air-sea turbulent fluxes in reanalyses and climate models - a new framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulev, S.; Tilinina, N.; Belyaev, K.

    2013-12-01

    Reanalyses fluxes and flux-related variables at high temporal resolution are widely used for forcing ocean general circulation models, case studies and estimation of regional energy budgets. We suggest a new approach for comparative assessment of fluxes in reanalyses and models based on application of modified Fisher-Tippett (MFT) distribution to turbulent heat fluxes. Two comparisons were performed - using direct surface turbulent flux output from different products (NCEP, NCEP-DOE, NCEP-CFSR, MERRA, JRA-25, ERA-Interim) and applying a single parameterization (COARE-3) to the reanalysis state variables. These allow for distinguishing between the impact of reanalysis surface parameterizations and variables onto surface turbulent fluxes. Statistical properties of surface turbulent fluxes were intercompared in terms of the MFT distribution parameters (scale and location) and extreme flux estimates derived from the distribution tails. In all reanalyses extreme turbulent heat fluxes amount to 1500-2000 W/m2 (for the 99th percentile) and can exceed 2000 W/m2 for higher percentiles in the western boundary current extension (WBCE) regions. Different reanalyses show significantly different shape of MFT distribution, implying considerable differences in the estimates of extreme fluxes. The highest extreme turbulent latent heat fluxes are diagnosed in NCEP-DOE, ERA-Interim and NCEP-CFSR reanalyses with the smallest being in MERRA. These differences may not necessarily reflect the differences in mean values. Analysis shows that differences in statistical properties of the state variables are the major source of differences in the shape of PDF of fluxes and in the estimates of extreme fluxes while the contribution of computational schemes used in different reanalyses is minor. The strongest differences in the characteristics of probability distributions of surface fluxes between different reanalyses are found in the Southern Ocean. Importantly, climate models considerably

  9. CLIVAR-GSOP/GODAE Ocean Synthesis Inter-Comparison of Global Air-Sea Fluxes From Ocean and Coupled Reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, Maria

    2014-05-01

    The GODAE OceanView and CLIVAR-GSOP ocean synthesis program has been assessing the degree of consistency between global air-sea flux data sets obtained from ocean or coupled reanalyses (Valdivieso et al., 2014). So far, fifteen global air-sea heat flux products obtained from ocean or coupled reanalyses have been examined: seven are from low-resolution ocean reanalyses (BOM PEODAS, ECMWF ORAS4, JMA/MRI MOVEG2, JMA/MRI MOVECORE, Hamburg Univ. GECCO2, JPL ECCOv4, and NCEP GODAS), five are from eddy-permitting ocean reanalyses developed as part of the EU GMES MyOcean program (Mercator GLORYS2v1, Reading Univ. UR025.3, UR025.4, UKMO GloSea5, and CMCC C-GLORS), and the remaining three are couple reanalyses based on coupled climate models (JMA/MRI MOVE-C, GFDL ECDA and NCEP CFSR). The global heat closure in the products over the period 1993-2009 spanned by all data sets is presented in comparison with observational and atmospheric reanalysis estimates. Then, global maps of ensemble spread in the seasonal cycle, and of the Signal to Noise Ratio of interannual flux variability over the 17-yr common period are shown to illustrate the consistency between the products. We have also studied regional variability in the products, particularly at the OceanSITES project locations (such as, for instance, the TAO/TRITON and PIRATA arrays in the Tropical Pacific and Atlantic, respectively). Comparisons are being made with other products such as OAFlux latent and sensible heat fluxes (Yu et al., 2008) combined with ISCCP satellite-based radiation (Zhang et al., 2004), the ship-based NOC2.0 product (Berry and Kent, 2009), the Large and Yeager (2009) hybrid flux dataset CORE.2, and two atmospheric reanalysis products, the ECMWF ERA-Interim reanalysis (referred to as ERAi, Dee et al., 2011) and the NCEP/DOE reanalysis R2 (referred to as NCEP-R2, Kanamitsu et al., 2002). Preliminary comparisons with the observational flux products from OceanSITES are also underway. References Berry, D

  10. Localization of Metal-Induced Gap States at the Metal-Insulator Interface: Origin of Flux Noise in SQUIDs and Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sangkook; Lee, Dung-Hai; Louie, Steven G.; Clarke, John

    2010-03-01

    The origin of magnetic flux noise in dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs) with a power spectrum scaling as 1/f (f is frequency) has been a puzzle for over 25 years. This noise limits both the low frequency performance of SQUIDs and the decoherence time of flux-sensitive superconducting qubits, making scaling-up for quantum computing problematic. Recent calculations and experiments indicate that the noise is generated by electrons that randomly reverse their spin directions. Their areal density of ˜ 5 x 10^17 m-2 is relatively insensitive to the nature of the superconductor and substrate. Here, we propose that the local magnetic moments originate in metal-induced gap states (MIGSs) localized by potential disorder at the metal-insulator interface. MIGSs are particularly sensitive to such disorder, so that the localized states have a Coulomb repulsion sufficiently large to make them singly occupied. Our calculations demonstrate that a modest level of disorder generates the required areal density of localized moments. This result suggests that magnetic flux noise could be reduced by fabricating superconductor-insulator interfaces with less disorder. Support: NSF DMR07-05941, US DOE De-AC02-05CH11231, Samsung Foundation, Teragrid, NERSC.

  11. Air-sea fluxes in a climate model using hourly coupling between the atmospheric and the oceanic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fangxing; von Storch, Jin-Song; Hertwig, Eileen

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the changes in the air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat and fresh water flux caused by increasing the ocean-atmosphere coupling frequency from once per day to once per hour in the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. We diagnose the relative influences of daily averaging and high-frequency feedbacks on the basic statistics of the air-sea fluxes at grid point level and quantify feedback modes responsible for large scale changes in fluxes over the Southern Ocean and the Equatorial Pacific. Coupling once per hour instead of once per day reduces the mean of the momentum-flux magnitude by up to 7 % in the tropics and increases it by up to 10 % in the Southern Ocean. These changes result solely from feedbacks between atmosphere and ocean occurring on time scales shorter than 1 day . The variance and extremes of all the fluxes are increased in most parts of the oceans. Exceptions are found for the momentum and fresh water fluxes in the tropics. The increases result mainly from the daily averaging, while the decreases in the tropics are caused by the high-frequency feedbacks. The variance increases are substantial, reaching up to 50 % for the momentum flux, 100 % for the fresh water flux, and a factor of 15 for the net heat flux. These diurnal and intra-diurnal variations account for up to 50-90 % of the total variances and exhibit distinct seasonality. The high-frequency coupling can influence the large-scale feedback modes that lead to large-scale changes in the magnitude of wind stress over the Southern Ocean and Equatorial Pacific. In the Southern Ocean, the dependence of the SST-wind-stress feedback on the mean state of SST, which is colder in the experiment with hourly coupling than in the experiment with daily coupling, leads to an increase of westerlies. In the Equatorial Pacific, Bjerknes feedback in the hourly coupled experiment reveals a diurnal cycle during the El Niño events, with the feedback being stronger in the nighttime than in the daytime and

  12. Air-Gapped Structures as Magnetic Elements for Use in Power Processing Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohri, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Methodical approaches to the design of inductors for use in LC filters and dc-to-dc converters using air gapped magnetic structures are presented. Methods for the analysis and design of full wave rectifier LC filter circuits operating with the inductor current in both the continuous conduction and the discontinuous conduction modes are also described. In the continuous conduction mode, linear circuit analysis techniques are employed, while in the case of the discontinuous mode, the method of analysis requires computer solutions of the piecewise linear differential equations which describe the filter in the time domain. Procedures for designing filter inductors using air gapped cores are presented. The first procedure requires digital computation to yield a design which is optimized in the sense of minimum core volume and minimum number of turns. The second procedure does not yield an optimized design as defined above, but the design can be obtained by hand calculations or with a small calculator. The third procedure is based on the use of specially prepared magnetic core data and provides an easy way to quickly reach a workable design.

  13. Effect of Sampling Depth on Air-Sea CO2 Flux Estimates in River-Stratified Arctic Coastal Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. A.; Papakyriakou, T. N.

    2015-12-01

    In summer-time Arctic coastal waters that are strongly influenced by river run-off, extreme stratification severely limits wind mixing, making it difficult to effectively sample the surface 'mixed layer', which can be as shallow as 1 m, from a ship. During two expeditions in southwestern Hudson Bay, off the Nelson, Hayes, and Churchill River estuaries, we confirmed that sampling depth has a strong impact on estimates of 'surface' pCO2 and calculated air-sea CO2 fluxes. We determined pCO2 in samples collected from 5 m, using a typical underway system on the ship's seawater supply; from the 'surface' rosette bottle, which was generally between 1 and 3 m; and using a niskin bottle deployed at 1 m and just below the surface from a small boat away from the ship. Our samples confirmed that the error in pCO2 derived from typical ship-board versus small-boat sampling at a single station could be nearly 90 μatm, leading to errors in the calculated air-sea CO2 flux of more than 0.1 mmol/(m2s). Attempting to extrapolate such fluxes over the 6,000,000 km2 area of the Arctic shelves would generate an error approaching a gigamol CO2/s. Averaging the station data over a cruise still resulted in an error of nearly 50% in the total flux estimate. Our results have implications not only for the design and execution of expedition-based sampling, but also for placement of in-situ sensors. Particularly in polar waters, sensors are usually deployed on moorings, well below the surface, to avoid damage and destruction from drifting ice. However, to obtain accurate information on air-sea fluxes in these areas, it is necessary to deploy sensors on ice-capable buoys that can position the sensors in true 'surface' waters.

  14. Mach number impact on heat flux and pressure distributions of a hypersonic flow over combined gap/step geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Paulo H. M.; Santos, Wilson F. N.

    2014-12-01

    A computational analysis of a hypersonic flow over a combined gap/step configuration at zero degree angle of attack, in chemical equilibrium and thermal non-equilibrium is presented in this work. Effects on pressure and heating loads due to changes on the freestream Mach number and on the step frontal-face height have been investigated by employing the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. The work focuses the attention of designers of hypersonic configurations on the fundamental parameter of surface discontinuity, which can have an important impact on even initial design. The analysis showed that heating and pressure loads increased with increasing not only the step height but also with the freestream Mach number. In addition, peak values for both loads took place at the vicinity of the step convex corner, a similar behavior observed for a forward-facing step configuration. It was also found that these loads for the gap/step configuration are slightly smaller than those for a forward-facing step.

  15. Fluxes of lactate into, from, and among gap junction-coupled astrocytes and their interaction with noradrenaline

    PubMed Central

    Hertz, Leif; Gibbs, Marie E.; Dienel, Gerald A.

    2014-01-01

    Lactate is a versatile metabolite with important roles in modulation of brain glucose utilization rate (CMRglc), diagnosis of brain-injured patients, redox- and receptor-mediated signaling, memory, and alteration of gene transcription. Neurons and astrocytes release and accumulate lactate using equilibrative monocarboxylate transporters that carry out net transmembrane transport of lactate only until intra- and extracellular levels reach equilibrium. Astrocytes have much faster lactate uptake than neurons and shuttle more lactate among gap junction-coupled astrocytes than to nearby neurons. Lactate diffusion within syncytia can provide precursors for oxidative metabolism and glutamate synthesis and facilitate its release from endfeet to perivascular space to stimulate blood flow. Lactate efflux from brain during activation underlies the large underestimation of CMRglc with labeled glucose and fall in CMRO2/CMRglc ratio. Receptor-mediated effects of lactate on locus coeruleus neurons include noradrenaline release in cerebral cortex and c-AMP-mediated stimulation of astrocytic gap junctional coupling, thereby enhancing its dispersal and release from brain. Lactate transport is essential for its multifunctional roles. PMID:25249930

  16. A Sensitivity Analysis of the Impact of Rain on Regional and Global Sea-Air Fluxes of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Shutler, J. D.; Land, P. E.; Woolf, D. K.; Quartly, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    The global oceans are considered a major sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Rain is known to alter the physical and chemical conditions at the sea surface, and thus influence the transfer of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere. It can influence gas exchange through enhanced gas transfer velocity, the direct export of carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean, by altering the sea skin temperature, and through surface layer dilution. However, to date, very few studies quantifying these effects on global net sea-air fluxes exist. Here, we include terms for the enhanced gas transfer velocity and the direct export of carbon in calculations of the global net sea-air fluxes, using a 7-year time series of monthly global climate quality satellite remote sensing observations, model and in-situ data. The use of a non-linear relationship between the effects of rain and wind significantly reduces the estimated impact of rain-induced surface turbulence on the rate of sea-air gas transfer, when compared to a linear relationship. Nevertheless, globally, the rain enhanced gas transfer and rain induced direct export increase the estimated annual oceanic integrated net sink of CO2 by up to 6%. Regionally, the variations can be larger, with rain increasing the estimated annual net sink in the Pacific Ocean by up to 15% and altering monthly net flux by > ± 50%. Based on these analyses, the impacts of rain should be included in the uncertainty analysis of studies that estimate net sea-air fluxes of CO2 as the rain can have a considerable impact, dependent upon the region and timescale. PMID:27673683

  17. A Sensitivity Analysis of the Impact of Rain on Regional and Global Sea-Air Fluxes of CO2.

    PubMed

    Ashton, I G; Shutler, J D; Land, P E; Woolf, D K; Quartly, G D

    The global oceans are considered a major sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Rain is known to alter the physical and chemical conditions at the sea surface, and thus influence the transfer of CO2 between the ocean and atmosphere. It can influence gas exchange through enhanced gas transfer velocity, the direct export of carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean, by altering the sea skin temperature, and through surface layer dilution. However, to date, very few studies quantifying these effects on global net sea-air fluxes exist. Here, we include terms for the enhanced gas transfer velocity and the direct export of carbon in calculations of the global net sea-air fluxes, using a 7-year time series of monthly global climate quality satellite remote sensing observations, model and in-situ data. The use of a non-linear relationship between the effects of rain and wind significantly reduces the estimated impact of rain-induced surface turbulence on the rate of sea-air gas transfer, when compared to a linear relationship. Nevertheless, globally, the rain enhanced gas transfer and rain induced direct export increase the estimated annual oceanic integrated net sink of CO2 by up to 6%. Regionally, the variations can be larger, with rain increasing the estimated annual net sink in the Pacific Ocean by up to 15% and altering monthly net flux by > ± 50%. Based on these analyses, the impacts of rain should be included in the uncertainty analysis of studies that estimate net sea-air fluxes of CO2 as the rain can have a considerable impact, dependent upon the region and timescale.

  18. Motion-correlated flow distortion and wave-induced biases in air-sea flux measurements from ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytherch, J.; Yelland, M. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Tupman, D. J.; Pascal, R. W.; Moat, B. I.; Norris, S. J.

    2015-09-01

    Direct measurements of the turbulent air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture and gases are often made using sensors mounted on ships. Ship-based turbulent wind measurements are corrected for platform motion using well established techniques, but biases at scales associated with wave and platform motion are often still apparent in the flux measurements. It has been uncertain whether this signal is due to time-varying distortion of the air flow over the platform or to wind-wave interactions impacting the turbulence. Methods for removing such motion-scale biases from scalar measurements have previously been published but their application to momentum flux measurements remains controversial. Here we show that the measured motion-scale bias has a dependence on the horizontal ship velocity and that a correction for it reduces the dependence of the measured momentum flux on the orientation of the ship to the wind. We conclude that the bias is due to experimental error and that time-varying motion-dependent flow distortion is the likely source.

  19. Motion-correlated flow distortion and wave-induced biases in air-sea flux measurements from ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prytherch, J.; Yelland, M. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Tupman, D. J.; Pascal, R. W.; Moat, B. I.; Norris, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    Direct measurements of the turbulent air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat, moisture and gases. are often made using sensors mounted on ships. Ship-based turbulent wind measurements are corrected for platform motion using well established techniques, but biases at scales associated with wave and platform motion are often still apparent in the flux measurements. It has been uncertain whether this signal is due to time-varying distortion of the air flow over the platform, or to wind-wave interactions impacting the turbulence. Methods for removing such motion-scale biases from scalar measurements have previously been published but their application to momentum flux measurements remains controversial. Here we show that the measured motion-scale bias has a dependence on the horizontal ship velocity, and that a correction for it reduces the dependence of the measured momentum flux on the orientation of the ship to the wind. We conclude that the bias is due to experimental error, and that time-varying motion-dependent flow distortion is the likely source.

  20. Inverse modeling of Asian (222)Rn flux using surface air (222)Rn concentration.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Shigekazu; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Moriizumi, Jun

    2010-11-01

    When used with an atmospheric transport model, the (222)Rn flux distribution estimated in our previous study using soil transport theory caused underestimation of atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations as compared with measurements in East Asia. In this study, we applied a Bayesian synthesis inverse method to produce revised estimates of the annual (222)Rn flux density in Asia by using atmospheric (222)Rn concentrations measured at seven sites in East Asia. The Bayesian synthesis inverse method requires a prior estimate of the flux distribution and its uncertainties. The atmospheric transport model MM5/HIRAT and our previous estimate of the (222)Rn flux distribution as the prior value were used to generate new flux estimates for the eastern half of the Eurasian continent dividing into 10 regions. The (222)Rn flux densities estimated using the Bayesian inversion technique were generally higher than the prior flux densities. The area-weighted average (222)Rn flux density for Asia was estimated to be 33.0 mBq m(-2) s(-1), which is substantially higher than the prior value (16.7 mBq m(-2) s(-1)). The estimated (222)Rn flux densities decrease with increasing latitude as follows: Southeast Asia (36.7 mBq m(-2) s(-1)); East Asia (28.6 mBq m(-2) s(-1)) including China, Korean Peninsula and Japan; and Siberia (14.1 mBq m(-2) s(-1)). Increase of the newly estimated fluxes in Southeast Asia, China, Japan, and the southern part of Eastern Siberia from the prior ones contributed most significantly to improved agreement of the model-calculated concentrations with the atmospheric measurements. The sensitivity analysis of prior flux errors and effects of locally exhaled (222)Rn showed that the estimated fluxes in Northern and Central China, Korea, Japan, and the southern part of Eastern Siberia were robust, but that in Central Asia had a large uncertainty.

  1. Deriving clear-sky longwave spectral flux from spaceborne hyperspectral radiance measurements: a case study with AIRS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiuhong; Huang, Xianglei

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that longwave (LW) spectral fluxes have unique merit in climate studies. Using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances as a case study, this study presents an algorithm to derive the entire LW clear-sky spectral fluxes from spaceborne hyperspectral observations. No other auxiliary observations are needed in the algorithm. A clear-sky scene is identified using a three-step detection method. The identified clear-sky scenes are then categorized into different sub-scene types using information about precipitable water, lapse rate and surface temperature inferred from the AIRS radiances at six selected channels. A previously established algorithm is then used to invert AIRS radiances to spectral fluxes over the entire LW spectrum at 10 cm-1 spectral interval. Accuracy of the algorithms is evaluated against collocated Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) observations. For nadir-view observations, the mean difference between outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) derived by this algorithm and the collocated CERES OLR is 1.52 Wm-2 with a standard deviation of 2.46 Wm-2. When the algorithm is extended for viewing zenith angle up to 45°, the performance is comparable to that for nadir-view results.

  2. Soil-Air Mercury Flux near a Large Industrial Emission Source before and after Closure (Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada).

    PubMed

    Eckley, Chris S; Blanchard, Pierrette; McLennan, Daniel; Mintz, Rachel; Sekela, Mark

    2015-08-18

    Prior to its closure, the base-metal smelter in Flin Flon, Manitoba, Canada was one of the North America's largest mercury (Hg) emission sources. Our project objective was to understand the exchange of Hg between the soil and the air before and after the smelter closure. Field and laboratory Hg flux measurements were conducted to identify the controlling variables and used for spatial and temporal scaling. Study results showed that deposition from the smelter resulted in the surrounding soil being enriched in Hg (up to 99 μg g(-1)) as well as other metals. During the period of smelter operation, air concentrations were elevated (30 ± 19 ng m(-3)), and the soil was a net Hg sink (daily flux: -3.8 ng m(-2) h(-1)). Following the smelter closure, air Hg(0) concentrations were reduced, and the soils had large emissions (daily flux: 108 ng m(-2) h(-1)). The annual scaling of soil Hg emissions following the smelter closure indicated that the landscape impacted by smelter deposition emitted or re-emitted almost 100 kg per year. Elevated soil Hg concentrations and emissions are predicted to continue for hundreds of years before background concentrations are re-established. Overall, the results indicate that legacy Hg deposition will continue to cycle in the environment long after point-source reductions.

  3. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  4. Design of single-winding energy-storage reactors for dc-to-dc converters using air-gapped magnetic-core structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohri, A. K.; Wilson, T. G.; Owen, H. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for designing air-gapped energy-storage reactors for nine different dc-to-dc converters resulting from combinations of three single-winding power stages for voltage stepup, current stepup and voltage stepup/current stepup and three controllers with control laws that impose constant-frequency, constant transistor on-time and constant transistor off-time operation. The analysis, based on the energy-transfer requirement of the reactor, leads to a simple relationship for the required minimum volume of the air gap. Determination of this minimum air gap volume then permits the selection of either an air gap or a cross-sectional core area. Having picked one parameter, the minimum value of the other immediately leads to selection of the physical magnetic structure. Other analytically derived equations are used to obtain values for the required turns, the inductance, and the maximum rms winding current. The design procedure is applicable to a wide range of magnetic material characteristics and physical configurations for the air-gapped magnetic structure.

  5. Helical Explosive Flux Compression Generator Research at the Air Force Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-06-01

    Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Directed Energy Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory Kirtland AFB, NM 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT...in support of the Air Force Research Laboratory ( AFRL ) explosive pulsed power program. These include circuit codes such as Microcap and

  6. Dual rotor single- stator axial air gap PMSM motor/generator drive for high torque vehicles applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutelea, L. N.; Deaconu, S. I.; Boldea, I.; Popa, G. N.

    2014-03-01

    The actual e - continuously variable transmission (e-CVT) solution for the parallel Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) requires two electric machines, two inverters, and a planetary gear. A distinct electric generator and a propulsion electric motor, both with full power converters, are typical for a series HEV. In an effort to simplify the planetary-geared e-CVT for the parallel HEV or the series HEV we hereby propose to replace the basically two electric machines and their two power converters by a single, axial-air-gap, electric machine central stator, fed from a single PWM converter with dual frequency voltage output and two independent PM rotors, destined for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and military vehicles applications. The proposed topologies and the magneto-motive force analysis are the core of the paper.

  7. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10−5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers. PMID:26923610

  8. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-02-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10-5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers.

  9. Prediction of DC Corona Onset Voltage for Rod-Plane Air Gaps by a Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuo; Ruan, Jiangjun; Du, Zhiye; Zhu, Lin; Shu, Shengwen

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method to predict the corona onset voltage for a rod-plane air gap, based on the support vector machine (SVM). Because the SVM is not limited by the size, dimension and nonlinearity of the samples, this method can realize accurate prediction with few training data. Only electric field features are chosen as the input; no geometric parameter is included. Therefore, the experiment data of one kind of electrode can be used to predict the corona onset voltages of other electrodes with different sizes. With the experimental data obtained by ozone detection technology, and experimental data provided by the reference, the efficiency of the proposed method is validated. Accurate predicted results with an average relative less than 3% are obtained with only 6 experimental data. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51477120)

  10. On the opposing roles of air temperature and wind speed variability in flux estimation from remotely sensed land surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, G.; Albertson, J. D.; Kustas, W. P.; Li, F.; Anderson, M. C.

    2007-10-01

    In semi-arid regions the evapotranspiration rates depend on both the spatial distribution of the vegetation and the soil moisture, for a given radiation regime. Remote sensing can provide high resolution spatially distributed estimation (o ˜ 10-100 m) of land surface states. However, data on the near surface air properties are not readily available at the same resolution and are often taken as spatially uniform over a greater region. Concern for how this scale mismatch might lead to erroneous flux estimations motivates this effort. This paper examines the relative roles of variability in the two dominant atmospheric states, wind speed and air temperature, on the variability of the surface fluxes. The study is conducted with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), where the boundary conditions are given by a surface energy balance model based on remotely sensed land surface data. Simulations have been performed for the late morning hours of two clear-sky summer days during the SGP97 experiment with different wetness conditions over an area characterized by a high contrast in surface temperature, canopy cover, and roughness between vegetated and dry bare soil areas. Spatial variability in canopy density effects both the air temperature Ta, through the energy partitioning, and the wind speed U, via the roughness, leading to local variations at 5 m above the ground of the order of 1 K and 1 m/s, respectively. Simulations show that the Ta variability tends to decrease the sensible heat flux H (- 30 W/m2) over bare soil areas and to increase it (+30 W/m2) over dense vegetation, thus reducing the total variability of the surface fluxes relative to those that would be estimated for spatially constant Ta, as observed in previous studies. The variability in U tends to increase H over bare soil (+50 W/m2), while having negligible effects over the vegetation, thus increasing the spatial variance of surface fluxes. However, when considered

  11. Analysis and Design Considerations of a High-Power Density, Dual Air Gap, Axial-Field Brushless, Permanent Magnet Motor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chahee Peter

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, brush dc motors have been the dominant drive system because they provide easily controlled motor speed over a wide range, rapid acceleration and deceleration, convenient control of position, and lower product cost. Despite these capabilities, the brush dc motor configuration does not satisfy the design requirements for the U.S. Navy's underwater propulsion applications. Technical advances in rare-earth permanent magnet materials, in high-power semiconductor transistor technology, and in various rotor position-sensing devices have made using brushless permanent magnet motors a viable alternative. This research investigates brushless permanent magnet motor technology, studying the merits of dual-air gap, axial -field, brushless, permanent magnet motor configuration in terms of power density, efficiency, and noise/vibration levels. Because the design objectives for underwater motor applications include high-power density, high-performance, and low-noise/vibration, the traditional, simplified equivalent circuit analysis methods to assist in meeting these goals were inadequate. This study presents the development and verification of detailed finite element analysis (FEA) models and lumped parameter circuit models that can calculate back electromotive force waveforms, inductance, cogging torque, energized torque, and eddy current power losses. It is the first thorough quantification of dual air-gap, axial -field, brushless, permanent magnet motor parameters and performance characteristics. The new methodology introduced in this research not only facilitates the design process of an axial field, brushless, permanent magnet motor but reinforces the idea that the high-power density, high-efficiency, and low-noise/vibration motor is attainable.

  12. Nonpolar III-nitride vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser with a photoelectrochemically etched air-gap aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, J. T. Yonkee, B. P.; Cohen, D. A.; Megalini, L.; Speck, J. S.; Lee, S.; DenBaars, S. P.; Nakamura, S.

    2016-01-18

    We demonstrate a III-nitride nonpolar vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) with a photoelectrochemically (PEC) etched aperture. The PEC lateral undercut etch is used to selectively remove the multi-quantum well (MQW) region outside the aperture area, defined by an opaque metal mask. This PEC aperture (PECA) creates an air-gap in the passive area of the device, allowing one to achieve efficient electrical confinement within the aperture, while simultaneously achieving a large index contrast between core of the device (the MQW within the aperture) and the lateral cladding of the device (the air-gap formed by the PEC etch), leading to strong lateral confinement. Scanning electron microscopy and focused ion-beam analysis is used to investigate the precision of the PEC etch technique in defining the aperture. The fabricated single mode PECA VCSEL shows a threshold current density of ∼22 kA/cm{sup 2} (25 mA), with a peak output power of ∼180 μW, at an emission wavelength of 417 nm. The near-field emission profile shows a clearly defined single linearly polarized (LP) mode profile (LP{sub 12,1}), which is in contrast to the filamentary lasing that is often observed in III-nitride VCSELs. 2D mode profile simulations, carried out using COMSOL, give insight into the different mode profiles that one would expect to be displayed in such a device. The experimentally observed single mode operation is proposed to be predominantly a result of poor current spreading in the device. This non-uniform current spreading results in a higher injected current at the periphery of the aperture, which favors LP modes with high intensities near the edge of the aperture.

  13. SU-E-T-454: Impact of Air Gap On PDDs of 6 MV Photon Beam for Various Field Sizes in Inhomogeneous Phantoms

    SciTech Connect

    Oyewale, S; Pokharel; Singh, H; Islam, M; Rana, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how the shape of air gap and its size will impact the percent depth doses (PDDs) of a 6MV photon beam for various field sizes. Methods: Two in-house phantoms were manufactured containing rectangular (phantom A) and circular (phantom B) air gaps. Both phantoms A and B were composed of same top layer (solid-water; 30×30cm{sup 2},5cm thickness) and bottom layer (solid-water; 30×30cm {sup 2},8cm thickness), but middle layer was varied to observe air gap effects and scatter contribution to the measurement point. In phantom A, a rectangular shaped air gap (30×30cm{sup 2},7cm thickness) was created by placing Styrofoam blocks between top and bottom layers of the phantom. In phantom B, middle layer was replaced by “inhomogenous block”, composed of acrylic plate (30×30cm{sup 2}, 4cm thickness) followed by PVC(30×30cm{sup 2},3cm thickness). Additionally, circular air gap was created by drilling a hole (diameter=2.8cm, length=7cm) at the center of “inhomogenous block”. In both phantoms, measurement readings were obtained at 13cm depth (i.e., 1cm after air gap) and depth of maximum dose(6MV energy; 100 MUs; field sizes ranged from 3×3cm{sup 2} to 10×10cm{sup 2}). The PDDs at 13cm depth were compared in both phantoms. Results: The measurements in both phantoms A and B showed an almost linear increase in PDDs with increasing field size, especially for smaller field sizes (from 3×3 to 7×7cm{sup 2}). For each field size, the PDD in phantom A was smaller compared to the one in phantom B. The difference in PDDs between two phantoms decreased with an increase in field size as the PDD difference decreased from 9.0% to 6.4%. Conclusion: The shape and size of air gap affect the PDD measurements in secondary build-up region as 6 MV primary beam traverses through the center of air gap. The scatter contribution due to increase in field size was more noticeable for field sizes ≤7×7cm{sup 2}.

  14. Diffusive flux of PAHs across sediment-water and water-air interfaces at urban superfund sites.

    PubMed

    Minick, D James; Anderson, Kim A

    2017-03-06

    Superfund sites may be a source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to the surrounding environment. These sites can also act as PAH sinks from present-day anthropogenic activities, especially in urban locations. Understanding PAH transport across environmental compartments helps to define the relative contributions of these sources and is therefore important for informing remedial and management decisions. In the present study, paired passive samplers were co-deployed at sediment-water and water-air interfaces within the Portland Harbor Superfund Site and the McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site. These sites, located along the Willamette River (Portland, OR, USA), have PAH contamination from both legacy and modern sources. Diffusive flux calculations indicate that the Willamette River acts predominantly as a sink for low molecular weight PAHs from both the sediment and the air. The sediment was also predominantly a source of 4- and 5-ring PAHs to the river, and the river was a source of these same PAHs to the air, indicating that legacy pollution may be contributing to PAH exposure for residents of the Portland urban center. At the remediated McCormick and Baxter Superfund Site, flux measurements highlight locations within the sand and rock sediment cap where contaminant breakthrough is occurring. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-9. © 2017 SETAC.

  15. Annual and seasonal fCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Barents Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauvset, S. K.; Chierici, M.; Counillon, F.; Omar, A.; Nondal, G.; Johannessen, T.; Olsen, A.

    2013-03-01

    The Barents Sea is the strongest CO2 sink in the Arctic region, yet estimates of the air-sea CO2 flux in this area show a large span reflecting uncertainty as well as significant variability both seasonally and regionally. Here we use a previously unpublished data set of seawater CO2 fugacity (fCO2), and map these data over the western Barents Sea through multivariable linear regressions with SeaWiFS/MODIS remote sensing and TOPAZ model data fields. We find that two algorithms are necessary in order to cover the full seasonal cycle, mainly because not all proxy variables are available for the entire year, and because variability in fCO2 is driven by different mechanisms in summer and winter. A comprehensive skill assessment indicates that there is a good overall correspondence between observations and predictions. The algorithms are also validated using two independent data sets, with good results. The gridded fCO2 fields reveal tight links between water mass distribution and fCO2 in all months, and particularly in winter. The seasonal cycle show peaks in the total air-sea CO2 influx in May and September, caused by respectively biological drawdown of CO2 and low sea ice concentration leaving a large open water area. For 2007 the annual average air-sea CO2 flux is - 48 ± 5 gC m- 2, which is comparable to previous estimates.

  16. Dissolved methane concentration profiles and air-sea fluxes from 41°S to 27°N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Cheryl A.; Jeffrey, Wade H.

    2002-07-01

    Water column samples from a transect cruise from southern Chile through the Panama Canal to the Gulf of Mexico were used to determine dissolved methane depth profiles and air-sea methane fluxes. In the Gulf of Mexico, surface concentrations were approximately 40% supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere, whereas near the equator and in the Peru upwelling region, 10-20% supersaturation generally occurred. These saturation ratios translate into an average flux of methane from the sea surface to the atmosphere of 0.38 μmol m-2 d-1. In addition, water column profiles of dissolved methane indicate that subsurface maxima in dissolved methane concentrations are a consistent feature of the open ocean, except near the equator. At the equator, the subsurface peak at the base of the mixed layer may be bowed down by the Equatorial Undercurrent. The highest methane concentration (12 nM) was observed in the Peru upwelling region.

  17. Air-gap gating of MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tambo, T.; Falson, J. Kozuka, Y.; Maryenko, D.; Tsukazaki, A.; Kawasaki, M.

    2014-08-28

    The adaptation of “air-gap” dielectric based field-effect transistor technology to controlling the MgZnO/ZnO heterointerface confined two-dimensional electron system (2DES) is reported. We find it possible to tune the charge density of the 2DES via a gate electrode spatially separated from the heterostructure surface by a distance of 5 μm. Under static gating, the observation of the quantum Hall effect suggests that the charge carrier density remains homogeneous, with the 2DES in the 3 mm square sample the sole conductor. The availability of this technology enables the exploration of the charge carrier density degree of freedom in the pristine sample limit.

  18. Air-water fluxes of N₂O and CH₄ during microalgae (Staurosira sp.) cultivation in an open raceway pond.

    PubMed

    Ferrón, Sara; Ho, David T; Johnson, Zackary I; Huntley, Mark E

    2012-10-02

    The industrial-scale production of biofuels from cultivated microalgae has gained considerable interest in the last several decades. While the climate benefits of microalgae cultivation that result from the capture of atmospheric CO(2) are known, the counteracting effect from the potential emission of other greenhouse gases has not been well quantified. Here, we report the results of a study conducted at an industrial pilot facility in Hawaii to determine the air-water fluxes of N(2)O and CH(4) from open raceway ponds used to grow the marine diatom Staurosira sp. as a feedstock for biofuel. Dissolved O(2), CH(4), and N(2)O concentrations were measured over a 24 h cycle. During this time, four SF(6) tracer release experiments were conducted to quantify gas transfer velocities in the ponds, and these were then used to calculate air-water fluxes. Our results show that pond waters were consistently supersaturated with CH(4) (up to 725%) resulting in an average emission of 19.9 ± 5.6 μmol CH(4) m(-2) d(-1). Upon NO(3)(-) depletion, the pond shifted from being a source to being a sink of N(2)O, with an overall net uptake during the experimental period of 3.4 ± 3.5 μmol N(2)O m(-2) d(-1). The air-water fluxes of N(2)O and CH(4) expressed as CO(2) equivalents of global warming potential were 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the overall CO(2) uptake by the microalgae.

  19. Assessing the potential for dimethylsulfide enrichment at the sea surface and its influence on air-sea flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Carolyn F.; Harvey, Mike J.; Smith, Murray J.; Bell, Thomas G.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Marriner, Andrew S.; McGregor, John A.; Law, Cliff S.

    2016-09-01

    The flux of dimethylsulfide (DMS) to the atmosphere is generally inferred using water sampled at or below 2 m depth, thereby excluding any concentration anomalies at the air-sea interface. Two independent techniques were used to assess the potential for near-surface DMS enrichment to influence DMS emissions and also identify the factors influencing enrichment. DMS measurements in productive frontal waters over the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand, did not identify any significant gradients between 0.01 and 6 m in sub-surface seawater, whereas DMS enrichment in the sea-surface microlayer was variable, with a mean enrichment factor (EF; the concentration ratio between DMS in the sea-surface microlayer and in sub-surface water) of 1.7. Physical and biological factors influenced sea-surface microlayer DMS concentration, with high enrichment (EF > 1.3) only recorded in a dinoflagellate-dominated bloom, and associated with low to medium wind speeds and near-surface temperature gradients. On occasion, high DMS enrichment preceded periods when the air-sea DMS flux, measured by eddy covariance, exceeded the flux calculated using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coupled-Ocean Atmospheric Response Experiment (COARE) parameterized gas transfer velocities and measured sub-surface seawater DMS concentrations. The results of these two independent approaches suggest that air-sea emissions may be influenced by near-surface DMS production under certain conditions, and highlight the need for further study to constrain the magnitude and mechanisms of DMS production in the sea-surface microlayer.

  20. Resistance modulation in VO2 nanowires induced by an electric field via air-gap gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Teruo; Chikanari, Masashi; Wei, Tingting; Tanaka, Hidekazu; The Institute of Scientific; Industrial Research Team

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) shows huge resistance change with metal-insulator transition (MIT) at around room temperature. Controlling of the MIT by applying an electric field is a topical ongoing research toward the realization of Mott transistor. In this study, we have successfully switched channel resistance of VO2 nano-wire channels by a pure electrostatic field effect using a side-gate-type field-effect transistor (SG-FET) viaair gap and found that single crystalline VO2 nanowires and the channels with narrower width enhance transport modulation rate. The rate of change in resistance ((R0-R)/R, where R0 and R is the resistance of VO2 channel with off state and on state gate voltage (VG) , respectively) was 0.42 % at VG = 30 V in in-plane poly-crystalline VO2 channels on Al2O3(0001) substrates, while the rate in single crystalline channels on TiO2 (001) substrates was 3.84 %, which was 9 times higher than that using the poly-crystalline channels. With reducing wire width from 3000 nm to 400 nm of VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrate, furthermore, resistance modulation ratio enhanced from 0.67 % to 3.84 %. This change can not be explained by a simple free-electron model. In this presentation, we will compare the electronic properties between in-plane polycrystalline VO2 on Al2O3 (0001) and single crystalline VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrates, and show experimental data in detail..

  1. Sensitivity of Global Sea-Air CO2 Flux to Gas Transfer Algorithms, Climatological Wind Speeds, and Variability of Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Charles R.; Signorini, Sergio

    2002-01-01

    Sensitivity analyses of sea-air CO2 flux to gas transfer algorithms, climatological wind speeds, sea surface temperatures (SST) and salinity (SSS) were conducted for the global oceans and selected regional domains. Large uncertainties in the global sea-air flux estimates are identified due to different gas transfer algorithms, global climatological wind speeds, and seasonal SST and SSS data. The global sea-air flux ranges from -0.57 to -2.27 Gt/yr, depending on the combination of gas transfer algorithms and global climatological wind speeds used. Different combinations of SST and SSS global fields resulted in changes as large as 35% on the oceans global sea-air flux. An error as small as plus or minus 0.2 in SSS translates into a plus or minus 43% deviation on the mean global CO2 flux. This result emphasizes the need for highly accurate satellite SSS observations for the development of remote sensing sea-air flux algorithms.

  2. A Newly Distributed Satellite-based Global Air-sea Surface Turbulent Fluxes Data Set -- GSSTF2b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shie, C.; Nelkin, E.; Ardizzone, J.; Savtchenko, A.; Chiu, L. S.; Adler, R. F.; Lin, I.; Gao, S.

    2010-12-01

    Accurate sea surface turbulent flux measurements are crucial to understanding the global water and energy cycle changes. Remote sensing is a valuable tool for global monitoring of these flux measurements. The GSSTF (Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes) algorithm was thus developed and applied to remote sensing research and applications. The recently revived and produced daily global (1ox1o) GSSTF2b (Version-2b) dataset (July 1987-December 2008) is currently under processing for an official distribution by NASA GES DISC (Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center) due by the end of this month (September, 2010). Like its predecessor product GSSTF2, GSSTF2b is expected to provide the scientific community a longer-period and useful turbulent surface flux dataset for global energy and water cycle research, as well as regional and short period data analyses. We have recently been funded by the NASA/MEaSUREs Program to resume processing of the GSSTF with an objective of continually producing an up-to-date uniform and reliable dataset of sea surface turbulent fluxes, derived from improved input remote sensing data and model reanalysis, which would continue to be useful for global energy and water flux research and applications. The daily global (1ox1o) GSSTF2b dataset has lately been produced using upgraded and improved input datasets such as the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) Version-6 (V6) product (including brightness temperature [Tb], total precipitable water [W], and wind speed [U]) and the NCEP/DOE Reanalysis-2 (R2) product (including sea skin temperature [SKT], 2-meter air temperature [T2m], and sea level pressure [SLP]). The input datasets previously used for producing the GSSTF2 product were the SSM/I Version-4 (V4) product and the NCEP Reanalysis-1 (R1) product. The newly produced GSSTF2b was found to generally agree better with available ship measurements obtained from several field experiments in 1999 than its counterpart

  3. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  4. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    PubMed

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-04-18

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  5. A Climate Data Record of Near-Surface Over-Ocean Parameters and Air-Sea Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayson, C. A.; Brown, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this climate data record, we have derived surface and near-surface parameters of wind speed, temperature, and humidity from a combination of satellite observations, with a focus on the use of these variables towards determination of the air-sea turbulent heat fluxes. The dataset is a follow-on to the CDR SeaFlux v 1 dataset, which currently covers the time period of 1988 through 2008, and the variables of sea surface temperature and 10-m temperature, wind speed, and specific humidity at a 3-hourly, 0.25º resolution over the global oceans. These products have been developed for the specific focus of accurate determination of the surface turbulent fluxes. The current dataset is brought forward to short latency (roughly three months) by adding in SSMIS data. This talk will discuss the additional issues associated with including the much-noisier SSMIS data, comparisons of uncertainties from the time period of the SSMIS as compared to the SSMI era, and an analysis of interannual variability over the time period from 1988 through 2015, including the recent ENSO variability.

  6. A comparative study on the effects of air gap wind and walking motion on the thermal properties of Arabian Thawbs and Chinese Cheongsams.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiying; Fan, Jintu; Wu, Yuenshing

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports on an experimental investigation on the effects of air gap, wind and walking motion on the thermal properties of traditional Arabian thawbs and Chinese cheongsams. Total thermal resistance (It) and vapour resistance (Re) were measured using the sweating fabric manikin - 'Walter', and the air gap volumes of the garments were determined by a 3D body scanner. The results showed the relative changes of It and Re of thawbs due to wind and walking motion are greater than those of cheongsams, which provided an explanation of why thawbs are preferred in extremely hot climate. It is further shown that thermal insulation and vapour resistance of thawbs increase with the air gap volume up to about 71,000 cm(3) and then decrease gradually. Thawbs with higher air permeability have significantly lower evaporative resistance particularly under windy conditions demonstrating the advantage of air permeable fabrics in body cooling in hot environments. Practitioner Summary: This paper aims to better understand the thermal insulation and vapour resistance of traditional Arabian thawbs and Chinese cheongsams, and the relationship between the thermal properties and their fit and design. The results of this study provide a scientific basis for designing ethnic clothing used in hot environments.

  7. Strong coupling in non-polar GaN/AlGaN microcavities with air-gap/III-nitride distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Renchun; Arita, Munetaka; Kako, Satoshi; Kamide, Kenji; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-01

    Strong coupling between excitons and photons is experimentally demonstrated in m-plane GaN/AlGaN microcavities (MCs) with air/AlGaN distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) at room temperature. Strong coupling is confirmed by momentum space spectroscopy, and a Rabi splitting (Ω) of 84 meV is estimated. A Rabi splitting of 84 meV is the largest value reported in a III-nitride DBR MC to date and is mainly attributed to the shortened effective cavity length resulting from the high index contrast in the air-gap DBRs used here. These results show that III-nitride air-gap DBR MCs have a high potential for realizing high Ω / κ systems (where κ is the cavity loss).

  8. Distribution and production of reactive mercury and dissolved gaseous mercury in surface waters and water/air mercury flux in reservoirs on Wujiang River, Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xuewu; Feng, Xinbin; Guo, Yanna; Meng, Bo; Yin, Runsheng; Yao, Heng

    2013-05-01

    Transformation and distribution of mercury (Hg) species play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of mercury in aquatic systems. Measurements of water/air exchange fluxes of Hg, reactive mercury (RHg), and dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) concentrations were conducted at 14 sites in five reservoirs on the Wujiang River, Guizhou, Southwest China. Clear spatial and temporal variations in Hg fluxes, RHg, and DGM concentrations were observed in the study area. Hg fluxes and RHg concentrations exhibited a consistent diurnal variation in the study area, with maximum fluxes and concentrations during daytime. A typical diurnal trend of DGM with elevated concentration at night was observed in a eutrophic reservoir with elevated bacteria abundance, suggesting a bacteria-induced production of DGM in this reservoir. For other reservoirs, a combination of sunlight-stimulated production and loss via photo-induced oxidation and evaporation regulated the diurnal trends of DGM. Seasonal variations with elevated Hg fluxes and RHg concentrations in warm season were noticeable in the study area, which highlighted the combined effect of interrelationships between Hg species in water and environmental parameters. Hg fluxes exhibited much more significant correlations with RHg and THg concentrations and air temperature compared to DGM concentrations and solar radiation. The measured fluxes were significantly higher than those simulated using the water/air thin film Hg0 gradient model. Aside from the potential limitations of dynamic flux chamber method, this may also suggest the thin film gas exchange model is not capable of predicting water/air Hg flux under low wind speed conditions. Additionally, it is speculated that DGM concentrations might vary significantly in surface waters with depth, and measurements of DGM at a depth of 2-4 cm below the water surface probably underestimated the DGM concentration that should be taken into account in simulations of water/air flux using

  9. Spectrally Resolved Flux Derived from Collocated AIRS and CERES Observations and its Application in Model Validation. Part I; Clear-Sky Over the Tropic Oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Xianglei; Yang, Wenze; Loeb, Norman G.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2008-01-01

    Spectrally resolved outgoing IR flux, the integrand of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), has its unique value in evaluating model simulations. Here we describe an algorithm of deriving such clear-sky outgoing spectral flux through the whole IR region from the collocated Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and the Clouds & the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) measurements over the tropical oceans. Based on the scene types and corresponding angular distribution models (ADMs) used in the CERES Single Satellite Footprint (SSF) dataset, spectrally-dependent ADMs are developed and used to estimate the spectral flux at each AIRS channel. A multivariate linear prediction scheme is then used to estimate spectral fluxes at frequencies not covered by the AIRS instrument. The whole algorithm is validated using synthetic spectra as well as the CERES OLR measurements. Using the GFDL AM2 model simulation as a case study, the application of the derived clear-sky outgoing spectral flux in model evaluation is illustrated. By comparing the observed and simulated spectral flux in 2004, compensating errors in the simulated OLR from different absorption bands can be revealed, so does the errors from frequencies within a given absorption band. Discrepancies between the simulated and observed spatial distributions and seasonal evolutions of the spectral fluxes at different spectral ranges are further discussed. The methodology described in this study can be applied to other surface types as well as cloudy-sky observations and corresponding model evaluations.

  10. The health impacts of exposure to indoor air pollution from solid fuels in developing countries: knowledge, gaps, and data needs.

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati, Majid; Kammen, Daniel M

    2002-01-01

    Globally, almost 3 billion people rely on biomass (wood, charcoal, crop residues, and dung) and coal as their primary source of domestic energy. Exposure to indoor air pollution (IAP) from the combustion of solid fuels is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the relationship between IAP exposure and disease and on interventions for reducing exposure and disease. We take an environmental health perspective and consider the details of both exposure and health effects that are needed for successful intervention strategies. We also identify knowledge gaps and detailed research questions that are essential in successful design and dissemination of preventive measures and policies. In addition to specific research recommendations, we conclude that given the interaction of housing, household energy, and day-to-day household activities in determining exposure to indoor smoke, research and development of effective interventions can benefit tremendously from integration of methods and analysis tools from a range of disciplines in the physical, social, and health sciences. PMID:12417475

  11. Temperature dependence of beat-length and confinement loss in an air-core photonic band-gap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Hong, Yong; Liu, Pan; Yang, Hanrui; Ling, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of polarization-maintaining (PM) property and loss in a highly-birefringent air-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is investigated. The effects of temperature variation on the effective index, beat-length and confinement loss are studied numerically by using the full-vector finite element method (FEM). It is found that, the PM property of this PBF is insensitive to the temperature, and the temperature-dependent beat-length coefficient can be as low as 2.86×10-8 m/°C, which is typically 200 times less than those of conventional panda fibers, the PBF has a stable confinement loss of 0.01 dB/m over the temperature range of -30 to 20 °C for the slow axis at the wavelength of 1.55 μm. The PBF with ultra-low temperature-dependent PM property and low loss can reduce the thermally induced polarization instability apparently in interferometric applications such as resonant fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG), optical fiber sensors, and so on.

  12. Indium phosphide all air-gap Fabry-Pérot filters for near-infrared spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, A.; Butt, M. A.; Fomchenkov, S. A.; Khonina, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    Food quality can be characterized by noninvasive techniques such as spectroscopy in the Near Infrared wavelength range. For example, 930 -1450 nm wavelength range can be used to detect diseases and differentiate between meat samples. Miniaturization of such NIR spectrometers is useful for quick and mobile characterization of food samples. Spectrometers can be miniaturized, without compromising the spectral resolution, using Fabry-Pérot (FP) filters consisting of two highly reflecting mirrors with a central cavity in between. The most commonly used mirrors in the design of FP filters are Distributed Bragg Reflections (DBRs) consisting of alternating high and low refractive index material pairs, due to their high reflectivity compared to metal mirrors. However, DBRs have high reflectivity for a selected range of wavelengths known as the stopband of the DBR. This range is usually much smaller than the sensitivity range of the spectrometer detector. Therefore, a bandpass filter is usually required to restrict wavelengths outside the stopband of the FP DBRs. Such bandpass filters are difficult to design and implement. Alternatively, high index contrast materials must be can be used to broaden the stopband width of the FP DBRs. In this work, Indium phosphide all air-gap filters are proposed in conjunction with InGaAs based detectors. The designed filter has a wide stopband covering the entire InGaAs detector sensitivity range. The filter can be tuned in the 950-1450 nm with single mode operation. The designed filter can hence be used for noninvasive meat quality control.

  13. "Advances in Coupled Air Quality, Farm Management and Biogeochemistry to address bidirectional ammonia flux"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A cropland farm management modeling system for regional air quality and field-scale applications of bi-directional ammonia exchange was presented at ITM XXI. The goal of this research is to improve estimates of nitrogen deposition to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and ambien...

  14. Modeling of the anthropogenic heat flux and its effect on air quality over the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, M.; Liao, J.; Wang, T.; Zhu, K.; Zhuang, B.; Han, Y.; Li, M.; Li, S.

    2015-11-01

    Anthropogenic heat (AH) emissions from human activities caused by urbanization can affect the city environment. Based on the energy consumption and the gridded demographic data, the spatial distribution of AH emission over the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region is estimated. Meanwhile, a new method for the AH parameterization is developed in the WRF/Chem model, which incorporates the gridded AH emission data with the seasonal and the diurnal variations into the simulations. By running this upgraded WRF/Chem for two typical months in 2010, the impacts of AH on the meteorology and air quality over the YRD region are studied. The results show that the AH fluxes over YRD have been growing in recent decades. In 2010, the annual mean values of AH over Shanghai, Jiangsu and Zhejiang are 14.46, 2.61 and 1.63 W m-2 respectively, with the high values of 113.5 W m-2 occurring in the urban areas of Shanghai. These AH emissions can significantly change the urban heat island and urban-breeze circulations in the cities of the YRD region. In Shanghai, 2 m air temperature increases by 1.6 °C in January and 1.4 °C in July, the planetary boundary layer height rises up by 140 m in January and 160 m in July, and 10 m wind speed is enhanced by 0.7 m s-1 in January and 0.5 m s-1 in July, with higher increment at night. And the enhanced vertical movement can transport more moisture to higher levels, which causes the decrease of water vapor at the ground level and the increase in the upper PBL, and thereby induces the accumulative precipitation to increase by 15-30 % over the megacities in July. The adding AH can impact the spatial and vertical distributions of the simulated pollutants as well. The concentrations of primary air pollutants decrease near surface and increase at the upper levels, due mainly to the increases of PBLH, surface wind speed and upward air vertical movement. But surface O3 concentrations increase in the urban areas, with maximum changes of 2.5 ppb in January and 4

  15. Impact of Air Pollution on Mineral Aerosol Deposition, Soluble Fe Flux and Ocean Biogeochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, H.

    2006-12-01

    We find that a two-step mechanism (sulfate and nitrate coating followed by hematite dissolution) is necessary to reproduce observations of mineral aerosol iron solubility that range from less than 1% over desert source regions to frequently more than 10% in the remote Pacific and Atlantic. This mechanism was implemented in a global atmospheric model of dust entrainment, transport, dissolution, and deposition that simulates a realistic distribution of mineral aerosol. Model simulations with pre-industrial and present levels of pollution are presented. Analysis shows that, while atmospheric pollution results in a slight decrease in mineral aerosol lifetime and lower dust concentrations over the remote oceans, it also appreciably increases the rate of hematite dissolution in the dust that remains airborne and results in a significant increase in the percent solubility of deposited iron. The net result of anthropogenic emissions of SO2 and NOx is increased oceanic deposition of soluble iron, particularly to the Northern Hemisphere oceans. These new soluble iron deposition fields are then used as input to an ocean biogeochemistry model. We first compare results from two complex ocean biogeochemistry model simulations using: 1. Fe fluxes based on previous global model approaches of constant solubility; 2. Fe fluxes of variable iron solubility from this study. We then examine the implications of the pollution driven increases in iron deposition to ocean ecosystems and to iron cycling in the surface ocean, particularly in the Subarctic and Equatorial Pacific where primary productivity is known to be stressed by low iron availability.

  16. Air-sea fluxes of CO2 and CH4 from the Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory on the south-west coast of the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingxi; Bell, Thomas G.; Hopkins, Frances E.; Kitidis, Vassilis; Cazenave, Pierre W.; Nightingale, Philip D.; Yelland, Margaret J.; Pascal, Robin W.; Prytherch, John; Brooks, Ian M.; Smyth, Timothy J.

    2016-05-01

    We present air-sea fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), momentum, and sensible heat measured by the eddy covariance method from the recently established Penlee Point Atmospheric Observatory (PPAO) on the south-west coast of the United Kingdom. Measurements from the south-westerly direction (open water sector) were made at three different sampling heights (approximately 15, 18, and 27 m above mean sea level, a.m.s.l.), each from a different period during 2014-2015. At sampling heights ≥ 18 m a.m.s.l., measured fluxes of momentum and sensible heat demonstrate reasonable ( ≤ ±20 % in the mean) agreement with transfer rates over the open ocean. This confirms the suitability of PPAO for air-sea exchange measurements in shelf regions. Covariance air-sea CO2 fluxes demonstrate high temporal variability. Air-to-sea transport of CO2 declined from spring to summer in both years, coinciding with the breakdown of the spring phytoplankton bloom. We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first successful eddy covariance measurements of CH4 emissions from a marine environment. Higher sea-to-air CH4 fluxes were observed during rising tides (20 ± 3; 38 ± 3; 29 ± 6 µmole m-2 d-1 at 15, 18, 27 m a.m.s.l.) than during falling tides (14 ± 2; 22 ± 2; 21 ± 5 µmole m-2 d-1), consistent with an elevated CH4 source from an estuarine outflow driven by local tidal circulation. These fluxes are a few times higher than the predicted CH4 emissions over the open ocean and are significantly lower than estimates from other aquatic CH4 hotspots (e.g. polar regions, freshwater). Finally, we found the detection limit of the air-sea CH4 flux by eddy covariance to be 20 µmole m-2 d-1 over hourly timescales (4 µmole m-2 d-1 over 24 h).

  17. Entrainment Heat Flux Computed with Lidar and Wavelet Technique in Buenos Aires During Last Chaitén Volcano Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawelko, Ezequiel Eduardo; Salvador, Jacobo Omar; Ristori, Pablo Roberto; Pallotta, Juan Vicente; Otero, Lidia Ana; Quel, Eduardo Jaime

    2016-06-01

    At Lidar Division of CEILAP (CITEDEF-CONICET) a multiwavelength Raman-Rayleigh lidar optimized to measure the atmospheric boundary layer is being operated. This instrument is used for monitoring important aerosol intrusion events in Buenos Aires, such as the arrival of volcanic ashes from the Chaitén volcano eruption on May 2008. That was the first monitoring of volcanic ash with lidar in Argentina. In this event several volcanic ash plumes with high aerosol optical thickness were detected in the free atmosphere, affecting the visibility, surface radiation and therefore, the ABL evolution. In this work, the impact of ashes in entrainment flux ratio is studied. This parameter is obtained from the atmospheric boundary layer height and entrainment zone thickness using algorithms based on covariance wavelet transform.

  18. Evaluation of Trichloroethylene vapour fluxes using measurements at the soil-air interface and in the atmosphere close to the soil surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotel, Solenn; Nagel, Vincent; Schäfer, Gerhard; Marzougui, Salsabil; Razakarisoa, Olivier; Millet, Maurice

    2013-04-01

    Industrialization during the 19th and 20th century led to the use of chemical products such as chlorinated solvents, e.g., trichloroethylene (TCE). At locations where volatile organic compounds were accidentally spilled on the soil during transport or leaked from their storage places, they could have migrated vertically through the unsaturated zone towards the underlying groundwater. As a result of their high volatility a large vapour plume is consequently formed. Understanding when, at which concentrations and how long, these pollutants will be present in soil, groundwater, atmosphere or indoor air, still remains a challenge up to date. This study was conducted as part of a broader experiment of TCE multiphase mass transfer in a large (25m×12m×3m) well-instrumented artificial basin. TCE was injected as liquid phase in the vadose zone and experiments were conducted during several months. Firstly, TCE vapour fluxes were experimentally determined in two different ways: (a) direct measurements at the soil-air interface using a flux chamber and (b) evaluations based on measurements of TCE concentrations in the air above the soil surface using a modular experimental flume (5m×1m×1m) with a fixed air flow. Secondly, numerical simulations were conducted to analyse the differences between these two types of fluxes. Several positions of the flume on the soil surface were tested. Based on the TCE concentrations measured in the air, vapour fluxes were determined with the aerodynamic method using the modified Thornthwaite-Holzmann equation. It assumes that the concentrations and velocities are temporally and spatially constant in horizontal planes and requires data on the gradients of concentration, horizontal wind velocity and temperature. TCE vapour fluxes measured at the soil-air interface decrease with distance from the source zone. However, this decrease was either high, at the first stage of experiment (120μg/(m2s) near the source zone compared to 1,1μg/(m2s) 2m

  19. Air-sea fluxes and satellite-based estimation of water masses formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabia, Roberto; Klockmann, Marlene; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Recent work linking satellite-based measurements of sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) with traditional physical oceanography has demonstrated the capability of generating routinely satellite-derived surface T-S diagrams [1] and analyze the distribution/dynamics of SSS and its relative surface density with respect to in-situ measurements. Even more recently [2,3], this framework has been extended by exploiting these T-S diagrams as a diagnostic tool to derive water masses formation rates and areas. A water mass describes a water body with physical properties distinct from the surrounding water, formed at the ocean surface under specific conditions which determine its temperature and salinity. The SST and SSS (and thus also density) at the ocean surface are largely determined by fluxes of heat and freshwater. The surface density flux is a function of the latter two and describes the change of the density of seawater at the surface. To obtain observations of water mass formation is of great interest, since they serve as indirect observations of the thermo-haline circulation. The SSS data which has become available through the SMOS [4] and Aquarius [5] satellite missions will provide the possibility of studying also the effect of temporally-varying SSS fields on water mass formation. In the present study, the formation of water masses as a function of SST and SSS is derived from the surface density flux by integrating the latter over a specific area and time period in bins of SST and SSS and then taking the derivative of the total density flux with respect to density. This study presents a test case using SMOS SSS, OSTIA SST, as well as Argo ISAS SST and SSS for comparison, heat fluxes from the NOCS Surface Flux Data Set v2.0, OAFlux evaporation and CMORPH precipitation. The study area, initially referred to the North Atlantic, is extended over two additional ocean basins and the study period covers the 2011-2012 timeframe. Yearly, seasonal

  20. Interaction between isoprene and ozone fluxes in a poplar plantation and its impact on air quality at the European level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenone, Terenzio; Hendriks, Carlijn; Brilli, Federico; Fransen, Erik; Gioli, Beniamio; Portillo-Estrada, Miguel; Schaap, Martijn; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-09-01

    The emission of isoprene and other biogenic volatile organic compounds from vegetation plays an important role in tropospheric ozone (O3) formation. The potentially large expansion of isoprene emitting species (e.g., poplars) for bioenergy production might, therefore, impact tropospheric O3 formation. Using the eddy covariance technique we have simultaneously measured fluxes isoprene, O3 and of CO2 from a poplar (Populus) plantation grown for bioenergy production. We used the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS to scale-up the isoprene emissions associated with the existing poplar plantations in Europe, and we assessed the impact of isoprene fluxes on ground level O3 concentrations. Our findings suggest that isoprene emissions from existing poplar-for-bioenergy plantations do not significantly affect the ground level of O3 concentration. Indeed the overall land in Europe covered with poplar plantations has not significantly changed over the last two decades despite policy incentives to produce bioenergy crops. The current surface area of isoprene emitting poplars-for-bioenergy remains too limited to significantly enhance O3 concentrations and thus to be considered a potential threat for air quality and human health.

  1. Interaction between isoprene and ozone fluxes in a poplar plantation and its impact on air quality at the European level

    PubMed Central

    Zenone, Terenzio; Hendriks, Carlijn; Brilli, Federico; Fransen, Erik; Gioli, Beniamio; Portillo-Estrada, Miguel; Schaap, Martijn; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-01-01

    The emission of isoprene and other biogenic volatile organic compounds from vegetation plays an important role in tropospheric ozone (O3) formation. The potentially large expansion of isoprene emitting species (e.g., poplars) for bioenergy production might, therefore, impact tropospheric O3 formation. Using the eddy covariance technique we have simultaneously measured fluxes isoprene, O3 and of CO2 from a poplar (Populus) plantation grown for bioenergy production. We used the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS to scale-up the isoprene emissions associated with the existing poplar plantations in Europe, and we assessed the impact of isoprene fluxes on ground level O3 concentrations. Our findings suggest that isoprene emissions from existing poplar-for-bioenergy plantations do not significantly affect the ground level of O3 concentration. Indeed the overall land in Europe covered with poplar plantations has not significantly changed over the last two decades despite policy incentives to produce bioenergy crops. The current surface area of isoprene emitting poplars-for-bioenergy remains too limited to significantly enhance O3 concentrations and thus to be considered a potential threat for air quality and human health. PMID:27615148

  2. Predicting the Turbulent Air-Sea Surface Fluxes, Including Spray Effects, from Weak to Strong Winds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-30

    from Moon et al. (2007) and Mueller and Veron (2009) are not much different from our main straight-line result (6) for UN10 above 20 m/s...model the air-sea drag as a consequence of just wind-wave coupling. That is, Moon et al. (2007) and Mueller and Veron (2009) modeled the surface stress... Veron evidently realized that they were predicting u* to be a linear function of UN10 in high winds.) In other words, exotic processes like sea

  3. Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Childhood Asthma: Recent Advances and Remaining Gaps in the Exposure Assessment Methods.

    PubMed

    Khreis, Haneen; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J

    2017-03-17

    Background: Current levels of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) are associated with the development of childhood asthma, although some inconsistencies and heterogeneity remain. An important part of the uncertainty in studies of TRAP-associated asthma originates from uncertainties in the TRAP exposure assessment and assignment methods. In this work, we aim to systematically review the exposure assessment methods used in the epidemiology of TRAP and childhood asthma, highlight recent advances, remaining research gaps and make suggestions for further research. Methods: We systematically reviewed epidemiological studies published up until 8 September 2016 and available in Embase, Ovid MEDLINE (R), and "Transport database". We included studies which examined the association between children's exposure to TRAP metrics and their risk of "asthma" incidence or lifetime prevalence, from birth to the age of 18 years old. Results: We found 42 studies which examined the associations between TRAP and subsequent childhood asthma incidence or lifetime prevalence, published since 1999. Land-use regression modelling was the most commonly used method and nitrogen dioxide (NO₂) was the most commonly used pollutant in the exposure assessments. Most studies estimated TRAP exposure at the residential address and only a few considered the participants' mobility. TRAP exposure was mostly assessed at the birth year and only a few studies considered different and/or multiple exposure time windows. We recommend that further work is needed including e.g., the use of new exposure metrics such as the composition of particulate matter, oxidative potential and ultra-fine particles, improved modelling e.g., by combining different exposure assessment models, including mobility of the participants, and systematically investigating different exposure time windows. Conclusions: Although our previous meta-analysis found statistically significant associations for various TRAP exposures and

  4. Traffic-Related Air Pollution and Childhood Asthma: Recent Advances and Remaining Gaps in the Exposure Assessment Methods

    PubMed Central

    Khreis, Haneen; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Current levels of traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) are associated with the development of childhood asthma, although some inconsistencies and heterogeneity remain. An important part of the uncertainty in studies of TRAP-associated asthma originates from uncertainties in the TRAP exposure assessment and assignment methods. In this work, we aim to systematically review the exposure assessment methods used in the epidemiology of TRAP and childhood asthma, highlight recent advances, remaining research gaps and make suggestions for further research. Methods: We systematically reviewed epidemiological studies published up until 8 September 2016 and available in Embase, Ovid MEDLINE (R), and “Transport database”. We included studies which examined the association between children’s exposure to TRAP metrics and their risk of “asthma” incidence or lifetime prevalence, from birth to the age of 18 years old. Results: We found 42 studies which examined the associations between TRAP and subsequent childhood asthma incidence or lifetime prevalence, published since 1999. Land-use regression modelling was the most commonly used method and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was the most commonly used pollutant in the exposure assessments. Most studies estimated TRAP exposure at the residential address and only a few considered the participants’ mobility. TRAP exposure was mostly assessed at the birth year and only a few studies considered different and/or multiple exposure time windows. We recommend that further work is needed including e.g., the use of new exposure metrics such as the composition of particulate matter, oxidative potential and ultra-fine particles, improved modelling e.g., by combining different exposure assessment models, including mobility of the participants, and systematically investigating different exposure time windows. Conclusions: Although our previous meta-analysis found statistically significant associations for various TRAP exposures and

  5. Resolving the abundance and air-sea fluxes of airborne microorganisms in the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Mayol, Eva; Jiménez, María A; Herndl, Gerhard J; Duarte, Carlos M; Arrieta, Jesús M

    2014-01-01

    Airborne transport of microbes may play a central role in microbial dispersal, the maintenance of diversity in aquatic systems and in meteorological processes such as cloud formation. Yet, there is almost no information about the abundance and fate of microbes over the oceans, which cover >70% of the Earth's surface and are the likely source and final destination of a large fraction of airborne microbes. We measured the abundance of microbes in the lower atmosphere over a transect covering 17° of latitude in the North Atlantic Ocean and derived estimates of air-sea exchange of microorganisms from meteorological data. The estimated load of microorganisms in the atmospheric boundary layer ranged between 6 × 10(4) and 1.6 × 10(7) microbes per m(2) of ocean, indicating a very dynamic air-sea exchange with millions of microbes leaving and entering the ocean per m(2) every day. Our results show that about 10% of the microbes detected in the boundary layer were still airborne 4 days later and that they could travel up to 11,000 km before they entered the ocean again. The size of the microbial pool hovering over the North Atlantic indicates that it could play a central role in the maintenance of microbial diversity in the surface ocean and contribute significantly to atmospheric processes.

  6. Experimental method to reveal the effect of rotor magnet size and air gap on artificial heart driving motor torque and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Yuan, H Y; Ru, W M; Zeng, P

    2002-01-01

    To investigate experimentally the effect of rotor magnet design on artificial heart driving motor performance, seven rotors with different magnet lengths or thicknesses, as well as different peripheral angles, were manufactured and tested in the same motor stator with different rotating speeds. The input power (voltage and current) and output torque were measured and the motor efficiency was computed. The results demonstrated that the reduction of rotor magnet size and the enlargement of the air gap between the rotor magnets and the stator coil core have no significant effect on motor efficiency, but will reduce the torque value on which the motor achieves the highest efficiency; it could be remedied however by increasing the rotating speed, because the torque at the high efficiency point will increase along with the rotating speed. These results may provide a basis for developing small rotor magnets, large air gap and high efficiency motors for driving an artificial heart pump.

  7. Environmental controls of energy and trace gas exchanges at the water-air interface: Global synthesis of eddy fluxes over inland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, M.; Desai, A. R.; Bohrer, G.; Blanken, P.; Deshmukh, C. S.; Franz, D.; Guérin, F.; Heiskanen, J. J.; Jammet, M.; Jonsson, A.; Karlsson, J.; Koebsch, F.; Liu, H.; Lohila, A.; Lundin, E.; Mammarella, I.; Rutgersson, A.; Sachs, T.; Serça, D.; Spence, C.; Strachan, I. B.; Vesala, T.; Weyhenmeyer, G. A.; Xiao, W.; Glatzel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Current estimates of energy and trace gases from inland waters often rely on limited point in time measurements, therefore, short time variation of fluxes and mechanism controlling the fluxes are particularly understudied. Here we present the results of a global synthesis of eddy fluxes from 29 globally distributed aquatic sites. The objective of this study was to quantify the magnitudes and variation of energy and CO2 fluxes and investigate their responses to environmental controls across half-hourly to monthly time scales. The coupled observations of in-lake physical and biogeochemical parameters with meteorology and eddy covariance fluxes were analyzed using decomposed correlation and wavelength coherence analysis to quantify the critical time scales that are associated with variation of energy and CO2 fluxes, and related drivers. The rates of fluxes were synthesized according to time scale, climate, and water body type. The diurnal cycles of both energy and CO2 fluxes variation were attributed to wind speed, solar radiation cycle, vapor pressure deficit, temperature gradients at water-air interface, and metabolism. Weekly time scales of variations were correlated with synoptic weather patterns. The monthly sums of energy fluxes showed a latitudinal gradient with the maxima observed in mid-latitude waterbodies. We found an inconsistent latitudinal pattern of monthly CO2 fluxes. Instead, we found correlation with proxies of lake productivity suggesting lake-specific characteristics play an important role in controlling flux magnitudes and variation. The results presented here highlight the importance of quantifying short-term variation of energy and trace gases fluxes towards improving the understanding of the water and carbon cycles and linked ecological processes.

  8. A correlation to predict the heat flux on the air-side of a vapor chamber with overturn-U flattened tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srimuang, Wasan; Limkaisang, Viroj

    2016-08-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a conventional vapor chamber (CVC) and a loop vapor chamber (LVC) are compared. The vapor chambers consisted of a stainless steel box with different covers. The results indicated that the heat flux and convective heat transfer coefficient of the air-side of LVC is higher than CVC. An empirical correlation was developed to predict the convective heat transfer coefficient of the air-side of the LVC.

  9. CO2 air-sea fluxes across the Portuguese estuaries Tagus and Sado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. P.; Cabeçadas, G.; Nogueira, M.

    2009-04-01

    Generally, estuaries and proximal shelves under the direct influence of river runoff and large inputs of organic matter are mostly heterotrophic and, therefore, act as a carbon source. In this context the CO2 dynamics in Tagus and Sado estuaries (SW Portugal) was studied under two different climate and hydrological situations. These moderately productive mesotidal coastal-plain lagoon-type estuaries, localised in the center of Portugal and distant 30-40 km apart, present quite different freshwater inflows, surface areas and water residence times. A study performed in 2001 revealed that the magnitude of CO2 fluxes in the two estuarine systems varied seasonally. CO2 emissions during the huge rainfall winter were similar in both estuaries, reaching a mean value of ~50 mmol m-2 d-1, while in spring emissions from Sado were ~6 times higher then Tagus ones, attaining a mean value of 62 mmol m-2 d-1. Nevertheless, in both sampling periods, Sado estuary showed, within the upper estuary (salinity

  10. Regulation of CO2 Air Sea Fluxes by Sediments in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burt, William; Thomas, Helmuth; Hagens, Mathilde; Brenner, Heiko; Pätsch, Johannes; Clargo, Nicola; Salt, Lesley

    2016-04-01

    A multi-tracer approach is applied to assess the impact of boundary fluxes (e.g. benthic input from sediments or lateral inputs from the coastline) on the acid-base buffering capacity, and overall biogeochemistry, of the North Sea. Analyses of both basin-wide observations in the North Sea and transects through tidal basins at the North-Frisian coastline, reveal that surface distributions of the δ13C signature of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) are predominantly controlled by a balance between biological production and respiration. In particular, variability in metabolic DIC throughout stations in the well-mixed southern North Sea indicates the presence of an external carbon source, which is traced to the European continental coastline using naturally-occurring radium isotopes (224Ra and 228Ra). 228Ra is also shown to be a highly effective tracer of North Sea total alkalinity (AT) compared to the more conventional use of salinity. Coastal inputs of metabolic DIC and AT are calculated on a basin-wide scale, and ratios of these inputs suggest denitrification as a primary metabolic pathway for their formation. The AT input paralleling the metabolic DIC release prevents a significant decline in pH as compared to aerobic (i.e. unbuffered) release of metabolic DIC. Finally, long-term pH trends mimic those of riverine nitrate loading, highlighting the importance of coastal AT production via denitrification in regulating pH in the southern North Sea.

  11. Static air-gap eccentricity fault diagnosis using rotor slot harmonics in line neutral voltage of three-phase squirrel cage induction motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oumaamar, Mohamed El Kamel; Maouche, Yassine; Boucherma, Mohamed; Khezzar, Abdelmalek

    2017-02-01

    The mixed eccentricity fault detection in a squirrel cage induction motor has been thoroughly investigated. However, a few papers have been related to pure static eccentricity fault and the authors focused on the RSH harmonics presented in stator current. The main objective of this paper is to present an alternative method based on the analysis of line neutral voltage taking place between the supply and the stator neutrals in order to detect air-gap static eccentricity, and to highlight the classification of all RSH harmonics in line neutral voltage. The model of squirrel cage induction machine relies on the rotor geometry and winding layout. Such developed model is used to analyze the impact of the pure static air-gap eccentricity by predicting the related frequencies in the line neutral voltage spectrum. The results show that the line neutral voltage spectrum are more sensitive to the air-gap static eccentricity fault compared to stator current one. The theoretical analysis and simulated results are confirmed by experiments.

  12. Eddy covariance flux of sulfur dioxide to the sea surface: Air-side resistance to deposition of a highly soluble gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, J.; De Bruyn, W. J.; Miller, S. D.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    Deposition to the sea surface represents a major atmospheric removal mechanism for sulfur dioxide and many other highly soluble products of tropospheric photochemistry. Such gases include nitric acid, ammonia, organic acids, sulfur dioxide, and highly soluble organic compounds such as methanol and acetone. The deposition of highly soluble gases is controlled by turbulent and diffusive transport on the air side of the air/sea interface. In this study, air/sea fluxes of the soluble gas sulfur dioxide (SO2 ), sensible and latent heat, and momentum were measured using eddy covariance. This was a pilot study carried out in April 2014 on Scripps pier in La Jolla, California, that was designed to assess the potential for measuring SO2 fluxes over the ocean. SO2 was detected using chemical ion mass spectrometry in negative ion mode with a sensitivity of roughly 100 Hz/ppt. The ionization scheme involved addition of ozone to a dried air stream and subsequent conversion of SO2 to the SO5 - ion. The results demonstrate the feasibility of seagoing SO2 flux measurements. Such measurements can be used to constrain the depositional velocities of soluble gases and test models for air-side resistance to air/sea gas transfer.

  13. A regression approach for estimation of anthropogenic heat flux based on a bottom-up air pollutant emission database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; McKeen, Stuart A.; Sailor, David J.

    2014-10-01

    A statistical regression method is presented for estimating hourly anthropogenic heat flux (AHF) using an anthropogenic pollutant emission inventory for use in mesoscale meteorological and air-quality modeling. Based on bottom-up AHF estimated from detailed energy consumption data and anthropogenic pollutant emissions of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) in the US National Emission Inventory year 2005 (NEI-2005), a robust regression relation between the AHF and the pollutant emissions is obtained for Houston. This relation is a combination of two power functions (Y = aXb) relating CO and NOx emissions to AHF, giving a determinant coefficient (R2) of 0.72. The AHF for Houston derived from the regression relation has high temporal (R = 0.91) and spatial (R = 0.83) correlations with the bottom-up AHF. Hourly AHF for the whole US in summer is estimated by applying the regression relation to the NEI-2005 summer pollutant emissions with a high spatial resolution of 4-km. The summer daily mean AHF range 10-40 W m-2 on a 4 × 4 km2 grid scale with maximum heat fluxes of 50-140 W m-2 for major US cities. The AHFs derived from the regression relations between the bottom-up AHF and either CO or NOx emissions show a small difference of less than 5% (4.7 W m-2) in city-scale daily mean AHF, and similar R2 statistics, compared to results from their combination. Thus, emissions of either species can be used to estimate AHF in the US cities. An hourly AHF inventory at 4 × 4 km2 resolution over the entire US based on the combined regression is derived and made publicly available for use in mesoscale numerical modeling.

  14. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  15. Climate and air quality impacts of altered BVOC fluxes from land cover change in Southeast Asia 1990 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Kandice; Yue, Xu; Unger, Nadine

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale transformation of the natural rainforests of Southeast Asia in recent decades, driven primarily by logging and agroforestry activities, including rapid expansion of plantations of high-isoprene-emitting oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) trees at the expense of comparatively low-emitting natural dipterocarp rainforests, may have altered the prevailing regime of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) fluxes from this tropical region. Chemical processing of isoprene in the atmosphere impacts the magnitude and distribution of several short-lived climate forcers, including ozone and secondary organic aerosols. Consequently, modification of the fluxes of isoprene and other BVOCs from vegetation serves as a mechanism by which tropical land cover change impacts both air quality and climate. We apply satellite-derived snapshots of land cover for the period 1990 - 2010 to the NASA ModelE2-Yale Interactive Terrestrial Biosphere (ModelE2-YIBs) global carbon-chemistry-climate model to quantify the impact of Southeast Asian land cover change on atmospheric chemical composition and climate driven by changes in isoprene emission. NASA ModelE2-YIBs features a fully interactive land carbon cycle and includes a BVOC emission algorithm which energetically couples isoprene production to photosynthesis. The time-slice simulations are nudged with large-scale winds from the GMAO reanalysis dataset and are forced with monthly anthropogenic and biomass burning reactive air pollution emissions from the MACCity emissions inventory. Relative to the year 1990, regional isoprene emissions in 2010 increased by 2.6 TgC/yr from the expansion of Southeast Asian oil palm plantations and decreased by 0.7 TgC/yr from the loss of regional dipterocarp rainforest. Considering only the impact of land-cover-change-induced isoprene emission changes in Southeast Asia over this period, we calculate a spatially heterogeneous impact on regional seasonal surface-level ozone concentrations (minimum: -1

  16. Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Otaduy, P.J.

    2005-09-27

    Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of

  17. Flux Pinning and Properties of Solid-Solution (Y,Nd)1+XBa2-x Cu3O7-delta Superconductors Processed in Air and Partial Oxygen Atmospheres (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    AFRL-PR-WP-TP-2006-204 FLUX PINNING AND PROPERTIES OF SOLID - SOLUTION (Y,Nd)1+XBa2-xCu3O7-δ SUPERCONDUCTORS PROCESSED IN AIR AND PARTIAL...SUBTITLE FLUX PINNING AND PROPERTIES OF SOLID - SOLUTION (Y,Nd)i+),(Ba,_„ Cu3 07_5 SUPERCONDUCTORS PROCESSED IN AIR AND PARTIAL OXYGEN ATMOSPHERES (PREPRINT

  18. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-01-01

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m2 (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m2. PMID:27077862

  19. An Optimized Air-Core Coil Sensor with a Magnetic Flux Compensation Structure Suitable to the Helicopter TEM System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Liu, Fei; Lin, Jun; Zhu, Kaiguang; Wang, Yanzhang

    2016-04-12

    The air-core coil sensor (ACS) is widely used as a transducer to measure the variation in magnetic fields of a helicopter transient electromagnetic (TEM) system. A high periodic emitting current induces the magnetic field signal of the underground medium. However, such current also generates a high primary field signal that can affect the received signal of the ACS and even damage the receiver. To increase the dynamic range of the received signal and to protect the receiver when emitting current rises/falls, the combination of ACS with magnetic flux compensation structure (bucking coil) is necessary. Moreover, the optimized ACS, which is composed of an air-core coil and a differential pre-amplifier circuit, must be investigated to meet the requirements of the helicopter TEM system suited to rapid surveying for shallow buried metal mine in rough topography. Accordingly, two ACSs are fabricated in this study, and their performance is verified and compared inside a magnetic shielding room. Using the designed ACSs, field experiments are conducted in Baoqing County. The field experimental data show that the primary field response can be compensated when the bucking coil is placed at an appropriate point in the range of allowed shift distance beyond the center of the transmitting coil and that the damage to the receiver induced by the over-statured signal can be solved. In conclusion, a more suitable ACS is adopted and is shown to have better performance, with a mass of 2.5 kg, resultant effective area of 11.6 m² (i.e., diameter of 0.496 m), 3 dB bandwidth of 66 kHz, signal-to-noise ratio of 4 (i.e., varying magnetic field strength of 0.2 nT/s), and normalized equivalent input noise of 3.62 nV/m².

  20. Ecosystem Metabolism and Air-Water Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in High Arctic Wetland Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnherr, I.; Venkiteswaran, J.; St. Louis, V. L.; Emmerton, C.; Schiff, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Freshwater lakes and wetlands can be very productive systems on the Arctic landscape compared to terrestrial tundra ecosystems and provide valuable resources to many organisms, including waterfowl, fish and humans. Rates of ecosystem productivity dictate how much energy flows through food webs, impacting the abundance of higher-level organisms (e.g., fish), as well as the net carbon balance, which determines whether a particular ecosystem is a source or sink of carbon. Climate change is predicted to result in warmer temperatures, increased precipitation and permafrost melting in the Arctic and is already altering northern ecosystems at unprecedented rates; however, it is not known how freshwater systems are responding to these changes. To predict how freshwater systems will respond to complex environmental changes, it is necessary to understand the key processes, such as primary production and ecosystem respiration, that are driving these systems. We sampled wetland ponds (n=8) and lakes (n=2) on northern Ellesmere Island (81° N, Nunavut, Canada) during the open water season for a suite of biogeochemical parameters, including concentrations of dissolved gases (O2, CO2, CH4, N2O) as well as stable-isotope ratios of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13C-DIC), dissolved oxygen (δ18O-DO), and water (δ18O-H2O). We will present rates of primary production and ecosystem respiration, modeled from the concentration and stable isotope ratios of DIC and DO, as well as air-water gas exchange of greenhouse gases in these high Arctic ponds and lakes. Preliminary results demonstrate that ecosystem metabolism in these ponds was high enough to result in significant deviations in the isotope ratios of DIC and DO from atmospheric equilibrium conditions. In other words ecosystem rates of primary production and respiration were faster than gas exchange even in these small, shallow, well-mixed ponds. Furthermore, primary production was elevated enough at all sites except Lake Hazen, a

  1. Distribution and sea-to-air fluxes of volatile halocarbons in the Bohai Sea and North Yellow Sea during spring.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Liu, Qiu-Lin; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Yang, Gui-Peng

    2017-01-26

    Concentrations of volatile halocarbons (VHCs), such as CHBr2Cl, CHBr3, C2HCl3, and C2Cl4, in the Bohai Sea (BS) and North Yellow Sea (NYS) were measured during the spring of 2014. The VHC concentrations varied widely and decreased with distance from the coast in the investigated area, with low values observed in the open sea. Depth profiles of the VHCs were characterized by the highest concentration generally found in the upper water column. The distributions of the VHCs in the BS and NYS were clearly influenced by the combined effects of biological production, anthropogenic activities, and riverine input. The sea-to-air fluxes of CHBr2Cl, CHBr3, C2HCl3, and C2Cl4 in the study area were estimated to be 47.17, 56.63, 162.56, and 104.37nmolm(-2)d(-1), respectively, indicating that the investigated area may be a source of atmospheric CHBr2Cl, CHBr3, C2HCl3, and C2Cl4 in spring.

  2. Observations of steady flux of PeV-energy extensive air showers from Cygnus X-3 during 1984-1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonwar, S. C.; Gopalakrishnan, N. V.; Rajeev, M. R.; Sreekantan, B. V.

    1988-07-01

    Data taken with a 24-detector extensive-air-shower (EAS) array, operating at Ooty since June, 1984, have been used to search for excess of EASs of energy greater than 250 TeV from the direction of binary X-ray source Cyg X-3. The data show a time-averaged excess in the number of showers from this direction, over the background determined from other regions of the sky having the same declination. The excess is most prominent among older showers having a flatter lateral distribution. A part of this excess shows up significantly in the phase region, 0.6-0.8 in the 4.8-hr periodicity analysis. These observations correspond to an integral flux of (7.16 + or - 3.15) x 10 to the -13th/sq cm sec at energies greater than 250 TeV and of (1.04 + or - 0.44) x 10 to the -13th/sq cm sec at energies greater than 2.5 PeV. The observations confirm, for the first time, results reported by the Kiel group (Samorski and Stamm, 1983) of a directional excess from the direction of Cyg X-3, without requiring the 4.8-hr periodicity analysis as was necessary in many of the other experiments reporting positive signals. This emphasizes the advantage of good angular resolution for such studies.

  3. Using remotely sensed data from AIRS to estimate the vapor flux on the Greenland ice sheet: Comparisons with observations and a regional climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, Linette N.; Lee, Jae N.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Noël, Brice; Broeke, Michiel R.; Nolin, Anne W.

    2017-01-01

    Mass loss from the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) in recent years has been dominated by runoff from surface melt. It is currently being studied extensively, while little interest has been given to the smallest component of surface mass balance (SMB): the vapor flux. Although poorly understood, it is not negligible and could potentially play a larger role in SMB in a warming climate where temperature, relative humidity, and precipitation changes remain uncertain. Here we present an innovative approach to estimate the vapor flux using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) version 6 data and a modified vapor flux model (BMF13) over the GrIS between 2003 and 2014. One modification to the BMF13 model includes a new Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer surface aerodynamic roughness product, which likely produces more accurate estimates of the drag coefficient on the ice sheet. When comparing AIRS data with GC-Net and Programme for Monitoring of the Greenland Ice Sheet automatic weather station observations of skin temperature, near-surface air temperature, and humidity, they agree within 2 K, 2.68 K, and 0.34 g kg-1. Largest differences occur in the ablation zone where there is significant subgrid heterogeneity. Overall, the average vapor flux from the GrIS between 2003 and 2014 was found to be 14.6 ± 3.6 Gt yr-1. No statistically significant trends were found during the data record. This data set is compared to the Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO2.3) vapor flux, and BMF13 produced smaller vapor fluxes in the summer ( 0.05 Gt d-1) and slightly more deposition in the winter ( 9.4 × 10-3 Gt d-1). Annually, differences between BMF13 and RACMO2.3 were only 30 ± 15%.

  4. Nanoscale heat flux between nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Biehs, S-A; Ben-Abdallah, P; Rosa, F S S; Joulain, K; Greffet, J-J

    2011-09-12

    By combining stochastic electrodynamics and the Maxwell-Garnett description for effective media we study the radiative heat transfer between two nanoporous materials. We show that the heat flux can be significantly enhanced by air inclusions, which we explain by: (a) the presence of additional surface waves that give rise to supplementary channels for heat transfer throughout the gap, (b) an increase in the contribution given by the ordinary surface waves at resonance, (c) and the appearance of frustrated modes over a broad spectral range. We generalize the known expression for the nanoscale heat flux for anisotropic metamaterials.

  5. Accounting for observational uncertainties in the evaluation of low latitude turbulent air-sea fluxes simulated in a suite of IPSL model versions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servonnat, Jerome; Braconnot, Pascale; Gainusa-Bogdan, Alina

    2015-04-01

    Turbulent momentum and heat (sensible and latent) fluxes at the air-sea interface are key components of the whole energetic of the Earth's climate and their good representation in climate models is of prime importance. In this work, we use the methodology developed by Braconnot & Frankignoul (1993) to perform a Hotelling T2 test on spatio-temporal fields (annual cycles). This statistic provides a quantitative measure accounting for an estimate of the observational uncertainty for the evaluation of low-latitude turbulent air-sea fluxes in a suite of IPSL model versions. The spread within the observational ensemble of turbulent flux data products assembled by Gainusa-Bogdan et al (submitted) is used as an estimate of the observational uncertainty for the different turbulent fluxes. The methodology holds on a selection of a small number of dominating variability patterns (EOFs) that are common to both the model and the observations for the comparison. Consequently it focuses on the large-scale variability patterns and avoids the possibly noisy smaller scales. The results show that different versions of the IPSL couple model share common large scale model biases, but also that there the skill on sea surface temperature is not necessarily directly related to the skill in the representation of the different turbulent fluxes. Despite the large error bars on the observations the test clearly distinguish the different merits of the different model version. The analyses of the common EOF patterns and related time series provide guidance on the major differences with the observations. This work is a first attempt to use such statistic on the evaluation of the spatio-temporal variability of the turbulent fluxes, accounting for an observational uncertainty, and represents an efficient tool for systematic evaluation of simulated air-seafluxes, considering both the fluxes and the related atmospheric variables. References Braconnot, P., and C. Frankignoul (1993), Testing Model

  6. Turbulent Heat Fluxes during an Intense Cold-Air Outbreak over the Kuroshio Extension Region: Results from a High-Resolution Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-12

    agreement with AMTEX observa- tions and sensible and latent heat fluxes of 300 and 700 Wm 2, respectively, which are close to the observed values. Xue et...1,300 Wm 2, respectively. Modeling of cold-air outbreaks using a full three-dimensional coupled atmosphere–ocean model was done for the Gulf Stream for a...latent heat flux of 575 Wm 2. In this study, we present a case from 30 January through 6 February 2005 where the formation of cyclo- nes followed the

  7. SU-E-T-777: Use of Tennis Racket and Air Gap Between the Body and Carbon Fiber Couch for Skin Sparing in Radiation Therapy of Prone Breast

    SciTech Connect

    Lief, E

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To reduce the skin dose from the carbon fiber couch scatter in radiation treatment of breast cancer in the prone position. If this issue is not addressed, the prone breast touching the solid carbon fiber couch can absorb significant dose to the skin and cause the skin reaction. Methods: 1. Use of “tennis racket” instead of the solid couch. To check this hypothesis, we measured the dose at the depth of 5 mm in solid water phantom placed on the couch, using a Farmer chamber. A plan for a patient with 6MV beams, gantry angles of 113 and 286 degrees Varian scale was used. It was found that treatment with “tennis racket” instead of the solid carbon fiber couch reduces the surface dose by 5–7%, depending on the beam direction. 2. Use of the air gap between the couch and the body was analyzed using radiochromic film on the surface of the solid water phantom 10 cm thick. Initially the phantom was placed on the couch with the film sandwiched in between. Two fields at the angles of 135 and 315 degrees were used. The measurements were repeated for the air gap of 2 and 5 cm and 6 and 15 MV beams. Results: It was found that a 2-cm gap decreased the surface dose by 3% for a 6 MV beam and by 5.5% for a 15 MV beam. A 5-cm gap reduced the dose by 9% for 6 MV and 13.5% for 15 MV. Conclusion: Use of both methods (combined if possible) can significantly reduce the surface dose in radiation therapy of the prone breast and possible skin reaction. We plan to explore dependence of the dose reduction upon the angle of incidence.

  8. Modeling air/sea flux parameters in a coastal area: A comparative study of results from the TOGA COARE model and the NOAA Buoy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sopkin, Kristin; Mizak, Connie; Gilbert, Sherryl; Subramanian, Vembu; Luther, Mark; Poor, Noreen

    Because estuaries and coastal regions are particularly susceptible to nutrient over-enrichment due to their close proximity to source-rich regions, a goal of the BRACE study was to improve estimates of nitrogen air/sea transfer rates in the Tampa Bay Estuary. Our objective was to critically evaluate two air/sea gas exchange models to determine their efficacy for use in a coastal region, with the ultimate goal of improving nitrogen exchange estimates in Tampa Bay. We used meteorological data and oceanographic parameters collected hourly at an instrumented tower located in Middle Tampa Bay, Florida. The data was used to determine the friction velocity and the turbulent flux of heat and moisture across the air/sea interface and then compared with modeled parameters at the same offshore site. On average both models underpredicted sensible heat flux and there was considerable scatter in the data during stable conditions, indicating that nitrogen gas exchange rates may also be underestimated. Model improvement, however, was observed with friction velocity comparisons. Model inter-comparisons of sensible heat flux and friction velocity suggest excellent agreement between the TOGA COARE and the NOAA Buoy models, but model estimated heat transfer coefficients and latent heat fluxes did not agree as well. Based on our analysis, we conclude that both models are suitable for use in a coastal environment to estimate nitrogen air/sea gas exchange, although the NOAA Buoy model requires fewer meteorological inputs. However, if the purpose is to conduct more sophisticated microscale modeling of air/sea interactions, we recommend the TOGA COARE model.

  9. Accounting for observation uncertainties in an evaluation metric of low latitude turbulent air-sea fluxes: application to the comparison of a suite of IPSL model versions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Servonnat, Jérôme; Găinuşă-Bogdan, Alina; Braconnot, Pascale

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent momentum and heat (sensible heat and latent heat) fluxes at the air-sea interface are key components of the whole energetic of the Earth's climate. The evaluation of these fluxes in the climate models is still difficult because of the large uncertainties associated with the reference products. In this paper we present an objective metric accounting for reference uncertainties to evaluate the annual cycle of the low latitude turbulent fluxes of a suite of IPSL climate models. This metric consists in a Hotelling T 2 test between the simulated and observed field in a reduce space characterized by the dominant modes of variability that are common to both the model and the reference, taking into account the observational uncertainty. The test is thus more severe when uncertainties are small as it is the case for sea surface temperature (SST). The results of the test show that for almost all variables and all model versions the model-reference differences are not zero. It is not possible to distinguish between model versions for sensible heat and meridional wind stress, certainly due to the large observational uncertainties. All model versions share similar biases for the different variables. There is no improvement between the reference versions of the IPSL model used for CMIP3 and CMIP5. The test also reveals that the higher horizontal resolution fails to improve the representation of the turbulent surface fluxes compared to the other versions. The representation of the fluxes is further degraded in a version with improved atmospheric physics with an amplification of some of the biases in the Indian Ocean and in the intertropical convergence zone. The ranking of the model versions for the turbulent fluxes is not correlated with the ranking found for SST. This highlights that despite the fact that SST gradients are important for the large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns, other factors such as wind speed, and air-sea temperature contrast play an

  10. Introduction: Special Issue of Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health for Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Source-to-Health Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for six principal air pollutants (criteria pollutants): carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter in two size ranges [less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and less ...

  11. Intraday evaporation and heat fluxes variation at air-water interface of extremely shallow lakes in Chilean Andean Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Jaime; de la Fuente, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Salars are landscapes formed by evapo-concentration of salts that usually have extremely shallow terminal lagoons (de la Fuente & Niño, 2010). They are located in the altiplanic region of the Andes Mountains of Chile, Argentina, Bolivia and Peru, and they sustain highly vulnerable and isolated ecosystems in the Andean Desert. These ecosystems are sustained by benthic primary production, which is directly linked to mass, heat and momentum transfer between the water column and the atmosphere (de la Fuente, 2014). Despite the importance of these transport processes across the air-water interface, there are few studies describing their intraday variation and how they are influenced by the stability of the atmospheric boundary layer in the altiplano. The main objective of this work is to analyze the intraday vertical transport variation of water vapor, temperature and momentum between the atmosphere and a shallow water body on Salar del Huasco located in northern Chile (20°19'40"S, 68°51'25"W). To achieve this goal, we measured atmospheric and water variables in a campaign realized on late October 2015, using high frequency meteorological instruments (a sonic anemometer with an incorporated infrared gas analyzer, and a standard meteorological station) and water sensors. From these data, we characterize the intraday variation of water vapor, temperature and momentum fluxes, we quantify the influence of the atmospheric boundary layer stability on them, and we estimate transfer coefficients associated to latent heat, sensible heat, hydrodynamic drag and vertical transport of water vapor. As first results, we found that latent and sensible heat fluxes are highly influenced by wind speed rather buoyancy, and we can identify four intraday intervals with different thermo-hydrodynamic features: (1) cooling under stable condition with wind speed near 0 from midnight until sunrise; (2) free convection with nearly no wind speed under unstable condition from sunrise until midday

  12. Comparison of two closed-path cavity-based spectrometers for measuring air-water CO2 and CH4 fluxes by eddy covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingxi; Prytherch, John; Kozlova, Elena; Yelland, Margaret J.; Parenkat Mony, Deepulal; Bell, Thomas G.

    2016-11-01

    In recent years several commercialised closed-path cavity-based spectroscopic instruments designed for eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and water vapour (H2O) have become available. Here we compare the performance of two leading models - the Picarro G2311-f and the Los Gatos Research (LGR) Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA) at a coastal site. Both instruments can compute dry mixing ratios of CO2 and CH4 based on concurrently measured H2O, temperature, and pressure. Additionally, we used a high throughput Nafion dryer to physically remove H2O from the Picarro airstream. Observed air-sea CO2 and CH4 fluxes from these two analysers, averaging about 12 and 0.12 mmol m-2 day-1 respectively, agree within the measurement uncertainties. For the purpose of quantifying dry CO2 and CH4 fluxes downstream of a long inlet, the numerical H2O corrections appear to be reasonably effective and lead to results that are comparable to physical removal of H2O with a Nafion dryer in the mean. We estimate the high-frequency attenuation of fluxes in our closed-path set-up, which was relatively small ( ≤ 10 %) for CO2 and CH4 but very large for the more polar H2O. The Picarro showed significantly lower noise and flux detection limits than the LGR. The hourly flux detection limit for the Picarro was about 2 mmol m-2 day-1 for CO2 and 0.02 mmol m-2 day-1 for CH4. For the LGR these detection limits were about 8 and 0.05 mmol m-2 day-1. Using global maps of monthly mean air-sea CO2 flux as reference, we estimate that the Picarro and LGR can resolve hourly CO2 fluxes from roughly 40 and 4 % of the world's oceans respectively. Averaging over longer timescales would be required in regions with smaller fluxes. Hourly flux detection limits of CH4 from both instruments are generally higher than the expected emissions from the open ocean, though the signal to noise of this measurement may improve closer to the coast.

  13. Technical approach for the assessment of air emissions from municipal landfills using the US EPA flux chamber and dispersion modeling to predict off-site impact potential

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, C.E.; Wilsey, S.D.; Hasek, T. Jr.

    1998-12-31

    Municipal solid waste landfills are described as large, heterogeneous area sources with relatively high generation rates of methane and carbon dioxide and relatively low emission levels of total non-methane hydrocarbon compounds (TNMHCs) and reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) including hydrogen sulfide. Recent public awareness and enacted air regulations have generated concerns from fugitive emissions of landfill gases as a significant contribution to air pollution and the potential health effects off-site. As such, assessing impacts to local ambient air quality around a municipal landfill can be a challenge to quantify and evaluate. A technical approach has been developed and used at a large municipal landfill in the Northeast in order to assess potential impact to local air quality with particular emphasis on identifying hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) and RSCs as well as other air toxics and odor-causing compounds. The technical approach includes: Screening the landfill surface using direct-reading field analyzers based on a surface grid system; Assigning areas of similar emission potential based on screening data and engineering descriptions of the landfill (surface condition and operation); Direct emission testing using the US EPA recommended flux chamber, estimating area-specific emissions using measured flux and surface area; Predicting off-site impact using a dispersion model with area source input capability; and Collection of collaborating off-site ambient air samples during periods of significant odor events to identify compounds and their concentrations. This approach was found to be superior to other assessment approaches including use of emission factors or indirect ambient air monitoring technologies.

  14. Sea surface carbon dioxide at the Georgia time series site (2006-2007): Air-sea flux and controlling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Cai, Wei-Jun; Hu, Xinping; Sabine, Christopher; Jones, Stacy; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Jiang, Li-Qing; Reimer, Janet J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in surface seawater was continuously recorded every three hours from 18 July 2006 through 31 October 2007 using a moored autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) system deployed on the Gray's Reef buoy off the coast of Georgia, USA. Surface water pCO2 (average 373 ± 52 μatm) showed a clear seasonal pattern, undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in cold months and generally oversaturated in warm months. High temporal resolution observations revealed important events not captured in previous ship-based observations, such as sporadically occurring biological CO2 uptake during April-June 2007. In addition to a qualitative analysis of the primary drivers of pCO2 variability based on property regressions, we quantified contributions of temperature, air-sea exchange, mixing, and biological processes to monthly pCO2 variations using a 1-D mass budget model. Although temperature played a dominant role in the annual cycle of pCO2, river inputs especially in the wet season, biological respiration in peak summer, and biological production during April-June 2007 also substantially influenced seawater pCO2. Furthermore, sea surface pCO2 was higher in September-October 2007 than in September-October 2006, associated with increased river inputs in fall 2007. On an annual basis this site was a moderate atmospheric CO2 sink, and was autotrophic as revealed by monthly mean net community production (NCP) in the mixed layer. If the sporadic short productive events during April-May 2007 were missed by the sampling schedule, one would conclude erroneously that the site is heterotrophic. While previous ship-based pCO2 data collected around this buoy site agreed with the buoy CO2 data on seasonal scales, high resolution buoy observations revealed that the cruise-based surveys undersampled temporal variability in coastal waters, which could greatly bias the estimates of air-sea CO2 fluxes or annual NCP, and even produce contradictory results.

  15. Characterization of Sea-Air Methane Fluxes Around a Seafloor Gas Seep in the Central Laptev Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geibel, M. C.; Thornton, B. F.; Prytherch, J.; Brooks, I. M.; Salisbury, D. J.; Tjernstrom, M. K. H.; Semiletov, I. P.; Mörth, C. M.; Humborg, C.; Crill, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    The fate of CH4 released from thawing subsea permafrost on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) is unclear. In recent years, interest has focused on the possibility of large emissions of CH4 directly to the atmosphere from this remote area. It is uncertain how high those emissions are and whether they are primarily of biogenic or thermogenic nature, or some combination of sources. The SWERUS-C3 expedition onboard the Swedish icebreaker Oden during July-August 2014 sought to document possible CH4 release from subsea permafrost, and to understand mechanisms and magnitudes of such CH4 being released to the atmosphere. During the first leg of the expedition continuous high-resolution measurements were made to determine the in situ concentrations of CH4 in both the atmosphere and surface water. During SWERUS-C3, several underwater gas flares were found within the ESAS region showing elevated CH4 concentrations collocated in the surface waters. Here we focus on one seep area, a so-called "mega-flare" site, in the central Laptev Sea. Over individual gas flares of this site the surface water concentration of CH4 reached as high as 200ppm. The atmospheric concentrations of CH4 briefly (< 1 s) reached a maximum of ~3.2 ppm. More typical atmospheric values around the seeps were between 1.9-2.0 ppm (background values were approximately 1.88 ppm). However, such peak concentrations in both air and water were highly localized, returning to background levels within a few hundred meters of the source seeps. Together with continuous high-precision eddy-covariance measurements that were made during the SWERUS-C3 expedition, the combined dataset allows an intensive analysis these highly inhomogeneous gas flares. This gives the opportunity to calculate accurate high-resolution CH4 fluxes and thus give a better insight into the current rates of subsea CH4 outgassing reaching the atmosphere.

  16. Reconstruction of super-resolution fields of ocean pCO2 and air-sea fluxes of CO2 from satellite imagery in the Southeastern Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Carrasco, I.; Sudre, J.; Garçon, V.; Yahia, H.; Garbe, C.; Paulmier, A.; Dewitte, B.; Illig, S.; Dadou, I.

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of Green House Gases GHGs fluxes at the air-sea interface at high resolution is crucial to accurately quantify the role of the ocean in the absorption and emission of GHGs. In this paper we present a novel method to reconstruct maps of surface ocean partial pressure of CO2, pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes at super resolution (4 km) using Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Ocean Colour (OC) data at this resolution, and CarbonTracker CO2 fluxes data at low resolution (110 km). Inference of super-resolution of pCO2, and air-sea CO2 fluxes is performed using novel nonlinear signal processing methodologies that prove efficient in the context of oceanography. The theoretical background comes from the Microcanonical Multifractal Formalism which unlocks the geometrical determination of cascading properties of physical intensive variables. As a consequence, a multiresolution analysis performed on the signal of the so-called singularity exponents allows the correct and near optimal cross-scale inference of GHGs fluxes, as the inference suits the geometric realization of the cascade. We apply such a methodology to the study offshore of the Benguela area. The inferred representation of oceanic partial pressure of CO2 improves and enhances the description provided by CarbonTracker, capturing the small scale variability. We examine different combinations of Ocean Colour and Sea Surface Temperature products in order to increase the number of valid points and the quality of the inferred pCO2 field. The methodology is validated using in-situ measurements by means of statistical errors. We obtain that mean absolute and relative errors in the inferred values of pCO2 with respect to in-situ measurements are smaller than for CarbonTracker.

  17. Natural Air-Sea Flux of CO2 in Simulations of the NASA-GISS Climate Model: Sensitivity to the Physical Ocean Model Formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanou, A.; Gregg, Watson W.; Romanski, J.; Kelley, M.; Bleck, R.; Healy, R.; Nazarenko, L.; Russell, G.; Schmidt, G. A.; Sun, S.; Tausnev, N.

    2013-01-01

    Results from twin control simulations of the preindustrial CO2 gas exchange (natural flux of CO2) between the ocean and the atmosphere are presented here using the NASA-GISS climate model, in which the same atmospheric component (modelE2) is coupled to two different ocean models, the Russell ocean model and HYCOM. Both incarnations of the GISS climate model are also coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (NOBM) which estimates prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2. Model intercomparison is carried out at equilibrium conditions and model differences are contrasted with biases from present day climatologies. Although the models agree on the spatial patterns of the air-sea flux of CO2, they disagree on the strength of the North Atlantic and Southern Ocean sinks mainly because of kinematic (winds) and chemistry (pCO2) differences rather than thermodynamic (SST) ones. Biology/chemistry dissimilarities in the models stem from the different parameterizations of advective and diffusive processes, such as overturning, mixing and horizontal tracer advection and to a lesser degree from parameterizations of biogeochemical processes such as gravitational settling and sinking. The global meridional overturning circulation illustrates much of the different behavior of the biological pump in the two models, together with differences in mixed layer depth which are responsible for different SST, DIC and nutrient distributions in the two models and consequently different atmospheric feedbacks (in the wind, net heat and freshwater fluxes into the ocean).

  18. Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Daisuke

    1998-11-01

    Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field*, Daisuke Okano, Kyushu Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, Japan. -----We have studied on guiding discharge path by weak ionized region between plasmas produced by a visible laser, that is, a YAG laser with wavelength 532nm, in an atmospheric air gap with DC non-uniform electric field using a rod-to-plate electrode. We succeeded in capturing the framing images in the temporal evolution on guiding discharge along the YAG laser light path. From the results of experiments, the region between two plasmas produced by a YAG laser can guide a discharge path, and the region between two plasmas on the laser light path is considered as well as a weak ionized one [1] produced by an excimer laser. [1]J.Sasaki, S.Kubodera, R.Ozaki and T.Uchiyama, J. Appl. Phys., 60 (1986) 3845. *This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)-no.10650295 of The Ministry of education, Science Sports and Culture in japan.

  19. X-ray and runaway electron generation in repetitive pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure air with a point-to-plane gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Tao; Yan Ping; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Shut'ko, Yuliya V.; Zhang Cheng

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, using two repetitive nanosecond generators, x-rays were detected in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a point-to- plane gap. The rise times of the generators were about 15 and 1 ns. The x-rays were directly measured by various dosimeters and a NaI scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. X-rays were detected in the continuous mode at pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz and a voltage pulse rise time of {approx}15 ns. It is shown that the maximum x-ray intensity is attainable at different pulse repetition frequencies depending on the voltage pulse parameters and cathode design. In atmospheric pressure air the x-ray intensity is found to increase with increasing the pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz. It is confirmed that the maximum x-ray intensity is attained in a diffuse discharge in a point-to-plane gap.

  20. Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings

    SciTech Connect

    Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu

    2009-07-15

    Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Experimental study of laminar flow forced-convection heat transfer in air flowing through offset plates heated by radiation heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, A.H.H.; Kishinami, Koki; Hanaoka, Yutaka; Suzuki, Jun

    1998-04-01

    An experimental study of the steady state laminar flow forced-convection heat transfer of air flowing through offset plates located between two parallel plates and heated by radiation heat flux was carried out. The ranges of parameters tested were incident radiation heat fluxes of 500, 700, and 1,000 W/m{sup 2}. With Re ranging from 650 to 2,560, the inlet air bulk temperatures changed from 18.2 to 70 C and the tilting angle of the unit with the horizontal ranged from 0 to 90{degree} respectively. The results show that the rate of the increase in the local Nusselt number was observed to be proportional with Re up to 1,900, while it became less sensitive over Re range of 1,900--2,500. Also, in this range of Re, with the inlet air temperature of 20 C, the angle of inclination of the unit has no effect on the local Nusselt number. Increasing the incident radiation heat flux in the case of higher values of Re leads to a slight decrease in the value of the local Nusselt number. The effect of the inlet air bulk temperature on the forced-convection heat transfer coefficient shows, in the case of the horizontal position, an increase in the inlet air bulk temperature leads to slight decreases in the value of the average Nusselt number, while it leads to significant decreases in the value of the average Nusselt number as the tilting angle increases up to the vertical position. This effect is clearer in the case of Re = 650 rather than Re = 2,550. This work has application to solar collectors.

  2. The influence of dynamic chamber design and operating parameters on calculated surface-to-air mercury fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckley, C. S.; Gustin, M.; Lin, C.-J.; Li, X.; Miller, M. B.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic Flux Chambers (DFCs) are commonly applied for the measurement of non-point source mercury (Hg) emissions from a wide range of surfaces. A standard operating protocol and design for DFCs does not exist, and as a result there is a large diversity in methods described in the literature. Because natural and anthropogenic non-point sources are thought to contribute significantly to the atmosphere Hg pool, development of accurate fluxes during field campaigns is essential. The objective of this research was to determine how differences in chamber material, sample port placement, vertical cross sectional area/volume, and flushing flow rate influence the Hg flux from geologic materials. Hg fluxes measured with a Teflon chamber were higher than those obtained using a polycarbonate chamber, with differences related to light transmission and substrate type. Differences in sample port placement (side versus top) did not have an influence on Hg fluxes. When the same flushing flow rate was applied to two chambers of different volumes, higher fluxes were calculated for the chamber with the smaller volume. Conversely, when two chambers with different volumes were maintained at similar turnover times, the larger volume chamber yielded higher Hg fluxes. Overall, the flushing flow rate and associated chamber turnover time had the largest influence on Hg flux relative to the other parameters tested. Results from computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling inside a DFC confirm that the smaller diffusion resistance at higher flushing flows contributes to the higher measured flux. These results clearly illustrate that differences in chamber design and operation can significantly influence the resulting calculated Hg flux, and thus impact the comparability of results obtained using DFC designs and/or operating parameters. A protocol for determining a flushing flow rate that results in fluxes less affected by chamber operating conditions and design is proposed. Application of this

  3. Proposal and Development of Radial Air-gap Coreless Generator Suitable for Small Wind Turbine using in Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Yasuda, Yoh; Ohmoto, Shingo; Hara, Takehisa

    Independent distributed generations using small wind turbines are widely spread as increasing of wind power generation. Installation of small wind turbines in densely-populated urban area is not only useful from the viewpoint of digging up wind power source in weak-wind area but also for enlightenment of renewable energy due to closing power supplies to consumptions. From the point of view, the authors proposed “urban wind power generation" using collective system with a number of small vertical wind turbines and have developed a suitable generator for low-speed vertical wind turbines such as Savonius windmill. Standardized on a coreless generator, the proposed generator is designed to let direction of magnetic fluxes radial in order to install the magnets and coils on the outer end of the generator. The change of magnet composition and flux direction gives realization of maximized speed of flux change and output voltage in the limited space. With above composition, the power of the proposed one is independent on the diameter. In this report, we describe evaluated fundamental performance of a prototype of the proposed generator. As the result of the experiments, the maximum output power of 283W was obtained. The obtained starting torque is enough small to begin to rotate at weak wind condition of no more than 1m/s. Therefore, it is clear that the proposed “radial” coreless generator is suitable for self-starting and producing high power at low speed wind.

  4. Automatic Web-Based, Radio-Network System To Monitor And Control Equipment For Investigating Gas Flux At Water - Air Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, N. T.; Silverstein, S.; Wik, M.; Beckman, P.; Crill, P. M.; Bastviken, D.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are major sources of greenhouse gases (GHG). Robust measurements of natural GHG emissions are vital for evaluating regional to global carbon budgets and for assessing climate feedbacks on natural emissions to improve climate models. Diffusive and ebullitive (bubble) transport are two major pathways of gas release from surface waters. To capture the high temporal variability of these fluxes in a well-defined footprint, we designed and built an inexpensive automatic device that includes an easily mobile diffusive flux chamber and a bubble counter, all in one. Besides a function of automatically collecting gas samples for subsequent various analyses in the laboratory, this device utilizes low cost CO2 sensor (SenseAir, Sweden) and CH4 sensor (Figaro, Japan) to measure GHG fluxes. To measure the spatial variability of emissions, each of the devices is equipped with an XBee module to enable a local radio communication DigiMesh network for time synchronization and data readout at a server-controller station on the lakeshore. Software of this server-controller is operated on a low cost Raspberry Pi computer which has a 3G connection for remote monitoring - controlling functions from anywhere in the world. From field studies in Abisko, Sweden in summer 2014 and 2015, the system has resulted in measurements of GHG fluxes comparable to manual methods. In addition, the deployments have shown the advantage of a low cost automatic network system to study GHG fluxes on lakes in remote locations.

  5. A new framework for estimation and comparative assessment of air-sea turbulent fluxes in reanalyses and climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulev, Sergey; Tilinina, Natalia; Belyaev, Konstantin

    2013-04-01

    Reanalyses fluxes and flux-related variables at high temporal resolution are widely used forcing ocean general circulation models, for the case studies and estimation of regional energy budgets. In order to evaluate surface fluxes in modern era reanalyses and climate models we suggest a new approach based on two parametric modified Fisher-Tippett (MFT) distribution applied to turbulent heat fluxes. Two comparisons were performed - using direct surface turbulent flux output from different products (NCEP, NCEP-DOE, NCEP-CFSR, MERRA, JRA-25, ERA-Interim) and applying a single parameterization (COARE-3) to the reanalysis state variables. These allow for distinguishing between the impact of reanalysis surface parameterizations and variables onto surface turbulent fluxes. Statistical properties of surface turbulent fluxes were intercompared in terms of the distribution parameters (scale and location) and extreme fluxes derived from distribution tails. In all reanalyses extreme turbulent heat fluxes amount to 1500-2000 W/m2 (for the 99th percentile) and can exceed 2000 W/m2 for higher percentiles in the western boundary current extension (WBCE) regions. Different reanalyses show significantly different shape of MFT distribution, implying considerable differences in the estimates of extreme fluxes. The highest extreme turbulent latent heat fluxes are diagnosed in NCEP-DOE, ERA-Interim and NCEP-CFSR reanalyses with the smallest being in MERRA. These differences may not necessarily reflect the differences in mean values. Analysis show that differences in statistical properties of the state variables are the major source of differences in the shape of PDF and estimates of extreme fluxes while the contribution of computational schemes used in different reanalyses is minor. The strongest differences in the characteristics of probability distributions of surface fluxes between different reanalyses is found in the Southern Ocean. Importantly, climate models, being capable of

  6. Air Force Officer Accession Planning: Addressing Key Gaps in Meeting Career Field Academic Degree Requirements for Nonrated Officers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-09

    Integration and AF/A1P Force Management Policy and conducted within the Manpower, Personnel, and Training Program of RAND Project AIR FORCE as part...website: http://www.rand.org/paf/ iv Table of Contents Preface...Nonrated Line OR Production ................................................................................. 56 7.10. History, Foreign Language

  7. High resolution measurements of methane and carbon dioxide in surface waters over a natural seep reveal dynamics of dissolved phase air-sea flux.

    PubMed

    Du, Mengran; Yvon-Lewis, Shari; Garcia-Tigreros, Fenix; Valentine, David L; Mendes, Stephanie D; Kessler, John D

    2014-09-02

    Marine hydrocarbon seeps are sources of methane and carbon dioxide to the ocean, and potentially to the atmosphere, though the magnitude of the fluxes and dynamics of these systems are poorly defined. To better constrain these variables in natural environments, we conducted the first high-resolution measurements of sea surface methane and carbon dioxide concentrations in the massive natural seep field near Coal Oil Point (COP), California. The corresponding high resolution fluxes were calculated, and the total dissolved phase air-sea fluxes over the surveyed plume area (∼363 km(2)) were 6.66 × 10(4) to 6.71 × 10(4) mol day(-1) with respect to CH4 and -6.01 × 10(5) to -5.99 × 10(5) mol day(-1) with respect to CO2. The mean and standard deviation of the dissolved phase air-sea fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide from the contour gridding analysis were estimated to be 0.18 ± 0.19 and -1.65 ± 1.23 mmol m(-2) day(-1), respectively. This methane flux is consistent with previous, lower-resolution estimates and was used, in part, to conservatively estimate the total area of the dissolved methane plume at 8400 km(2). The influx of carbon dioxide to the surface water refutes the hypothesis that COP seep methane appreciably influences carbon dioxide dynamics. Seeing that the COP seep field is one of the biggest natural seeps, a logical conclusion could be drawn that microbial oxidation of methane from natural seeps is of insufficient magnitude to change the resulting plume area from a sink of atmospheric carbon dioxide to a source.

  8. On the importance of high-frequency air-temperature fluctuations for spectroscopic corrections of open-path carbon dioxide flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoev, Ivan; Helbig, Manuel; Sonnentag, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    A growing number of studies report systematic differences in CO2 flux estimates obtained with the two main types of gas analyzers: compared to eddy-covariance systems based on closed-path (CP) gas analyzers, systems with open-path (OP) gas analyzers systematically overestimate CO2 uptake during daytime periods with high positive sensible heat fluxes, while patterns for differences in nighttime CO2 exchange are less obvious. These biases have been shown to correlate with the sign and the magnitude of the sensible heat flux and to introduce large uncertainties when calculating annual CO2 budgets. In general, CP and OP gas analyzers commonly used to measure the CO2 density in the atmosphere operate on the principle of infrared light absorption approximated by Beer-Lambert's law. Non-dispersive interference-based optical filter elements are used to select spectral bands with strong attenuation of light transmission, characteristic to the gas of interest. The intensity of the light passing through the optical sensing path depends primarily on the amount of absorber gas in the measurement volume. Besides the density of the gas, barometric pressure and air temperature are additional factors affecting the strength and the half-width of the absorption lines. These so-called spectroscopic effects are accounted for by measuring barometric pressure and air temperature in the sensing path and scaling the light-intensity measurements before applying the calibration equation. This approach works well for CP gas analyzers with an intake tube that acts as a low-pass filter on fast air-temperature fluctuations. Low-frequency response temperature sensors in the measurement cell are therefore sufficient to account for spectroscopic temperature effects. In contrast, OP gas analyzers are exposed to high-frequency air-temperature fluctuations associated with the atmospheric surface-layer turbulent heat exchange. If not corrected adequately, these fast air-temperature variations can cause

  9. Towards a regional passive air sampling network and strategy for new POPs in the GRULAC region: Perspectives from the GAPS Network and first results for organophosphorus flame retardants.

    PubMed

    Rauert, Cassandra; Harner, Tom; Schuster, Jasmin K; Quinto, Karen; Fillmann, Gilberto; Castillo, Luisa Eugenia; Fentanes, Oscar; Ibarra, Martín Villa; Miglioranza, Karina S B; Rivadeneira, Isabel Moreno; Pozo, Karla; Puerta, Andrea Padilla; Zuluaga, Beatriz Helena Aristizábal

    2016-12-15

    A discussion is presented on the limitations for air monitoring studies around the Group of Latin American and Caribbean Countries (GRULAC), highlighting key issues requiring further attention, and reports on how a special initiative is addressing these limitations. Preliminary results are presented for the first reported data on organophosphorus flame retardant (OPFR) concentrations in outdoor air from the GRULAC region. At the majority of sites the concentrations and the profile of the OPFRs detected were similar with tris (chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) dominating (air levels. This preliminary study of only 7 sites highlights how extensive regional passive sampling networks (such as GAPS) can provide important new information to support risk assessment of these and similar chemicals. Finally, the various challenges with implementing a regional monitoring program are discussed, including harmonizing data from various monitoring programs for reporting to the GMP.

  10. A study of the evolution of the surface heat flux off the southeast coast of the United States during a cold air outbreak using satellite remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vukovich, Fred M.; Dunn, J. W.; Crissman, Bobby W.

    1990-01-01

    Attention is given to the contribution of the marine boundary layer to storm development via a study of the evolution of the spatial distribution of the heat flux during a cold-air outburst (CAO) which occurred during the GALE Field Program period in a 550,000-sq-km area off the southeast coast of the United States. The study focuses on a CAO that occurred in the period February 24-26, 1986. During the CAO, the area averaged total surface heat flux ranged from 190 W/sq m to 1114 W/sq m. The high value was characterized by a lower average surface air and dew-point temperatures and a higher average surface wind speed. In general, the surface heat flux increased as the sea-surface temperatures on the continental shelf increased. It reached the maximum over the Gulf Stream, and then decreased over the eastern portions of the Gulf Stream and over the Sargasso Sea. The configuration conforms with some of the earlier findings of Bane and Osgoode (1989) and Blanton et al. (1989).

  11. Mapping of the air-sea CO2 flux in the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent seas: Basin-wide distribution and seasonal to interannual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunaka, Sayaka; Murata, Akihiko; Watanabe, Eiji; Chierici, Melissa; Fransson, Agneta; van Heuven, Steven; Hoppema, Mario; Ishii, Masao; Johannessen, Truls; Kosugi, Naohiro; Lauvset, Siv K.; Mathis, Jeremy T.; Nishino, Shigeto; Omar, Abdirahman M.; Olsen, Are; Sasano, Daisuke; Takahashi, Taro; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2016-09-01

    We produced 204 monthly maps of the air-sea CO2 flux in the Arctic north of 60°N, including the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent seas, from January 1997 to December 2013 by using a self-organizing map technique. The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in surface water data were obtained by shipboard underway measurements or calculated from alkalinity and total inorganic carbon of surface water samples. Subsequently, we investigated the basin-wide distribution and seasonal to interannual variability of the CO2 fluxes. The 17-year annual mean CO2 flux shows that all areas of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent seas were net CO2 sinks. The estimated annual CO2 uptake by the Arctic Ocean was 180 TgC yr-1. The CO2 influx was strongest in winter in the Greenland/Norwegian Seas (>15 mmol m-2 day-1) and the Barents Sea (>12 mmol m-2 day-1) because of strong winds, and strongest in summer in the Chukchi Sea (∼10 mmol m-2 day-1) because of the sea-ice retreat. In recent years, the CO2 uptake has increased in the Greenland/Norwegian Sea and decreased in the southern Barents Sea, owing to increased and decreased air-sea pCO2 differences, respectively.

  12. A quantitative determination of air-water heat fluxes in Hermit Lake, New Hampshire under varying meteorological conditions, time of day, and time of year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyper, Nicholas D.

    An extensive heat flux study is performed at Hermit Lake, New Hampshire from May 26, 2010 till November 7, 2010 to determine the effects of the five individual heat fluxes on Hermit Lake and the surrounding amphibian community. Hermit Lake was chosen due to the relatively long meteorological observations record within the White Mountains of New Hampshire, a new lakeside meteorological station, and ongoing phenology studies of the surrounding eco-system. Utilizing meteorological data from the lakeside weather station and moored water temperature sensors, the incident (Qi), blackbody ( Qbnet ), latent (Qe), sensible (Q s), and net (Qn) heat fluxes are calculated. The incident heat flux is the dominate term in the net flux, accounting for 93% of the variance found in Qn and producing a heat gain of ˜ 19x108 J m-2 throughout the period of study. This large gain produces a net gain of heat in the lake until October 1, 2010, where gains by Qi are offset by the large combined losses of Qbnet , Qs, and Qe thereby producing a gradual decline of heat within the lake. The latent and blackbody heat fluxes produce the largest losses of heat in the net heat flux with a total losses of ˜ -8x108 J m-2 and ˜ -7x108 J m-2, respectively. The sensible heat flux is negligible, producing a total minimal loss of ˜ -1x108 J m-2. Overall the net heat produces a net gain of heat of 2x108 J m-2 throughout the study period. Frog calls indicative of breeding are recorded from May 26, 2010 until August 16, 2010. The spring peeper, American toad, and green frog each produced enough actively calling days to be compared to air temperature, surface water temperature, and wind speed data, as well as data from the five heat fluxes. Linear regression analysis reveals that certain water temperature thresholds affect the calling activities of the spring peeper and green frog, while higher wind speeds have a dramatic effect on the calling activities of both the green frog and American toad. All three

  13. In depth analysis of the role of the mountain gap south of the Valley of Mexico on the air quality in Mexico City.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerardo Ruiz Suarez, Luis

    2010-05-01

    38 days of air quality observations in Tenango del Aire (TENAI), south of Mexico City during MILAGRO were analyzed. That site was managed by FQA-CCA-UNAM's team with a mobile laboratory equipped with standard air quality monitors: O3, NOx, NOy, CO, SO2 and surface meteorological parameters. Hosted additional instruments were: CH2O, column NO2 (DOAS), backscatter (Lidar) and pilot balloons. Also, an ultra light plane from IMK-IFU, equipped with O3, PM10, CN, Dew Point monitors flew around the Popocatepetl and Iztaccihuatl volcanoes and above of TENAI some days during MILAGRO. Atop of TENAI, the ultra light descended in spiral until near ground and ascended to resume its path. In addition to these measurements, UNAM team ran air quality numerical simulations using the Mesoscale Climate and Chemistry Model (MCCM) and an online coupled Wind Erosion Processor to MCCM we call WEPS-MCCM. The combined observations on the ground, the ultra light plane and the models results enabled us to carry out an in depth analysis of air quality in such important region south of Mexico City. Comparison were made with the episodes classification proposed by De Foy; Ozone North and South, Convection North and South, Cold Surge and South Venting to characterize dynamics in the Valley of Mexico. The aim was to define how well connected is TENAI with the air quality network in the MCMA. The influence of the mountain gap on ozone and PM10 levels in Mexico City is analyzed by episode type. Also, the impact of the mega city of Mexico on the nearby region to the south can be understood by observations in TENAI. More polluted episode types in TENAI are those called: Cold Surge, Ozone South and South Venting due to a wind shift occurring in early afternoon that brings back polluted air that was drained south during the morning and returns back to TENAI rich in aged air parcels. March 17 was chosen to show the integrated analysis of all variables observed and modeled (MCCM) in TENAI. In that day

  14. Characterization of the NOx-Ox relationship in a mountain gap rural area of interchange of air masses southeast of the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Suarez, L.; Garcia-Yee, J.; Torres-JArdon, R.; Barrera Huertas, H.; Torres-Jaramillo, A.; Ortinez, A.

    2013-05-01

    Varying levels of oxidants (Ox = O3 + NO2) with respect to NOx were registered at three sites in a mountain southeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) in February and March 2011. The Ox-NOx ratio was used to gain a better understanding of the photochemical and transport processes happening over this mountain pass. Relatively high concentrations of O3 (moving average concentrations of 8 hours) exceeded maximum levels of the World Health Organization, and the European Union. The cumulative exceedances above background level of O3 in the one month-long campaign also exceeded the three months accumulative UN-ECE AOT40 critical level for crop protection. It was observed that the level of Ox in the mountain gap sites consisted of two contributions: One, independent of NOx emissions, extremely dominant and considered equivalent to the regional background O3 concentration; the second and much smaller was dependent of NOx local concentrations. Evidence was found that the oxidation of NO provided the major contribution of NO2 to Ox, rather than direct NO2 emissions. The contribution of regional Ox dominated from midmorning to noon when the boundary layer height began to increase due to sunlight heating of the surface leading to the mixing of higher concentrations of O3 above the nighttime thermal inversion. After noon, when the ozone vertical distribution was uniform, the Ox and O3 concentrations reached their maximum; they were very similar with very low levels of NO2. The analysis of wind data collected at the monitoring sites showed that from mid-morning to early afternoon, a northerly weak flow was common. Afterwards stronger southerly winds became dominant bringing in O3 rich air parcels into the atmospheric basin where MCMA is located. The high regional ozone concentrations add evidence for the need of coordinated air quality management policies for the complete central part of Mexico. Keywords: mountain gap, oxidant, ground level ozone, Central Mexico

  15. An upper limit of muon flux of energies above 100 TeV determined from horizontal air showers observed at Akeno

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagano, M.; Yoshii, H.; Hara, T.; Kamata, K.; Kawaguchi, S.; Kifune, T.

    1985-01-01

    Muon energy spectrum above 100 TeV was determined by observing the extensive air showers (EAS) from the horizontal direction (HAS). No definite muon originated shower of sizes above 100,000 and zenith angles above 60 deg was observed. The upper limits of HAS intensity is 5x10/12 m/2 s/1 sn/1 above 100,000. It is indicated that the upper limit of muon flux above 100 TeV is about 1.3x10/8 m/2 s/1 sr/1 and is in agreement with that expected from the primary spectrum with a knee assuming scaling in the fragmentation region and 40% protons in the primary beam. The critical energy at which muon flux from prompt processes take over that from the conventional process is higher than 100 Tev at horizontal direction.

  16. Sea-air CO2 flux in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre: Role and influence of Sub-Tropical Mode Water formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Andreas J.; Krug, Lilian A.; Bates, Nicholas R.; Doney, Scott C.

    2013-07-01

    The uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) into the mid-latitudes of the North Atlantic Ocean through the production of wintertime Sub-Tropical Mode Water (STMW) also known as Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) is poorly quantified and constrained. Nonetheless, it has been proposed that the EDW could serve as an important short-term sink of anthropogenic CO2. The objective of the present investigation was to determine sea-air CO2 gas exchange rates and seawater CO2 dynamics during wintertime formation of EDW in the North Atlantic Ocean. During 2006 and 2007, several research cruises were undertaken as part of the CLIMODE project across the northwest Atlantic Ocean with the intent to study the pre-conditioning, formation, and the evolution of EDW. Sea-air CO2 exchange rates were calculated based on measurements of atmospheric pCO2, surface seawater pCO2 and wind speed with positive values denoting a net flux from the surface ocean to the atmosphere. Average sea-air CO2 flux calculated along cruise tracks in the formation region equaled -18±6 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1 and -14±9 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1 in January of 2006 and March of 2007, respectively. Average sea-air CO2 flux in newly formed outcropping EDW in February and March of 2007 equaled -28±10 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1. These estimates exceeded previous flux estimates in this region by 40-185%. The magnitude of CO2 flux was mainly controlled by the observed variability in wind speed and ΔpCO2 with smaller changes owing to variability in sea surface temperature. Small but statistically significant difference (4.1±2.6 μmol kg-1) in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) was observed in two occurrences of newly formed EDW in February and March of 2007. This difference was explained either by differences in the relative contribution from different water masses involved in the initial formation process of EDW or temporal changes owing to sea-air CO2 exchange (˜25%) and vertical and/or lateral mixing (˜75%) with water masses high in DIC

  17. Spatio-temporal dynamics of biogeochemical processes and air-sea CO2 fluxes in the Western English Channel based on two years of FerryBox deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Latimier, M.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Vernet, M.; Bozec, Y.

    2014-12-01

    From January 2011 to January 2013, a FerryBox system was installed on a Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS), which crossed the Western English Channel (WEC) between Roscoff (France) and Plymouth (UK) up to 3 times a day. The FerryBox continuously measured sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), dissolved oxygen (DO), fluorescence and partial pressure of CO2 (from April 2012) along the ferry track. Sensors were calibrated based on 714 bimonthly surface samplings with precisions of 0.016 for SSS, 3.3 μM for DO, 0.40 μg L- 1 for Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) (based on fluorescence measurements) and 5.2 μatm for pCO2. Over the 2 years of deployment (900 crossings), we reported 9% of data lost due to technical issues and quality checked data was obtained to allow investigation of the dynamics of biogeochemical processes related to air-sea CO2 fluxes in the WEC. Based on this unprecedented high-frequency dataset, the physical structure of the WEC was assessed using SST anomalies and the presence of a thermal front was observed around the latitude 49.5°N, which divided the WEC in two main provinces: the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the all-year well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC). These hydrographical properties strongly influenced the spatial and inter-annual distributions of phytoplankton blooms, which were mainly limited by nutrients and light availability in the nWEC and the sWEC, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes were also highly related to hydrographical properties of the WEC between late April and early September 2012, with the sWEC a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1, whereas the nWEC acted as a sink for atmospheric CO2 of 6.9 mmol m- 2 d- 1. The study of short time-scale dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes revealed that an intense and short (less than 10 days) summer bloom in the nWEC contributed to 29% of the CO2 sink during the productive period, highlighting the necessity for high frequency observations in coastal

  18. Wintertime CO2 fluxes in an Arctic polynya using eddy covariance: Evidence for enhanced air-sea gas transfer during ice formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Else, B. G. T.; Papakyriakou, T. N.; Galley, R. J.; Drennan, W. M.; Miller, L. A.; Thomas, H.

    2011-09-01

    Between Nov. 1 2007 and Jan. 31 2008, we calculated the air-sea flux of CO2, sensible heat, and water vapor in an Arctic polynya system (Amundsen Gulf, Canada) using eddy covariance equipment deployed on the research icebreaker CCGS Amundsen. During this time period, Amundsen Gulf was a dynamic sea ice environment composed primarily of first year ice with open water coverage varying between 1-14%. In all cases where measurements were influenced by open water we measured CO2 fluxes that were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those expected under similar conditions in the open ocean. Fluxes were typically directed toward the water surface with a mean flux of -4.88 μmol m-2 s-1 and a maximum of -27.95 μmol m-2 s-1. One case of rapid outgassing (mean value +2.10 μmol m-2 s-1) was also observed. The consistent patten of enhanced gas exchange over open water allows us to hypothesize that high water-side turbulence is the main cause of these events. Modification of the physical and chemical properties of the surface seawater by cooling and brine rejection may also play a role. A rough calculation using an estimate of open water coverage suggests that the contribution of these events to the annual regional air-sea CO2 exchange budget may make the winter months as important as the open water months. Although high, the uptake of CO2 fits within mixed layer dissolved inorganic carbon budgets derived for the region by other investigators.

  19. Response of biological production and air-sea CO2 fluxes to upwelling intensification in the California and Canary Current Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachkar, Zouhair; Gruber, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Upwelling-favorable winds have increased in most Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS) in the last decades, and it is likely that they increase further in response to global climate change. Here, we explore the response of biological production and air-sea CO2 fluxes to upwelling intensification in two of the four major EBUS, namely the California Current System (California CS) and Canary Current System (Canary CS). To this end, we use eddy-resolving regional ocean models on the basis of the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS) to which we have coupled a NPZD-type ecosystem model and a biogeochemistry module describing the carbon cycle and subject these model configurations to an idealized increase in the wind stress. We find that a doubling of the wind-stress doubles net primary production (NPP) in the southern California CS and central and northern Canary CS, while it leads to an increase of less than 50% in the central and northern California CS as well as in the southern Canary CS. This differential response is a result of i) different nutrient limitation states with higher sensitivity to upwelling intensification in regions where nutrient limitation is stronger and ii) more efficient nutrient assimilation by biology in the Canary CS relative to the California CS because of a faster nutrient-replete growth rate and longer nearshore water residence times. In the regions where production increases commensurably with upwelling intensification, the enhanced net biological uptake of CO2 compensates the increase in upwelling driven CO2 outgassing, resulting in only a small change in the biological pump efficiency and hence in a small sensitivity of air-sea CO2 fluxes to upwelling intensification. In contrast, in the central California CS as well as in the southern Canary CS around Cape Blanc, the reduced biological efficiency enhances the CO2 outgassing and leads to a substantial sensitivity of the air-sea CO2 fluxes to upwelling intensification.

  20. Dynamics of air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North-West European Shelf based on Voluntary Observing Ship (VOS) and satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrec, P.; Cariou, T.; Macé, E.; Morin, P.; Salt, L. A.; Vernet, M.; Taylor, B.; Paxman, K.; Bozec, Y.

    2015-04-01

    From January 2011 to December 2013, we constructed a comprehensive pCO2 dataset based on voluntary observing ship (VOS) measurements in the Western English Channel (WEC). We subsequently estimated surface pCO2 and air-sea CO2 fluxes in north-west European continental shelf waters using multiple linear regressions (MLRs) from remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST), chlorophyll a concentration (Chl a), the gas transfer velocity coefficient (K), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and modeled mixed layer depth (MLD). We developed specific MLRs for the seasonally stratified northern WEC (nWEC) and the permanently well-mixed southern WEC (sWEC) and calculated surface pCO2 with relative uncertainties of 17 and 16 μatm, respectively. We extrapolated the relationships obtained for the WEC based on the 2011-2013 dataset (1) temporally over a decade and (2) spatially in the adjacent Celtic and Irish Seas (CS and IS), two regions which exhibit hydrographical and biogeochemical characteristics similar to those of WEC waters. We validated these extrapolations with pCO2 data from the SOCAT database and obtained relatively robust results with an average precision of 4 ± 22 μatm in the seasonally stratified nWEC and the southern and northern CS (sCS and nCS), but less promising results in the permanently well-mixed sWEC, IS and Cap Lizard (CL) waters. On an annual scale, seasonally stratified systems acted as a sink of CO2 from the atmosphere of -0.4, -0.9 and -0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the nCS, sCS and nWEC, respectively, whereas, permanently well-mixed systems acted as source of CO2 to the atmosphere of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.4 mol C m-2 year-1 in the sWEC, CL and IS, respectively. Air-sea CO2 fluxes showed important inter-annual variability resulting in significant differences in the intensity and/or direction of annual fluxes. We scaled the mean annual fluxes over six provinces for the last decade and obtained the first annual average uptake of -0.95 Tg C year-1 for this

  1. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  2. Elemental mercury (Hg(0)) in air and surface waters of the Yellow Sea during late spring and late fall 2012: concentration, spatial-temporal distribution and air/sea flux.

    PubMed

    Ci, Zhijia; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zhangwei; Zhang, Xiaoshan

    2015-01-01

    The Yellow Sea in East Asia receives great Hg input from regional emissions. However, Hg cycling in this marine system is poorly investigated. In late spring and late fall 2012, we determined gaseous elemental Hg (GEM or Hg(0)) in air and dissolved gaseous Hg (DGM, mainly Hg(0)) in surface waters to explore the spatial-temporal variations of Hg(0) and further to estimate the air/sea Hg(0) flux in the Yellow Sea. The results showed that the GEM concentrations in the two cruises were similar (spring: 1.86±0.40 ng m(-3); fall: 1.84±0.50 ng m(-3)) and presented similar spatial variation pattern with elevated concentrations along the coast of China and lower concentrations in the open ocean. The DGM concentrations of the two cruises were also similar with 27.0±6.8 pg L(-1) in the spring cruise and 28.2±9.0 pg L(-1) in the fall cruise and showed substantial spatial variation. The air/sea Hg(0) fluxes in the spring cruise and fall cruise were estimated to be 1.06±0.86 ng m(-2) h(-1) and 2.53±2.12 ng m(-2) h(-1), respectively. The combination of this study and our previous summer cruise showed that the summer cruise presented enhanced values of GEM, DGM and air/sea Hg(0) flux. The possible reason for this trend was that high solar radiation in summer promoted Hg(0) formation in seawater, and the high wind speed during the summer cruise significantly increased Hg(0) emission from sea surface to atmosphere and subsequently enhanced the GEM levels.

  3. Gas transfer velocities for quantifying methane, oxygen and other gas fluxes through the air-water interface of wetlands with emergent vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Empirical models for the gas transfer velocity, k, in the ocean, lakes and rivers are fairly well established, but there are few data to predict k for wetlands. We have conducted experiments in a simulated emergent marsh in the laboratory to explore the relationship between k, wind shear and thermal convection. Now we identify the implications of these results for gas transfer in actual wetlands by (1) quantifying the range of wind conditions in emergent vegetation canopies and the range of thermal convection intensities in wetland water columns, and (2) describing the non-linear interaction of these two stirring forces over their relevant ranges in wetlands. We measured mean wind speeds and wind speed variance within the shearless region of a Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh canopy in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Northern California, USA). The mean wind speed within this region, , is significantly smaller than wind above the canopy. Based on our laboratory experiments, for calm or even average wind conditions in this emergent marsh k600 is only on the order 0.1 cm hr-1 (for neutrally or stably stratified water columns). We parameterize unstable thermal stratification and the resulting thermal convection using the heat flux through the air-water interface, q. We analyzed a water temperature record for the Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh to obtain a long-term heat flux record. We used these heat flux data along with short-term heat flux data from other wetlands in the literature to identify the range of the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection in wetlands. The typical range of heat fluxes through water columns shaded by closed emergent canopies (-200 W m-2 to +200 W m-2) yields k600 values of 0.5 - 2.5 cm hr-1 according to the model we developed in the laboratory. Thus for calm or average wind conditions, the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection is significantly larger than the gas transfer velocity associated with wind

  4. Model-measurement comparison of ammonia bi-directional air-surface exchange fluxes over agricultural fields

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modeling of the bi-directional fluxes (BDFs) of ammonia (NH3) over fertilized soybean and corn canopies was evaluated for three intensive sampling periods: the first, during the summer of 2002 in Warsaw, North Carolina (NC), USA; and the second and third during the summer of 2007...

  5. Computation of Air-Sea Fluxes in Five Atmospheric Rivers over the Northeast Pacific Using Dropsonde Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairall, C. W.; Blomquist, B.; Gentemann, C. L.; Ralph, F. M.; Spackman, J. R.; Intrieri, J. M.; White, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    29 July 2014 Atmospheric Rivers (AR's) play a dominant role in variability of precipitation on the US W. Coast. A major AR study field effort with three research aircraft and the ship RV Ron Brown are committed to a campaign in January-February 2015. In this paper we report on an "early-start" deployment of the NOAA G-IV aircraft, which was conducted in February 2014 to test new flight modules and to work out key logistical and flight operations methods. In February 2014 the NOAA G-IV research aircraft sampled 10 ARs over the northeast Pacific Ocean. On five of these flights (Feb 08, 11, 13, 18, 21) dropsondes were deployed in a line crossing the AR so as to robustly sample the atmospheric structure. The sonde profiles yield gradients of wind speed, potential temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio in the surface layer over the ocean. Surface fluxes can be estimated from these gradients. If sea surface temperature (SST) is available, fluxes can also be computed using a bulk-flux algorithm. Conventional atmospheric sondes do not measure SST, but we developed a method to estimate SST by extrapolating the gradient to the surface. This was effective for temperature and water vapor profiles. A short iteration yielded reasonable estimates of SST and fluxes of momentum, sensible, and latent heat. The SST values were compared to satellite values. Five different satellite products were used: microwave, AMSR, wsat, TMI, and MODIS. A single satellite estimate was created as the median of these five. Standard deviation (std) of the five satellite estimates at each location is about 0.5 C. A grand comparison of satellite and sonde SST estimates for the five flights was made. For a total of 119 locations, the mean of Sonde-Satellite SST is about -0.02 C (std 0.76 C, correlation coefficient 0.983). For SST deduced from the humidity profile, the mean difference is 0.20 C (std 1.26, correlation 0.953). Surface fluxes were surprisingly small: sensible heat flux was typically

  6. Effect of gas-transfer velocity parameterization choice on air-sea CO2 fluxes in the North Atlantic Ocean and the European Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrobel, Iwona; Piskozub, Jacek

    2016-09-01

    The oceanic sink of carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important part of the global carbon budget. Understanding uncertainties in the calculation of this net flux into the ocean is crucial for climate research. One of the sources of the uncertainty within this calculation is the parameterization chosen for the CO2 gas-transfer velocity. We used a recently developed software toolbox, called the FluxEngine (Shutler et al., 2016), to estimate the monthly air-sea CO2 fluxes for the extratropical North Atlantic Ocean, including the European Arctic, and for the global ocean using several published quadratic and cubic wind speed parameterizations of the gas-transfer velocity. The aim of the study is to constrain the uncertainty caused by the choice of parameterization in the North Atlantic Ocean. This region is a large oceanic sink of CO2, and it is also a region characterized by strong winds, especially in winter but with good in situ data coverage. We show that the uncertainty in the parameterization is smaller in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Arctic than in the global ocean. It is as little as 5 % in the North Atlantic and 4 % in the European Arctic, in comparison to 9 % for the global ocean when restricted to parameterizations with quadratic wind dependence. This uncertainty becomes 46, 44, and 65 %, respectively, when all parameterizations are considered. We suggest that this smaller uncertainty (5 and 4 %) is caused by a combination of higher than global average wind speeds in the North Atlantic (> 7 ms-1) and lack of any seasonal changes in the direction of the flux direction within most of the region. We also compare the impact of using two different in situ pCO2 data sets (Takahashi et al. (2009) and Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) v1.5 and v2.0, for the flux calculation. The annual fluxes using the two data sets differ by 8 % in the North Atlantic and 19 % in the European Arctic. The seasonal fluxes in the Arctic computed from the two data sets disagree with each

  7. Distribution and sea-to-air flux of isoprene in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea during summer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Long; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Yang, Gui-Peng

    2017-07-01

    Spatial distribution and sea-to-air flux of isoprene in the East China Sea and the South Yellow Sea in July 2013 were investigated. This study is the first to report the concentrations of isoprene in the China marginal seas. Isoprene concentrations in the surface seawater during summer ranged from 32.46 to 173.5 pM, with an average of 83.62 ± 29.22 pM. Distribution of isoprene in the study area was influenced by the diluted water from the Yangtze River, which stimulated higher in-situ phytoplankton production of isoprene rather than direct freshwater input. Variations in isoprene concentrations were found to be diurnal, with high values observed during daytime. A significant correlation was observed between isoprene and chlorophyll a in the study area. Relatively higher isoprene concentrations were recorded at stations where the phytoplankton biomass was dominated by Chaetoceros, Skeletonema, Pennate-nitzschia, and Thalassiosira. Positive correlation was observed between isoprene and methyl iodide. In addition, sea-to-air fluxes of isoprene approximately ranged from 22.17 nmol m(-2) d(-1)-537.2 nmol m(-2) d(-1), with an average of 161.5 ± 133.3 nmol m(-2) d(-1). These results indicate that the coastal and shelf areas may be important sources of atmospheric isoprene.

  8. Modulation of air-sea fluxes by extratropical planetary waves and its impact during the recent surface warming slowdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molteni, Franco; Farneti, Riccardo; Kucharski, Fred; Stockdale, Timothy N.

    2017-02-01

    It is widely accepted that natural decadal variability played a major role in the slowdown in global warming observed in the 21st century, with sea surface cooling in the tropical Pacific recognized as a major contributor. However, the warming pause was most pronounced during boreal winter, with Northern Hemisphere flow anomalies also playing a role. Here we quantify the contribution of extratropical heat exchanges by comparing geopotential and temperature anomalies simulated by ensembles of seasonal forecasts with similar ocean temperature but different heat fluxes north of 40°N, as a result of planetary wave variability. We show that an important part of heat flux anomalies is associated with decadal variations in the phase of a specific planetary wave pattern. In model simulations covering the last three decades, this variability pattern accounts for a decrease of 0.35°C/decade in the post-1998 wintertime temperature trend over northern continents.

  9. Turbulent mass flux closure modeling for variable density turbulence in the wake of an air-entraining transom stern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrickson, Kelli; Yue, Dick

    2016-11-01

    This work presents the development and a priori testing of closure models for the incompressible highly-variable density turbulent (IHVDT) flow in the near wake region of a transom stern. This complex, three-dimensional flow includes three regions with distinctly different flow behavior: (i) the convergent corner waves that originate from the body and collide on the ship center plane; (ii) the "rooster tail" that forms from the collision; and (iii) the diverging wave train. The characteristics of these regions involve violent free-surface flows and breaking waves with significant turbulent mass flux (TMF) at Atwood number At = (ρ2 -ρ1) / (ρ2 +ρ1) 1 for which there is little guidance in turbulence closure modeling for the momentum and scalar transport along the wake. Utilizing datasets from high-resolution simulations of the near wake of a canonical three-dimensional transom stern using conservative Volume-of-Fluid (cVOF), implicit Large Eddy Simulation (iLES), and Boundary Data Immersion Method (BDIM), we develop explicit algebraic turbulent mass flux closure models that incorporate the most relevant physical processes. Performance of these models in predicting the turbulent mass flux in all three regions of the wake will be presented. Office of Naval Research.

  10. Assessing the Potential to Derive Air-Sea Freshwater Fluxes from Aquarius-Like Observations of Surface Salinity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhen, Li; Adamec, David

    2009-01-01

    A state-of-the-art numerical model is used to investigate the possibility of determining freshwater flux fields from temporal changes io sea-surface salinity (SSS), a goal of the satellite salinity-measuring mission, Aquarius/SAC-D. Because the estimated advective temporal scale is usually longer than the Aquarius/SAC-D revisit time, the possibility of producing freshwater flux estimates from temporal salinity changes is first examined by using a correlation analysis. For the mean seasonal cycle, the patterns of the correlations between the freshwater fluxes and surface salinity temporal tendencies are mainly zonally oriented, and are highest where the local precipitation is also relatively high. Nonseasonal (deviations from the monthly mean) correlations are highest along mid-latitude moon tracks and are relatively small in the tropics. The complex correlation patterns presented here suggest that a global retrieval of the difference between evaporation and precipitation (E-P) from salinity changes requires more complex techniques than a simple consideration of local balance with surface forcing.

  11. Air-sea fluxes of dimethyl sulfide and carbon dioxide measured by the gradient technique in the subtropical and equatorial Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Y.; Tanimoto, H.; Inomata, S.; Iwata, T.; Sakuma, H.; Tsunogai, U.; Nakagawa, F.; Ishii, M.; Kosugi, N.; Tsuda, A.; Uematsu, M.

    2012-12-01

    Fluxes of dimethyl sulfide (DMS), acetone and CO2 from the ocean to the atmosphere were measured in the subtropical South Pacific Ocean and the equatorial Pacific Ocean in January-February 2012. Vertical profiles of these gases were obtained above the ocean surface by measurements at 7 heights from 1 to 1400 cm with a profiling buoy aboard R/V Hakuho-Maru during KH-11-10 and KH-12-1 (EqPOS) cruises. The concentrations of DMS, acetone and CO2 in gas samples were simultaneously monitored by a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and a non-dispersive infrared detector (NDIR), respectively. In addition, DMS and acetone concentrations in the surface seawater and air were continuously measured with PTR-MS during the cruises. Average of seawater DMS concentrations in the subtropical ocean (2.1±0.5 nM) was slightly lower than that in the equatorial ocean (3.2±1.0 nM). The DMS fluxes significantly varied in the range of 3.6-13.1 and 0.1-18.9 μmol m-2 d-1 in the subtropical and equatorial ocean, respectively. The magnitude of DMS fluxes in both observations was dependent of that of wind speed. The gas transfer velocities of DMS were calculated from the fluxes and the seawater DMS concentrations. The magnitude of the gas transfer velocity mainly depended on that of wind speed. We will discuss the gas transfer velocity including results obtained from the CO2 and acetone observations.

  12. Spatial and temporal variability of CO2 fluxes at the sediment-air interface in a tidal flat of a temperate lagoon (Arcachon Bay, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migné, Aline; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Ouisse, Vincent; Boucher, Guy

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the spatial and temporal variability of benthic metabolism in a temperate mesotidal lagoon. This was achieved by measuring fluxes of CO2 in static chambers during emersion, both under light and dark conditions. Three sample sites were selected according to their tidal level (upper or mid), their sediment type (sand or mud) and the presence/absence of the seagrass Zostera noltei. The three sites were investigated at three seasons (end of winter, spring and beginning of autumn). At each site and each season, three benthic chambers were used simultaneously in successive incubations over the emersion period. The sediment chlorophyll-a content varied seasonally in the upper sands (reaching 283 mg.m- 2 in spring) but not in the mid muds (averaging 142 mg m- 2 in bare muds and 186 mg m- 2 in muds covered by seagrass). The maximum sediment CO2-uptake under light was 9.89 mmol m- 2 h- 1 in the mid-bare muds, in early autumn. The maximum sediment CO2-release under darkness was 6.97 mmol m- 2 h- 1 in the mid muds covered by seagrass, in spring. Both CO2-fluxes measured in the light and in the dark increased over periods of emersion. This increase, not related to light nor temperature variations, could be explained by changes in the amount and chemistry of pore water during the air exposure of sediments. The benthic trophic state index, based on the maximum light CO2-flux versus maximum dark CO2-flux ratio, assigned to each site at each season indicated that the sediments were net autotrophic in spring in upper sands and in mid muds covered by seagrass and highly autotrophic in other cases. The most autotrophic sediments were the mid-level bare muds whatever the season. The relevance of this index is discussed compared to carbon annual budget.

  13. The sea-air exchange of mercury (Hg) in the marine boundary layer of the Augusta basin (southern Italy): concentrations and evasion flux.

    PubMed

    Bagnato, E; Sproveri, M; Barra, M; Bitetto, M; Bonsignore, M; Calabrese, S; Di Stefano, V; Oliveri, E; Parello, F; Mazzola, S

    2013-11-01

    The first attempt to systematically investigate the atmospheric mercury (Hg) in the MBL of the Augusta basin (SE Sicily, Italy) has been undertaken. In the past the basin was the receptor for Hg from an intense industrial activity which contaminated the bottom sediments of the Bay, making this area a potential source of pollution for the surrounding Mediterranean. Three oceanographic cruises have been thus performed in the basin during the winter and summer 2011/2012, where we estimated averaged Hgatm concentrations of about 1.5±0.4 (range 0.9-3.1) and 2.1±0.98 (range 1.1-3.1) ng m(-3) for the two seasons, respectively. These data are somewhat higher than the background Hg atm value measured over the land (range 1.1±0.3 ng m(-3)) at downtown Augusta, while are similar to those detected in other polluted regions elsewhere. Hg evasion fluxes estimated at the sea/air interface over the Bay range from 3.6±0.3 (unpolluted site) to 72±0.1 (polluted site of the basin) ng m(-2) h(-1). By extending these measurements to the entire area of the Augusta basin (~23.5 km(2)), we calculated a total sea-air Hg evasion flux of about 9.7±0.1 g d(-1) (~0.004 tyr(-1)), accounting for ~0.0002% of the global Hg oceanic evasion (2000 tyr(-1)). The new proposed data set offers a unique and original study on the potential outflow of Hg from the sea-air interface at the basin, and it represents an important step for a better comprehension of the processes occurring in the marine biogeochemical cycle of this element.

  14. The carbon dioxide system on the Mississippi River-dominated continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico: 1. Distribution and air-sea CO2 flux.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Jen; Cai, Wei-Jun; Wang, Yongchen; Lohrenz, Steven E; Murrell, Michael C

    2015-03-01

    River-dominated continental shelf environments are active sites of air-sea CO2 exchange. We conducted 13 cruises in the northern Gulf of Mexico, a region strongly influenced by fresh water and nutrients delivered from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River system. The sea surface partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) was measured, and the air-sea CO2 flux was calculated. Results show that CO2 exchange exhibited a distinct seasonality: the study area was a net sink of atmospheric CO2 during spring and early summer, and it was neutral or a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere during midsummer, fall, and winter. Along the salinity gradient, across the shelf, the sea surface shifted from a source of CO2 in low-salinity zones (0≤S<17) to a strong CO2 sink in the middle-to-high-salinity zones (17≤S<33), and finally was a near-neutral state in the high-salinity areas (33≤S<35) and in the open gulf (S≥35). High pCO2 values were only observed in narrow regions near freshwater sources, and the distribution of undersaturated pCO2 generally reflected the influence of freshwater inputs along the shelf. Systematic analyses of pCO2 variation demonstrated the importance of riverine nitrogen export; that is, riverine nitrogen-enhanced biological removal, along with mixing processes, dominated pCO2 variation along the salinity gradient. In addition, extreme or unusual weather events were observed to alter the alongshore pCO2 distribution and to affect regional air-sea CO2 flux estimates. Overall, the study region acted as a net CO2 sink of 0.96 ± 3.7 mol m(-2) yr(-1) (1.15 ± 4.4 Tg C yr(-1)).

  15. Propagation or failure of detonation across an air gap in an LX-17 column: continuous time-dependent detonation or shock speed using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D E; Chandler, J B; Compton, S M; Garza, R G; Grimsley, D A; Hernandez, A; Villafana, R J; Wade, J T; Weber, S R; Wong, B M; Souers, P C

    2008-01-16

    The detailed history of the shock/detonation wave propagation after crossing a room-temperature-room-pressure (RTP) air gap between a 25.4 mm diameter LX-17 donor column and a 25.4 mm diameter by 25.4 mm long LX-17 acceptor pellet is investigated for three different gap widths (3.07, 2.08, and 0.00 mm) using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique. The 2.08 mm gap propagated and the 3.07 mm gap failed and this can be seen clearly and unambiguously in the EFO data even though the 25.4 mm-long acceptor pellet would be considered quite short for a determination by more traditional means such as pins.

  16. Investigation of organochlorine pesticides from the Indus Basin, Pakistan: sources, air-soil exchange fluxes and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Jawairia; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Mahmood, Adeel; Ali, Usman; Rehman, Muhammad Yasir Abdur; Malik, Riffat Naseem; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan

    2014-11-01

    Present study aimed to evaluate the contamination status of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their associated potential for air-soil exchange and health risks from ecologically important sites of the Indus Basin, Pakistan. Among different OCPs investigated, ΣDDTs and ΣHCHs were more prevalent compounds in the agricultural soils and ambient air samples of the study area. The average concentrations for DDTs were found higher at downstream agricultural sites, particularly at Head Panjnad (Soil: 320 ng/g; Air: 743 pg/m(3)) and acting as an ultimate sink of ΣOCP burden in soils. Spatial distribution patterns inferred ubiquitous distribution of ΣDDTs in soils and air of the study area. Source diagnostic ratios demonstrated that studied OCPs either are illegally being used in agricultural practices or/and they are residues of past use in the environment. Fugacity fraction model revealed wide variations (ff=0.12-0.94) with 20% of OCPs above equilibrium range and net volatilization of α-endosulfan, β-HCH and o,p'-DDD. Assessment of cancer risks for OCPs indicated a higher cancer risk (CR>1×10(-6)) for the residents of the Indus Basin. According to the available soil quality guidelines, DDTs and HCHs were above the permissible limits and pose a threat to natural habitat and biodiversity of the Indus Basin.

  17. On the Opposing Roles of Air Temperature and Wind Speed Variability in Flux Estimation over Partially Vegetated Landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In semi-arid regions the evapotranspiration rates depend on both the spatial distribution of the vegetation and the soil moisture, for a given radiation regime. Remote sensing can provide high resolution spatially distributed estimation of land surface states. However, data on the near surface air p...

  18. The effects of river inflow and retention time on the spatial heterogeneity of chlorophyll and water-air CO2 fluxes in a tropical hydropower reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, F. S.; Soares, M. C. S.; Assireu, A. T.; Curtarelli, M. P.; Abril, G.; Stech, J. L.; Alvalá, P. C.; Ometto, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Abundant research has been devoted to understanding the complexity of the biogeochemical and physical processes that are responsible for greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from hydropower reservoirs. These systems may have spatially complex and heterogeneous GHG emissions due to flooded biomass, river inflows, primary production and dam operation. In this study, we investigated the relationships between the water-air CO2 fluxes and the phytoplanktonic biomass in the Funil Reservoir, which is an old, stratified tropical reservoir that exhibits intense phytoplankton blooms and a low partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Our results indicated that the seasonal and spatial variability of chlorophyll concentrations (Chl) and pCO2 in the Funil Reservoir are related more to changes in the river inflow over the year than to environmental factors such as air temperature and solar radiation. Field data and hydro-dynamic simulations revealed that river inflow contributes to increased heterogeneity during the dry season due to variations in the reservoir retention time and river temperature. Contradictory conclusions could be drawn if only temporal data collected near the dam were considered without spatial data to represent CO2 fluxes throughout the reservoir. During periods of high retention, the average CO2 fluxes were 10.3 mmol m-2 d-1 based on temporal data near the dam versus -7.2 mmol m-2 d-1 with spatial data from along the reservoir surface. In this case, the use of solely temporal data to calculate CO2 fluxes results in the reservoir acting as a CO2 source rather than a sink. This finding suggests that the lack of spatial data in reservoir C budget calculations can affect regional and global estimates. Our results support the idea that the Funil Reservoir is a dynamic system where the hydrodynamics represented by changes in the river inflow and retention time are potentially a more important force driving both the Chl and pCO2 spatial variability than the in-system ecological

  19. Air-Water Exchange of N2 and O2 from In Situ Measurements in the Subarctic and Subtropical Pacific Oceans: Oxygen Flux and Net Biological Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerson, S.

    2008-12-01

    In-situ measurements of wind speed, atmospheric pressure, surface-ocean total dissolved gas pressure and oxygen concentration are used to determine the flux of nitrogen and oxygen between the ocean and atmosphere in the subarctic and subtropical Pacific Oceans. Measurements were made hourly over a period of about one year on surface moorings at the Hawaii Ocean Time series (HOT) in 2005 and at Station P in 2007. Gas pressures in the mixed layer were determined using a gas tension device (GTD) and an oxygen sensor calibrated by Winkler O2 titrations. The pressures of nitrogen and oxygen vary smoothly within a few percent of atmospheric saturation in the subtropical Pacific Ocean, but in the subarctic surface waters these values are punctuated by very rapid excursions caused by storms. The primary flux of oxygen in the upper ocean is between the ocean and atmosphere. We use a simple ocean mixed-layer model to determine this flux and estimate the net biological oxygen production at these sites. Assuming that the net biological oxygen and carbon production are stoichiometrically related over an annual cycle, this method provides a measure of the annual carbon export from the mixed layer, an important component of the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle. There is net biological O2 production most of the year in the subtropical ocean; however, little evidence of net O2 production in the wintertime in the subarctic Pacific. This contrasts with earlier 14C primary production measurements which indicate that wintertime production is about half that in summer at both locations. Annual estimates of biologically produced carbon export at these two sites will be contrasted at the presentation in the fall meeting. This research indicates that it should be possible to derive estimates of the net annual air-water oxygen fluxes caused by biological production at any location of the open ocean where there is a surface mooring. Large, abrupt atmospheric pressure changes (up to 50

  20. Fabrication of macromolecular gradients in aligned fiber scaffolds using a combination of in-line blending and air-gap electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Alysha P; Robbins, Andrew B; Mohiuddin, Sahar F; Jiang, Mingliang; Moreno, Michael R; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth M

    2016-12-22

    Although a variety of fabrication methods have been developed to generate electrospun meshes with gradient properties, no platform has yet to achieve fiber alignment in the direction of the gradient that mimics the native tendon-bone interface. In this study, we present a method combining in-line blending and air-gap electrospinning to address this limitation in the field. A custom collector with synced rotation permitted fiber collection with uniform mesh thickness and periodic copper wires were used to induce fiber alignment. Two poly(ester urethane ureas) with different hard segment contents (BPUR 50, BPUR 10) were used to generate compositional gradient meshes with and without fiber alignment. The compositional gradient across the length of the mesh was characterized using a fluorescent dye and the results indicated a continuous transition from the BPUR 50 to the BPUR 10. As expected, the fiber alignment of the gradient meshes induced a corresponding alignment of adherent cells in static culture. Tensile testing of the sectioned meshes confirmed a graded transition in mechanical properties and an increase in anisotropy with fiber alignment. Finite element modeling was utilized to illustrate the gradient mechanical properties across the full length of the mesh and lay the foundation for future computational development work. Overall, these results indicate that this electrospinning method permits the fabrication of macromolecular gradients in the direction of fiber alignment and demonstrate its potential for use in interfacial tissue engineering.

  1. Performance and emission characteristics of a low heat rejection engine with different air gap thicknesses with Jatropha oil based bio-diesel.

    PubMed

    Murali Krishna, M V S; Sarita, G; Seshagiri Rao, V V R; Chowdary, R P; Ramana Reddy, Ch V

    2010-04-01

    The research work on alternate fuels has been the topic of wider interest in the context of depletion of fossil fuels and increasing of pollution levels of the engines with conventional fossil fuels. Alcohols and vegetable oils are considered to replace diesel fuels as they are renewable in nature. However, use of alcohols in internal combustion engines is limited in India, as these fuels are diverted to PetroChemical industries and hence much emphasis is given to the non-edible vegetable oils as alternate fuels in internal combustion engines. However, the drawbacks of low volatility and high viscosity associated with non-edible vegetable oils call for hot combustion chamber, provided by low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine. Investigations are carried out on a LHR diesel engine with varied air gap thicknesses and injection pressures with jatropha oil based bio-diesel at normal temperature. Performance is improved with high degree of insulation with LHR engine with vegetable oil in comparison with conventional engine (CE) with pure diesel operation.

  2. Simulation-based conceptual design of an acoustic metamaterial with full band gap using an air-based 1-3 piezoelectric composite for ultrasonic noise control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei, Shahrokh; Eskandari-Ghadi, Morteza; Rahimian, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    This paper aims at proposing a novel type of acoustic metamaterials with complete band gap composed of piezoelectric rods with square array as inclusions embedded in an air background (matrix). A modified plane wave expansion method accompanied with the principles of the Bloch-Floquet method with electromechanical coupling effect and also impedance spectra are used to get a band frequency and to investigate the passband for the selected cut of piezoelectric rods. We investigate both the electromechanical coupling coefficient and mechanical quality factor and their dependency to passband and bandwidth, which depends on both the density and the wave impedance of the matrix and the inclusions (rods). The ratio of the volume of inclusion to the matrix is used to define the fill factor or the so-called inclusion ratio, to introduce the bandwidth as a function of that. Furthermore, the fabrication method is presented in this paper. The results make a suitable foundation for design purposes and may develop an inherently passive ultrasonic noise control. In addition, the results provide the required guidance for a simulation-based design of elastic wave filters or wave guide that might be useful in high-precision mechanical systems operated in certain frequency ranges and switches made of piezoelectric materials; they also propose a novel type of elastic metamaterials, which is independent of the wave direction and has an equal sensitivity in all directions in which it reacts omnidirectionally and mitigates the occupational noise exposure.

  3. Net sea-air CO2 fluxes and modelled pCO2 in the southwestern subtropical Atlantic continental shelf during spring 2010 and summer 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Rosane Gonçalves; Garcia, Carlos Alberto Eiras; Tavano, Virginia Maria

    2016-05-01

    Sea-air CO2 fluxes over continental shelves vary substantially in time on both seasonal and sub-seasonal scales, driven primarily by variations in surface pCO2 due to several oceanic mechanisms. Furthermore, coastal zones have not been appropriately considered in global estimates of sea-air CO2 fluxes, despite their importance to ecology and to productivity. In this work, we aimed to improve our understanding of the role played by shelf waters in controlling sea-air CO2 fluxes by investigating the southwestern Atlantic Ocean (21-35°S) region, where physical, chemical and biological measurements were made on board the Brazilian R. V. Cruzeiro do Sul during late spring 2010 and early summer 2011. Features such as discharge from the La Plata River, intrusions of tropical waters on the outer shelf due to meandering and flow instabilities of the Brazil Current, and coastal upwelling in the Santa Marta Grande Cape and São Tomé Cape were detected by both in situ measurements and ocean colour and thermal satellite imagery. Overall, shelf waters in the study area were a source of CO2 to the atmosphere, with an average of 1.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 for the late spring and 11.2 mmol CO2 m-2 day-1 for the early summer cruises. The spatial variability in ocean pCO2 was associated with surface ocean properties (temperature, salinity and chlorophyll-a concentration) in both the slope and shelf waters. Empirical algorithms for predicting temperature-normalized surface ocean pCO2 as a function of surface ocean properties were shown to perform well in both shelf and slope waters, except (a) within cyclonic eddies produced by baroclinic instability of the Brazil Current as detected by satellite SST imagery and (b) in coastal upwelling regions. In these regions, surface ocean pCO2 values were higher as a result of upwelled CO2-enriched subsurface waters. Finally, a pCO2 algorithm based on both sea surface temperature and surface chlorophyll-a was developed that enabled the spatial

  4. Sensitivity of modelled sulfate aerosol and its radiative effect on climate to ocean DMS concentration and air-sea flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesdal, Jan-Erik; Christian, James R.; Monahan, Adam H.; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-09-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is a well-known marine trace gas that is emitted from the ocean and subsequently oxidizes to sulfate in the atmosphere. Sulfate aerosols in the atmosphere have direct and indirect effects on the amount of solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. Thus, as a potential source of sulfate, ocean efflux of DMS needs to be accounted for in climate studies. Seawater concentration of DMS is highly variable in space and time, which in turn leads to high spatial and temporal variability in ocean DMS emissions. Because of sparse sampling (in both space and time), large uncertainties remain regarding ocean DMS concentration. In this study, we use an atmospheric general circulation model with explicit aerosol chemistry (CanAM4.1) and several climatologies of surface ocean DMS concentration to assess uncertainties about the climate impact of ocean DMS efflux. Despite substantial variation in the spatial pattern and seasonal evolution of simulated DMS fluxes, the global-mean radiative effect of sulfate is approximately linearly proportional to the global-mean surface flux of DMS; the spatial and temporal distribution of ocean DMS efflux has only a minor effect on the global radiation budget. The effect of the spatial structure, however, generates statistically significant changes in the global-mean concentrations of some aerosol species. The effect of seasonality on the net radiative effect is larger than that of spatial distribution and is significant at global scale.

  5. Surface Ocean pCO2 Seasonality and Sea-Air CO2 Flux Estimates for the North American East Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signorini, Sergio; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G., Jr.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Salisbury, Joe; Wang, Zhaohui Aleck; Thomas, Helmuth; Shadwick, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Underway and in situ observations of surface ocean pCO2, combined with satellite data, were used to develop pCO2 regional algorithms to analyze the seasonal and interannual variability of surface ocean pCO2 and sea-air CO2 flux for five physically and biologically distinct regions of the eastern North American continental shelf: the South Atlantic Bight (SAB), the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB), the Gulf of Maine (GoM), Nantucket Shoals and Georges Bank (NS+GB), and the Scotian Shelf (SS). Temperature and dissolved inorganic carbon variability are the most influential factors driving the seasonality of pCO2. Estimates of the sea-air CO2 flux were derived from the available pCO2 data, as well as from the pCO2 reconstructed by the algorithm. Two different gas exchange parameterizations were used. The SS, GB+NS, MAB, and SAB regions are net sinks of atmospheric CO2 while the GoM is a weak source. The estimates vary depending on the use of surface ocean pCO2 from the data or algorithm, as well as with the use of the two different gas exchange parameterizations. Most of the regional estimates are in general agreement with previous studies when the range of uncertainty and interannual variability are taken into account. According to the algorithm, the average annual uptake of atmospheric CO2 by eastern North American continental shelf waters is found to be between 3.4 and 5.4 Tg C/yr (areal average of 0.7 to 1.0 mol CO2 /sq m/yr) over the period 2003-2010.

  6. Climatological mean and decadal change in surface ocean pCO 2, and net sea-air CO 2 flux over the global oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, Stewart C.; Wanninkhof, Rik; Sweeney, Colm; Feely, Richard A.; Chipman, David W.; Hales, Burke; Friederich, Gernot; Chavez, Francisco; Sabine, Christopher; Watson, Andrew; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Schuster, Ute; Metzl, Nicolas; Yoshikawa-Inoue, Hisayuki; Ishii, Masao; Midorikawa, Takashi; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Körtzinger, Arne; Steinhoff, Tobias; Hoppema, Mario; Olafsson, Jon; Arnarson, Thorarinn S.; Tilbrook, Bronte; Johannessen, Truls; Olsen, Are; Bellerby, Richard; Wong, C. S.; Delille, Bruno; Bates, N. R.; de Baar, Hein J. W.

    2009-04-01

    A climatological mean distribution for the surface water pCO 2 over the global oceans in non-El Niño conditions has been constructed with spatial resolution of 4° (latitude) ×5° (longitude) for a reference year 2000 based upon about 3 million measurements of surface water pCO 2 obtained from 1970 to 2007. The database used for this study is about 3 times larger than the 0.94 million used for our earlier paper [Takahashi et al., 2002. Global sea-air CO 2 flux based on climatological surface ocean pCO 2, and seasonal biological and temperature effects. Deep-Sea Res. II, 49, 1601-1622]. A time-trend analysis using deseasonalized surface water pCO 2 data in portions of the North Atlantic, North and South Pacific and Southern Oceans (which cover about 27% of the global ocean areas) indicates that the surface water pCO 2 over these oceanic areas has increased on average at a mean rate of 1.5 μatm y -1 with basin-specific rates varying between 1.2±0.5 and 2.1±0.4 μatm y -1. A global ocean database for a single reference year 2000 is assembled using this mean rate for correcting observations made in different years to the reference year. The observations made during El Niño periods in the equatorial Pacific and those made in coastal zones are excluded from the database. Seasonal changes in the surface water pCO 2 and the sea-air pCO 2 difference over four climatic zones in the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian and Southern Oceans are presented. Over the Southern Ocean seasonal ice zone, the seasonality is complex. Although it cannot be thoroughly documented due to the limited extent of observations, seasonal changes in pCO 2 are approximated by using the data for under-ice waters during austral winter and those for the marginal ice and ice-free zones. The net air-sea CO 2 flux is estimated using the sea-air pCO 2 difference and the air-sea gas transfer rate that is parameterized as a function of (wind speed) 2 with a scaling factor of 0.26. This is estimated by inverting

  7. Development and application of dynamic air chambers for measurement of volatilization fluxes of benzene and MTBE from constructed wetlands planted with common reed.

    PubMed

    Reiche, Nils; Lorenz, Wilhelm; Borsdorf, Helko

    2010-03-01

    Phytoremediation of industrially contaminated groundwater has been a proven technique for several decades. However, mass balances of contaminants are often focused in laboratory investigations. The evaluation of the transfer of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under field conditions from the saturated and vadose soil zone into the atmosphere, directly or via plants, is rarely part of the research scope. This can provoke problems--particularly with regard to legal issues--if large-scale phytoremediation sites are situated near residential areas. In this study volatilization of VOCs was quantified in a horizontal-flow constructed wetland planted with reed grass. For this purpose, a specially designed air chamber was constructed, validated, and routine sampling campaigns were performed over the course of one year. Results indicate that the overall volatilization of the observed contaminants benzene and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) depended on seasonal variations with the highest volatilization fluxes measured in summer, when the detected volatilization fluxes of 846+/-116 and 252+/-11 microg m(-2) h(-1) for MTBE and benzene, respectively, accounted for 2.4% and 5.6% of the respective overall contaminant mass loss in the planted wetland. Furthermore, chamber data give strong evidence for the increased volatilization of VOCs through vegetation by direct comparison of planted and unplanted wetlands.

  8. 1D PIC-DSMC simulations of breakdown in microscale gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Chris H.; Hopkins, Matthew M.; Crozier, Paul S.; Boerner, Jeremiah J.; Musson, Lawrence C.; Hooper, Russell W.; Bettencourt, Matthew T.

    2012-11-01

    An explicit electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC) code with complex boundary conditions and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) particle collisions is utilized to investigate one dimensional direct current breakdown between two electrodes separated by air at STP. The simulation model includes Auger neutralization and cold field electron emission from the cathode as well as electron-neutral elastic, ionization, and excitation interactions. The simulated breakdown voltages at various electrode gap sizes are compared to experimental data and the Paschen curve. It is found that cold field electron emission can explain the breakdown voltage deviation from the Paschen curve measured for small gaps. Breakdown in large gaps proceeds over multiple ion transit timescales as electrons created via Auger neutralization of ions at the cathode quickly stream across the gap, creating new ions which accelerate towards the cathode and release another "pulse" of electrons. If the resultant pulse of electrons is larger than the initial pulse, then this process can build up a significant quasi-neutral plasma in the gap and the voltage drop across the gap will occur primarily across the (thin) sheath. Breakdown is accelerated if the electric field at the cathode surface is large enough for significant cold field emission flux, which increases the plasma density and decreases the Debye length and thus the sheath size, further increasing the electric field and cold field emission flux from the cathode surface. Breakdown in air pressure gaps was found to be sensitive to the differential scattering cross section for electron-neutral interactions. Isotropic scattering of elastic collisions results in lower breakdown voltages at moderate gaps (several mean free paths) and higher breakdown voltages for large gap sizes compared to when more accurate forward-biased scattering distributions are used. The dependence of breakdown voltage on the scattering distribution is due to a competition

  9. Multi-Satellite Characterization of Interannual Variation in Primary Production and Air-Sea CO2 Flux in the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrigo, K. R.

    2005-12-01

    The Ross Sea is the most productive sector of the Southern Ocean, the largest of the three iron limited HNLC regions. This productivity supports a rich upper trophic level community, including large numbers of penguins, seals, and whales. It also represents a large sink for atmospheric CO2. Since the advent of ocean color remote sensing using satellites such as CZCS, SeaWiFS, and MODIS, it has become increasingly clear that productivity in the Ross Sea is also characterized by a great deal of interannual variability. Passive microwave data from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager show that distributions of sea ice within the Ross Sea vary markedly from year to year, with some years experiencing nearly ice-free springtime conditions while others remain nearly ice covered. This extreme variability in sea ice cover is due to changes in climate state as well as some unusual events specific to the Ross Sea, such as the calving of two enormous icebergs, one in 2000 and the other in 2002. Variation in ice cover during austral spring and summer impacts the growth of the phytoplankton community, whose cumulative rate of annual primary production ranges widely, from <10 Tg C in 2002-03 to almost 40 Tg C in 1999-00. When these satellite data are used in conjunction with a three-dimensional ocean ecosystem model of the Ross Sea, the calculated air-sea fluxes of CO2 are even more variable, varying over 50-fold between 1997 and 2004. Not surprisingly, the lowest atmospheric flux of CO2 into the surface waters of the Ross Sea (0.10 Tg C) is associated with the year having the lowest primary production and highest sea ice cover. The extreme sensitivity of rates of primary production and particularly air-sea CO2 fluxes to changes in sea ice distribution in the Southern Ocean suggest that this region may undergo dramatic changes if global temperatures continue to rise, as they have in the vicinity of the Antarctic Peninsula.

  10. Production and air-sea flux of halomethanes in the western subarctic Pacific in relation to phytoplankton pigment concentrations during the iron fertilization experiment (SEEDS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Shinya; Toda, Shuji; Suzuki, Koji; Kato, Shungo; Narita, Yasusi; Kurihara, Michiko K.; Akatsuka, Yoko; Oda, Hiroshi; Nagai, Takahiro; Nagao, Ippei; Kudo, Isao; Uematsu, Mitsuo

    2009-12-01

    Iron could play a key role in controlling phytoplankton biomass and productivity in high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll regions. As a part of the iron fertilization experiment carried out in the western subarctic Pacific from July to August 2004 (Subarctic Pacific iron Experiment for Ecosystem Dynamics Study II—SEEDS II), we analysed the concentrations of trace gases in the seawater for 12 d following iron fertilization. The mean concentrations of chlorophyll a in the mixed layer (5-30 m depth) increased from 0.94 to 2.81 μg L -1 for 8 d in the iron patch. The mean concentrations of methyl bromide (CH 3Br; 5-30 m depth) increased from 6.4 to 13.4 pmol L -1 for 11 d; the in-patch concentration increased relative to the out-patch concentration. A linear correlation was observed between the concentrations of 19'-hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin, which is a biomarker of several prymnesiophytes, and CH 3Br in the seawater. After fertilization, the air-sea flux of CH 3Br inside the patch changed from influx to efflux from the ocean. There was no clear evidence for the increase in saturation anomaly of methyl chloride (CH 3Cl) due to iron fertilization. Furthermore, CH 3Cl fluxes did not show a tendency to increase after fertilization of the patch. In contrast to CH 3Br, no change was observed in the concentrations of bromoform (in-patch day 11 and out-patch day 11: 1.7 and 1.7 pmol L -1), dibromomethane (2.1 and 2.2 pmol L -1), and dibromochloromethane (1.0 and 1.2 pmol L -1, respectively). The concentration of isoprene, which is known to have a relationship with chlorophyll a, did not change in this study. The responses of trace gases during SEEDS II differed from the previous findings ( in situ iron enrichment experiment—EisenEx, Southern Ocean iron experiment—SOFeX, and Subarctic Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment Study—SERIES). Thus, in order to estimate the concomitant effect of iron fertilization on the climate, it is important to assess the induction of biological

  11. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2013-10-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice combined with an ongoing trend toward a more dynamic atmosphere is modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of identifying indices of ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. The mean atmospheric forcing was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~5 km h-1) blowing from the N-E and a decaying ice cover (<80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2 with a mean uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2d-1. We attribute this discrepancy to: (1) elevated PP rates (>600 mg C m-2d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (>10mmol C m-2d-1). Although generally <100 mg C m-2d-1, daily PP rates cumulated to a total PP of ~437.6 × 103 t C, which was roughly twice higher than the organic carbon delivery by river inputs (~241.2 × 103 t C). Subsurface PP represented 37.4% of total PP for the

  12. [Summer Greenhouse Gases Exchange Flux Across Water-air Interface in Three Water Reservoirs Located in Different Geologic Setting in Guangxi, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-hong; Pu, Jun-bing; Sun, Ping-an; Yuan, Dao-xian; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Tao; Mo, Xue

    2015-11-01

    Due to special hydrogeochemical characteristics of calcium-rich, alkaline and DIC-rich ( dissolved inorganic carbon) environment controlled by the weathering products from carbonate rock, the exchange characteristics, processes and controlling factors of greenhouse gas (CO2 and CH4) across water-air interface in karst water reservoir show obvious differences from those of non-karst water reservoir. Three water reservoirs (Dalongdong reservoir-karst reservoir, Wulixia reservoir--semi karst reservoir, Si'anjiang reservoir-non-karst reservoir) located in different geologic setting in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China were chosen to reveal characteristics and controlling factors of greenhouse gas exchange flux across water-air interface. Two common approaches, floating chamber (FC) and thin boundary layer models (TBL), were employed to research and contrast greenhouse gas exchange flux across water-air interface from three reservoirs. The results showed that: (1) surface-layer water in reservoir area and discharging water under dam in Dalongdong water reservoir were the source of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Surface-layer water in reservoir area in Wulixia water reservoir was the sink of atmospheric CO2 and the source of atmospheric CH4, while discharging water under dam was the source of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Surface-layer water in Si'anjiang water reservoir was the sink of atmospheric CO2 and source of atmospheric CH4. (2) CO2 and CH4 effluxes in discharging water under dam were much more than those in surface-layer water in reservoir area regardless of karst reservoir or non karst reservoir. Accordingly, more attention should be paid to the CO2 and CH4 emission from discharging water under dam. (3) In the absence of submerged soil organic matters and plants, the difference of CH4 effluxes between karst groundwater-fed reservoir ( Dalongdong water reservoir) and non-karst area ( Wulixia water reservoir and Si'anjiang water reservoir) was less. However, CO2

  13. PAH and PCB in the Baltic -- A budget approach including fluxes, occurrence and concentration variability in air, suspended and settling particulates in water, surface sediments and river water

    SciTech Connect

    Broman, D.; Axelman, J.; Bandh, C.; Ishaq, R.; Naef, C.; Pettersen, H.; Zebuehr, Y.

    1995-12-31

    In order to study the fate and occurrence of two groups of hydrophobic compounds in the Baltic aquatic environment a large number of samples were collected from the southern Baltic proper to the northern Bothnian Bay for the analyses of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The following sample matrices were collected; bottom surface sediments (0--1 cm, collected with gravity corer), settling particulate matter (collected with sediment traps), open water samples and over water samples (suspended particulates and dissolved fraction sampled by filtration) and air samples (aerosols and vapor phase sampled by filtration). All samples (except over water and air) were collected at open sea in the Baltic. The analyses results have been used to make a model approach on the whole Baltic and to elucidate different aspects of the behavior of PAHs and PCBs in the Baltic, such as the occurrence of the compounds in water and sediment, the total content as well as the concentration variabilities over such a large geographical area, Further, the data on settling particulate matter as well as the air concentration data were used to estimate the total fluxes of PAHs and PCBs to the bottoms of the Baltic and t o the total water area of the Baltic, respectively. Further, data on the PAH and PCB content in river water from four major rivers provides rough estimates of the riverine input to the Baltic. The dynamics of PAHs and PCBs within the water mass have also been studied in terms of settling velocities and residence times in the water mass for these type of compounds in the open Baltic.

  14. A Modeling Study of Irrigation Effects on Surface Fluxes and Land-Air-Cloud Interactions in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Huang, Maoyi; Yang, Ben; Berg, Larry K.

    2013-06-13

    In this study, the authors incorporate an operational-like irrigation scheme into the Noah land surface model as part of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). A series of simulations, with and without irrigation, is conducted over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) for an extremely dry (2006) and wet (2007) year. The results show that including irrigation reduces model bias in soil moisture and surface latent heat (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes, especially during a dry year. Irrigation adds additional water to the surface, leading to changes in the planetary boundary layer. The increase in soil moisture leads to increases in the surface evapotranspiration and near-surface specific humidity but decreases in the SH and surface temperature. Those changes are local and occur during daytime. There is an irrigation-induced decrease in both the lifting condensation level (ZLCL) and mixed-layer depth. The decrease in ZLCL is larger than the decrease in mixed-layer depth, suggesting an increasing probability of shallow clouds. The simulated changes in precipitation induced by irrigation are highly variable in space, and the average precipitation over the SGP region only slightly increases. A high correlation is found among soil moisture, SH, and ZLCL. Larger values of soil moisture in the irrigated simulation due to irrigation in late spring and summer persist into the early fall, suggesting that irrigation-induced soil memory could last a few weeks to months. The results demonstrate the importance of irrigation parameterization for climate studies and improve the process-level understanding on the role of human activity in modulating land–air–cloud interactions.

  15. AIR VEHICLE INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic Structural Response and Life Prediction: Phase 1-Identification of Knowledge Gaps, Volume 1: Nonproprietary Version

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    AFRL-RB-WP-TR-2010-3068,V1 AIR VEHICLE INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic ...Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic Structural Response and Life Prediction: Phase 1-Identification of Knowledge Gaps, Volume 1...AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION The Boeing Company M/C 110-SK56 2600 Westminster Avenue Seal Beach , CA 90740 REPORT NUMBER 9

  16. Numerical investigation of the Arctic ice-ocean boundary layer and implications for air-sea gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigdeli, Arash; Loose, Brice; Nguyen, An T.; Cole, Sylvia T.

    2017-01-01

    In ice-covered regions it is challenging to determine constituent budgets - for heat and momentum, but also for biologically and climatically active gases like carbon dioxide and methane. The harsh environment and relative data scarcity make it difficult to characterize even the physical properties of the ocean surface. Here, we sought to evaluate if numerical model output helps us to better estimate the physical forcing that drives the air-sea gas exchange rate (k) in sea ice zones. We used the budget of radioactive 222Rn in the mixed layer to illustrate the effect that sea ice forcing has on gas budgets and air-sea gas exchange. Appropriate constraint of the 222Rn budget requires estimates of sea ice velocity, concentration, mixed-layer depth, and water velocities, as well as their evolution in time and space along the Lagrangian drift track of a mixed-layer water parcel. We used 36, 9 and 2 km horizontal resolution of regional Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) configuration with fine vertical spacing to evaluate the capability of the model to reproduce these parameters. We then compared the model results to existing field data including satellite, moorings and ice-tethered profilers. We found that mode sea ice coverage agrees with satellite-derived observation 88 to 98 % of the time when averaged over the Beaufort Gyre, and model sea ice speeds have 82 % correlation with observations. The model demonstrated the capacity to capture the broad trends in the mixed layer, although with a significant bias. Model water velocities showed only 29 % correlation with point-wise in situ data. This correlation remained low in all three model resolution simulations and we argued that is largely due to the quality of the input atmospheric forcing. Overall, we found that even the coarse-resolution model can make a modest contribution to gas exchange parameterization, by resolving the time variation of parameters that drive the 222Rn budget

  17. AGLITE: a multi-wavelength lidar for measuring emitted aerosol concentrations and fluxes and air motion from agricultural facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Bingham, Gail E.; Zavyalov, Vladimir V.; Swasey, Jason A.; Hancock, Jed J.; Crowther, Blake G.; Cornelsen, Scott S.; Marchant, Christian; Cutts, James N.; Huish, David C.; Earl, Curtis L.; Andersen, Jan M.; Cox, McLain L.

    2006-12-01

    AGLITE is a multi-wavelength lidar developed for the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and its program on particle emissions from animal production facilities. The lidar transmitter is a 10 kHz pulsed NdYAG laser at 355, 532 and 1064 nm. We analyze lidar backscatter and extinction to extract aerosol physical properties. All-reflective optics and dichroic and interferometric filters permit all wavelengths to be measured simultaneously, day or night, using photon counting by MTs, an APD, and fast data acquisition. The lidar housing is a transportable trailer suitable for all-weather operation at any accessible site. We direct the laser and telescope FOVs to targets of interest in both azimuth and elevation. The lidar has been applied in atmospheric studies at a swine production farm in Iowa and a dairy in Utah. Prominent aerosol plumes emitted from the swine facility were measured as functions of temperature, turbulence, stability and the animal feed cycle. Particle samplers and turbulence detectors were used by colleagues specializing in those fields. Lidar measurements also focused on air motion as seen by scans of the farm volume. The value of multi-wavelength, eye-safe lidars for agricultural aerosol measurements has been confirmed by the successful operation of AGLITE.

  18. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  19. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  20. Roles of biological and physical processes in driving seasonal air-sea CO2 flux in the Southern Ocean: New insights from CARIOCA pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlivat, L.; Boutin, J.; Antoine, D.

    2015-07-01

    On a mean annual basis, the Southern Ocean is a sink for atmospheric CO2. However the seasonality of the air-sea CO2 flux in this region is poorly documented. We investigate processes regulating air-sea CO2 flux in a large area of the Southern Ocean (38°S-55°S, 60°W-60°E) that represents nearly one third of the subantarctic zone. A seasonal budget of CO2 partial pressure, pCO2 and of dissolved inorganic carbon, DIC in the mixed layer is assessed by quantifying the impacts of biology, physics and thermodynamical effect on seawater pCO2. A focus is made on the quantification at a monthly scale of the biological consumption as it is the dominant process removing carbon from surface waters. In situ biological carbon production rates are estimated from high frequency estimates of DIC along the trajectories of CARIOCA drifters in the Atlantic and Indian sector of the Southern Ocean during four spring-summer seasons over the 2006-2009 period. Net community production (NCP) integrated over the mixed layer is derived from the daily change of DIC, and mixed layer depth estimated from Argo profiles. Eleven values of NCP are estimated and range from 30 to 130 mmol C m- 2 d- 1. They are used as a constraint for validating satellite net primary production (NPP). A satellite data-based global model is used to compute depth integrated net primary production, NPP, for the same periods along the trajectories of the buoys. Realistic NCP/NPP ratios are obtained under the condition that the SeaWiFS chlorophyll are corrected by a factor of ≈ 2-3, which is an underestimation previously reported for the Southern Ocean. Monthly satellite based NPP are computed over the 38°S-55°S, 60°W-60°E area. pCO2 derived from these NPP combined with an export ratio, and taking into account the impact of physics and thermodynamics is in good agreement with the pCO2 seasonal climatology of Takahashi (2009). On an annual timescale, mean NCP values, 4.4 to 4.9 mol C m- 2 yr- 1 are ≈ 4-5 times

  1. Modeling of the anthropogenic heat flux and its effect on regional meteorology and air quality over the Yangtze River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Min; Liao, Jingbiao; Wang, Tijian; Zhu, Kuanguang; Zhuang, Bingliang; Han, Yong; Li, Mengmeng; Li, Shu

    2016-05-01

    Anthropogenic heat (AH) emissions from human activities caused by urbanization can affect the city environment. Based on the energy consumption and the gridded demographic data, the spatial distribution of AH emission over the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region is estimated. Meanwhile, a new method for the AH parameterization is developed in the WRF/Chem model, which incorporates the gridded AH emission data with the seasonal and diurnal variations into the simulations. By running this upgraded WRF/Chem for 2 typical months in 2010, the impacts of AH on the meteorology and air quality over the YRD region are studied. The results show that the AH fluxes over the YRD have been growing in recent decades. In 2010, the annual-mean values of AH over Shanghai, Jiangsu and Zhejiang are 14.46, 2.61 and 1.63 W m-2, respectively, with the high value of 113.5 W m-2 occurring in the urban areas of Shanghai. These AH emissions can significantly change the urban heat island and urban-breeze circulations in the cities of the YRD region. In Shanghai, 2 m air temperature increases by 1.6 °C in January and 1.4 °C in July, the PBLH (planetary boundary layer height) rises up by 140 m in January and 160 m in July, and 10 m wind speed is enhanced by 0.7 m s-1 in January and 0.5 m s-1 in July, with a higher increment at night. The enhanced vertical movement can transport more moisture to higher levels, which causes the decrease in water vapor at ground level and the increase in the upper PBL (planetary boundary layer), and thereby induces the accumulative precipitation to increase by 15-30 % over the megacities in July. The adding of AH can impact the spatial and vertical distributions of the simulated pollutants as well. The concentrations of primary air pollutants decrease near the surface and increase at the upper levels, due mainly to the increases in PBLH, surface wind speed and upward air vertical movement. But surface O3 concentrations increase in the urban areas, with maximum

  2. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  3. Relationships Between the Bulk-Skin Sea Surface Temperature Difference, Wind, and Net Air-Sea Heat Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emery, William J.; Castro, Sandra L.; Lindstrom, Eric (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The primary purpose of this project was to evaluate and improve models for the bulk-skin temperature difference to the point where they could accurately and reliably apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. To accomplish this goal, work was conducted in three primary areas. These included production of an archive of available data sets containing measurements of the skin and bulk temperatures and associated environmental conditions, evaluation of existing skin layer models using the compiled data archive, and additional theoretical work on the development of an improved model using the data collected under diverse environmental conditions. In this work we set the basis for a new physical model of renewal type, and propose a parameterization for the temperature difference across the cool skin of the ocean in which the effects of thermal buoyancy, wind stress, and microscale breaking are all integrated by means of the appropriate renewal time scales. Ideally, we seek to obtain a model that will accurately apply under a wide variety of environmental conditions. A summary of the work in each of these areas is included in this report. A large amount of work was accomplished under the support of this grant. The grant supported the graduate studies of Sandra Castro and the preparation of her thesis which will be completed later this year. This work led to poster presentations at the 1999 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting and 2000 IGARSS meeting. Additional work will be presented in a talk at this year's American Meteorological Society Air-Sea Interaction Meeting this May. The grant also supported Sandra Castro during a two week experiment aboard the R/P Flip (led by Dr. Andrew Jessup of the Applied Physics Laboratory) to help obtain additional shared data sets and to provide Sandra with a fundamental understanding of the physical processes needed in the models. In a related area, the funding also partially supported Dr. William Emery and Daniel

  4. Elevated CO2 effects on canopy and soil water flux parameters measured using a large chamber in crops grown with free-air CO2 enrichment.

    PubMed

    Burkart, S; Manderscheid, R; Wittich, K-P; Löpmeier, F J; Weigel, H-J

    2011-03-01

    An arable crop rotation (winter barley-sugar beet-winter wheat) was exposed to elevated atmospheric CO(2) concentrations ([CO(2) ]) using a FACE facility (Free-Air CO(2) Enrichment) during two rotation periods. The atmospheric [CO(2) ] of the treatment plots was elevated to 550 ppm during daylight hours (T>5°C). Canopy transpiration (E(C) ) and conductance (G(C) ) were measured at selected intervals (>10% of total growing season) using a dynamic CO(2) /H(2) O chamber measuring system. Plant available soil water content (gravimetry and TDR probes) and canopy microclimate conditions were recorded in parallel. Averaged across both growing seasons, elevated [CO(2) ] reduced E(C) by 9%, 18% and 12%, and G(C) by 9%, 17% and 12% in barley, sugar beet and wheat, respectively. Both global radiation (Rg) and vapour pressure deficit (VPD) were the main driving forces of E(C) , whereas G(C) was mostly related to Rg. The responses of E(C) and especially G(C) to [CO(2) ] enrichment were insensitive to weather conditions and leaf area index. However, differences in LAI between plots counteracted the [CO(2) ] impact on E(C) and thus, at least in part, explained the variability of seasonal [CO(2) ] responses between crops and years. As a consequence of lower transpirational canopy water loss, [CO(2) ] enrichment increased plant available soil water content in the course of the season by ca. 15 mm. This was true for all crops and years. Lower transpirational cooling due to a [CO(2) ]-induced reduction of E(C) increased canopy surface and air temperature by up to 2 °C and 0.5 °C, respectively. This is the first study to address effects of FACE on both water fluxes at canopy scale and water status of a European crop rotation.

  5. Observational Properties of Protoplanetary Disk Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnière, Peggy; Bjorkman, J. E.; Frank, Adam; Quillen, Alice C.; Carciofi, A. C.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Wood, Kenneth

    2006-02-01

    We study the effects of an annular gap induced by an embedded protoplanet on disk scattered light images and the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED). We find that the outer edge of a gap is brighter in the scattered light images than a similar location in a gap-free disk. The stellar radiation that would have been scattered by material within the gap is instead scattered by the disk wall at the outer edge of the gap, producing a bright ring surrounding the dark gap in the images. Given sufficient resolution, such gaps can be detected by the presence of this bright ring in scattered light images. A gap in a disk also changes the shape of the SED. Radiation that would have been absorbed by material in the gap is instead reprocessed by the outer gap wall. This leads to a decrease in the SED at wavelengths corresponding to the temperature at the radius of the missing gap material, and to a corresponding flux increase at longer wavelengths corresponding to the temperature of the outer wall. We note, however, that the presence of an annular gap does not change the bolometric IR flux; it simply redistributes the radiation previously produced by material within the gap to longer wavelengths. Although it will be difficult on the basis of the SED alone to distinguish between the presence of a gap and other physical effects, the level of changes can be sufficiently large to be measurable with current instruments (e.g., Spitzer).

  6. A comparison of CO2 dynamics and air-water fluxes in a river-dominated estuary and a mangrove-dominated marine estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhand, Anirban; Chanda, Abhra; Manna, Sudip; Das, Sourav; Hazra, Sugata; Roy, Rajdeep; Choudhury, S. B.; Rao, K. H.; Dadhwal, V. K.; Chakraborty, Kunal; Mostofa, K. M. G.; Tokoro, T.; Kuwae, Tomohiro; Wanninkhof, Rik

    2016-11-01

    The fugacity of CO2 (fCO2 (water)) and air-water CO2 flux were compared between a river-dominated anthropogenically disturbed open estuary, the Hugli, and a comparatively pristine mangrove-dominated semiclosed marine estuary, the Matla, on the east coast of India. Annual mean salinity of the Hugli Estuary (≈7.1) was much less compared to the Matla Estuary (≈20.0). All the stations of the Hugli Estuary were highly supersaturated with CO2 (annual mean 2200 µatm), whereas the Matla was marginally oversaturated (annual mean 530 µatm). During the postmonsoon season, the outer station of the Matla Estuary was under saturated with respect to CO2 and acted as a sink. The annual mean CO2 emission from the Hugli Estuary (32.4 mol C m-2 yr-1) was 14 times higher than the Matla Estuary (2.3 mol C m-2 yr-1). CO2 efflux rate from the Hugli Estuary has increased drastically in the last decade, which is attributed to increased runoff from the river-dominated estuary.

  7. Mercury in the marine boundary layer and seawater of the South China Sea: Concentrations, sea/air flux, and implication for land outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xuewu; Feng, Xinbin; Zhang, Gan; Xu, Weihai; Li, Xiangdong; Yao, Hen; Liang, Peng; Li, Jun; Sommar, Jonas; Yin, Runsheng; Liu, Na

    2010-03-01

    Using R/V Shiyan 3 as a sampling platform, measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), surface seawater total mercury (THg), methyl mercury (MeHg), and dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) were carried out above and in the South China Sea (SCS). Measurements were collected for 2 weeks (10 to 28 August 2007) during an oceanographic expedition, which circumnavigated the northern SCS from Guangzhou (Canton), Hainan Inland, the Philippines, and back to Guangzhou. GEM concentrations over the northern SCS ranged from 1.04 to 6.75 ng m-3 (mean: 2.62 ng m-3, median: 2.24 ng m-3). The spatial distribution of GEM was characterized by elevated concentrations near the coastal sites adjacent to mainland China and lower concentrations at stations in the open sea. Trajectory analysis revealed that high concentrations of GEM were generally related to air masses from south China and the Indochina peninsula, while lower concentrations of GEM were related to air masses from the open sea area, reflecting great Hg emissions from south China and Indochina peninsula. The mean concentrations of THg, MeHg, and DGM in surface seawater were 1.2 ± 0.3 ng L-1, 0.12 ± 0.05 ng L-1, and 36.5 ± 14.9 pg L-1, respectively. In general, THg and MeHg levels in the northern SCS were higher compared to results reported from most other oceans/seas. Elevated THg levels in the study area were likely attributed to significant Hg delivery from surrounding areas of the SCS primarily via atmospheric deposition and riverine input, whereas other sources like in situ production by various biotic and abiotic processes may be important for MeHg. Average sea/air flux of Hg in the study area was estimated using a gas exchange method (4.5 ± 3.4 ng m-2 h-1). This value was comparable to those from other coastal areas and generally higher than those from open sea environments, which may be attributed to the reemission of Hg previously transported to this area.

  8. Synoptic evaluation of carbon cycling in the Beaufort Sea during summer: contrasting river inputs, ecosystem metabolism and air-sea CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Coupel, P.; Else, B.; Nahavandian, S.; Lansard, B.; Raimbault, P.; Papakyriakou, T.; Gratton, Y.; Fortier, L.; Tremblay, J.-É.; Babin, M.

    2014-05-01

    The accelerated decline in Arctic sea ice and an ongoing trend toward more energetic atmospheric and oceanic forcings are modifying carbon cycling in the Arctic Ocean. A critical issue is to understand how net community production (NCP; the balance between gross primary production and community respiration) responds to changes and modulates air-sea CO2 fluxes. Using data collected as part of the ArcticNet-Malina 2009 expedition in the southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean), we synthesize information on sea ice, wind, river, water column properties, metabolism of the planktonic food web, organic carbon fluxes and pools, as well as air-sea CO2 exchange, with the aim of documenting the ecosystem response to environmental changes. Data were analyzed to develop a non-steady-state carbon budget and an assessment of NCP against air-sea CO2 fluxes. During the field campaign, the mean wind field was a mild upwelling-favorable wind (~ 5 km h-1) from the NE. A decaying ice cover (< 80% concentration) was observed beyond the shelf, the latter being fully exposed to the atmosphere. We detected some areas where the surface mixed layer was net autotrophic owing to high rates of primary production (PP), but the ecosystem was overall net heterotrophic. The region acted nonetheless as a sink for atmospheric CO2, with an uptake rate of -2.0 ± 3.3 mmol C m-2 d-1 (mean ± standard deviation associated with spatial variability). We attribute this discrepancy to (1) elevated PP rates (> 600 mg C m-2 d-1) over the shelf prior to our survey, (2) freshwater dilution by river runoff and ice melt, and (3) the presence of cold surface waters offshore. Only the Mackenzie River delta and localized shelf areas directly affected by upwelling were identified as substantial sources of CO2 to the atmosphere (> 10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Daily PP rates were generally < 100 mg C m-2 d-1 and cumulated to a total PP of ~ 437.6 × 103 t C for the region over a 35-day period. This amount was about twice the

  9. Soil-air greenhouse gas fluxes influenced by farming practices in reservoir drawdown area: A case at the Three Gorges Reservoir in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Zhang, Zengyu; Lin, Chuxue; Chen, Yongbo; Wen, Anbang; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    The Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) in China has large water level variations, creating about 393 km(2) of drawdown area seasonally. Farming practices in drawdown area during the low water level period is common in the TGR. Field experiments on soil-air greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in fallow grassland, peanut field and corn field in reservoir drawdown area at Lijiaba Bay of the Pengxi River, a tributary of the Yangtze River in the TGR were carried out from March through September 2011. Experimental fields in drawdown area had the same land use history. They were adjacent to each other horizontally at a narrow range of elevation i.e. 167-169 m, which assured that they had the same duration of reservoir inundation. Unflooded grassland with the same land-use history was selected as control for study. Results showed that mean value of soil CO2 emissions in drawdown area was 10.38 ± 0.97 mmol m(-2) h(-1). The corresponding CH4 fluxes and N2O fluxes were -8.61 ± 2.15 μmol m(-2) h(-1) and 3.42 ± 0.80 μmol m(-2) h(-1). Significant differences and monthly variations among land uses in treatments of drawdown area and unflooded grassland were evident. These were impacted by the change in soil physiochemical properties which were alerted by reservoir operation and farming. Particularly, N-fertilization in corn field stimulated N2O emissions from March to May. In terms of global warming potentials (GWP), corn field in drawdown area had the maximum GWP mainly due to N-fertilization. Gross GWP in peanut field in drawdown area was about 7% lower than that in fallow grassland. Compared to unflooded grassland, reservoir operation created positive net effect on GHG emissions and GWPs in drawdown area. However, selection of crop species, e.g. peanut, and best practices in farming, e.g. prohibiting N-fertilization, could potentially mitigate GWPs in drawdown area. In the net GHG emissions evaluation in the TGR, farming practices in the drawdown area shall be taken

  10. Air-Sea CO2 fluxes and NEP changes in a Baja California Coastal Lagoon during the anomalous North Pacific warm condition in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávila López, M. D. C.; Martin Hernandez-Ayon, J. M.; Camacho-Ibar, V.; Sandoval Gil, J.; Mejía-Trejo, A.; Félix-Bermudez, A.; Pacheco-Ruiz, I.

    2015-12-01

    The present study examines the temporal variability of seawater carbonate chemistry and air-sea CO2 fluxes (FCO2) in a Baja California Mediterranean-climate coastal lagoon. This study was carried out from Nov-2013 to Nov-2014, a period in which anomalous warm conditions were present in the North Pacific Ocean influenced the local oceanography in the adjacent coastal waters off Baja California. These ocean conditions resulted on a negative anomaly of upwelling index, which led to summer-like season (weak upwelling condition) that could be observed in the response of carbon dynamics and metabolic status in San Quintín Bay. Minor changes in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration during spring months (~100 µmol kg-1) where observed and were associated to biological processes within the lagoon. High DIC (~2200 µmol kg-1), pCO2 (~800 μatm), and minimum pH (~7.8) values were observed in summer, reflecting the predominance of respiration processes apparently mostly linked to the remineralization of sedimentary organic matter supplied from macroalgal blooms. San Quintín Bay acted as a weak source of CO2 to the atmosphere during the study period, with maximum value observed in July (~10 mmol C m-2 d-1). Temporal biomass production of macroalgae contributed to about 50% of total FCO2 estimated in spring-summer seasons, that was a potencial internal source of organic matter to fuel respiration processes in San Quintín Bay. Eelgrass metabolism contributes in a lower degree in total FCO2. During the anomalous ocean conditions in 2014, the lagoon switched seasonally between net heterotrophy and net autotrophy during the study period, where photosynthesis and respiration processes in the lagoon were closer to a balance. Whole-system metabolism and FCO2 clearly indicated the strong dependence of San Quintín Bay on upwelling conditions and benthic metabolism activity, which was mainly controlled by dominant primary producer communities.

  11. Global sea-air CO 2 flux based on climatological surface ocean pCO 2, and seasonal biological and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Taro; Sutherland, Stewart C.; Sweeney, Colm; Poisson, Alain; Metzl, Nicolas; Tilbrook, Bronte; Bates, Nicolas; Wanninkhof, Rik; Feely, Richard A.; Sabine, Christopher; Olafsson, Jon; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    Based on about 940,000 measurements of surface-water pCO 2 obtained since the International Geophysical Year of 1956-59, the climatological, monthly distribution of pCO 2 in the global surface waters representing mean non-El Niño conditions has been obtained with a spatial resolution of 4°×5° for a reference year 1995. The monthly and annual net sea-air CO 2 flux has been computed using the NCEP/NCAR 41-year mean monthly wind speeds. An annual net uptake flux of CO 2 by the global oceans has been estimated to be 2.2 (+22% or -19%) Pg C yr -1 using the (wind speed) 2 dependence of the CO 2 gas transfer velocity of Wanninkhof (J. Geophys. Res. 97 (1992) 7373). The errors associated with the wind-speed variation have been estimated using one standard deviation (about±2 m s -1) from the mean monthly wind speed observed over each 4°×5° pixel area of the global oceans. The new global uptake flux obtained with the Wanninkhof (wind speed) 2 dependence is compared with those obtained previously using a smaller number of measurements, about 250,000 and 550,000, respectively, and are found to be consistent within±0.2 Pg C yr -1. This estimate for the global ocean uptake flux is consistent with the values of 2.0±0.6 Pg C yr -1 estimated on the basis of the observed changes in the atmospheric CO 2 and oxygen concentrations during the 1990s (Nature 381 (1996) 218; Science 287 (2000) 2467). However, if the (wind speed) 3 dependence of Wanninkhof and McGillis (Res. Lett. 26 (1999) 1889) is used instead, the annual ocean uptake as well as the sensitivity to wind-speed variability is increased by about 70%. A zone between 40° and 60° latitudes in both the northern and southern hemispheres is found to be a major sink for atmospheric CO 2. In these areas, poleward-flowing warm waters meet and mix with the cold subpolar waters rich in nutrients. The pCO 2 in the surface water is decreased by the cooling effect on warm waters and by the biological drawdown of pCO 2 in

  12. Muon and neutrino fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, P. G.; Protheroe, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The result of a new calculation of the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes and the energy spectrum of muon-neutrinos produced in individual extensive air showers (EAS) initiated by proton and gamma-ray primaries is reported. Also explained is the possibility of detecting atmospheric nu sub mu's due to gamma-rays from these sources.

  13. Linking Air Quality and Watershed Models for Environmental Assessments: Analysis of the Effects of Model-Specific Precipitation Estimates on Calculated Water Flux

    EPA Science Inventory

    Directly linking air quality and watershed models could provide an effective method for estimating spatially-explicit inputs of atmospheric contaminants to watershed biogeochemical models. However, to adequately link air and watershed models for wet deposition estimates, each mod...

  14. Nitrous oxide and methane in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters in the Strait of Gibraltar: Air-sea fluxes and inter-basin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Paz, M.; Huertas, I. E.; Flecha, S.; Ríos, A. F.; Pérez, F. F.

    2015-11-01

    The global ocean plays an important role in the overall budget of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4), as both gases are produced within the ocean and released to the atmosphere. However, for large parts of the open and coastal oceans there is little or no spatial data coverage for N2O and CH4. Hence, a better assessment of marine emissions estimates is necessary. As a contribution to remedying the scarcity of data on marine regions, N2O and CH4 concentrations have been determined in the Strait of Gibraltar at the ocean Fixed Time series (GIFT). During six cruises performed between July 2011 and November 2014 samples were collected at the surface and various depths in the water column, and subsequently measured using gas chromatography. From this we were able to quantify the temporal variability of the gas air-sea exchange in the area and examine the vertical distribution of N2O and CH4 in Atlantic and Mediterranean waters. Results show that surface Atlantic waters are nearly in equilibrium with the atmosphere whereas deeper Mediterranean waters are oversaturated in N2O, and a gradient that gradually increases with depth was detected in the water column. Temperature was found to be the main factor responsible for the seasonal variability of N2O in the surface layer. Furthermore, although CH4 levels did not reveal any feature clearly associated with the circulation of water masses, vertical distributions showed that higher concentrations are generally observed in the Atlantic layer, and that the deeper Mediterranean waters are considerably undersaturated (by up to 50%). Even though surface waters act as a source of atmospheric N2O during certain periods, on an annual basis the net N2O flux in the Strait of Gibraltar is only 0.35 ± 0.27 μmol m-2 d-1, meaning that these waters are almost in a neutral status with respect to the atmosphere. Seasonally, the region behaves as a slight sink for atmospheric CH4 in winter and as a source in spring and fall. Approximating

  15. A flux-mnemonic permanent magnet brushless machine for wind power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chuang; Chau, K. T.; Jiang, J. Z.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the concept of flux mnemonics is newly extended to the wind power generator. By incorporating a small magnetizing winding into an outer-rotor doubly salient AlNiCo permanent magnet (PM) machine, a new flux-mnemonic PM brushless wind power generator is proposed and implemented. This generator can offer effective and efficient air-gap flux control. First, the characteristics of the proposed generator are analyzed by using the finite element method. Second, the closed-loop flux control is devised to achieve a constant generated voltage under time-varying wind speeds. Finally, the experimental results are given to verify the validity of the proposed generator and control system.

  16. In situ evaluation of air-sea CO2 gas transfer velocity in an inner estuary using eddy covariance - with a special focus on the importance of using reliable CO2-fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jørgensen, E. T.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Sejr, M. K.

    2012-04-01

    The air-sea exchange of CO2 or CO2 flux is driven by the difference in the partial pressure of CO2 in the water and the atmosphere (ΔpCO2), the solubility of CO2 (K0) and the gas transfer velocity (k) (Wanninkhof et al., 2009;Weiss, 1974) . ΔpCO2 and K0 are determined with relatively high precision and it is estimated that the biggest uncertainty when modelling the air-sea flux is the parameterization of k. As an example; the estimated global air-sea flux increases by 70 % when using the parameterization by Wanninkhof and McGillis (1999) instead of Wanninkhof (1992) (Rutgersson et al., 2008). In coastal areas the uncertainty is even higher and only few studies have focused on determining transfer velocity for the coastal waters and even fewer on estuaries (Borges et al., 2004;Rutgersson et al., 2008). The transfer velocity (k600) of CO2 in the inner estuary of Roskilde Fjord, Denmark was investigated using eddy covariance CO2 fluxes (ECM) and directly measured ΔpCO2 during May and June 2010. The data was strictly sorted to heighten the certainty of the results and the outcome was; DS1; using only ECM, and DS2; including the inertial dissipation method (IDM). The inner part of Roskilde Fjord showed to be a very biological active CO2 sink and preliminary results showed that the average k600 was more than 10 times higher than transfer velocities from similar studies of other coastal areas. The much higher transfer velocities were estimated to be caused by the greater fetch and shallower water in Roskilde Fjord, which indicated that turbulence in both air and water influence k600. The wind speed parameterization of k600 using DS1 showed some scatter but when including IDM the r2 of DS2 reached 0.93 with an exponential parameterization, where U10 was based on the Businger-Dyer relationships using friction velocity and atmospheric stability. This indicates that some of the uncertainties coupled with CO2 fluxes calculated by the ECM are removed when including the IDM.

  17. Band gaps in bubble phononic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, V.; Bretagne, A.; Lanoy, M.; Tourin, A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the interaction between Bragg and hybridization effects on the band gap properties of bubble phononic crystals. These latter consist of air cavities periodically arranged in an elastomer matrix and are fabricated using soft-lithography techniques. Their transmission properties are affected by Bragg effects due to the periodicity of the structure as well as hybridization between the propagating mode of the embedding medium and bubble resonance. The hybridization gap survives disorder while the Bragg gap requires a periodic distribution of bubbles. The distance between two bubble layers can be tuned to make the two gaps overlap or to create a transmission peak in the hybridization gap.

  18. Sensitivity analysis of an ocean carbon cycle model in the North Atlantic: an investigation of parameters affecting the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and export of detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, V.; Kettle, H.; Merchant, C. J.

    2011-06-01

    The sensitivity of the biological parameters in a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model in the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and detrital export is analysed. We explore the effect on these outputs of variation in the values of the twenty parameters that control ocean ecosystem growth in a 1-D formulation of the UK Met Office HadOCC NPZD model used in GCMs. We use and compare the results from one-at-a-time and all-at-a-time perturbations performed at three sites in the EuroSITES European Ocean Observatory Network: the Central Irminger Sea (60° N 40° W), the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (49° N 16° W) and the European Station for Time series in the Ocean Canary Islands (29° N 15° W). Reasonable changes to the values of key parameters are shown to have a large effect on the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production, and export of biological detritus to the deep ocean. Changes in the values of key parameters have a greater effect in more productive regions than in less productive areas. The most sensitive parameters are generally found to be those controlling well-established ocean ecosystem parameterisations widely used in many NPZD-type models. The air-sea CO2 flux is most influenced by variation in the parameters that control phytoplankton growth, detrital sinking and carbonate production by phytoplankton (the rain ratio). Primary production is most sensitive to the parameters that define the shape of the photosynthesis-irradiance curve. Export production is most sensitive to the parameters that control the rate of detrital sinking and the remineralisation of detritus.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of an Ocean Carbon Cycle Model in the North Atlantic: an investigation of parameters affecting the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and export of detritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, V.; Kettle, H.; Merchant, C. J.

    2010-12-01

    The sensitivity of the biological parameters in a nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model in the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production and detrital export is analysed. The NPZD model is the Hadley Centre Ocean Carbon Cycle model (HadOCC) from the UK Met Office, used in the Hadley Centre Coupled Model 3 (HadCM3) and FAst Met Office and Universities Simulator (FAMOUS) GCMs. Here, HadOCC is coupled to the 1-D General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) and forced with European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting meteorology to undertake a sensitivity analysis of its twenty biological parameters. Analyses are performed at three sites in the EuroSITES European Ocean Observatory Network: the Central Irminger Sea (60° N 40° W), the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (49° N 16° W) and the European Station for Time series in the Ocean Canary Islands (29° N 15° W) to assess variability in parameter sensitivities at different locations in the North Atlantic Ocean. Reasonable changes to the values of key parameters are shown to have a large effect on the calculation of the air-sea CO2 flux, primary production, and export of biological detritus to the deep ocean. Changes in the values of key parameters have a greater effect in more productive regions than in less productive areas. We perform the analysis using one-at-a-time perturbations and using a statistical emulator, and compare results. The most sensitive parameters are generic to many NPZD ocean ecosystem models. The air-sea CO2 flux is most influenced by variation in the parameters that control phytoplankton growth, detrital sinking and carbonate production by phytoplankton (the rain ratio). Primary production is most sensitive to the parameters that define the shape of the photosythesis-irradiance curve. Export production is most sensitive to the parameters that control the rate of detrital sinking and the remineralisation of detritus.

  20. AIR VEHICLES INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic Structural Response and Life Prediction Phase 1 - Identification of Knowledge Gaps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    rudder, all-moving horizontal tails, and body flap were “beefed up ” based on preliminary flutter assessment. The all-moving tail/ wing carry-through...external surface temperatures on the fuselage and wings of up to 640°F, and the acreage surface and structural temperatures in the engine nacelle area...edge to rotate up into the air-stream inducing a heating amplification on the panel edge as well as on the adjacent panels. In the X-33 program the

  1. An examination of boundary layer structure under the influence of the gap winds in Urumqi, China, during air pollution episode in winter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Xia, Xiangao; Xin, Yu; Ma, Yufen; Yang, Jing; Li, Jinglin; Yang, Xinghua

    2012-01-01

    Tethered-sonde measurements of atmospheric profiles were performed at Urumuqi, capital of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, from 29 December 2008 to 14 January 2009. The data were used to examine the boundary layer structure during this severe air pollution period. Diurnal evolution of local wind flow near Urumqi was simulated using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5). Measurements from operational radiosonde data showed that a southeasterly elevated low-level jet often intruded upon Urumqi through the middle Tianshan Mountain pass to the south of the city. The tethered-sonde measurements showed that calm and northwesterly winds prevailed near the surface in Urumqi, whereas the southeasterly winds of relatively higher speed were dominant above approximately 400 m. Both temperature inversion and humidity inversion frequently occured during day and nighttime. Temperature inversion intensity could sharply rise as the stronger elevated southeasterly gale (ESEG) happened. Model simulations showed that the winds near the surface around Urumqi remained calm during nighttime and developed toward the mountains during daytime. As cool airflow in the basin confronted the southeasterly winds from the pass in the lower layer, they formed a convergence line around Urumqi city, which was not favor for dilution of air pollutants.

  2. Experimental Characterization of Interchannel Mixing of Multiphase Flow Through a Narrow Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkiharju, Simo A.; Gose, James W.; Buchanan, John R., Jr.; Mychkovsky, Alexander G.; Lowe, Kirk T.; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2016-11-01

    Two-phase mass transfer through a gap connecting two adjacent channels was investigated as a function of gap geometry and flow conditions. An experiment with a simplified geometry was conducted to aid in the physical understanding and to provide data for validation of numerical computations. The flow loop consisted of two (127 mm)2 channels connected by a 1,219 mm (L) x 229 mm (W) gap, the height of which could be adjusted from 0 to 50 mm. The inlet Reynolds number in each channel could be independently varied from 4x104 - 1x105. During previous experiments, the single phase mixing was extensively investigated. The inlet void fraction was varied from 1 to 20%. Gas was injected as nominally monodisperse bubbles with diameter O(5 mm). The mass transfer through the gap was determined from measurements of the flow rates of water and air, and tracer concentration taken at channel inlets/outlets. The void fraction, bubble diameter distribution and gas flux was determined at the inlets based on flow rate measurements prior to gas injection, optical probes and Wire Mesh Sensor (WMS) data. At the outlets the gas fluxes were based on WMS measurements and the liquid phase mixing was determined based on measurement of the tracer concentration and liquid flow rate after separation of gas. Imaging of fluorescent tracer dye was utilized for select conditions to examine the dynamics of the mixing.

  3. Air-sea heat fluxes associated to mesoscale eddies in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean and their dependence on different regional conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyba, Inés M.; Saraceno, Martín; Solman, Silvina A.

    2016-11-01

    Heat fluxes between the ocean and the atmosphere largely represent the link between the two media. A possible mechanism of interaction is generated by mesoscale ocean eddies. In this work we evaluate if eddies in Southwestern Atlantic (SWA) Ocean may significantly affect flows between the ocean and the atmosphere. Atmospherics conditions associated with eddies were examined using data of sea surface temperature (SST), sensible (SHF) and latent heat flux (LHF) from NCEP-CFSR reanalysis. On average, we found that NCEP-CFSR reanalysis adequately reflects the variability expected from eddies in the SWA, considering the classical eddy-pumping theory: anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddies cause maximum positive (negative) anomalies with maximum mean anomalies of 0.5 °C (-0.5 °C) in SST, 6 W/m2 (-4 W/m2) in SHF and 12 W/m2 (-9 W/m2) in LHF. However, a regional dependence of heat fluxes associated to mesoscale cyclonic eddies was found: in the turbulent Brazil-Malvinas Confluence (BMC) region they are related with positive heat flux anomaly (ocean heat loss), while in the rest of the SWA they behave as expected (ocean heat gain). We argue that eddy-pumping do not cool enough the center of the cyclonic eddies in the BMC region simply because most of them trapped very warm waters when they originate in the subtropics. The article therefore concludes that in the SWA: (1) a robust link exists between the SST anomalies generated by eddies and the local anomalous heat flow between the ocean and the atmosphere; (2) in the BMC region cyclonic eddies are related with positive heat anomalies, contrary to what is expected.

  4. Design and construction of Information Systems of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Air-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiankun; Fang, Lei; Bai, Yan; He, Xianqiang; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Jianyu

    2013-10-01

    Climate change has become one of the hotspots of global attention in recent progress of globalization and industrialization. The mainstream opinion presented by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) regards that the global warming was caused mainly by greenhouse gases generated by human activities, such as anthropogenic CO2, which also resulting in the high-frequent happening of abnormal climate events. Satellite remote sensing is an efficient and economic method for CO2 flux observation. In this paper, we describe an Information System of Ocean Satellite Monitoring for Ari-sea CO2 Flux (IssCO2) which developed by the Second Institute of Oceanography, China. The IssCO2can achieve the whole procedure automatically from the satellite remote data receiving to products distribution, including the data acquirement and satellite image process, products generation, etc. The IssCO2 can process various types of in situ data, satellite data and model data, and validate the final satellite-derived CO2 flux products by in situ data; it can provide a real-time browsing and download of remote sensing products on the web based on the Geo-information System (GIS) technologies. The IssCO2 can meet the concurrent queries of different levels of users, and the query results can be visual displayed and analyzed on the client.

  5. From elementary flux modes to elementary flux vectors: Metabolic pathway analysis with arbitrary linear flux constraints.

    PubMed

    Klamt, Steffen; Regensburger, Georg; Gerstl, Matthias P; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Schuster, Stefan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Zanghellini, Jürgen; Müller, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Elementary flux modes (EFMs) emerged as a formal concept to describe metabolic pathways and have become an established tool for constraint-based modeling and metabolic network analysis. EFMs are characteristic (support-minimal) vectors of the flux cone that contains all feasible steady-state flux vectors of a given metabolic network. EFMs account for (homogeneous) linear constraints arising from reaction irreversibilities and the assumption of steady state; however, other (inhomogeneous) linear constraints, such as minimal and maximal reaction rates frequently used by other constraint-based techniques (such as flux balance analysis [FBA]), cannot be directly integrated. These additional constraints further restrict the space of feasible flux vectors and turn the flux cone into a general flux polyhedron in which the concept of EFMs is not directly applicable anymore. For this reason, there has been a conceptual gap between EFM-based (pathway) analysis methods and linear optimization (FBA) techniques, as they operate on different geometric objects. One approach to overcome these limitations was proposed ten years ago and is based on the concept of elementary flux vectors (EFVs). Only recently has the community started to recognize the potential of EFVs for metabolic network analysis. In fact, EFVs exactly represent the conceptual development required to generalize the idea of EFMs from flux cones to flux polyhedra. This work aims to present a concise theoretical and practical introduction to EFVs that is accessible to a broad audience. We highlight the close relationship between EFMs and EFVs and demonstrate that almost all applications of EFMs (in flux cones) are possible for EFVs (in flux polyhedra) as well. In fact, certain properties can only be studied with EFVs. Thus, we conclude that EFVs provide a powerful and unifying framework for constraint-based modeling of metabolic networks.

  6. Development of an Agricultural Fertilizer Modeling System for Bi-Directional Ammonia Fluxes in the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Model

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric ammonia (NH3) plays an important role in fine-mode aerosol formation. Accurate estimates of ammonia from both human and natural emissions can reduce uncertainties in air quality modeling. The majority of ammonia anthropogenic emissions come from the agricul...

  7. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Gap Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles. PMID:25635395

  8. SAMOS Surface Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Shawn; Bourassa, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The development of a new surface flux dataset based on underway meteorological observations from research vessels will be presented. The research vessel data center at the Florida State University routinely acquires, quality controls, and distributes underway surface meteorological and oceanographic observations from over 30 oceanographic vessels. These activities are coordinated by the Shipboard Automated Meteorological and Oceanographic System (SAMOS) initiative in partnership with the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) project. Recently, the SAMOS data center has used these underway observations to produce bulk flux estimates for each vessel along individual cruise tracks. A description of this new flux product, along with the underlying data quality control procedures applied to SAMOS observations, will be provided. Research vessels provide underway observations at high-temporal frequency (1 min. sampling interval) that include navigational (position, course, heading, and speed), meteorological (air temperature, humidity, wind, surface pressure, radiation, rainfall), and oceanographic (surface sea temperature and salinity) samples. Vessels recruited to the SAMOS initiative collect a high concentration of data within the U.S. continental shelf and also frequently operate well outside routine shipping lanes, capturing observations in extreme ocean environments (Southern, Arctic, South Atlantic, and South Pacific oceans). These observations are atypical for their spatial and temporal sampling, making them very useful for many applications including validation of numerical models and satellite retrievals, as well as local assessments of natural variability. Individual SAMOS observations undergo routine automated quality control and select vessels receive detailed visual data quality inspection. The result is a quality-flagged data set that is ideal for calculating turbulent flux estimates. We will describe the bulk flux algorithms that have been applied to the

  9. Estimating total horizontal aeolian flux within shrub-invaded groundwater-dependent meadows using empirical and mechanistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vest, Kimberly R.; Elmore, Andrew J.; Kaste, James M.; Okin, Gregory S.; Li, Junran

    2013-06-01

    erosion is a significant environmental problem that removes soil resources from sensitive ecosystems and contributes to air pollution. In regions of shallow groundwater, friable (puffy) soils are maintained through capillary action, surface evaporation of solute-rich soil moisture, and protection from mobilization by groundwater-dependent grasses and shrubs. When a reduction in vegetation cover occurs through any disturbance process, there is potential for aeolian transport and dust emission. We find that as mean gap size between vegetation elements scaled by vegetation height increases, total horizontal aeolian sediment flux increases and explains 58% of the variation in total horizontal aeolian sediment flux. We also test a probabilistic model of wind erosion based on gap size between vegetation elements scaled by vegetation height (the Okin model), which predicts measured total horizontal aeolian sediment flux more closely than another commonly used model based on the average plant area observed in profile (Raupach model). The threshold shear velocity of bare soil appears to increase as gap size between vegetation elements scaled by vegetation height increases, reflecting either surface armoring or reduced interaction between the groundwater capillary zone and surface sediments. This work advances understanding of the importance of measuring gap size between vegetation elements scaled by vegetation height for empirically estimating Q and for structuring process-based models of desert wind erosion in groundwater-dependent vegetation.

  10. Aircraft trace gas measurements during the London 2012 Olympics: Air quality and emission fluxes derived from sampling upwind and downwind of a megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G.; O'Shea, S.; Muller, J.; Jones, B.; O'Sullivan, D.; Lee, J. D.; Bauguitte, S.; Gallagher, M. W.; Percival, C.; Barratt, B.; McQuaid, J. B.; Illingworth, S.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents airborne in situ and remote sensing measurements recorded during July and August 2012, across the period of the London 2012 Summer Olympics and simultaneous with the Clear air for London (ClearfLo) ground-based measurement and modelling campaign. Through long-term (2-year) and intensive observation periods (Winter 2011 and Summer 2012), the ClearfLo programme aims to better understand emissions, as well as the chemical, dynamical and micro-meteorological processes which modulate air quality in the London urban environment - an important risk factor for both acute and chronic health effects. The work presented here focuses on two contrasting case studies within the summer ClearfLo period: 30 July 2012 and 9 August 2012, representing relatively clean background and polluted background cases, respectively, and characterised by well-mixed Atlantic westerly maritime inflow in the former and stagnant air (high pressure) in the latter. Measurements of CO, CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, HCN, and other gases measured on board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 aircraft will be presented and interpreted, with emphasis on observed concentration gradients and tracer-tracer correlations as well as airmass vertical structure and airmass history upwind and downwind of central London in each case. By applying a simple advective model and making use of vertically resolved thermodynamic and composition data, we are able to derive emission strengths for these gases that are representative of the total enclosed surface area. Example emissions for these two cases range between 6x105 kg(C)/hr and 9x105 kg(C)/hr for CO2, and ~0.6x105 kg(C)/hr for CH4. This airborne sampling methodology highlights the unique utility of aircraft measurements to routinely and climatologically characterise emissions from area sources such as cities, and points to future missions to target localised hotspots and distributed point sources.

  11. Analytical Modeling of a Novel Transverse Flux Machine for Direct Drive Wind Turbine Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, IIftekhar; Husain, Tausif; Uddin, Md Wasi; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-09-02

    This paper presents a nonlinear analytical model of a novel double sided flux concentrating Transverse Flux Machine (TFM) based on the Magnetic Equivalent Circuit (MEC) model. The analytical model uses a series-parallel combination of flux tubes to predict the flux paths through different parts of the machine including air gaps, permanent magnets (PM), stator, and rotor. The two-dimensional MEC model approximates the complex three-dimensional flux paths of the TFM and includes the effects of magnetic saturation. The model is capable of adapting to any geometry which makes it a good alternative for evaluating prospective designs of TFM as compared to finite element solvers which are numerically intensive and require more computation time. A single phase, 1 kW, 400 rpm machine is analytically modeled and its resulting flux distribution, no-load EMF and torque, verified with Finite Element Analysis (FEA). The results are found to be in agreement with less than 5% error, while reducing the computation time by 25 times.

  12. Analytical Modeling of a Novel Transverse Flux Machine for Direct Drive Wind Turbine Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, IIftekhar; Husain, Tausif; Uddin, Md Wasi; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain; Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2015-08-24

    This paper presents a nonlinear analytical model of a novel double-sided flux concentrating Transverse Flux Machine (TFM) based on the Magnetic Equivalent Circuit (MEC) model. The analytical model uses a series-parallel combination of flux tubes to predict the flux paths through different parts of the machine including air gaps, permanent magnets, stator, and rotor. The two-dimensional MEC model approximates the complex three-dimensional flux paths of the TFM and includes the effects of magnetic saturation. The model is capable of adapting to any geometry that makes it a good alternative for evaluating prospective designs of TFM compared to finite element solvers that are numerically intensive and require more computation time. A single-phase, 1-kW, 400-rpm machine is analytically modeled, and its resulting flux distribution, no-load EMF, and torque are verified with finite element analysis. The results are found to be in agreement, with less than 5% error, while reducing the computation time by 25 times.

  13. Two-phase flow patterns in adiabatic and diabatic corrugated plate gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polzin, A.-E.; Kabelac, S.; de Vries, B.

    2016-09-01

    Correlations for two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop can be improved considerably, when they are adapted to specific flow patterns. As plate heat exchangers find increasing application as evaporators and condensers, there is a need for flow pattern maps for corrugated plate gaps. This contribution presents experimental results on flow pattern investigations for such a plate heat exchanger background, using an adiabatic visualisation setup as well as a diabatic setup. Three characteristic flow patterns were observed in the considered range of two-phase flow: bubbly flow, film flow and slug flow. The occurrence of these flow patterns is a function of mass flux, void fraction, fluid properties and plate geometry. Two different plate geometries having a corrugation angle of 27° and 63°, respectively and two different fluids (water/air and R365mfc liquid/vapor) have been analysed. A flow pattern map using the momentum flux is presented.

  14. Dual-rotor, radial-flux, toroidally-wound, permanent-magnet machine

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Ronghai; Lipo, Thomas A.

    2005-08-02

    The present invention provides a novel dual-rotor, radial-flux, toroidally-wound, permanent-magnet machine. The present invention improves electrical machine torque density and efficiency. At least one concentric surface-mounted permanent magnet dual-rotor is located inside and outside of a torus-shaped stator with back-to-back windings, respectively. The machine substantially improves machine efficiency by reducing the end windings and boosts the torque density by at least doubling the air gap and optimizing the machine aspect ratio.

  15. Measurement of aerosol particles, gases and flux radiation in the Pico de Orizaba National Park, and its relationship to air pollution transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez, C.; Castro, T.; Muhlia, A.; Moya, M.; Martínez-Arroyo, A.; Báez, A.

    Continuous atmospheric measurements were carried out at the Pico de Orizaba National Park (PONP), Mexico, in order to evaluate the characteristics and sources of air quality. This action allowed one to identify specific threats for the effective protection of natural resources and biodiversity. Results show the presence of particles and polluted gases transported by winds from the urban zones nearby (cities of Mexico, Puebla and Tlaxcala), as well as their measurable influence on the optical properties of the park environment. Nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and sulfur dioxide show a daily pattern suggesting an influence of pollution generated by anthropogenic processes. Average concentration of SO 2 was higher than recorded at the southern part of Mexico City. Ozone concentrations ranging from 0.035 to 0.06 ppm suggest residual or background ozone character. Back trajectory analysis of air parcels arriving at the site confirm pollution caused by biomass burning and mass transport from urban zones. The SO 42-/TC ratio exhibited values (0.88±0.33) similar to urban areas. Ratios BC/TC and OC/BC for PONP are similar to those reported as influenced by burning emissions of fossil fuels. Typical rural aerosols were also found at the site, and sulfate and ammonium concentrations were correlated. The most predominating mode in surface particles size distribution was at 0.32 μm with no significant presence of coarse particles. Total carbon (OC+BC) content of fine particle mass (PM less than 1 μm) comprised, on average, 75%. Optical properties retrieved from photometric data show intermittent influence from urban pollution. Time periods with low absorbing particles, great visibility and abundance of small particles alternating with short times with bigger particles and high turbidity indicated by the optical depth.

  16. Mechanisms driving the seasonality of air-sea CO2 flux in the ice-free zone of the Southern Ocean and how these might evolve: A 1D vertical biogeochemical model approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancelot, C.; Pasquer, B.; Metzl, N.; Goosse, H.

    2015-12-01

    The biogeochemical SWAMCO-3 model is used to understand mechanisms governing the seasonality of air-sea CO2 exchanges in the ice-free Southern Ocean. The model explicitly details the dynamics of three Phytoplankton Functional Types (PFTs) of importance for C, N, P, Si, Fe cycling and air-sea CO2 exchange in this area. These are the diatoms, the pico-nanophytoplankton and the coccolithophores whose growth regulation by light, temperature and nutrients has been obtained from phenomenological observations available for these PFTs. The performance of the SWAMCO-3 model coupled to a vertical one-dimensional physical model is assessed at the location of the time-series station KERFIX (around 51°S-68°E). The model was able to reproduce a mean seasonal cycle based on years where a maximum of chemical and biological observations are available. Ocean fCO2 in equilibrium with the atmosphere are simulated both in winter associated with surface layer replenishment in DIC due to deep vertical mixing and in late summer as a consequence of the warming effect on the carbonate system. A clear under-saturation is simulated in summer driven by primary production. Model scenarios cancelling biological activity or only coccolithophores allowed, by comparison with the standard simulation, untangling the respective role of physical and biological processes in driving the sign and magnitude of air-sea CO2 exchanges. First, we show that coccolithophores are repressing the ocean C uptake, but only marginally (5%). Second, the model highlights the role of diatoms on the presence of a CO2 sink in summer. Altogether, this results in a weak annual air-sea CO2 flux (-0.9 mol m-2 y-1 or -0.1 Pg C y-1 for the ice-free zone south of 50°S), whose variability seems more related to the thermodynamical processes. We then speculate how global warming might influence the latter mechanisms and alter air-sea CO2 exchanges in this region.

  17. A study of the influence of forest gaps on fire-atmosphere interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Michael T.; Heilman, Warren E.; Zhong, Shiyuan; Charney, Joseph J.; Bian, Xindi

    2016-07-01

    Much uncertainty exists regarding the possible role that gaps in forest canopies play in modulating fire-atmosphere interactions in otherwise horizontally homogeneous forests. This study examines the influence of gaps in forest canopies on atmospheric perturbations induced by a low-intensity fire using the ARPS-CANOPY model, a version of the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) model with a canopy parameterization. A series of numerical experiments are conducted with a stationary low-intensity fire, represented in the model as a line of enhanced surface sensible heat flux. Experiments are conducted with and without forest gaps, and with gaps in different positions relative to the fire line. For each of the four cases considered, an additional simulation is performed without the fire to facilitate comparison of the fire-perturbed atmosphere and the background state. Analyses of both mean and instantaneous wind velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, air temperature, and turbulent mixing of heat are presented in order to examine the fire-perturbed atmosphere on multiple timescales. Results of the analyses indicate that the impact of the fire on the atmosphere is greatest in the case with the gap centered on the fire and weakest in the case with the gap upstream of the fire. It is shown that gaps in forest canopies have the potential to play a role in the vertical as well as horizontal transport of heat away from the fire. Results also suggest that, in order to understand how the fire will alter wind and turbulence in a heterogeneous forest, one needs to first understand how the forest heterogeneity itself influences the wind and turbulence fields without the fire.

  18. Gap filling strategies and error in estimating annual soil respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil respiration (Rsoil) is one of the largest CO2 fluxes in the global carbon (C) cycle. Estimation of annual Rsoil requires extrapolation of survey measurements or gap-filling of automated records to produce a complete time series. While many gap-filling methodologies have been employed, there is ...

  19. Flux-Feedback Magnetic-Suspension Actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J.

    1990-01-01

    Flux-feedback magnetic-suspension actuator provides magnetic suspension and control forces having linear transfer characteristics between force command and force output over large range of gaps. Hall-effect devices used as sensors for electronic feedback circuit controlling currents flowing in electromagnetic windings to maintain flux linking suspended element at substantially constant value independent of changes in length of gap. Technique provides effective method for maintenance of constant flux density in gap and simpler than previous methods. Applications include magnetic actuators for control of shapes and figures of antennas and of precise segmented reflectors, magnetic suspensions in devices for storage of angular momentum and/or kinetic energy, and systems for control, pointing, and isolation of instruments.

  20. Interannual fluctuations of sea-air CO2 fluxes and carbon transport between 1950 and 2000: Biological and temperature effects deduced from OBCMSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winguth, A.; Dobbel, M.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Wentzel, P.

    2003-04-01

    Factors controlling the interannual variability of air-sea CO2 in response to the changes in temperature, circulation, and phytoplankton or zooplankton are not well known and controversially discussed. A recent analysis of pCO2 data by Takahasi et al. (2002) show the importance of high-latitude northern and southern oceans as a sink for atmospheric CO2. These areas are source areas for deep an intermediate water masses and hence represents a direct connection between the atmosphere and the deep oceans. We are using two coupled ocean general circulation - marine ecosystem models with different resolution, the NPZD-type HAMOCC4 coupled to the LSG and the C-HOPE, to explore how biology, temperature, and circulation changes can explain some of the agreements and discrepancies between the data and the model in these regions. These exploratory sensitivity experiments are designed to be a first step towards a currently developed inverse ecosystem model to quantify large-scale interannual-to-decadal fluctuations of the marine carbon cycle and to provide more accurate predictions of the climate system.

  1. Source fingerprint monitoring of air pollutants from petrochemical industry and the determination of their annual emission flux using open path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yih-Shiaw Huang; Shih-Yi Chang; Tai-Ly Tso

    1996-12-31

    Toxic air pollutants were investigated in several petrochemical industrial park in Taiwan using a movable open-path Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results show the qualitative and quantitative analysis of emission gases from plants, and also provide the emission rates of various compounds. More than twenty compounds under usual operation were found from these industrial park. The concentration variation with time could be correlated exactly with the distances from the emission source along the wind direction. This means that by changing the measuring points the source of emission could be unambiguously identified. The point, area and line source (PAL) plume dispersion model has been applied to estimate the emission rate of either a point or an area source. The local atmospheric stability was determined by releasing an SF{sub 6} tracer. The origin of errors came mainly from the uncertainty of the source configuration and the variation of the meteorological condition. Through continuous measurement using a portable open-path Fourier transform infrared (POP-FTIR) spectrometer, the maximum value of the emission rate and the annual amount of emission could be derived. The emission rate of the measured toxic gases was derived by the model technique, and the results show that the emission amount is on the order of ten to hundred tons per year.

  2. Phytoplankton carbon fixation gene (RuBisCO) transcripts and air-sea CO2 flux in the Mississippi River plume

    SciTech Connect

    John, David E.; Wang, Zhaohui A.; Liu, Xuewu; Byrne, Robert H.; Corredor, Jorge E.; López, José M.; Cabrera, Alvaro; Bronk, Deborah A.; Tabita, F. Robert; Paul, John H.

    2007-08-30

    River plumes deliver large quantities of nutrients to oligotrophic oceans, often resulting in significant CO2 drawdown. To determine the relationship between expression of the major gene in carbon fixation (large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase, RuBisCO) and CO2 dynamics, we evaluated rbcL mRNA abundance using novel quantitative PCR assays, phytoplankton cell analyses, photophysiological parameters, and pCO2 in and around the Mississippi River plume (MRP) in the Gulf of Mexico. Lower salinity (30–32) stations were dominated by rbcL mRNA concentrations from heterokonts, such as diatoms and pelagophytes, which were at least an order of magnitude greater than haptophytes, alpha-Synechococcus or high-light Prochlorococcus. However, rbcL transcript abundances were similar among these groups at oligotrophic stations (salinity 34–36). Diatom cell counts and heterokont rbcL RNA showed a strong negative correlation to seawater pCO2. While Prochlorococcus cells did not exhibit a large difference between low and high pCO2 water, Prochlorococcus rbcL RNA concentrations had a strong positive correlation to pCO2, suggesting a very low level of RuBisCO RNA transcription among Prochlorococcus in the plume waters, possibly due to their relatively poor carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These results provide molecular evidence that diatom/pelagophyte productivity is largely responsible for the large CO2 drawdown occurring in the MRP, based on the co-occurrence of elevated RuBisCO gene transcript concentrations from this group and reduced seawater pCO2 levels. This may partly be due to efficient CCMs that enable heterokont eukaryotes such as diatoms to continue fixing CO2 in the face of strong CO2 drawdown. Finally, our work represents the first attempt to relate in situ microbial gene expression to contemporaneous CO2 flux

  3. A novel single-phase flux-switching permanent magnet linear generator used for free-piston Stirling engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ping; Sui, Yi; Tong, Chengde; Bai, Jingang; Yu, Bin; Lin, Fei

    2014-05-01

    This paper investigates a novel single-phase flux-switching permanent-magnet (PM) linear machine used for free-piston Stirling engines. The machine topology and operating principle are studied. A flux-switching PM linear machine is designed based on the quasi-sinusoidal speed characteristic of the resonant piston. Considering the performance of back electromotive force and thrust capability, some leading structural parameters, including the air gap length, the PM thickness, the ratio of the outer radius of mover to that of stator, the mover tooth width, the stator tooth width, etc., are optimized by finite element analysis. Compared with conventional three-phase moving-magnet linear machine, the proposed single-phase flux-switching topology shows advantages in less PM use, lighter mover, and higher volume power density.

  4. Behind the Pay Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey, Judy Goldberg; Hill, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Women have made remarkable gains in education during the past three decades, yet these achievements have resulted in only modest improvements in pay equity. The gender pay gap has become a fixture of the U.S. workplace and is so ubiquitous that many simply view it as normal. "Behind the Pay Gap" examines the gender pay gap for college graduates.…

  5. O3 flux-related responsiveness of photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal conductance of adult Fagus sylvatica to experimentally enhanced free-air O3 exposure.

    PubMed

    Löw, M; Häberle, K-H; Warren, C R; Matyssek, R

    2007-03-01

    Knowledge of responses of photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal conductance to cumulative ozone uptake (COU) is still scarce, and this is particularly the case for adult trees. The effect of ozone (O(3)) exposure on trees was examined with 60-year-old beech trees (FAGUS SYLVATICA) at a forest site of southern Germany. Trees were exposed to the ambient O(3) regime (1 x O(3)) or an experimentally elevated twice-ambient O(3) regime (2 x O(3)). The elevated 2 x O (3) regime was provided by means of a free-air O(3) canopy exposure system. The hypotheses were tested that (1) gas exchange is negatively affected by O(3) and (2) the effects of O(3) are dose-dependent and thus the sizes of differences between treatments are positively related to COU. Gas exchange (light-saturated CO(2) uptake rate A(max), stomatal conductance g (s), maximum rate of carboxylation Vc (max), ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate turnover limited rate of photosynthesis J (max), CO(2) compensation point CP, apparent quantum yield of net CO(2) uptake AQ, carboxylation efficiency CE, day- and nighttime respiration) and chlorophyll fluorescence (electron transfer rate, ETR) were measured IN SITU on attached sun and shade leaves. Measurements were made periodically throughout the growing seasons of 2003 (an exceptionally dry year) and 2004 (a year with average rainfall). In 2004 Vc(max), J(max), and CE were lower in trees receiving 2 x O(3) compared with the ambient O(3) regime (1 x O(3)). Treatment differences in Vc (max), J (max), CE were rather small in 2004 (i.e., parameter levels were lower by 10 - 30 % in 2 x O(3) than 1 x O(3)) and not significant in 2003. In 2004 COU was positively correlated with the difference between treatments in A (max), g (s), and ETR (i.e., consistent with the dose-dependence of O(3)'s deleterious effects). However, in 2003, differences in A(max), g (s), and ETR between the two O(3) regimes were smaller at the end of the dry summer 2003 (i.e., when COU was greatest). The

  6. Plasmon transmission through excitonic subwavelength gaps.

    PubMed

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-04-14

    We study the transfer of electromagnetic energy across a subwavelength gap separating two co-axial metal nanorods. In the absence of spacer in the gap separating the rods, the system exhibits strong coupling behavior between longitudinal plasmons in the two rods. The nature and magnitude of this coupling are studied by varying various geometrical parameters. As a function of frequency, the transmission is dominated by a split longitudinal plasmon peak. The two hybrid modes are the dipole-like "bonding" mode characterized by a peak intensity in the gap and a quadrupole-like "antibonding" mode whose amplitude vanishes at the gap center. When the length of one rod is varied, this mode spectrum exhibits the familiar anti-crossing behavior that depends on the coupling strength determined by the gap width. When off-resonant 2-level emitters are placed in the gap, almost no effect on the frequency dependent transmission is observed. In contrast, when the molecular system is resonant with the plasmonic line shape, the transmission is strongly modified, showing characteristics of strong exciton-plasmon coupling. Most strongly modified is the transmission near the lower frequency "bonding" plasmon mode. The presence of resonant molecules in the gap affects not only the molecule-field interaction but also the spatial distribution of the field intensity and the electromagnetic energy flux across the junction.

  7. Plasmon transmission through excitonic subwavelength gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    We study the transfer of electromagnetic energy across a subwavelength gap separating two co-axial metal nanorods. In the absence of spacer in the gap separating the rods, the system exhibits strong coupling behavior between longitudinal plasmons in the two rods. The nature and magnitude of this coupling are studied by varying various geometrical parameters. As a function of frequency, the transmission is dominated by a split longitudinal plasmon peak. The two hybrid modes are the dipole-like "bonding" mode characterized by a peak intensity in the gap and a quadrupole-like "antibonding" mode whose amplitude vanishes at the gap center. When the length of one rod is varied, this mode spectrum exhibits the familiar anti-crossing behavior that depends on the coupling strength determined by the gap width. When off-resonant 2-level emitters are placed in the gap, almost no effect on the frequency dependent transmission is observed. In contrast, when the molecular system is resonant with the plasmonic line shape, the transmission is strongly modified, showing characteristics of strong exciton-plasmon coupling. Most strongly modified is the transmission near the lower frequency "bonding" plasmon mode. The presence of resonant molecules in the gap affects not only the molecule-field interaction but also the spatial distribution of the field intensity and the electromagnetic energy flux across the junction.

  8. Homopolar dc motor and trapped flux brushless dc motor using high temperature superconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crapo, Alan D.; Lloyd, Jerry D.

    1991-03-01

    Two motors have been designed and built for use with high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) materials. They are a homopolar dc motor that uses HTSC field windings and a brushless dc motor that uses bulk HTSC materials to trap flux in steel rotor poles. The HTSC field windings of the homopolar dc motor are designed to operate at 1000 A/sq cm in a 0.010-T field. In order to maximize torque in the homopolar dc motor, an iron magnetic circuit with small air gaps gives maximum flux for minimum Ampere turns in the field. A copper field winding version of the homopolar dc motor has been tested while waiting for 575 A turn HTSC coils. The trapped flux brushless dc motor has been built and is ready to test melt textured bulk HTSC rings that are currently being prepared. The stator of the trapped flux motor will impress a magnetic field in the steel rotor poles with warm HTSC bulk rings. The rings are then cooled to 77 K to trap the flux in the rotor. The motor can then operate as a brushless dc motor.

  9. Homopolar dc motor and trapped flux brushless dc motor using high temperature superconductor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Crapo, A.D.; Lloyd, J.D. )

    1991-03-01

    This paper reports on two motors designed and built for use with high temperature superconductor (HTSC) materials. They are a homopolar DC motor that will use HTSC field windings and a brushless DC motor that will use bulk HTSC material to trap flux in steel rotor poles. The HTSC field windings of the homopolar DC motor are designed to operate at 1000 Amperes/cm{sup 2} in a 0.010 Tesla (100 Gauss) field. In order to maximize torque in the homopolar DC motor, an iron magnetic circuit with small air gaps gives maximum flux for minimum Ampere turns in the field. A copper field winding version of the homopolar DC motor has been tested while the authors wait for 575 Ampere turn HTSC coils.

  10. A biogenic CO2 flux adjustment scheme for the mitigation of large-scale biases in global atmospheric CO2 analyses and forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agustí-Panareda, Anna; Massart, Sébastien; Chevallier, Frédéric; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boussetta, Souhail; Dutra, Emanuel; Beljaars, Anton

    2016-08-01

    Forecasting atmospheric CO2 daily at the global scale with a good accuracy like it is done for the weather is a challenging task. However, it is also one of the key areas of development to bridge the gaps between weather, air quality and climate models. The challenge stems from the fact that atmospheric CO2 is largely controlled by the CO2 fluxes at the surface, which are difficult to constrain with observations. In particular, the biogenic fluxes simulated by land surface models show skill in detecting synoptic and regional-scale disturbances up to sub-seasonal time-scales, but they are subject to large seasonal and annual budget errors at global scale, usually requiring a posteriori adjustment. This paper presents a scheme to diagnose and mitigate model errors associated with biogenic fluxes within an atmospheric CO2 forecasting system. The scheme is an adaptive scaling procedure referred to as a biogenic flux adjustment scheme (BFAS), and it can be applied automatically in real time throughout the forecast. The BFAS method generally improves the continental budget of CO2 fluxes in the model by combining information from three sources: (1) retrospective fluxes estimated by a global flux inversion system, (2) land-use information, (3) simulated fluxes from the model. The method is shown to produce enhanced skill in the daily CO2 10-day forecasts without requiring continuous manual intervention. Therefore, it is particularly suitable for near-real-time CO2 analysis and forecasting systems.

  11. Large gap control in electromagnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Subrata; Prasad, Dinkar; Pal, Jayanta

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes design and implementation of a single axis dc attraction type electromagnetic suspension system where an electromagnet of 2.6 kg mass is levitated over a large gap under a fixed ferromagnetic guide-way. The electromagnet exhibits nonlinear force-current-distance characteristics, and if controllers are to be designed by using linear analysis, the air-gap is restricted to a small region around the chosen nominal operating point. In this work, an attempt has been made to increase the operating range of an electromagnetic suspension system by using the concept of piecewise linear control where the nonlinear force-current-airgap relationships of the magnetic suspension system have been successively linearized at several operating points with a suitable controller designed for each operating point. A novel analog switching scheme has been designed and implemented to automatically switch to the relevant controller depending on the actual air-gap.

  12. Numerical Investigation of Engine Inlet Vane Hot-Air Anti-Icing System with Surface Air Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Chen, Weijian; Zhang, Dalin

    The inlet vane of aircraft engine needs to be equipped with anti-icing system to prevent ice accretion on the leading edge due to flight safety requirements, and the engine bleed hot-air is mostly used to heat the vane surface in anti-icing system. In order to save the energy consumption, a new anti-icing structure was developed and investigated with numerical simulation. Besides the use of small tunnels to enhance the heat transfer characteristics, a narrow gap was opened and assigned on the vane surface at the end of the anti-icing tunnels, and the exhaust hot-air was released from the gap to form an air film on the outside surface, which was supposed to prevent the droplets from impinging to the surface and sweep the droplets away. The droplets impingement on the vane surface was investigated by solving the 3D Eulerian air/droplets twophase model, and the impingement results were compared with the original system. Meanwhile, the thermodynamic analysis of the anti-icing system was presented in this paper. The results indicate that the air film is effective to decrease the droplets impingement area, and the new structure could provide more heat flux for anti-icing than the regular anti-icing structure.

  13. Closing the Pay Gap

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    the pay gap has been narrowed, hut only to just under 10 percent. And current military compensation legislation does not close the gap until 2026. There...will continue to be a pay gap until 2026 unless the next administration and the next Congress provide more for pay above the 1999 legislated ramp- up...of .5 percent (one half of one percent) per year to attain pay equality . That means that soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines and Coast Guardsmen

  14. Measurement of particulate matter emission fluxes from a beef cattle feedlot using Flux-gradient technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on air emissions from open-lot beef cattle feedlots are limited. This research was conducted to determine PM10 emission fluxes from a commercial beef cattle feedlot in Kansas using the flux-gradient technique, a widely-used micrometeorological method for gaseous emissions from open sources. V...

  15. Standardization of flux chamber and wind tunnel flux measurements for quantifying emissions from area sources at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia (NH3) at animal feeding operations (AFO). However, there has been little regard to the extreme variation and inaccuracy caused by inappropriate air velocity or sweep air flow...

  16. Influence of Gap-Filling to Generate Continuous Datasets on Process Network Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, J.; Kim, J.; Kim, S.; Chun, J.

    2013-12-01

    The interplay of environmental conditions, energy, matter, and information defines the context and constraints for the set of processes and structures that may emerge during self-organization in complex ecosystems. Following Ruddell and Kumar (2009), we have evaluated statistical measures of characterizing the organization of the information flow in ecohydrological process networks in a deciduous forest ecosystem. We used the time series data obtained in 2008 (normal year) from the KoFlux forest tower site in central Korea. The 30-minute averages of eddy fluxes of energy, water and CO2 were measured at 40m above an oak-dominated old deciduous forest along with other micrometeorological variables. In this analysis, we selected 13 variables: atmospheric pressure (Pa), net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), gross primary productivity (GPP), ecosystem respiration (RE), latent heat flux (LE), precipitation (Precip), solar radiation (Rg), air temperature (T), vapor pressure deficit (VPD), sensible heat flux (H), canopy temperature (Tc), wind direction (WD), and wind speed (WS). Our results support that a process network approach can be used to formally resolve feedback, time scales, and subsystems that define the complex ecosystem's organization by considering mutual information and transfer entropy simultaneously. We also observed that the turbulent and atmospheric boundary layer subsystems are coupled through feedback loops, and form a regional self-organizing subsystem in August when the forest is in healthy environment. In particular, we noted that the observed feedback loops in the process network disappeared when the time series data were artificially gap-filled for missing data, which is a common practice in post-data processing. In this presentation, we report the influence of gap-filling on the process network analysis by artificially assigning different sizes and periods of missing data and discuss the implication of our results on validation and calibration of

  17. Optimizing Power Density and Efficiency of a Double-Halbach Array Permanent-Magnet Ironless Axial-Flux Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is investigating hybrid electric and turboelectric propulsion concepts for future aircraft to reduce fuel burn, emissions, and noise. Systems studies show that the weight and efficiency of the electric system components need to be improved for this concept to be feasible. This effort aims to identify design parameters that affect power density and efficiency for a double-Halbach array permanent-magnet ironless axial flux motor configuration. These parameters include both geometrical and higher-order parameters, including pole count, rotor speed, current density, and geometries of the magnets, windings, and air gap.

  18. Wintertime boundary-layer structure and air sea interaction over the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khelif, Djamal; Friehe, Carl A.; Jonsson, Haflidi; Wang, Qing; Rados, Konstantinos

    2005-06-01

    The wintertime meteorology over the Japan/East Sea (JES) is characterized by episodic strong northwesterly winds known as "cold-air outbreaks" resulting from the incursion of dry and cold air masses from the Eurasian continent. These were found by previous studies (mostly based on indirect methods) to greatly enhance the air-sea interaction and, in particular an area about 150 km in diameter off Vladivostok was identified as the Flux Center. Aircraft in situ measurements of turbulent fluxes and mean meteorological variables were made during the winter 2000. The existence and location of the Flux Center were confirmed although the turbulent sensible and latent-heat fluxes were not as high as previously found due to the air temperature being several degrees warmer. However, the stress was found to be significantly larger as a result of higher wind speeds. The internal boundary layer was found to grow linearly with the square root of offshore fetch, with a growth rate of 2.49m for an intense cold-air outbreak and 2.06m for a moderate one. A persistent initial decrease in the inversion height was observed at 41.86∘N,132.6∘E and may be attributable to the fanning out of the jet flow out of the Vladivostok gap as it expands onto the open ocean. The radiometric skin sea-surface temperature in the Flux Center exhibited large variability in the 0-4 °C range and was positively correlated with the total turbulent (latent+sensible) heat loss. Meteorological variables and surface fluxes results from Naval Research Laboratory Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) model compared reasonably, while the predictions of the internal boundary layer height were markedly lower than the observations.

  19. Synoptic Estimates of Air Sea Fluxes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    98 X COMPONENT Y COMPONENT LLC’ LjJ 0 L) (3z--z _3, !Cr Z C Lrr, LLJ LAJ 0 ’ 1 u 6 00 11’ 0 HvERRGING PERIOD IN DAYS AVERRO -INC...n~2 Llii: u Ajc, I L,. t ’," J V C) I aI * CD LL-i u-i C)C3 0 1 1 0 10 0 100 0 1 1 0 10 0 100 0 AVERAGING PERIOD IN D’VTS AVERRO INf, PERIOD IN Dq-S

  20. Towards Improved Estimates of Ocean Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentamy, Abderrahim; Hollman, Rainer; Kent, Elisabeth; Haines, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Recommendations and priorities for ocean heat flux research are for instance outlined in recent CLIVAR and WCRP reports, eg. Yu et al (2013). Among these is the need for improving the accuracy, the consistency, and the spatial and temporal resolution of air-sea fluxes over global as well as at region scales. To meet the main air-sea flux requirements, this study is aimed at obtaining and analyzing all the heat flux components (latent, sensible and radiative) at the ocean surface over global oceans using multiple satellite sensor observations in combination with in-situ measurements and numerical model analyses. The fluxes will be generated daily and monthly for the 20-year (1992-2011) period, between 80N and 80S and at 0.25deg resolution. Simultaneous estimates of all surface heat flux terms have not yet been calculated at such large scale and long time period. Such an effort requires a wide range of expertise and data sources that only recently are becoming available. Needed are methods for integrating many data sources to calculate energy fluxes (short-wave, long wave, sensible and latent heat) across the air-sea interface. We have access to all the relevant, recently available satellite data to perform such computations. Yu, L., K. Haines, M. Bourassa, M. Cronin, S. Gulev, S. Josey, S. Kato, A. Kumar, T. Lee, D. Roemmich: Towards achieving global closure of ocean heat and freshwater budgets: Recommendations for advancing research in air-sea fluxes through collaborative activities. INTERNATIONAL CLIVAR PROJECT OFFICE, 2013: International CLIVAR Publication Series No 189. http://www.clivar.org/sites/default/files/ICPO189_WHOI_fluxes_workshop.pdf

  1. Fast flux locked loop

    DOEpatents

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R.; Snapp, Lowell D.

    2002-09-10

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  2. Eddy covariance measurements in screenhouses: turbulence characteristics and flux gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicken, U.; Cohen, S.; Tanny, J.

    2012-04-01

    Shading banana and other orchard crops with screens is popular in arid and semi-arid regions for decreasing water use and increasing fruit quality. However, crop water use within this unique environment is much less studied than for canopies in the open. Previous studies of our research group have established the use of the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique for reliable evapotranspiration and sensible heat flux measurements within screenhouses. These studies focused on operating conditions of the system. The present paper is a comprehensive study which examined the performance of the EC system in different types of screenhouses (shading and insect-proof), different crops (banana and pepper) at different development stages (small and large plants) and different climatic regions in Israel. The main goal was to establish guidelines for optimal application of the EC technique in screenhouses. The research consisted of 6 field campaigns: in 3 campaigns two EC systems were simultaneously deployed either vertically or horizontally, and in 3 other campaigns a single EC system was deployed at one measurement height. EC systems were deployed at different normalized system heights, Zs, which define the relative measurement heights within the air gap between the canopy top and the horizontal screened roof. System performance was examined using quality tests like energy balance closure, flux variance similarity, friction velocity, footprint modeling, energy spectrum, turbulence intensity and vertical and horizontal flux gradient analyses. Resulting energy balance closure slopes averaged 0.81±0.08 and 0.91±0.08 for the smaller and larger plants, respectively. Turbulent flows were found to be marginally developed within the air gap between the top of the plants and the horizontal screened roof. Turbulence intensity, flux variance similarity test, energy spectrum decay rate and friction velocity were essentially independent of the measurement height and were within the common range

  3. Senseless Extravagance, Shocking Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weissbourd, Richard; Dodge, Trevor

    2012-01-01

    Although most people in the United States believe, at least theoretically, in educational equality, fewer and fewer appear to care about the resource gaps between affluent and poor schools, says Weissbourd. He illustrates these gaps with vivid descriptions of what he calls an "opulence arms race" among affluent independent schools, but…

  4. Information Gap Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicekdag, Mehmet Ali

    1995-01-01

    Focuses on a real world technique used to teach language proficiency in the classroom. This method involves creating deliberate information and opinion gaps by administering pop quizzes and other communicative games and filling those gaps through cooperative action. Use of this technique generated heated discussion among students. (nine…

  5. Bridging a Cultural Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviatan, Talma

    2008-01-01

    There has been a broad wave of change in tertiary calculus courses in the past decade. However, the much-needed change in tertiary pre-calculus programmes--aimed at bridging the gap between high-school mathematics and tertiary mathematics--is happening at a far slower pace. Following a discussion on the nature of the gap and the objectives of a…

  6. Narrowing Participation Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Kirtley, Karmen; Matassa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shrinking the achievement gap in mathematics is a tall order. One way to approach this challenge is to think about how the achievement gap manifests itself in the classroom and take concrete action. For example, opportunities to participate in activities that involve mathematical reasoning and argumentation in a safe and supportive manner are…

  7. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  8. The National "Expertise Gap"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's report, "Diversity and the Ph.D.," released in May, which documents in troubling detail the exact dimensions of what the foundation's president, Dr. Robert Weisbuch, is calling the national "expertise gap." Weisbuch states that the expertise gap extends beyond the…

  9. The Parenting Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Richard V.; Howard, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    The parenting gap is a big factor in the opportunity gap. The chances of upward social mobility are lower for children with parents struggling to do a good job--in terms of creating a supportive and stimulating home environment. Children lucky enough to have strong parents are more likely to succeed at all the critical life stages, which means…

  10. Which Achievement Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Sharon; Medrich, Elliott; Fowler, Donna

    2007-01-01

    From the halls of Congress to the local elementary school, conversations on education reform have tossed around the term "achievement gap" as though people all know precisely what that means. As it's commonly used, "achievement gap" refers to the differences in scores on state or national achievement tests between various…

  11. States Address Achievement Gaps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Summarizes 2 state initiatives to address the achievement gap: North Carolina's report by the Advisory Commission on Raising Achievement and Closing Gaps, containing an 11-point strategy, and Kentucky's legislation putting in place 10 specific processes. The North Carolina report is available at www.dpi.state.nc.us.closingthegap; Kentucky's…

  12. Mercury vapor air-surface exchange measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part I: Data comparability and method characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable quantification of air-biosphere exchange flux of elemental mercury vapor (Hg0) is crucial for understanding the global biogeochemical cycle of mercury. However, there has not been a standard analytical protocol for flux quantification, and little attention has been devoted to characterize the temporal variability and comparability of fluxes measured by different methods. In this study, we deployed a collocated set of micrometeorological (MM) and dynamic flux chamber (DFC) measurement systems to quantify Hg0 flux over bare soil and low standing crop in an agricultural field. The techniques include relaxed eddy accumulation (REA), modified Bowen ratio (MBR), aerodynamic gradient (AGM) as well as dynamic flux chambers of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs. The five systems and their measured fluxes were cross-examined with respect to magnitude, temporal trend and correlation with environmental variables. Fluxes measured by the MM and DFC methods showed distinct temporal trends. The former exhibited a highly dynamic temporal variability while the latter had much more gradual temporal features. The diurnal characteristics reflected the difference in the fundamental processes driving the measurements. The correlations between NDFC and TDFC fluxes and between MBR and AGM fluxes were significant (R>0.8, p<0.05), but the correlation between DFC and MM fluxes were from weak to moderate (R=0.1-0.5). Statistical analysis indicated that the median of turbulent fluxes estimated by the three independent MM techniques were not significantly different. Cumulative flux measured by TDFC is considerably lower (42% of AGM and 31% of MBR fluxes) while those measured by NDFC, AGM and MBR were similar (<10% difference). This suggests that incorporating an atmospheric turbulence property such as friction velocity for correcting the DFC-measured flux effectively bridged the gap between the Hg0 fluxes measured by enclosure and MM techniques. Cumulated flux measured by REA

  13. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  14. Magnetic-flux pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  15. Aerodynamic and Acoustic Effects of Ventricular Gap

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, Fariborz; Karnell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Supraglottic compression is frequently observed in individuals with dysphonia. It is commonly interpreted as an indication of excessive circumlaryngeal muscular tension and ventricular medialization. The purpose of this study was to describe the aerodynamic and acoustic impact of varying ventricular medialization in a canine model. Methods Subglottal air pressure, glottal airflow, electroglottograph, acoustic signals and high-speed video images were recorded in seven excised canine larynges mounted in vitro for laryngeal vibratory experimentation. The degree of gap between the ventricular folds was adjusted and measured using sutures and weights. Data was recorded during phonation when the ventricular gap was narrow, neutral, and large. Glottal resistance was estimated by measures of subglottal pressure and glottal flow. Results Glottal resistance increased systematically as ventricular gap became smaller. Wide ventricular gaps were associated with increases in fundamental frequency and decreases in glottal resistance. Sound pressure level did not appear to be impacted by the adjustments in ventricular gap used in this research. Conclusions Increases in supraglottic compression and associated reduced ventricular width may be observed in a variety of disorders that affect voice quality. Ventricular compression may interact with true vocal fold posture and vibration resulting in predictable changes in aerodynamic, physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual measures of phonation. The data from this report supports the theory that narrow ventricular gaps may be associated with disordered phonation. In vitro and in vivo human data are needed to further test this association. PMID:24321590

  16. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Billy E.; Groves, Scott E.; Larsen, Greg J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.

    2006-11-14

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  17. Pulse flux measuring device

    DOEpatents

    Riggan, William C.

    1985-01-01

    A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

  18. Organic vapor fluxes through the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.A.; Tisdale, A.K.; Cho, H.J.

    1996-10-01

    Volatilization from shallow ground water followed by air-phase transport through the unsaturated zone is a poorly understood process that may be a significant natural remediation mechanism for volatile organic pollutants including chlorinated solvents and gasoline constituents (e.g., benzene, toluene, etc.). To improve understanding of this process, the upward flux of trichloroethene (TCE) vapor through the unsaturated zone above a contaminated, water-table aquifer at Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, has been studied under natural conditions over a 12-mo period. Vertical gas-phase diffusion fluxes were determined indirectly by measuring the TCE vapor concentration gradient in the unsaturated zone and using Fick`s Law to calculate the flux. The total gas-phase flux (e.g., the sum of diffusion and advection fluxes) was measured directly with a vertical flux chamber (VFC). In many cases, the upward TCE vapor flux was several orders of magnitude greater than the upward TCE diffusion flux, suggesting that the vertical transport of TCE vapors by gas advection is significant relative to vertical transport by diffusion. The measured total flux of TCE vapor from the subsurface to the atmosphere is approximately 50 kg/yr and is comparable in magnitude to the removal rate of TCE from the aquifer by an existing pump-and-treat system and by discharge into a nearby stream.

  19. Extending quantum coherence of superconducting flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Kamal, Archana; Orlando, Terry; Gustavsson, Simon; Oliver, William; Engineering Quantum Systems, MIT Team

    We present the design of a superconducting qubit with multiple Josephson junctions. The design starts with a capacitively shunted flux qubit, and it incorporates particular junction parameter choices for the purpose of simultaneously optimizing over transition frequency, anharmonicity, flux- and charge-noise sensitivity around flux degeneracy. By studying the scaling properties with design parameters, we identify directions to extend coherence substantially. This research was funded by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) via MIT Lincoln Laboratory under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002.

  20. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  1. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  2. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  3. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  4. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  5. Rho GAPs and GEFs

    PubMed Central

    van Buul, Jaap D; Geerts, Dirk; Huveneers, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Within blood vessels, endothelial cell–cell and cell–matrix adhesions are crucial to preserve barrier function, and these adhesions are tightly controlled during vascular development, angiogenesis, and transendothelial migration of inflammatory cells. Endothelial cellular signaling that occurs via the family of Rho GTPases coordinates these cell adhesion structures through cytoskeletal remodelling. In turn, Rho GTPases are regulated by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) and guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). To understand how endothelial cells initiate changes in the activity of Rho GTPases, and thereby regulate cell adhesion, we will discuss the role of Rho GAPs and GEFs in vascular biology. Many potentially important Rho regulators have not been studied in detail in endothelial cells. We therefore will first overview which GAPs and GEFs are highly expressed in endothelium, based on comparative gene expression analysis of human endothelial cells compared with other tissue cell types. Subsequently, we discuss the relevance of Rho GAPs and GEFs for endothelial cell adhesion in vascular homeostasis and disease. PMID:24622613

  6. Closing the Performance Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Cheryl G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the principal of a K-2, 400-student suburban elementary school near Flint, Michigan, worked with her staff and superintendent to develop and implement a strategic plan to close the student achievement gap. Reports significant improvement in reading and math scores after 1 year. (PKP)

  7. STEMMING the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Jim; Valentine, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    America has a gap when it comes to youth pursuing science and technology careers. In an effort to improve the knowledge and application of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), after-school programs can work in conjunction with formal in-school curriculum to improve science education. One organization that actively addresses this…

  8. Confronting the Autonomy Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamowski, Steven; Petrilli, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    "The Autonomy Gap," a recent study by the American Institute for Research and the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, found that many public elementary school principals feel constrained by a bureaucracy that impedes their ability to raise student achievement. Unfortunately, those principals are still held accountable for their school's results--even…

  9. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  10. Structuring the Information Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Julian

    1984-01-01

    Describes an information gap procedure to teach a new structure which requires students to look for and exchange information in order to complete a task in an English as a second language class. Illustrates the method with a set of materials and suggests ways for teachers to produce similar materials. (SED)

  11. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  12. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  13. California: Emigrant Gap

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) images of the Central Valley and the Sierra Nevada Mountains show several smoke plumes from wildfires ... from the Emigrant Gap Fire, located about 40 kilometers west of Lake Tahoe. The animated panorama uses different MISR cameras to enable ...

  14. Bridging a Communication Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Ethel

    1972-01-01

    Description of a community program in cooperation with a regional extension service. The goals were to explore the generation gap, and conflict in life values, understand family role, increase self awareness, improve adult-youth communication, and understand the individual and his relationship to basic social principles. (Author/JB)

  15. Bridging the Development Gap.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-11-01

    Bridging the Development Gap is contractual cooperative agreement between Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. and DARPA. This program was developed...processing, interfacing with I/O devices, memory constraints, as well as real-time throughput and latency challenges. Mercury has bridged the indicated

  16. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  17. Vortex and gap generation in gauge models of graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, O.; Cordeiro, C.E.; Delfino, A.; Paula, W. de; Frederico, T.

    2011-04-15

    Effective quantum field theoretical continuum models for graphene are investigated. The models include a complex scalar field and a vector gauge field. Different gauge theories are considered and their gap patterns for the scalar, vector, and fermion excitations are investigated. Different gauge groups lead to different relations between the gaps, which can be used to experimentally distinguish the gauge theories. In this class of models the fermionic gap is a dynamic quantity. The finite-energy vortex solutions of the gauge models have the flux of the ''magnetic field'' quantized, making the Bohm-Aharonov effect active even when external electromagnetic fields are absent. The flux comes proportional to the scalar field angular momentum quantum number. The zero modes of the Dirac equation show that the gauge models considered here are compatible with fractionalization.

  18. Design Considerations of a Transverse Flux Machine for Direct-Drive Wind Turbine Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Tausif; Hasan, Iftekhar; Sozer, Yilmaz; Husain, Iqbal; Muljadi, Eduard

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the design considerations of a double-sided transverse flux machine (TFM) for direct-drive wind turbine applications. The TFM has a modular structure with quasi-U stator cores and ring windings. The rotor is constructed with ferrite magnets in a flux-concentrating arrangement to achieve high air gap flux density. The design considerations for this TFM with respect to initial sizing, pole number selection, key design ratios, and pole shaping are presented in this paper. Pole number selection is critical in the design process of a TFM because it affects both the torque density and power factor under fixed magnetic and changing electrical loading. Several key design ratios are introduced to facilitate the design procedure. The effect of pole shaping on back-emf and inductance is also analyzed. These investigations provide guidance toward the required design of a TFM for direct-drive applications. The analyses are carried out using analytical and three-dimensional finite element analysis. A prototype is under construction for experimental verification.

  19. Health risk assessment of migrant workers' exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls in air and dust in an e-waste recycling area in China: Indication for a new wealth gap in environmental rights.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yalin; Hu, Jinxing; Lin, Wei; Wang, Ning; Li, Cheng; Luo, Peng; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Wang, Wenbo; Su, Xiaomei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Yindong; Huang, Ronglang; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Migrant workers who work and live in polluted environment are a special vulnerable group in the accelerating pace of urbanization and industrialization in China. In the electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area, for example, migrant workers' exposure to pollutants, such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), is the result of an informal e-waste recycling process. A village in an electronic waste recycling area where migrant workers gather was surveyed. The migrant workers' daily routines were simulated according to the three-space transition: work place-on the road-home. Indoor air and dust in the migrant workers' houses and workplaces and the ambient air on the roads were sampled. The PCB levels of the air and dust in the places corresponding to the migrant workers are higher than those for local residents. The migrant workers have health risks from PCBs that are 3.8 times greater than those of local residents. This is not only caused by the exposure at work but also by their activity patterns and the environmental conditions of their dwellings. These results revealed the reason for the health risk difference between the migrant workers and local residents, and it also indicated that lifestyle and economic status are important factors that are often ignored compared to occupational exposure.

  20. Triode for Magnetic Flux Quanta

    PubMed Central

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Colauto, F.; Benseman, T.; Rosenmann, D.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2016-01-01

    In an electronic triode, the electron current emanating from the cathode is regulated by the electric potential on a grid between the cathode and the anode. Here we demonstrate a triode for single quantum magnetic field carriers, where the flow of individual magnetic vortices in a superconducting film is regulated by the magnetic potential of striae of soft magnetic strips deposited on the film surface. By rotating an applied in-plane field, the magnetic strip potential can be varied due to changes in the magnetic charges at the strip edges, allowing accelerated or retarded motion of magnetic vortices inside the superconductor. Scaling down our design and reducing the gap width between the magnetic stripes will enable controlled manipulation of individual vortices and creation of single flux quantum circuitry for novel high-speed low-power superconducting electronics. PMID:27845375

  1. Triode for Magnetic Flux Quanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Colauto, F.; Benseman, T.; Rosenmann, D.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2016-11-01

    In an electronic triode, the electron current emanating from the cathode is regulated by the electric potential on a grid between the cathode and the anode. Here we demonstrate a triode for single quantum magnetic field carriers, where the flow of individual magnetic vortices in a superconducting film is regulated by the magnetic potential of striae of soft magnetic strips deposited on the film surface. By rotating an applied in-plane field, the magnetic strip potential can be varied due to changes in the magnetic charges at the strip edges, allowing accelerated or retarded motion of magnetic vortices inside the superconductor. Scaling down our design and reducing the gap width between the magnetic stripes will enable controlled manipulation of individual vortices and creation of single flux quantum circuitry for novel high-speed low-power superconducting electronics.

  2. Triode for Magnetic Flux Quanta.

    PubMed

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V K; Colauto, F; Benseman, T; Rosenmann, D; Kwok, W-K

    2016-11-15

    In an electronic triode, the electron current emanating from the cathode is regulated by the electric potential on a grid between the cathode and the anode. Here we demonstrate a triode for single quantum magnetic field carriers, where the flow of individual magnetic vortices in a superconducting film is regulated by the magnetic potential of striae of soft magnetic strips deposited on the film surface. By rotating an applied in-plane field, the magnetic strip potential can be varied due to changes in the magnetic charges at the strip edges, allowing accelerated or retarded motion of magnetic vortices inside the superconductor. Scaling down our design and reducing the gap width between the magnetic stripes will enable controlled manipulation of individual vortices and creation of single flux quantum circuitry for novel high-speed low-power superconducting electronics.

  3. Optimum Design for Noncontact Ultrasonic Motor with Flexurally Vibrating Disk Using an Equivalent Circuit Considering Viscosity of Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamayoshi, Yasuhiro; Tamura, Hideki; Hirose, Seiji

    2009-07-01

    The optimum design for a noncontact ultrasonic motor with a flexurally vibrating disk has been investigated by analyzing the sound pressure in the air gap using an equivalent circuit considering the viscosity of air. The calculated results indicate that the sound pressure is affected by the viscosity and mass effect in the air gap, which are changed by the gap distance. The experimental results of revolution speed measured at various gap distances agree qualitatively with the sound pressure calculated using the equivalent circuit. In the case of wider gaps, a design satisfying the resonant condition of the air gap is necessary for optimizing the motor because the air gap resonates by the mass effect. However, in motors with an air gap narrower than about 50 µm, a higher speed rotation can be obtained for a wide range of rotor diameters and for a wide frequency range without consideration of the air gap resonance because the air viscosity effect becomes dominant.

  4. Heat and moisture transfer in gaps between sweating imitation skin and nonwoven cloth: effect of gap space and alignment of skin and clothing on the moisture transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozumi, Yoshio; Akaki, Kenichi; Tanabe, Naomasa

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates heat and moisture transfer between a sweating film and a nonwoven sheet both experimentally and numerically. A mathematical model based on heat conduction and moisture diffusion in both the air gap and cloth is presented. The evaporation rate and surface temperature of the sweating film are well predicted under various conditions such as air gap height, heating conditions, and sweating film orientation by evaluating the effective thermal conductivity and diffusion coefficient from the empirical equations of the Nusselt number for a fluid layer, even though the air gap height is sufficiently large to cause natural convections.

  5. Inviscid flux-splitting algorithms for real gases with non-equilibrium chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun; Liou, Meng-Sing; Van Leer, Bram

    1990-01-01

    Formulations of inviscid flux splitting algorithms for chemical nonequilibrium gases are presented. A chemical system for air dissociation and recombination is described. Numerical results for one-dimensional shock tube and nozzle flows of air in chemical nonequilibrium are examined.

  6. Minding the Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Millicent Anne

    2015-02-23

    Neutron & X-ray scattering provides nano- to meso-scale details of complex fluid structure; 1D electronic density maps dervied from SAXS yield molecular level insights; Neutron reflectivity provides substructure details of substrate supported complex fluids; Complex fluids composition can be optimized to support a wide variety of both soluble and membrane proteins; The water gap dimensions can be finely tuned through polymer component.

  7. Variable Gap Conjugated Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    conducting gold interfacial layer interjected between the ITO glass electrode and the PEDOT/PSS hole transport layer . A family of low band gap, and near IR...which can be used as both electrochromics and as the hole transport layers in light emitting diodes. Hybrid electrochromic and electroluminescent (EC...MEH-PPV, P3HT, etc.) in order to blanket the solar spectrum. Initial device results on these multi-component blends are promising. In addition, we

  8. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons. PMID:27982030

  9. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of branched gap plasmon resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Søren; Esfandyarpour, Majid; Koh, Ai Leen; Mortensen, N. Asger; Brongersma, Mark L.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-12-01

    The miniaturization of integrated optical circuits below the diffraction limit for high-speed manipulation of information is one of the cornerstones in plasmonics research. By coupling to surface plasmons supported on nanostructured metallic surfaces, light can be confined to the nanoscale, enabling the potential interface to electronic circuits. In particular, gap surface plasmons propagating in an air gap sandwiched between metal layers have shown extraordinary mode confinement with significant propagation length. In this work, we unveil the optical properties of gap surface plasmons in silver nanoslot structures with widths of only 25 nm. We fabricate linear, branched and cross-shaped nanoslot waveguide components, which all support resonances due to interference of counter-propagating gap plasmons. By exploiting the superior spatial resolution of a scanning transmission electron microscope combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy, we experimentally show the propagation, bending and splitting of slot gap plasmons.

  10. Recurrence Analysis of Eddy Covariance Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Holger; Flach, Milan; Foken, Thomas; Hauhs, Michael

    2015-04-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) method is one key method to quantify fluxes in biogeochemical cycles in general, and carbon and energy transport across the vegetation-atmosphere boundary layer in particular. EC data from the worldwide net of flux towers (Fluxnet) have also been used to validate biogeochemical models. The high resolution data are usually obtained at 20 Hz sampling rate but are affected by missing values and other restrictions. In this contribution, we investigate the nonlinear dynamics of EC fluxes using Recurrence Analysis (RA). High resolution data from the site DE-Bay (Waldstein-Weidenbrunnen) and fluxes calculated at half-hourly resolution from eight locations (part of the La Thuile dataset) provide a set of very long time series to analyze. After careful quality assessment and Fluxnet standard gapfilling pretreatment, we calculate properties and indicators of the recurrent structure based both on Recurrence Plots as well as Recurrence Networks. Time series of RA measures obtained from windows moving along the time axis are presented. Their interpretation is guided by three different questions: (1) Is RA able to discern periods where the (atmospheric) conditions are particularly suitable to obtain reliable EC fluxes? (2) Is RA capable to detect dynamical transitions (different behavior) beyond those obvious from visual inspection? (3) Does RA contribute to an understanding of the nonlinear synchronization between EC fluxes and atmospheric parameters, which is crucial for both improving carbon flux models as well for reliable interpolation of gaps? (4) Is RA able to recommend an optimal time resolution for measuring EC data and for analyzing EC fluxes? (5) Is it possible to detect non-trivial periodicities with a global RA? We will demonstrate that the answers to all five questions is affirmative, and that RA provides insights into EC dynamics not easily obtained otherwise.

  11. Wind tunnels vs. flux chambers: Area source emission measurements and the necessity for VOC and odour correction factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC), odour, and ammonia (NH3) with little regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. As a result, flux measurements have been highly variable and scientists have been in disagreement as to the better...

  12. Effect of flux adjustments on temperature variability in climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CMIP investigators; Duffy, P. B.; Bell, J.; Covey, C.; Sloan, L.

    2000-03-01

    It has been suggested that “flux adjustments” in climate models suppress simulated temperature variability. If true, this might invalidate the conclusion that at least some of observed temperature increases since 1860 are anthropogenic, since this conclusion is based in part on estimates of natural temperature variability derived from flux-adjusted models. We assess variability of surface air temperatures in 17 simulations of internal temperature variability submitted to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project. By comparing variability in flux-adjusted vs. non-flux adjusted simulations, we find no evidence that flux adjustments suppress temperature variability in climate models; other, largely unknown, factors are much more important in determining simulated temperature variability. Therefore the conclusion that at least some of observed temperature increases are anthropogenic cannot be questioned on the grounds that it is based in part on results of flux-adjusted models. Also, reducing or eliminating flux adjustments would probably do little to improve simulations of temperature variability.

  13. Aspects of flux compactification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao

    In this thesis, we study three main aspects of flux compactifications: (1) classify supergravity solutions from flux compactification; (2) construct flux-deformed geometry and 4D low-energy theory to describe these flux vacua; and (3) study 4D particle phenomenology and cosmology of flux vacua. In the first part, we review G-structure, the basic tool to study supersymmetric flux solutions, and some typical solutions obtained in heterotic, type IIA and type IIB string theories. Then we present a comprehensive classification of supersymmetric vacua of M-theory compactification on 7D manifolds with general four-form fluxes. We analyze the cases where the resulting four-dimensional vacua have N = 1, 2, 3, 4 supersymmetry and the internal space allows for SU(2)-, SU(3)- or G 2-structures. In particular, we find for N = 2 supersymmetry, that the external space-time is Minkowski and the base manifold of the internal space is conformally Kahler for SU(2) structures, while for SU(3) structures the internal space has to be Einstein-Sasaki and no internal fluxes are allowed. Moreover, we provide a new vacuum with N = 1 supersymmetry and SU(3) structure, where all fluxes are non-zero and the first order differential equations are solved. In the second part, we simply review the methods used to construct one subclass of fluxed-deformed geometry or the so-called "twisted manifold", and the associated 4D effective theory describing these flux vacua. Then by employing (generalized) Scherk-Schwarz reduction, we construct the geometric twisting for Calabi-Yau manifolds of Voisin-Borcea type (K 3 x T2)/ Z2 and study the superpotential in a type IIA orientifold based on this geometry. The twists modify the direct product by fibering the K 3 over T2 while preserving the Z2 involution. As an important application, the Voisin-Borcea class contains T6/( Z2 x Z2 ), the usual setting for intersecting D6 brane model building. Past work in this context considered only those twists inherited

  14. Heat flux measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Weikle, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    A new automated, computer controlled heat flux measurement facility is described. Continuous transient and steady-state surface heat flux values varying from about 0.3 to 6 MW/sq m over a temperature range of 100 to 1200 K can be obtained in the facility. An application of this facility is the development of heat flux gauges for continuous fast transient surface heat flux measurement on turbine blades operating in space shuttle main engine turbopumps. The facility is useful for durability testing at fast temperature transients.

  15. Comparing three gap filling methods for eddy covariance crop evapotranspiration measurements within a hilly agricultural catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudhina, Nissaf; Prévot, Laurent; Zitouna Chebbi, Rim; Mekki, Insaf; Jacob, Frédéric; Ben Mechlia, Netij; Masmoudi, Moncef

    2015-04-01

    Hilly watersheds are widespread throughout coastal areas around the Mediterranean Basin. They experience agricultural intensification since hilly topographies allow water-harvesting techniques that compensate for rainfall storage, water being a strong limiting factor for crop production. Their fragility is likely to increase with climate change and human pressure. Within semi-arid hilly watershed conditions, evapotranspiration (ETR) is a major term of both land surface energy and water balances. Several methods allow determining ETR, based either on direct measurements, or on estimations and forecast from weather and soil moisture data using simulation models. Among these methods, eddy covariance technique is based on high-frequency measurements of fluctuations of wind speed and air temperature / humidity, to directly determine the convective fluxes between land surface and atmosphere. In spite of experimental and instrumental progresses, datasets of eddy covariance measurements often experience large portions of missing data. The latter results from energy power failure, experimental maintenance, instrumental troubles such as krypton hygrometer malfunctioning because of air humidity, or quality assessment based filtering in relation to spatial homogeneity and temporal stationarity of turbulence within surface boundary layer. This last item is all the more important as hilly topography, when combined with strong winds, tends to increase turbulence within surface boundary layer. The main objective of this study is to establish gap-filling procedures to provide complete chronicles of eddy-covariance measurements of crop evapotranspiration (ETR) within a hilly agricultural watershed. We focus on the specific conditions induced by the combination of hilly topography and wind direction, by discriminating between upslope and downslope winds. The experiment was set for three field configurations within hilly conditions: two flux measurement stations (A, B) were installed

  16. Nitric oxide fluxes from an agricultural soil using a flux-gradient method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, N. M.; Wagner-Riddle, C.; Thurtell, G. W.; Beauchamp, E. G.

    1999-05-01

    Soil emission of nitric oxide may be a significant source of NOx in rural areas. Agricultural practices may enhance these emissions by addition of nitrogen fertilizers. A system that enables continuous measurement of NO fluxes from agricultural surfaces using the flux-gradient method was developed. Hourly differences in NO concentrations in air sampled at two intake heights (0.6 and 1 m) were determined using a chemiluminescence analyzer. Eddy diffusivities were determined using wind profiles (cup anemometers), and stability corrections calculated using a 5 cm path sonic anemometer. Fast switching of sampling between air intake heights (every 30 s) and determination of concentration values at a frequency of 2 Hz minimized the errors due to fluctuations in background concentration. Low travel times for air samples in the tubing (˜8 s) were estimated to result in small errors in flux values (<0.5 ng N m-2 s-1) due to chemical reactions. The overall resolution of the system was estimated as ˜1 ng N m-2s-1. NO fluxes from a bare soil were measured quasi-continuously from January to June 1995 at Elora, Canada, comprising a total of 1833 hourly values. Daily NO fluxes before nitrogen fertilization were small, increasing after nitrogen fertilizer was added (>10 ng N m-2 s-1). Monthly NO fluxes estimated were similar to those observed in previous studies. The designed system could be easily modified to measure NOx and NO fluxes by using an additional chemiluminescence analyzer. The system also could be adapted to measure fluxes sequentially from various plots, enabling testing of agricultural practices on NO emissions.

  17. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP LAND COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gap Analysis Program is a national inter-agency program that maps the distribution

    of plant communities and selected animal species and compares these distributions with land

    stewardship to identify gaps in biodiversity protection. GAP uses remote satellite imag...

  18. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  19. Video Meteor Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  20. Air Research

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's air research provides the critical science to develop and implement outdoor air regulations under the Clean Air Act and puts new tools and information in the hands of air quality managers and regulators to protect the air we breathe.

  1. Mass and Ozone Fluxes from the Lowermost Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Olsen, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    Net mass flux from the stratosphere to the troposphere can be computed from the heating rate along the 380K isentropic surface and the time rate of change of the mass of the lowermost stratosphere (the region between the tropopause and the 380K isentrope). Given this net mass flux and the cross tropopause diabatic mass flux, the residual adiabatic mass flux across the tropopause can also be estimated. These fluxes have been computed using meteorological fields from a free-running general circulation model (FVGCM) and two assimilation data sets, FVDAS, and UKMO. The data sets tend to agree that the annual average net mass flux for the Northern Hemisphere is about 1P10 kg/s. There is less agreement on the southern Hemisphere flux that might be half as large. For all three data sets, the adiabatic mass flux is computed to be from the upper troposphere into the lowermost stratosphere. This flux will dilute air entering from higher stratospheric altitudes. The mass fluxes are convolved with ozone mixing ratios from the Goddard 3D CTM (which uses the FVGCM) to estimate the cross-tropopause transport of ozone. A relatively large adiabatic flux of tropospheric ozone from the tropical upper troposphere into the extratropical lowermost stratosphere dilutes the stratospheric air in the lowermost stratosphere. Thus, a significant fraction of any measured ozone STE may not be ozone produced in the higher Stratosphere. The results also illustrate that the annual cycle of ozone concentration in the lowermost stratosphere has as much of a role as the transport in the seasonal ozone flux cycle. This implies that a simplified calculation of ozone STE mass from air mass and a mean ozone mixing ratio may have a large uncertainty.

  2. The global drug gap.

    PubMed

    Reich, M R

    2000-03-17

    Global inequities in access to pharmaceutical products exist between rich and poor countries because of market and government failures as well as huge income differences. Multiple policies are required to address this global drug gap for three categories of pharmaceutical products: essential drugs, new drugs, and yet-to-be-developed drugs. Policies should combine "push" approaches of subsidies to support targeted drug development, "pull" approaches of financial incentives such as market guarantees, and "process" approaches aimed at improved institutional capacity. Constructive solutions are needed that can both protect the incentives for research and development and reduce the inequities of access.

  3. Mind the gap.

    SciTech Connect

    Bhagwat, M. S.; Krassnigg, A.; Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.; Physics; Univ. Graz; Univ. of Pittsburgh

    2007-03-01

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  4. Production Flux of Sea-Spray Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, G.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Lewis, E. R.; O'Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea-spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea-spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux with emphasis on particles with r80 (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 µm and as small as 0.01 µm. Production of sea-spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics, and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r80 < 0.25 µm and in locations with high biological activity can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities, such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface, that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  5. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, Gerrit; Andreas, Edgar L.; Anguelova, Magdalena D.; Fairall, C. W.; Lewis, Ernie R.; O'Dowd, Colin; Schulz, Michael; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2011-05-01

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r80 (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 μm and as small as 0.01 μm. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r80 < 0.25 μm and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  6. Air-surface exchange of Hg0 measured by collocated micrometeorological and enclosure methods - Part 1: Data comparability and method characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Sommar, J.; Lin, C.-J.; Feng, X.

    2014-09-01

    Reliable quantification of air-biosphere exchange flux of elemental mercury vapor (Hg0) is crucial for understanding global biogeochemical cycle of mercury. However, there has not been a standard analytical protocol for flux quantification, and little attention has been devoted to characterize the temporal variability and comparability of fluxes measured by different methods. In this study, we deployed a collocated set of micro-meteorological (MM) and enclosure measurement systems to quantify Hg0 flux over bare soil and low standing crop in an agricultural field. The techniques include relaxed eddy accumulation (REA), modified Bowen-ratio (MBR), aerodynamic gradient (AGM) as well as dynamic flux chambers of traditional (TDFC) and novel (NDFC) designs. The five systems and their measured fluxes were cross-examined with respect to magnitude, temporal trend and sensitivity to environmental variables. Fluxes measured by the MM and DFC methods showed distinct temporal trends. The former exhibited a highly dynamic temporal variability while the latter had much gradual temporal features. The diurnal characteristics reflected the difference in the fundamental processes driving the measurements. The correlations between NDFC and TDFC fluxes and between MBR and AGM fluxes were significant (R > 0.8, p < 0.05), but the correlation between DFC and MM instantaneous fluxes were from weak to moderate (R = 0.1-0.5). Statistical analysis indicated that the median of turbulent fluxes estimated by the three independent MM-techniques were not significantly different. Cumulative flux measured by TDFC is considerably lower (42% of AGM and 31% of MBR fluxes) while those measured by NDFC, AGM and MBR were similar (< 10% difference). This implicates that the NDFC technique, which accounts for internal friction velocity, effectively bridged the gap in measured Hg0 flux compared to MM techniques. Cumulated flux measured by REA was ~60% higher than the gradient-based fluxes. Environmental

  7. Electron heat flux instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  8. Short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins in air and soil of subtropical terrestrial environment in the pearl river delta, South China: distribution, composition, atmospheric deposition fluxes, and environmental fate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Jun; Cheng, Zhineng; Li, Qilu; Pan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Ruijie; Liu, Di; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Xiang; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Zhang, Gan

    2013-03-19

    Research on the environmental fate of short- and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs and MCCPs) in highly industrialized subtropical areas is still scarce. Air, soil, and atmospheric deposition process in the Pearl River Delta of South China were investigated, and the average SCCP and MCCP concentrations were 5.2 μg/sampler (17.69 ng/m(3)) and 4.1 μg/sampler for passive air samples, 18.3 and 59.3 ng/g for soil samples, and 5.0 and 5.3 μg/(m(2)d) for deposition samples, respectively. Influenced by primary sources and the properties of chlorinated paraffins (CPs), a gradient trend of concentrations and a fractionation of composition from more to less industrialized areas were discovered. Intense seasonal variations with high levels in summer air and winter deposition samples indicated that the air and deposition CP levels were controlled mainly by the vapor and particle phase, respectively. Complex environmental processes like volatilization and fractionation resulted in different CP profiles in different environment matrixes and sampling locations, with C(10-11) C(l6-7) and C(14) C(l6-7), C(10-12) C(l6-7) and C(14) C(l6-8), and C(11-12) C(l6-8) and C(14) C(l7-8) dominating in air, soil, and atmospheric deposition, respectively. Shorter-chain and less chlorinated congeners were enriched in air in the less industrialized areas, while longer-chain and higher chlorinated congeners were concentrated in soil in the more industrialized areas. This is suggesting that the gaseous transport of CPs is the dominant mechanism responsible for the higher concentrations of lighter and likely more mobile CPs in the rural areas.

  9. Turbine blade tip gap reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2012-09-11

    A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  10. Fabrication of Thin Film Heat Flux Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Will, Herbert A.

    1992-01-01

    Prototype thin film heat flux sensors have been constructed and tested. The sensors can be applied to propulsion system materials and components. The sensors can provide steady state and fast transient heat flux information. Fabrication of the sensor does not require any matching of the mounting surface. Heat flux is proportional to the temperature difference across the upper and lower surfaces of an insulation material. The sensor consists of an array of thermocouples on the upper and lower surfaces of a thin insulating layer. The thermocouples for the sensor are connected in a thermopile arrangement. A 100 thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on silicon wafers. The sensor produced an output voltage of 200-400 microvolts when exposed to a hot air heat gun. A 20 element thermocouple pair heat flux sensor has been fabricated on aluminum oxide sheet. Thermocouples are Pt-Pt/Rh with silicon dioxide as the insulating material. This sensor produced an output of 28 microvolts when exposed to the radiation of a furnace operating at 1000 C. Work is also underway to put this type of heat flux sensor on metal surfaces.

  11. Design and performance of a dynaniic gas flux chamber.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Rivka; Rolston, Dennis E

    2002-01-01

    Chambers are commonly used to measure the emission of many trace gases and chemicals from soil. An aerodynamic (flow through) chamber was designed and fabricated to accurately measure the surface flux of trace gases. Flow through the chamber was controlled with a small vacuum at the outlet. Due to the design using fans, a partition plate, and aerodynamic ends, air is forced to sweep parallel and uniform over the entire soil surface. A fraction of the air flowing inside the chamber is sampled in the outlet. The air velocity inside the chamber is controlled by fan speed and outlet suction flow rate. The chamber design resulted in a uniform distribution of air velocity at the soil surface. Steady state flux was attained within 5 min when the outlet air suction rate was 20 L/min or higher. For expected flux rates, the presence of the chamber did not affect the measured fluxes at outlet suction rates of around 20 L/min, except that the chamber caused some cooling of the surface in field experiments. Sensitive measurements of the pressure deficit across the soil layer in conjunction with measured fluxes in the source box and chamber outlet show that the outflow rate must be controlled carefully to minimize errors in the flux measurements. Both over- and underestimation of the fluxes are possible if the outlet flow rate is not controlled carefully. For this design, the chamber accurately measured steady flux at outlet air suction rates of approximately 20 L/min when the pressure deficit within the chamber with respect to the ambient atmosphere ranged between 0.46 and 0.79 Pa.

  12. High Flux Neutral Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-31

    vacuum gap switches a 60 kV trigger signal to the first gaps. The APEX machine has a built in triggering circuit used to trigger the vacuum gap from a... switch ( triggered from a pushbutton and a standard krytron circuit) connected the two capacitor groups to supply a 6kV pulse to the coil. The peak...circuit switching a capacitor through the flashtube. The krytron was triggered directly from a 400V signal from the delay unit DI. This delay unit

  13. Information gap decision support for contaminant remediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; O'Malley, D.

    2013-12-01

    Uncertainty quantifications and decision analyses under severe lack of information are ubiquitous in every applied field of engineering, policy, and science. A severe lack of information precludes our ability to determine unbiased probabilistic distributions for model parameters and model predictions; therefore, model and decision uncertainties due to a severe lack of information cannot be characterized probabilistically. To circumvent this problem, information gap (info-gap) theory has been developed to explicitly recognize and quantify the implications of information gaps in decision making. Here we present a decision analysis based on info-gap theory developed for a source identification problem where the locations and mass fluxes of contaminants impacting groundwater resources are unknown. The problem is characterized with a lack of information related to (1) model parameters representing contaminant migration in the aquifer, and (2) observed contamination concentration in the existing monitoring wells. These two sources of uncertainty are coupled through an inverse model where the observed concentrations are applied to estimate model parameters. The decision goal is based on contaminant predictions at points of compliance. The decision analysis is demonstrated for synthetic and real-world test cases. The applied uncertainty-quantification, decision-support techniques and computational algorithms are implemented in code MADS (Model Analyses for Decision Support; http://mads.lanl.gov). MADS is C/C++ code that provides a framework for model-based decision support. MADS performs various types of model analyses including sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, uncertainty quantification, model calibration, selection and averaging. To perform the analyses, MADS can be coupled with any external simulators. Our efforts target development of an interactive computer-based Decision Support System (DSS) that will help domain scientist, managers, regulators, and

  14. Small Multiples with Gaps.

    PubMed

    Meulemans, Wouter; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan; Turkay, Cagatay; Wood, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Small multiples enable comparison by providing different views of a single data set in a dense and aligned manner. A common frame defines each view, which varies based upon values of a conditioning variable. An increasingly popular use of this technique is to project two-dimensional locations into a gridded space (e.g. grid maps), using the underlying distribution both as the conditioning variable and to determine the grid layout. Using whitespace in this layout has the potential to carry information, especially in a geographic context. Yet, the effects of doing so on the spatial properties of the original units are not understood. We explore the design space offered by such small multiples with gaps. We do so by constructing a comprehensive suite of metrics that capture properties of the layout used to arrange the small multiples for comparison (e.g. compactness and alignment) and the preservation of the original data (e.g. distance, topology and shape). We study these metrics in geographic data sets with varying properties and numbers of gaps. We use simulated annealing to optimize for each metric and measure the effects on the others. To explore these effects systematically, we take a new approach, developing a system to visualize this design space using a set of interactive matrices. We find that adding small amounts of whitespace to small multiple arrays improves some of the characteristics of 2D layouts, such as shape, distance and direction. This comes at the cost of other metrics, such as the retention of topology. Effects vary according to the input maps, with degree of variation in size of input regions found to be a factor. Optima exist for particular metrics in many cases, but at different amounts of whitespace for different maps. We suggest multiple metrics be used in optimized layouts, finding topology to be a primary factor in existing manually-crafted solutions, followed by a trade-off between shape and displacement. But the rich range of possible

  15. Updates on AmeriFlux Network Data Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, B.; Boden, T.; Krassovski, M.; Jackson, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory serves as the central data repository for the AmeriFlux network. The currently available datasets include hourly or half-hourly meteorological and flux observations, biological measurement records, and synthesis data products. In this presentation, we provide an update on this network database including the recent release of gap-filled meteorological records and progress in generating value-added high level products for the flux measurements. We will also discuss our plans in developing and producing other high-level products, such as uncertainty estimates for flux measurement and derivation of phenology from the available measurements at flux sites.

  16. Gap Opening in 3D: Single-planet Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Jeffrey; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Giant planets can clear deep gaps when embedded in 2D (razor-thin) viscous circumstellar disks. We show by direct simulation that giant planets are just as capable of carving out gaps in 3D. Surface density maps are similar between 2D and 3D, even in detail. In particular, the scaling {{{Σ }}}{gap}\\propto {q}-2 of gap surface density with planet mass, derived from a global “zero-dimensional” balance of Lindblad and viscous torques, applies equally well to results obtained at higher dimensions. Our 3D simulations reveal extensive, near-sonic, meridional flows both inside and outside the gaps; these large-scale circulations might bear on disk compositional gradients, in dust or other chemical species. At high planet mass, gap edges are mildly Rayleigh unstable and intermittently shed streams of material into the gap—less so in 3D than in 2D.

  17. Numerical Simulations of a Flux Rope Ejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, P.; Mackay, D. H.; Poedts, S.

    2015-03-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are the most violent phenomena observed on the Sun. One of the most successful models to explain CMEs is the flux rope ejection model, where a magnetic flux rope is expelled from the solar corona after a long phase along which the flux rope stays in equilibrium while magnetic energy is being accumulated. However, still many questions are outstanding on the detailed mechanism of the ejection and observations continuously provide new data to interpret and put in the context. Currently, extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) are providing new insights into the early phase of CME evolution. In particular, observations show the ejection of magnetic flux ropes from the solar corona and how they evolve into CMEs. However, these observations are difficult to interpret in terms of basic physical mechanisms and quantities, thus, we need to compare equivalent quantities to test and improve our models. In our work, we intend to bridge the gap between models and observations with our model of flux rope ejection where we consistently describe the full life span of a flux rope from its formation to ejection. This is done by coupling the global non-linear force-free model (GNLFFF) built to describe the slow low- β formation phase, with a full MHD simulation run with the software MPI-AMRVAC, suitable to describe the fast MHD evolution of the flux rope ejection that happens in a heterogeneous β regime. We also explore the parameter space to identify the conditions upon which the ejection is favoured (gravity stratification and magnetic field intensity) and we produce synthesised AIA observations (171 Å and 211 Å). To carry this out, we run 3D MHD simulation in spherical coordinates where we include the role of thermal conduction and radiative losses, both of which are important for determining the temperature distribution of the solar corona during a CME. Our model of

  18. The Gap-Tpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Catalanotti, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Di Meo, P.; Longo, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Fiorillo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency.

  19. Directed flux motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Andrew (Inventor); Punnoose, Andrew (Inventor); Strausser, Katherine (Inventor); Parikh, Neil (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A directed flux motor described utilizes the directed magnetic flux of at least one magnet through ferrous material to drive different planetary gear sets to achieve capabilities in six actuated shafts that are grouped three to a side of the motor. The flux motor also utilizes an interwoven magnet configuration which reduces the overall size of the motor. The motor allows for simple changes to modify the torque to speed ratio of the gearing contained within the motor as well as simple configurations for any number of output shafts up to six. The changes allow for improved manufacturability and reliability within the design.

  20. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  1. Atmospheric discharges and particle fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Reymers, A.

    2015-07-01

    Fluxes of the electrons, gamma rays, and neutrons observed by particle detectors located on the Earth's surface during thunderstorms originate so-called Thunderstorm Ground Enhancements (TGEs). The relativistic runaway electron avalanches giving rise to TGEs originate in the thundercloud's lower dipole between the main negatively charged region in the middle of the thundercloud and transient lower positively charged region. Acceleration of electrons in the upper dipole between main negative and main positive charge regions leads to initiation of the terrestrial gamma flashes (TGFs) intensive researched during the last two decades by orbiting gamma ray observatories. TGFs are exceptionally intense, submillisecond bursts of electromagnetic radiation directed to the open space from the thunderstorm atmosphere. Unlike visible lightning, TGF beams do not create a hot plasma channel and optical flash; hence, in the literature they got name "dark lightning." We investigate the TGEs development in 1 min and 1 s time series of particle detector count rates. Synchronized time series of the near-surface electric field and lightning occurrences allows interconnecting two atmospheric phenomena. Registration of the Extensive Air Showers allows approaching problems of relation of the lightning occurrences and particle fluxes.

  2. Integration of carbon fluxes and optical remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Contreras, S.; Nestola, E.; Flanagan, L. B.; Gamon, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    The integration of optical and flux measurements can improve our understanding of flux controls and dynamics. For our study, reflectance and flux measurements at a dry mixed-grass prairie grassland and crop ecosystem were collected. A LUE model was used to estimate productivity and then compared to eddy-covariance derived NEE and GPP. Both narrow band and low cost two-band radiometers were explored as alternative ways to estimate terms of the LUE model. The high temporal resolution in an automated broadband sensors system resulted in estimated carbon fluxes that accurately tracked the seasonal carbon flux dynamics, including the precise tracking of the phenologic cycle through green-up, maturity, and senescence. Furthermore, automated sensors offered a continuous time series that provide a novel approach for partitioning net carbon fluxes into its productivity and respiration components, as well as allowed gap filling missing eddy covariance data. Association between harvested biomass and NDVI derived from ground spectrometry provide a method for assessing variation in standing green biomass. By integrating remote sensing and flux measurement approaches, we can achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the dynamics involving the biospheric carbon budget. Having the optical and flux measurements a comparable location and time scale as the eddy covariance allows for up-scaling flux measurements, and could permit direct comparisons to aircraft and satellite measurements.

  3. BOREAS TF-4 CO2 and CH4 Chamber Flux Data from the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Dean; Striegl, Robert; Wickland, Kimberly; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-4 team measured fluxes of CO2 and CH4 across the soil-air interface in four ages of jack pine forest at the BOREAS SSA during August 1993 to March 1995. Gross and net flux of CO2 and flux of CH4 between soil and air are presented for 24 chamber sites in mature jack pine forest, 20-year-old, 4-year-old, and clear cut areas. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  4. Gap heating with pressure gradients. [for Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection system tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. D.; Maraia, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    The heating rate distribution and temperature response on the gap walls of insulating tiles is analyzed to determine significant phenomena and parameters in flows where there is an external surface pressure gradient. Convective heating due to gap flow, modeled as fully developed pipe flow, is coupled with a two-dimensional thermal model of the tiles that includes conduction and radiative heat transfer. To account for geometry and important environmental parameters, scale factors are obtained by curve-fitting measured temperatures to analytical solutions. These scale factors are then used to predict the time-dependent gap heat flux and temperature response of tile gaps on the Space Shuttle Orbiter during entry.

  5. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, D. R.

    2016-01-01

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration. The instruments used are: • a fast-response, three-dimensional (3D) wind sensor (sonic anemometer) to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the speed of sound (SOS) (used to derive the air temperature) • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain the water vapor density and the CO2 concentration, and • an open-path infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) to obtain methane density and methane flux at one SGP EF and at the NSA CF. The ECOR systems are deployed at the locations where other methods for surface flux measurements (e.g., energy balance Bowen ratio [EBBR] systems) are difficult to employ, primarily at the north edge of a field of crops. A Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) has been installed collocated with each deployed ECOR system in SGP, NSA, Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), ARM Mobile Facility 1 (AMF1), and ARM Mobile Facility 2 (AMF2). The surface energy balance system consists of upwelling and downwelling solar and infrared radiometers within one net radiometer, a wetness sensor, and soil measurements. The SEBS measurements allow the comparison of ECOR sensible and latent heat fluxes with the energy balance determined from the SEBS and provide information on wetting of the sensors for data quality purposes. The SEBS at one SGP and one NSA site also support upwelling and downwelling PAR measurements to qualify those two locations as Ameriflux sites.

  6. Diffusive flux of methane from warm wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, T.R.; Burke, R.A.; Sackett, W.M. )

    1988-12-01

    Diffusion of methane across the air-water interface from several wetland environments in south Florida was estimated from measured surface water concentrations using an empirically derived gas exchange model. The flux from the Everglades sawgrass marsh system varied widely, ranging from 0.18 + or{minus}0.21 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr for densely vegetated regions to 2.01 + or{minus}0.88 for sparsely vegetated, calcitic mud areas. Despite brackish salinities, a strong methane flux, 1.87 + or{minus}0.63 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr, was estimated for an organic-rich mangrove pond near Florida Bay. The diffusive flux accounted for 23, 36, and 13% of the total amount of CH{sub 4} emitted to the atmosphere from these environments, respectively. The average dissolved methane concentration for an organic-rich forested swamp was the highest of any site at 12.6 microM; however, the calculated diffusive flux from this location, 2.57 + or{minus}1.88 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr, was diminished by an extensive plant canopy that sheltered the air-water interface from the wind. The mean diffusive flux from four freshwater lakes, 0.77 + or{minus}0.73 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr, demonstrated little temperature dependence. The mean diffusive flux for an urbanized, subtropical estuary was 0.06 + or{minus}0.05 mol CH{sub 4}/sq m/yr.

  7. Spatial Representativeness of Flux Tower Sites: A Comparison Between Tower and Aircraft Eddy-Covariance Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caulton, D.; Shepson, P. B.; Munger, J. W.; Hollinger, D. Y.; Saatchi, S. S.; Moghaddam, M.; Stirm, B. H.

    2013-12-01

    Development and testing of regional and global scale ecosystem models rely on analysis of data from flux towers that have footprint scales (~1 km2) that are much smaller and contain relatively homogeneous land use types. This approach tends to assume that the patchwork approach appropriately represents regions that are, especially on larger scale, much more heterogeneous in terms of land cover, soil moisture, topography and climatology, etc. While aircraft platforms provide snapshot views of NEE, they have access to essentially any environment and can access difficult and heterogeneous environments. We used an instrumented aircraft platform equipped with a 50 Hz wind probe and GPS/INS and a 10 Hz Picarro CO2/H2O analyzer to measure eddy covariance fluxes over larger spatial scales (~20 km2) over and near Howland Forest, ME, Harvard Forest, MA and Duke Forest, NC, as part of the Airborne Observatory of Subcanopy and Subsurface (AirMOSS) mission campaigns. Flux measurements were conducted for varying land cover types in these forests in July, 2012 and June-August, 2013. Measured fluxes will be compared with tower fluxes from each of the three sites to investigate the quality of the aircraft data, and the ability to assess local-regional scale variability and the spatial representativeness of these towers, with respect to the larger scale fluxes. In addition, soil moisture data from a NASA G-III aircraft will be used to investigate spatial representativeness and the soil moisture dependence of the fluxes.

  8. Cryogenic flux-concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, B. M.; Brechna, H.; Hill, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Flux concentrator has high primary to secondary coupling efficiency enabling it to produce high magnetic fields. The device provides versatility in pulse duration, magnetic field strengths and power sources.

  9. Charged Particle Flux Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, D. A.; Stocks, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    Improved version of Faraday cup increases accuracy of measurements of flux density of charged particles incident along axis through collection aperture. Geometry of cone-and-sensing cup combination assures most particles are trapped.

  10. Acid soldering flux poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    The harmful substances in soldering fluxes are called hydrocarbons. They include: Ammonium chloride Rosin Hydrochloric acid Zinc ... Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ... Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ...

  11. GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-20

    ... climate components (atmosphere, ocean, land, cryosphere, biosphere). The GEWEX Radiative Flux Assessment (RFA) project will provide a ... Spatial Coverage: (-20.45, -2.43)(-62.87, -47.90) Full Product Page ...

  12. Anomalous aharonov-bohm gap oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sangalli, Davide; Marini, Andrea

    2011-10-12

    The gap oscillations caused by a magnetic flux penetrating a carbon nanotube represent one of the most spectacular observations of the Aharonov-Bohm effect at the nanoscale. Our understanding of this effect is, however, based on the assumption that the electrons are strictly confined on the tube surface, on trajectories that are not modified by curvature effects. Using an ab initio approach based on density functional theory, we show that this assumption fails at the nanoscale inducing important corrections to the physics of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Curvature effects and electronic density that is spilled out of the nanotube surface are shown to break the periodicity of the gap oscillations. We predict the key phenomenological features of this anomalous Aharonov-Bohm effect in semiconductive and metallic tubes and the existence of a large metallic phase in the low flux regime of multiwalled nanotubes, also suggesting possible experiments to validate our results.

  13. Terminology gap in hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    Water is central to life on Earth. People have been trying to understand how water moves in the hydrosphere throughout the human history. In the 9th century BC, the famous Greek poet Homer described the hydrological cycle in Iliad as "okeanos whose stream bends back in a circle" with a belief that rivers are ocean-fed from subterranean seas. Later, Aristotle (4th century BC) claimed that most of the water came from underground caverns in which air was transformed into water. It was only until 1674, French scientist Perrault developed the correct concept of the water cycle. In modern times, scientists are interested in understanding the individual processes of the hydrological cycle with a keen focus on runoff which supplies water to rivers, lakes, and oceans. Currently, the prevailing concepts on runoff processes include 'infiltration excess runoff' and 'saturation excess runoff'. However, there is no term to describe another major runoff due to the excess beyond the soil water holding capacity (i.e., the field capacity). We argue that a new term should be introduced to fill this gap, and it could be called 'holding excess runoff' which is compatible with the convention. This new term is significant in correcting a half-century misnomer where 'holding excess runoff' has been incorrectly named as 'saturation excess runoff', which was introduced by the Xinanjiang model in China in 1960s. Similar concept has been adopted in many well-known hydrological models such as PDM and HBV in which the saturation refers to the field capacity. The term 'holding excess runoff' resolves such a common confusion in the hydrological community.

  14. Ion-gap sensing for engine control

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This article reports that in addition to detecting misfire to conform with California onboard diagnostic (OBD II) regulations, Delco Electronics and Mecel AB engineers are looking at ion-gap sensing to control knock, A/F ratio, and other possible engine control parameters. The combustion of fuel in an engine cylinder produces ions. Detection of those ions by the spark plug (ion-gap sensing), and use of the resulting ion currents, has been employed in engine management systems since 1988. Saab introduced the first application, for cam-phase sensing. The main driving force for ion-gap sensing is OBD II requirements for 100% misfire detection at all speeds and loads. The technique has been expanded in subsequent applications to include misfire, knock, and pre-ignition detection and control, and more recently in combustion-ion detection using a capacitance-type, ion-current measurement method. Use of the ion current`s wave shape to control knock allows elimination of the separate piezoelectric type (PZT) sensor. Future applications could provide additional engine-control features including air/fuel ratio measurement and control.

  15. Spark Gap Electrode Erosion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    between shots, leading to thermal expansion and contraction of the surface . Calculations of the temperature differen- tial between the heating and cooling...and (b) copper-tungsten iK-33) anode surfaces in nitrogen 127 36 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE. VOL. PS-I 2, NO. 1. MARCH 1984 S Air : 2t Lr o...describe the self breakdown voltage distribution ""[ * as a function of the relevant parameters (such as elec- trode surface conditions, gas type and

  16. Interspecific Variation in SO2 Flux 1

    PubMed Central

    Olszyk, David M.; Tingey, David T.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationships among stomatal, residual, and epidermal conductances in determining the flux of SO2 air pollution to leaves. Variations in leaf SO2 and H2O vapor fluxes were determined using four plant species: Pisum sativum L. (garden pea), Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. flacca (mutant of tomato), Geranium carolinianum L. (wild geranium), and Diplacus aurantiacus (Curtis) Jeps. (a native California shrub). Fluxes were measured using the mass-balance approach during exposure to 4.56 micromoles per cubic meter (0.11 microliters per liter) SO2 for 2 hours in a controlled environmental chamber. Flux through adaxial and abaxial leaf surfaces with closed stomata ranged from 1.9 to 9.4 nanomoles per square meter per second for SO2, and 0.3 to 1.3 millimoles per square meter per second for H2O vapor. Flux of SO2 into leaves through stomata ranged from ∼0 to 8.5 (dark) and 3.8 to 16.0 (light) millimoles per square meter per second. Flux of H2O vapor from leaves through stomata ranged from ∼0 to 0.6 (dark) to 0.4 to 0.9 (light) millimole per square meter per second. Lycopersicon had internal flux rates for both SO2 and H2O vapor over twice as high as for the other species. Stomatal conductance based on H2O vapor flux averaged from 0.07 to 0.13 mole per square meter per second among the four species. Internal conductance of SO2 as calculated from SO2 flux was from 0.04 mole per square meter per second lower to 0.06 mole per square meter per second higher than stomatal conductance. For Pisum, Geranium, and Diplacus stomatal conductance was the same or slightly higher than internal conductance, indicating that, in general, SO2 flux could be predicted from stomatal conductance for H2O vapor. However, for the Lycopersicon mutant, internal leaf conductance was much higher than stomatal conductance, indicating that factors inside leaves can play a significant role in determining SO2 flux. PMID:16664551

  17. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  18. [Effects of forest gap size and uprooted microsite on the microclimate in Pinus koraiensis-dominated broad-leaved mixed forest].

    PubMed

    Duan, Wen-biao; Du, Shan; Chen, Li-xin; Wang, Li-xia; Wei, Quan-shuai; Zhao, Jian-hui

    2013-08-01

    Three representative forest gaps with pit-mound microsites formed by uprooted trees were selected within the 2.55 hm2 plot in a Pinus koraiensis-dominated broad-leaved mixed forest in Xiao Xing'an Mountains of Northeast China. The cleared land and closed stand were set up as the controls, and the PAR, air temperature and relative humidity in the centers of different size gaps and in mound top as well as the total radiation and precipitation in the gap centers were measured between July and September, 2011 by using multichannel automatic meteorological stations. The differences of the microclimate between the gap centers and mound top in different months were compared, and the monthly and diurnal variations of the microclimatic factors in the gap centers and in the mound top under typical weather conditions were analyzed. The results showed that the mean monthly PAR and air temperature in the three gaps of different sizes were in the order of large gap > medium gap > small gap, and the mean monthly relative humidity was in the order of small gap > medium gap > large gap. For the same size gap, the mean monthly PAR and air temperature were higher in the mound top than in the gap center, whereas the mean monthly relative humidity was higher in the gap center than in the mound top. Both the mean monthly total radiation and the mean monthly air temperature in the forest gaps and in the controls were in the order of July > August > September and of cleared land > large gap > medium gap > small gap > closed stand, while the mean monthly relative humidity was in the order of closed stand > small gap > medium gap > large gap > cleared land. The differences in the mean monthly relative humidity between closed stand and various gaps and between closed stand and cleared land reached significant level. The monthly precipitation from July to September decreased in the order of cleared land > large gap > medium gap > small gap > closed stand. Whether in sunny days or in overcast

  19. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  20. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1984-02-16

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  1. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1986-08-19

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

  2. Axial-flux modular permanent-magnet generator with a toroidal winding for wind-turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Wan, Y.H.

    1999-08-01

    Permanent-magnet (PM) generators have been used for wind turbines for many years. Many small wind-turbine manufacturers use direct-drive PM generators. For wind-turbine generators, the design philosophy must cover the following characteristics: low cost, light weight, low speed, high torque, and variable-speed generation. The generator is easy to manufacture and the design can be scaled up for a larger size without major retooling. A modular PM generator with axial flux direction was chosen. The permanent magnet used is NdFeB or ferrite magnet with flux guide to focus flux density in the air gap. Each unit module of the generator may consist of one, two, or more phases. Each generator can be expanded to two or more unit modules. Each unit module is built from simple modular poles. The stator winding is formed like a torus. Thus, the assembly process is simplified and the winding insertion in the slot is less tedious. The authors built a prototype of one unit module and performed preliminary tests in the laboratory. Follow-up tests will be conducted in the laboratory to improve the design.

  3. On comparison of modeled surface flux variations to aircraft observations.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Wesely, M. L.; Environmental Research; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2003-07-30

    Evaluation of models of air-surface exchange is facilitated by an accurate match of areas simulated with those seen by micrometeorological flux measurements. Here, spatial variations in fluxes estimated with the parameterized subgrid-scale surface (PASS) flux model were compared to flux variations seen aboard aircraft above the Walnut River Watershed (WRW) in Kansas. Despite interference by atmospheric eddies, the areas where the modeled sensible and latent heat fluxes were most highly correlated with the aircraft flux estimates were upwind of the flight segments. To assess whether applying a footprint function to the surface values would improve the model evaluation, a two-dimensional correlation distribution was used to identify the locations and relative importance of contributing modeled surface pixels upwind of each segment of the flight path. The agreement between modeled surface fluxes and aircraft measurements was improved when upwind fluxes were weighted with an optimized footprint parameter {var_phi}, which can be estimated from wind profiler data and surface eddy covariance. Variations of the flight-observed flux were consistently greater than those modeled at the surface, perhaps because of the smoothing effect of using 1 km pixels in the model. In addition, limited flight legs prevented sufficient filtering of the effects of atmospheric convection, possibly accounting for some of the more prominent changes in fluxes measured along the flight paths.

  4. Quantifying the drivers of ocean-atmosphere CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Williams, Richard G.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    A mechanistic framework for quantitatively mapping the regional drivers of air-sea CO2 fluxes at a global scale is developed. The framework evaluates the interplay between (1) surface heat and freshwater fluxes that influence the potential saturated carbon concentration, which depends on changes in sea surface temperature, salinity and alkalinity, (2) a residual, disequilibrium flux influenced by upwelling and entrainment of remineralized carbon- and nutrient-rich waters from the ocean interior, as well as rapid subduction of surface waters, (3) carbon uptake and export by biological activity as both soft tissue and carbonate, and (4) the effect on surface carbon concentrations due to freshwater precipitation or evaporation. In a steady state simulation of a coarse-resolution ocean circulation and biogeochemistry model, the sum of the individually determined components is close to the known total flux of the simulation. The leading order balance, identified in different dynamical regimes, is between the CO2 fluxes driven by surface heat fluxes and a combination of biologically driven carbon uptake and disequilibrium-driven carbon outgassing. The framework is still able to reconstruct simulated fluxes when evaluated using monthly averaged data and takes a form that can be applied consistently in models of different complexity and observations of the ocean. In this way, the framework may reveal differences in the balance of drivers acting across an ensemble of climate model simulations or be applied to an analysis and interpretation of the observed, real-world air-sea flux of CO2.

  5. Energy balance and non-turbulent fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moderow, Uta; Feigenwinter, Christian; Bernhofer, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Often, the sum of the turbulent fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat from eddy covariance (EC) measurements does not match the available energy (sum of net radiation, ground heat flux and storage changes). This is referred to as energy balance closure gap. The reported imbalances vary between 0%