Science.gov

Sample records for air gap formation

  1. Dynamics of air gap formation around roots with changing soil water content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetterlein, D.; Carminati, A.; Weller, U.; Oswald, S.; Vogel, H.-J.

    2009-04-01

    Most models regarding uptake of water and nutrients from soil assume intimate contact between roots and soil. However, it is known for a long time that roots may shrink under drought conditions. Due to the opaque nature of soil this process could not be observed in situ until recently. Combining tomography of the entire sample (field of view of 16 x 16 cm, pixel side 0.32 mm) with local tomography of the soil region around roots (field of view of 5 x 5 cm, pixel side 0.09 mm), the high spatial resolution required to image root shrinkage and formation of air-filled gaps around roots could be achieved. Applying this technique and combining it with microtensiometer measurements, measurements of plant gas exchange and microscopic assessment of root anatomy, a more detailed study was conducted to elucidate at which soil matric potential roots start to shrink in a sandy soil and which are the consequences for plant water relations. For Lupinus albus grown in a sandy soil tomography of the entire root system and of the interface between taproot and soil was conducted from day 11 to day 31 covering two drying cycles. Soil matric potential decreased from -36 hPa at day 11 after planting to -72, -251, -429 hPa, on day 17, 19, 20 after planting. On day 20 an air gap started to occur around the tap root and extended further on day 21 with matric potential below -429 hPa (equivalent to 5 v/v % soil moisture). From day 11 to day 21 stomatal conductivity decreased from 467 to 84 mmol m-2 s-1, likewise transpiration rate decreased and plants showed strong wilting symptoms on day 21. Plants were watered by capillary rise on day 21 and recovered completely within a day with stomatal conductivity increasing to 647 mmol m-2 s-1. During a second drying cycle, which was shorter as plants continuously increased in size, air gap formed again at the same matric potential. Plant stomatal conductance and transpiration decreased in a similar fashion with decreasing matric potential and

  2. Surfactant-Assisted Voltage-Driven Silver Nanoparticle Chain Formation across Microelectrode Gaps in Air.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nidhi; Zamborini, Francis P

    2015-10-27

    Here we describe the electrodeposition of Ag in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) onto 5 μm gap Au interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes that are bare, thiol-functionalized, or thiol-functionalized and seeded with 4 nm diameter Au nanoparticles (NPs). After deposition, applying a voltage between 5 and 10 V in air for 0 to 1000 s resulted in one-dimensional (1D) Ag NP chains spanning across the IDA gap. The Ag NP chains form on IDAs functionalized with thiols and Au NP-seeded at about 5 V and at 10 V for the other nonseeded surfaces. Ag NP chains do not form at all up to 10 V when IDAs are treated with ozone or water soaking to remove possible CTA(+) ions from the surface, when Ag deposition takes place in the absence of CTAB, or when the voltage is applied under dry N2 (low humidity). Chain formation occurs by Ag moving from the positive to negative electrode. Coating the devices with a negatively charged surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, also results in Ag NP chains by Ag moving from the positive to the negative electrodes, which confirms that the chains form by electrochemical oxidation at the positive electrode and deposition at the negative electrode. The surfactant ions and thin layer of water present in the humid environment facilitate this electrochemical process. PMID:26344389

  3. Surfactant-Assisted Voltage-Driven Silver Nanoparticle Chain Formation across Microelectrode Gaps in Air.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nidhi; Zamborini, Francis P

    2015-10-27

    Here we describe the electrodeposition of Ag in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) onto 5 μm gap Au interdigitated array (IDA) electrodes that are bare, thiol-functionalized, or thiol-functionalized and seeded with 4 nm diameter Au nanoparticles (NPs). After deposition, applying a voltage between 5 and 10 V in air for 0 to 1000 s resulted in one-dimensional (1D) Ag NP chains spanning across the IDA gap. The Ag NP chains form on IDAs functionalized with thiols and Au NP-seeded at about 5 V and at 10 V for the other nonseeded surfaces. Ag NP chains do not form at all up to 10 V when IDAs are treated with ozone or water soaking to remove possible CTA(+) ions from the surface, when Ag deposition takes place in the absence of CTAB, or when the voltage is applied under dry N2 (low humidity). Chain formation occurs by Ag moving from the positive to negative electrode. Coating the devices with a negatively charged surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, also results in Ag NP chains by Ag moving from the positive to the negative electrodes, which confirms that the chains form by electrochemical oxidation at the positive electrode and deposition at the negative electrode. The surfactant ions and thin layer of water present in the humid environment facilitate this electrochemical process.

  4. Air-gap heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Heyn, Ch.; Schmidt, M.; Schwaiger, S.; Stemmann, A.; Mendach, S.; Hansen, W.

    2011-01-17

    We demonstrate the fabrication of thin GaAs layers which quasi hover above the underlying GaAs substrate. The hovering layers have a perfect epitaxial relationship to the substrate crystal lattice and are connected to the substrate surface only by lattice matched nanopillars of low density. These air-gap heterostructures are created by combining in situ molecular beam epitaxy compatible self-assembled droplet-etching and ex situ selective wet-chemical etching.

  5. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... § 56.6603 Air gap. At least a 15-foot air gap shall be provided between the blasting circuit and...

  6. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... § 56.6603 Air gap. At least a 15-foot air gap shall be provided between the blasting circuit and...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND...-Surface and Underground § 57.6603 Air gap. At least a 15-foot air gap shall be provided between...

  8. Engine piston having an insulating air gap

    DOEpatents

    Jarrett, Mark Wayne; Hunold,Brent Michael

    2010-02-02

    A piston for an internal combustion engine has an upper crown with a top and a bottom surface, and a lower crown with a top and a bottom surface. The upper crown and the lower crown are fixedly attached to each other using welds, with the bottom surface of the upper crown and the top surface of the lower crown forming a mating surface. The piston also has at least one centrally located air gap formed on the mating surface. The air gap is sealed to prevent substantial airflow into or out of the air gap.

  9. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  11. 30 CFR 56.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air gap. 56.6603 Section 56.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  12. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  13. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  14. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  15. 30 CFR 57.6603 - Air gap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air gap. 57.6603 Section 57.6603 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Extraneous...

  16. Gap-dependent transitions of atmospheric microplasma in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Hong-Yu; Huang, Bo-Shiun

    2011-04-15

    We report on the gap dependence of the planar atmospheric microplasma in air. We investigate the transitions of the dielectric barrier discharge in open air, including the random walk filaments (plasma columns), localized filaments, stochastic filaments, and diffuse discharge. A star-shaped filamentary discharge pattern is observed after the formation of the localized filaments. The liquid drops found on the dielectric surface further become a confining pattern for star-shaped discharge. We also demonstrate the applications of the insulating pattern for the use of the plasma display in open air by the handwritten characters with UV adhesive.

  17. Tunable optofluidic dye laser with integrated air-gap etalon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wuzhou; Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Psaltis, Demetri

    2010-11-01

    In this work we demonstrate an integrated air-gap etalon that enables single wavelength operation and tuning ability for optofluidic dye laser. The integrated elastomeric air-gap etalon is controlled by air pressure. The chip was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via replica molding. It comprises a liquid waveguide and micro-scale air-gap mirrors providing the feedback. The lasing wavelength is chosen by the interference between two parallel PDMS-air interfaces inside the internal tunable air-gap etalon, of which pneumatic tuning can be realized by inflating the air-gap etalon with compressed air. This dye laser exhibits a pumping threshold of 1.6 μJ/pulse, a lasing linewidth of 3 nm and a tuning range of 14 nm.

  18. Air Gap Effects in LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Ault, S; Avara, R; Bahl, K L; Boat, R; Cunningham, B; Gidding, D; Janzen, J; Kuklo, D; Lee, R; Lauderbach, L; Weingart, W C; Wu, B; Winer, K

    2005-09-26

    Three experiments done over twenty years on gaps in LX-17 are reported. For the detonation front moving parallel to the gaps, jets of gas products were seen coming from the gaps at velocities greater than the detonation velocity. A case can be made that the jet velocity increased with gap thickness but the data is scattered. For the detonation front moving transverse to the gap, time delays were seen. The delays roughly increase with gap width, going from 0-70 ns at 'zero gap' to around 300 ns at 0.5-1 mm gap. Larger gaps of up to 6 mm width almost certainly stopped the detonation, but this was not proved. Real-time resolution of the parallel jets and determination of the actual re-detonation or failure in the transverse case needs to be done in future experiments.

  19. Mutational analysis of gap junction formation.

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, G; Werner, R; Levine, E; Rabadan-Diehl, C

    1992-01-01

    The paired oocyte cell-cell channel assay was used to investigate the mechanisms involved in the process of formation of gap junction channels. Single oocytes, injected with connexin-specific mRNAs, accumulate a pool of precursors from which cell-cell channels can form rapidly upon pairing. Several lines of evidence, including immunohistochemistry and surface labeling, indicate that part of this precursor pool is located in the cell membrane, probably in the form of closed hemichannels. The homophilic binding of hemichannels to each other can be mimicked by synthetic peptides representing the extracellular loop sequences of connexin32. The peptides specifically suppress channel formation. A crucial role is established for the six cysteines in the extracellular domains that are conserved in all vertebrate gap junction proteins. Change of any of these cysteines into serines results in absolute loss of function of the mutant connexin. The effects of thiol-specific reagents on channel formation suggest that docking and/or opening of channels involves disulfide exchange. Several of the variable amino acids in the extracellular loop sequences were found to determine specificity of connexin-connexin interactions. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:1376165

  20. The mechanics of endothelial gap formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattoraj, Joyjit; Del Gado, Emanuela; Hardin, C. Corey; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    The vascular endothelium is a layer of specialized cells, referred to as endothelial cells (EC) that line the internal surfaces of blood vessels and are largely responsible for regulating the transit of fluids, solutes and immune system cells from the circulation, across the vessel wall, and into the tissues. We investigate the physics of the mechanical events that may proceed and eventually lead to dramatic increase of its permeability, leading to serious illness. In combination with experiments measuring local stresses and gap formation in EC in different conditions, we devise a minimal model based on an amorphous assembly of adhesive particles, subjected to an imposed tension. Numerical simulations of the model show that, as a function of the rate at which the tension is imposed, the system goes from an elastic regime in which small gaps increase in number to a ``plastic'' one, where pre-existing gaps increase in size, and internal stresses display large hetereogeneities and long range correlations. This second regime bears intriguing similarities with the experimental finding in EC monolayers.

  1. Transmission properties of frequency selective structures with air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Li-Feng; Lü, Ming-Yun; Wu, Zhe

    2010-12-01

    The transmission properties of compound frequency selective structures with dielectric slab and air gaps were investigated by computation and experimentation. Mechanism analyses were also carried out. Results show that the air gaps have a distinct influence on the transmission properties. Resonant frequency of the structure would increase rapidly when the air gap appears. After the gap gets larger to a specific value, generally 1/5 wavelength corresponding to the resonant frequency, the transmission properties would change periodically with the gap thickness. The change of transmission properties in one period has a close relationship with the dielectric thickness. These results provide a new method for designing a bandpass radome of large incidence angle and low loss with the concept of stealth shield radome.

  2. Bias stress effect in "air-gap" organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Podzorov, V

    2012-05-22

    The origin of the bias stress effect related only to semiconductor properties is investigated in "air-gap" organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) in the absence of a material gate dielectric. The effect becomes stronger as the density of trap states in the semiconductor increases. A theoretical model based on carrier trapping and relaxation in localized tail states is formulated. Polar molecular vapors in the gap of "air-gap" OFETs also have a significant impact on the bias stress effect via the formation of bound states between the charge carriers and molecular dipoles at the semiconductor surface. PMID:22499410

  3. Influence of film thickness and air exposure on the transport gap of manganese phthalocyanine

    SciTech Connect

    Haidu, F.; Fechner, A.; Salvan, G.; Gordan, O. D.; Fronk, M.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Lehmann, D.; Mahns, B.; Knupfer, M.

    2013-06-15

    The interface formation between manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) and cobalt was investigated combining ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy. The transport band gap of the MnPc increases with the film thickness up to a value of (1.2 {+-} 0.3) eV while the optical band gap as determined from spectroscopic ellipsometry amounts to 0.5 eV. The gap values are smaller compared to other phthalocyanines due to metallic Mn 3d states close to the Fermi level. The transport band gap was found to open upon air exposure as a result of the disappearance of the occupied 3d electronic states.

  4. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2013-03-05

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  5. Permanent-magnet-less machine having an enclosed air gap

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2012-02-07

    A permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous system includes a stator that generates a magnetic rotating field when sourced by an alternating current. An uncluttered rotor disposed within the magnetic rotating field is spaced apart from the stator to form an air gap relative to an axis of rotation. A stationary excitation core spaced apart from the uncluttered rotor by an axial air gap and a radial air gap substantially encloses the stationary excitation core. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include stator core gaps to reduce axial flux flow. Some permanent magnet-less, brushless synchronous systems include an uncluttered rotor coupled to outer laminations. The quadrature-axis inductance may be increased in some synchronous systems. Some synchronous systems convert energy such as mechanical energy into electrical energy (e.g., a generator); other synchronous systems may convert any form of energy into mechanical energy (e.g., a motor).

  6. The Air Gap Phenomenon in Children's Landscape Drawings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargreaves, David J.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    These studies confirm the view that the "air gap" phenomenon, which refers to the area that remains when ground and sky lines are constructed at the bottom and top of a drawing, is commonly found in the free drawings of middle and later childhood, but that it is readily abandoned when task demands are modified accordingly. (Author/DB)

  7. Use of air gap structures to lower intralevel capacitance

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Roherty-Osmun, E.

    1997-03-01

    Interconnect delays, arising in part from intralevel capacitance, are one of the factors limiting the performance of advanced circuits. In addition, the problem of filling the spaces between neighboring metal lines with an insulator is becoming increasingly acute as aspect ratios increase. We address these problems simultaneously by intentionally creating an air gap between closely spaced metal lines. Undesirable topography is eliminated using a spin-on dielectric. We then cap the wafers with silicon dioxide and planarize using chemical mechanical polishing. Simple modeling of test structures predicts an equivalent dielectric constant of 1.9 on features similar to those expected for 0.25 micron technologies. Two level metal test structures fabricated in a 0.5 micron CMOS technology show that the process can be readily integrated with current standard CMOS processes. The potential problems of via misalignment, overall dielectric stack height, and the relative difficulty of ensuring void formation compared to that of ensuring a void-free fill are considered.

  8. An ultrasonic air pump using an acoustic traveling wave along a small air gap.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Daisuke; Wada, Yuji; Nakamura, Kentaro; Nishikawa, Masato; Nakagawa, Tatsuyuki; Kihara, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic air pump that uses a traveling wave along a small air gap between a bending vibrator and a reflector is discussed. The authors investigate ultrasonic air pumps that make use of bending vibrators and reflectors and confirm that air can be induced to flow by generating an asymmetric acoustic standing wave along an air gap. In this paper, we proposed a novel ultrasonic air pump in which a traveling wave along an air gap induces acoustic streaming and achieves one-way airflow. Two new reflector configurations, stepped and tapered, were designed and used to generate traveling waves. To predict airflow generation, sound pressure distribution in the air gap was calculated by means of finite element analysis (FEA). As a preliminary step, 2 FEA models were compared: one piezoelectric-structure-acoustic model and one piezoelectric- structure-fluid model, which included the viscosity effect of the fluid. The sound pressure distribution in the air gap, including fluid viscosity, was calculated by the FEA because it is expected to be dominant and thus have a strong effect on the sound pressure field in such a thin fluid layer. Based on the FEA results of the stepped and the tapered reflectors, it was determined that acoustic traveling waves could propagate along the gaps. Experiments were carried out with the designed bending vibrator and the reflectors. The acoustic fields in the air gap were measured via a fiber optic probe, and it was determined that the sound pressure and the phase distribution tendencies corresponded well with the results computed by FEA. Through our experiments, one-way airflow generation, in the same direction of the traveling wave and with the maximum flow velocity of 5.6 cm/s, was achieved.

  9. Excitonic gap formation and condensation in the bilayer graphene structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apinyan, V.; Kopeć, T. K.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the excitonic gap formation in the Bernal Stacked, bilayer graphene (BLG) structures at half-filling. Considering the local Coulomb interaction between the layers, we calculate the excitonic gap parameter and we discuss the role of the interlayer and intralayer Coulomb interactions and the interlayer hopping on the excitonic pair formation in the BLG. Particularly, we predict the origin of excitonic gap formation and condensation, in relation to the furthermost interband optical transition spectrum. The general diagram of excitonic phase transition is given, explaining different interlayer correlation regimes. The temperature dependence of the excitonic gap parameter is shown and the role of the chemical potential, in the BLG, is discussed in details.

  10. Theoretical and experimental studies on air gap membrane distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. L.; Zhu, C.; Cheung, C. S.; Leung, C. W.

    Air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) is an innovative membrane separation technique for pure water extraction from aqueous solutions. In this study, both theoretical and experimental investigations are carried out on AGMD of different aqueous solutions, namely, tap water, salted water, dyed solutions, acid solutions, and alkali solutions. A simple mechanistic model of heat and mass transfer associated with AGMD is developed. Simple relationships of permeate flux, total heating or cooling load and thermal efficiency of AGMD with respect to the membrane distillation temperature difference are obtained. Effects of solution concentration and the width of the air gap in AGMD are analyzed. In the experimental study, the experiments were conducted using 1m PTFE membrane with a membrane distillation temperature difference up to 55∘C. The AGMD system yields a permeate flux of pure water of up to 28kg/m2h. Direct comparison of the experimental results with the proposed modeling predictions shows a fairly good match.

  11. Lowering of intralevel capacitance using air gap structures

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Roherty-Osmun, E.; Farino, A.J.

    1996-11-01

    Interconnect delays, arising in part from intralevel capacitance, are one of the limiting factors in the performance of advanced integrated circuits. In addition, the problem of filling the spaces between neighboring metal lines with an insulator is becoming increasingly severe as aspect ratios increase. We address these problems by intentionally creating a air gap between closely spaced metal lines. The ends of the air gap and reentrant features are then sealed using a spin on dielectric. The entire structure is then capped with silicon dioxide and planarized . Simple modeling of mechanical test structures on silicon predicts an equivalent dielectric constant of 1.9 on features similar to those expected for 0.25 micron technologies. Metal to metal test structures fabricated in a 0.5 micron CMOS technology show that the process can be readily integrated with chemical mechanical polishing and current standard CMOS processes.

  12. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Two-Dimensional Locally Resonant Sonic Crystals Comprised of Helmholtz Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, L.; Elford, D. P.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Swallowe, G. M.

    2010-12-01

    We present a new type of sonic crystal technology offering a novel method of achieving broad acoustic band gaps. The proposed design of a locally resonating sonic crystal (LRSC) is constructed from "C"-shaped Helmholtz resonators as opposed to traditional solid scattering units. This unique construction enables a two band gap system to be generated in which the first -- a Bragg type band gap, arises due to the periodic nature of the crystal, whilst the second gap results from resonance of the air column within the resonators. The position of this secondary band gap is found to be dependent upon the dimensions of the resonating cavity. The band gap formation is investigated theoretically using finite element methods, and confirmed through experimental testing. It is noted that the resonance band gaps detected cover a much broader frequency range (in the order of kHz) than has been achieved to date. In addition the possibility of overlapping such a wide band gap with the characteristic Bragg gap generated by the structure itself could yield gaps of even greater range. A design of sonic crystal is proposed, that comprises of several resonators with differing cavity sizes. Such a structure generates multiple resonance gaps corresponding to the various resonator sizes, which may be overlapped to form yet larger band gaps. This multiple resonance gap system can occur in two configurations. Firstly a simple mixed array can be created by alternating resonator sizes in the array and secondly using a System coined the Matryoshka (Russian doll) array in which the resonators are distributed inside one another. The proposed designs of LRSC's offer a real potential for acoustic shielding using sonic crystals, as both the size and position of the band gaps generated can be controlled. This is an application which has been suggested and investigated for several years with little progress. Furthermore the frequency region attenuated by resonance is unrelated to the crystals lattice

  13. Acoustic Band Gap Formation in Two-Dimensional Locally Resonant Sonic Crystals Comprised of Helmholtz Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalmers, L.; Elford, D. P.; Kusmartsev, F. V.; Swallowe, G. M.

    We present a new type of sonic crystal technology offering a novel method of achieving broad acoustic band gaps. The proposed design of a locally resonating sonic crystal (LRSC) is constructed from "C"-shaped Helmholtz resonators as opposed to traditional solid scattering units. This unique construction enables a two band gap system to be generated in which the first — a Bragg type band gap, arises due to the periodic nature of the crystal, whilst the second gap results from resonance of the air column within the resonators. The position of this secondary band gap is found to be dependent upon the dimensions of the resonating cavity. The band gap formation is investigated theoretically using finite element methods, and confirmed through experimental testing. It is noted that the resonance band gaps detected cover a much broader frequency range (in the order of kHz) than has been achieved to date. In addition the possibility of overlapping such a wide band gap with the characteristic Bragg gap generated by the structure itself could yield gaps of even greater range. A design of sonic crystal is proposed, that comprises of several resonators with differing cavity sizes. Such a structure generates multiple resonance gaps corresponding to the various resonator sizes, which may be overlapped to form yet larger band gaps. This multiple resonance gap system can occur in two configurations. Firstly a simple mixed array can be created by alternating resonator sizes in the array and secondly using a system coined the Matryoshka (Russian doll) array in which the resonators are distributed inside one another. The proposed designs of LRSC's offer a real potential for acoustic shielding using sonic crystals, as both the size and position of the band gaps generated can be controlled. This is an application which has been suggested and investigated for several years with little progress. Furthermore the frequency region attenuated by resonance is unrelated to the crystals

  14. Gas Giant Planet Formation in the Photoevaporating Disk. I. Gap Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lin; Jin, Liping; Liu, Chengzhi; Fan, Cunbo

    2016-08-01

    Planet formation and photoevaporation have both been considered as gap opening mechanisms in protoplanetary disks. We have studied giant planet formation in a photoevaporating disk with long-term evolution. Our calculations suggest that the core accretion rate of a protoplanet declines and the trigger of the runaway gas accretion for a giant planet is delayed under the action of photoevaporation. We find that the final mass of a giant planet characterized by the “gap-limiting” case is not influenced by photoevaporation but the final mass of a giant planet characterized by the “diffusion-limiting” case is greatly influenced by photoevaporation. Considering the formation process of giant planets, we suggest that the locations of the gaps opened by giant planets are within 30-40 au and the gap width in the “gap-limiting” case is wider than that in the “diffusion-limiting” case. We also find that gaps in photoevaporating disks are wider than those in non-photoevaporating disks. Our calculations suggest that the origins of multiple gaps in a disk can be diverse depending on their formation locations. In the formation region of giant planets, gaps are opened by giant planets. The outer gap beyond the giant planet formation region may be opened under the action of photoevaporation. A gap may also be opened at 1-3 au under the actions of photoevaporating dissipation and gas accretion of the outer giant planets.

  15. Band gap formation in graphene by in-situ doping

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jeongho; Mitchel, W. C.; Brown, Gail J.; Grazulis, Lawrence; Smith, Howard E.; Pacley, Shanee D.; Boeckl, John J.; Eyink, Kurt G.; Mou, Shin; Tomich, David H.; Hoelscher, John E.; Elhamri, Said

    2011-05-16

    We report the formation of band gaps in as-grown stacks of epitaxial graphene with opposite doping. Control of in-situ doping during carbon source molecular beam epitaxy growth on SiC was achieved by using different carbon sources. Doping heterostructures were grown by stacking n-type material from a C{sub 60} source on p-type material from a graphite filament source. Activation energies for the resistivity and carrier concentration indicated band gaps up to 200 meV. A photoconductivity threshold was observed in the range of the electrical activation energies. Band gap formation is attributed to electric fields induced by spatially separated ionized dopants of opposite charge.

  16. Direct control of air gap flux in permanent magnet machines

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for field weakening in PM machines uses field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72) to produce flux in one or more stators (34, 49, 63, 64), including a flux which counters flux normally produced in air gaps between the stator(s) (34, 49, 63, 64) and the rotor (20, 21, 41, 61) which carries the PM poles. Several modes of operation are introduced depending on the magnitude and polarity of current in the field weakening coils (35, 44, 45, 71, 72). The invention is particularly useful for, but not limited to, the electric vehicle drives and PM generators.

  17. Electronic structure of narrow gap semiconductors: Understanding gap formation and thermoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Paul Melvin

    Electronic band structure calculations are invaluable theoretical tools to understand structural, transport, and optical properties of materials. We have used this tool in the search for new high performance thermoelectric materials, which are usually narrow-gap semiconductors. We have studied the electronic structures of these systems both to understand which properties of the band structure are most important for thermoelectric properties and the nature of the gap formation. Narrow-gap semiconductors lie between metals and wide-gap semiconductors, so understanding the nature of the gap formation is very important. The small band gaps in the systems we have studied generally arise from hybridization between different bands. We have used the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) within density functional theory (DFT). These have been implemented using the full-potential linearized augmented planewave (FLAPW) method within the WIEN97 package. This state-of-the-art method is among the most accurate methods for calculating the electronic structure of solids. We have studied four classes of compounds. These include the half-Heusler compounds, the ternary Zintl-phase compounds, the simple chalcogenides, and the complex chalcogenides. The ternary half-Heusler compounds, considered having a stuffed NaCl structure, show promising thermoelectric properties. The band gap formation is understood by starting with the semi-metallic binary NaCl compounds from which they are formed. Adding the transition (or noble) metal atom causes a strong p-d hybridization near the Fermi energy which opens up the band gap. This hybridization also leads to highly anisotropic effective masses at the conduction band minimum which are found in the best thermoelectric materials. Similar band gap formation is found in the ternary Zintl-phase compounds which are considered a stuffed Th3P4 structure. The band gaps in these ternary compounds are larger than

  18. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  19. Supersonic flow and shock formation in turbine tip gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, John

    1993-01-01

    Shock formation due to overexpansion of supersonic flow at the inlet to the tip clearance gap of a turbomachine has been studied. As the flow enters the tip gap, it accelerates around the blade pressure-side corner creating a region of minimum static pressure. The 'free streamline' separates from the wall at the corner; and, for Mach numbers greater than about 1.3, it curves back to intersect the blade tip. At this point, the freestream flow is abruptly turned parallel to the surface, giving rise to an oblique shock. The results are consistent with compressible sharp-edged orifice flow calculations found in the literature and with the theory of oblique shock wave formation in supersonic flow over a wedge. For freestream Mach numbers of 1.4 to 1.8, wave angles are 43 to 54 deg, and turning angles are 9 to 20 deg; as the Mach number increases, the angle of turn also increases. It appears that in a turbine, after separating from the inlet corner, the flow reattaches on the blade tip and an oblique shock is formed at 0.4-1.4 tip gap heights into the clearance gap. The resulting shock-boundary layer interaction may contribute to further enhancement of already high heat transfer to the blade tip in this region. This in turn could lead to higher blade temperatures and adversely affect blade life and turbine efficiency.

  20. Gap soliton formation in a nonlinear anti-directional coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhov, M S; Maimistov, Andrei I

    2012-11-30

    We consider propagation of electromagnetic solitary waves in two tunnel-coupled waveguides. It is assumed that one of the waveguides is made of a positive-index dielectric, having a Kerr nonlinearity. The other waveguide is made of a linear optical metamaterial characterised by the so-called negative refraction. The gap soliton formation in such a system, which, as shown, has a threshold character, is studied numerically. (solitons)

  1. Influence of composite insertion technique on gap formation

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Neha; Bahuguna, Nikhil; Anand, Surbhi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare newer bulk-fill composites with an incrementally filled composite for adaptability and subsequent gap formation at the pulpal floor. Materials and Methods: Class I cavities were prepared in 60 intact molars, with a shallow depression in the center of the pulpal floor. The samples were divided into four groups (n = 15), according to the material used; smart dentine replacement (SDR), SonicFill, Ever X Flow and Z350 XT, restored to a depth of 4 mm. Following thermocycling, samples were sectioned buccolingually and examined under a stereomicroscope. Seven samples from each group were coated with nail varnish except for approximately 1 mm around the tooth restoration junction. These samples were examined under stereomicroscope after staining with 2% buffered methylene blue dye. The remaining samples were examined under a scanning electron microscope for gap formation. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Bonferroni test. Results: SDR showed the significantly best adaptability as compared to both SonicFill and Ever X Flow (comparable). However, significantly least adaptive capacity was seen in the incrementally filled group (Z350 XT). Conclusion: Bulk-fill composites performed better than incremental composites, demonstrating better adaptability and less gap formation at the pulpal floor. PMID:26957799

  2. Mind the Gap: Timing Planet Formation by Looking in the Holes and Gaps of Dusty Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvet, Nuria; Espaillat, Catherine; Furlan, Elise; Hartmann, Lee; Muzerolle, James; Watson, Dan

    2008-03-01

    Uncovering the details of disk dissipation is critical to understanding the formation of planetary systems. In the past few years Spitzer has greatly aided in this task by giving us an unprecedented view of dust clearing in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, most notably through observations of stars with inner disks that are mostly devoid of small dust i.e. the 'transitional disks.' Recently, Spitzer has identified a new class of 'pre-transitional disks' with significant near-infrared excesses which indicate the presence of an optically thick inner disk separated from an optically thick outer disk, suggesting the incipient development of disk gaps as opposed to the inner holes seen in transitional disks. Here we propose for five hours of IRS time to study variability in 18 transitional and pre-transitional disks in Taurus and Chamaeleon in order to refine planet formation theories. The prospect of detecting variability in these objects is favorable based on IRS data taken in the past few weeks showing that transitional disks exhibit extreme variability due to the behavior of optically thin dust within the inner disk hole. Variability in transitional and pre-transitional disks can be linked with planets interacting with dust in the holes and gaps of these disks and therefore this study will help provide estimates of spatial inhomogeneities and characteristic timescales of changes for planet formation models.

  3. Development of a highly efficient brushless dc motor utilizing both radial and axial air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, K. J.; Jang, G. H.; Sung, S. J.; Chang, J. H.

    2012-04-01

    This research proposes an effective structure for a brushless dc motor utilizing both radial and axial air gaps. The proposed motor generates torque in both the radial and axial air gaps, while the conventional motor generates torque only in the radial air gap. The proposed motor was optimized to minimize the electromagnetic loss of the motor to increase the effective air gap length and fill-factor of the coil while decreasing the saturation of the core at the same time. The electromagnetic loss was reduced by 35% in comparison with a conventional motor.

  4. Opening Hemichannels in Nonjunctional Membrane Stimulates Gap Junction Formation

    PubMed Central

    Beahm, Derek L.; Hall, James E.

    2004-01-01

    We studied gap junction formation in pairs of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing connexins that form functional hemichannels and found no correlation between junctional conductance (Gj) and whole-cell hemichannel conductances (Ghemi) within the first few hours of pairing. However, opening hemichannels to a threshold current stimulated a rapid Gj increase. Moreover, cx46 hemichannel current stimulated cx40 Gj even though cx40 and cx46 do not form heteromeric or heterotypic gap junctions. Initial growth rate and final steady-state level of stimulated Gj were proportional to the product of hemichannel conductances. External calcium affected the growth rate of stimulated Gj but not the final steady-state value. Time constants of formation were short in low [Ca2+]out (3 min in 200 μM Ca2+) and long in high [Ca2+]out (15 min in 1 mM Ca2+), but in oocyte pairs pretreated with lectins to reduce steric hindrance imposed by large membrane glycoproteins the time constant was short and Ca2+-independent. We suggest that hemichannel activity stimulates Gj by collapsing the extracellular volume between membranes to allow the end-to-end binding between hemichannels. These studies suggest the possibility that functional hemichannels could trigger or enhance junctional formation in vivo in response to appropriate stimuli. PMID:14747314

  5. Thickness and air gap measurement of assembled IR objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueerss, B.; Langehanenberg, P.

    2015-05-01

    A growing number of applications like surveillance, thermography, or automotive demand for infrared imaging systems. Their imaging performance is significantly influenced by the alignment of the individual lens elements. Besides the lateral orientation of lenses, the air spacing between the lenses is a crucial parameter. Because of restricted mechanical accessibility within an assembled objective, a non-contact technique is required for the testing of these parameters. So far commercial measurement systems were not available for testing of IR objectives since many materials used for infrared imaging are non-transparent at wavelengths below 2 μm. We herewith present a time-domain low coherent interferometer capable of measuring any kind of infrared material (e.g., Ge, Si, etc.) as well as VIS materials. The fiber-optic set-up is based on a Michelson-Interferometer in which the light from a broadband super-luminescent diode is split into a reference arm with a variable optical delay and a measurement arm where the sample is placed. On a photo detector, the reflected signals from both arms are superimposed and recorded as a function of the variable optical path. Whenever the group delay difference is zero, a coherence peak occurs and the relative lens' surface distances are derived from the optical delay. In order to penetrate IR materials, the instrument operates at 2.2 μm. The set-up allows the contactless determination of thicknesses and air gaps inside of assembled infrared objective lenses with accuracy in the micron range. It therefore is a tool for the precise manufacturing or quality control.

  6. The effect of very small air gaps on small field dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, P. H.; Crowe, S. B.; Kairn, T.; Kenny, J.; Lehmann, J.; Lye, J.; Dunn, L.; Hill, B.; Knight, R. T.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of very small air gaps (less than 1 mm) on the dosimetry of small photon fields used for stereotactic treatments. Measurements were performed with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) for 6 MV photons on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator with a Brainlab µMLC attachment for square field sizes down to 6 mm × 6 mm. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using EGSnrc C++ user code cavity. It was found that the Monte Carlo model used in this study accurately simulated the OSLD measurements on the linear accelerator. For the 6 mm field size, the 0.5 mm air gap upstream to the active area of the OSLD caused a 5.3% dose reduction relative to a Monte Carlo simulation with no air gap. A hypothetical 0.2 mm air gap caused a dose reduction >2%, emphasizing the fact that even the tiniest air gaps can cause a large reduction in measured dose. The negligible effect on an 18 mm field size illustrated that the electronic disequilibrium caused by such small air gaps only affects the dosimetry of the very small fields. When performing small field dosimetry, care must be taken to avoid any air gaps, as can be often present when inserting detectors into solid phantoms. It is recommended that very small field dosimetry is performed in liquid water. When using small photon fields, sub-millimetre air gaps can also affect patient dosimetry if they cannot be spatially resolved on a CT scan. However the effect on the patient is debatable as the dose reduction caused by a 1 mm air gap, starting out at 19% in the first 0.1 mm behind the air gap, decreases to <5% after just 2 mm, and electronic equilibrium is fully re-established after just 5 mm.

  7. Traction force dynamics predict gap formation in activated endothelium.

    PubMed

    Valent, Erik T; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Hordijk, Peter L

    2016-09-10

    In many pathological conditions the endothelium becomes activated and dysfunctional, resulting in hyperpermeability and plasma leakage. No specific therapies are available yet to control endothelial barrier function, which is regulated by inter-endothelial junctions and the generation of acto-myosin-based contractile forces in the context of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. However, the spatiotemporal distribution and stimulus-induced reorganization of these integral forces remain largely unknown. Traction force microscopy of human endothelial monolayers was used to visualize contractile forces in resting cells and during thrombin-induced hyperpermeability. Simultaneously, information about endothelial monolayer integrity, adherens junctions and cytoskeletal proteins (F-actin) were captured. This revealed a heterogeneous distribution of traction forces, with nuclear areas showing lower and cell-cell junctions higher traction forces than the whole-monolayer average. Moreover, junctional forces were asymmetrically distributed among neighboring cells. Force vector orientation analysis showed a good correlation with the alignment of F-actin and revealed contractile forces in newly formed filopodia and lamellipodia-like protrusions within the monolayer. Finally, unstable areas, showing high force fluctuations within the monolayer were prone to form inter-endothelial gaps upon stimulation with thrombin. To conclude, contractile traction forces are heterogeneously distributed within endothelial monolayers and force instability, rather than force magnitude, predicts the stimulus-induced formation of intercellular gaps. PMID:27498166

  8. Wh-filler-gap dependency formation guides reflexive antecedent search

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Michael; Ackerman, Lauren; Baumann, Peter; Potter, David; Yoshida, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies on online sentence processing have shown that the parser can resolve non-local dependencies rapidly and accurately. This study investigates the interaction between the processing of two such non-local dependencies: wh-filler-gap dependencies (WhFGD) and reflexive-antecedent dependencies. We show that reflexive-antecedent dependency resolution is sensitive to the presence of a WhFGD, and argue that the filler-gap dependency established by WhFGD resolution is selected online as the antecedent of a reflexive dependency. We investigate the processing of constructions like (1), where two NPs might be possible antecedents for the reflexive, namely which cowgirl and Mary. Even though Mary is linearly closer to the reflexive, the only grammatically licit antecedent for the reflexive is the more distant wh-NP, which cowgirl. (1). Which cowgirl did Mary expect to have injured herself due to negligence? Four eye-tracking text-reading experiments were conducted on examples like (1), differing in whether the embedded clause was non-finite (1 and 3) or finite (2 and 4), and in whether the tail of the wh-dependency intervened between the reflexive and its closest overt antecedent (1 and 2) or the wh-dependency was associated with a position earlier in the sentence (3 and 4). The results of Experiments 1 and 2 indicate the parser accesses the result of WhFGD formation during reflexive antecedent search. The resolution of a wh-dependency alters the representation that reflexive antecedent search operates over, allowing the grammatical but linearly distant antecedent to be accessed rapidly. In the absence of a long-distance WhFGD (Experiments 3 and 4), wh-NPs were not found to impact reading times of the reflexive, indicating that the parser's ability to select distant wh-NPs as reflexive antecedents crucially involves syntactic structure. PMID:26500579

  9. Mapping forest canopy gaps using air-photo interpretation and ground surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fox, T.J.; Knutson, M.G.; Hines, R.K.

    2000-01-01

    Canopy gaps are important structural components of forested habitats for many wildlife species. Recent improvements in the spatial accuracy of geographic information system tools facilitate accurate mapping of small canopy features such as gaps. We compared canopy-gap maps generated using ground survey methods with those derived from air-photo interpretation. We found that maps created from high-resolution air photos were more accurate than those created from ground surveys. Errors of omission were 25.6% for the ground-survey method and 4.7% for the air-photo method. One variable of inter est in songbird research is the distance from nests to gap edges. Distances from real and simulated nests to gap edges were longer using the ground-survey maps versus the air-photo maps, indicating that gap omission could potentially bias the assessment of spatial relationships. If research or management goals require location and size of canopy gaps and specific information about vegetation structure, we recommend a 2-fold approach. First, canopy gaps can be located and the perimeters defined using 1:15,000-scale or larger aerial photographs and the methods we describe. Mapped gaps can then be field-surveyed to obtain detailed vegetation data.

  10. Aging and the 4-kHz Air-Bone Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nondahl, David M.; Tweed, Ted S.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Wiley, Terry L.; Dalton, Dayna S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors assessed age- and sex-related patterns in the prevalence and 10-year incidence of 4-kHz air-bone gaps and associated factors. Method: Data were obtained as part of the longitudinal, population-based Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study ( Cruickshanks et al., 1998). An air-bone gap at 4 kHz was defined as an…

  11. Test Format and the Variation of Gender Achievement Gaps within the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Sean; Fahle, Erin; Kalogrides, Demetra; Podolsky, Anne; Zarate, Rosalia

    2016-01-01

    Prior research demonstrates the existence of gender achievement gaps and the variation in the magnitude of these gaps across states. This paper characterizes the extent to which the variation of gender achievement gaps on standardized tests across the United States can be explained by differing state accountability test formats. A comprehensive…

  12. Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Health Outcomes: Conference Summary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources to Health Outcomes,” an international specialty conference sponsored by the American Association for Aerosol Research, was held to address key uncertainties in our understanding of adverse health effects related to air po...

  13. The effects of air gap reflections during air-coupled leaky Lamb wave inspection of thin plates.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zichuan; Jiang, Wentao; Cai, Maolin; Wright, William M D

    2016-02-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic inspection using leaky Lamb waves offers attractive possibilities for non-contact testing of plate materials and structures. A common method uses an air-coupled pitch-catch configuration, which comprises a transmitter and a receiver positioned at oblique angles to a thin plate. It is well known that the angle of incidence of the ultrasonic bulk wave in the air can be used to preferentially generate specific Lamb wave modes in the plate in a non-contact manner, depending on the plate dimensions and material properties. Multiple reflections of the ultrasonic waves in the air gap between the transmitter and the plate can produce additional delayed waves entering the plate at angles of incidence that are different to those of the original bulk wave source. Similarly, multiple reflections of the leaky Lamb waves in the air gap between the plate and an inclined receiver may then have different angles of incidence and propagation delays when arriving at the receiver and hence the signal analysis may become complex, potentially leading to confusion in the identification of the wave modes. To obtain a better understanding of the generation, propagation and detection of leaky Lamb waves and the effects of reflected waves within the air gaps, a multiphysics model using finite element methods was established. This model facilitated the visualisation of the propagation of the reflected waves between the transducers and the plate, the subsequent generation of additional Lamb wave signals within the plate itself, their leakage into the adjacent air, and the reflections of the leaky waves in the air gap between the plate and receiver. Multiple simulations were performed to evaluate the propagation and reflection of signals produced at different transducer incidence angles. Experimental measurements in air were in good agreement with simulation, which verified that the multiphysics model can provide a convenient and accurate way to interpret the signals in

  14. Technical Note: Spatial resolution of proton tomography: Impact of air gap between patient and detector

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Uwe; Besserer, Juergen; Hartmann, Matthias

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Proton radiography and tomography were investigated since the early 1970s because of its low radiation dose, high density resolution, and ability to image directly proton stopping power. However, spatial resolution is still a limiting factor. In this note, preliminary results of the impact of an air gap between detector system and patient on spatial resolution are presented. Methods: Spatial resolution of proton radiography and tomography is governed by multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) of the protons in the patient. In this note, the authors employ Monte Carlo simulations of protons traversing a 20 cm thick water box. Entrance and exit proton coordinate measurements were simulated for improved spatial resolution. The simulations were performed with and without a 5 cm air gap in front of and behind the patient. Loss of spatial resolution due to the air gap was studied for protons with different initial angular confusion. Results: It was found that spatial resolution is significantly deteriorated when a 5 cm air gap between the position sensitive detector and the patient is included. For a perfect parallel beam spatial resolution worsens by about 40%. Spatial resolution is getting worse with increasing angular confusion and can reach 80%. Conclusions: When proton radiographies are produced by measuring the entrance and exit coordinates of the protons in front of and behind the patient the air gap between the detector and the patient can significantly deteriorate the spatial resolution of the system by up to 80%. An alternative would be to measure in addition to the coordinates also the exit and entrance angles of each proton. In principle, using the air gap size and proton angle, images can be reconstructed with the same spatial resolution than without air gap.

  15. Air gap resonant tunneling bandpass filter and polarizer.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, A; Bitarafan, M H; Allen, T W; DeCorby, R G

    2016-04-15

    We describe a bandpass filter based on resonant tunneling through an air layer in the frustrated total internal reflection regime, and show that the concept of induced transmission can be applied to the design of thin film matching stacks. Experimental results are reported for Si/SiO2-based devices exhibiting a polarization-dependent passband, with bandwidth on the order of 10 nm in the 1550 nm wavelength range, peak transmittance on the order of 80%, and optical density greater than 5 over most of the near infrared region. PMID:27082360

  16. 30 CFR 285.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 285.659 Section 285.659 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply with the Clean Air...

  17. Thickness and air gap measurement of assembled IR objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueerss, B.; Langehanenberg, P.

    2015-10-01

    A growing number of applications like surveillance, thermography, or automotive demand for infrared imaging systems. Their imaging performance is significantly influenced by the alignment of the individual lenses. Besides the lateral orientation of lenses, the air spacing between the lenses is a crucial parameter. Because of restricted mechanical accessibility within an assembled objective, a non-contact technique is required for the testing of these parameters. So far, commercial measurement systems were not available for testing of IR objectives since most materials used for infrared imaging are non-transparent at wavelengths below 2 μm. We herewith present a time-domain low coherent interferometer capable of measuring any kind of infrared material (e.g., Ge, Si, etc.) as well as VIS materials. The set-up is based on a Michelson interferometer in which the light from a broadband superluminescent diode is split into a reference arm with a variable optical delay and a measurement arm where the sample is placed. On a detector, the reflected signals from both arms are superimposed and recorded as a function of the variable optical path. Whenever the group delay difference is zero, a coherence peak occurs and the relative distances of the lens surfaces are derived from the optical delay. In order to penetrate IR materials, the instrument operates at 2.2 μm. Together with an LWIR autocollimator, this technique allows for the determination of centering errors, lens thicknesses and air spacings of assembled IR objective lenses with a micron accuracy. It is therefore a tool for precision manufacturing and quality control.

  18. Measuring air gap width of permanent magnet linear generators using search coil sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, R.; Danielsson, O.; Leijon, M.

    2007-01-15

    A concept for a wave power plant is being developed at the Centre for Renewable Electric Energy Conversion at the Angstroem Laboratory at Uppsala University. The concept is based on a permanent magnet linear generator placed on the seabed, directly driven by a surface following buoy. Critical for the survival of the generator is that the air gap between the moving and static parts of the generator is constantly fixed at the designed width to prevent the moving and static parts from connecting during operation. This paper shows the design and evaluation of an inductive sensor for measuring the air gap width during generator operation. In order to survive during years on the seafloor inside the wave power plants, the sensor has deliberately been chosen to be a passive component, as well as robust and compact. A coil etched on a printed circuit board, i.e., a search coil, was the chosen basis for the sensor. The sensor has been tested on an existing test rig of a wave power plant and the results have been compared with finite element simulations.The results show that a search coil magnetic sensor etched on a printed circuit board is a suitable concept for measuring the air gap width. Experimentally measured and theoretically calculated sensor signals show very good agreement. The setup has a sensitivity of {+-}0.4 mm in the range of 4-9.5 mm air gap. The potential for future improvements of the sensitivity is considerable.

  19. CHARACTERIZING DETONATING LX-17 CHARGES CROSSING A TRANSVERSE AIR GAP WITH EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Lauderbach, L M; Souers, P C; Garcia, F; Vitello, P; Vandersall, K S

    2009-06-26

    Experiments were performed using detonating LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% Kel-F by weight) charges with various width transverse air gaps with manganin peizoresistive in-situ gauges present. The experiments, performed with 25 mm diameter by 25 mm long LX-17 pellets with the transverse air gap in between, showed that transverse gaps up to about 3 mm could be present without causing the detonation wave to fail to continue as a detonation. The Tarantula/JWL{sup ++} code was utilized to model the results and compare with the in-situ gauge records with some agreement to the experimental data with additional work needed for a better match to the data. This work will present the experimental details as well as comparison to the model results.

  20. Seed Regeneration Potential of Canopy Gaps at Early Formation Stage in Temperate Secondary Forests, Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Qiao-Ling; Zhu, Jiao-Jun; Yu, Li-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Promoting the seed regeneration potential of secondary forests undergoing gap disturbances is an important approach for achieving forest restoration and sustainable management. Seedling recruitment from seed banks strongly determines the seed regeneration potential, but the process is poorly understood in the gaps of secondary forests. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the effects of gap size, seed availability, and environmental conditions on the seed regeneration potential in temperate secondary forests. It was found that gap formation could favor the invasion of more varieties of species in seed banks, but it also could speed up the turnover rate of seed banks leading to lower seed densities. Seeds of the dominant species, Fraxinus rhynchophylla, were transient in soil and there was a minor and discontinuous contribution of the seed bank to its seedling emergence. For Quercus mongolica, emerging seedling number was positively correlated with seed density in gaps (R = 0.32, P<0.01), especially in medium and small gaps (<500 m2). Furthermore, under canopies, there was a positive correlation between seedling number and seed density of Acer mono (R = 0.43, P<0.01). Gap formation could promote seedling emergence of two gap-dependent species (i.e., Q. mongolica and A. mono), but the contribution of seed banks to seedlings was below 10% after gap creation. Soil moisture and temperature were the restrictive factors controlling the seedling emergence from seeds in gaps and under canopies, respectively. Thus, the regeneration potential from seed banks is limited after gap formation. PMID:22745771

  1. The effect of body postures on the distribution of air gap thickness and contact area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2016-08-01

    The heat and mass transfer in clothing is predominantly dependent on the thickness of air layer and the magnitude of contact area between the body and the garment. The air gap thickness and magnitude of the contact area can be affected by the posture of the human body. Therefore, in this study, the distribution of the air gap and the contact area were investigated for different body postures of a flexible manikin. In addition, the effect of the garment fit (regular and loose) and style (t-shirts, sweatpants, jacket and trousers) were analysed for the interaction between the body postures and the garment properties. A flexible manikin was scanned using a three-dimensional (3D) body scanning technique, and the scans were post-processed in dedicated software. The body posture had a strong effect on the air gap thickness and the contact area for regions where the garment had a certain distance from the body. Furthermore, a mathematical model was proposed to estimate the possible heat transfer coefficient for the observed air layers and their change with posture. The outcome of this study can be used to improve the design of the protective and functional garments and predict their effect on the human body.

  2. Forests under climate change and air pollution: gaps in understanding and future directions for research.

    PubMed

    Matyssek, R; Wieser, G; Calfapietra, C; de Vries, W; Dizengremel, P; Ernst, D; Jolivet, Y; Mikkelsen, T N; Mohren, G M J; Le Thiec, D; Tuovinen, J-P; Weatherall, A; Paoletti, E

    2012-01-01

    Forests in Europe face significant changes in climate, which in interaction with air quality changes, may significantly affect forest productivity, stand composition and carbon sequestration in both vegetation and soils. Identified knowledge gaps and research needs include: (i) interaction between changes in air quality (trace gas concentrations), climate and other site factors on forest ecosystem response, (ii) significance of biotic processes in system response, (iii) tools for mechanistic and diagnostic understanding and upscaling, and (iv) the need for unifying modelling and empirical research for synthesis. This position paper highlights the above focuses, including the global dimension of air pollution as part of climate change and the need for knowledge transfer to enable reliable risk assessment. A new type of research site in forest ecosystems ("supersites") will be conducive to addressing these gaps by enabling integration of experimentation and modelling within the soil-plant-atmosphere interface, as well as further model development.

  3. 30 CFR 285.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? 285.659 Section 285.659 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY... Pipeline Deviations § 285.659 What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air...

  4. Band gap of two-dimensional fiber-air photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shu; Li, Masha

    2016-04-01

    A two-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) composed of textile fiber and air is initially discussed in this paper. Textile materials are so called soft materials, which are different from the previous PCs composed of rigid materials. The plain wave expansion method is used to calculate band structure of different PCs by altering component properties or structural parameters. Results show that the dielectric constant of textile fibers, fiber filling ratio and lattice arrangement are effective factors which influence PCs' band gap. Yet lattice constant and fiber diameter make inconspicuous influence on the band gap feature.

  5. A barometric pressure sensor based on the air-gap scale effect in a cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh-Dung, Nguyen; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Uchiyama, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2013-09-01

    The most common structure for a conventional barometric pressure sensor consists of a vacuum-sealed cavity and a diaphragm. However, we hypothesize that a simple structure with an unsealed cavity and an ultra-thin cantilever can provide more sensitive measurements. We produced a 300-nm-thick cantilever with a small spring constant, which made the cantilever sensitive to low pressures. We demonstrated that miniaturizing the air-gap of the cantilever enables the sensor to measure barometric pressure changes at a low pressure change rate with a high resolution, which was 1 Pa at 0.05 Hz, and for a gap size of 1.7 μm.

  6. Preprophase band formation and cortical division zone establishment: RanGAP behaves differently from microtubules during their band formation.

    PubMed

    Yabuuchi, Takatoshi; Nakai, Tomonori; Sonobe, Seiji; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Mineyuki, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    Correct positioning of the division plane is a prerequisite for plant morphogenesis. The preprophase band (PPB) is a key intracellular structure of division site determination. PPB forms in G2 phase as a broad band of microtubules (MTs) that narrows in prophase and specializes few-micrometer-wide cortical belt region, named the cortical division zone (CDZ), in late prophase. The PPB comprises several molecules, some of which act as MT band organization and others remain in the CDZ marking the correct insertion of the cell plate in telophase. Ran GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP) is accumulated in the CDZ and forms a RanGAP band in prophase. However, little is known about when and how RanGAPs gather in the CDZ, and especially with regard to their relationships to MT band formation. Here, we examined the spatial and temporal distribution of RanGAPs and MTs in the preprophase of onion root tip cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy and showed that the RanGAP band appeared in mid-prophase as the width of MT band was reduced to nearly 7 µm. Treatments with cytoskeletal inhibitors for 15 min caused thinning or broadening of the MT band but had little effects on RanGAP band in mid-prophase and most of late prophase cells. Detailed image analyses of the spatial distribution of RanGAP band and MT band showed that the RanGAP band positioned slightly beneath the MT band in mid-prophase. These results raise a possibility that RanGAP behaves differently from MTs during their band formation. PMID:26237087

  7. Nonlinear sub-cyclotron resonance as a formation mechanism for gaps in banded chorus

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Xiangrong; Guo, Zehua; Dong, Chuanfei; Gary, S. Peter

    2015-05-14

    An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at ω ≃ 0.5Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near 0.3Ωe and 0.6Ωe. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.

  8. The measurement of water vapour transfer rate through clothing system with air gap between layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ae-Gyeong

    2008-02-01

    The experiments described in this paper are designed to test the water vapour transfer rates through outdoor clothing system with air gap between layers under conditions more closely actual wear. It was adopted distance of 5 mm to ensure no disturbance of the air gap thickness between layers throughout the measurement period with all fabrics. The results have indicated that the water vapour transfer rates of clothing system decrease very slightly with time, it is shown that they approached nearly equilibrium state throughout the experiment. It is revealed that the water vapour transfer rates of the clothing system were ordered into groups determined by the type of waterproof breathable fabric as a shell layer being ordered.

  9. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungan, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2008-02-05

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in 0 reactive flow JWL++ and Linked Cheetah V4, mostly at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. The physical basis of the input parameters is considered.

  10. Local droplet etching – Nanoholes, quantum dots, and air-gap heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Heyn, Ch.; Sonnenberg, D.; Graf, A.; Kerbst, J.; Stemmann, A.; Hansen, W.

    2014-05-15

    Local droplet etching (LDE) allows the self-organized generation of nanoholes in semiconductor surfaces and is fully compatible with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The influence of the process parameters as well as of droplet and substrate materials on the LDE nanohole morphology is discussed. Furthermore, recent applications of LDE, the fabrication of quantum dots by hole filling and the creation of air-gap heterostructures are addressed.

  11. Bulk-fill resin composites: polymerization contraction, depth of cure, and gap formation.

    PubMed

    Benetti, A R; Havndrup-Pedersen, C; Honoré, D; Pedersen, M K; Pallesen, U

    2015-01-01

    The bulk-filling of deep, wide dental cavities is faster and easier than traditional incremental restoration. However, the extent of cure at the bottom of the restoration should be carefully examined in combination with the polymerization contraction and gap formation that occur during the restorative procedure. The aim of this study, therefore, was to compare the depth of cure, polymerization contraction, and gap formation in bulk-fill resin composites with those of a conventional resin composite. To achieve this, the depth of cure was assessed in accordance with the International Organization for Standardization 4049 standard, and the polymerization contraction was determined using the bonded-disc method. The gap formation was measured at the dentin margin of Class II cavities. Five bulk-fill resin composites were investigated: two high-viscosity (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, SonicFill) and three low-viscosity (x-tra base, Venus Bulk Fill, SDR) materials. Compared with the conventional resin composite, the high-viscosity bulk-fill materials exhibited only a small increase (but significant for Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) in depth of cure and polymerization contraction, whereas the low-viscosity bulk-fill materials produced a significantly larger depth of cure and polymerization contraction. Although most of the bulk-fill materials exhibited a gap formation similar to that of the conventional resin composite, two of the low-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites, x-tra base and Venus Bulk Fill, produced larger gaps.

  12. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment.

    PubMed

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42%. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  13. Effect of heterogenous and homogenous air gaps on dry heat loss through the garment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mert, Emel; Psikuta, Agnes; Bueno, Marie-Ange; Rossi, René M.

    2015-11-01

    In real life conditions, the trapped air between the human body and the garment has uneven shape and vary over the body parts as a consequence of the complex geometry of the human body. However, the existing clothing models assume uniform air layer between the human body and the garment or its full contact, which may cause large error in the output of simulations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a heterogeneous vertical air gap with different configuration of folds (size and frequency) on dry heat loss using a heated cylinder (Torso). It was found that the presence of folds in the garment led to an increased heat loss from the body in comparison to a homogeneous air gap of comparable size. Interestingly, the size of folds did not have an influence on the dry heat loss. Additionally, the effect of the contact area on dry heat loss became important when exceeding a threshold of about 42 %. The results from this study are useful for modelling of a realistic dry heat loss through the clothing and contribute to the improvement of design of protective and active sport garments.

  14. Role of air in granular jet formation.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Gabriel; Bergmann, Raymond; van der Meer, Devaraj; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2007-07-01

    A steel ball impacting on a bed of very loose, fine sand results in a surprisingly vigorous jet which shoots up from the surface of the sand [D. Lohse, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 198003 (2004)10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.198003]. When the ambient pressure p is reduced, the jet is found to be less vigorous [R. Royer, Nature Phys. 1, 164 (2005)10.1038/nphys175]. In this Letter we show that p also affects the rate of penetration of the ball: Higher pressure increases the rate of penetration, which makes the cavity created by the ball close deeper into the sand bed, where the hydrostatic pressure is stronger, thereby producing a more energetic collapse and jetting. The origin of the deeper penetration under normal ambient pressure is found to lie in the extra sand fluidization caused by the air flow induced by the falling ball.

  15. Role of Air in Granular Jet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, Gabriel; Bergmann, Raymond; van der Meer, Devaraj; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2007-07-01

    A steel ball impacting on a bed of very loose, fine sand results in a surprisingly vigorous jet which shoots up from the surface of the sand [D. Lohse , Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 198003 (2004)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.93.198003]. When the ambient pressure p is reduced, the jet is found to be less vigorous [R. Royer , Nature Phys. 1, 164 (2005)1745-248110.1038/nphys175]. In this Letter we show that p also affects the rate of penetration of the ball: Higher pressure increases the rate of penetration, which makes the cavity created by the ball close deeper into the sand bed, where the hydrostatic pressure is stronger, thereby producing a more energetic collapse and jetting. The origin of the deeper penetration under normal ambient pressure is found to lie in the extra sand fluidization caused by the air flow induced by the falling ball.

  16. Emulating microwave-induced breakdown in air with trigatron spark gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenardo, B.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Granatstein, V. L.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2011-10-01

    A spark gap and power supply have been constructed to emulate the duration and energy dissipation of air breakdown induced by a 670GHz gyrotron beam, a source that our group plans to use to explore remote detection of concealed radioactive materials. The spark gap is being used in calibration and testing of diagnostics, including atomic line spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and microwave scattering. The power supply accepts a variable high voltage input up to 5 kV, stores energy in a 1.8 microfarad capacitor, and arcs across a gap of 1.34 mm. The gap is triggered by a AA-battery powered piezoelectric igniter available commercially (used in common gas grills). Preliminary results show that for a charging voltage of 3 kV, we are able to trigger a spark with energy 1.78 +/- 0.23 Joules lasting approximately 2 microseconds, values which can be tuned by varying resistance and charging voltage of the discharge circuit. Our goal is to dissipate 3 Joules in 10 microseconds, which we expect to see in the gyrotron beam breakdown.

  17. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungen, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2007-05-30

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in the Linked Cheetah V4.0 reactive flow code at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. A report card of 25 tests run with the same settings on LX-17 is shown, possibly the most extensive simultaneous calibration yet tried with an explosive. The physical basis of some of the input parameters is considered.

  18. Communicating air quality information: experimental evaluation of alternative formats.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Branden B

    2003-02-01

    A long-running effort in environmental communication is daily publication of a report on local air pollution in many American newspapers based on the Pollutant Standards Index (PSI). A 1998 proposal by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) to change the PSI prompted a survey experiment with 1,100 adults in Philadelphia, evaluating the proposed change's ability to better inform the populace. The effects of exposure to the old and new versions of the PSI, as well as health cautions and information about groups sensitive to air pollution, were compared with evaluation criteria suggested by Weinstein and Sandman (1993). Sample respondents had strong baseline concerns about air pollution. Descriptors of air quality (e.g., "good; " "unhealthy") were difficult to discriminate, particularly in the New format. Concern rose as hypothetical air pollution levels rose, but the New format (as well as PSI versions without health cautions or sensitive-group information) evoked a sharp discontinuity in concern between below- and above-standard pollution levels. Both Old and New formats reduced concern relative to no provision of PSI information at all, but the New format reduced concern significantly more than the Old version. No PSI format did particularly well at increasing knowledge of air pollution or decreasing intentions to be active outdoors during high pollution, contrary to the agency's aim. Although U.S. EPA has since adopted the new proposal as a national "Air Quality Index" requirement, the experiment's results illuminate the strengths and limitations of the new PSI as a means of informing citizens and motivating them to protect themselves. PMID:12635725

  19. Tuning efficiency and linewidth of electrostatically actuated multiple air-gap filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, F.; Prott, C.; Irmer, S.; Daleiden, J.; Tarraf, A.; Hillmer, H.; Strassner, M.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the tuning efficiency of electrostatically actuated multiple air-gap filters fabricated in InP for dense wavelength division multiplex applications by comparing measured tuning curves with the results of optical and mechanical simulations. These filters exhibit a record tuning range of 127 nm at 7.3 V tuning voltage. The filters were measured in reflection using standard single mode fiber. The subsequent analysis is based on a one-dimensional electromechanical and optical model providing a reasonable estimation for the pull-in voltage. Optical simulations show that the filter linewidth does not affect the tuning efficiency.

  20. Vertical cavity surface emitting laser based on gallium arsenide/air-gap distributed Bragg reflectors: From concept to working devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Qingwei

    Vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) have created new opportunities in optoelectronics. However, VCSELs have so far been commercialized mainly for operation at 0.85 mum, despite their potential importance at other wavelengths, such as 1.3 mum and 1.55 mum. The limitations at these longer wavelengths come from material characteristics, such as a low contrast ratio in mirror materials, lower mirror reflectivity, and smaller optical gain for longer wavelength materials versus AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wells. A similar situation, insufficient gain relative to the cavity loss, existed in the past for shorter wavelength VCSELs before high quality epitaxial mirrors were developed. Semiconductor/air-gap Distributed Bragg Reflectors (DBRs) are attractive due to their high index contrast, which leads to a high reflectivity, wide stop band and low optical loss mirror with a small number of pairs. This concept is ready to be integrated into material systems other than AlGaAs/GaAs, which is studied in this work. Therefore, the impact of these DBRs can be extended into both visible and longer infrared wavelengths as a solution to the trade-off between DBR and active region materials. Air-gap DBRs can also be used as basic building blocks of micro-opto-electro-mechanical systems (MOEMS). The high Q microcavity formed by the air-gap DBRs also provide a good platform for microcavity physics study. Air-gap DBRs are modeled using the transmission matrix formulae of the Maxwell equations. A comparison to existing DBR technology shows the great advantage and potential that the air-gap DBR possesses. Two types of air-gap are proposed and developed. The first one includes multiple GaAs/air pairs while the second one combines a single air-gap with metal and dielectric mirrors. New device structures and processing designs, especially an all-epitaxial lateral current and optical confinement technique, are carried out to incorporate air-gap DBRs into VCSEL structures. The first VCSEL

  1. Air Plasma Formation in MHD Slipstream Accelerator for Mercury Lightcraft

    SciTech Connect

    Myrabo, L.N.; Raizer, Y.P.; Surzhikov, S.

    2004-03-30

    This paper investigates the physics of air plasma formation at the entrance of the MHD slipstream accelerator for the 'tractor-beam' Mercury Lightcraft. Two scenarios are analyzed. The first addresses the needs of the minimum power airspike assuming that all the power required for air plasma formation must come from the remote laser beam. The second case considers the constant-focus airspike and assumes that the breakdown criteria is satisfied by an on-board auxiliary source (e.g., electric discharge, RF source, microwave source, or E-beam)

  2. Air Plasma Formation in MHD Slipstream Accelerator for Mercury Lightcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Raizer, Y. P.; Surzhikov, S.

    2004-03-01

    This paper investigates the physics of air plasma formation at the entrance of the MHD slipstream accelerator for the `tractor-beam' Mercury Lightcraft. Two scenarios are analyzed. The first addresses the needs of the minimum power airspike assuming that all the power required for air plasma formation must come from the remote laser beam. The second case considers the constant-focus airspike and assumes that the breakdown criteria is satisfied by an on-board auxiliary source (e.g., electric discharge, RF source, microwave source, or E-beam).

  3. Nonlinear sub-cyclotron resonance as a formation mechanism for gaps in banded chorus

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong; Guo, Zehua; Dong, Chuanfei; Gary, S. Peter

    2015-05-14

    An interesting characteristic of magnetospheric chorus is the presence of a frequency gap at ω ≃ 0.5Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron angular frequency. Recent chorus observations sometimes show additional gaps near 0.3Ωe and 0.6Ωe. Here we present a novel nonlinear mechanism for the formation of these gaps using Hamiltonian theory and test particle simulations in a homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless plasma. We find that an oblique whistler wave with frequency at a fraction of the electron cyclotron frequency can resonate with electrons, leading to effective energy exchange between the wave and particles.

  4. 30 CFR 585.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... implementing regulations as promulgated by the EPA under 40 CFR part 55. (b) For air quality modeling that you... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP... What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply...

  5. 30 CFR 585.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... implementing regulations as promulgated by the EPA under 40 CFR part 55. (b) For air quality modeling that you... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP... What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply...

  6. 30 CFR 585.659 - What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... implementing regulations as promulgated by the EPA under 40 CFR part 55. (b) For air quality modeling that you... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP... What requirements must I include in my SAP, COP, or GAP regarding air quality? (a) You must comply...

  7. Root-soil air gap and resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface of Robinia pseudoacacia.

    PubMed

    Liu, X P; Zhang, W J; Wang, X Y; Cai, Y J; Chang, J G

    2015-12-01

    During periods of water deficit, growing roots may shrink, retaining only partial contact with the soil. In this study, known mathematical models were used to calculate the root-soil air gap and water flow resistance at the soil-root interface, respectively, of Robinia pseudoacacia L. under different water conditions. Using a digital camera, the root-soil air gap of R. pseudoacacia was investigated in a root growth chamber; this root-soil air gap and the model-inferred water flow resistance at the soil-root interface were compared with predictions based on a separate outdoor experiment. The results indicated progressively greater root shrinkage and loss of root-soil contact with decreasing soil water potential. The average widths of the root-soil air gap for R. pseudoacacia in open fields and in the root growth chamber were 0.24 and 0.39 mm, respectively. The resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface in both environments increased with decreasing soil water potential. Stepwise regression analysis demonstrated that soil water potential and soil temperature were the best predictors of variation in the root-soil air gap. A combination of soil water potential, soil temperature, root-air water potential difference and soil-root water potential difference best predicted the resistance to water flow at the soil-root interface.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of air gap motion with respect to wind load and mooring system for semi-submersible platform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Fa-li; Nie, Yan; Yang, De-qing; Dong, Gang; Cui, Jin

    2016-07-01

    A design of semi-submersible platform is mainly based on the extreme response analysis due to the forces experienced by the components during lifetime. The external loads can induce the extreme air gap response and potential deck impact to the semi-submersible platform. It is important to predict air gap response of platforms accurately in order to check the strength of local structures which withstand the wave slamming due to negative air gap. The wind load cannot be simulated easily by model test in towing tank whereas it can be simulated accurately in wind tunnel test. Furthermore, full scale simulation of the mooring system in model test is still a tuff work especially the stiffness of the mooring system. Owing to the above mentioned problem, the model test results are not accurate enough for air gap evaluation. The aim of this paper is to present sensitivity analysis results of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load for the design of semi-submersible platform. Though the model test results are not suitable for the direct evaluation of air gap, they can be used as a good basis for tuning the radiation damping and viscous drag in numerical simulation. In the presented design example, a numerical model is tuned and validated by ANSYS AQWA based on the model test results with a simple 4 line symmetrical horizontal soft mooring system. According to the tuned numerical model, sensitivity analysis studies of air gap motion with respect to the mooring system and wind load are performed in time domain. Three mooring systems and five simulation cases about the presented platform are simulated based on the results of wind tunnel tests and sea-keeping tests. The sensitivity analysis results are valuable for the floating platform design.

  9. Interfingering of the Frontier Formation and Aspen Shale, Cumberland Gap, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    M'gonigle, J.

    1982-01-01

    The basal part, or the Chalk Creek Member, of the non-marine lower Frontier Formation (Upper Cretaceous) includes a thin coal bed that grades S into a carbonaceous shale. The latter plus associated sandstones and shales pinch out S of Cumberland Gap and lie stratigraphically below the top of the Aspen Shale. The beds in the upper part of the Aspen, in turn, pinch out within the Frontier Formation. The coal bed and equivalent carbonaceous shale represent in-place accumulation of peat. The interfingering suggests that in SW Wyoming the Lower/Upper Cretaceous boundary is within the Chalk Creek Member. -from Author

  10. Simple air-gap fiber Fabry-Perot interferometers based on a fiber endface with Sn-microsphere overlay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheng-Ling; Hung, Cheng-Hung; Li, Chai-Ming; You, Yan-Wun

    2012-10-01

    This study presents a simple, cost-effective and sensitive air-gap fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (AG-PPFI) which is based on a metal Tin (Sn)-overlaying fiber technique. An extremely small drop of metallic Sn was heated and then melted to shrink into a microsphere owing to the cohesion of the material. When a fiber was inserted into the melting Sn microsphere, an air gap was naturally formed between the fiber endface and the metal Sn during the cooling process. By carefully controlling the reaction time, various air-gaps can be formed as the Fabry-Perot interferometric cavities for the proposed AG-PPFIs. Measurements reveal that a smaller length of air-gap and heavier mass of Sn-microsphere are associated with higher sensitivity of temperature, but the former is dominated. A best temperature sensitivity of wavelength shift with +4.3 nm/°C is achieved when the air-gap is about 5 μm with mass of Sn-microsphere of about 10 μg. The variation of the wavelength shift is equivalent to sensitivity for a change in the cavity length of +14.83 nm/°C.

  11. Costs and benefits of photosynthetic light acclimation by tree seedlings in response to gap formation.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, R; Hikosaka, K; Hiura, T; Hirose, T

    2008-04-01

    Some shade leaves increase their photosynthetic capacity (P (max)) when exposed to a higher irradiance. The increase in P (max) is associated with an increase in chloroplast size or number. To accommodate those chloroplasts, plants need to make thick leaves in advance. We studied the cost and benefit of photosynthetic acclimation in mature leaves of a tree species, Kalopanax pictus Nakai, in a cool-temperate deciduous forest. Costs were evaluated as the additional investment in biomass required to make thick leaves, while the benefit was evaluated as an increase in photosynthetic carbon gain. We created gaps by felling canopy trees and examined the photosynthetic responses of mature leaves of the understorey seedlings. In the shade, leaves of K. pictus had vacant spaces that were not filled by chloroplasts in the mesophyll cells facing the intercellular space. When those leaves were exposed to higher irradiance after gap formation, the area of the mesophyll surface covered by chloroplasts increased by 17% and P (max) by 27%. This increase in P (max) led to an 11% increase in daily carbon gain, which was greater than the amount of biomass additionally invested to construct thicker leaves. We conclude that the capacity of a plant to acclimate to light (photosynthetic acclimation) would contribute to rapid growth in response to gap formation.

  12. Water desalination by air-gap membrane distillation using meltblown polypropylene nanofiber membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosalam, S.; Chiam, C. K.; Widyaparamitha, S.; Chang, Y. W.; Lee, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a study of air gap membrane distillation (AGMD) using meltblown polypropylene (PP) nanofiber membrane to produce fresh water via desalination process. PP nanofiber membranes with the effective area 0.17 m2 are tested with NaCl solutions (0.5 - 4.0 wt.%) and seawater as the feed solutions (9400 - 64800 μS/cm) in a tubular membrane module. Results show that the flux decreases with increasing the membrane thickness from 547 to 784 μm. The flux increases with the feed flow rate and temperature difference across the membrane. The feed concentration affects the flux insignificantly. The AGMD system can reject the salts at least 96%. Water vapor permeation rate is relatively higher than solute permeation rate resulting in the conductivity value of permeate decreases when the corresponding flux increases. The AGMD system produces the fresh water (200 - 1520 μS/cm) that is suitable for drinking, fisheries or irrigation.

  13. A fiber inclinometer using a fiber microtaper with an air-gap microcavity fiber interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Zhongyao; Gang, Tingting; Hu, Manli; Qiao, Xueguang; Liu, Nan; Rong, Qiangzhou

    2016-04-01

    A micro-inclinometer is proposed and demonstrated experimentally; the device consists of a micro-fiber taper followed by an air-gap microcavity. A part of the core mode can couple to cladding modes via the taper. These cladding modes and residual core modes transmitted to downstream of the Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer. A fraction of these modes are reflected back to the SMF by two surfaces of the FP cavity and eventually recoupled to the leading-in SMF, resulting in a well-defined interference spectrum. The fringe contrast of the interferometer is highly sensitive to fiber bending with direction-independence and thus is capable of measuring tilt angles in high resolution. In addition, the interference wavelength always remains unchanged during the fiber bending.

  14. Experimental investigation on flame pattern formations of DME-air mixtures in a radial microchannel

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Aiwu; Maruta, Kaoru; Nakamura, Hisashi; Kumar, Sudarshan; Liu, Wei

    2010-09-15

    Flame pattern formations of premixed DME-air mixture in a heated radial channel with a gap distance of 2.5 mm were experimentally investigated. The DME-air mixture was introduced into the radial channel through a delivery tube which connected with the center of the top disk. With an image-intensified high-speed video camera, rich flame pattern formations were identified in this configuration. Regime diagram of all these flame patterns was drawn based on the experimental findings in the equivalence ratio range of 0.6-2.0 and inlet velocity range of 1.0-5.0 m/s. Compared with our previous study on premixed methane-air flames, there are several distinct characteristics for the present study. First, Pelton-wheel-like rotary flames and traveling flames with kink-like structures were observed for the first time. Second, in most cases, flames can be stabilized near the inlet port of the channel, exhibiting a conical or cup-like shape, while the conventional circular flame was only observed under limited conditions. Thirdly, an oscillating flame phenomenon occurred under certain conditions. During the oscillation process, a target appearance was seen at some instance. These pattern formation characteristics are considered to be associated with the low-temperature oxidation of DME. (author)

  15. The role of air in granular jet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meer, Devaraj; Bergmann, Raymond; Caballero, Gabriel; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-11-01

    A steel ball impacting on a bed of very loose, fine sand results in a surprisingly vigorous jet which shoots out from the surface of the sand. When the ambient pressure is reduced, the jet is found to be less vigorous, which suggests that air should play an important role in the mechanism of jet formation. In our impact experiments it was found that the penetration depth of the ball strongly decreases with decreasing pressure, whereas all other results are consistent with the gravitational collapse of the cavity that is created upon impact. This limits the influence of air to the stage of void formation, in which the cavity is created by a balance of the initial potential energy of the sphere and the dissipation due to the drag the ball experiences when penetrating into the sand.

  16. Spontaneous formation of stringlike clusters and smectic sheets for colloidal rods confined in thin wedgelike gaps.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideatsu; Maeda, Yoshiko

    2013-08-20

    Monodispersed colloidal rods of β-FeOOH with sizes ranging from 270 to 580 nm in length and 50 to 80 nm in width were synthesized. Narrow wedgelike gaps (0 to 700 nm in height) were formed around the inner bottom edge of the suspension glass cells. Optical microscopic observations revealed the formation of stringlike clusters of the rods and smectic sheets (by spontaneous side-by-side clustering of the strings) in the isotropic phase of the rod suspensions confined in narrow gaps; the electrolyte (HCl) concentrations of the suspensions are 5-40 mM, at which inter-rod interactions are attractive. The strings exhibit different colors that were used to investigate the structures of the strings with the help of interference color theory for thin films. The results are as follows. (1) The rods, lying flat on the gap bottom, are connected side-by-side and stacked upward to form stringlike clusters with different thicknesses depending on the gap height. (2) The stacking numbers (N(sr)) of the rods are estimated to be 1-5. With N(sr) increasing from 2 to 5, the volume fractions (ϕ) of the rods in the strings increased typically from 0.25-0.3 to 0.35-0.42 to reach limiting values (close to the ϕ values of the rods in the bulk smectic phase). (3) Unexpected low-ϕ strings are found in regions with an intermediate height in the gaps. These behaviors of ϕ may be caused by thermal fluctuations of the strings.

  17. Spontaneous formation of stringlike clusters and smectic sheets for colloidal rods confined in thin wedgelike gaps.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hideatsu; Maeda, Yoshiko

    2013-08-20

    Monodispersed colloidal rods of β-FeOOH with sizes ranging from 270 to 580 nm in length and 50 to 80 nm in width were synthesized. Narrow wedgelike gaps (0 to 700 nm in height) were formed around the inner bottom edge of the suspension glass cells. Optical microscopic observations revealed the formation of stringlike clusters of the rods and smectic sheets (by spontaneous side-by-side clustering of the strings) in the isotropic phase of the rod suspensions confined in narrow gaps; the electrolyte (HCl) concentrations of the suspensions are 5-40 mM, at which inter-rod interactions are attractive. The strings exhibit different colors that were used to investigate the structures of the strings with the help of interference color theory for thin films. The results are as follows. (1) The rods, lying flat on the gap bottom, are connected side-by-side and stacked upward to form stringlike clusters with different thicknesses depending on the gap height. (2) The stacking numbers (N(sr)) of the rods are estimated to be 1-5. With N(sr) increasing from 2 to 5, the volume fractions (ϕ) of the rods in the strings increased typically from 0.25-0.3 to 0.35-0.42 to reach limiting values (close to the ϕ values of the rods in the bulk smectic phase). (3) Unexpected low-ϕ strings are found in regions with an intermediate height in the gaps. These behaviors of ϕ may be caused by thermal fluctuations of the strings. PMID:23876087

  18. Tunable complete photonic band gap in anisotropic photonic crystal slabs with non-circular air holes using liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathollahi Khalkhali, T.; Bananej, A.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we analyze the tunability of complete photonic band gap of square and triangular photonic crystal slabs composed of square and hexagonal air holes in anisotropic tellurium background with SiO2 as cladding material. The non-circular holes are infiltrated with liquid crystal. Using the supercell method based on plane wave expansion, we study the variation of complete band gap by changing the optical axis orientation of liquid crystal. Our numerical results show that noticeable tunability of complete photonic band gap can be obtained in both square and triangular structures with non-circular holes.

  19. Fabrication and optical properties of non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Renchun Kako, Satoshi; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-11

    Using the thermal decomposition technique, non-polar III-nitride air-gap distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) microcavities (MCs) with a single quantum well have been fabricated. Atomic force microscopy reveals a locally smooth DBR surface, and room-temperature micro-photoluminescence measurements show cavity modes. There are two modes per cavity due to optical birefringence in the non-polar MCs, and a systematic cavity mode shift with cavity thickness was also observed. Although the structures consist of only 3 periods (top) and 4 periods (bottom), a quality factor of 1600 (very close to the theoretical value of 2100) reveals the high quality of the air-gap DBR MCs.

  20. Two-photon excitation of surface plasmon and the period-increasing effect of low spatial frequency ripples on a GaP crystal in air/water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jukun; Jia, Tianqing; Zhao, Hongwei; Huang, Yaoqing

    2016-11-01

    We report the period-increasing effect of low spatial frequency ripples on a GaP crystal irradiated by 1 kHz, 50 fs, 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses. Massive free electrons are excited by a two-photon absorption process and surface plasmon is excited. The Drude model is used to estimate the changing of the dielectric constant of the GaP crystal. The period-increasing effects of low spatial frequency laser-induced ripples are theoretically predicted in air/water, and the experimental results agree well. The experimental and theoretical results indicate that surface plasmon excited by two-photon absorption plays a key role in the formation of low spatial frequency ripples.

  1. The reversed description-experience gap: Disentangling sources of presentation format effects in risky choice.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Andreas; Hilbig, Benjamin E; Henninger, Felix; Fiedler, Susann

    2016-04-01

    Previous literature has suggested that risky choice patterns in general--and probability weighting in particular--are strikingly different in experience-based as compared with description-based formats. In 2 reanalyses and 3 new experiments, we investigate differences between experience-based and description-based decisions using a parametric approach based on cumulative prospect theory (CPT). Once controlling for sampling biases, we consistently find a reversal of the typical description-experience gap, that is, a reduced sensitivity to probabilities and increased overweighting of small probabilities in decisions from experience as compared with decisions from descriptions. This finding supports the hypothesis that regression to the mean effects in probability estimation are a crucial source of differences between both presentation formats. Further analyses identified task specific information asymmetry prevalent in gambles involving certainty as a third source of differences. We present a novel conceptualization of multiple independent sources of bias that contribute to the description-experience gap, namely sampling biases and task specific information asymmetry on the one hand, and regression to the mean effects in probability estimation on the other hand. PMID:26974209

  2. The reversed description-experience gap: Disentangling sources of presentation format effects in risky choice.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Andreas; Hilbig, Benjamin E; Henninger, Felix; Fiedler, Susann

    2016-04-01

    Previous literature has suggested that risky choice patterns in general--and probability weighting in particular--are strikingly different in experience-based as compared with description-based formats. In 2 reanalyses and 3 new experiments, we investigate differences between experience-based and description-based decisions using a parametric approach based on cumulative prospect theory (CPT). Once controlling for sampling biases, we consistently find a reversal of the typical description-experience gap, that is, a reduced sensitivity to probabilities and increased overweighting of small probabilities in decisions from experience as compared with decisions from descriptions. This finding supports the hypothesis that regression to the mean effects in probability estimation are a crucial source of differences between both presentation formats. Further analyses identified task specific information asymmetry prevalent in gambles involving certainty as a third source of differences. We present a novel conceptualization of multiple independent sources of bias that contribute to the description-experience gap, namely sampling biases and task specific information asymmetry on the one hand, and regression to the mean effects in probability estimation on the other hand.

  3. Effect of silver incorporation in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly Bose, R.; Kumar, R. Vinod; Sudheer, S. K.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Reddy, V. R.; Ganesan, V.

    2012-12-01

    Silver incorporated tungsten oxide thin films are prepared by RF magnetron sputtering technique. The effect of silver incorporation in micro structure evolution, phase enhancement, band gap tuning and other optical properties are investigated using techniques such as x-ray diffraction, micro-Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Effect of silver addition in phase formation and band gap tuning of tungsten oxide thin films are investigated. It is found that the texturing and phase formation improves with enhancement in silver content. It is also found that as the silver incorporation enhances the thickness of the films increases at the same time the strain in the film decreases. Even without annealing the desired phase can be achieved by doping with silver. A broad band centered at the wavelength 437 nm is observed in the absorption spectra of tungsten oxide films of higher silver incorporation and this can be attributed to surface plasmon resonance of silver atoms present in the tungsten oxide matrix. The transmittance of the films is decreased with increase in silver content which can be due to increase in film thickness, enhancement of scattering, and absorption of light caused by the increase of grain size, surface roughness and porosity of films and enhanced absorption due to surface plasmon resonance of silver. It is found that silver can act as the seed for the growth of tungsten oxide grains and found that the grain size increases with silver content which in turn decreases the band gap of tungsten oxide from 3.14 eV to 2.70 eV.

  4. Study of Various Slanted Air-Gap Structures of Interior Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor with Brushless Field Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, Leon M; Lee, Seong T

    2010-01-01

    This paper shows how to maximize the effect of the slanted air-gap structure of an interior permanent magnet synchronous motor with brushless field excitation (BFE) for application in a hybrid electric vehicle. The BFE structure offers high torque density at low speed and weakened flux at high speed. The unique slanted air-gap is intended to increase the output torque of the machine as well as to maximize the ratio of the back-emf of a machine that is controllable by BFE. This irregularly shaped air-gap makes a flux barrier along the d-axis flux path and decreases the d-axis inductance; as a result, the reluctance torque of the machine is much higher than a uniform air-gap machine, and so is the output torque. Also, the machine achieves a higher ratio of the magnitude of controllable back-emf. The determination of the slanted shape was performed by using magnetic equivalent circuit analysis and finite element analysis (FEA).

  5. A fluorenone based low band gap solution processable copolymer for air stable and high mobility organic field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Prashant; Ha, Tae-Jun; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2013-02-25

    A fluorenone based alternating copolymer () with a furan based fused aromatic moiety has been designed and synthesized. exhibits a small band gap with a lower HOMO value. Testing this polymer semiconductor as the active layer in organic thin-film transistors results in hole mobilities as high as 0.15 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in air.

  6. The effect of coronae on leader initiation and development under thunderstorm conditions and in long air gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, N. L.; Bazelyan, E. M.; Carpenter, R. B., Jr.; Drabkin, M. M.; Raizer, Yu P.

    2001-11-01

    The initiation and development of a leader is theoretically studied by considering an electrode which is embedded in a cloud of space charge injected by a corona discharge. The focus is on the initiation of upward lightning from a stationary grounded object in a thundercloud electric field. The main results are also applicable to the leader process in long laboratory air gaps at direct voltage. Simple physical models of non-stationary coronae developing in free space near a solitary stressed sphere and of a leader propagating in the space charge cloud of coronae are suggested. It is shown that the electric field redistribution due to the space charge released by the long corona discharge near the top of a high object hinders the initiation and development of an upward leader from the object in a thundercloud electric field. The conditions for the formation of corona streamers that are required to initiate a leader are derived. The criteria are obtained for a leader to be initiated and propagate in the space charge cloud. A hypothesis is proposed that the streamers are never initiated near the top of a high object under thunderstorm conditions if at ground level there is only a slowly-varying electric field of the thundercloud. The streamers may be induced by the fast-rising electric field of distant downward leaders or intracloud discharges.

  7. Indoor air chemistry: Formation of organic acids and aldehydes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.; Lioy, P.J. ||; Wilson, W.E.

    1994-12-31

    Laying emphasis on the formation of aldehydes and organic acids, the study has examined the gas-phase reactions of ozone with unsaturated VOCs. The formation of formaldehyde and formic acid was observed for all the three selected unsaturated VOCs: styrene, limonene, and 4-vinylcyclohexene. In addition, benzaldehyde was detected in the styrene-ozone-air reaction system, and acetic acid was also found in limonene-ozone-air system. The study has also examined the gas-phase reactions among formaldehyde, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide and found the formation of formic acid. The nitrate radical was suggested to play an important role in converting formaldehyde into formic acid. Experiments for all the reactions were conducted by using a 4.3 m{sup 3} Teflon chamber. Since the conditions for the reactions were similar to those for indoor environments, the results from the study can be implicated to real indoor situations and can be employed to support the findings and suggestions from the previous studies: certain aldehydes and organic acids could be generated by indoor chemistry.

  8. Hereditary mucoepithelial dysplasia: a disease apparently of desmosome and gap junction formation.

    PubMed Central

    Witkop, C J; White, J G; King, R A; Dahl, M V; Young, W G; Sauk, J J

    1979-01-01

    A previously unrecognized autosomal dominant syndrome affecting oral, nasal, vaginal, urethral, anal, bladder, and conjunctival mucosa with cataracts, follicular keratosis, nonscarring alopecia, and terminal lung disease is described in a four-generation kindred of German extraction. Severe photophobia, tearing, and nystagmus in infancy heralds the development of keratitis, corneal vascularization, and lens cataracts. Repeated corneal transplants have failed. Red, periorificial mucosal lesions involving the above structures are noted by 1 year of age and may persist throughout life. Chronic rhinorrhea and repeated upper respiratory infections frequently progress to bilateral pneumonia accompanied by loss of hair, diarrhea, occasional melena, enuresis, pyuria, and hematuria. Spontaneous pneumothorax is frequent, terminating in fibrocystic-type lung disease and cor pulmonale. Women have had repeated abnormal vaginal PAP smears. Histologically the mucosal epithelium shows dyshesion, thinning of the epithelial layer, and dyskeratosis. Mucosal PAP smears show lack of epithelial maturation, cytoplasmic vacuoles and inclusions, and individual cell dyskeratosis. Histochemically there is a lack of cornification and keratinization. Ultrastructural studies show lack of keratohyalin granules, a paucity of desmosomes, intercellular accumulations, cytoplasmic vacuolization, and formation of bands and aggregates of filamentous fibers and structures in the cytoplasm resembling desmosomes and gap junctions. The condition is probably a panepithelial cell defect of desmosomal and gap junction structure most prominently affecting mucosal epithelia associated with an increased susceptibility to a variety of adventitious organisms. Images Fig. 2-5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:484550

  9. GAPS IN THE HD 169142 PROTOPLANETARY DISK REVEALED BY POLARIMETRIC IMAGING: SIGNS OF ONGOING PLANET FORMATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Quanz, Sascha P.; Avenhaus, Henning; Garufi, Antonio; Schmid, Hans Martin; Buenzli, Esther; Wolf, Sebastian

    2013-03-20

    We present H-band Very Large Telescope/NACO polarized light images of the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 169142 probing its protoplanetary disk as close as {approx}0.''1 to the star. Our images trace the face-on disk out to {approx}1.''7 ({approx}250 AU) and reveal distinct substructures for the first time: (1) the inner disk ({approx}<20 AU) appears to be depleted in scattering dust grains; (2) an unresolved disk rim is imaged at {approx}25 AU; (3) an annular gap extends from {approx}40 to 70 AU; (4) local brightness asymmetries are found on opposite sides of the annular gap. We discuss different explanations for the observed morphology among which ongoing planet formation is a tempting, but yet to be proven, one. Outside of {approx}85 AU the surface brightness drops off roughly {proportional_to}r {sup -3.3}, but describing the disk regions between 85-120 AU and 120-250 AU separately with power laws {proportional_to}r {sup -2.6} and {proportional_to}r {sup -3.9} provides a better fit hinting toward another discontinuity in the disk surface. The flux ratio between the disk-integrated polarized light and the central star is {approx}4.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}. Finally, combining our results with those from the literature, {approx}40% of the scattered light in the H band appears to be polarized. Our results emphasize that HD 169142 is an interesting system for future planet formation or disk evolution studies.

  10. Role of Short-Range Order and Hyperuniformity in the Formation of Band Gaps in Disordered Photonic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froufe-Pérez, Luis S.; Engel, Michael; Damasceno, Pablo F.; Muller, Nicolas; Haberko, Jakub; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Scheffold, Frank

    2016-07-01

    We study photonic band gap formation in two-dimensional high-refractive-index disordered materials where the dielectric structure is derived from packing disks in real and reciprocal space. Numerical calculations of the photonic density of states demonstrate the presence of a band gap for all polarizations in both cases. We find that the band gap width is controlled by the increase in positional correlation inducing short-range order and hyperuniformity concurrently. Our findings suggest that the optimization of short-range order, in particular the tailoring of Bragg scattering at the isotropic Brillouin zone, are of key importance for designing disordered PBG materials.

  11. Specific motifs in the external loops of connexin proteins can determine gap junction formation between chick heart myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Warner, A; Clements, D K; Parikh, S; Evans, W H; DeHaan, R L

    1995-01-01

    1. Gap junction formation was compared in the absence and presence of small peptides containing extracellular loop sequences of gap junction (connexin) proteins by measuring the time taken for pairs of spontaneously beating embryonic chick heart myoballs to synchronize beat rates. Test peptides were derived from connexin 32. Non-homologous peptides were used as controls. Control pairs took 42 +/- 0.5 min (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 1088) to synchronize. 2. Connexins 32 and 43, but not 26, were detected in gap junction plaques. The density and distribution of connexin immunolabelling varied between myoballs. 3. Peptides containing conserved motifs from extracellular loops 1 and 2 delayed gap junction formation. The steep portion of the dose-response relation lay between 30 and 300 microM peptide. 4. In loop 1, the conserved motifs QPG and SHVR were identified as being involved in junction formation. In loop 2, the conserved SRPTEK motif was important. The ability of peptides containing the SRPTEK motif to interfere with the formation of gap junctions was enhanced by amino acids from the putative membrane-spanning region. 5. Peptides from loop 1 and loop 2 were equivalently effective; there was no synergism between them. 6. The inclusion of conserved cysteines in test peptides did not make them more effective in the competition assay. Images Figure 1 PMID:8576861

  12. A fiber air-gap Fabry-Pérot temperature sensor demodulated by using frequency modulated continuous wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wanfu; Xie, Jianglei; Li, Yi; Xu, Ben; Kang, Juan; Shen, Changyu; Wang, Jianfeng; Jin, Yongxing; Liu, Honglin; Ni, Kai; Dong, Xinyong; Zhao, Chunliu; Jin, Shangzhong

    In this study, a fiber in-line air-gap Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) is fabricated by HF acid etching. For a low-cost and higher precise measurement, a demodulation system based on frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) technique is build up and demonstrated in this air-gap FPI. In temperature measurements, the temperature sensitivity is about 1.75 rad/°C by phase shift detection. We also test the long term performance of the system and the RMS error is about 0.04 rad, which corresponds to the temperature resolution of ~0.02 °C. It is much higher than the measurement resolution by using the traditional wavelength shift detection method. Our experiments show that the FMCW can provide a low-cost, high resolution and high speed interrogation solution to the fiber FPIs.

  13. Observations on biofilm formation in industrial air-cooling units

    SciTech Connect

    Liebert, C.A.; Hood, M.A.; Winter, P.A.; Singleton, F.L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations on biofilm formation in industrial air-cooling units were made over a 60-day operational period. Methods employed included: epifluorescent direct counts of water and slime samples, enumeration of culturable bacteria in water and slime samples, and ultrastructural observations of microbial attachment to formvar coated grids and epoxy resin blocks. Acridine orange direct counts and culturable counts of bacteria in water samples remained constant over the 60-day cycle, while culturable counts in slime samples increased with time. Interfering fluorescent materials present in the slime made accurate direct counts difficult to obtain. Initial increases in numbers of bacteria on formvar coated grids and culturable counts of slime samples were positively correlated with time. However, after 14 days, the formvar deteriorated and direct transmission electron microscopic bacterial counts could no longer be obtained. Submersion of epoxy resin blocks, especially those with pitted surfaces, provided an excellent method for the observation of bacterial attachment and colonization. 21 references, 3 figures.

  14. Nanodiamond formation via thermal radiation from an air shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Carli, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Nanodiamonds have recently been found in sediments of Younger Dryas age, about 12,900 years ago. Carbon isotope ratios imply that the source of carbon was terrestrial organic matter and rule out the possibility that the diamond was of cosmic origin, e.g., from an influx of meteorites. The nanodiamonds are associated with mineral spherules (and other shapes) that have compositions and textures consistent with the rapid melting and solidification of local soil. The inferred temperatures are much too high for natural events such as forest fires. Similar deposits of nanodiamond have been found in the 65 million year old K-Pg layer associated with the ca. 200 km diameter Chicxulub impact crater. Nanodiamond have also been reported in the vicinity of the Tunguska event, presumed to be the result of an air shock produced by the interaction of a rapidly moving cosmic body with the Earth's atmosphere. We infer that the nanodiamonds were formed when the thermal radiation from the air shock pyrolyzed surface organic matter. Rapid reaction locally depleted the atmosphere of oxygen and the remaining carbon could condense as nanodiamond. A similar mechanism can be invoked to account for the formation of nanodiamond as a froduct of the detonation of ozygen-deficient high explosives.

  15. Extinction measurements for optical band gap determination of soot in a series of nitrogen-diluted ethylene/air non-premixed flames.

    PubMed

    Adkins, Erin M; Miller, J Houston

    2015-01-28

    Visible light extinction was measured in a series of nitrogen-diluted, ethylene/air, non-premixed flames and this data was used to determine the optical band gap, OBG, as a function of flame position. Collimated light from a supercontinuum source is telescopically expanded and refocused to match the f- number of a dispersing monochromator. The dispersed light is split into a power metering channel and a channel that is periscoped and focused into the flame. The transmitted light is then recollimated and focussed onto a silicon photodiode detector. After tomographic reconstruction of the radial extinction field, the OBG was derived from the near-edge absorption feature using Tauc/Davis-Mott analysis. A slight evolution in OBG was observed throughout all flame systems with a consistent range of OBG observed between approximately 1.85 eV and 2.35 eV. Averaging over all positions the mean OBG was approximately 2.09 eV for all flame systems. Comparing these results to previously published computational results relating calculated HOMO-LUMO gaps for a variety of D2h PAH molecules to the number of aromatic rings in the structure, showed that the observed optical band gap is consistent with a PAH of about 14 rings or a conjugation length of 0.97 nm. This work provides experimental support to the model of soot formation where the transition from chemical to physical growth starts at a modest molecular size; about the size of circumpyrene.

  16. Gap formation in a self-gravitating disk and the associated migration of the embedded giant planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Hui-Gen; Zhou, Ji-Lin; Wittenmyer, Robert A.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of our recent study on the interactions between a giant planet and a self-gravitating gas disk. We investigate how the disk's self-gravity affects the gap formation process and the migration of the giant planet. Two series of 1-D and 2-D hydrodynamic simulations are performed. We select several surface densities and focus on the gravitationally stable region. To obtain more reliable gravity torques exerted on the planet, a refined treatment of the disk's gravity is adopted in the vicinity of the planet. Our results indicate that the net effect of the disk's self-gravity on the gap formation process depends on the surface density of the disk. We notice that there are two critical values, ΣI and ΣII. When the surface density of the disk is lower than the first one, Σ0 < ΣI, the effect of self-gravity suppresses the formation of a gap. When Σ0 > ΣI, the self-gravity of the gas tends to benefit the gap formation process and enlarges the width/depth of the gap. According to our 1-D and 2-D simulations, we estimate the first critical surface density to be ΣI ≈ 0.8 MMSN. This effect increases until the surface density reaches the second critical value ΣII. When Σ0 > ΣII, the gravitational turbulence in the disk becomes dominant and the gap formation process is suppressed again. Our 2-D simulations show that this critical surface density is around 3.5 MMSN. We also study the associated orbital evolution of a giant planet. Under the effect of the disk's self-gravity, the migration rate of the giant planet increases when the disk is dominated by gravitational turbulence. We show that the migration timescale correlates with the effective viscosity and can be up to 104 yr.

  17. The Effect of Suture Preloading on the Force to Failure and Gap Formation After Flexor Tendon Repair

    PubMed Central

    Vanhees, Matthias; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Larson, Dirk R.; Amadio, Peter C.; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gap formation is a common and severe complication after flexor tendon repair that can affect the outcome and prolong tendon healing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect that a pretensional force applied to the suture during tendon repair has on the repair strength and force that causes gap formation. Methods We used a total of 48 flexor digitorum profundus tendons from 12 human cadaver hands. We employed a core tendon suture, using the modified Pennington technique, and a running suture for flexor tendon repair. Before tying the knots of the core suture, we preloaded the sutures in each tendon end 0, 5, 10, or 15 N for 10 seconds to compare the effect of loading magnitude on repaired tendon peak force to failure and force causing gap formation. Results The force to form a gap of 2 mm in the 15-N preload group was significantly increased compared with the 0-N and 5-N preload groups. At the 3-mm gap formation, the force of all preload groups was significantly higher than the nonpreload group. The peak force with a preload of 10 N and 15 N was significantly higher than 0-N preload. Conclusions These findings suggest that pretensioning with 10 to 15 N at the suture–tendon interface before tying the knot has a beneficial effect on both the tendon gap formation and the peak force to failure. Clinical relevance When the surgeons perform tendon repair, pretensioning at the suture–tendon conjunction will increase the repair strength. PMID:23261189

  18. Characteristics of a laser triggered spark gap using air, Ar, CH4, H2, He, N2, SF6, and Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, W. D.; Kushner, M. J.; Seamans, J. F.

    1988-03-01

    A KrF discharge laser (248 nm) has been used to laser trigger, by volume preionization, a spark gap switch (38-65 kV, >10 kA, 100 ns pulse duration) filled with 20 different gas mixtures using various combinations of air, Ar, CH4, H2, He, N2 SF6, and Xe. A pulsed laser interferometer is used to probe the spark column. Characteristics studied include the internal structure of the column, the arc expansion rate, and evidence of any photoionization precursor effect. Our results show that the rate of arc expansion varies depending on the average molecular weight of the mixtures. In this experiment, pure H2 has the highest rate (≊9.5×105 cm/s) and air has one of the lowest (≊7×105 cm/s) for the same hold-off voltage. A computer model of the spark column formation is able to predict most of the structure observed in the arcs, including the effect of mixing gases with widely different molecular weights. The work suggests that, under proper circumstances, the spark gap switch performance may be improved by using gases lighter than conventional switch gases such as SF6.

  19. Plasmonic waveguide ring resonators with 4 nm air gap and λ0(2)/15,000 mode-area fabricated using photolithography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehak; Song, Juhee; Sung, Gun Yong; Shin, Jung H

    2014-10-01

    Plasmonic air-gap disk resonators with 3.5 μm diameter and a 4 nm thick, 40 nm wide air gap for a mode area of only λ0(2)/15,000 were fabricated using photolithography only. The resonant modes were clearly identified using tapered fiber coupling method at the resonant wavelengths of 1280-1620 nm. We also demonstrate the advantage of the air-gap structure by using the resonators as label-free biosensors with a sensitivity of 1.6 THz/nm.

  20. Experimental Study on Branch and Diffuse Type of Streamers in Leader Restrike of Long Air Gap Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, She; Zeng, Rong; Zhuang, Chijie; Zhou, Xuan; Ding, Yujian

    2016-03-01

    One of the main problems in the Ultra High Voltage (UHV) transmission project is to choose the external insulation distance, which requires a deep understanding of the long air gap discharge mechanism. The leader-streamer propagation is one of most important stages in long air gap discharge. In the conductor-tower lattice configuration, we have measured the voltage, the current on the high voltage side and the electric field in the gap. While the streamer in the leader-streamer system presented a conical or hyperboloid diffuse shape, the clear branch structure streamer in front of the leader was firstly observed by a high speed camera in the experiment. Besides, it is found that the leader velocity, width and injected charge for the branch type streamer are greater than those of a diffuse type. We propose that the phenomenon results from the high humidity, which was 15.5-16.5 g/m3 in our experiment. supported by the Fund of the National Priority Basic Research of China (2011CB209403) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51325703, 51377094, 51577098)

  1. The influence of the sand-dust environment on air-gap breakdown discharge characteristics of the plate-to-plate electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bo; Zhang, Gang; Chen, Bangfa; Gao, Naikui; Li, Yaozhong; Peng, Zongren; Jin, Haiyun

    2010-03-01

    The experiments of plane-plane gap discharge was carried out in an environment of artificial sandstorm. By comparing and analyzing the differences in gap breakdown voltage between the sand & dust environment and clean air, some problems were investigated, such as effects of wind speed and particle concentration on the breakdown voltage, differences of gap discharge characteristics between the dust & sand medium and the clean air medium. The results showed that compared with the clean air environment, the dust & sand environment had a decreased gap breakdown voltage. The longer the gap distance, the greater the voltage drop; the breakdown voltage decreased with the increase of particle concentration in flow. With the increase of wind speed, the breakdown voltage decreased at the beginning and rose afterwards. The results of the paper may helpful for further research regarding the unidentified flashover and external insulation characteristics of the HV power grid in the dust & sand environment.

  2. Formation of GaP nanocones and micro-mesas by metal-assisted chemical etching.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaehoon; Oh, Jihun

    2016-02-01

    Metal-assisted chemical etching (MaCE) of a (100) n-type GaP using patterned Pd catalysts in a mixed solution of HF and H2O2 at room temperature is reported for the first time. Various patterns of Pd catalysts, i.e., meshes and patches, with length scales ranging from 200 nm to several μm were used. Depending on the sizes of the Pd catalysts, GaP exhibits two distinctively different MaCE mechanisms: the conventional and inverse MaCE. With Pd nanomeshes, the ordered arrays of GaP nanocones were formed by the preferential removal of GaP directly under the Pd catalysts by the MaCE mechanism. When Pd micro-patches with several μm in length were used, bare GaP uncovered with the Pd patches was selectively dissolved to form GaP micro-mesa structures, following an inverse MaCE mechanism. We attribute these size-dependent etching behaviors to the dissolution limited etching characteristics of GaP during MaCE. Furthermore, we show that etched GaP structures can exhibit both mechanisms when a micro-patterned Pd nanomesh is used. The morphological evolution of etched GaP structures produced by MaCE is also presented. PMID:26780962

  3. Amyloid fibril formation at a uniformly sheared air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Hirsa, Amir

    2013-11-01

    Amyloid fibril formation is a process by which protein molecules in solution form nuclei and aggregate into fibrils. Amyloid fibrils have long been associated with several common diseases such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's. More recently, fibril protein deposition has been implicated in uncommon disorders leading to the failure of various organs including the kidneys, heart, and liver. Fibrillization can also play a detrimental role in biotherapeutic production. Results from previous studies show that a hydrophobic interface, such air/water, can accelerate fibrillization. Studies also show that agitation accelerates fibrillization. When attempting to elucidate fundamental mechanisms of fibrillization and distinguish the effects of interfaces and flow, it can be helpful to experiment with uniformly sheared interfaces. A new Taylor-Couette device is introduced for in situ, real-time high resolution microscopy. With a sub-millimeter annular gap, surface tension acts as the channel floor, permitting a stable meniscus to be placed arbitrarily close to a microscope to study amyloid fibril formation over long periods.

  4. Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources to Health Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for six principal air pollutants (“criteria” pollutants): carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter (PM) in two size ranges [...

  5. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  6. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  7. Coherent Synchrotron-Based Micro-Imaging Employed for Studies of Micro-Gap Formation in Dental Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, T.; Zabler, S.; Rack, A.; Stiller, M.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.; Nelson, K.

    2011-09-01

    Biocompatible materials such as titanium are regularly applied in oral surgery. Titanium-based implants for the replacement of missing teeth demand a high mechanical precision in order to minimize micro-bacterial leakage, especially when two-piece concepts are used. Synchrotron-based hard x-ray radiography, unlike conventional laboratory radiography, allows high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when micro-sized features in such highly attenuating objects are visualized. Therefore, micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the sample under different mechanical loads can be studied. We show the existence of micro-gaps in implants with conical connections and study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential source of implant failure, i.e., bacterial leakage, which can be a stimulus for an inflammatory process.

  8. Coherent Synchrotron-Based Micro-Imaging Employed for Studies of Micro-Gap Formation in Dental Implants

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, T.; Stiller, M.; Nelson, K.; Zabler, S.; Rack, A.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.

    2011-09-09

    Biocompatible materials such as titanium are regularly applied in oral surgery. Titanium-based implants for the replacement of missing teeth demand a high mechanical precision in order to minimize micro-bacterial leakage, especially when two-piece concepts are used. Synchrotron-based hard x-ray radiography, unlike conventional laboratory radiography, allows high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when micro-sized features in such highly attenuating objects are visualized. Therefore, micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the sample under different mechanical loads can be studied. We show the existence of micro-gaps in implants with conical connections and study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential source of implant failure, i.e., bacterial leakage, which can be a stimulus for an inflammatory process.

  9. Qualitative SEM/EDS analysis of microleakage and apical gap formation of adhesive root-filling materials

    PubMed Central

    SOUZA, Soraia de Fátima Carvalho; FRANCCI, Carlos; BOMBANA, Antonio C.; KENSHIMA, Silvia; BARROSO, Lúcia P.; D'AGOSTINO, Liz Z.; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the correspondence between gap formation and apical microleakage in root canals filled with epoxy resin-based (AH Plus) combined or not with resinous primer or with a dimethacrylate-based root canal sealer (Epiphany). Material and Methods Thirty-nine lower single-rooted human premolars were filled by the lateral condensation technique (LC) and immersed in a 50-wt% aqueous silver nitrate solution at 37ºC (24 h). After longitudinal sectioning, epoxy resin replicas were made from the tooth specimens. Both the replicas and the specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The gaps were observed in the replicas. Apical microleakage was detected in the specimens by SEM/energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The data were analyzed statistically using an Ordinal Logistic Regression model and Analysis of Correspondence (α=0.05). Results Epiphany presented more regions containing gaps between dentin and sealer (p<0.05). There was correspondence between the presence of gaps and microleakage (p<0.05). Microleakage was similar among the root-filling materials (p>0.05). Conclusions The resinous primer did not improve the sealing ability of AH Plus sealer and the presence of gaps had an effect on apical microleakage for all materials. PMID:22858699

  10. Band gap shift in the indium-tin-oxide films on polyethylene napthalate after thermal annealing in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, H.; Mayer, J. W.; Alford, T. L.

    2006-10-01

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin films on polyethylene napthalate (PEN) with high carrier concentration (˜1021/cm3) have been grown by electron-beam deposition without the introduction of oxygen into the chamber. The electrical properties of the ITO films (such as, carrier concentration, electrical mobility, and resistivity) abruptly changed after annealing in the air atmospheres. In addition, optical transmittance and optical band gap values significantly changed after heat treatment. The optical band gap narrowing behavior is observed in the as-deposited sample because of impurity band and heavy carrier concentration. The influence of annealing in air on the electrical and optical properties of ITO/PEN samples can be explained by the change in the free electron concentration, which is evaluated in terms of the oxygen content. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses are used to determine the oxygen content in the film. Hall effect measurements are used to determine the dependence of electrical properties on oxygen content.

  11. Air-Gapped Structures as Magnetic Elements for Use in Power Processing Systems. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohri, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Methodical approaches to the design of inductors for use in LC filters and dc-to-dc converters using air gapped magnetic structures are presented. Methods for the analysis and design of full wave rectifier LC filter circuits operating with the inductor current in both the continuous conduction and the discontinuous conduction modes are also described. In the continuous conduction mode, linear circuit analysis techniques are employed, while in the case of the discontinuous mode, the method of analysis requires computer solutions of the piecewise linear differential equations which describe the filter in the time domain. Procedures for designing filter inductors using air gapped cores are presented. The first procedure requires digital computation to yield a design which is optimized in the sense of minimum core volume and minimum number of turns. The second procedure does not yield an optimized design as defined above, but the design can be obtained by hand calculations or with a small calculator. The third procedure is based on the use of specially prepared magnetic core data and provides an easy way to quickly reach a workable design.

  12. Leaf anatomy and light acclimation in woody seedlings after gap formation in a cool-temperate deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Oguchi, R; Hikosaka, K; Hiura, T; Hirose, T

    2006-10-01

    The photosynthetic light acclimation of fully expanded leaves of tree seedlings in response to gap formation was studied with respect to anatomical and photosynthetic characteristics in a natural cool-temperate deciduous forest. Eight woody species of different functional groups were used; two species each from mid-successional canopy species (Kalopanax pictus and Magnolia obovata), from late-successional canopy species (Quercus crispula and Acer mono), from sub-canopy species (Acer japonicum and Fraxinus lanuginosa) and from vine species (Schizophragma hydrangeoides and Hydrangea petiolaris). The light-saturated rate of photosynthesis (Pmax) increased significantly after gap formation in six species other than vine species. Shade leaves of K. pictus, M. obovata and Q. crispula had vacant spaces along cell walls in mesophyll cells, where chloroplasts were absent. The vacant space was filled after the gap formation by increased chloroplast volume, which in turn increased Pmax. In two Acer species, an increase in the area of mesophyll cells facing the intercellular space enabled the leaves to increase Pmax after maturation. The two vine species did not significantly change their anatomical traits. Although the response and the mechanism of acclimation to light improvement varied from species to species, the increase in the area of chloroplast surface facing the intercellular space per unit leaf area accounted for most of the increase in Pmax, demonstrating the importance of leaf anatomy in increasing Pmax.

  13. Gap Formations in Simulations of Shpb Tests on Elastic Materials Soft in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftenberg, M. N.; Scheidler, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    The LS-DYNA code was applied to split Hopkinson pressure bar tests on a material at least two orders of magnitude stiffer in dilatation than in shear. Two constitutive models were applied, linear elasticity and a compressible form of Mooney-Rivlin elasticity. The latter was fitted to data from ballistic gelatin. The incident and transmission bars were aluminum. The nominal strain rate was 2500/s. Gaps appeared at the interfaces between the specimen and both bars. Unloading of the specimen and bars accompanied these gaps. The input-velocity rise time was varied to observe pulse shaping effects. Mesh sensitivity and contact-parameter sensitivity studies were performed.

  14. Design of single-winding energy-storage reactors for dc-to-dc converters using air-gapped magnetic-core structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohri, A. K.; Wilson, T. G.; Owen, H. A., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure is presented for designing air-gapped energy-storage reactors for nine different dc-to-dc converters resulting from combinations of three single-winding power stages for voltage stepup, current stepup and voltage stepup/current stepup and three controllers with control laws that impose constant-frequency, constant transistor on-time and constant transistor off-time operation. The analysis, based on the energy-transfer requirement of the reactor, leads to a simple relationship for the required minimum volume of the air gap. Determination of this minimum air gap volume then permits the selection of either an air gap or a cross-sectional core area. Having picked one parameter, the minimum value of the other immediately leads to selection of the physical magnetic structure. Other analytically derived equations are used to obtain values for the required turns, the inductance, and the maximum rms winding current. The design procedure is applicable to a wide range of magnetic material characteristics and physical configurations for the air-gapped magnetic structure.

  15. Gap Formations Along Specimen-Bar Interfaces in Numerical Simulations of SHPB Tests on Elastic Materials Soft in Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftenberg, Martin N.; Scheidler, Mike

    2009-06-01

    Simulations of split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) tests on elastic materials were performed using LS-DYNA. The specimens were much stiffer in dilatation than in shear. A compressible form of Mooney-Rivlin elasticity was applied with parameters evaluated from ballistic gelatin data. The bars were aluminum. The velocity prescribed on the incident bar increased over a rise time until attaining a steady-state value corresponding to a nominal strain rate of 2500/s. The rise time was varied to observe effects of pulse shaping. All calculations were 2D axisymmetric. A penalty-based contact algorithm was applied at the specimen-bar interfaces. This algorithm introduced a stiffness and a viscosity parameter. In sensitivity studies we varied the radius of the bars, the specimen's mesh, and the two contact parameters. In all calculations with the Mooney-Rivlin model, gaps formed at both specimen-bar interfaces over a wide range of strains. This gap phenomenon appears not to have been previously reported in the SHPB literature. We replaced the Mooney-Rivlin model with linear elasticity in order to explore whether the gaps were associated with material nonlinearity. We fixed Young's modulus at a value much smaller than that of aluminum. For sufficiently large Poisson ratios, we again observed gap formations at both specimen-bar interfaces.

  16. Band-gap engineering with a twist: Formation of intercalant superlattices in twisted graphene bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symalla, Franz; Shallcross, Sam; Beljakov, Igor; Fink, Karin; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Meded, Velimir

    2015-05-01

    Graphene-based materials have long been considered as promising building blocks for a new generation of high-frequency (terahertz) electronic devices, but their use is complicated by the lack of an intrinsic band gap in graphene itself. Here we exploit synthetically controllable incommensuration of twisted graphene bilayers as a scaffold for intercalation of alkali metal ions with the periodicity of the bilayer supercell. Systematic exploration of the energy profiles of the ions as a function of position suggests that the alkali metal ions aggregate commensurately with the symmetry of the twisted bilayer. The intercalated alkali metal ions act as a source of a periodic perturbation on the level of the bilayer supercell, which permits opening and engineering of a band gap between graphene's π bands. The twist angle between the graphene layers determines the structure and disorder of the intercalant sublattice and, consequently, the magnitude of the band gap. Appropriate choices of the intercalant and twist angle thus permit band-gap engineering in graphene. We offer arguments that the impact of intercalation on the all important charge mobility of graphene will be rather small.

  17. Circumjovian Disk Clearing After Gap-Opening and the Formation of a Partially Differentiated Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosqueira, I.; Estrada, P. R.; Cuzzi, J.; Squyres, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    We look into the possibility that Callisto's accretional history straddled the time during which Jupiter opened a gap in the solar nebula and occurred over an extended period from a very extended very low density disk. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-02-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10‑5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers.

  19. Prediction of DC Corona Onset Voltage for Rod-Plane Air Gaps by a Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shuo; Ruan, Jiangjun; Du, Zhiye; Zhu, Lin; Shu, Shengwen

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method to predict the corona onset voltage for a rod-plane air gap, based on the support vector machine (SVM). Because the SVM is not limited by the size, dimension and nonlinearity of the samples, this method can realize accurate prediction with few training data. Only electric field features are chosen as the input; no geometric parameter is included. Therefore, the experiment data of one kind of electrode can be used to predict the corona onset voltages of other electrodes with different sizes. With the experimental data obtained by ozone detection technology, and experimental data provided by the reference, the efficiency of the proposed method is validated. Accurate predicted results with an average relative less than 3% are obtained with only 6 experimental data. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51477120)

  20. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10−5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers. PMID:26923610

  1. Dual rotor single- stator axial air gap PMSM motor/generator drive for high torque vehicles applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutelea, L. N.; Deaconu, S. I.; Boldea, I.; Popa, G. N.

    2014-03-01

    The actual e - continuously variable transmission (e-CVT) solution for the parallel Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) requires two electric machines, two inverters, and a planetary gear. A distinct electric generator and a propulsion electric motor, both with full power converters, are typical for a series HEV. In an effort to simplify the planetary-geared e-CVT for the parallel HEV or the series HEV we hereby propose to replace the basically two electric machines and their two power converters by a single, axial-air-gap, electric machine central stator, fed from a single PWM converter with dual frequency voltage output and two independent PM rotors, destined for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and military vehicles applications. The proposed topologies and the magneto-motive force analysis are the core of the paper.

  2. [Spatiotempaoral distribution patterns of photosynthetic photon flux density, air temperature, and relative air humidity in forest gap of Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest in Xi-ao Xing' an Mountains].

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Duan, Wen-biao; Chen, Li-xin

    2009-12-01

    A continuous measurement of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD), air temperature, and relative air humidity was made in the forest gap in primary Pinus koraiensis-dominated broadleaved mixed forest in Xiao Xing' an Mountains to compare the spatiotemporal distribution patterns of the parameters. The diurnal maximum PPFD in the forest gap appeared between 11:00 and 13:00 on sunny and overcast days. On sunny days, the maximum PPFD during various time periods did not locate in fixed locations, the diurnal maximum PPFD occurred in the canopy edge of northern part of the gap; while on overcast days, it always occurred in the center of the gap. The mean monthly PPFD in the gap was the highest in June and the lowest in September, with the largest range observed in July. The maximum air temperature happened between 9:00 and 15:00 on sunny days, between 15:00 and 19:00 on overcast days, the locations were 8 m in the southern part of gap center both on sunny and overcast days. From 5:00 to 9:00, the air temperature at measured positions in the gap was higher on overcast days than on sunny days; but from 9:00 to 19:00, it was opposite. The mean monthly air temperature was the highest in June, and the lowest in September. The maximum relative humidity appeared between 5:00 and 9:00 on sunny and overcast days, and occurred in the canopy border of western part of the gap, with the relative air humidity on overcast days being always higher than that on sunny days. The mean monthly relative humidity was the highest in July, and the lowest in June. The heterogeneity of PPFD was higher on sunny days than on overcast days, but the heterogeneities of air temperature and relative humidity were not obvious. The maximum PPFD, air temperature, and relative humidity were not located in the same positions among different months during growing season. For mean monthly PPFD and air temperature, their variation gradient was higher in and around the center of gap; while for mean monthly

  3. Estimation of Minimal Breakdown Point in a GaP Plasma Structure and Discharge Features in Air and Argon Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, H. Hilal; Tanrıverdi, Evrim

    2016-08-01

    We present gas discharge phenomena in argon and air media using a gallium phosphide (GaP) semiconductor and metal electrodes. The system has a large-diameter ( D) semiconductor and a microscaled adjustable interelectrode gap ( d). Both theoretical and experimental findings are discussed for a direct-current (dc) electric field ( E) applied to this structure with parallel-plate geometry. As one of the main parameters, the pressure p takes an adjustable value from 0.26 kPa to 101 kPa. After collection of experimental data, a new theoretical formula is developed to estimate the minimal breakdown point of the system as a function of p and d. It is proven that the minimal breakdown point in the semiconductor and metal electrode system differs dramatically from that in metal and metal electrode systems. In addition, the surface charge density σ and spatial electron distribution n e are calculated theoretically. Current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) demonstrate that there exist certain negative differential resistance (NDR) regions for small interelectrode separations (i.e., d = 50 μm) and low and moderate pressures between 3.7 kPa and 13 kPa in Ar medium. From the difference of currents in CVCs, the bifurcation of the discharge current is clarified for an applied voltage U. Since the current differences in NDRs have various values from 1 μA to 7.24 μA for different pressures, the GaP semiconductor plasma structure can be used in microwave diode systems due to its clear NDR region.

  4. Air-gap gating of MgZnO/ZnO heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Tambo, T.; Falson, J. Kozuka, Y.; Maryenko, D.; Tsukazaki, A.; Kawasaki, M.

    2014-08-28

    The adaptation of “air-gap” dielectric based field-effect transistor technology to controlling the MgZnO/ZnO heterointerface confined two-dimensional electron system (2DES) is reported. We find it possible to tune the charge density of the 2DES via a gate electrode spatially separated from the heterostructure surface by a distance of 5 μm. Under static gating, the observation of the quantum Hall effect suggests that the charge carrier density remains homogeneous, with the 2DES in the 3 mm square sample the sole conductor. The availability of this technology enables the exploration of the charge carrier density degree of freedom in the pristine sample limit.

  5. Resistance modulation in VO2 nanowires induced by an electric field via air-gap gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Teruo; Chikanari, Masashi; Wei, Tingting; Tanaka, Hidekazu; The Institute of Scientific; Industrial Research Team

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) shows huge resistance change with metal-insulator transition (MIT) at around room temperature. Controlling of the MIT by applying an electric field is a topical ongoing research toward the realization of Mott transistor. In this study, we have successfully switched channel resistance of VO2 nano-wire channels by a pure electrostatic field effect using a side-gate-type field-effect transistor (SG-FET) viaair gap and found that single crystalline VO2 nanowires and the channels with narrower width enhance transport modulation rate. The rate of change in resistance ((R0-R)/R, where R0 and R is the resistance of VO2 channel with off state and on state gate voltage (VG) , respectively) was 0.42 % at VG = 30 V in in-plane poly-crystalline VO2 channels on Al2O3(0001) substrates, while the rate in single crystalline channels on TiO2 (001) substrates was 3.84 %, which was 9 times higher than that using the poly-crystalline channels. With reducing wire width from 3000 nm to 400 nm of VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrate, furthermore, resistance modulation ratio enhanced from 0.67 % to 3.84 %. This change can not be explained by a simple free-electron model. In this presentation, we will compare the electronic properties between in-plane polycrystalline VO2 on Al2O3 (0001) and single crystalline VO2 on TiO2 (001) substrates, and show experimental data in detail..

  6. Formation of the S  =  1 paramagnetic centers in the bond-diluted spin-gap magnet.

    PubMed

    Glazkov, V N; Krasnikova, Yu V; Hüvonen, D; Zheludev, A

    2016-05-25

    Electron spin resonance experiment reveals that non-magnetic bond doping of the spin-gap magnet (C4H12N2)Cu2Cl6 (abbreviated PHCC) results in the formation of S  =  1 paramagnetic centers that dominate low-temperature ESR response. We have followed evolution of this signal with doping impurity content and have found that the concentraion of these centers is quadratic over the impurity content. We also observe coexistence of the ESR responses from these local centers and from delocalized triplet excitations over a certain temperature range. PMID:27119200

  7. Similarity laws for cathode-directed streamers in gaps with an inhomogeneous field at elevated air pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotov, O. V.; Golota, V. I.; Kadolin, B. B.; Karas', V. I.; Ostroushko, V. N.; Zavada, L. M.; Shulika, A. Yu.

    2010-11-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of cathode-directed streamers in the gap closure regime without a transition into spark breakdown. Spatiotemporal, electrodynamic, and spectroscopic characteristics of streamer discharges in air at different pressures were studied. Similarity laws for streamer discharges were formulated. These laws allow one to compare the discharge current characteristics and streamer propagation dynamics at different pressures. Substantial influence of gas photoionization on the deviations from the similarity laws was revealed. The existence of a pressure range in which the discharges develop in a similar way was demonstrated experimentally. In particular, for fixed values of the product pd and discharge voltage U, the average streamer velocity is also fixed. It is found that, although the similarity laws are violated in the interstreamer pause of the discharge, the average discharge current and the product of the pressure and the streamer repetition period remain the same at different pressures. The radiation spectra of the second positive system of nitrogen (the C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}-B{sup 3{Pi}}{sub g} transitions) in a wavelength range of 300-400 nm at air pressures of 1-3 atm were recorded. It is shown that, in the entire pressure range under study, the profiles of the observed radiation bands practically remain unchanged and the relative intensities of the spectral lines corresponding to the {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}-B{sup 3{Pi}}{sub g} transitions are preserved.

  8. Sedimentology of the Mesaverde Formation at Rifle Gap, Colorado and implications for gas-bearing intervals in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1982-03-01

    The exposures of the Mesaverde Formation at Rifle Gap, Colorado, are of a regressive series of marine to fluvial deposits about 1650 m (5000 ft) thick. Grading up out of the marine Mancos Shale, the blanket shoreline sandstones of the Corcoran, Cozzette, and Rollins Sandstones record substages of the regression as delta lobes were activated and abandoned in northwestern Colorado during Late Cretaceous time. The overlying coals, sandstones, and carbonaceous mudstones were deposited on the paludal lower delta plain behind the shoreline. Meandering fluvial systems prograded over the paludal deposits. These systems deposited point-bar sandstones and overbank mudstones and siltstones in composite meander-belt trends, some of which are now gas-bearing, low-permeability reservoirs. Reorientation of the paleogeography during the Laramide orogeny (contemporaneous with fluvial deposition) probably changed the orientation of the meander belt trends. The uppermost sandstones at Rifle Gap, including the Ohio Creek conglomerate, are interpreted as shoreline deposits of a transgression that has been previously unrecognized in the area. Most of the record of this transgression has been destroyed by pre-Eocene erosion. The outcrops at Rifle Gap provide a basis for interpreting subsurface deposis in the Department of Energy's Western Gas Sands Project Multi-Well Experiment, 12 miles away.

  9. Gap junctions composed of connexins 41.8 and 39.4 are essential for colour pattern formation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Irion, Uwe; Frohnhöfer, Hans Georg; Krauss, Jana; Çolak Champollion, Tuǧba; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Geiger-Rudolph, Silke; Weiler, Christian; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between all three pigment cell types are required to form the stripe pattern of adult zebrafish (Danio rerio), but their molecular nature is poorly understood. Mutations in leopard (leo), encoding Connexin 41.8 (Cx41.8), a gap junction subunit, cause a phenotypic series of spotted patterns. A new dominant allele, leo(tK3), leads to a complete loss of the pattern, suggesting a dominant negative impact on another component of gap junctions. In a genetic screen, we identified this component as Cx39.4 (luchs). Loss-of-function alleles demonstrate that luchs is required for stripe formation in zebrafish; however, the fins are almost not affected. Double mutants and chimeras, which show that leo and luchs are only required in xanthophores and melanophores, but not in iridophores, suggest that both connexins form heteromeric gap junctions. The phenotypes indicate that these promote homotypic interactions between melanophores and xanthophores, respectively, and those cells instruct the patterning of the iridophores.

  10. VAP-B binds to Rab3GAP1 at the ER: its implication in nuclear envelope formation through the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment.

    PubMed

    Hantan, Degejirihu; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Sakisaka, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAP-B) is a tail-anchored protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). VAP-B functions as an adaptor protein to recruit target proteins to the ER and execute various cellular functions, lipid transport, membrane traffic, ER stress etc. Recently, VAP-B has been shown to regulate the nuclear envelope protein transport through the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC). We showed here that VAP-B directly binds to Rab3 GTPase activating protein 1 (Rab3GAP1), the catalytic subunit of Rab3GAP, through the two phenylalanines (FF) in an acidic tract (FFAT)-like motif of Rab3GAP1. Rab3GAP consists of two subunits, the catalytic subunit Rab3GAP1 and the non-catalytic subunit Rab3GAP2. VAP-B binds to Rab3GAP1 even in the Rab3GAP1/2 heterodimer complex. A single amino acid substitution of the FFAT-like motif reduces the binding activity of Rab3GAP1 to VAP-B. On the other hand, the FFAT-like motif mutation increases the binding activity of Rab3GAP1 to ERGIC-53, the ERGIC marker protein. Overexpression of Rab3GAP1 affects nuclear envelope formation more potently than that of Rab3GAP1 FFAT-like motif mutant. These results suggest that the binding of VAP-B to Rab3GAP1 is implicated in the regulation of nuclear envelope formation through ERGIC.

  11. Formation of Bragg band gaps in anisotropic phononic crystals analyzed with the empty lattice model

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yan -Feng; Maznev, Alexei; Laude, Vincent

    2016-05-11

    Bragg band gaps of phononic crystals generally, but not always, open at Brillouin zone boundaries. The commonly accepted explanation stems from the empty lattice model: assuming a small material contrast between the constituents of the unit cell, avoided crossings in the phononic band structure appear at frequencies and wavenumbers corresponding to band intersections; for scalar waves the lowest intersections coincide with boundaries of the first Brillouin zone. However, if a phononic crystal contains elastically anisotropic materials, its overall symmetry is not dictated solely by the lattice symmetry. We construct an empty lattice model for phononic crystals made of isotropic andmore » anisotropic materials, based on their slowness curves. We find that, in the anisotropic case, avoided crossings generally do not appear at the boundaries of traditionally defined Brillouin zones. Furthermore, the Bragg "planes" which give rise to phononic band gaps, are generally not flat planes but curved surfaces. Lastly, the same is found to be the case for avoided crossings between shear (transverse) and longitudinal bands in the isotropic case.« less

  12. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-15

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are {approx}0.1-2 {mu}s over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  13. Measurements of electron avalanche formation time in W-band microwave air breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Alan M.; Hummelt, Jason S.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2011-08-01

    We present measurements of formation times of electron avalanche ionization discharges induced by a focused 110 GHz millimeter-wave beam in atmospheric air. Discharges take place in a free volume of gas, with no nearby surfaces or objects. When the incident field amplitude is near the breakdown threshold for pulsed conditions, measured formation times are ˜0.1-2 μs over the pressure range 5-700 Torr. Combined with electric field breakdown threshold measurements, the formation time data shows the agreement of 110 GHz air breakdown with the similarity laws of gas discharges.

  14. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    PubMed Central

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  15. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    PubMed

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  16. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    PubMed

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-04-18

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  17. The role of deep centers in formation of dosimetric properties of wide-gap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, S. V.; Kortov, V. S.

    2014-11-01

    The direct and indirect methods of experimental detection of deep traps in wide-gap insulators are described. The experimentally observed effects of influence of deep traps with different nature on luminescent and dosimetric properties of materials are analyzed. It is established that the most wide-spread and well-studied effects are the sensitization and superlinearity of dose response. They are interpreted in terms of the kinetic model of competitive electron traps. Taking into account the temperature dependence of capture probability by deep traps in this model allows one to explain some new effects associated with luminescence thermal quenching. The luminescence model of Al2O3:C single crystal is described. In this model the temperature dependence of competitive interaction between the main and deep traps is caused by thermal ionization of excited states of F-centers.

  18. Mass Gap for Black-Hole Formation in Higher-Derivative and Ghost-Free Gravity.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Valeri P

    2015-07-31

    We study a spherical gravitational collapse of a small mass in higher-derivative and ghost-free theories of gravity. By boosting a solution of linearized equations for a static point mass in such theories we obtain in the Penrose limit the gravitational field of an ultrarelativistic particle. Taking a superposition of such solutions we construct a metric of a collapsing null shell in the linearized higher-derivative and ghost-free gravity. The latter allows one to find the gravitational field of a thick null shell. By analyzing these solutions we demonstrate that in a wide class of the higher dimensional theories of gravity as well as for the ghost-free gravity there exists a mass gap for mini-black-hole production. We also found conditions when the curvature invariants remain finite at r=0 for the collapse of the thick null shell.

  19. Detection of air-gap eccentricity and broken-rotor bar conditions in a squirrel-cage induction motor using the radial flux sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Don-Ha; Woo, Byung-Chul; Sun, Jong-Ho; Kang, Dong-Sik; Han, Sang-Bo; Kim, Byung-Kuk; Cho, Youn-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    A new method for detecting eccentricity and broken rotor bar conditions in a squirrel-cage induction motor is proposed. Air-gap flux variation analysis is done using search coils, which are inserted at stator slots. Using this method, the leakage flux in radial direction can be directly detected. Using finite element method, the air-gap flux variation is accurately modeled and analyzed. From the results of the simulation, a motor under normal condition shows maximum magnetic flux density of 1.3 T. On the other hand, the eccentric air-gap condition displays about 1.1 T at 60 deg. and 1.6 T at 240 deg. A difference of flux density is 0.5 T in the abnormal condition, whereas no difference is detected in the normal motor. In the broken rotor bar conditions, the flux densities at 65 deg. and 155 deg. are about 0.4 T and 0.8 T, respectively. These simulation results are coincided with those of experiment. Consequently, the measurement of the magnetic flux at air gap is one of effective ways to discriminate the faulted conditions of the eccentricity and broken rotor bars.

  20. Detection of air-gap eccentricity and broken-rotor bar conditions in a squirrel-cage induction motor using the radial flux sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Don-Ha; Han, Sang-Bo; Woo, Byung-Chul; Sun, Jong-Ho; Kang, Dong-Sik; Kim, Byung-Kuk; Cho, Youn-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    A new method for detecting eccentricity and broken rotor bar conditions in a squirrel-cage induction motor is proposed. Air-gap flux variation analysis is done using search coils, which are inserted at stator slots. Using this method, the leakage flux in radial direction can be directly detected. Using finite element method, the air-gap flux variation is accurately modeled and analyzed. From the results of the simulation, a motor under normal condition shows maximum magnetic flux density of 1.3T. On the other hand, the eccentric air-gap condition displays about 1.1T at 60° and 1.6T at 240°. A difference of flux density is 0.5T in the abnormal condition, whereas no difference is detected in the normal motor. In the broken rotor bar conditions, the flux densities at 65° and 155° are about 0.4 T and 0.8T, respectively. These simulation results are coincided with those of experiment. Consequently, the measurement of the magnetic flux at air gap is one of effective ways to discriminate the faulted conditions of the eccentricity and broken rotor bars.

  1. Bridging the gap: disk formation in the Class 0 phase with ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dapp, Wolf B.; Basu, Shantanu; Kunz, Matthew W.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Ideal magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations have revealed catastrophic magnetic braking in the protostellar phase, which prevents the formation of a centrifugal disk around a nascent protostar. Aims: We determine if non-ideal MHD, including the effects of ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation determined from a detailed chemical network model, will allow for disk formation at the earliest stages of star formation. Methods: We employ the axisymmetric thin-disk approximation in order to resolve a dynamic range of 9 orders of magnitude in length and 16 orders of magnitude in density, while also calculating partial ionization using up to 19 species in a detailed chemical equilibrium model. Magnetic braking is applied to the rotation using a steady-state approximation, and a barotropic relation is used to capture the thermal evolution. Results: We resolve the formation of the first and second cores, with expansion waves at the periphery of each, a magnetic diffusion shock, and prestellar infall profiles at larger radii. Power-law profiles in each region can be understood analytically. After the formation of the second core, the centrifugal support rises rapidly and a low-mass disk of radius ≈ 10 R⊙ is formed at the earliest stage of star formation, when the second core has mass ~10-3 M⊙. The mass-to-flux ratio is ~104 times the critical value in the central region. Conclusions: A small centrifugal disk can form in the earliest stage of star formation, due to a shut-off of magnetic braking caused by magnetic field dissipation in the first core region. There is enough angular momentum loss to allow the second collapse to occur directly, and a low-mass stellar core to form with a surrounding disk. The disk mass and size will depend upon how the angular momentum transport mechanisms within the disk can keep up with mass infall onto the disk. Accounting only for direct infall, we estimate that the disk will remain ≲10 AU, undetectable even by ALMA, for

  2. The Effect of the Saharan Air Layer on the Formation of Hurricane Isabel (2003) Simulated with AIRS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, iguang; Braun, Scott A.; Qu, John J.

    2006-01-01

    The crucial physics of how the atmosphere really accomplishes the tropical cyclogenesis process is still poorly understood. The presence of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL), an elevated mixed layer of warm and dry air that extends from Africa to the tropical Atlantic and contains a substantial amount of mineral dust, adds more complexity to the tropical cyclogenesis process in the Atlantic basin. The impact of the SAL on tropical cyclogenesis is still uncertain. Karyampudi and Carlson (1988) conclude that a strong SAL can potentially aid tropical cyclone development while Dunion and Velden (2004) argue that the SAL generally inhibits tropical cyclogenesis and intensification. Advancing our understanding of the physical mechanisms of tropical cyclogenesis and the associated roles of the SAL strongly depends on the improvement in the observations over the data-sparse ocean areas. After the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), and the microwave Humidity Sounder of Brazil (HSB) were launched with the NASA Aqua satellite in 2002, new data products retrieved from the AIRS suite became available for studying the effect of the warm, dry air mass associated with the SAL (referred to as the thermodynamic effect). The vertical profiles of the AIRS retrieved temperature and humidity provide an unprecedented opportunity to examine the thermodynamic effect of the SAL. The observational data can be analyzed and assimilated into numerical models, in which the model thermodynamic state is allowed to relax to the observed state from AIRS data. The objective of this study is to numerically demonstrate that the thermodynamic effect of the SAL on the formation of Hurricane Isabel (2003) can be largely simulated through nudging of the AIRS data.

  3. A comparative study on the effects of air gap wind and walking motion on the thermal properties of Arabian Thawbs and Chinese Cheongsams.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhiying; Fan, Jintu; Wu, Yuenshing

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports on an experimental investigation on the effects of air gap, wind and walking motion on the thermal properties of traditional Arabian thawbs and Chinese cheongsams. Total thermal resistance (It) and vapour resistance (Re) were measured using the sweating fabric manikin - 'Walter', and the air gap volumes of the garments were determined by a 3D body scanner. The results showed the relative changes of It and Re of thawbs due to wind and walking motion are greater than those of cheongsams, which provided an explanation of why thawbs are preferred in extremely hot climate. It is further shown that thermal insulation and vapour resistance of thawbs increase with the air gap volume up to about 71,000 cm(3) and then decrease gradually. Thawbs with higher air permeability have significantly lower evaporative resistance particularly under windy conditions demonstrating the advantage of air permeable fabrics in body cooling in hot environments. Practitioner Summary: This paper aims to better understand the thermal insulation and vapour resistance of traditional Arabian thawbs and Chinese cheongsams, and the relationship between the thermal properties and their fit and design. The results of this study provide a scientific basis for designing ethnic clothing used in hot environments.

  4. Robust carrier formation process in low-band gap organic photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonezawa, Kouhei; Kamioka, Hayato; Yasuda, Takeshi; Han, Liyuan; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2013-10-01

    By means of femto-second time-resolved spectroscopy, we investigated the carrier formation process against film morphology and temperature (T) in highly-efficient organic photovoltaic, poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b '] dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b] thiophenediyl

  5. Subnanometer poly-silicon gap structure formation: Comparison study between size expansion and size reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, U.; Nazwa, T.; Dhahi, Th. S.

    2012-06-01

    This study describes the comparison among the three fabrication methods of an array of poly-silicon nanogap structures. The three different methods are size expansion technique (SET), size reduction technique (SRT) and e-beam lithography (EBL) technique. Generally, SRT involves the breaking of the primarily pattern with no gap structure into nanogap scale. Conversely, SET engages in the process of enhancing the initially microgap pattern into nanogap scale. EBL refers to a lithographic process that uses a focused beam of electrons to form the circuit patterns needed for material deposition on or removal from the wafer. Using conventional photolithography, a procedure to fabricate poly-silicon nanogap structure on the wafer scale is designed. The nanogap (NG) fabrication procedure is based on the standard CMOS technology follows by employing both methods respectively. The lateral nanogap is introduced in the fabrication process using poly-silicon as an anode electrode. The similarity and distinction will be highlighted for each particular process involved in the fabrication of nanogap structures. The simple least-cost method does not require complicated nanolithography method of fabrication but it is still possible to measure the electrical properties of a single molecule. On top of that, these techniques can be applied extensively to different designs of nanogap structure down to several nanometer levels of dimensions. The innovative method reported here can easily produce a nanogap electrode in a reproducible manner.

  6. A Coupled Multiphase Fluid Flow And Heat And Vapor Transport Model For Air-Gap Membrane Distillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit

    2010-05-01

    Membrane distillation (MD) is emerging as a viable desalination technology because of its low energy requirements that can be provided from low-grade, waste heat and because it causes less fouling. In MD, desalination is accomplished by transporting water vapour through a porous hydrophobic membrane. The vapour transport process is governed by the vapour pressure difference between the two sides of a membrane. A variety of configurations have been tested to impose this vapour pressure gradient, however, the air-gap membrane distillation (AGMD) has been found to be the most efficient. The separation mechanism of AGMD and its overall efficiency is based on vapour-liquid equilibrium (VLE). At present, little knowledge is available about the optimal design of such a transmembrane VLE-based evaporation, and subsequent condensation processes. While design parameters for MD have evolved mostly through experimentations, a comprehensive mathematical model is yet to be developed. This is primarily because the coupling and non-linearity of the equations, the interactions between the flow, heat and mass transport regimes, and the complex geometries involved pose a challenging modelling and simulation problem. Yet a comprehensive mathematical model is needed for systematic evaluation of the processes, design parameterization, and performance prediction. This paper thus presents a coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transfer model to investigate the main processes and parameters affecting the performance of an AGMD.

  7. The health impacts of exposure to indoor air pollution from solid fuels in developing countries: knowledge, gaps, and data needs.

    PubMed Central

    Ezzati, Majid; Kammen, Daniel M

    2002-01-01

    Globally, almost 3 billion people rely on biomass (wood, charcoal, crop residues, and dung) and coal as their primary source of domestic energy. Exposure to indoor air pollution (IAP) from the combustion of solid fuels is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In this paper, we review the current knowledge on the relationship between IAP exposure and disease and on interventions for reducing exposure and disease. We take an environmental health perspective and consider the details of both exposure and health effects that are needed for successful intervention strategies. We also identify knowledge gaps and detailed research questions that are essential in successful design and dissemination of preventive measures and policies. In addition to specific research recommendations, we conclude that given the interaction of housing, household energy, and day-to-day household activities in determining exposure to indoor smoke, research and development of effective interventions can benefit tremendously from integration of methods and analysis tools from a range of disciplines in the physical, social, and health sciences. PMID:12417475

  8. Temperature dependence of beat-length and confinement loss in an air-core photonic band-gap fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenlong; Li, Xuyou; Hong, Yong; Liu, Pan; Yang, Hanrui; Ling, Weiwei

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of polarization-maintaining (PM) property and loss in a highly-birefringent air-core photonic band-gap fiber (PBF) is investigated. The effects of temperature variation on the effective index, beat-length and confinement loss are studied numerically by using the full-vector finite element method (FEM). It is found that, the PM property of this PBF is insensitive to the temperature, and the temperature-dependent beat-length coefficient can be as low as 2.86×10-8 m/°C, which is typically 200 times less than those of conventional panda fibers, the PBF has a stable confinement loss of 0.01 dB/m over the temperature range of -30 to 20 °C for the slow axis at the wavelength of 1.55 μm. The PBF with ultra-low temperature-dependent PM property and low loss can reduce the thermally induced polarization instability apparently in interferometric applications such as resonant fiber optic gyroscope (RFOG), optical fiber sensors, and so on.

  9. Indium phosphide all air-gap Fabry-Pérot filters for near-infrared spectroscopic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, A.; Butt, M. A.; Fomchenkov, S. A.; Khonina, S. N.

    2016-08-01

    Food quality can be characterized by noninvasive techniques such as spectroscopy in the Near Infrared wavelength range. For example, 930 -1450 nm wavelength range can be used to detect diseases and differentiate between meat samples. Miniaturization of such NIR spectrometers is useful for quick and mobile characterization of food samples. Spectrometers can be miniaturized, without compromising the spectral resolution, using Fabry-Pérot (FP) filters consisting of two highly reflecting mirrors with a central cavity in between. The most commonly used mirrors in the design of FP filters are Distributed Bragg Reflections (DBRs) consisting of alternating high and low refractive index material pairs, due to their high reflectivity compared to metal mirrors. However, DBRs have high reflectivity for a selected range of wavelengths known as the stopband of the DBR. This range is usually much smaller than the sensitivity range of the spectrometer detector. Therefore, a bandpass filter is usually required to restrict wavelengths outside the stopband of the FP DBRs. Such bandpass filters are difficult to design and implement. Alternatively, high index contrast materials must be can be used to broaden the stopband width of the FP DBRs. In this work, Indium phosphide all air-gap filters are proposed in conjunction with InGaAs based detectors. The designed filter has a wide stopband covering the entire InGaAs detector sensitivity range. The filter can be tuned in the 950-1450 nm with single mode operation. The designed filter can hence be used for noninvasive meat quality control.

  10. The role of school performance in narrowing gender gaps in the formation of STEM aspirations: a cross-national study

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Allison; Legewie, Joscha; DiPrete, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    This study uses cross-national evidence to estimate the effect of school peer performance on the size of the gender gap in the formation of STEM career aspirations. We argue that STEM aspirations are influenced not only by gender stereotyping in the national culture but also by the performance of peers in the local school environment. Our analyses are based on the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). They investigate whether 15-year-old students from 55 different countries expect to have STEM jobs at the age of 30. We find considerable gender differences in the plans to pursue careers in STEM occupations in all countries. Using PISA test scores in math and science aggregated at the school level as a measure of school performance, we find that stronger performance environments have a negative impact on student career aspirations in STEM. Although girls are less likely than boys to aspire to STEM occupations, even when they have comparable abilities, boys respond more than girls to competitive school performance environments. As a consequence, the aspirations gender gap narrows for high-performing students in stronger performance environments. We show that those effects are larger in countries that do not sort students into different educational tracks. PMID:25762961

  11. The role of school performance in narrowing gender gaps in the formation of STEM aspirations: a cross-national study.

    PubMed

    Mann, Allison; Legewie, Joscha; DiPrete, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    This study uses cross-national evidence to estimate the effect of school peer performance on the size of the gender gap in the formation of STEM career aspirations. We argue that STEM aspirations are influenced not only by gender stereotyping in the national culture but also by the performance of peers in the local school environment. Our analyses are based on the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA). They investigate whether 15-year-old students from 55 different countries expect to have STEM jobs at the age of 30. We find considerable gender differences in the plans to pursue careers in STEM occupations in all countries. Using PISA test scores in math and science aggregated at the school level as a measure of school performance, we find that stronger performance environments have a negative impact on student career aspirations in STEM. Although girls are less likely than boys to aspire to STEM occupations, even when they have comparable abilities, boys respond more than girls to competitive school performance environments. As a consequence, the aspirations gender gap narrows for high-performing students in stronger performance environments. We show that those effects are larger in countries that do not sort students into different educational tracks.

  12. Interplay between Sb flux and growth temperature during the formation of GaSb islands on GaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kazzi, S.; Desplanque, L.; Wallart, X.; Wang, Y.; Ruterana, P.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the influence of the Sb flux on the growth of GaSb islands on a highly mismatched (001) GaP substrate. Between low and medium Sb flux values, standard kinetics drives the GaSb island formation and their relaxation is progressively favored by 90° misfit dislocations at the GaSb/GaP interface. However, under high Sb flux, the GaSb islands are elongated in the [110] direction and their density decreases. Further experiments varying the growth temperature at fixed Sb flux confirm this finding. We relate this observation to an enhancement of Ga diffusion when the effective Sb flux on the surface is increased. This behavior is qualitatively explained by the large cohesive energy of Sb-Sb bonds present on the surface, which impede the Ga adatom incorporation.

  13. Evidence for Air-Seeding: Watching the Formation of Embolism in Conifer Xylem

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, S.; Kartusch, B.; Kikuta, S.

    2016-01-01

    Water transport in plants is based on a metastable system as the xylem “works” at negative water potentials (ψ). At critically low ψ, water columns can break and cause embolism. According to the air-seeding hypothesis, this occurs by air entry via the pits. We studied the formation of embolism in dehydrating xylem sections of Juniperus virginiana (Cupressaceae), which were monitored microscopically and via ultrasonic emission analyses. After replacement of water by air in outer tracheid layers, a complex movement of air-water menisci into tracheids was found. With decreasing ψ, pits started to aspirate and the speed of menisci movements increased. In one experiment, an airseeding event could be detected at a pit. The onset of ultrasonic activity was observed when pits started to close, and ultrasonic emission ceased at intense dehydration. Experiments clearly indicated that predictions of the air-seeding hypothesis are correct: At low ψ, pit mechanisms to prevent air entry failed and air spread into tracheids. ψ fluctuations caused complex movements of air-water menisci and pits, and at low ψ, air-seeding caused ultrasonic emissions. Main insights are presented in a video.

  14. Effect of pressure on structure and NO sub X formation in CO-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.; Miller, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of nitric oxide formation in a laminar CO-air diffusion flame over a pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The carbon monoxide (CO) issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port coaxially into a coflowing stream of air confined within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. Nitric oxide concentrations from the flame were measured at two carbon monoxide (fuel) flow rates: 73 standard cubic/min and 146 sccm. Comparison of the present data with data in the literature for a methane-air diffusion flame shows that for flames of comparable flame height (8 to 10 mm) and pseudoequivalence ratio (0.162), the molar emission index of a CO-air flame is significantly greater than that of a methane-air flame.

  15. Preliminary formation analysis for compressed air energy storage in depleted natural gas reservoirs :

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, William Payton

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an engineering and operational understanding of CAES performance for a depleted natural gas reservoir by evaluation of relative permeability effects of air, water and natural gas in depleted natural gas reservoirs as a reservoir is initially depleted, an air bubble is created, and as air is initially cycled. The composition of produced gases will be evaluated as the three phase flow of methane, nitrogen and brine are modeled. The effects of a methane gas phase on the relative permeability of air in a formation are investigated and the composition of the produced fluid, which consists primarily of the amount of natural gas in the produced air are determined. Simulations of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in depleted natural gas reservoirs were carried out to assess the effect of formation permeability on the design of a simple CAES system. The injection of N2 (as a proxy to air), and the extraction of the resulting gas mixture in a depleted natural gas reservoir were modeled using the TOUGH2 reservoir simulator with the EOS7c equation of state. The optimal borehole spacing was determined as a function of the formation scale intrinsic permeability. Natural gas reservoir results are similar to those for an aquifer. Borehole spacing is dependent upon the intrinsic permeability of the formation. Higher permeability allows increased injection and extraction rates which is equivalent to more power per borehole for a given screen length. The number of boreholes per 100 MW for a given intrinsic permeability in a depleted natural gas reservoir is essentially identical to that determined for a simple aquifer of identical properties. During bubble formation methane is displaced and a sharp N2methane boundary is formed with an almost pure N2 gas phase in the bubble near the borehole. During cycling mixing of methane and air occurs along the boundary as the air bubble boundary moves. The extracted gas mixture changes as a

  16. Air at hydrophobic surfaces and kinetics of three phase contact formation.

    PubMed

    Krasowska, M; Zawala, J; Malysa, K

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on the importance of air presence at hydrophobic solid surfaces for wetting film rupture and kinetics of three phase contact formation. Affinity to air is a typical feature of hydrophobic surfaces, but it has been often either overlooked or not taken into consideration. When the hydrophobic surface, contacted earlier with air, is immersed into water then air can stay attached to the surface. The origin of long range hydrophobic forces and data showing that these interactions were due to the bridging of nanobubbles attached to the hydrophobic surfaces are discussed. A major part of the review is devoted to the description and analysis of data showing that air (nano-, micro-bubbles and/or air film) present at a hydrophobic surface facilitated rupture of the liquid film and three phase contact formation during bubble collisions with flat Teflon plates of different surface roughness. Although all Teflon plates were highly hydrophobic (contact angles ca. 100 degrees -130 degrees ) the time of the three phase contact (TPC) formation and attachment of the colliding bubble was strongly affected by the plate surface roughness. The time of the TPC formation was shortened from over 80 down to 2-3 ms when the roughness was increased from below 1 microm to over 50 microm. Higher surface roughness means that larger amounts of air was entrapped during the Teflon plates' immersion in water. Additional experimental evidence is given, showing that facilitation of the TPC formation and the bubble attachment was due to air presence and re-distribution over the Teflon surfaces: i) prolonging the plate immersion time resulted in quicker attachment; ii) irregular and disappearing air pockets were recorded at a Teflon surface; iii) a satellite bubble left at a Teflon surface during the first collision facilitated the attachment; iv) attachment always occurred during the first collision in the case of a very rough "Teflon V" surface, but in highly concentrated n

  17. Excess air formation as a mechanism for delivering oxygen to groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mächler, L.; Peter, S.; Brennwald, M. S.; Kipfer, R.

    2013-10-01

    The temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of the concentrations of dissolved gases (He, Ar, Kr, N2, O2, and CO2) in an infiltrating groundwater system fed by the peri-alpine river Thur (Switzerland) were analyzed before, during and after a single, well-defined flood event. The analysis was based on measurements taken in five different groundwater observation wells that were located approximately 10 m apart and tapped the same groundwater body, but were situated in three different riparian zones. The input of O2 into the groundwater as a result of the formation of excess air was found to be of the same order of magnitude as that resulting from the advection of river water, although the amount of excess air formed and the amount of O2 delivered varied significantly among the riparian zones. The results suggest that the input of O2 into groundwater as a result of excess air formation is controlled not only by the hydraulic conditions prevailing in the river and the groundwater, but also by the thickness of the confining bed at the top of the aquifer. The sandy gravel aquifer itself is too coarse to trap a significant amount of air during the water level rise. The clay layer confining the aquifer, however, acts as a barrier hindering the escape of air from the subsoil to the surface, and hence is likely to be a key factor controlling the trapping and dissolution of air in groundwater.

  18. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  19. Experimental method to reveal the effect of rotor magnet size and air gap on artificial heart driving motor torque and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Qian, K X; Yuan, H Y; Ru, W M; Zeng, P

    2002-01-01

    To investigate experimentally the effect of rotor magnet design on artificial heart driving motor performance, seven rotors with different magnet lengths or thicknesses, as well as different peripheral angles, were manufactured and tested in the same motor stator with different rotating speeds. The input power (voltage and current) and output torque were measured and the motor efficiency was computed. The results demonstrated that the reduction of rotor magnet size and the enlargement of the air gap between the rotor magnets and the stator coil core have no significant effect on motor efficiency, but will reduce the torque value on which the motor achieves the highest efficiency; it could be remedied however by increasing the rotating speed, because the torque at the high efficiency point will increase along with the rotating speed. These results may provide a basis for developing small rotor magnets, large air gap and high efficiency motors for driving an artificial heart pump.

  20. Hydrophilic strips for preventing air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Munseok; Na, Yang; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2015-12-01

    In a microfluidic chamber, unwanted formation of air bubbles is a critical problem. Here, we present a hydrophilic strip array that prevents air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber. The array is located on the top surface of the chamber, which has a large variation in width, and consists of a repeated arrangement of super- and moderately hydrophilic strips. This repeated arrangement allows a flat meniscus (i.e. liquid front) to form when various solutions consisting of a single stream or two parallel streams with different hydrophilicities move through the chamber. The flat meniscus produced by the array completely prevents the formation of bubbles. Without the array in the chamber, the meniscus shape is highly convex, and bubbles frequently form in the chamber. This hydrophilic strip array will facilitate the use of a microfluidic chamber with a large variation in width for various microfluidic applications. PMID:26382942

  1. Hydrophilic strips for preventing air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber.

    PubMed

    Choi, Munseok; Na, Yang; Kim, Sung-Jin

    2015-12-01

    In a microfluidic chamber, unwanted formation of air bubbles is a critical problem. Here, we present a hydrophilic strip array that prevents air bubble formation in a microfluidic chamber. The array is located on the top surface of the chamber, which has a large variation in width, and consists of a repeated arrangement of super- and moderately hydrophilic strips. This repeated arrangement allows a flat meniscus (i.e. liquid front) to form when various solutions consisting of a single stream or two parallel streams with different hydrophilicities move through the chamber. The flat meniscus produced by the array completely prevents the formation of bubbles. Without the array in the chamber, the meniscus shape is highly convex, and bubbles frequently form in the chamber. This hydrophilic strip array will facilitate the use of a microfluidic chamber with a large variation in width for various microfluidic applications.

  2. A High-Latitude Winter Continental Low Cloud Feedback Suppresses Arctic Air Formation in Warmer Climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T.; Tziperman, E.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    High latitude continents have warmed much more rapidly in recent decades than the rest of the globe, especially in winter, and the maintenance of warm, frost-free conditions in continental interiors in winter has been a long-standing problem of past equable climates. It has also been found that the high-latitude lapse rate feedback plays an important role in Arctic amplification of climate change in climate model simulations, but we have little understanding of why lapse rates at high latitudes change so strongly with warming. To better understand these problems, we study Arctic air formation - the process by which a high-latitude maritime air mass is advected over a continent during polar night, cooled at the surface by radiation, and transformed into a much colder continental polar air mass - and its sensitivity to climate warming. We use a single-column version of the WRF model to conduct two-week simulations of the cooling process across a wide range of initial temperature profiles and microphysics schemes, and find that a low cloud feedback suppresses Arctic air formation in warmer climates. This cloud feedback consists of an increase in low cloud amount with warming, which shields the surface from radiative cooling, and increases the continental surface air temperature by roughly two degrees for each degree increase of the initial maritime surface air temperature. The time it takes for the surface air temperature to drop below freezing increases nonlinearly to ~10 days for initial maritime surface air temperatures of 20 oC. Given that this is about the time it takes an air mass starting over the Pacific to traverse the north American continent, this suggests that optically thick stratus cloud decks could help to maintain frost-free winter continental interiors in equable climates. We find that CMIP5 climate model runs show large increases in cloud water path and surface cloud longwave forcing in warmer climates, consistent with the proposed low-cloud feedback

  3. Format and basic geometry of a perspective display of air traffic for the cockpit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael Wallace; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The design and implementation of a perspective display of air traffic for the cockpit is discussed. Parameters of the perspective are variable and interactive so that the appearance of the projected image can be widely varied. This approach makes allowances for exploration of perspective parameters and their interactions. The display was initially used to study the cases of horizontal maneuver biases found in experiments involving a plan view air traffic display format. Experiments to determine the effect of perspective geometry on spatial judgements have evolved from the display program. Several scaling techniques and other adjustments to the perspective are used to tailor the geometry for effective presentation of 3-D traffic situations.

  4. A Novel 96well-formatted Micro-gap Plate Enabling Drug Response Profiling on Primary Tumour Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wei-Yuan; Hsiung, Lo-Chang; Wang, Chen-Ho; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Ching-Hung; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Wo, Andrew M.

    2015-04-01

    Drug-based treatments are the most widely used interventions for cancer management. Personalized drug response profiling remains inherently challenging with low cell count harvested from tumour sample. We present a 96well-formatted microfluidic plate with built-in micro-gap that preserves up to 99.2% of cells during multiple assay/wash operation and only 9,000 cells needed for a single reagent test (i.e. 1,000 cells per test spot x 3 selected concentration x triplication), enabling drug screening and compatibility with conventional automated workstations. Results with MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines showed that no statistical significance was found in dose-response between the device and conventional 96-well plate control. Primary tumour samples from breast cancer patients tested in the device also showed good IC50 prediction. With drug screening of primary cancer cells must consider a wide range of scenarios, e.g. suspended/attached cell types and rare/abundant cell availability, the device enables high throughput screening even for suspended cells with low cell count since the signature microfluidic cell-trapping feature ensures cell preservation in a multiple solution exchange protocol.

  5. Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine Employing Air Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    The effects of air flow on fuel spray and flame formation in a high-speed compression-ignition engine have been investigated by means of the NACA combustion apparatus. The process was studied by examining high-speed motion pictures taken at the rate of 2,200 frames a second. The combustion chamber was of the flat-disk type used in previous experiments with this apparatus. The air flow was produced by a rectangular displacer mounted on top of the engine piston. Three fuel-injection nozzles were tested: a 0.020-inch single-orifice nozzle, a 6-orifice nozzle, and a slit nozzle. The air velocity within the combustion chamber was estimated to reach a value of 425 feet a second. The results show that in no case was the form of the fuel spray completely destroyed by the air jet although in some cases the direction of the spray was changed and the spray envelope was carried away by the moving air. The distribution of the fuel in the combustion chamber of a compression-ignition engine can be regulated to some extent by the design of the combustion chamber, by the design of the fuel-injection nozzle, and by the use of air flow.

  6. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti(3+) state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti(3+), Ti(4+), O(2-), oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift. PMID:27572095

  7. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-08-01

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti3+, Ti4+, O2‑, oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift.

  8. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti3+ state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti3+, Ti4+, O2−, oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti3+ and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift. PMID:27572095

  9. Formation of oxygen vacancies and Ti(3+) state in TiO2 thin film and enhanced optical properties by air plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Bandna; Kumar, Santosh; Lee, Heung-No; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-08-30

    This is the first time we report that simply air plasma treatment can also enhances the optical absorbance and absorption region of titanium oxide (TiO2) films, while keeping them transparent. TiO2 thin films having moderate doping of Fe and Co exhibit significant enhancement in the aforementioned optical properties upon air plasma treatment. The moderate doping could facilitate the formation of charge trap centers or avoid the formation of charge recombination centers. Variation in surface species viz. Ti(3+), Ti(4+), O(2-), oxygen vacancies, OH group and optical properties was studied using X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The air plasma treatment caused enhanced optical absorbance and optical absorption region as revealed by the formation of Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies in the band gap of TiO2 films. The samples were treated in plasma with varying treatment time from 0 to 60 seconds. With the increasing treatment time, Ti(3+) and oxygen vacancies increased in the Fe and Co doped TiO2 films leading to increased absorbance; however, the increase in optical absorption region/red shift (from 3.22 to 3.00 eV) was observed in Fe doped TiO2 films, on the contrary Co doped TiO2 films exhibited blue shift (from 3.36 to 3.62 eV) due to Burstein Moss shift.

  10. Low clouds suppress Arctic air formation and amplify high-latitude continental winter warming

    PubMed Central

    Cronin, Timothy W.; Tziperman, Eli

    2015-01-01

    High-latitude continents have warmed much more rapidly in recent decades than the rest of the globe, especially in winter, and the maintenance of warm, frost-free conditions in continental interiors in winter has been a long-standing problem of past equable climates. We use an idealized single-column atmospheric model across a range of conditions to study the polar night process of air mass transformation from high-latitude maritime air, with a prescribed initial temperature profile, to much colder high-latitude continental air. We find that a low-cloud feedback—consisting of a robust increase in the duration of optically thick liquid clouds with warming of the initial state—slows radiative cooling of the surface and amplifies continental warming. This low-cloud feedback increases the continental surface air temperature by roughly two degrees for each degree increase of the initial maritime surface air temperature, effectively suppressing Arctic air formation. The time it takes for the surface air temperature to drop below freezing increases nonlinearly to ∼10 d for initial maritime surface air temperatures of 20 °C. These results, supplemented by an analysis of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 climate model runs that shows large increases in cloud water path and surface cloud longwave forcing in warmer climates, suggest that the “lapse rate feedback” in simulations of anthropogenic climate change may be related to the influence of low clouds on the stratification of the lower troposphere. The results also indicate that optically thick stratus cloud decks could help to maintain frost-free winter continental interiors in equable climates. PMID:26324919

  11. Low clouds suppress Arctic air formation and amplify high-latitude continental winter warming.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Timothy W; Tziperman, Eli

    2015-09-15

    High-latitude continents have warmed much more rapidly in recent decades than the rest of the globe, especially in winter, and the maintenance of warm, frost-free conditions in continental interiors in winter has been a long-standing problem of past equable climates. We use an idealized single-column atmospheric model across a range of conditions to study the polar night process of air mass transformation from high-latitude maritime air, with a prescribed initial temperature profile, to much colder high-latitude continental air. We find that a low-cloud feedback--consisting of a robust increase in the duration of optically thick liquid clouds with warming of the initial state--slows radiative cooling of the surface and amplifies continental warming. This low-cloud feedback increases the continental surface air temperature by roughly two degrees for each degree increase of the initial maritime surface air temperature, effectively suppressing Arctic air formation. The time it takes for the surface air temperature to drop below freezing increases nonlinearly to ∼ 10 d for initial maritime surface air temperatures of 20 °C. These results, supplemented by an analysis of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 climate model runs that shows large increases in cloud water path and surface cloud longwave forcing in warmer climates, suggest that the "lapse rate feedback" in simulations of anthropogenic climate change may be related to the influence of low clouds on the stratification of the lower troposphere. The results also indicate that optically thick stratus cloud decks could help to maintain frost-free winter continental interiors in equable climates.

  12. Effects of Air-Fuel Spray and Flame Formation in a Compression-Ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Waldron, C D

    1937-01-01

    High-speed motion pictures were taken at the rate of 2,500 frames per second of the fuel spray and flame formation in the combustion chamber of the NACA combustion apparatus. The compression ratio was 13.2 and the speed 1,500 revolutions per minute. An optical indicator was used to record the time-pressure relationship in the combustion chamber. The air-fuel ratio was varied from 10.4 to 365. The results showed that as the air-fuel ratio was increased definite stratification of the charge occurred in the combustion chamber even though moderate air flow existed. The results also showed the rate of vapor diffusion to be relatively slow.

  13. Interactions of fire emissions and urban pollution over California: Ozone formation and air quality simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, H. B.; Cai, C.; Kaduwela, A.; Weinheimer, A.; Wisthaler, A.

    2012-09-01

    An instrumented DC-8 aircraft was employed to perform airborne observations in rural and urban environs of California during the summer 2008 NASA ARCTAS-CARB campaign. The fortuitous occurrence of large wildfire episodes in Northern California allowed for studies of fire emissions, their composition, and their interactions with rural and urban air. Relative to CO, emissions of HCN were shown to vary non-linearly with fire characteristics while those of CH3CN were nearly unchanged, making the latter a superior quantitative tracer of biomass combustion. Although some fire plumes over California contained little NOx and virtually no O3 enhancement, others contained ample VOCs and sufficient NOx, largely from urban influences, to result in significant ozone formation. The highest observed O3 mixing ratios (170 ppb) were also in fire-influenced urban air masses. Attempts to simulate these interactions using CMAQ, a high-resolution state of the art air quality model, were only minimally successful and indicated several shortcomings in simulating fire emission influences on urban smog formation. A variety of secondary oxidation products (e.g. O3, PAN, HCHO) were substantially underestimated in fire-influenced air masses. Available data involving fire plumes and anthropogenic pollution interactions are presently quite sparse and additional observational and mechanistic studies are needed.

  14. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, B. B.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Ortega, A. M.; Day, D. A.; Kaser, L.; Jud, W.; Karl, T.; Hansel, A.; Hunter, J. F.; Cross, E. S.; Kroll, J. H.; Peng, Z.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-11-01

    Ambient air was oxidized by OH radicals in an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) located in a montane pine forest during the BEACHON-RoMBAS campaign to study biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and aging. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semi-continuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative time scales of condensation of low volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles, condensational loss to the walls, and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 4 μg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 1 μg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4-1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene + p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 LT. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic compounds, and net production at lower ages followed by net consumption of terpenoid oxidation products as photochemical age increased. New particle formation was observed in the reactor after oxidation, especially during times when precursor gas concentrations and SOA formation were largest. Approximately 6 times more SOA was formed in the reactor from OH oxidation than

  15. Wintertime Air Quality Impacts from Oil and Natural Gas Drilling Operations in the Bakken Formation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanoski-Cole, Ashley; Sive, Barkley; Zhou, Yong; Prenni, Anthony; Schurman, Misha; Day, Derek; Sullivan, Amy; Li, Yi; Hand, Jenny; Gebhart, Kristi; Schichtel, Bret; Collett, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    Oil and natural gas extraction has dramatically increased in the last decade in the United States due to the increased use of unconventional drilling techniques which include horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. The impact of these drilling activities on local and regional air quality in oil and gas basins across the country are still relatively unknown, especially in recently developed basins such as the Bakken shale formation. This study is the first to conduct a comprehensive characterization of the regional air quality in the Bakken region. The Bakken shale formation, part of the Williston basin, is located in North Dakota and Montana in the United States and Saskatchewan and Manitoba in Canada. Oil and gas drilling operations can impact air quality in a variety of ways, including the generation of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), hazardous air pollutants, ozone, and greenhouse gas emissions. During the winter especially, PM formation can be enhanced and meteorological conditions can favor increased concentrations of PM and other pollutants. In this study, ground-based measurements throughout the Bakken region in North Dakota and Montana were collected over two consecutive winters to gain regional trends of air quality impacts from the oil and gas drilling activities. Additionally, one field site had a comprehensive suite of instrumentation operating at high time resolution to gain detailed characterization of the atmospheric composition. Measurements included organic carbon and black carbon concentrations in PM, the characterization of inorganic PM, inorganic gases, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), precipitation and meteorology. These elevated PM episodes were further investigated using the local meteorological conditions and regional transport patterns. Episodes of elevated concentrations of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide were also detected. The VOC concentrations were analyzed and specific VOCs that are known oil and gas tracers were used

  16. Introduction: Special Issue of Air Quality, Atmosphere and Health for Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Source-to-Health Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has established the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for six principal air pollutants (criteria pollutants): carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter in two size ranges [less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and less ...

  17. Special Issue of Inhalation Toxicology for Air Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources-to-Health Outcomes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pollution and Health: Bridging the Gap from Sources to Health Outcomes”, an international specialty conference by the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR) (http://aaar.2010specialty.org/), provided one such opportunity for these interactions. The Conference was organi...

  18. In vitro synchrotron-based radiography of micro-gap formation at the implant–abutment interface of two-piece dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Rack, A.; Rack, T.; Stiller, M.; Riesemeier, H.; Zabler, S.; Nelson, K.

    2010-01-01

    Micro-gap formation at the implant–abutment interface of two-piece dental implants was investigated in vitro using high-resolution radiography in combination with hard X-ray synchrotron radiation. Images were taken with the specimen under different mechanical loads of up to 100 N. The aim of this investigation was to prove the existence of micro-gaps for implants with conical connections as well as to study the mechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. Synchrotron-based radiography in comparison with classical laboratory radiography yields high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when exploiting micro-sized features in highly attenuating objects. The first illustration of a micro-gap which was previously indistinguishable by laboratory methods underlines that the complex micro-mechanical behavior of implants requires further in vitro investigations where synchrotron-based micro-imaging is one of the prerequisites. PMID:20157285

  19. On the mechanism of zirconium nitride formation by zirconium, zirconia and yttria burning in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malikova, Ekaterina; Pautova, Julia; Gromov, Alexander; Monogarov, Konstantin; Larionov, Kirill; Teipel, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    The combustion of Zr and (Zr+ZrO2) powdery mixtures in air was accompanied by major ZrN stabilization. The synthesis of cheap ZrN with the high yield in air was facile and utile. The influence of Y2O3 additive on the content of ZrN the solid combustion products (SCP) was investigated. The reagents and SCP were analyzed by BET, DTA-TGA, XRD, SEM and EDS. Burning temperature was measured by thermal imager. The yield of ZrN in the SCP has been varied by the time regulation of the combustion process. The burning samples were quenched at a certain time to avoid the re-oxidation of the obtained ZrN by oxygen. The quenching of the burned (Zr+ZrO2) samples with the Y2O3 additive was allowed increasing the ZrN yield in SCP up to 66 wt%. The chemical mechanism of ZrN formation in air was discussed and the probable source of ZrN massive formation is suggested.

  20. Formation and growth of indoor air aerosol particles as a result of D-limonene oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartiainen, E.; Kulmala, M.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Taipale, R.; Rinne, J.; Vehkamäki, H.

    Oxidation of D-limonene, which is a common monoterpene, can lead to new aerosol particle formation in indoor environments. Thus, products containing D-limonene, such as citrus fruits, air refresheners, household cleaning agents, and waxes, can act as indoor air aerosol particle sources. We released D-limonene into the room air by peeling oranges and measured the concentration of aerosol particles of three different size ranges. In addition, we measured the concentration of D-limonene, the oxidant, and the concentration of ozone, the oxidizing gas. Based on the measurements we calculated the growth rate of the small aerosol particles, which were 3-10 nm in diameter, to be about 6300nmh-1, and the losses of the aerosol particles that were due to the coagulation and condensation processes. From these, we further approximated the concentration of the condensable vapour and its source rate and then calculated the formation rate of the small aerosol particles. For the final result, we calculated the nucleation rate and the maximum number of molecules in a critical cluster. The nucleation rate was in the order of 105cm-3s-1 and the number of molecules in a critical-sized cluster became 1.2. The results were in agreement with the activation theory.

  1. Effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas-turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet-air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen from a gas-turbine combustor. Combustor inlet-air temperature ranged from 450 F to 1050 F. The tests were run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NO sub x emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet-air humidity at a constant exponential rate of 19 percent per mass percent water vapor in the air. This decrease of NO sub x emission index with increasing humidity was found to be independent of inlet-air temperature.

  2. The effect of dentin pre-treatment and heat-augmented cure on marginal gap formation of a dentin bonding agent.

    PubMed

    Zidan, O; Ross, G; Lee, I K; Gomez-Marin, O; Yeh, S H

    1991-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of enhancing the cure of a DBA and the effect of dentin surface pre-treatment on marginal gap formation. Dentin cavities were prepared on extracted teeth and were pre-treated either with EDTA or phosphoric acid. Marginal leakage was expressed as percent length of margins with gaps. The mean percent length of margins with gaps for the chemically cured groups ranged from a maximum of 97% to a minimum of 85%. For the chemical/thermal-cured group, the mean percent length of margins with gaps was 95%, 95%, 73%, 35%, and 65%, corresponding to the following: pretreatment, no pre-treatment, EDTA, and phosphoric acid for 60, 15, or five s, respectively. SEM micrographs showed partial removal of one smear layer with EDTA and total removal of the smear layers with phosphoric acid. It is concluded that dentin pre-treatment methods have an effect on the percent length of margins with gaps when the DBA used had its cure supplemented with heat.

  3. Effects of flow on insulin fibril formation at an air/water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, David; Heldt, Caryn; Sorci, Mirco; Belfort, Georges; Hirsa, Amir

    2009-11-01

    The amyloid fibril formation process, which is implicated in several diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's, is characterized by the conversion of monomers to oligomers and then to fibrils. Besides well-studied factors such as pH, temperature and concentration, the kinetics of this process are significantly influenced by the presence of solid or fluid interfaces and by flow. By studying the nucleation and growth of a model system (insulin fibrils) in a well-defined flow field with an air/water interface, we can identify the flow conditions that impact protein aggregation kinetics both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface. The present flow system (deep-channel surface viscometer) consists of an annular region bounded by stationary inner and outer cylinders, an air/water interface, and a floor driven at constant rotation. We show the effects of Reynolds number on the kinetics of the fibrillation process both in the bulk solution and at the air/water interface, as well as on the structure of the resultant amyloid aggregates.

  4. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    DOE PAGES

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; et al

    2016-03-08

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen–Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed formore » semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m−3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4–1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of

  5. In situ secondary organic aerosol formation from ambient pine forest air using an oxidation flow reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Brett B.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Ortega, Amber M.; Day, Douglas A.; Kaser, Lisa; Jud, Werner; Karl, Thomas; Hansel, Armin; Hunter, James F.; Cross, Eben S.; Kroll, Jesse H.; Peng, Zhe; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-03-01

    An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) is a vessel inside which the concentration of a chosen oxidant can be increased for the purpose of studying SOA formation and aging by that oxidant. During the BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen-Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) field campaign, ambient pine forest air was oxidized by OH radicals in an OFR to measure the amount of SOA that could be formed from the real mix of ambient SOA precursor gases, and how that amount changed with time as precursors changed. High OH concentrations and short residence times allowed for semicontinuous cycling through a large range of OH exposures ranging from hours to weeks of equivalent (eq.) atmospheric aging. A simple model is derived and used to account for the relative timescales of condensation of low-volatility organic compounds (LVOCs) onto particles; condensational loss to the walls; and further reaction to produce volatile, non-condensing fragmentation products. More SOA production was observed in the OFR at nighttime (average 3 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected) compared to daytime (average 0.9 µg m-3 when LVOC fate corrected), with maximum formation observed at 0.4-1.5 eq. days of photochemical aging. SOA formation followed a similar diurnal pattern to monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and toluene+p-cymene concentrations, including a substantial increase just after sunrise at 07:00 local time. Higher photochemical aging (> 10 eq. days) led to a decrease in new SOA formation and a loss of preexisting OA due to heterogeneous oxidation followed by fragmentation and volatilization. When comparing two different commonly used methods of OH production in OFRs (OFR185 and OFR254-70), similar amounts of SOA formation were observed. We recommend the OFR185 mode for future forest studies. Concurrent gas-phase measurements of air after OH oxidation illustrate the decay of primary VOCs, production of small oxidized organic

  6. Shock Separation and Dead-Zone Formation from Detonations in an Internal Air-Well Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molitoris, John; Andreski, Henry; Garza, Raul; Batteux, Jan; Vitello, Peter; Souers, Clark

    2007-06-01

    Here we report on measurements of dead-zone formation due to shock separation from detonations attempting to corner-turn in an internal air-well geometry. This geometry is also known as a ``hockey-puck'' configuration. These measurements were performed on detonations in LX-17 and PBX9502 using time sequence radiography to image the event with surface contact timing pins as an additional diagnostic. In addition to an open corner in the high-explosive component we also examined the effects of steel defining the corner. In these experiments we find a long lived dead-zone consisting of shocked explosive that persists to very late times. Data and numerical modeling will be presented in addition to a comparison with previous work using an external air well. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  7. On the mechanism of zirconium nitride formation by zirconium, zirconia and yttria burning in air

    SciTech Connect

    Malikova, Ekaterina; Pautova, Julia; Gromov, Alexander; Monogarov, Konstantin; Larionov, Kirill; Teipel, Ulrich

    2015-10-15

    The combustion of Zr and (Zr+ZrO{sub 2}) powdery mixtures in air was accompanied by major ZrN stabilization. The synthesis of cheap ZrN with the high yield in air was facile and utile. The influence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive on the content of ZrN the solid combustion products (SCP) was investigated. The reagents and SCP were analyzed by BET, DTA–TGA, XRD, SEM and EDS. Burning temperature was measured by thermal imager. The yield of ZrN in the SCP has been varied by the time regulation of the combustion process. The burning samples were quenched at a certain time to avoid the re-oxidation of the obtained ZrN by oxygen. The quenching of the burned (Zr+ZrO{sub 2}) samples with the Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive was allowed increasing the ZrN yield in SCP up to 66 wt%. The chemical mechanism of ZrN formation in air was discussed and the probable source of ZrN massive formation is suggested. - Highlights: • Combustion of Zr, (Zr+ZrO{sub 2}) and (Zr+ZrO{sub 2}+Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) powdery mixtures in air was studied. • The new combustion phenomenon has been found: metal (Zr) chemically reacts with its oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) in the burning wave. • The effective influence of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} additive (2–3 wt%) on ZrN yield in combustion products is shown. • The yield of ZrN in the combustion products can be varied by the burning time regulation (quenching)

  8. X-ray and runaway electron generation in repetitive pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure air with a point-to-plane gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Tao; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Zhang, Cheng; Shut'ko, Yuliya V.; Yan, Ping

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, using two repetitive nanosecond generators, x-rays were detected in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a point-to- plane gap. The rise times of the generators were about 15 and 1 ns. The x-rays were directly measured by various dosimeters and a NaI scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. X-rays were detected in the continuous mode at pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz and a voltage pulse rise time of ˜15 ns. It is shown that the maximum x-ray intensity is attainable at different pulse repetition frequencies depending on the voltage pulse parameters and cathode design. In atmospheric pressure air the x-ray intensity is found to increase with increasing the pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz. It is confirmed that the maximum x-ray intensity is attained in a diffuse discharge in a point-to-plane gap.

  9. X-ray and runaway electron generation in repetitive pulsed discharges in atmospheric pressure air with a point-to-plane gap

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Tao; Yan Ping; Tarasenko, Victor F.; Shut'ko, Yuliya V.; Zhang Cheng

    2011-05-15

    In this paper, using two repetitive nanosecond generators, x-rays were detected in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a point-to- plane gap. The rise times of the generators were about 15 and 1 ns. The x-rays were directly measured by various dosimeters and a NaI scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. X-rays were detected in the continuous mode at pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz and a voltage pulse rise time of {approx}15 ns. It is shown that the maximum x-ray intensity is attainable at different pulse repetition frequencies depending on the voltage pulse parameters and cathode design. In atmospheric pressure air the x-ray intensity is found to increase with increasing the pulse repetition frequency up to 1 kHz. It is confirmed that the maximum x-ray intensity is attained in a diffuse discharge in a point-to-plane gap.

  10. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  11. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  12. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  13. Formation of calcium in the products of iron oxide-aluminum thermite combustion in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromov, A. A.; Gromov, A. M.; Popenko, E. M.; Sergienko, A. V.; Sabinskaya, O. G.; Raab, B.; Teipel, U.

    2016-10-01

    The composition of condensed products resulting from the combustion of thermite mixtures (Al + Fe2O3) in air is studied by precise methods. It is shown that during combustion, calcium is formed and stabilized in amounts of maximal 0.55 wt %, while is missing from reactants of 99.7 wt % purity. To explain this, it is hypothesized that a low-energy nuclear reaction takes place alongside the reactions of aluminum oxidation and nitridation, resulting in the formation of calcium (Kervran-Bolotov reaction).

  14. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥0.5more » eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.« less

  15. Pseudogap formation and unusual quasiparticle tunneling in cuprate superconductors: Polaronic and multiple-gap effects on the tunneling spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzhumanov, S.; Ganiev, O. K.; Djumanov, Sh. S.

    2013-10-01

    We propose new simple and generalized multiple-gap models of quasiparticle tunneling across the high-Tc cuprate superconductor (HTSC)/insulator/normal metal (SIN) junction based on the two different mechanisms for tunneling at positive and negative bias voltages, and the gap inhomogeneity (i.e., multiple-gap) picture. The tunneling of electrons from the normal metal into the quasiparticle states in HTSC with the BCS-type density of states (DOSs) takes place at V>0, while the tunneling of Cooper pairs and large polarons from the HTSC with the BCS DOS and quasi-free state DOS (which appears only in the dissociation of polarons) into the normal metal occurs at V<0. We show that most of the unusual features of tunneling spectra such as nearly U- and V-shaped subgap features, peak-dip-hump structure (appearing systematically at V<0) and asymmetry of the conductance peaks and their temperature and doping dependences, and shoulder-like features inside the main conductance peaks arise naturally in our specific models of SIN tunneling. The experimental tunneling spectra of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ are adequately reproduced by using the specific multiple-gap models and taking into account the distribution of BCS and polaronic gap values.

  16. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥ 0.5 eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.

  17. Formation of quantum spin Hall state on Si surface and energy gap scaling with strength of spin orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Miao; Ming, Wenmei; Liu, Zheng; Wang, Zhengfei; Yao, Yugui; Liu, Feng

    2014-11-19

    For potential applications in spintronics and quantum computing, it is desirable to place a quantum spin Hall insulator [i.e., a 2D topological insulator (TI)] on a substrate while maintaining a large energy gap. Here, we demonstrate a unique approach to create the large-gap 2D TI state on a semiconductor surface, based on first-principles calculations and effective Hamiltonian analysis. We show that when heavy elements with strong spin orbit coupling (SOC) such as Bi and Pb atoms are deposited on a patterned H-Si(111) surface into a hexagonal lattice, they exhibit a 2D TI state with a large energy gap of ≥0.5 eV. The TI state arises from an intriguing substrate orbital filtering effect that selects a suitable orbital composition around the Fermi level, so that the system can be matched onto a four-band effective model Hamiltonian. Furthermore, it is found that within this model, the SOC gap does not increase monotonically with the increasing strength of SOC. These interesting results may shed new light in future design and fabrication of large-gap topological quantum states.

  18. Advection fog formation and aerosols produced by combustion-originated air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liaw, G. S.; Vaughan, O. H., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The way in which pollutants produced by the photochemical reaction of NO(X) and SO(X) affect the quality of the human environment through such phenomena as the formation of advection fog is considered. These pollutants provide the major source of condensation nuclei for the formation of fog in highways, airports and seaports. Results based on the monodisperse, multicomponent aerosol model show that: (1) condensation nuclei can grow and form a dense fog without the air having attained supersaturation; (2) the mass concentration range for NO(X) is one-third that of SO(X); and (3) the greater the mass concentration, the particle concentration, and the radius of condensation nuclei, the denser the fog that is formed.

  19. Thermal decomposition of captan and formation pathways of toxic air pollutants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Mackie, John C; Kennedy, Eric M; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2010-06-01

    This study investigates the thermal decomposition of a widely used fungicide, captan, under gas phase conditions, similar to those occurring in fires, cigarette burning, and combustion of biomass treated or contaminated with pesticides. The laboratory-scale apparatus consisted of a plug flow reactor equipped with sampling trains for gaseous, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and condensed products, with analysis performed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), respectively. Under oxidative conditions, the thermal decomposition of captan generated gaseous pollutants including carbon disulfide, thiophosgene, phosgene, and hydrogen cyanide. The VOC analysis revealed the formation of tetrachloroethylene, hexachloroethane, and benzonitrile. Quantum chemical calculations indicated that captan decomposes unimolecularly, via fission of the C-S bond, with the ensuing radicals reacting with O(2). The results of the present study provide an improved understanding of the formation pathways of toxic air pollutants in the accidental or deliberate combustion of captan.

  20. A Feasibility Study on Operating Large Scale Compressed Air Energy Storage in Porous Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Pfeiffer, W. T.; Li, D.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous formations has been considered as one promising option of large scale energy storage for decades. This study, hereby, aims at analyzing the feasibility of operating large scale CAES in porous formations and evaluating the performance of underground porous gas reservoirs. To address these issues quantitatively, a hypothetic CAES scenario with a typical anticline structure in northern Germany was numerically simulated. Because of the rapid growth in photovoltaics, the period of extraction in a daily cycle was set to the early morning and the late afternoon in order to bypass the massive solar energy production around noon. The gas turbine scenario was defined referring to the specifications of the Huntorf CAES power plant. The numerical simulations involved two stages, i.e. initial fill and cyclic operation, and both were carried out using the Eclipse E300 simulator (Schlumberger). Pressure loss in the gas wells was post analyzed using an analytical solution. The exergy concept was applied to evaluate the potential energy amount stored in the specific porous formation. The simulation results show that porous formations prove to be a feasible solution of large scale CAES. The initial fill with shut-in periods determines the spatial distribution of the gas phase and helps to achieve higher gas saturation around the wells, and thus higher deliverability. The performance evaluation shows that the overall exergy flow of stored compressed air is also determined by the permeability, which directly affects the deliverability of the gas reservoir and thus the number of wells required.

  1. Electronic Characterization of Defects in Narrow Gap Semiconductors-Comparison of Electronic Energy Levels and Formation Energies in Mercury Cadmium Telluride, Mercury Zinc Telluride, and Mercury Zinc Selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1996-01-01

    We have used a Green's function technique to calculate the energy levels and formation energy of deep defects in the narrow gap semiconductors mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT) and mercury zinc selenide (MZS). The formation energy is calculated from the difference between the total energy with an impurity cluster and the total energy for the perfect crystal. Substitutional (including antisite), interstitial (self and foreign), and vacancy deep defects are considered. Relaxation effects are calculated (with molecular dynamics). By use of a pseudopotential, we generalize the ideal vacancy model so as to be able to consider relaxation for vacancies. Different charge states are considered and the charged state energy shift (as computed by a modified Haldane-Anderson model) can be twice that due to relaxation. Different charged states for vacancies were not calculated to have much effect on the formation energy. For all cases we find deep defects in the energy gap only for cation site s-like orbitals or anion site p-like orbitals, and for the substitutional case only the latter are appreciably effected by relaxation. For most cases for MCT, MZT, MZS, we consider x (the concentration of Cd or Zn) in the range appropriate for a band gap of 0.1 eV. For defect energy levels, the absolute accuracy of our results is limited, but the precision is good, and hence chemical trends are accurately predicted. For the same reason, defect formation energies are more accurately predicted than energy level position. We attempt, in Appendix B, to calculate vacancy formation energies using relatively simple chemical bonding ideas due to Harrison. However, these results are only marginally accurate for estimating vacancy binding energies. Appendix C lists all written reports and publications produced for the grant. We include abstracts and a complete paper that summarizes our work which is not yet available.

  2. The relationship between ozone formation and air temperature in the atmospheric surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belan, Boris D.; Savkin, Denis; Tolmachev, Gennadii

    2016-04-01

    Studying the formation and dynamics of ozone in the atmosphere is important due to several reasons. First, the contribution of tropospheric ozone to the global greenhouse effect is only slightly less than that of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. Second, tropospheric ozone acts as a strong poison that has negative effects on human health, animals, and vegetation. Third, being a potent oxidizer, ozone destroys almost all materials, including platinum group metals and compounds. Fourthly, ozone is formed in situ from precursors as a result of photochemical processes, but not emitted into the atmosphere by any industrial enterprises directly. In this work, we present some results of the study aimed at the revealing relationship between ozone formation rate and surface air temperature in the background atmosphere. It has been found that this relationship is nonlinear. Analysis of the possible reasons showed that the nonlinear character of this relationship may be due to a nonlinear increase in the reaction constants versus air temperature and a quadratic increase in the concentration of hydrocarbons with increasing temperature. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science contract no.14.613.21.0013 (ID: RFMEFI61314X0013).

  3. Biofilm Formation Derived from Ambient Air and the Characteristics of Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanematsu, H.; Kougo, H.; Kuroda, D.; Itho, H.; Ogino, Y.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2013-04-01

    Biofilm is a kind of thin film on solidified matters, being derived from bacteria. Generally, planktonic bacteria float in aqueous environments, soil or air, most of which can be regarded as oligotrophic environments. Since they have to survive by instinct, they seek for nutrients that would exist on materials surfaces as organic matters. Therefore, bacteria attach materials surfaces reversibly. The attachment and detachment repeat for a while and finally, they attach on them irreversibly and the number of bacteria on them increases. At a threshold number, bacteria produce polymeric matters at the same time by quorum sensing mechanism and the biofilm produces on material surfaces. The biofilm produced in that way generally contains water (more than 80%), EPS (Exopolymeric Substance) and bacteria themselves. And they might bring about many industrial problems, fouling, corrosion etc. Therefore, it is very important for us to control and prevent the biofilm formation properly. However, it is generally very hard to produce biofilm experimentally and constantly in ambient atmosphere on labo scale. The authors invented an apparatus where biofilm could form on specimen's surfaces from house germs in the ambient air. In this experiment, we investigated the basic characteristics of the apparatus, reproducibility, the change of biofilm with experimental time, the quality change of water for biofilm formation and their significance for biofilm research.

  4. Formation, disruption and mechanical properties of a rigid hydrophobin film at an air-water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Lynn; Kirby, Stephanie; Anna, Shelley; CMU Team

    Hydrophobins are small, globular proteins with distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions that make them extremely surface active. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential industrial applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams and emulsions, and as dispersants. Practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, both individually and in the presence of surfactants. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been shown to strongly stabilize air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. In this work, we characterize the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to strongly, irreversibly adsorb at air/water interfaces; the magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure, until the CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the addition of SDS, a strong surfactant, to the bulk. SDS is found to co-adsorb to interfaces pre-coated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU. These results lend insight into the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. Funding from GoMRI.

  5. Effect of nitric oxide on photochemical ozone formation in mixtures of air with molecular chlorine and with trichlorofluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittker, D. A.; Wong, E. L.

    1978-01-01

    Ozone formation in a reaction chamber at room temperature and atmospheric pressure were studied for the photolysis of mixtures of NO with either Cl2 or CFCl3 in air. Both Cl2 + NO and CFCl3 + NO in air strongly inhibited O3 formation during the entire 3 to 4 hour reaction. A chemical mechanism that explains the results was presented. An important part of this mechanism was the formation and destruction of chlorine nitrate. Computations were performed with this same mechanism for CFCl3-NO-air mixtures at stratospheric temperatures, pressures, and concentrations. Results showed large reductions in steady-state O3 concentrations in these mixtures as compared with pure air.

  6. The School Age Gender Gap in Reading Achievement: Examining the Influences of Item Format and Intrinsic Reading Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwabe, Franziska; McElvany, Nele; Trendtel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The importance of reading competence for both individuals and society underlines the strong need to understand the gender gap in reading achievement. Beyond mean differences in reading comprehension, research has indicated that girls possess specific advantages on constructed-response items compared with boys of the same reading ability. Moreover,…

  7. Experimental investigations on decay heat removal in advanced nuclear reactors using single heater rod test facility: Air alone in the annular gap

    SciTech Connect

    Bopche, Santosh B.; Sridharan, Arunkumar

    2010-11-15

    During a loss of coolant accident in nuclear reactors, radiation heat transfer accounts for a significant amount of the total heat transfer in the fuel bundle. In case of heavy water moderator nuclear reactors, the decay heat of a fuel bundle enclosed in the pressure tube and outer concentric calandria tube can be transferred to the moderator. Radiation heat transfer plays a significant role in removal of decay heat from the fuel rods to the moderator, which is available outside the calandria tube. A single heater rod test facility is designed and fabricated as a part of preliminary investigations. The objective is to anticipate the capability of moderator to remove decay heat, from the reactor core, generated after shut down. The present paper focuses mainly on the role of moderator in removal of decay heat, for situation with air alone in the annular gap of pressure tube and calandria tube. It is seen that the naturally aspirated air is capable of removing the heat generated in the system compared to the standstill air or stagnant water situations. It is also seen that the flowing moderator is capable of removing a greater fraction of heat generated by the heater rod compared to a stagnant pool of boiling moderator. (author)

  8. Indirect effects of emerald ash borer-induced ash mortality and canopy gap formation on epigaeic beetles.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Kamal J K; Smith, Annemarie; Hartzler, Diane M; Herms, Daniel A

    2014-06-01

    Exotic herbivorous insects have drastically and irreversibly altered forest structure and composition of North American forests. For example, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) from Asia has caused wide-scale mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in eastern United States and Canada. We studied the effects of forest changes resulting from emerald ash borer invasion on epigaeic or ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) along a gradient of ash dieback and gap sizes in southeastern Michigan. Ground beetles were sampled in hydric, mesic, and xeric habitats in which black (Fraxinus nigra Marshall), green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall), and white (Fraxinus americana L.) ash were the most common species, respectively. During 2006-2007, we trapped 2,545 adult ground beetles comprising 52 species. There was a negative correlation between percent ash tree mortality in 2006 and catches of all beetles. Catches of Agonum melanarium Dejean (in 2006) and Pterostichus mutus (Say) (in 2006-2007) were negatively correlated with tree mortality and gap size, respectively. However, catches of Pterostichus corvinus Dejean were positively correlated with gap size in 2006. As ash mortality and average gap size increased from 2006 to 2007, catches of all beetles as well as P. mutus and Pterostichus stygicus (Say) increased (1.3-3.9 times), while species diversity decreased, especially in mesic and xeric stands. Cluster analysis revealed that beetle assemblages in hydric and mesic stand diverged (25 and 40%, respectively) in their composition from 2006 to 2007, and that hydric stands had the most unique beetle assemblages. Overall, epigaeic beetle assemblages were altered in ash stands impacted by emerald ash borer; however, these impacts may dissipate as canopy gaps close. PMID:24690169

  9. Involvement of the adrenal glands and testis in gap junction formation via testosterone within the male rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Eisuke; Wada, Ikuo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Wakabayashi, Kenjiro; Ito, Kinya; Soji, Tsuyoshi; Herbert, Damon C

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the influence of testicular and adrenal androgens on the presence of gap junctions between folliculo-stellate cells in the anterior pituitary glands of 60-day-old Wistar-Imamichi strain male rats. The animals were separated into six groups: Group A served as the controls and had free access to a normal diet and water, Group B was given a normal diet and 0.9% NaCl for their drinking water as the controls of adrenalectomized groups, Group C was castrated, Group D was adrenalectomized, Group E was both castrated and adrenalectomized, and Group F was also both castrated and adrenalectomized. In addition, the animals of Group F were administered a dose of testosterone that is known to produce high physiological levels of the hormones in plasma. Five rats from each group were sacrificed 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 days after their respective operation, and the anterior pituitary glands were removed and prepared for observation by transmission electron microscopy. We quantified the number of follicles and gap junctions and calculated the rate of occurrence as the ratio of the number of gap junctions existing between folliculo-stellate cells per intersected follicle profile. Simultaneous removal of adrenal glands with castration resulted in a significantly decrease in the number of gap junctions, whereas the administration of testosterone to these rats compensated for this change. These observations indicate that the preservation of gap junctions between folliculo-stellate cells is mainly dependent on androgens from both the testes and adrenal glands in adult male rats.

  10. Indirect effects of emerald ash borer-induced ash mortality and canopy gap formation on epigaeic beetles.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Kamal J K; Smith, Annemarie; Hartzler, Diane M; Herms, Daniel A

    2014-06-01

    Exotic herbivorous insects have drastically and irreversibly altered forest structure and composition of North American forests. For example, emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) from Asia has caused wide-scale mortality of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in eastern United States and Canada. We studied the effects of forest changes resulting from emerald ash borer invasion on epigaeic or ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) along a gradient of ash dieback and gap sizes in southeastern Michigan. Ground beetles were sampled in hydric, mesic, and xeric habitats in which black (Fraxinus nigra Marshall), green (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall), and white (Fraxinus americana L.) ash were the most common species, respectively. During 2006-2007, we trapped 2,545 adult ground beetles comprising 52 species. There was a negative correlation between percent ash tree mortality in 2006 and catches of all beetles. Catches of Agonum melanarium Dejean (in 2006) and Pterostichus mutus (Say) (in 2006-2007) were negatively correlated with tree mortality and gap size, respectively. However, catches of Pterostichus corvinus Dejean were positively correlated with gap size in 2006. As ash mortality and average gap size increased from 2006 to 2007, catches of all beetles as well as P. mutus and Pterostichus stygicus (Say) increased (1.3-3.9 times), while species diversity decreased, especially in mesic and xeric stands. Cluster analysis revealed that beetle assemblages in hydric and mesic stand diverged (25 and 40%, respectively) in their composition from 2006 to 2007, and that hydric stands had the most unique beetle assemblages. Overall, epigaeic beetle assemblages were altered in ash stands impacted by emerald ash borer; however, these impacts may dissipate as canopy gaps close.

  11. The role of heparan sulfate deficiency in autistic phenotype: potential involvement of Slit/Robo/srGAPs-mediated dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Christine; Sawmiller, Darrell; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are the second most common developmental cause of disability in the United States. ASDs are accompanied with substantial economic and emotional cost. The brains of ASD patients have marked structural abnormalities, in the form of increased dendritic spines and decreased long distance connections. These structural differences may be due to deficiencies in Heparin Sulfate (HS), a proteoglycan involved in a variety of neurodevelopmental processes. Of particular interest is its role in the Slit/Robo pathway. The Slit/Robo pathway is known to be involved in the regulation of axonal guidance and dendritic spine formation. HS mediates the Slit/Robo interaction; without its presence Slit's repulsive activity is abrogated. Slit/Robo regulates dendritic spine formation through its interaction with srGAPs (slit-robo GTPase Activating Proteins), which leads to downstream signaling, actin cytoskeleton depolymerization and dendritic spine collapse. Through interference with this pathway, HS deficiency can lead to excess spine formation. PMID:27089953

  12. Percolation Cooling of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Lower Head by Way of Thermal Cracking and Gap Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, K.L.

    2002-01-15

    Two partial models have been developed to elucidate the Three Mile Island Unit 2 lower head coolability by water percolation from above into the thermally cracking debris bed and into a gap between the debris and the wall. The bulk permeability of the cracked top crust is estimated based on simple fracture mechanics and application of Poiseuille's law to the fractures. The gap is considered as an abstraction representing an initially rugged interface, which probably expanded by thermal deformation and cracking in connection with the water ingress. The coupled flow and heat conduction problem for the top crust is solved in slab geometry based on the two-phase Darcy equations together with quasi-steady mass and energy conservation equations. The resulting water penetration depth is in good agreement with the depth of the so-called loose debris bed. The lower-head and bottom-crust problem is treated analogously by a two-dimensional axisymmetric model. The notion of a gap is maintained as a useful concept in the flow analysis. Simulations show that a central hot spot with a peak wall temperature of 1075 to 1100 deg. C can be obtained, but the quenching rates are not satisfactory. It is concluded that a three-dimensional model with an additional mechanism to explain the sudden water ingress to the hot spot center would be more appropriate.

  13. Characterization of the NOx-Ox relationship in a mountain gap rural area of interchange of air masses southeast of the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz Suarez, L.; Garcia-Yee, J.; Torres-JArdon, R.; Barrera Huertas, H.; Torres-Jaramillo, A.; Ortinez, A.

    2013-05-01

    Varying levels of oxidants (Ox = O3 + NO2) with respect to NOx were registered at three sites in a mountain southeast of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) in February and March 2011. The Ox-NOx ratio was used to gain a better understanding of the photochemical and transport processes happening over this mountain pass. Relatively high concentrations of O3 (moving average concentrations of 8 hours) exceeded maximum levels of the World Health Organization, and the European Union. The cumulative exceedances above background level of O3 in the one month-long campaign also exceeded the three months accumulative UN-ECE AOT40 critical level for crop protection. It was observed that the level of Ox in the mountain gap sites consisted of two contributions: One, independent of NOx emissions, extremely dominant and considered equivalent to the regional background O3 concentration; the second and much smaller was dependent of NOx local concentrations. Evidence was found that the oxidation of NO provided the major contribution of NO2 to Ox, rather than direct NO2 emissions. The contribution of regional Ox dominated from midmorning to noon when the boundary layer height began to increase due to sunlight heating of the surface leading to the mixing of higher concentrations of O3 above the nighttime thermal inversion. After noon, when the ozone vertical distribution was uniform, the Ox and O3 concentrations reached their maximum; they were very similar with very low levels of NO2. The analysis of wind data collected at the monitoring sites showed that from mid-morning to early afternoon, a northerly weak flow was common. Afterwards stronger southerly winds became dominant bringing in O3 rich air parcels into the atmospheric basin where MCMA is located. The high regional ozone concentrations add evidence for the need of coordinated air quality management policies for the complete central part of Mexico. Keywords: mountain gap, oxidant, ground level ozone, Central Mexico

  14. Enhanced soot formation in flickering CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Shaddix, C.R.; Harrington, J.E.; Smyth, K.C.

    1994-12-31

    Optical methods are used to examine soot production in a co-flowing, axisymmetric CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flame in which the fuel flow rate is acoustically forced to create a time-varying flowfield. For a particular forcing condition in which tip clipping occurs (0.75 V loudspeaker excitation), elastic scattering of vertically polarized light from the soot particles increases by nearly an order of magnitude with respect to that observed for a steady flame with the same mean fuel flow rate. Peak soot volume fractions, as measured by time-resolved laser extinction/tomography at 632.8 and 454.5 run and calibrated laser-induced incandescence (LII), show a factor of 4-5 enhancement in this flickering flame. A Mie analysis suggests that most of the enhanced soot production results from the formation of larger particles in the time-varying flowfield.

  15. Blood platelet-derived microparticles release and bubble formation after an open-sea air dive.

    PubMed

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Gempp, Emmanuel; Ignatescu, Mihaela

    2012-10-01

    Bubble-induced platelet aggregation offers an index for evaluating decompression severity in humans and in a rat model of decompression sickness. Endothelial cells, blood platelets, or leukocytes shed microparticles (MP) upon activation and during cell apoptosis. The aim was to study blood platelet MP (PMP) release and bubble formation after a scuba-air dive in field conditions. Healthy, experienced divers were assigned to 1 experimental group (n = 10) with an open-sea air dive to 30 msw for 30 min and 1 control group (n = 5) during head-out water immersion for the same period. Bubble grades were monitored with a pulsed doppler according to Kissman Integrated Severity Score (KISS). Blood samples for platelet count (PC) and PMP (annexin V and CD41) were taken 1 h before and after exposure in both groups. The result showed a decrease in post-dive PC compared with pre-dive values in experimental group with no significant change in the control group. We observed a significant increase in PMP values after the dive while no change was revealed in the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between the PMP values after the dive and the KISS bubble score. The present study highlighted a relationship between the post-dive decrease in PC, platelet MP release, and bubble formation. Release of platelet MPs could reflect bubble-induced platelet aggregation and could play a key role in alteration of the coagulation. Further studies must investigate endothelial and leukocyte MP release in the same field conditions.

  16. The lasting effect of limonene-induced particle formation on air quality in a genuine indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Carolin; Wissenbach, Dirk K; von Bergen, Martin; Franck, Ulrich; Wendisch, Manfred; Schlink, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric ozone-terpene reactions, which form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, can affect indoor air quality when outdoor air mixes with indoor air during ventilation. This study, conducted in Leipzig, Germany, focused on limonene-induced particle formation in a genuine indoor environment (24 m(3)). Particle number, limonene and ozone concentrations were monitored during the whole experimental period. After manual ventilation for 30 min, during which indoor ozone levels reached up to 22.7 ppb, limonene was introduced into the room at concentrations of approximately 180 to 250 μg m(-3). We observed strong particle formation and growth within a diameter range of 9 to 50 nm under real-room conditions. Larger particles with diameters above 100 nm were less affected by limonene introduction. The total particle number concentrations (TPNCs) after limonene introduction clearly exceed outdoor values by a factor of 4.5 to 41 reaching maximum concentrations of up to 267,000 particles cm(-3). The formation strength was influenced by background particles, which attenuated the formation of new SOA with increasing concentration, and by ozone levels, an increase of which by 10 ppb will result in a six times higher TPNC. This study emphasizes indoor environments to be preferred locations for particle formation and growth after ventilation events. As a consequence, SOA formation can produce significantly higher amounts of particles than transported by ventilation into the indoor air.

  17. Geothermal Evaluation of The Hosston Formation Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas Phase II Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisloft, Jon; Foley, Duncan

    1984-05-30

    This report summarizes the results of a phased program to test the geothermal characteristics of the Hosston Formation at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The geothermal resource evaluation was made possible through drilling and preliminary testing of a large diameter well, Lackland AFB No.1, at the south portion of the base. Phase I of the program had 3 major components: (1) compilation and interpretation of surface and subsurface geologic data to site the well; (2) design of the well; and (3) permitting the well. Phase II consisted of well drilling and preliminary development. The goal of the program was to identify water temperature, water quality, and productivity characteristics of the Hosston aquifer, which preliminary studies suggested might be favorable for direct applications on the base. Results reported herein suggest that heat pumps or other engineering alternatives might be needed for such applications. Results of the well drilling give data on water productivity, quality and temperature. Air-lift testing shows that, although the well does not flow to surface, good artesian pressure exists. Water quality appears acceptable, with about 2200 parts per million total dissolved solids. Equilibrated reservoir temperatures appear to be slightly less than 108 F (42 C).

  18. Influence of the Saharan Air Layer on Atlantic tropical cyclone formation during the period 1-12 September 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Weiyu; Wu, Liguang; Shie, Chung-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data show that the Saharan air layer (SAL) is a dry, warm, and well-mixed layer between 950 and 500 hPa over the tropical Atlantic, extending westward from the African coast to the Caribbean Sea. The formations of both Hurricane Isabel and Tropical Depression 14 (TD14) were accompanied with outbreaks of SAL air during the period 1-12 September 2003, although TD14 failed to develop into a named tropical cyclone. The influence of the SAL on their formations is investigated by examining data from satellite observations and numerical simulations, in which AIRS data are incorporated into the MM5 model through the nudging technique. Analyses of the AIRS and simulation data suggest that the SAL may have played two roles in the formation of tropical cyclones during the period 1-12 September 2003. First, the outbreaks of SAL air on 3 and 8 September enhanced the transverse-vertical circulation with the rising motion along the southern edge of the SAL and the sinking motion inside the SAL, triggering the development of two tropical disturbances associated with Hurricane Isabel and TD14. Second, in addition to the reduced environmental humidity and enhanced static stability in the lower troposphere, the SAL dry air intruded into the inner region of these tropical disturbances as their cyclonic flows became strong. This effect may have slowed down the formation of Isabel and inhibited TD14 becoming a named tropical cyclone, while the enhanced vertical shear contributed little to tropical cyclone formation during this period. The 48-h trajectory calculations confirm that the parcels from the SAL can be transported into the inner region of an incipient tropical cyclone.

  19. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-03-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  20. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-01-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  1. Kinetic studies of NO formation in pulsed air-like low-pressure dc plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, M.; Gortschakow, S.; Guaitella, O.; Marinov, D.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the formation of NO in pulsed air-like dc plasmas at a pressure of 1.33 mbar and mean currents between 50 and 150 mA of discharge pulses with 5 ms duration has been investigated both experimentally and by self-consistent numerical modelling. Using time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the densities of NO, NO2 and N2O have been measured in synthetic air as well as in air with 0.8% of NO2 and N2O, respectively. The temporal evolution of the NO density shows four distinct phases during the plasma pulse and the early afterglow in the three gas mixtures that were used. In particular, a steep density increase during the ignition phase and after termination of the discharge current pulse has been detected. The NO concentration has been found to reach a constant value of 0.57× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , 1.05× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , and 1.3× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} for mean plasma currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA, respectively, in the afterglow. The measured densities of NO2 and N2O in the respective mixture decrease exponentially during the plasma pulse and remain almost constant in the afterglow, especially where the admixture of NO2 has a remarkable impact on the NO production during the ignition. The numerical results of the coupled solution of a set of rate equations for the various heavy particles and the time-dependent Boltzmann equation of the electrons agree quite well with the experimental findings for the different air-like plasmas. The main reaction processes have been analysed on the basis of the model calculations and the remaining differences between the experiment and modelling especially during the afterglow are discussed.

  2. Unconventional Magnetism and Band Gap Formation in LiFePO4: Consequence of Polyanion Induced Non-planarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Ajit; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen plays a critical role in strongly correlated transition metal oxides as crystal field effect is one of the key factors that determine the degree of localization of the valence d/f states. Based on the localization, a set of conventional mechanisms such as Mott-Hubbard, Charge-transfer and Slater were formulated to explain the antiferromagnetic and insulating (AFI) phenomena in many of these correlated systems. From the case study on LiFePO4, through density-functional calculations, we demonstrate that none of these mechanisms are strictly applicable to explain the AFI behavior when the transition metal oxides have polyanions such as (PO4)3-. The symmetry-lowering of the metal-oxygen complex, to stabilize the polyanion, creates an asymmetric crystal field for d/f states. In LiFePO4 this field creates completely non-degenerate Fe-d states which, with negligible p-d and d-d covalent interactions, become atomically localized to ensure a gap at the Fermi level. Due to large exchange splitting, high spin state is favored and an antiferromagnetic configuration is stabilized. For the prototype LiFePO4, independent electron approximation is good enough to obtain the AFI ground state. Inclusion of additional correlation measures like Hubbard U simply amplifies the gap and therefore LiFePO4 can be preferably called as weakly coupled Mott insulator.

  3. Unconventional Magnetism and Band Gap Formation in LiFePO4: Consequence of Polyanion Induced Non-planarity

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Ajit; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen plays a critical role in strongly correlated transition metal oxides as crystal field effect is one of the key factors that determine the degree of localization of the valence d/f states. Based on the localization, a set of conventional mechanisms such as Mott-Hubbard, Charge-transfer and Slater were formulated to explain the antiferromagnetic and insulating (AFI) phenomena in many of these correlated systems. From the case study on LiFePO4, through density-functional calculations, we demonstrate that none of these mechanisms are strictly applicable to explain the AFI behavior when the transition metal oxides have polyanions such as (PO4)3−. The symmetry-lowering of the metal-oxygen complex, to stabilize the polyanion, creates an asymmetric crystal field for d/f states. In LiFePO4 this field creates completely non-degenerate Fe-d states which, with negligible p-d and d-d covalent interactions, become atomically localized to ensure a gap at the Fermi level. Due to large exchange splitting, high spin state is favored and an antiferromagnetic configuration is stabilized. For the prototype LiFePO4, independent electron approximation is good enough to obtain the AFI ground state. Inclusion of additional correlation measures like Hubbard U simply amplifies the gap and therefore LiFePO4 can be preferably called as weakly coupled Mott insulator. PMID:26791249

  4. Aqueous photooxidation of ambient Po Valley Italy air samples: Insights into secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkland, J. R.; Lim, Y. B.; Sullivan, A. P.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, C.; Collett, J. L.; Keutsch, F. N.; Turpin, B. J.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we conducted aqueous photooxidation experiments with ambient samples in order to develop insights concerning the formation of secondary organic aerosol through gas followed by aqueous chemistry (SOAaq). Water-soluble organics (e.g., glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, acetic acid, acetone) are formed through gas phase oxidation of alkene and aromatic emissions of anthropogenic and biogenic origin. Their further oxidation in clouds, fogs and wet aerosols can form lower volatility products (e.g., oligomers, organic acids) that remain in the particle phase after water evaporation, thus producing SOA. The aqueous OH radical oxidation of several individual potentially important precursors has been studied in the laboratory. In this work, we used a mist-chamber apparatus to collect atmospheric mixtures of water-soluble gases from the ambient air at San Pietro Capofiume, Italy during the PEGASOS field campaign. We measured the concentration dynamics after addition of OH radicals, in order to develop new insights regarding formation of SOA through aqueous chemistry. Specifically, batch aqueous reactions were conducted with 33 ml mist-chamber samples (TOC ~ 50-100μM) and OH radicals (~10-12M) in a new low-volume aqueous reaction vessel. OH radicals were formed in-situ, continuously by H2O2 photolysis. Products were analyzed by ion chromatography (IC), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS +/-), and ESI-MS with IC pre-separation (IC/ESI-MS-). Reproducible formation of pyruvate and oxalate were observed both by IC and ESI-MS. These compounds are known to form from aldehyde oxidation in the aqueous phase. New insights regarding the aqueous chemistry of these "more atmospherically-realistic" experiments will be discussed.

  5. Axial gap rotating electrical machine

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-02-23

    Direct drive rotating electrical machines with axial air gaps are disclosed. In these machines, a rotor ring and stator ring define an axial air gap between them. Sets of gap-maintaining rolling supports bear between the rotor ring and the stator ring at their peripheries to maintain the axial air gap. Also disclosed are wind turbines using these generators, and structures and methods for mounting direct drive rotating electrical generators to the hubs of wind turbines. In particular, the rotor ring of the generator may be carried directly by the hub of a wind turbine to rotate relative to a shaft without being mounted directly to the shaft.

  6. Physics of band-gap formation and its evolution in the pillar-based phononic crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabolghasem, Reza; Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali Asghar; Adibi, Ali; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2014-07-07

    In this paper, the interplay of Bragg scattering and local resonance is theoretically studied in a phononic crystal (PnC) structure composed of a silicon membrane with periodic tungsten pillars. The comparison of phononic band gaps (PnBGs) in three different lattice types (i.e., square, triangular, and honeycomb) with different pillar geometries shows that different PnBGs have varying degrees of dependency on the lattice symmetry based on the interplay of the local resonances and the Bragg effect. The details of this interplay is discussed. The significance of locally resonating pillars, specially in the case of tall pillars, on PnBGs is discussed and verified by examining the PnBG position and width in perturbed lattices via Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the PnBGs caused by the local resonance of the pillars are more resilient to the lattice perturbations than those caused by Bragg scattering.

  7. Understanding the origin of band gap formation in graphene on metals: graphene on Cu/Ir(111).

    PubMed

    Vita, H; Böttcher, S; Horn, K; Voloshina, E N; Ovcharenko, R E; Kampen, Th; Thissen, A; Dedkov, Yu S

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the nature of the interaction at the graphene/metal interfaces is the basis for graphene-based electron- and spin-transport devices. Here we investigate the hybridization between graphene- and metal-derived electronic states by studying the changes induced through intercalation of a pseudomorphic monolayer of Cu in between graphene and Ir(111), using scanning tunnelling microscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory calculations. We observe the modifications in the band structure by the intercalation process and its concomitant changes in the charge distribution at the interface. Through a state-selective analysis of band hybridization, we are able to determine their contributions to the valence band of graphene giving rise to the gap opening. Our methodology reveals the mechanisms that are responsible for the modification of the electronic structure of graphene at the Dirac point, and permits to predict the electronic structure of other graphene-metal interfaces. PMID:25027748

  8. Formation of high conductive nano-crystalline silicon embedded in amorphous silicon-carbide films with large optical band gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yang; Shan, Dan; Qian, Mingqing; Xu, Jun; Li, Wei; Chen, Kunji

    2016-10-01

    High conductive phosphorus-doped nano-crystalline Si embedded in Silicon-Carbide (SiC) host matrix (nc-Si:SiC) films were obtained by thermally annealing doped amorphous Si-rich SiC materials. It was found that the room conductivity is increased significantly accompanying with the increase of doping concentrations as well as the enhanced crystallizations. The conductivity can be as high as 630 S/cm for samples with the optical band gap around 2.7 eV, while the carrier mobility is about 17.9 cm2/ V.s. Temperature-dependent conductivity and mobility measurements were performed which suggested that the carrier transport process is strongly affected by both the grain boundaries and the doping concentrations.

  9. Mechanisms for secondary eyewall formation, and cold-air damming: Tropical cyclone interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Rivera, Jose Manuel

    This dissertation consists of two topics, the mechanisms leading to secondary eyewall formation in tropical cyclones, and effects of tropical cyclone---cold-air interactions on heavy precipitation. The first research topic involves a proposed coupled mechanism for secondary eyewall formation (SEF; initiation of an eyewall replacement cycle), using a WRF-ARW simulation of Hurricane Katrina (2005). The storm underwent a series of structural changes that were deemed necessary for the cycle to begin. These included a significant increase of rainband activity in the SEF region and the eventual vertical coupling of azimuthal-mean updrafts that led to cycle initiation. Increased rainband activity outside the primary eyewall in the hours before was mostly related to an intensifying main feeder band. Close to initiation, an updraft (explained by a pre-existing hypothesis) emerged outside the primary eyewall near the top of the boundary layer (BL). This updraft then intensified and extended both upward and outward, while the storm intensified and approached SEF. Eventually, the updraft coupled with the upward motion associated with rainband-related convection near the SEF radius. Once the alignment occurred, the deep updraft quickly organized to support deep convection that led to SEF within hours of initiation. The coupling of updrafts emanating from the BL with the environmental upward motion associated with the pre-existing rainband activity is proposed to be the key for SEF initiation in this case. The second topic investigates the interactions between an Appalachian cold-air damming event and the near-passage of Tropical Storm Kyle (2002) along the coastal Carolinas, as assessed by using a numerical weather prediction model. While the storm moved along the coastline, it began extra-tropical transition, bringing heavy rains to both the coastal region and inland towards the Piedmont of North Carolina. Our goal is to quantify the effects of both interacting weather systems

  10. Kinetics of NO formation and decay in nanosecond pulse discharges in Air, H2-Air, and C2H4-Air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, David; Shkurenkov, Ivan; Adamovich, Igor V.; Lempert, Walter R.

    2016-04-01

    Time-resolved, absolute NO and N atom number densities are measured by NO Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and N Two-Photon Absorption LIF in a diffuse plasma filament, nanosecond pulse discharge in dry air, hydrogen-air, and ethylene-air mixtures at 40 Torr, over a wide range of equivalence ratios. The results are compared with kinetic modeling calculations incorporating pulsed discharge dynamics, kinetics of vibrationally and electronically excited states of nitrogen, plasma chemical reactions, and radial transport. The results show that in air afterglow, NO decay occurs primarily by the reaction with N atoms, NO  +  N  →  N2  +  O. In the presence of hydrogen, this reaction is mitigated by reaction of N atoms with OH, N  +  OH  →  NO  +  H, resulting in significant reduction of N atom number density in the afterglow, additional NO production, and considerably higher NO number densities. In fuel-lean ethylene-air mixtures, a similar trend (i.e. N atom concentration reduction and NO number density increase) is observed, although [NO] increase on ms time scale is not as pronounced as in H2-air mixtures. In near-stoichiometric and fuel-lean ethylene-air mixtures, when N atom number density was below detection limit, NO concentration was measured to be lower than in air plasma. These results suggest that NO kinetics in hydrocarbon-air plasmas is more complex compared to air and hydrogen-air plasmas, additional NO reaction pathways may well be possible, and their analysis requires further kinetic modeling calculations.

  11. Plagioclase zonation styles in hornblende gabbro inclusions from Little Glass Mountain, Medicine Lake volcano, California: Implications for fractionation mechanisms and the formation of composition gaps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brophy, J.G.; Dorais, M.J.; Donnelly-Nolan, J.; Singer, B.S.

    1997-01-01

    The rhyolite of Little Glass Mountain (73-74% SiO2) is a single eruptive unit that contains inclusions of quenched andesite liquid (54-61% SiO2) and partially crystalline cumulate hornblende gabbro (53-55% SiO2). Based on previous studies, the quenched andesite inclusions and host rhyolite lava are related to one another through fractional crystallization and represent an example of a fractionation-generated composition gap. The hornblende gabbros represent the cumulate residue associated with the rhyolite-producing and composition gap-forming fractionation event. This study combines textural (Nomarski Differential Interference Contrast, NDIC, imaging), major element (An content) and trace element (Mg, Fe, Sr, K, Ti, Ba) data on the style of zonation of plagioclase crystals from representative andesite and gabbro inclusions, to assess the physical environment in which the fractionation event and composition gap formation took place. The andesite inclusions (54-61% SiO2) are sparsely phyric with phenocrysts of plagioclase, augite and Fe-oxide??olivine, +/-orthopyroxene, +/-hornblende set within a glassy to crystalline matrix. The gabbro cumulates (53-55% SiO2) consist of an interconnected framework of plagioclase, augite, olivine, orthopyroxene, hornblende and Fe-oxide along with highly vesicular interstitial glass (70-74% SiO2). The gabbros record a two-stage crystallization history of plagioclase + olivine + augite (Stage I) followed by plagioclase+orthopyroxene + hornblende + Fe-oxide (Stage II). Texturally, the plagioclase crystals in the andesite inclusions are characterized by complex, fine-scale oscillatory zonation and abundant dissolution surfaces. Compositionally (An content) the crystals are essentially unzoned from core-to-rim. These features indicate growth within a dynamic (convecting?), reservoir of andesite magma. In contrast, the plagioclase crystals in the gabbros are texturally smooth and featureless with strong normal zonation from An74 at the

  12. Experimental and Modeling Investigation of the Effect of Air Preheat on the Formation of NOx in an RQL Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samuelsen, G. S.; Brouwer, J.; Vardakas, M. A.; Holderman, J. D.

    2012-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept has been proposed to minimize the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in gas turbine systems. The success of this low-NOx combustor strategy is dependent upon the links between the formation of NOx, inlet air preheat temperature, and the mixing of the jet air and fuel-rich streams. Chemical equilibrium and kinetics modeling calculations and experiments were performed to further understand NOx emissions in an RQL combustor. The results indicate that as the temperature at the inlet to the mixing zone increases (due to preheating and/or operating conditions) the fuel-rich zone equivalence ratio must be increased to achieve minimum NOx formation in the primary zone of the combustor. The chemical kinetics model illustrates that there is sufficient residence time to produce NOx at concentrations that agree well with the NOx measurements. Air preheat was found to have very little effect on mixing, but preheating the air did increase NOx emissions significantly. By understanding the mechanisms governing NOx formation and the temperature dependence of key reactions in the RQL combustor, a strategy can be devised to further reduce NOx emissions using the RQL concept.

  13. Propagation or failure of detonation across an air gap in an LX-17 column: continuous time-dependent detonation or shock speed using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, D E; Chandler, J B; Compton, S M; Garza, R G; Grimsley, D A; Hernandez, A; Villafana, R J; Wade, J T; Weber, S R; Wong, B M; Souers, P C

    2008-01-16

    The detailed history of the shock/detonation wave propagation after crossing a room-temperature-room-pressure (RTP) air gap between a 25.4 mm diameter LX-17 donor column and a 25.4 mm diameter by 25.4 mm long LX-17 acceptor pellet is investigated for three different gap widths (3.07, 2.08, and 0.00 mm) using the Embedded Fiber Optic (EFO) technique. The 2.08 mm gap propagated and the 3.07 mm gap failed and this can be seen clearly and unambiguously in the EFO data even though the 25.4 mm-long acceptor pellet would be considered quite short for a determination by more traditional means such as pins.

  14. Formation of plasma channels in air under filamentation of focused ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionin, A. A.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.

    2015-03-01

    The formation of plasma channels in air under filamentation of focused ultrashort laser pulses was experimentally and theoretically studied together with theoreticians of the Moscow State University and the Institute of Atmospheric Optics. The influence of various characteristics of ultrashort laser pulses on these plasma channels is discussed. Plasma channels formed under filamentation of focused laser beams with a wavefront distorted by spherical aberration (introduced by adaptive optics) and by astigmatism, with cross-section spatially formed by various diaphragms and with different UV and IR wavelengths, were experimentally and numerically studied. The influence of plasma channels created by a filament of a focused UV or IR femtosecond laser pulse (λ = 248 nm or 740 nm) on characteristics of other plasma channels formed by a femtosecond pulse at the same wavelength following the first one with varied nanosecond time delay was also experimentally studied. An application of plasma channels formed due to the filamentation of focused UV ultrashort laser pulses including a train of such pulses and a combination of ultrashort and long (~100 ns) laser pulses for triggering and guiding long (~1 m) electric discharges is discussed.

  15. Soot formation in turbulent nonpremixed kerosine-air flames burning at elevated pressure: Experimental measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.J.; Stewart, C.D.; Moss, J.B.

    1994-12-31

    Detailed scalar property maps have been constructed for turbulent jet flames of prevaporized kerosine, burning in a coflowing air stream and confined within an optically accessed cylindrical chamber, which permits operation at elevated pressure. Time-averaged measurements of spatially resolved soot volume fraction by path-integrated laser absorption and tomographic inversion, temperature by fine wire thermocouple, and mixture fraction by microprobe sampling and mass spectrometric analysis are reported at chamber pressures from 1 to 6.4 bar. While the principal objective of the study has been to develop a database for modelling and computational prediction, the centerline data admit presentation in a standardized form, based on the centerline flame length to the maximum soot concentration, which permits analysis of the pressure dependence from turbulent flames of differing sizes. In this form, the peak soot volume fractions and soot formation rates appear linearly dependent on pressure, exhibiting a peak mass fraction of soot carbon of 7%, substantially independent of pressure. The peak soot loading, at the highest pressure investigated, approaches 120 gm{sup {minus}3} before complete laser extinction renders the flame inaccessible to further measurement. The high carbon loading and enhanced radiative loss lead to reduced mean temperatures throughout the flame by comparison with more widely studied gaseous fuels such as ethylene. Measured temperatures do not exceed 1,438 K anywhere on the centerline of the flame at 1 bar, for example.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of ozone formation and transport for a Central California air pollution episode

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Ling; Tonse, Shaheen; Cohan, Daniel S.; Mao, Xiaoling; Harley, Robert A.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2009-05-15

    CMAQ-HDDM is used to determine spatial and temporal variations in ozone limiting reagents and local vs upwind source contributions for an air pollution episode in Central California. We developed a first- and second- order sensitivity analysis approach with the Decoupled Direct Method to examine spatial and temporal variations of ozone-limiting reagents and the importance of local vs upwind emission sources in the San Joaquin Valley of central California for a five-day ozone episode (29th July-3rd Aug, 2000). Despite considerable spatial variations, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emission reductions are overall more effective than volatile organic compound (VOC) control for attaining the 8-hr ozone standard in this region for this episode, in contrast to the VOC control that works better for attaining the prior 1-hr ozone standard. Inter-basin source contributions of NO{sub x} emissions are limited to the northern part of the SJV, while anthropogenic VOC (AVOC) emissions, especially those emitted at night, influence ozone formation in the SJV further downwind. Among model input parameters studied here, uncertainties in emissions of NO{sub x} and AVOC, and the rate coefficient of the OH + NO{sub 2} termination reaction, have the greatest effect on first-order ozone responses to changes in NO{sub x} emissions. Uncertainties in biogenic VOC emissions only have a modest effect because they are generally not collocated with anthropogenic sources in this region.

  17. Soot formation and temperature field structure in laminar propane-air diffusion flames at elevated pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bento, Decio S.; Guelder, OEmer L.; Thomson, Kevin A.

    2006-06-15

    The effect of pressure on soot formation and the structure of the temperature field was studied in coflow propane-air laminar diffusion flames over the pressure range of 0.1 to 0.73 MPa in a high-pressure combustion chamber. The fuel flow rate was selected so that the soot was completely oxidized within the visible flame and the flame was stable at all pressures. Spectral soot emission was used to measure radially resolved soot volume fraction and soot temperature as a function of pressure. Additional soot volume fraction measurements were made at selected heights using line-of-sight light attenuation. Soot concentration values from these two techniques agreed to within 30% and both methods exhibited similar trends in the spatial distribution of soot concentration. Maximum line-of-sight soot concentration along the flame centerline scaled with pressure; the pressure exponent was about 1.4 for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel carbon content converted to soot, also followed a power-law dependence on pressure, where the pressure exponent was near to unity for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Soot temperature measurements indicated that the overall temperatures decreased with increasing pressure; however, the temperature gradients increased with increasing pressure. (author)

  18. Radical Concentrations and Prompt NO Formation in Hydrocarbon-Air Premixed Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusi, Yasuji; Yuuki, Akimasa

    1985-05-01

    Hydroxyl radical concentrations in laminar, premixed CH4-air flat-flames were measured by a conventional absorption method in the flame temperature range T{=}2200-1700 K. The OH mole fractions in the reaction zone POH were found to be insensitive to the flame temperature and the maximum POH to be about 6× 10-3 at T{=}2000 K in a stoichiometric flame. The rate constant for the prompt NO formation, CH+N2→HCN+N\\dashrightarrow2NO (4), is modified as k4{=}1.2× 1012\\exp (-13600/RT) by the relation between the amount of prompt NO and the saturation ion current Is. It is also shown from the measurements of NOx, unburnt hydrocarbons H.C., and Is, that the chemical kinetics are not significantly influenced by the flame temperature, and NO emission is reduced by reactions among NO, H.C., and N-containing intermediate species in low-temperature flames, even in stoichiometric and fuel-lean mixtures.

  19. The interaction between soot and NO formation in a laminar axisymmetric coflow ethylene/air diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Smallwood, Gregory J.

    2007-04-15

    The interaction between soot and NO formation in a laminar axisymmetric coflow ethylene/air diffusion flame was investigated by numerical simulation. A detailed gas-phase reaction scheme and a simplified soot model were employed. The results show that the formation of NO has little effect on that of soot. However, the formation of soot in the flame significantly suppresses the formation of NO. The peak NO concentration and NO emission index are reduced by 28 and 46%, respectively, due to the formation of soot. The influence of soot on NO formation is caused by not only the radiation-induced thermal effect, but also the reaction-induced chemical effect. Relatively the thermal effect is more significant, causing 25 and 38% reduction, respectively, in peak NO concentration and NO emission index. The chemical effect is caused by the competition for acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) between soot and NO formation. The formation of soot consumes acetylene in the flame and thus lowers the formation rate of radical CH. This reduces the reaction rate of CH + N{sub 2} = HCN + N, which is the rate-limiting step of the prompt NO formation route, the dominant route in the studied flame. (author)

  20. Multifactorial anticancer effects of digalloyl-resveratrol encompass apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and inhibition of lymphendothelial gap formation in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Madlener, S; Saiko, P; Vonach, C; Viola, K; Huttary, N; Stark, N; Popescu, R; Gridling, M; Vo, N T-P; Herbacek, I; Davidovits, A; Giessrigl, B; Venkateswarlu, S; Geleff, S; Jäger, W; Grusch, M; Kerjaschki, D; Mikulits, W; Golakoti, T; Fritzer-Szekeres, M; Szekeres, T; Krupitza, G

    2010-01-01

    Background: Digalloyl-resveratrol (di-GA) is a synthetic compound aimed to combine the biological effects of the plant polyhydroxy phenols gallic acid and resveratrol, which are both radical scavengers and cyclooxygenase inhibitors exhibiting anticancer activity. Their broad spectrum of activities may probably be due to adjacent free hydroxyl groups. Methods: Protein activation and expression were analysed by western blotting, deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate levels by HPLC, ribonucleotide reductase activity by 14C-cytidine incorporation into nascent DNA and cell-cycle distribution by FACS. Apoptosis was measured by Hoechst 33258/propidium iodide double staining of nuclear chromatin and the formation of gaps into the lymphendothelial barrier in a three-dimensional co-culture model consisting of MCF-7 tumour cell spheroids and human lymphendothelial monolayers. Results: In HL-60 leukaemia cells, di-GA activated caspase 3 and dose-dependently induced apoptosis. It further inhibited cell-cycle progression in the G1 phase by four different mechanisms: rapid downregulation of cyclin D1, induction of Chk2 with simultaneous downregulation of Cdc25A, induction of the Cdk-inhibitor p21Cip/Waf and inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase activity resulting in reduced dCTP and dTTP levels. Furthermore, di-GA inhibited the generation of lymphendothelial gaps by cancer cell spheroid-secreted lipoxygenase metabolites. Lymphendothelial gaps, adjacent to tumour bulks, can be considered as gates facilitating metastatic spread. Conclusion: These data show that di-GA exhibits three distinct anticancer activities: induction of apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest and disruption of cancer cell-induced lymphendothelial disintegration. PMID:20424615

  1. Performance and emission characteristics of a low heat rejection engine with different air gap thicknesses with Jatropha oil based bio-diesel.

    PubMed

    Murali Krishna, M V S; Sarita, G; Seshagiri Rao, V V R; Chowdary, R P; Ramana Reddy, Ch V

    2010-04-01

    The research work on alternate fuels has been the topic of wider interest in the context of depletion of fossil fuels and increasing of pollution levels of the engines with conventional fossil fuels. Alcohols and vegetable oils are considered to replace diesel fuels as they are renewable in nature. However, use of alcohols in internal combustion engines is limited in India, as these fuels are diverted to PetroChemical industries and hence much emphasis is given to the non-edible vegetable oils as alternate fuels in internal combustion engines. However, the drawbacks of low volatility and high viscosity associated with non-edible vegetable oils call for hot combustion chamber, provided by low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine. Investigations are carried out on a LHR diesel engine with varied air gap thicknesses and injection pressures with jatropha oil based bio-diesel at normal temperature. Performance is improved with high degree of insulation with LHR engine with vegetable oil in comparison with conventional engine (CE) with pure diesel operation. PMID:21114115

  2. Performance and emission characteristics of a low heat rejection engine with different air gap thicknesses with Jatropha oil based bio-diesel.

    PubMed

    Murali Krishna, M V S; Sarita, G; Seshagiri Rao, V V R; Chowdary, R P; Ramana Reddy, Ch V

    2010-04-01

    The research work on alternate fuels has been the topic of wider interest in the context of depletion of fossil fuels and increasing of pollution levels of the engines with conventional fossil fuels. Alcohols and vegetable oils are considered to replace diesel fuels as they are renewable in nature. However, use of alcohols in internal combustion engines is limited in India, as these fuels are diverted to PetroChemical industries and hence much emphasis is given to the non-edible vegetable oils as alternate fuels in internal combustion engines. However, the drawbacks of low volatility and high viscosity associated with non-edible vegetable oils call for hot combustion chamber, provided by low heat rejection (LHR) diesel engine. Investigations are carried out on a LHR diesel engine with varied air gap thicknesses and injection pressures with jatropha oil based bio-diesel at normal temperature. Performance is improved with high degree of insulation with LHR engine with vegetable oil in comparison with conventional engine (CE) with pure diesel operation.

  3. The lasting effect of limonene-induced particle formation on air quality in a genuine indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Rösch, Carolin; Wissenbach, Dirk K; von Bergen, Martin; Franck, Ulrich; Wendisch, Manfred; Schlink, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric ozone-terpene reactions, which form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles, can affect indoor air quality when outdoor air mixes with indoor air during ventilation. This study, conducted in Leipzig, Germany, focused on limonene-induced particle formation in a genuine indoor environment (24 m(3)). Particle number, limonene and ozone concentrations were monitored during the whole experimental period. After manual ventilation for 30 min, during which indoor ozone levels reached up to 22.7 ppb, limonene was introduced into the room at concentrations of approximately 180 to 250 μg m(-3). We observed strong particle formation and growth within a diameter range of 9 to 50 nm under real-room conditions. Larger particles with diameters above 100 nm were less affected by limonene introduction. The total particle number concentrations (TPNCs) after limonene introduction clearly exceed outdoor values by a factor of 4.5 to 41 reaching maximum concentrations of up to 267,000 particles cm(-3). The formation strength was influenced by background particles, which attenuated the formation of new SOA with increasing concentration, and by ozone levels, an increase of which by 10 ppb will result in a six times higher TPNC. This study emphasizes indoor environments to be preferred locations for particle formation and growth after ventilation events. As a consequence, SOA formation can produce significantly higher amounts of particles than transported by ventilation into the indoor air. PMID:25966888

  4. Chemical potential shift and gap-state formation in SrTiO{sub 3−δ} revealed by photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, Prabir Kumar, Pramod; Aswin, V.; Dogra, Anjana; Joshi, Amish G.

    2014-08-07

    In this study, we report on investigations of the electronic structure of SrTiO{sub 3} annealed at temperature ranging between 550 and 840 °C in an ultrahigh vacuum. Annealing induced oxygen vacancies (O{sub vac}) impart considerable changes in the electronic structure of SrTiO{sub 3}. Using core-level photoemission spectroscopy, we have studied the chemical potential shift (Δμ) as a function of annealing temperature. The result shows that the chemical potential monotonously increases with electron doping in SrTiO{sub 3−δ}. The monotonous increase of the chemical potential rules out the existence of electronic phase separation in the sample. Using valence band photoemission, we have demonstrated the formation of a low density of states at the near Fermi level electronic spectrum of SrTiO{sub 3−δ}. The gap-states were observed by spectral weight transfer over a large energy scale of the stoichiometric band gap of SrTiO{sub 3} system leading finally to an insulator-metal transition. We have interpreted our results from the point of structural distortions induced by oxygen vacancies.

  5. Effect of air-staging on anthracite combustion and NOx formation

    SciTech Connect

    Weidong Fan; Zhengchun Lin; Youyi Li; Jinguo Kuang; Mingchuan Zhang

    2009-01-15

    Experiments were carried out in a multipath air inlet one-dimensional furnace to assess NOx emission characteristics of the staged combustion of anthracite coal. These experiments allowed us to study the impact of pulverized coal fineness and burnout air position on emission under both deep and shallow air-staged combustion conditions. We also studied the impact of char-nitrogen release on both the burning-out process of the pulverized coal and the corresponding carbon content in fly ash. We found that air-staged combustion affects a pronounced reduction in NOx emissions from the combustion of anthracite coal. The more the air is staged, the more NOx emission is reduced. In shallow air-staged combustion (f{sub M} = 0.85), the fineness of the pulverized coal strongly influences emissions, and finer coals result in lower emissions. Meanwhile, the burnout air position has only a weak effect. In the deep air-staged combustion (f{sub M} = 0.6), the effect of coal fineness is smaller, and the burnout air position has a stronger effect. When the primary combustion air is stable, NOx emissions increase with increasing burnout air. This proves that, in the burnout zone, coal char is responsible for the discharge of fuel-nitrogen that is oxidized to NOx. The measurement of secondary air staging in a burnout zone can help inhibit the oxidization of NO caused by nitrogen release. Air-staged combustion has little effect on the burnout of anthracite coal, which proves to be suitable for air-staged combustion. 31 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. An experimental and numerical study of nitrogen oxide formation mechanisms in ammonia-hydrogen-air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Praveen

    quantitatively. The NOx predictions by all the three chemical mechanisms are observed to be in fairly good agreement with the measured NOx, qualitatively, however predictions are found to be 3 to 4 times higher than the measurements for both lean and rich H 2/NH3 premixed flames. For laminar H2/NH3 diffusion flames, detailed 2-D comparisons of in-situ NO measurements with the 2-D simulated NO using the Tian, GRI-Mech3.0 and modified GRI-Mech chemical mechanisms are performed and found to differ from the measured NO by approximately an order of magnitude. For NH3 seeded H2/air diffusion flames, GRI-Mech3.0 seemed to overpredict NO by more than an order of magnitude and failed to capture the fundamental flame characteristics, such as the flame length variation with increasing NH3 in the fuel mixture. On the other hand, the predicted NO profiles by the Tian mechanism were not only found to be in better agreement with the measured NO, but they also captured the in-flame NO distribution as well, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Overall, the Tian mechanism is found to be the superior chemical mechanism to capture the NOx formation chemistry in NH3 seeded flames.

  7. Site specific comparison of H2, CH4 and compressed air energy storage in porous formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmann Pfeiffer, Wolf; Wang, Bo; Bauer, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The supply of energy from renewable sources like wind or solar power is subject to fluctuations determined by the climatic and weather conditions, and shortage periods can be expected on the order of days to weeks. Energy storage is thus required if renewable energy dominates the total energy production and has to compensate the shortages. Porous formations in the subsurface could provide large storage capacities for various energy carriers, such as hydrogen (H2), synthetic methane (CH4) or compressed air (CAES). All three energy storage options have similar requirements regarding the storage site characteristics and consequently compete for suitable subsurface structures. The aim of this work is to compare the individual storage methods for an individual storage site regarding the storage capacity as well as the achievable delivery rates. This objective is pursued using numerical simulation of the individual storage operations. In a first step, a synthetic anticline with a radius of 4 km, a drop of 900 m and a formation thickness of 20 m is used to compare the individual storage methods. The storage operations are carried out using -depending on the energy carrier- 5 to 13 wells placed in the top of the structure. A homogeneous parameter distribution is assumed with permeability, porosity and residual water saturation being 500 mD, 0.35 and 0.2, respectively. N2 is used as a cushion gas in the H2 storage simulations. In case of compressed air energy storage, a high discharge rate of 400 kg/s equating to 28.8 mio. m³/d at surface conditions is required to produce 320 MW of power. Using 13 wells the storage is capable of supplying the specified gas flow rate for a period of 31 hours. Two cases using 5 and 9 wells were simulated for both the H2 and the CH4 storage operation. The target withdrawal rates of 1 mio. sm³/d are maintained for the whole extraction period of one week in all simulations. However, the power output differs with the 5 well scenario producing

  8. Soot Formation in Laminar Premixed Ethylene/Air Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot formation was studied within laminar premixed ethylene/air flames (C/O ratios of 0.78-0.98) stabilized on a flat-flame burner operating at atmospheric pressure. Measurements included soot volume fractions by both laser extinction and gravimetric methods, temperatures by multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and transmission electron microscopy, major gas species concentrations by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of condensable hydrocarbons by gravimetric sampling. and velocities by laser velocimetry. These data were used to find soot surface growth rates and primary soot particle nucleation rates along the axes of the flames. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates were correlated successfully by predictions based on typical hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) mechanisms of Frenklach and co-workers and Colket and Hall. These results suavest that reduced soot surface growth rates with increasing residence time seen in the present and other similar flames were mainly caused by reduced rates of surface activation due to reduced H atom concentrations as temperatures decrease as a result of radiative heat losses. Primary soot particle nucleation rates exhibited variations with temperature and acetylene concentrations that were similar to recent observations for diffusion flames; however, nucleation rates in the premixed flames were significantly lower than in, the diffusion flames for reasons that still must be explained. Finally, predictions of yields of major gas species based on mechanisms from both Frenklach and co-workers and Leung and Lindstedt were in good agreement with present measurements and suggest that H atom concentrations (relevant to HACA mechanisms) approximate estimates based on local thermodynamic equilibrium in the present flames.

  9. Modeling of wind gap formation and development of sedimentary basins during fold growth: application to the Zagros Fold Belt, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collignon, Marine; Yamato, Philippe; Castelltort, Sébastien; Kaus, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Mountain building and landscape evolution are controlled by the interactions between river dynamics and tectonic forces. Such interactions have been largely studied but a quantitative evaluation of tectonic/geomorphic feedbacks remains required for understanding sediments routing within orogens and fold-and-thrust belts. Here, we employ numerical simulations to assess the conditions of uplift and river incision necessary to deflect an antecedent drainage network during the growth of one or several folds. We propose that a partitioning of the river network into internal (endorheic) and longitudinal drainage arises as a result of lithological differences within the deforming crustal sedimentary cover. We show with examples from the Zagros Fold Belt (ZFB) that drainage patterns can be linked to the incision ratio R between successive lithological layers, corresponding to the ratio between their relative erodibilities or incision coefficients. Transverse drainage networks develop for uplift rates smaller than 0.8 mm.yr-1 and -10 < R < 10. Intermediate drainage network are obtained for uplift rates up to 2 mm.yr-1 and incision ratios of 20. Parallel drainage networks and formation of sedimentary basins occur for large values of incision ratio (R >20) and uplift rates between 1 and 2 mm.yr-1. These results have implications for predicting the distribution of sediment depocenters in fold-and-thrust belts, which can be of direct economic interest for hydrocarbon exploration.

  10. Non-isothermal analysis of die corner gap formation for materials deformed by multi-pass ECAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, N.; Moreira, L. P.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the upper-bound solutions proposed by Eivani and Karimi Taheri [Comp. Mater. Sci. 42 (2008) 14] to calculate processing force and evaluate die corner angle Ψ formation in terms of tribology and die configurations during cold single pass equal channels angular pressed metals with constant flow stress were extended to work-hardening metals processed by two passes according to route A by using the Swift model combined to von Mises isotropic plasticity criterion. Also, adiabatic heat equation was coupled to solutions to express the final temperature of the workpiece. For that, thermomechanical properties of a hot-dip galvanized interstitial-free (IF) were considered and its behavior under pressing was evaluated to non-hardening and work-hardening conditions in all performed analyses. By including work-hardening in the models and for the critical friction factor of 0.4, theoretical predictions after single pass showed a decreasing of die corner angle and pressing force predictions and increasing of effective plastic strain and end temperature for all friction conditions and tooling geometries evaluated. In addition, after second pass, these responses showed higher values. Finally, with the proposed upper-bound models it was possible to analyze the dependency of angle Ψ, effective plastic strain, pressing load and sample temperature with the instantaneous workpiece height at the entry surface of deformation zone.

  11. Seasonality of new particle formation in Vienna, Austria - Influence of air mass origin and aerosol chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonaschütz, Anna; Demattio, Anselm; Wagner, Robert; Burkart, Julia; Zíková, Naděžda; Vodička, Petr; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Steiner, Gerhard; Schwarz, Jaroslav; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2015-10-01

    The impact of air mass origin and season on aerosol chemical composition and new particle formation and growth events (NPF events) in Vienna, Austria, is investigated using impactor samples from short-term campaigns and two long-term number size distribution datasets. The results suggest that air mass origin is most important for bulk PM concentrations, chemical composition of the coarse fraction (>1.5 μm) and the mass size distribution, and less important for chemical composition of the fine fraction (<1.5 μm). Continental air masses (crustal elements) were distinguished from air masses of marine origin (traces of sea salt). NPF events were most frequent in summer (22% of measurement days), and least frequent in winter (3% of measurement days). They were associated with above-average solar radiation and ozone concentrations, but were largely independent of PM2.5. Air mass origin was a secondary influence on NPF, largely through its association with meteorological conditions. Neither a strong dependence on the PM2.5 loading of the air masses, nor indications of a source area for NPF precursors outside the city were found.

  12. Wide Gap TLP Bonding a Single-Crystal Superalloy: Evolution of the L/S Interface Morphology and Formation of the Isolated Grain Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, N. C.; Liu, J. D.; Jin, T.; Sun, X. F.; Hu, Z. Q.

    2013-04-01

    The microstructural evolution and bonding behavior of transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded joints for single-crystal superalloy samples with a 300- μm-wide gap have been investigated. The results show that at the initial stage, the interface grows with a cellular structure. With the increase of time, the length and numbers of the cellular structures decrease. At the final stage, the interface evolves with a planar manner. The gradient of B ahead of the liquid/solid interface exists and becomes sharper from the initial to the final analyzed from the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) results. Inevitably, isolated grain forms during the evolution of the interface and the growth rate of isothermal solidification zone (ISZ) changes through the whole bonding process, and these both deviate from the traditional TLP bonding models. The mechanisms of the formation of the isolated grain boundaries and the reasons for the deviation of the solidification rate are discussed. Also, some effective methods to avoid the formation of isolated grain boundaries in the ISZ are proposed.

  13. Regional changes of AQP0-dependent square array junction and gap junction associated with cortical cataract formation in the Emory mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sondip K; Brako, Lawrence; Gu, Sumin; Jiang, Jean X; Lo, Woo-Kuen

    2014-10-01

    The Emory mutant mouse has been widely used as an animal model for human senile cataract since it develops late-onset hereditary cataract. Here, we focus on the regional changes of aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins that are associated with the cortical cataract formation in the Emory mutant mice. Emory mutant and CFW wild-type mice at age 1-16 months were used in this study. By using an established photography system with dissecting microscopy, the opacities were first detected at the anterior or posterior lens center surface in Emory mice at age 7 months, and gradually extended toward the equator during the 16 months examined. Scanning EM verified that disorganized and fragmented fiber cells were associated with the areas of opacities within approximately 200 μm from the lens surface, indicating that Emory mouse cataracts belong to the cortical cataracts. Freeze-fracture TEM further confirmed that cortical cataracts exhibited extensive wavy square array junctions, small gap junctions and globules. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that in contrast to the high labeling intensity of AQP0-loop antibody, the labeling of AQP0 C-terminus antibody was decreased considerably in superficial fibers in Emory cataracts. Similarly, a significant decrease in the labeling of the antibody against Cx50 C-terminus, but not Cx46 C-terminus, occurred in superficial and outer cortical fibers in Emory cataracts. Western blotting further revealed that the C-termini of both AQP0 and Cx50 in Emory cataracts were decreased to over 50% to that of the wild-type. Thus, this systematic study concludes that the Emory mouse cataract belongs to the cortical cataract which is due to regional breakdown of superficial fibers associated with formation of AQP0-dependent wavy square array junctions, small gap junctions and globules. The marked decreases of the C-termini of both AQP0 and Cx50 in the superficial fibers may disturb the needed interaction between these two proteins during fiber cell

  14. Visible-light induced isoindoles formation to trigger intermolecular Diels-Alder reactions in the presence of air.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao; Zhen, Le; Cheng, Yong; Du, Hong-Jin; Zhao, Hui; Wen, Xiaoan; Kong, Ling-Yi; Xu, Qing-Long; Sun, Hongbin

    2015-06-01

    Visible-light induced isoindole formation triggered an intermolecular Diels-Alder reaction with dienophiles such as acetylenedicarboxylate and maleimides in the presence of air. The reaction resulted in excellent diastereoselctivity and high yields under mild reaction conditions. This protocol provides an atom-economical, transition-metal-free (TM-free) and straightforward approach to structurally diverse bridged-ring heterocycles from easily accessible molecules.

  15. Study of the formation of 3-D titania nanofibrous structure by MHz femtosecond laser in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, K.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we describe the formation mechanism of web-like three-dimensional (3-D) titania nanofibrous structures during femtosecond laser ablation of titanium (Ti) targets in the presence of background air. First, we demonstrate the mechanism of ablation of Ti targets by multiple femtosecond laser pulses at ambient air in an explicit analytical form. The formulas for evaporation rates and the number of ablated particles, which is analogous to the deposition rate of the synthesized nanofibers, for the ablation by a single pulse and multiple pulses as a function of laser parameters, background gas, and material properties are predicted and compared to experimental results. Afterwards, the formation of nanofibrous structures is demonstrated by applying an existing simplified kinetic model to Ti targets and ambient conditions. The predicted theory provides nanofiber diameter dependency with the combination of laser parameters, target properties, and ambient gas characteristics. Experimental studies are then performed on titania nanofibrous structures synthesized by laser ablation of Ti targets using MHz repletion-rate femtosecond laser at ambient air. The models' predictions are then compared with the experimental results, where nanostructures with different morphologies are manufactured by altering laser parameters. Our results indicate that femtosecond laser ablation of Ti targets at air background yields crystalline titania nanostructures. The formation of crystalline titania nanostructures is preceded by thermal mechanism of nucleation and growth. The results point out that laser pulse repetition and dwell time can control the density, size, and pore size of the engineered nanofibrous structure. As the deposition rate of nanostructures is analogous to the ablation rate of the target, higher density of nanofibrous structure is seen at greater laser fluences. The predicted theory can be applied to predict ablation mechanism and nanofiber formation of different

  16. Study of the formation of 3-D titania nanofibrous structure by MHz femtosecond laser in ambient air

    SciTech Connect

    Tavangar, Amirhossein; Venkatakrishnan, K.; Tan Bo

    2013-01-14

    In this study, we describe the formation mechanism of web-like three-dimensional (3-D) titania nanofibrous structures during femtosecond laser ablation of titanium (Ti) targets in the presence of background air. First, we demonstrate the mechanism of ablation of Ti targets by multiple femtosecond laser pulses at ambient air in an explicit analytical form. The formulas for evaporation rates and the number of ablated particles, which is analogous to the deposition rate of the synthesized nanofibers, for the ablation by a single pulse and multiple pulses as a function of laser parameters, background gas, and material properties are predicted and compared to experimental results. Afterwards, the formation of nanofibrous structures is demonstrated by applying an existing simplified kinetic model to Ti targets and ambient conditions. The predicted theory provides nanofiber diameter dependency with the combination of laser parameters, target properties, and ambient gas characteristics. Experimental studies are then performed on titania nanofibrous structures synthesized by laser ablation of Ti targets using MHz repletion-rate femtosecond laser at ambient air. The models' predictions are then compared with the experimental results, where nanostructures with different morphologies are manufactured by altering laser parameters. Our results indicate that femtosecond laser ablation of Ti targets at air background yields crystalline titania nanostructures. The formation of crystalline titania nanostructures is preceded by thermal mechanism of nucleation and growth. The results point out that laser pulse repetition and dwell time can control the density, size, and pore size of the engineered nanofibrous structure. As the deposition rate of nanostructures is analogous to the ablation rate of the target, higher density of nanofibrous structure is seen at greater laser fluences. The predicted theory can be applied to predict ablation mechanism and nanofiber formation of different

  17. The effect of sidewall forest canopies on the formation of cold-air pools: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, M. T.; Zhong, S.

    2013-06-01

    While the evolution and dynamics of cold-air pools in basins and valleys continue to be an active area of research, the influence of vegetation cover on cold-air pools remains largely unexamined. Recently, the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) atmospheric model has been modified to allow simulation of flow through a multilayer canopy (ARPS-CANOPY). In this study, two-dimensional numerical simulations are performed with ARPS-CANOPY to examine the impact of sidewall forest cover on diurnal cold-air pool formation inside an idealized valley. A cold-air pool develops regardless of the presence or absence of sidewall vegetation. However, the strength of the temperature inversion and the overall cooling appear to be substantially modified by sidewall vegetation. The coldest overall valley temperature occurs with no sidewall vegetation cover while the warmest occurs when the valley sidewalls are fully covered with vegetation. In simulations with partial forest cover, the nocturnal cooling in approximately the upper two thirds (lower one third) of the valley atmosphere is shown to be most sensitive to forest cover along the upper half (lower half) of the sidewall. The sidewall forest cover also affects downslope flows through a combination of weaker surface cooling beneath the forest canopy and increased drag on air flowing down the sidewalls. Finally, the strength of downslope flow is shown to be highly sensitive to the presence or absence of trees farther up the slope.

  18. Studies on the tempo of bubble formation in recently cavitated vessels: a model to predict the pressure of air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-06-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84 K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above.

  19. Air tube formation at the freezing transition in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Völtz, C; Maeda, Y; Tabe, Y; Yokoyama, H

    2007-03-01

    A phenomenon is presented, which changes the shape of gas bubbles in liquid crystals and also creates long gas tubes. The system consists of air bubbles which are injected into a nematic liquid crystal host. The shape of these air bubbles changes from spherical to ellipsoidal by initiating freezing of the sample. Furthermore, long gas tubes are formed from the air which was formerly dissolved in the liquid crystal. The gas tubes are created by the progression of the crystalline-liquid interface. Their length can reach up to 40 times their diameter. The diameter of the tubes depends on the pressure applied to the system, as well as on the interface velocity.

  20. Global hydromagnetic simulations of a planet embedded in a dead zone: Gap opening, gas accretion, and formation of a protoplanetary jet

    SciTech Connect

    Gressel, O.; Nelson, R. P.; Turner, N. J.; Ziegler, U. E-mail: r.p.nelson@qmul.ac.uk E-mail: uziegler@aip.de

    2013-12-10

    We present global hydrodynamic (HD) and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations with mesh refinement of accreting planets embedded in protoplanetary disks (PPDs). The magnetized disk includes Ohmic resistivity that depends on the overlying mass column, leading to turbulent surface layers and a dead zone near the midplane. The main results are: (1) the accretion flow in the Hill sphere is intrinsically three-dimensional for HD and MHD models. Net inflow toward the planet is dominated by high-latitude flows. A circumplanetary disk (CPD) forms. Its midplane flows outward in a pattern whose details differ between models. (2) The opening of a gap magnetically couples and ignites the dead zone near the planet, leading to stochastic accretion, a quasi-turbulent flow in the Hill sphere, and a CPD whose structure displays high levels of variability. (3) Advection of magnetized gas onto the rotating CPD generates helical fields that launch magnetocentrifugally driven outflows. During one specific epoch, a highly collimated, one-sided jet is observed. (4) The CPD's surface density is ∼30 g cm{sup −2}, small enough for significant ionization and turbulence to develop. (5) The accretion rate onto the planet in the MHD simulation reaches a steady value 8 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ⊕} yr{sup –1} and is similar in the viscous HD runs. Our results suggest that gas accretion onto a forming giant planet within a magnetized PPD with a dead zone allows rapid growth from Saturnian to Jovian masses. As well as being relevant for giant planet formation, these results have important implications for the formation of regular satellites around gas giant planets.

  1. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ambient Air in an Oxidation Flow Reactor at GoAmazon2014/5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Brett B.; de Sa, Suzane S.; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Hu, Weiwei; Seco, Roger; Park, Jeong-Hoo; Guenther, Alex; Kim, Saewung; Brito, Joel; Wurm, Florian; Artaxo, Paulo; Yee, Lindsay; Isaacman-VanWertz, Gabrial; Goldstein, Allen; Newburn, Matt K.; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Martin, Scot T.; Brune, William H.; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    During GoAmazon2014/5, ambient air was exposed to controlled concentrations of OH or O3 in situ using an oxidation flow reactor (OFR). Oxidation ranged from hours-several weeks of aging. Oxidized air was sampled by several instruments (e.g., HR-AMS, ACSM, PTR-TOF-MS, SMPS, CCN) at both the T3 site (IOP1: Feb 1-Mar 31, 2014, and IOP2: Aug 15-Oct 15, 2014) and T2 site (between IOPs and into 2nd IOP). The oxidation of ambient air in the OFR led to substantial and variable secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from any SOA-precursor gases, known and unknown, that entered the OFR. In general, more SOA was produced during the nighttime than daytime, suggesting that SOA-precursor gases were found in relatively higher concentrations at night. Similarly, more SOA was formed in the dry season (IOP2) than wet season (IOP1). The maximum amount of SOA produced during nighttime from OH oxidation ranged from less than 1 μg/m3 on some nights to greater than 10 μg/m3 on other nights. O3 oxidation of ambient air also led to SOA formation, although several times less than from OH oxidation. The amount of SOA formation sometimes, but not always, correlated with measured gas-phase biogenic and/or anthropogenic SOA precursors (e.g., SV-TAG sesquiterpenes, PTR-TOFMS aromatics, isoprene, and monoterpenes). The SOA mass formed in the OFR from OH oxidation was up to an order of magnitude larger than could be explained from aerosol yields of measured primary VOCs. This along with measurements from previous campaigns suggests that most SOA was formed from intermediate S/IVOC sources (e.g., VOC oxidation products, evaporated POA, or direct emissions). To verify the SOA yields of VOCs under OFR experimental conditions, atmospherically-relevant concentrations of several VOCs were added individually into ambient air in the OFR and oxidized by OH or O3. SOA yields in the OFR were similar to published chamber yields. Preliminary PMF factor analysis showed production of secondary factors in

  2. Formation of alkenes and oxygenated VOCs from light mediated surface chemistry of nonanoic acid at the air-seawater interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, L.; Volkamer, R.; Ciuraru, R.; Bernard, F.; George, C.

    2013-12-01

    Organic carbon is relevant in the atmosphere because it affects oxidative capacity that determines the removal rate of climate active gases and modifies aerosols. The significant presence of organic compounds at the surface of the ocean is a source for primary and secondary aerosol formation that potentially can modify cloud cover. Field observations of glyoxal over the remote marine boundary layer, and the tropical free troposphere remain unexplained by atmospheric models, and indicate missing sources of marine organic carbon species from heterogeneous processes mediated by light. We have studied the light induced surface chemistry of synthetic aqueous -mixtures containing NaCl, NaBr, NaI, photosensitizers (humic acids) and an organic surfactant (nonanoic acid) in a photochemical Quartz flowreactor. The air from the flowreactor was transferred to a dark reactor where the products from photosensitized reactions at the air/sea interface were further exposed to ozone. The products were sampled in the presence/absence of light and ozone by Proton Transfer Reaction Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) and Light-Emitting-Diode Cavity-Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS). In the presence of light nonenal formation is observed. Addition of ozone leads to the formation of glyoxal, among other products. Further experiments were conducted in an atmospheric simulation chamber. We discuss first results and atmospheric implications.

  3. On the effect of carbon monoxide addition on soot formation in a laminar ethylene/air coflow diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Thomson, Kevin A.; Smallwood, Gregory J.

    2009-06-15

    The effect of carbon monoxide addition on soot formation in an ethylene/air diffusion flame is investigated by experiment and detailed numerical simulation. The paper focuses on the chemical effect of carbon monoxide addition by comparing the results of carbon monoxide and nitrogen diluted flames. Both experiment and simulation show that although overall the addition of carbon monoxide monotonically reduces the formation of soot, the chemical effect promotes the formation of soot in an ethylene/air diffusion flame. The further analysis of the details of the numerical result suggests that the chemical effect of carbon monoxide addition may be caused by the modifications to the flame temperature, soot surface growth and oxidation reactions. Flame temperature increases relative to a nitrogen diluted flame, which results in a higher surface growth rate, when carbon monoxide is added. Furthermore, the addition of carbon monoxide increases the concentration of H radical owing to the intensified forward rate of the reaction CO + OH = CO{sub 2} + H and therefore increases the surface growth reaction rates. The addition of carbon monoxide also slows the oxidation rate of soot because the same reaction CO + OH = CO{sub 2} + H results in a lower concentration of OH. (author)

  4. Laser prepulse induced plasma channel formation in air and relativistic self focusing of an intense short pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashok; Dahiya, Deepak; Sharma, A. K.

    2011-02-15

    An analytical formalism is developed and particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to study plasma channel formation in air by a two pulse technique and subsequent relativistic self focusing of the third intense laser through it. The first prepulse causes tunnel ionization of air. The second pulse heats the plasma electrons and establishes a prolonged channel. The third pulse focuses under the combined effect of density nonuniformity of the channel and relativistic mass nonlinearity. A channel with 20% density variation over the spot size of the third pulse is seen to strongly influence relativistic self focusing at normalized laser amplitude {approx}0.4-1. In deeper plasma channels, self focusing is less sensitive to laser amplitude variation. These results are reproduced in particle-in-cell simulations. The present treatment is valid for millimeter range plasma channels.

  5. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  6. Photosensitized Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols above the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Ciuraru, R; Boréave, A; George, C

    2016-08-16

    In this study, we evaluated photosensitized chemistry at the air-sea interface as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our results show that, in addition to biogenic emissions, abiotic processes could also be important in the marine boundary layer. Photosensitized production of marine secondary organic aerosol was studied in a custom-built multiphase atmospheric simulation chamber. The experimental chamber contained water, humic acid (1-10 mg L(-1)) as a proxy for dissolved organic matter, and nonanoic acid (0.1-10 mM), a fatty acid proxy which formed an organic film at the air-water interface. Dark secondary reaction with ozone after illumination resulted in SOA particle concentrations in excess of 1000 cm(-3), illustrating the production of unsaturated compounds by chemical reactions at the air-water interface. SOA numbers via photosensitization alone and in the absence of ozone did not exceed background levels. From these results, we derived a dependence of SOA numbers on nonanoic acid surface coverage and dissolved organic matter concentration. We present a discussion on the potential role of the air-sea interface in the production of atmospheric organic aerosol from photosensitized origins. PMID:27434860

  7. Photosensitized Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols above the Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Ciuraru, R; Boréave, A; George, C

    2016-08-16

    In this study, we evaluated photosensitized chemistry at the air-sea interface as a source of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). Our results show that, in addition to biogenic emissions, abiotic processes could also be important in the marine boundary layer. Photosensitized production of marine secondary organic aerosol was studied in a custom-built multiphase atmospheric simulation chamber. The experimental chamber contained water, humic acid (1-10 mg L(-1)) as a proxy for dissolved organic matter, and nonanoic acid (0.1-10 mM), a fatty acid proxy which formed an organic film at the air-water interface. Dark secondary reaction with ozone after illumination resulted in SOA particle concentrations in excess of 1000 cm(-3), illustrating the production of unsaturated compounds by chemical reactions at the air-water interface. SOA numbers via photosensitization alone and in the absence of ozone did not exceed background levels. From these results, we derived a dependence of SOA numbers on nonanoic acid surface coverage and dissolved organic matter concentration. We present a discussion on the potential role of the air-sea interface in the production of atmospheric organic aerosol from photosensitized origins.

  8. FORMATION OF POLYKETONES IN IRRADIATED TOLUENE/PROPYLENE/NOX/AIR MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory study was carried out to investigate the formation of polyketones in secondary organic aerosol from photooxidation of the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene, a major constituent of automobile exhaust. The laboratory experiments consisted of irradiating toluene/propylene...

  9. Anion gap acidosis.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Szerlip, H M

    1998-01-01

    Although an anion gap at less than 20 mEq/L rarely has a defined etiology, significant elevations in the anion gap almost always signify presence of an acidosis that can be easily identified. Anion gap acidoses can be divided into those caused by lactate accumulation, ketoacid production, toxin/drugs, and uremia. Lactic acidoses caused by decreased oxygen delivery or defective oxygen utilization are associated with high mortality. The treatment of lactic acidosis is controversial. The use of bicarbonate to increase pH is rarely successful and, by generating PCO2, may worsen outcome. Ketoacidosis is usually secondary to diabetes or alcohol. Treatment is aimed at turning off ketogenesis and repairing fluid and electrolyte abnormalities. Methanol, ethylene glycol, and salicylates are responsible for the majority of toxin-induced anion gap acidoses. Both methanol and ethylene glycol are associated with severe acidoses and elevated osmolar gaps. Treatment of both is alcohol infusion to decrease formation of toxic metabolites and dialyses to remove toxins. Salicylate toxicity usually is associated with a mild metabolic acidosis and a respiratory alkalosis. Uremia is associated with a mild acidosis secondary to decreased ammonia secretion and an anion gap caused by the retention of unmeasured anions. A decrease in anion gap is caused by numerous mechanisms and thus has little clinical utility.

  10. Heterogeneous photocatalytic effect of zinc oxide on photochemical smog formation reaction of C 4H 8-NO 2-air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Koji; Yazawa, Takenori; Ibusuki, Takashi

    As a model of heterogeneous photochemical smog formation reaction, butene-NO 2-air systems in the presence of zinc oxide were experimentally studied using a flowing reaction system. Zinc oxide revealed a remarkable photocatalytic action which involved the production of hitherto unreported species such as cyano-compounds (HCN and CH 3CN) as well as a striking change in the distribution of the reaction products (aldehydes, ketones, epoxides, alkyl nitrates, HNO 3, CO, CO 2, etc.). It is confirmed that ZnO little affected the initial process of gas-phase photochemical reactions but interacted photocatalytically with the gas-phase reaction products.

  11. Three air quality studies: Great Lakes ozone formation and nitrogen dry deposition; and Tucson aerosol chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Theresa

    The Clean Air Act of 1970 was promulgated after thousands of lives were lost in four catastrophic air pollution events. It authorized the establishment of National Ambient Air Quality Standards or (NAAQS) for six pollutants that are harmful to human health and welfare: carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter, ozone and sulfur dioxide. The Clean Air Act also led to the establishment of the United Stated Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) to set and enforce regulations. The first paper in this dissertation studies ozone in the Lake Michigan region (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Jacko, R., Hillery, J., 2011. Lake Michigan air quality: The 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP). Atmospheric Environment 45, 3192-3202.) The Chicago-Milwaukee-Gary metropolitan area has been unable to meet the ozone NAAQS since the Clean Air Act was implemented. The Lake Michigan Air Directors' Consortium (LADCO) hypothesized that land breezes transport ozone precursor compounds over the lake, where a large air/water temperature difference creates a shallow conduction layer, which is an efficient reaction chamber for ozone formation. In the afternoon, lake breezes and prevailing synoptic winds then transport ozone back over the land. To further evaluate this hypothesis, LADCO sponsored the 1994-2003 LADCO Aircraft Project (LAP) to measure the air quality over Lake Michigan and the surrounding areas. This study has found that the LAP data supports this hypothesis of ozone formation, which has strong implications for ozone control strategies in the Lake Michigan region. The second paper is this dissertation (Foley, T., Betterton, E.A., Wolf, A.M.A., 2012. Ambient PM10 and metal concentrations measured in the Sunnyside Unified School District, Tucson, Arizona. Journal of the Arizona-Nevada Academy of Science, 43, 67-76) evaluated the airborne concentrations of PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 10 microns or less) and eight metalloids and metals

  12. Evaluation of thermal formation and air ventilation inside footwear during gait: The role of gait and fitting.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Matsutani, Toshiki; Satsumoto, Yayoi

    2016-07-01

    Comfort is an important concept in footwear design. The microclimate inside footwear contributes to the perception of thermal comfort. To investigate the effect of ventilation on microclimate formation inside footwear, experiments with subjects were conducted at four gait speeds with three different footwear sizes. Skin temperature, metabolism, and body mass were measured at approximately 25 °C and 50% relative humidity, with no solar radiation and a calm wind. The footwear occupancy and ventilation rate were also estimated, with the latter determined using the tracer gas method. The experimental results revealed that foot movement, metabolism, evaporation, radiation, convection, and ventilation were the main factors influencing the energy balance for temperature formation on the surface of the foot. The cooling effect of ventilation on the arch temperature was observed during gait. The significance of the amount of air space and ventilation on the improvement in the thermal comfort of footwear was clarified.

  13. Evaluation of thermal formation and air ventilation inside footwear during gait: The role of gait and fitting.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Yasuhiro; Matsutani, Toshiki; Satsumoto, Yayoi

    2016-07-01

    Comfort is an important concept in footwear design. The microclimate inside footwear contributes to the perception of thermal comfort. To investigate the effect of ventilation on microclimate formation inside footwear, experiments with subjects were conducted at four gait speeds with three different footwear sizes. Skin temperature, metabolism, and body mass were measured at approximately 25 °C and 50% relative humidity, with no solar radiation and a calm wind. The footwear occupancy and ventilation rate were also estimated, with the latter determined using the tracer gas method. The experimental results revealed that foot movement, metabolism, evaporation, radiation, convection, and ventilation were the main factors influencing the energy balance for temperature formation on the surface of the foot. The cooling effect of ventilation on the arch temperature was observed during gait. The significance of the amount of air space and ventilation on the improvement in the thermal comfort of footwear was clarified. PMID:26611985

  14. Frost and ice formation in the air convection pile permafrost protection device

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, R.L.; Hudgins, E.H.

    1982-09-01

    Experimental studies on frost and ice growth under simulated summer conditions were performed on a 3.0-m (10-ft) model of an air convection pile. The air convection pile is a thermosyphon-type permafrost protection device which has been considered for use in arctic construction projects. The device consists of an outer tube, usually 45.75 cm (18 in.) in diameter, extending 3.05 to 18.3 m (10 to 60 ft) into the permafrost. This outer tube contains a shorter concentric 25.4-cm- (10in.) dia inner tube. Data was taken for typical arctic temperatures and humidities and for simulated above-ground heights of 0.153, 1.373, and 2.88 m (0.5, 4.5, and 7.5 ft). The results have shown that the ice growth is governed by the concentration gradient in the annulus of the pile.

  15. In-situ formation of multiphase air plasma sprayed barrier coatings for turbine components

    DOEpatents

    Subramanian, Ramesh

    2001-01-01

    A turbine component (10), such as a turbine blade, is provided which is made of a metal alloy (22) and a base, planar-grained thermal barrier layer (28) applied by air plasma spraying on the alloy surface, where a heat resistant ceramic oxide overlay material (32') covers the bottom thermal barrier coating (28), and the overlay material is the reaction product of the precursor ceramic oxide overlay material (32) and the base thermal barrier coating material (28).

  16. Hydrochloric acid aerosol formation by the interaction of hydrogen chloride with humid air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhein, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The conditions in which hydrochloric acid aerosol is predicted by the interaction of hydrogen chloride gas with the water vapor in humid air are analyzed. The liquid gas phase equilibrium for the HCL-H2O system is expressed in terms of relative humidity and hydrogen chloride concentration as parts per million, units commonly used in pollution studies. Presented are the concentration (wt %) of HC1 in the aerosol and the concentration of aerosol (ppm) predicted.

  17. Disruption of the air-sea interface and formation of two-phase transitional layer in hurricane conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A.; Matt, S.; Fujimura, A.

    2012-04-01

    The change of the air-sea interaction regime in hurricane conditions is linked to the mechanism of direct disruption of the air-sea interface by pressure fluctuations working against surface tension forces (Soloviev and Lukas, 2010). The direct disruption of the air-sea interface due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and formation of a two-phase transitional layer have been simulated with a computational fluid dynamics model. The volume of fluid multiphase model included surface tension at the water-air interface. The model was initialized with either a flat interface or short wavelets. Wind stress was applied at the upper boundary of the air layer, ranging from zero stress to hurricane force stress in different experiments. Under hurricane force wind, the numerical model demonstrated disruption of the air-water interface and the formation of spume and the two-phase transition layer. In the presence of a transition layer, the air-water interface is no longer explicitly identifiable. As a consequence, the analysis of dimensions suggests a linear dependence for velocity and logarithm of density on depth (which is consistent with the regime of marginal stability in the transition layer). The numerical simulations confirmed the presence of linear segments in the corresponding profiles within the transition layer. This permitted a parameterization of the equivalent drag coefficient due to the presence of the two-phase transition layer at the air-sea interface. This two-phase layer parameterization represented the lower limit imposed on the drag coefficient under hurricane conditions. The numerical simulations helped to reduce the uncertainty in the critical Richardson number applicable to the air-sea interface and in the values of two dimensionless constants; this reduced the uncertainty in the parameterization of the lower limit on the drag coefficient. The available laboratory data (Donelan et al., 2004) are bounded by the two-phase layer parameterization from

  18. Biostratigraphy and biochronology of the Monte Hermoso Formation (early Pliocene) at its type locality, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassini, Rodrigo L.; Montalvo, Claudia I.; Deschamps, Cecilia M.; Manera, Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The Monte Hermoso Formation, cropping out at its type locality of Farola Monte Hermoso (Buenos Aires Province), is a classical fossiliferous unit of the South American Neogene, highlighted by the abundance and diversity of its vertebrate remains. However, its biostratigraphy and age have been largely debated, and numerous discrepancies and controversies have been stated. In this regard, the result of the analysis of new materials recovered from the different levels of this formation, following a strict control of stratigraphic provenance, is here reported. As well, the provenance of specimens of previous collections has been evaluated. The studied assemblage consists of Osteichthyes, Amphibia, Reptilia, Aves and Mammalia. These latter are the most numerous and belong to the Didelphimorphia, Polydolopimorphia, Rodentia, Notoungulata, Litopterna and Xenarthra. The recorded taxa suggest no important faunistic variations among the different levels of the Monte Hermoso Formation that would imply significant chronological differences, and hence, justify the recognition of two biostratigraphic units. The analysis of the first and last records as well as the taxa considered as exclusive, does not support the validity of the biozones of Trigodon gaudryi and Neocavia depressidens previously proposed. On this basis, a new scheme for the Monte Hermoso Formation at its type locality is proposed, including a new single biostratigraphic unit. This unit is the Eumysops laeviplicatus Range Zone, which represents the biostratigraphic base for the Montehermosan Stage/Age of the early Pliocene.

  19. Formation of a Rigid Hydrophobin Film and Disruption by an Anionic Surfactant at an Air/Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Stephanie M; Zhang, Xujun; Russo, Paul S; Anna, Shelley L; Walker, Lynn M

    2016-06-01

    Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins produced by fungi. Cerato-ulmin (CU) is a hydrophobin that has been associated with Dutch elm disease. Like other hydrophobins, CU stabilizes air bubbles and oil droplets through the formation of a persistent protein film at the interface. The behavior of hydrophobins at surfaces has raised interest in their potential applications, including use in surface coatings, food foams, and emulsions and as dispersants. The practical use of hydrophobins requires an improved understanding of the interfacial behavior of these proteins, alone and in the presence of added surfactants. In this study, the adsorption behavior of CU at air/water interfaces is characterized by measuring the surface tension and interfacial rheology as a function of adsorption time. CU is found to adsorb irreversibly at air/water interfaces. The magnitude of the dilatational modulus increases with adsorption time and surface pressure until CU eventually forms a rigid film. The persistence of this film is tested through the sequential addition of strong surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) to the bulk liquid adjacent to the interface. SDS is found to coadsorb to interfaces precoated with a CU film. At high concentrations, the addition of SDS significantly decreases the dilatational modulus, indicating disruption and displacement of CU by SDS. Sequential adsorption results in mixed layers with properties not observed in interfaces generated from complexes formed in the bulk. These results lend insight to the complex interfacial interactions between hydrophobins and surfactants. PMID:27164189

  20. Fuel Efficient Strategies for Reducing Contrail Formations in United States Air Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Chen, Neil Y.; Ng, Hok K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a class of strategies for reducing persistent contrail formation in the United States airspace. The primary objective is to minimize potential contrail formation regions by altering the aircraft's cruising altitude in a fuel-efficient way. The results show that the contrail formations can be reduced significantly without extra fuel consumption and without adversely affecting congestion in the airspace. The contrail formations can be further reduced by using extra fuel. For the day tested, the maximal reduction strategy has a 53% contrail reduction rate. The most fuel-efficient strategy has an 8% reduction rate with 2.86% less fuel-burnt compared to the maximal reduction strategy. Using a cost function which penalizes extra fuel consumed while maximizing the amount of contrail reduction provides a flexible way to trade off between contrail reduction and fuel consumption. It can achieve a 35% contrail reduction rate with only 0.23% extra fuel consumption. The proposed fuel-efficient contrail reduction strategy provides a solution to reduce aviation-induced environmental impact on a daily basis.

  1. Real-Time Secondary Aerosol Formation Measurements using a Photooxidation Reactor (PAM) and AMS in Urban Air and Biomass Smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, A. M.; Cubison, M.; Hayes, P. L.; Brune, W. H.; Hu, W.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Alvarez, S. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Bon, D.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Sullivan, A. P.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Recent field studies reveal large formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) under urban polluted ambient conditions, while SOA formation in biomass burning smoke appears to be variable but sometimes substantial. To study this formation in real-time, a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) photooxidation reactor was deployed with submicron aerosol size and chemical composition measurements during two studies: FLAME-3, a biomass-burning study at USDA Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula in 2009, MT and CalNex-LA in Pasadena, CA in 2010. A high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) alternated sampling unprocessed and PAM-processed aerosol. The PAM reactor produces OH concentrations up to 4 orders of magnitude higher than in ambient air, achieving equivalent aging of ~2 weeks in 5 minutes of processing. The OH intensity was also scanned every 20 min. in both field studies. Results show the value of PAM-AMS as a tool for in-situ evaluation of changes in OA concentration and composition due to SOA formation and POA oxidation. In FLAME-3, net SOA formation was variable among smokes from different biomasses; however, OA oxidation was always observed. The average SOA enhancement factor was 1.7 +/- 0.5 of the initial POA. Reactive VOCs such as toluene, monoterpenes, and acetaldehyde, as measured from a PIT-MS, decreased with increased PAM processing; however, formic acid, acetone, and some unidentified OVOCs increased after significant exposure to high oxidant levels suggesting multigenerational chemistry. Results from CalNex-LA show enhancement of SOA and inorganic aerosol from gas-phase precursors. This enhanced OA mass increase from PAM processing is maximum at night and correlates with trimethylbenzene concentrations, which indicates the dominance of short-lived SOA precursors in the LA Basin. A traditional SOA model with mostly aromatic precursors underpredicts the amount of SOA formed by about an order-of-magnitude, which

  2. Formation of H-type liquid crystal dimer at air-water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Karthik, C. Gupta, Adbhut Joshi, Aditya Manjuladevi, V. Gupta, Raj Kumar; Varia, Mahesh C.; Kumar, Sandeep

    2014-04-24

    We have formed the Langmuir monolayer of H-shaped Azo linked liquid crystal dimer molecule at the air-water interface. Isocycles of the molecule showed hysteresis suggesting the ir-reversible nature of the monolayer formed. The thin film deposited on the silicon wafer was characterized using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). The images showed uniform domains of the dimer molecule. We propose that these molecules tend to take book shelf configuration in the liquid phase.

  3. Gap Resolution

    2009-06-16

    With the continued improvements of next generation DNA sequencing technologies and their advantages over traditional Sanger sequencing, the Joint Genome Institute (JGI) has modified its sequencing pipeline to take advantage of the benefits of such technologies. Currently, standard 454 Titanium, paired end 454 Titanium, and Illumina GAll data are generated for all microbial projects and then assembled using draft assemblies at a much greater throughput than before. However, it also presents us with new challenges.more » In addition to the increased throughput, we also have to deal with a larger number of gaps in the Newbler genome assemblies. Gaps in these assemblies are usually caused by repeats (Newbler collapses repeat copies into individual contigs, thus creating gaps), strong secondary structures, and artifacts of the PCR process (specific to 454 paired end libraries). Some gaps in draft assemblies can be resolved merely by adding back the collapsed data from repeats. To expedite gap closure and assembly improvement on large numbers of these assemblies, we developed software to address this issue.« less

  4. Air pollution and acid rain in Chongqing City: The source and formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Xu

    1996-12-31

    Chongqing, the biggest city of Southwestern China, is suffered from air pollution and acid rain for a long time. Studies have shown that coal-burning results in pollution of sulfur dioxide and causes acid rain on a wide range in the area. Emission of sulfur dioxide has met by 0.8 million tons in Chongqing a year. Concentrations of sulfur dioxide in ambient air are above 0.20 mg/m{sup 3} during the recent thirty years. Results of precipitation monitoring show annual precipitation-weighted mean pH ranged from 3.91 to 4.70 and sulfate concentrations ranged from 8.71 mg/1 to 26.29 mg/1 in Chongqing for the past decades. The equivalent ratio of SO{sup 2-}{sub 4} / NO{sup -}{sub 3} in Chongqing (also in China) is higher than those in other countries. It is found that fog water is also acidified in Chongqing City and the concentrations of pollutants in fog water are much higher than those in rain.

  5. Ozone formation potentials of organic compounds from different emission sources in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianjun; Luo, Dongmin

    2012-08-01

    Different organic compounds exhibit different propensities for ozone formation. Two approaches were used to study the ozone formation potentials or source reactivities of different anthropogenic organic compounds emission categories in California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The first approach was based on the combination of total organic gases (TOG) emission speciation profiles and the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scale of organic species. The second approach quantified ozone impacts from different emission sources by performing 3-dimensional air quality model sensitivity analysis involving increased TOG emissions from particular sources. The source reactivities derived from these two approaches agree reasonably well for 58 anthropogenic organic compounds emission categories in the SoCAB. Both approaches identify TOG emissions from mobile sources as having the highest reactivity. Source reactivities from both approaches were also combined with TOG emissions from each source category to produce a 2005 reactivity-based anthropogenic TOG emission inventory for the SoCAB. The top five reactivity-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources in the SoCAB during 2005 were: light-duty passenger cars, off-road equipment, consumer products, light-duty trucks category 2 (i.e., 3751-5750 lb), and recreational boats. This is in contrast to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, which indicates that livestock waste and composting emission categories were two of the five largest mass-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources. The reactivity-based TOG emission inventory is an important addition to the mass-based TOG emission inventory because it represents the ozone formation potentials from emission sources and can be used to assist in determining targeted sources for developing organic compounds reduction policies.

  6. Ozone Formation Potentials from Different Anthropogenic Emission Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds in California's South Coast Air Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Luo, D.; Croes, B.

    2010-12-01

    Different volatile organic compounds (VOC) exhibit different propensities for ozone formation. Two approaches were used to study the relative ozone formation potentials (source reactivities) of different anthropogenic VOC emission source categories in California’s South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB). The first approach combined emission speciation profiles for total organic gases (TOG) with maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) scales for VOC species. The second approach quantified ozone impacts from different sources by performing 3-dimensional air quality model sensitivity analyses involving increased TOG emissions from particular sources. The source reactivities for 58 VOC emission categories in SoCAB derived from these two approaches agree reasonably well (R2 = ~0.9). Both approaches revealed the two emissions source types with the highest TOG reactivity were mobile sources and managed forest burning. Also, a reactivity-based TOG emission inventory for SoCAB in 2005 was produced by combining the source reactivities from both approaches with TOG emissions from anthropogenic source categories. The top five reactivity-based source categories are: light-duty passenger cars, off-road equipments, consumer products, light-duty trucks, and recreational boats. This is in contrast to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, which indicates that farming operations (mainly from animal waste) was one of the five largest mass-based anthropogenic TOG emission sources. Compared to the mass-based TOG emission inventory, the reactivity-based TOG emission inventory more appropriately represents the ozone formation potentials from emission sources, and highlights those sources that should be targeted for future regulations.

  7. Air-sea fluxes and satellite-based estimation of water masses formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabia, Roberto; Klockmann, Marlene; Fernandez-Prieto, Diego; Donlon, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Recent work linking satellite-based measurements of sea surface salinity (SSS) and sea surface temperature (SST) with traditional physical oceanography has demonstrated the capability of generating routinely satellite-derived surface T-S diagrams [1] and analyze the distribution/dynamics of SSS and its relative surface density with respect to in-situ measurements. Even more recently [2,3], this framework has been extended by exploiting these T-S diagrams as a diagnostic tool to derive water masses formation rates and areas. A water mass describes a water body with physical properties distinct from the surrounding water, formed at the ocean surface under specific conditions which determine its temperature and salinity. The SST and SSS (and thus also density) at the ocean surface are largely determined by fluxes of heat and freshwater. The surface density flux is a function of the latter two and describes the change of the density of seawater at the surface. To obtain observations of water mass formation is of great interest, since they serve as indirect observations of the thermo-haline circulation. The SSS data which has become available through the SMOS [4] and Aquarius [5] satellite missions will provide the possibility of studying also the effect of temporally-varying SSS fields on water mass formation. In the present study, the formation of water masses as a function of SST and SSS is derived from the surface density flux by integrating the latter over a specific area and time period in bins of SST and SSS and then taking the derivative of the total density flux with respect to density. This study presents a test case using SMOS SSS, OSTIA SST, as well as Argo ISAS SST and SSS for comparison, heat fluxes from the NOCS Surface Flux Data Set v2.0, OAFlux evaporation and CMORPH precipitation. The study area, initially referred to the North Atlantic, is extended over two additional ocean basins and the study period covers the 2011-2012 timeframe. Yearly, seasonal

  8. [Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) on yield formation in rice (Oryza sativa)].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianye; Yang, Hongjian; Dong, Guichun; Wang, Yulong; Zhu, Jianguo; Yang, Lianxian; Shan, Yuhua

    2002-10-01

    Effect of Free-Air CO2 enrichment (FACE, 200 mumol.mol-1 higher than CK) on rice yield and its components under field condition were studied with a Japonica variety 99-15. Results showed that FACE treatment had no obvious effect on plant height and number of leaves on main stem, but could quicken growth process of rice, shorten the whole growth duration. Increment of nitrogen application rate could weaken the effect of FACE on whole growth duration. The number of tillers and panicles, and fulfilled-grain percentage increased significantly under FACE treatment, whereas spikelets per panicle decreased. FACE treatment could significantly increase grain yield of rice, especially when higher rate of nitrogen fertilizer was applied. Increasing spikelets per panicle and spikelets per unit area under FACE treatment would result in marked increment of rice yield. Increasing nitrogen application rate was an important approach to increase spikelets per panicle and spikelets per unit area under FACE treatment.

  9. [Effects of free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) on yield formation of wheat].

    PubMed

    Ynag, Lian-xin; Li, Shi-feng; Wang, Yu-long; Huang, Jian-ye; Yang, Hong-jian; Dong, Gui-chun; Zhu, Jian-guo; Liu, Gang

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effects of predicted higher CO2 levels on the growth duration, plant height, yield, and yield components of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiment with weak gluten variety Ningmai 9 was conducted at Anzhen of Wuxi in Jiangsu Province in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 growth seasons. The target [CO2] in FACE plots was 200 microl x L(-1) above that in ambient air. Three levels of N were supplied, i.e., 90 kg x hm(-2) (2001-2002) and 125 kg x hm(-2)(2002-2003) (low level, LN), 180 kg x hm(-2) 2002-2003) (medium level, MN), and 250 kg x hm(-2)(high level, HN). The durations from sowing to heading and from heading to maturity and the whole growth period of wheat in FACE plots shortened 1.3 , 1.3 and 2.6 days, respectively, compared with the control. FACE increased the plant height (+4.0% significantly, due to the increases of panicle length and of the first and second internode lengths. FACE also greatly increased the grain yield by an average of 24.6%. Across the two years, there was a positive [CO2] x N interaction for grain yield, with a yield increase of 15.2%, 21.4% and 35.4% at LN, MN and HN, respectively. The ears per square meter in FACE plots was increased by an average of 17.8% mainly due to the increase of maximum tiller number per unit ground area rather than that of the percentage of productive tiller (panicle bearing). In addition, FACE increased the grain number per ear (+2.9% and the individual grain mass (+4.8%).

  10. Radar Echo Structure, Air Motion and Hail Formation in a Large Stationary Multicellular Thunderstorm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, L. J.; Fankhauser, J. C.

    1983-10-01

    Observations from aircraft, Doppler radars, surface mesonetwork, upper air network and surveillance radar are used to describe the structure and evolution of a large rain and hailstorm that occurred on 22 June 1976 in northeastern Colorado. In its early stage, the storm was unicellular in nature and was moving northward somewhat slower than the middle-level environmental winds. Once significant outflow developed beneath the storm, new cells started their growth over the southeastwardly progressing outflow boundary and then advected northward and interacted with the now nearly motionless main updraft. For about 45 min the storm exhibited characteristics of the steady, vaulted supercell, though overall it was still clearly multicellular in nature. During this stage nearly 2.5×109 kg s1 of air and 2×107 kg s1 of moisture were being processed through cloud base within the vault updraft. Precipitation that grew to millimeter size within the small (about 5 km diameter) cells served as embryos for continued growth to hailstones as big as 3 cm diameter within the main updraft associated with the weak echo vault. Calculated ice particle growth trajectories in the nearly steady phase indicated that recycling of precipitation particles within a single updraft was not possible, however, as all particles followed simple paths northward across and to the sides of the main updraft core, failing out as rain, graupel or hail on the north and west sides of the updraft. Small particles that entered the main updraft where speeds exceeded 15 m s1 were exhausted into the anvil as 5-8 mm graupel.

  11. Ammonia conversion and NOx formation in laminar coflowing nonpremixed methane-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Neal; Jensen, Anker; Glarborg, Peter; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Bell, John B.; Pope, Christopher J.; Kee, Robert J.

    2002-01-07

    This paper reports on a combined experimental and modeling investigation of NOx formation in nitrogen-diluted laminar methane diffusion flames seeded with ammonia. The methane-ammonia mixture is a surrogate for biomass fuels which contain significant fuel-bound nitrogen. The experiments use flue-gas sampling to measure the concentration of stable species in the exhaust gas, including NO, O2, CO, and CO2. The computations evolve a two-dimensional low Mach number model using a solution-adaptive projection algorithm to capture fine-scale features of the flame. The model includes detailed thermodynamics and chemical kinetics, differential diffusion, buoyancy, and radiative losses. The model shows good agreement with the measurements over the full range of experimental NH3 seeding amounts. As more NH3 is added, a greater percentage is converted to N2 rather than to NO. The simulation results are further analyzed to trace the changes in NO formation mechanisms with increasing amounts of ammonia in the fuel.

  12. Enhanced formation of secondary air pollutants and aggravation of urban smog due to crop residue burning emissions in North India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Chinmoy; Kumar, Vinod; Sinha, Vinayak

    2013-04-01

    implications for the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere increased from an average value of 14 /s (N.F.E.) to 40 /s (F.E.) just due to CO, NOx and the measured aromatics. The observed increase in ozone was 10ppbV higher after sunrise on the day after the fire plume was sampled and driven by the sudden NOx availability at a site that normally falls in a NOx limited ozone production regime. The strong pollutant enhancements in carcinogenic aromatic hydrocarbons that are also highly reactive and fuel ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation when accompanied by the high NOx and CO levels resulting from crop residue burning in N. India, clearly highlight the need to address the practice of crop residue burning which strongly alters the composition and chemistry of the atmosphere with adverse effects on both air quality and health. This study is the first from within India to combine fast in-situ PTR-MS VOC emission tracer measurements with online measurements of primary pollutants and MODIS satellite data. Further targeted studies employing a comprehensive measurement suite of both aerosol and gas species are needed to assess the full impact of crop residue burning on atmospheric chemistry and regional air quality. Acknowledgement: We thank the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry Facility for data and the Ministry of Human Resource Development (MHRD),India and IISER Mohali for funding the facility. Vinod Kumar acknowledges the DST INSPIRE Fellowship programme. Chinmoy Sarkar thanks the Max Planck-DST India Partner Group on Tropospheric OH reactivity and VOCs for funding support.

  13. Effect of the Graded-Gap Layer Composition on the Formation of n + -n - -p Structures in Boron-Implanted Heteroepitaxial Cd x Hg1- x Te Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talipov, N. Kh.; Voitsekhovskii, А. V.; Grigor'ev, D. V.

    2014-07-01

    Processes of formation of n + -n--p-structures in boron-implanted heteroepitaxial (HEL) CdxHg1-xTe (CMT) layers of p-type grown by molecular beam epitaxy (HEL CMT MBE) with different compositions of the upper graded-gap layer are studied. It is shown that the surface composition (xs) of HEL CMT MBE significantly affects both the electrical parameters of the implanted layer and the spatial distribution of radiation defects of donor type. For HEL CMT MBE with the small surface composition xs = 0.22-0.33, it is found that the layer electron concentration (Ns) is decreased after saturation with accumulation of radiation defects, as the dose of B+ ions is increased in the range of D = 1ṡ1011-3ṡ1015 сm-2. An increase of the surface composition up to xs = 0.49-0.56 results in a significant decrease in Ns and a disappearance of the saturation of concentration in the whole dose range. The value of Ns monotonically increases with the energy (E) of boron ions and composition xs. It is found that for B+-ion energies E = 20-100 keV, the depth of the surface n + -layer increases with increasing energy and exceeds the total projected path of boron ions. However, in the energy range E = 100-150 keV, the depth of n+-layer stops increasing with the increase of the surface composition. The depth (dn) of a lightly doped n--layer monotonically decreases with increasing energy of boron ions in the entire range of E = 20-150 keV. With increasing dose (D) of B+ ions in the interval D = 1ṡ1014-1ṡ1015сm-2, deep n--layers with dn = 4-5 μm are formed only in the HEL CMT MBE with xs = 0.22-0.33. For the samples with xs = 0.49-0.56, the depth changes in the interval dn = 1.5-2.5 μm. At D ≤ 3ṡ1013сm-2, n + -n--p-structure is not formed for all surface compositions, if implantation is performed at room temperature. However, implantation at T = 130°C leads to the formation of a deep n--layer. Planar photodiodes with the n-p-junction area of A = 35×35 μm2 made on the basis of

  14. Influence of aerosol spectrum and air pollutants on fog formation in urban environment of megacity Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Manju; Payra, Swagata

    2009-04-01

    Urban areas are facing increasing fog frequencies that may result due to increased air pollution emanating from variety of sources. The increased pollution levels may lead to the atmospheric reactions resulting into the formation of secondary pollutants that may also lead to increased aerosol number concentrations (ANC) in the atmosphere. This could cause enhanced water aerosols in the presence of favourable meteorological conditions and high relative humidity. This study deals with the atmospheric pollution and visibility during winter season of megacity Delhi in order to assess the relationship between the two specifically during fog episodes. Thus, this study analyses the levels of air pollutants, aerosol spectrum and meteorological conditions during one week each in the winter season of the years 2004 and 2006 in order to have an improved understanding of their role in fog formation in mega-city Delhi. More than 300 h of measurements which included episodes of dense, thick and moderate fogs of about 25 h, were studied. The measurements cover most of the accumulation mode and greater size spectrum of aerosols. Thus, the analysis is performed for the entire period, specifically, before the fog sets up, during and afterwards. In general, the relatively small variations in number concentration show larger variations in visibility prior and post dense fog formation than during dense fog episodes. Preliminary analysis of monthly averaged RSPM (Respirable Suspended particulate Matter or PM(10)) concentration values for four winter months for a period of 6 years (1996-2001) and visibility did not show a good correlation with total occurrences of fog. However, daily averaged RSPM concentration showed a good correlation with the occurrences of thick fog. Diurnal variation of Sulfur-dioxide and Nitrogen dioxide were found to have inverse relationship with visibility during fog which may be due to formation of secondary pollutants such as sulfate and to a lesser extent

  15. High intensive light channel formation in the post-filamentation region of ultrashort laser pulses in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu E.; Ionin, A. A.; Mokrousova, D. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the post-filamentation stage of focused high-power Ti:Sa-laser pulses in air is presented. For the first time to our knowledge, the angular and spatial characteristics of specific spatially localized light structures, the ionization-free post-filament channels (PFCs), formed inside the laser beam in the post-filamentation region are systematically quantified under different external focusing and energy of initial pulse. We show that PFC angular divergence tends to decrease with the increase of the laser pulse energy and beam focal distance. These findings are discussed in the framework of the Bessel–Gauss-like beam formation in a course of pulse filamentation stage.

  16. High intensive light channel formation in the post-filamentation region of ultrashort laser pulses in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu E.; Ionin, A. A.; Mokrousova, D. V.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Sunchugasheva, E. S.; Zemlyanov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the post-filamentation stage of focused high-power Ti:Sa-laser pulses in air is presented. For the first time to our knowledge, the angular and spatial characteristics of specific spatially localized light structures, the ionization-free post-filament channels (PFCs), formed inside the laser beam in the post-filamentation region are systematically quantified under different external focusing and energy of initial pulse. We show that PFC angular divergence tends to decrease with the increase of the laser pulse energy and beam focal distance. These findings are discussed in the framework of the Bessel-Gauss-like beam formation in a course of pulse filamentation stage.

  17. Ultrafast formation of air-processable and high-quality polymer films on an aqueous substrate

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Polymer solar cells are attracting attention as next-generation energy sources. Scalable deposition techniques of high-quality organic films should be guaranteed to realize highly efficient polymer solar cells in large areas for commercial viability. Herein, we introduce an ultrafast, scalable, and versatile process for forming high-quality organic films on an aqueous substrate by utilizing the spontaneous spreading phenomenon. This approach provides easy control over the thickness of the films by tuning the spreading conditions, and the films can be transferred to a variety of secondary substrates. Moreover, the controlled Marangoni flow and ultrafast removal of solvent during the process cause the films to have a uniform, high-quality nanomorphology with finely separated phase domains. Polymer solar cells were fabricated from a mixture of polymer and fullerene derivatives on an aqueous substrate by using the proposed technique, and the device exhibited an excellent power conversion efficiency of 8.44 %. Furthermore, a roll-to-roll production system was proposed as an air-processable and scalable commercial process for fabricating organic devices. PMID:27507624

  18. Ultrafast formation of air-processable and high-quality polymer films on an aqueous substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-08-01

    Polymer solar cells are attracting attention as next-generation energy sources. Scalable deposition techniques of high-quality organic films should be guaranteed to realize highly efficient polymer solar cells in large areas for commercial viability. Herein, we introduce an ultrafast, scalable, and versatile process for forming high-quality organic films on an aqueous substrate by utilizing the spontaneous spreading phenomenon. This approach provides easy control over the thickness of the films by tuning the spreading conditions, and the films can be transferred to a variety of secondary substrates. Moreover, the controlled Marangoni flow and ultrafast removal of solvent during the process cause the films to have a uniform, high-quality nanomorphology with finely separated phase domains. Polymer solar cells were fabricated from a mixture of polymer and fullerene derivatives on an aqueous substrate by using the proposed technique, and the device exhibited an excellent power conversion efficiency of 8.44 %. Furthermore, a roll-to-roll production system was proposed as an air-processable and scalable commercial process for fabricating organic devices.

  19. Ultrafast formation of air-processable and high-quality polymer films on an aqueous substrate.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-08-10

    Polymer solar cells are attracting attention as next-generation energy sources. Scalable deposition techniques of high-quality organic films should be guaranteed to realize highly efficient polymer solar cells in large areas for commercial viability. Herein, we introduce an ultrafast, scalable, and versatile process for forming high-quality organic films on an aqueous substrate by utilizing the spontaneous spreading phenomenon. This approach provides easy control over the thickness of the films by tuning the spreading conditions, and the films can be transferred to a variety of secondary substrates. Moreover, the controlled Marangoni flow and ultrafast removal of solvent during the process cause the films to have a uniform, high-quality nanomorphology with finely separated phase domains. Polymer solar cells were fabricated from a mixture of polymer and fullerene derivatives on an aqueous substrate by using the proposed technique, and the device exhibited an excellent power conversion efficiency of 8.44 %. Furthermore, a roll-to-roll production system was proposed as an air-processable and scalable commercial process for fabricating organic devices.

  20. Ultrafast formation of air-processable and high-quality polymer films on an aqueous substrate.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jonghyeon; Jeong, Seonju; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Polymer solar cells are attracting attention as next-generation energy sources. Scalable deposition techniques of high-quality organic films should be guaranteed to realize highly efficient polymer solar cells in large areas for commercial viability. Herein, we introduce an ultrafast, scalable, and versatile process for forming high-quality organic films on an aqueous substrate by utilizing the spontaneous spreading phenomenon. This approach provides easy control over the thickness of the films by tuning the spreading conditions, and the films can be transferred to a variety of secondary substrates. Moreover, the controlled Marangoni flow and ultrafast removal of solvent during the process cause the films to have a uniform, high-quality nanomorphology with finely separated phase domains. Polymer solar cells were fabricated from a mixture of polymer and fullerene derivatives on an aqueous substrate by using the proposed technique, and the device exhibited an excellent power conversion efficiency of 8.44 %. Furthermore, a roll-to-roll production system was proposed as an air-processable and scalable commercial process for fabricating organic devices. PMID:27507624

  1. Three dimensional simulations of pattern formation during high-pressure, freely localized microwave breakdown in air

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtzanidis, K. Boeuf, J. P.; Rogier, F.

    2014-12-15

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that a freely localized 100 GHz microwave discharge can propagate towards the microwave source with high speed, forming a complex pattern of self-organized filaments. We present three-dimensional simulations of the formation and propagation of such patterns that reveal more information on their nature and interaction with the electromagnetic waves. The developed three-dimensional Maxwell-plasma solver permits the study of different forms of incident field polarization. Results for linear and circular polarization of the wave are presented and comparisons with recent experiments show a good overall agreement. The three dimensional simulations provide a quantitative analysis of the parameters controlling the time and length scales of the strongly non-linear plasma dynamics and could be useful for potential microwave plasma applications such as aerodynamic flow and combustion control.

  2. Air-sea interaction and formation of the Asian summer monsoon onset vortex over the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guoxiong; Guan, Yue; Liu, Yimin; Yan, Jinghui; Mao, Jiangyu

    2012-01-01

    In spring over the southern Bay of Bengal (BOB), a vortex commonly develops, followed by the Asian summer monsoon onset. An analysis of relevant data and a case study reveals that the BOB monsoon onset vortex is formed as a consequence of air-sea interaction over BOB, which is modulated by Tibetan Plateau forcing and the land-sea thermal contrast over the South Asian area during the spring season. Tibetan Plateau forcing in spring generates a prevailing cold northwesterly over India in the lower troposphere. Strong surface sensible heating is then released, forming a prominent surface cyclone with a strong southwesterly along the coastal ocean in northwestern BOB. This southwesterly induces a local offshore current and upwelling, resulting in cold sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The southwesterly, together with the near-equatorial westerly, also results in a surface anticyclone with descending air over most of BOB and a cyclone with ascending air over the southern part of BOB. In the eastern part of central BOB, where sky is clear, surface wind is weak, and ocean mixed layer is shallow, intense solar radiation and low energy loss due to weak surface latent and sensible heat fluxes act onto a thin ocean layer, resulting in the development of a unique BOB warm pool in spring. Near the surface, water vapor is transferred from northern BOB and other regions to southeastern BOB, where surface sensible heating is relatively high. The atmospheric available potential energy is generated and converted to kinetic energy, thereby resulting in vortex formation. The vortex then intensifies and moves northward, where SST is higher and surface sensible heating is stronger. Meanwhile, the zonal-mean kinetic energy is converted to eddy kinetic energy in the area east of the vortex, and the vortex turns eastward. Eventually, southwesterly sweeps over eastern BOB and merges with the subtropical westerly, leading to the onset of the Asian summer monsoon.

  3. Mechanistic Evaluation of LixOy Formation on δ-MnO2 in Nonaqueous Li-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhixiao; De Jesus, Luis R; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Mukherjee, Partha P

    2016-09-01

    Transition metal oxides are usually used as catalysts in the air cathode of lithium-air (Li-air) batteries. This study elucidates the mechanistic origin of the oxygen reduction reaction catalyzed by δ-MnO2 monolayers and maps the conditions for Li2O2 growth using a combination of first-principles calculations and mesoscale modeling. The MnO2 monolayer, in the absence of an applied potential, preferentially reacts with a Li atom instead of an O2 molecule to initiate the formation of LiO2. The oxygen reduction products (LiO2, Li2O2, and Li2O molecules) strongly interact with the MnO2 monolayer via the stabilization of Li-O chemical bonds with lattice oxygen atoms. As compared to the disproportionation reaction, direct lithiation reactions are the primary contributors to the stabilization of Li2O2 on the MnO2 monolayer. The energy profiles of (Li2O2)2 and (Li2O)2 nucleation on δ-MnO2 monolayer during the discharge process demonstrate that Li2O2 is the predominant discharge product and that further reduction to Li2O is inhibited by the high overpotential of 1.21 V. Interface structures have been examined to study the interaction between the Li2O2 and MnO2 layers. This study demonstrates that a Li2O2 film can be homogeneously deposited onto δ-MnO2 and that the Li2O2/MnO2 interface acts as an electrical conductor. A mesoscale model, developed based on findings from the first-principles calculations, further shows that Li2O2 is the primary product of electrochemical reactions when the applied potential is smaller than 2.4 V. PMID:27532334

  4. Properties of the seawater-air interface. 2. Rates of surface film formation under steady state conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dragcevic, D.; Pravdic, V.

    1981-05-01

    The laboratory techniques of dynamic surface tension and of surface electrical potential measurements were used to determine rates of formation and of reorientation of organic surface films at the seawater-air interface. Relaxation times of surface films were determined for three characteristic samples obtained by screen and bottle sampling in the coastal waters of the northern Adriatic area. These data were compared with those for model samples produced by spreading oleic acid and crude oil on or dissolving polyethyleneglycol and sodium dodecyl sulfate in artificial seawater. Relaxation times were in the range of 0.1-1 s for most of the samples. A good representative value for field samples is 0.2 s. The temperature-dependence (the energies of activation) for the surface film relaxation indicates that several processes control material transport toward the seawater-air interface. The findings are interpreted as showing that an almost ever-present organic surface film influences the mechanism and the rate of material transport across the sea-atmosphere boundary.

  5. Transient secondary organic aerosol formation from limonene ozonolysis in indoor environments: impacts of air exchange rates and initial concentration ratios.

    PubMed

    Youssefi, Somayeh; Waring, Michael S

    2014-07-15

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) results from the oxidation of reactive organic gases (ROGs) and is an indoor particle source. The aerosol mass fraction (AMF), a.k.a. SOA yield, quantifies the SOA forming potential of ROGs and is the ratio of generated SOA to oxidized ROG. The AMF depends on the organic aerosol concentration, as well as the prevalence of later generation reactions. AMFs have been measured in unventilated chambers or steady-state flow through chambers. However, indoor settings have outdoor air exchange, and indoor SOA formation often occurs when ROGs are transiently emitted, for instance from emissions of cleaning products. Herein, we quantify "transient AMFs" from ozonolysis of pulse-emitted limonene in a ventilated chamber, for 18 experiments at low (0.28 h(-1)), moderate (0.53 h(-1)), and high (0.96 h(-1)) air exchange rates (AER) with varying initial ozone-limonene ratios. Transient AMFs increased with the amount of ROG reacted; AMFs also increased with decreasing AERs and increasing initial ozone-limonene ratios, which together likely promoted more ozone reactions with the remaining exocyclic bond of oxidized limonene products in the SOA phase. Knowing the AER and initial ozone-limonene ratio is crucial to predict indoor transient SOA behavior accurately.

  6. Number size distribution of aerosols at Mt. Huang and Nanjing in the Yangtze River Delta, China: Effects of air masses and characteristics of new particle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Honglei; Zhu, Bin; Shen, Lijuan; An, Junlin; Yin, Yan; Kang, Hanqing

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol number spectra in the range of 10 nm-10 μm were observed at Mt. Huang (Aug. 15-Sep. 15) and Nanjing (Oct. 13-Nov. 15) by a wide-range particle spectrometer (WPS) in 2011. Based on the backward trajectories obtained using the HYSPLIT model, the transport pathways of observed air masses during the study periods were classified into the following four groups: maritime air mass, continental air mass, marine-continental mixed air mass and local air mass. The variations in the aerosol number spectrum and the new particle formation (NPF) events for various types of air masses were discussed, along with meteorological data. The results showed that the average number concentration was 12,540 cm- 3 at Nanjing and only 2791 cm- 3 at Mt. Huang. The aerosol number concentration in Nanjing was 3-7 times higher than that in Mt. Huang; the large discrepancy was in the range of 10-100 nm. Different types of air masses had different effects on number concentration distribution. The number concentration of aerosols was higher in marine air masses, continental air masses and continental-marine mixed air masses at 10-50 nm, 100-500 nm and 50-200 nm, respectively. Under the four types of air masses, the aerosol size spectra had bimodal distributions in Nanjing and unimodal distributions in Mt. Huang (except under continental air masses: HT1). The effects of the diverse air masses on aerosol size segments of the concentration peak in Mt. Huang were stronger than those in Nanjing. The local air masses were dominant at these two sites and accounted for 44% of the total air masses. However, the aerosol number concentration was the lowest in Mt. Huang and the highest in Nanjing when local air masses were present. The number concentrations for foreign air masses increased at Mt. Huang and decreased at Nanjing. Different types of air masses had greater effects on the aerosol spectrum distribution at Mt. Huang than at Nanjing. During the NPF events, the particle growth rates at Mt

  7. Combustion characteristics and air pollutant formation during oxy-fuel co-combustion of microalgae and lignite.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Dou, Jinxiao; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels is seen as one of the key technologies for carbon capture to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion characteristics of lignite coal, Chlorella vulgaris microalgae, and their blends under O2/N2 and O2/CO2 conditions were studied using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (TG-MS). During co-combustion of blends, three distinct peaks were observed and were attributed to C. vulgaris volatiles combustion, combustion of lignite, and combustion of microalgae char. Activation energy during combustion was calculated using iso-conventional method. Increasing the microalgae content in the blend resulted in an increase in activation energy for the blends combustion. The emissions of S- and N-species during blend fuel combustion were also investigated. The addition of microalgae to lignite during air combustion resulted in lower CO2, CO, and NO2 yields but enhanced NO, COS, and SO2 formation. During oxy-fuel co-combustion, the addition of microalgae to lignite enhanced the formation of gaseous species.

  8. Instabilities and soot formation in high-pressure, rich, iso-octane-air explosion flames. 1. Dynamical structure

    SciTech Connect

    Lockett, R.D.; Woolley, R.

    2007-12-15

    Simultaneous OH planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and Rayleigh scattering measurements have been performed on 2-bar rich iso-octane-air explosion flames obtained in the optically accessible Leeds combustion bomb. Separate shadowgraph high-speed video images have been obtained from explosion flames under similar mixture conditions. Shadowgraph images, quantitative Rayleigh images, and normalized OH concentration images have been presented for a selection of these explosion flames. Normalized experimental equilibrium OH concentrations behind the flame fronts have been compared with normalized computed equilibrium OH concentrations as a function of equivalence ratio. The ratio of superequilibrium OH concentration in the flame front to equilibrium OH concentration behind the flame front reveals the response of the flame to the thermal-diffusive instability and the resistance of the flame front to rich quenching. Burned gas temperatures have been determined from the Rayleigh scattering images in the range 1.4{<=}{phi}{<=}1.9 and are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding predicted adiabatic flame temperatures. Soot formation was observed to occur behind deep cusps associated with large-wavelength cracks occurring in the flame front for equivalence ratio {phi}{>=}1.8 (C/O{>=}0.576). The reaction time-scale for iso-octane pyrolysis to soot formation has been estimated to be approximately 7.5-10 ms. (author)

  9. Characterizing the Amount and Chemistry of Biogenic SOA Formation from Pine Forest Air Using a Flow Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, B. B.; Ortega, A. M.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Fry, J.; Zarzana, K. J.; Draper, D. C.; Brown, S. S.; Kaser, L.; Karl, T.; Jud, W.; Hansel, A.; Hodzic, A.; Dube, W. P.; Wagner, N. L.; Brune, W. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    The amount and chemistry of biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation was characterized as a function of oxidant exposure using a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) oxidative flow reactor, sampling air in a terpene- and MBO-dominated pine forest during the 2011 BEACHON-RoMBAS field campaign at the U.S. Forest Service Manitou Forest Experimental Observatory in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. In the reactor, a chosen oxidant (OH, O3, or NO3) was generated and stepped over a range of values up to 10,000 times ambient levels, accelerating the gas-phase and heterogeneous oxidative aging of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), inorganic gases, and preexisting aerosol. The resulting SOA formation was measured using an Aerodyne HR-ToF-AMS, a TSI SMPS and a PTR-TOF-MS. Oxidative processing in the flow reactor was equivalent to a few hours up to ~20 days of atmospheric aging during the ~4-min reactor residence time. During BEACHON-RoMBAS, OH oxidation led to a net production of up to several μg/m3 of SOA at intermediate exposures (1-10 equivalent days) but resulted in net loss of OA mass (up to ~30%) at higher OH exposures (10-20 equivalent days), demonstrating the competing effects of functionalization/condensation vs. fragmentation/evaporation reactions as OH exposure increased. O3 and NO3 oxidation led to smaller (up to 0.5 μg/m3) SOA production, and loss of SOA mass due to fragmentation reactions was not observed. OH oxidation resulted in f44 vs. f43 and Van Krevelen diagram (H:C vs. O:C) slopes similar to ambient oxidation, suggesting the flow reactor oxidation pathways are similar to those in ambient air. Organic nitrate SOA production was observed from NO3 radical oxidation only. New particle formation was observed from OH oxidation, but not O3 or NO3 oxidation under our experimental conditions. An enhancement of SOA production under the influence of anthropogenic pollution (Denver) was also observed. High-resolution AMS measurements showed that the O:C and H

  10. IMAGING OF A TRANSITIONAL DISK GAP IN REFLECTED LIGHT: INDICATIONS OF PLANET FORMATION AROUND THE YOUNG SOLAR ANALOG LkCa 15

    SciTech Connect

    Thalmann, C.; Goto, M.; Henning, T.; Carson, J.; Brandner, W.; Feldt, M.; Grady, C. A.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Janson, M.; Fukagawa, M.; Honda, M.; Mulders, G. D.; Min, M.; Moro-MartIn, A.; Hodapp, K. W.; Abe, L.; Egner, S.; Golota, T.; Fukue, T.

    2010-08-01

    We present H- and K{sub s}-band imaging data resolving the gap in the transitional disk around LkCa 15, revealing the surrounding nebulosity. We detect sharp elliptical contours delimiting the nebulosity on the inside as well as the outside, consistent with the shape, size, ellipticity, and orientation of starlight reflected from the far-side disk wall, whereas the near-side wall is shielded from view by the disk's optically thick bulk. We note that forward scattering of starlight on the near-side disk surface could provide an alternate interpretation of the nebulosity. In either case, this discovery provides confirmation of the disk geometry that has been proposed to explain the spectral energy distributions of such systems, comprising an optically thick disk with an inner truncation radius of {approx}46 AU enclosing a largely evacuated gap. Our data show an offset of the nebulosity contours along the major axis, likely corresponding to a physical pericenter offset of the disk gap. This reinforces the leading theory that dynamical clearing by at least one orbiting body is the cause of the gap. Based on evolutionary models, our high-contrast imagery imposes an upper limit of 21 M{sub Jup} on companions at separations outside of 0.''1 and of 13 M{sub Jup} outside of 0.''2. Thus, we find that a planetary system around LkCa 15 is the most likely explanation for the disk architecture.

  11. Significant reduction in NiO band gap upon formation of Lix Ni1-x O alloys: applications to solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Alidoust, Nima; Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Keith, John A; Carter, Emily A

    2014-01-01

    Long-term sustainable solar energy conversion relies on identifying economical and versatile semiconductor materials with appropriate band structures for photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications (e.g., band gaps of ∼ 1.5-2.0 eV). Nickel oxide (NiO) is an inexpensive yet highly promising candidate. Its charge-transfer character may lead to longer carrier lifetimes needed for higher efficiencies, and its conduction band edge is suitable for driving hydrogen evolution via water-splitting. However, NiO's large band gap (∼ 4 eV) severely limits its use in practical applications. Our first-principles quantum mechanics calculations show band gaps dramatically decrease to ∼ 2.0 eV when NiO is alloyed with Li2O. We show that Lix Ni1-x O alloys (with x=0.125 and 0.25) are p-type semiconductors, contain states with no impurity levels in the gap and maintain NiO's desirable charge-transfer character. Lastly, we show that the alloys have potential for photoelectrochemical applications, with band edges well-placed for photocatalytic hydrogen production and CO2 reduction, as well as in tandem dye-sensitized solar cells as a photocathode.

  12. Gas phase formation of extremely oxidized pinene reaction products in chamber and ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Lönn, G.; Schobesberger, S.; Dal Maso, M.; Trimborn, A.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2012-06-01

    High molecular weight (300-650 Da) naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night between spring and autumn in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16) oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC). The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3-) and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7-1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4- (Hyytiälä) and C3F5O2- (JPAC). The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C10H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4-5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1-1 ppt (~106-107 molec cm-3). This is in a similar range as the amount of gaseous H2SO4 in Hyytiälä during day-time. As these highly oxidized organics are roughly 3 times heavier, likely with extremely low vapor pressures, their role in the initial steps of new aerosol particle formation and

  13. Gas phase formation of extremely oxidized pinene reaction products in chamber and ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehn, M.; Kleist, E.; Junninen, H.; Petäjä, T.; Lönn, G.; Schobesberger, S.; Dal Maso, M.; Trimborn, A.; Kulmala, M.; Worsnop, D. R.; Wahner, A.; Wildt, J.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2012-02-01

    High molecular weight (300-650 Da) naturally charged negative ions have previously been observed at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, Finland. The long-term measurements conducted in this work showed that these ions are observed practically every night during spring and summer in Hyytiälä. The ambient mass spectral patterns could be reproduced in striking detail during additional measurements of α-pinene (C10H16) oxidation at low-OH conditions in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber (JPAC). The ions were identified as clusters of the nitrate ion (NO3-) and α-pinene oxidation products reaching oxygen to carbon ratios of 0.7-1.3, while retaining most of the initial ten carbon atoms. Attributing the ions to clusters instead of single molecules was based on additional observations of the same extremely oxidized organics in clusters with HSO4- (Hyytiälä) and C3F5O2- (JPAC). The most abundant products in the ion spectra were identified as C105H14O7, C10H14O9, C10H16O9, and C10H14O11. The mechanism responsible for forming these molecules is still not clear, but the initial reaction is most likely ozone attack at the double bond, as the ions are mainly observed under dark conditions. β-pinene also formed highly oxidized products under the same conditions, but less efficiently, and mainly C9 compounds which were not observed in Hyytiälä, where β-pinene on average is 4-5 times less abundant than α-pinene. Further, to explain the high O/C together with the relatively high H/C, we propose that geminal diols and/or hydroperoxide groups may be important. We estimate that the night-time concentration of the sum of the neutral extremely oxidized products is on the order of 0.1-1 ppt (~106-107 molec cm-3). This is in a similar range as the amount of gaseous H2SO4 in Hyytiälä during day-time. As these highly oxidized organics are roughly 3 times heavier, likely with extremely low vapor pressures, their role in the initial steps of new aerosol particle formation and

  14. Surface pressure affects B-hordein network formation at the air-water interface in relation to gastric digestibility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingqi; Huang, Jun; Zeng, Hongbo; Chen, Lingyun

    2015-11-01

    Protein interfacial network formation under mechanical pressure and its influence on degradation was investigated at molecular level using Langmuir-Blodgett B-hordein monolayer as a 2D model. Surface properties, such as surface pressure, dilatational and shear rheology and the surface pressure--area (π-A) isotherm, of B-hordein at air-water interface were analyzed by tensiometer, rheometer and a Langmuir-Blodgett trough respectively. B-Hordein conformation and orientation under different surface pressures were determined by polarization modulation-infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS). The interfacial network morphology was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). B-Hordein could reduce the air-water surface tension rapidly to ∼ 45 mN/m and form a solid-like network with high rheological elasticity and compressibility at interface, which could be a result of interactions developed by intermolecular β-sheets. The results also revealed that B-hordein interfacial network switched from an expanded liquid phase to a solid-like film with increasing compression pressure. The orientation of B-hordein was parallel to the surface when in expended liquid phase, whereas upon compression, the hydrophobic repetitive region tilted away from water phase. When compressed to 30 mN/m, a strong elastic network was formed at the interface, and it was resistant to a harsh gastric-like environment of low pH and pepsin. This work generated fundamental knowledge, which suggested the potential to design B-hordein stabilized emulsions and encapsulations with controllable digestibility for small intestine targeted delivery of bioactive compounds.

  15. Suppression of Arctic Air Formation by Cloud Radiative Effects in a Two-Dimensional Cloud Resolving Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, T.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    To better understand equable paleoclimates, Arctic amplification of winter warming, and the high-latitude lapse-rate feedback, we investigate the process of Arctic air formation, wherein a high latitude maritime air mass is advected over land during polar night and strongly cooled from the surface up. We extend previous work done using a single-column model (Cronin and Tziperman, PNAS, in press) by performing two-dimensional idealized cloud-resolving simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Quantitatively consistent with previous results, we find that as the initial atmospheric state is warmed, increases in low cloud amount reduce the average surface cooling over a 14-day period by roughly a degree for each degree of warming of the initial atmospheric state, with the feedback strength increasing with warming. This is primarily attributed to a monotonic increase in surface cloud radiative forcing of approximately 2 W m-2 for each degree that the initial atmospheric sounding is warmed. The use of a two-dimensional model as opposed to a single-column model shows that the lower-tropospheric cloud layer becomes more turbulent and dominated by cumulus clouds as the climate is warmed, yet the cloud fraction remains high owing to the continued prevalence of stratus and fog layers. These results are robust across a variety of cloud microphysics schemes and are not sensitive to the horizontal or vertical resolution of the model. We also explore the vertical structure and horizontal variability of the bulk horizontal flow, the sensitivity of the results to subsidence and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration, and the contrasting roles of top-of-atmosphere and surface cloud radiative effects.

  16. Imaging of a Transitional Disk Gap in Reflected Light: Indications of Planet Formation Around the Young Solar Analog LkCa 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, C.; Grady, C. A.; Goto, M.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Janson, M.; Henning, T.; Fukagawa, M.; Honda, M.; Mulders, G. D.; Min, M.; Moro-Martín, A.; McElwain, M. W.; Hodapp, K. W.; Carson, J.; Abe, L.; Brandner, W.; Egner, S.; Feldt, M.; Fukue, T.; Golota, T.; Guyon, O.; Hashimoto, J.; Hayano, Y.; Hayashi, M.; Hayashi, S.; Ishii, M.; Kandori, R.; Knapp, G. R.; Kudo, T.; Kusakabe, N.; Kuzuhara, M.; Matsuo, T.; Miyama, S.; Morino, J.-I.; Nishimura, T.; Pyo, T.-S.; Serabyn, E.; Shibai, H.; Suto, H.; Suzuki, R.; Takami, M.; Takato, N.; Terada, H.; Tomono, D.; Turner, E. L.; Watanabe, M.; Yamada, T.; Takami, H.; Usuda, T.; Tamura, M.

    2010-08-01

    We present H- and K s-band imaging data resolving the gap in the transitional disk around LkCa 15, revealing the surrounding nebulosity. We detect sharp elliptical contours delimiting the nebulosity on the inside as well as the outside, consistent with the shape, size, ellipticity, and orientation of starlight reflected from the far-side disk wall, whereas the near-side wall is shielded from view by the disk's optically thick bulk. We note that forward scattering of starlight on the near-side disk surface could provide an alternate interpretation of the nebulosity. In either case, this discovery provides confirmation of the disk geometry that has been proposed to explain the spectral energy distributions of such systems, comprising an optically thick disk with an inner truncation radius of ~46 AU enclosing a largely evacuated gap. Our data show an offset of the nebulosity contours along the major axis, likely corresponding to a physical pericenter offset of the disk gap. This reinforces the leading theory that dynamical clearing by at least one orbiting body is the cause of the gap. Based on evolutionary models, our high-contrast imagery imposes an upper limit of 21 M Jup on companions at separations outside of 0farcs1 and of 13 M Jup outside of 0farcs2. Thus, we find that a planetary system around LkCa 15 is the most likely explanation for the disk architecture. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, and on data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under program ID 280.C-5033(A).

  17. Developmental transcriptome analysis and identification of genes involved in formation of intestinal air-breathing function of Dojo loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Weiwei; Cao, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xiuwen; Huang, Songqian; Liu, Chuanshu; Tomljanovic, Tea

    2016-01-01

    Dojo loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is a freshwater fish species of the loach family Cobitidae, using its posterior intestine as an accessory air-breathing organ. Little is known about the molecular regulatory mechanisms in the formation of intestinal air-breathing function of M. anguillicaudatus. Here high-throughput sequencing of mRNAs was performed from six developmental stages of posterior intestine of M. anguillicaudatus: 4-Dph (days post hatch) group, 8-Dph group, 12-Dph group, 20-Dph group, 40-Dph group and Oyd (one-year-old) group. These six libraries were assembled into 81300 unigenes. Totally 40757 unigenes were annotated. Subsequently, 35291 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were scanned among different developmental stages and clustered into 20 gene expression profiles. Finally, 15 key pathways and 25 key genes were mined, providing potential targets for candidate gene selection involved in formation of intestinal air-breathing function in M. anguillicaudatus. This is the first report of developmental transcriptome of posterior intestine in M. anguillicaudatus, offering a substantial contribution to the sequence resources for this species and providing a deep insight into the formation mechanism of its intestinal air-breathing function. This report demonstrates that M. anguillicaudatus is a good model for studies to identify and characterize the molecular basis of accessory air-breathing organ development in fish. PMID:27545457

  18. Developmental transcriptome analysis and identification of genes involved in formation of intestinal air-breathing function of Dojo loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Weiwei; Cao, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xiuwen; Huang, Songqian; Liu, Chuanshu; Tomljanovic, Tea

    2016-01-01

    Dojo loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is a freshwater fish species of the loach family Cobitidae, using its posterior intestine as an accessory air-breathing organ. Little is known about the molecular regulatory mechanisms in the formation of intestinal air-breathing function of M. anguillicaudatus. Here high-throughput sequencing of mRNAs was performed from six developmental stages of posterior intestine of M. anguillicaudatus: 4-Dph (days post hatch) group, 8-Dph group, 12-Dph group, 20-Dph group, 40-Dph group and Oyd (one-year-old) group. These six libraries were assembled into 81300 unigenes. Totally 40757 unigenes were annotated. Subsequently, 35291 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were scanned among different developmental stages and clustered into 20 gene expression profiles. Finally, 15 key pathways and 25 key genes were mined, providing potential targets for candidate gene selection involved in formation of intestinal air-breathing function in M. anguillicaudatus. This is the first report of developmental transcriptome of posterior intestine in M. anguillicaudatus, offering a substantial contribution to the sequence resources for this species and providing a deep insight into the formation mechanism of its intestinal air-breathing function. This report demonstrates that M. anguillicaudatus is a good model for studies to identify and characterize the molecular basis of accessory air-breathing organ development in fish. PMID:27545457

  19. Developmental transcriptome analysis and identification of genes involved in formation of intestinal air-breathing function of Dojo loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Weiwei; Cao, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xiuwen; Huang, Songqian; Liu, Chuanshu; Tomljanovic, Tea

    2016-08-22

    Dojo loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus is a freshwater fish species of the loach family Cobitidae, using its posterior intestine as an accessory air-breathing organ. Little is known about the molecular regulatory mechanisms in the formation of intestinal air-breathing function of M. anguillicaudatus. Here high-throughput sequencing of mRNAs was performed from six developmental stages of posterior intestine of M. anguillicaudatus: 4-Dph (days post hatch) group, 8-Dph group, 12-Dph group, 20-Dph group, 40-Dph group and Oyd (one-year-old) group. These six libraries were assembled into 81300 unigenes. Totally 40757 unigenes were annotated. Subsequently, 35291 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were scanned among different developmental stages and clustered into 20 gene expression profiles. Finally, 15 key pathways and 25 key genes were mined, providing potential targets for candidate gene selection involved in formation of intestinal air-breathing function in M. anguillicaudatus. This is the first report of developmental transcriptome of posterior intestine in M. anguillicaudatus, offering a substantial contribution to the sequence resources for this species and providing a deep insight into the formation mechanism of its intestinal air-breathing function. This report demonstrates that M. anguillicaudatus is a good model for studies to identify and characterize the molecular basis of accessory air-breathing organ development in fish.

  20. Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model for Simulating Winter Ozone Formation in the Uinta Basin with Intensive Oil and Gas Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matichuk, R.; Tonnesen, G.; Luecken, D.; Roselle, S. J.; Napelenok, S. L.; Baker, K. R.; Gilliam, R. C.; Misenis, C.; Murphy, B.; Schwede, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    The western United States is an important source of domestic energy resources. One of the primary environmental impacts associated with oil and natural gas production is related to air emission releases of a number of air pollutants. Some of these pollutants are important precursors to the formation of ground-level ozone. To better understand ozone impacts and other air quality issues, photochemical air quality models are used to simulate the changes in pollutant concentrations in the atmosphere on local, regional, and national spatial scales. These models are important for air quality management because they assist in identifying source contributions to air quality problems and designing effective strategies to reduce harmful air pollutants. The success of predicting oil and natural gas air quality impacts depends on the accuracy of the input information, including emissions inventories, meteorological information, and boundary conditions. The treatment of chemical and physical processes within these models is equally important. However, given the limited amount of data collected for oil and natural gas production emissions in the past and the complex terrain and meteorological conditions in western states, the ability of these models to accurately predict pollution concentrations from these sources is uncertain. Therefore, this presentation will focus on understanding the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model's ability to predict air quality impacts associated with oil and natural gas production and its sensitivity to input uncertainties. The results will focus on winter ozone issues in the Uinta Basin, Utah and identify the factors contributing to model performance issues. The results of this study will help support future air quality model development, policy and regulatory decisions for the oil and gas sector.

  1. Oxygen miscibility gap and spin glass formation in the pyrochlore Lu{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7}

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.; Ritter, C.; Harrison, A.; Attfield, J.P.

    2013-07-15

    Rare earth (R) molybdate pyrochlores, R{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7}, are of interest as frustrated magnets. Polycrystalline samples of Lu{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7−x} prepared at 1600 °C display a coexistence of cubic pyrochlore phases. Rietveld fits to powder neutron diffraction data and chemical analyses show that the miscibility gap is between a stoichiometric x=0 and an oxygen-deficient x≈0.4 phase. Lu{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7} behaves as a spin glass material, with a divergence of field cooled and zero field cooled DC magnetic susceptibilities at a spin freezing temperature T{sub f}=16 K, that varies with frequency in AC measurements following a Vogel–Fulcher law. Lu{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 6.6} is more highly frustrated spin glass and has T{sub f}=20 K. - Graphical abstract: The cubic Lu{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7−x} system exhibits a miscibility gap between coexisting pyrochlore phases at 1600 °C. Neutron powder diffraction refinement and chemical analysis shows that the gap separates stoichiometric x=0 and oxygen-deficient x≈0.4 phases. Lu{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7−x} has a frustrated spin glass ground state that is sensitive to the oxygen content. - Highlights: • The cubic Lu{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7−x} system has a miscibility gap between coexisting pyrochlore phases at 1600 °C. • Neutron powder diffraction shows that the gap separates x=0 and oxygen-deficient x≈0.4 phases. • Lu{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7−x} has a frustrated spin glass ground state that is sensitive to the oxygen content.

  2. Radiation effects in moist-air systems and the influence of radiolytic product formation on nuclear waste glass corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Wang, L.M.

    1997-07-01

    Ionizing radiation may affect the performance of glass in an unsaturated repository site by interacting with air, water vapor, or liquid water to produce a variety of radiolytic products. Tests were conducted to examine the effects of radiolysis under high gas/liquid ratios. Results indicate that nitrate is the predominant radiolytic product produced following both gamma and alpha radiation exposure, with lesser amounts of nitrite and carboxylic acids. The formation of nitrogen acids during exposure to long-lived, alpha-particle-emitting transuranic elements indicates that these acids may play a role in influencing nuclear waste form reactions in a long-term unsaturated disposal scenario. Experiments were also conducted with samples that simulate the composition of Savannah River Plant nuclear waste glasses. Radiolytic product formation in batch tests (340 m{sup {minus}1}, 90 C) resulted in a small increase in the release rates of many glass components, such as alkali and alkaline earth elements, although silicon and uranium release rates were slightly reduced indicating an overall beneficial effect of radiation on waste form stability. The radiolytic acids increased the rate of ion exchange between the glass and the thin film of condensate, resulting in accelerated corrosion rates for the glass. The paragenetic sequence of alteration phases formed on both the irradiated and nonirradiated glass samples reacted in the vapor hydration tests matches closely with those developed during volcanic glass alteration in naturally occurring saline-alkaline lake systems. This correspondence suggests that the high temperatures used in these tests have not changed the underlying glass reaction mechanism relate to that which controls glass reactions under ambient surficial conditions.

  3. The footprints of Saharan air layer and lightning on the formation of tropical depressions over the eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno Delgado, Diana C.; Chiao, Sen

    2014-09-01

    The roles of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and lightning during genesis of Tropical Depression (TD) 8 (2006) and TD 12 (2010) were investigated in relation to the interaction of the dust outbreaks with each system and their surrounding environment. This study applied data collected from the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis and 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes projects. Satellite observations from METEOSAT and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)—Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) were also employed for the study of the dust content. Lightning activity data from the Met Office Arrival Time Difference (ATD) system were used as another parameter to correlate moist convective overturning and a sign of cyclone formation. The AOD and lightning analysis for TD 8 demonstrated the time-lag connection through their positive contribution to TC-genesis. TD 12 developed without strong dust outbreak, but with lower wind shear (2 m s-1) and an organized Mesoscale Convective System (MCS). Overall, the results from the combination of various data analyses in this study support the fact that both systems developed under either strong or weak dust conditions. From these two cases, the location (i.e., the target area) of strong versus weak dust outbreaks, in association with lightning, were essential interactions that impacted TC-genesis. While our dust footprints hypothesis applied under strong dust conditions (i.e., TD 8), other factors (e.g., vertical wind shear, pre-existing vortex and trough location, thermodynamics) need to be evaluated as well. The results from this study suggest that the SAL is not a determining factor that affects the formation of tropical cyclones (i.e., TD 8 and TD 12).

  4. Pressure dependence of NO formation in laminar fuel-rich premixed CH{sub 4}/air flames

    SciTech Connect

    van Essen, V.M.; Sepman, A.V.; Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B.

    2008-05-15

    Effects of pressure on NO formation in CH{sub 4}/air flames at a fixed equivalence ratio of 1.3 are investigated. The axial profiles of temperature, OH, CH, and NO mole fractions are measured using laser-induced fluorescence and compared with one-dimensional flame calculations. The measured and calculated temperature, CH, and NO profiles in free flames are observed to vary upon increasing the pressure from 40 to 75 Torr, following a scaling law derived for a chemical mechanism containing only second-order reactions. At pressures 300-760 Torr, the measurements and calculations in burner-stabilized flames show increasing flame temperature and NO mole fractions when the mass flux is increased linearly with pressure, while the CH profiles remain unchanged. The observed deviation from the scaling law in the temperature profiles arises from the increasing contribution of three-body reactions to the flame front propagation velocity, leading to a decrease in the degree of burner stabilization. The deviation from the pressure scaling law for the NO mole fractions is due to the temperature dependence of the rate coefficient for the reaction between CH and N{sub 2} and the fact that the temperature profiles themselves do not scale. In contrast, the surprisingly good scaling of the CH mole fractions with pressure indicates the dominant role of two-body reactions participating in the chain of chemical reactions leading to CH formation. The calculations using GRI-Mech 3.0 substantially overpredict (up to 50%) the measured nitric oxide concentrations for all pressures studied. The observed differences in the NO mole fraction may be addressed by improving the CH prediction. (author)

  5. The mechanism of two-dimensional pocket formation in lean premixed methane-air flames with implications to turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Echekki, T.; Kollmann, W.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism of unburnt pocket formation in an unsteady two-dimensional premixed lean methane-air flame is investigated using direct numerical simulations. Theoretical results for nonlinear diffusion equations combined with analytical examples are used to interpret some of the results. Flame structure and propagation show three distinct stages of pocket formation: (1) flame channel closing involving head-on quenching of flames, (2) cusp recovery, and (3) pocket burnout. The flame channel closing and subsequent pocket burnout are mutual annihilation events that feature curvature, diffusion normal to the flame front, unsteady strain rate effects, and singularities in flame propagation and stretch rate. The results show that during channel closing and pocket burnout thermo-diffusive and chemical interactions result in the acceleration of the flames prior to annihilation; the time scales associated with the final stage of mutual annihilation and the initial stage of cusp recovery are significantly smaller than diffusive and convective time scales. Peak radical concentrations resulting from flame channel closing and pocket burnout exceed peak laminar values by as much as 25%. After the merging of the fuel consumption layers, radical production and flame structure shifts more towards an H{sub 2}/CO/O{sub 2} system at the expense of hydrocarbon reactions. Species thermodiffusive interaction times are shorter than the unstrained one-dimensional counterpart due to unsteady strain and convection. Curvature effects on the flame propagation are prominent during pocket burnout and cusp recovery. The recovery stage shows strong dependence on diffusion of radicals left from the channel closing stage. This diffusion is amplified by the strong curvature of the flame cusp.

  6. The footprints of Saharan air layer and lightning on the formation of tropical depressions over the eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno Delgado, Diana C.; Chiao, Sen

    2015-02-01

    The roles of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) and lightning during genesis of Tropical Depression (TD) 8 (2006) and TD 12 (2010) were investigated in relation to the interaction of the dust outbreaks with each system and their surrounding environment. This study applied data collected from the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis and 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes projects. Satellite observations from METEOSAT and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)—Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) were also employed for the study of the dust content. Lightning activity data from the Met Office Arrival Time Difference (ATD) system were used as another parameter to correlate moist convective overturning and a sign of cyclone formation. The AOD and lightning analysis for TD 8 demonstrated the time-lag connection through their positive contribution to TC-genesis. TD 12 developed without strong dust outbreak, but with lower wind shear (2 m s-1) and an organized Mesoscale Convective System (MCS). Overall, the results from the combination of various data analyses in this study support the fact that both systems developed under either strong or weak dust conditions. From these two cases, the location (i.e., the target area) of strong versus weak dust outbreaks, in association with lightning, were essential interactions that impacted TC-genesis. While our dust footprints hypothesis applied under strong dust conditions (i.e., TD 8), other factors (e.g., vertical wind shear, pre-existing vortex and trough location, thermodynamics) need to be evaluated as well. The results from this study suggest that the SAL is not a determining factor that affects the formation of tropical cyclones (i.e., TD 8 and TD 12).

  7. [METHODOLOGY FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF THE IMPACT OF THE ATMOSPHERIC AIR POLLUTION ON THE FORMATION OF THE LEVELS OF OVERALL MORBIDITY RATE OF BRONCHIAL ASTHMA].

    PubMed

    Veremchuk, L V; Cherpack, N A; Gvozdenko, T A; Volkova, M V

    2015-01-01

    In large cities with strong air pollution the formation of the levels of morbidity rate of bronchial asthma has a complex causation that requires the search for informative methods for identification of causes and consequences of this dependence. Method for the assessment of the dependence of overall levels of morbidity rate of bronchial asthma on the degree of air pollution allows you to select a "useful information" of the direct impact of air pollution on a background of random processes and latent relationship between human and environment. The use of the method of the information entropy analysis allowed us to estimate the total and the individual contribution of the separate components of air pollution on the formation of levels of total morbidity rate of bronchial asthma in the population of the city of Vladivostok. Levels of total incidence of this pathology were established to differ in various age groups. The adult population is more adapted to air pollution, but retains a high sensitivity to the impact of nitrogen dioxide. Levels of overall l morbidity rate of bronchial asthma in children and adolescents depend on the total air pollution with some dominance of the influence of suspended matter and carbon monoxide.

  8. An examination of boundary layer structure under the influence of the gap winds in Urumqi, China, during air pollution episode in winter.

    PubMed

    Li, Xia; Xia, Xiangao; Xin, Yu; Ma, Yufen; Yang, Jing; Li, Jinglin; Yang, Xinghua

    2012-01-01

    Tethered-sonde measurements of atmospheric profiles were performed at Urumuqi, capital of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, from 29 December 2008 to 14 January 2009. The data were used to examine the boundary layer structure during this severe air pollution period. Diurnal evolution of local wind flow near Urumqi was simulated using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5). Measurements from operational radiosonde data showed that a southeasterly elevated low-level jet often intruded upon Urumqi through the middle Tianshan Mountain pass to the south of the city. The tethered-sonde measurements showed that calm and northwesterly winds prevailed near the surface in Urumqi, whereas the southeasterly winds of relatively higher speed were dominant above approximately 400 m. Both temperature inversion and humidity inversion frequently occured during day and nighttime. Temperature inversion intensity could sharply rise as the stronger elevated southeasterly gale (ESEG) happened. Model simulations showed that the winds near the surface around Urumqi remained calm during nighttime and developed toward the mountains during daytime. As cool airflow in the basin confronted the southeasterly winds from the pass in the lower layer, they formed a convergence line around Urumqi city, which was not favor for dilution of air pollutants.

  9. The footprints of Saharan Air Layer and lightning on the formation of tropical depressions over the eastern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno Delgado, Diana C.

    In this study, the results of an observational analysis and a numerical analysis on the role of the Saharan Air Layer during tropical cyclogenesis (TC-genesis) are described. The observational analysis investigates the interaction of dust particles and lightning during the genesis stage of two developed cases (Hurricanes Helene 2006 and Julia 2010). The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and WRF-Chemistry models were used to include and monitor the aerosols and chemical processes that affect TC-genesis. The numerical modeling involved two developed cases (Hurricanes Helene 2006 and Julia 2010) and two non-developed cases (Non-Developed 2011 and Non-Developed 2012). The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and lightning analysis for Hurricane Helene 2006 demonstrated the time-lag connection through their positive contribution to TC-genesis. The observational analyses supported the fact that both systems developed under either strong or weak dust conditions. From the two cases, the location of strong versus weak dust outbreaks in association with lightning was essential interactions that impacted TC-genesis. Furthermore, including dust particles, chemical processes, and aerosol feedback in the simulations with WRF-CHEM provides results closer to observations than regular WRF. The model advantageously shows the location of the dust particles inside of the tropical system. Overall, the results from this study suggest that the SAL is not a determining factor that affects the formation of tropical cyclones.

  10. Numerical studies of nitric oxide formation in nanosecond-pulsed discharge-stabilized flames of premixed methane/air.

    PubMed

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A

    2015-08-13

    A simulation is developed to investigate the kinetics of nitric oxide (NO) formation in premixed methane/air combustion stabilized by nanosecond-pulsed discharges. The simulation consists of two connected parts. The first part calculates the kinetics within the discharge while considering both plasma/combustion reactions and species diffusion, advection and thermal conduction to the surrounding flow. The second part calculates the kinetics of the overall flow after mixing the discharge flow with the surrounding flow to account for the effect that the discharge has on the overall kinetics. The simulation reveals that the discharge produces a significant amount of atomic oxygen (O) as a result of the high discharge temperature and dissociative quenching of excited state nitrogen by molecular oxygen. This atomic oxygen subsequently produces hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The fractions of these O and OH then undergo Zel'dovich reactions and are found to contribute to as much as 73% of the total NO that is produced. The post-discharge simulation shows that the NO survives within the flow once produced. PMID:26170428

  11. New particle formation under the influence of the long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Indra; Kim, Seyoung; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio; Takami, Akinori; Yoshino, Ayako; Irei, Satoshi; Park, Kihong; Takamura, Tamio; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2016-09-01

    Field observations to investigate the correlation between New Particle Formation (NPF) and the long-range transport of air pollutants in the East Asia region were carried out on a rural Island of Japan in the East-China Sea (Fukue Island, 32.8°N, 128.7°E) over three periods (February 23 to March 7, 2013; November 7 to 20, 2013; and November 2 to 24, 2014). Frequent NPF events were identified (16 events in 50 days), typically in association with sudden increases in particle number concentrations and the successive growth of particles to mobility diameters of several tens of nanometers. The NPF events were classified into two types (A and B) according to the initially detected particle sizes (onset diameters). Type-A consisted of strong NPF events with onset diameters as small as 5 nm. Type-B consisted of NPF events whose onset (<10 nm) was not clearly identifiable. The correlations of SO2 concentrations, solar radiation, PM2.5 concentrations, and chemical composition were analyzed based on the types of NPF events.

  12. Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 1. Ozone formation metrics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Robert J; Revelle, Meghan K; Dabdub, Donald

    2004-02-01

    Metrics associated with ozone (O3) formation are investigated using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) three-dimensional air-quality model. Variables investigated include the O3 production rate (P(O3)), O3 production efficiency (OPE), and total reactivity (the sum of the reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO) and all organic gases that react with the hydroxyl radical). Calculations are spatially and temporally resolved; surface-level and vertically averaged results are shown for September 9, 1993 for three Southern California locations: Central Los Angeles, Azusa, and Riverside. Predictions indicate increasing surface-level O3 concentrations with distance downwind, in line with observations. Surface-level and vertically averaged P(O3) values peak during midday and are highest downwind; surface P(O3) values are greater than vertically averaged values. Surface OPEs generally are highest downwind and peak during midday in downwind locations. In contrast, peaks occur in early morning and late afternoon in the vertically averaged case. Vertically averaged OPEs tend to be greater than those for the surface. Total reactivities are highest in upwind surface locations and peak during rush hours; vertically averaged reactivities are smaller and tend to be more uniform temporally and spatially. Total reactivity has large contributions from CO, alkanes, alkenes, aldehydes, unsubstituted monoaromatics, and secondary organics. Calculations using estimated emissions for 2010 result in decreases in P(O3) values and reactivities but increases in OPEs.

  13. New particle formation under the influence of the long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Indra; Kim, Seyoung; Seto, Takafumi; Otani, Yoshio; Takami, Akinori; Yoshino, Ayako; Irei, Satoshi; Park, Kihong; Takamura, Tamio; Kaneyasu, Naoki; Hatakeyama, Shiro

    2016-09-01

    Field observations to investigate the correlation between New Particle Formation (NPF) and the long-range transport of air pollutants in the East Asia region were carried out on a rural Island of Japan in the East-China Sea (Fukue Island, 32.8°N, 128.7°E) over three periods (February 23 to March 7, 2013; November 7 to 20, 2013; and November 2 to 24, 2014). Frequent NPF events were identified (16 events in 50 days), typically in association with sudden increases in particle number concentrations and the successive growth of particles to mobility diameters of several tens of nanometers. The NPF events were classified into two types (A and B) according to the initially detected particle sizes (onset diameters). Type-A consisted of strong NPF events with onset diameters as small as 5 nm. Type-B consisted of NPF events whose onset (<10 nm) was not clearly identifiable. The correlations of SO2 concentrations, solar radiation, PM2.5 concentrations, and chemical composition were analyzed based on the types of NPF events.

  14. Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 1. Ozone formation metrics.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Robert J; Revelle, Meghan K; Dabdub, Donald

    2004-02-01

    Metrics associated with ozone (O3) formation are investigated using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) three-dimensional air-quality model. Variables investigated include the O3 production rate (P(O3)), O3 production efficiency (OPE), and total reactivity (the sum of the reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO) and all organic gases that react with the hydroxyl radical). Calculations are spatially and temporally resolved; surface-level and vertically averaged results are shown for September 9, 1993 for three Southern California locations: Central Los Angeles, Azusa, and Riverside. Predictions indicate increasing surface-level O3 concentrations with distance downwind, in line with observations. Surface-level and vertically averaged P(O3) values peak during midday and are highest downwind; surface P(O3) values are greater than vertically averaged values. Surface OPEs generally are highest downwind and peak during midday in downwind locations. In contrast, peaks occur in early morning and late afternoon in the vertically averaged case. Vertically averaged OPEs tend to be greater than those for the surface. Total reactivities are highest in upwind surface locations and peak during rush hours; vertically averaged reactivities are smaller and tend to be more uniform temporally and spatially. Total reactivity has large contributions from CO, alkanes, alkenes, aldehydes, unsubstituted monoaromatics, and secondary organics. Calculations using estimated emissions for 2010 result in decreases in P(O3) values and reactivities but increases in OPEs. PMID:14968859

  15. Atmospheric air diffuse array-needles dielectric barrier discharge excited by positive, negative, and bipolar nanosecond pulses in large electrode gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, De-zheng; Wang, Wen-chun; Liu, Zhi-jie; Wang, Sen; Jiang, Peng-chao; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, positive, negative, and bipolar nanosecond pulses are employed to generate stable and diffuse discharge plasma using array needles-plate electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. A comparison study of discharge images, electrical characteristics, optical emission spectra, and plasma vibrational temperature and rotational temperatures in three pulsed polarity discharges is carried on under different discharge conditions. It is found that bipolar pulse is beneficial to the excitation of diffuse dielectric barrier discharge, which can generate a room temperature plasma with more homogeneous and higher discharge intensity compared with unipolar discharges. Under the condition of 6 mm electrode gap distance, 26 kV pulse peak voltage, and 150 Hz pulse repetition rate, the emission intensity of N2 (C3Πu → B3Πg) of the bipolar pulsed discharge is 4 times higher than the unipolar discharge (both positive and negative), while the plasma gas temperature is kept at 300 K, which is about 10-20 K lower than the unipolar discharge plasma.

  16. Effect of inlet-air humidity, temperature, pressure, and reference Mach number on the formation of oxides of nitrogen in a gas turbine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchionna, N. R.; Diehl, L. A.; Trout, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the effect of inlet air humidity on the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from a gas turbine combustor. Combustor inlet air temperature ranged from 506 K (450 F) to 838 K (1050 F). The tests were primarily run at a constant pressure of 6 atmospheres and reference Mach number of 0.065. The NOx emission index was found to decrease with increasing inlet air humidity at a constant exponential rate: NOx = NOx0e-19H (where H is the humidity and the subscript 0 denotes the value at zero humidity). the emission index increased exponentially with increasing normalized inlet air temperature to the 1.14 power. Additional tests made to determine the effect of pressure and reference Mach number on NOx showed that the NOx emission index varies directly with pressure to the 0.5 power and inversely with reference Mach number.

  17. Formation of Dirac point and the topological surface states inside the strained gap for mixed 3D Hg1-xCdx Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchewka, Michał

    2016-10-01

    In this paper the results of the numerical calculation obtained for the three-dimensional (3D) strained Hg1-xCdx Te layers for the x-Cd composition from 0.1 to 0.155 and a different mismatch of the lattice constant are presented. For the investigated region of the Cd composition (x value) the negative energy gap (Eg =Γ8 -Γ6) in the Hg1-xCdx Te is smaller than in the case of pure HgTe which, as it turns out, has a significant influence on the topological surface states (TSS) and the position of the Dirac point. The numerical calculation based on the finite difference method applied for the 8×8 kp model with the in-plane tensile strain for (001) growth oriented structure shows that the Dirac cone inside the induced insulating band gap for non zero of the Cd composition and a bigger strain caused by the bigger lattice mismatch (than for the 3D HgTe TI) can be obtained. It was also shown how different x-Cd compounds move the Dirac cone from the valence band into the band gap. The presented results show that 75 nm wide 3D Hg1-xCdx Te structures with x ≈ 0.155 and 1.6% lattice mismatch make the system a true topological insulator with the dispersion of the topological surface states similar to those ones obtained for the strained CdTe/HgTe QW.

  18. Analysis of photonic band gaps in two-dimensional photonic crystals with rods covered by a thin interfacial layer

    SciTech Connect

    Trifonov, T.; Marsal, L.F.; Pallares, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Alcubilla, R.

    2004-11-15

    We investigate different aspects of the absolute photonic band gap (PBG) formation in two-dimensional photonic structures consisting of rods covered with a thin dielectric film. Specifically, triangular and honeycomb lattices in both complementary arrangements, i.e., air rods drilled in silicon matrix and silicon rods in air, are studied. We consider that the rods are formed of a dielectric core (silicon or air) surrounded by a cladding layer of silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), or germanium (Ge). Such photonic lattices present absolute photonic band gaps, and we study the evolution of these gaps as functions of the cladding material and thickness. Our results show that in the case of air rods in dielectric media the existence of dielectric cladding reduces the absolute gap width and may cause complete closure of the gap if thick layers are considered. For the case of dielectric rods in air, however, the existence of a cladding layer can be advantageous and larger absolute PBG's can be achieved.

  19. Effect of different sulphur precursors on morphology and band-gap on the formation of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) particles with microwave irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patro, Bharati; Vijaylakshmi, S.; Sharma, Pratibha

    2016-05-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a promising semiconductor material for ecological cost effective thin film Photovoltaic (PV) devices. As it contains earth abundant and non-toxic elements, it has the advantages over commercially available CIGS and CdTe thin film PV devices. In the present work, the pure phase Cu2ZnSnS4 particles were successfully synthesised with microwave irradiation. The morphology and phase study was carried out for the samples prepared with two different sulphur precursors viz. thiourea and thioacetamide (TAA). CZTS particles with thiourea as sulphur precursor are more crystalline than CZTS particles with TAA. The band gap of 1.654eV and 1.713eV were calculated for the samples prepared with thiourea and TAA respectively.

  20. A computational study of radiation and gravity effect on temperature and soot formation in a methane air co-flow diffusion flame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowal, Arup Jyoti; Mandal, Bijan Kumar

    2016-07-01

    An effort has been made for a quantitative assessment of the soot formed under steady state in a methane air co flow diffusion flame by a numerical simulation at normal gravity and at lower gravity levels of 0.5 G, 0.1 G and 0.0001 G (microgravity). The peak temperature at microgravity is reduced by about 50 K than that at normal gravity level. There is an augmentation of soot formation at lower gravity levels. Peak value at microgravity multiplies by a factor of ˜7 of that at normal gravity. However, if radiation is not considered, soot formation is found to be much more.

  1. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Efficient surface-erosion plasma formation in air due to the action of pulse-periodic laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min'ko, L. Ya; Chumakou, A. N.; Bosak, N. A.

    1990-11-01

    A study was made of the interaction of a series of periodic laser (λ = 1.06 μm) pulses with a number of materials (aluminum, copper, graphite, ebonite) in air at laser radiation power densities q = 107-109 W/cm2 and repetition frequencies f<=50 kHz. The radiation was concentrated in spots of ~ 10 - 2 cm2 area. Efficient formation of plasma as a result of laser erosion (q > 2 × 108 W/cm2, f>=5 kHz) was observed. A screening layer of an air plasma created by the first pulse of the series was expelled from the interaction zone and this was followed by erosion plasma formation under conditions of slight screening of the target during the action of the subsequent laser pulses.

  2. IN VIVO EVIDENCE OF FREE RADICAL FORMATION IN THE RAT LUNG AFTER EXPOSURE TO AN EMISSION SOURCE AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to air pollution particles can be associated with increased human morbidity and mortality. The mechanism(s) of lung injury remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that lung exposure to oil fly ash (an emission source air pollution particle) causes in vivo free radical ...

  3. Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model for Simulating Winter Ozone Formation in the Uinta Basin

    EPA Science Inventory

    Areas with close proximity to oil and natural gas operations in rural Utah have experienced winter ozone levels that exceed EPA’s National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Through a collaborative effort, EPA Region 8 – Air Program, ORD, and OAQPS used the Commun...

  4. Interfacial chemical reaction and multiple gap state formation on three layer cathode in organic light-emitting diode: Ca/BaF2/Alq3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Gun; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin; Lee, Seung Mi; Kim, Jeong Won

    2015-07-01

    A three layer cathode is a promising stack structure for long lifetime and high efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes. The interfacial chemical reactions and their effects on electronic structures for alkaline-earth metal (Ca, Ba)/Alq3 [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum] and Ca/BaF2/Alq3 are investigated using in-situ X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as molecular model calculation. The BaF2 interlayer initially prevents direct contact between Alq3 and the reactive Ca metal, but it is dissociated into Ba and CaF2 by the addition of Ca. As the Ca thickness increases, the Ca penetrates the interlayer to directly participate in the reaction with the underlying Alq3. This series of chemical reactions takes place irrespective of the BaF2 buffer layer thickness as long as the Ca overlayer thickness is sufficient. The interface reaction between the alkaline-earth metal and Alq3 generates two energetically separated gap states in a sequential manner. This phenomenon is explained by step-by-step charge transfer from the alkaline-earth metal to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital states of Alq3, forming new occupied states below the Fermi level.

  5. Interfacial chemical reaction and multiple gap state formation on three layer cathode in organic light-emitting diode: Ca/BaF{sub 2}/Alq{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Gun; Kim, Jeong Won; Lee, Hyunbok; Yi, Yeonjin; Lee, Seung Mi

    2015-07-14

    A three layer cathode is a promising stack structure for long lifetime and high efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes. The interfacial chemical reactions and their effects on electronic structures for alkaline-earth metal (Ca, Ba)/Alq{sub 3} [tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum] and Ca/BaF{sub 2}/Alq{sub 3} are investigated using in-situ X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as molecular model calculation. The BaF{sub 2} interlayer initially prevents direct contact between Alq{sub 3} and the reactive Ca metal, but it is dissociated into Ba and CaF{sub 2} by the addition of Ca. As the Ca thickness increases, the Ca penetrates the interlayer to directly participate in the reaction with the underlying Alq{sub 3}. This series of chemical reactions takes place irrespective of the BaF{sub 2} buffer layer thickness as long as the Ca overlayer thickness is sufficient. The interface reaction between the alkaline-earth metal and Alq{sub 3} generates two energetically separated gap states in a sequential manner. This phenomenon is explained by step-by-step charge transfer from the alkaline-earth metal to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital states of Alq{sub 3}, forming new occupied states below the Fermi level.

  6. The Effect of Air Preheat at Atmospheric Pressure on the Formation of NO(x) in the Quick-Mix Sections of an Axially Staged Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vardakas, M. A.; Leong, M. Y.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept has been proposed to minimize the formation of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) in gas turbine systems. The success of this combustor strategy is dependent upon the efficiency of the mixing section bridging the fuel-rich and fuel-lean stages. Note that although these results were obtained from an experiment designed to study an RQL mixer, the link between mixing and NOx signatures is considerably broader than this application, in that the need to understand this link exists in most advanced combustors. The experiment reported herein was designed to study the effects of inlet air temperature on NO(x) formation in a mixing section. The results indicate that NO(x) emission is increased for all preheated cases compared to non-preheated cases. When comparing the various mixing modules, the affect of jet penetration is important, as this determines where NO(x) concentrations peak, and affects overall NO(x) production. Although jet air comprises 70 percent of the total airflow, the impact that jet air preheat has on overall NO(x) emissions is small compared to preheating both main and jet air flow.

  7. Investigation of the impact of imposed air inlet velocity oscillations on the formation and oxidation of soot using simultaneous 2-Colour-TIRE-LII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, A.; Suntz, R.; Bockhorn, H.

    2015-05-01

    The response of non-premixed swirling flames to acoustic perturbations at various frequencies (0-350 Hz) and the impact of imposed air inlet velocity oscillations on the formation and oxidation of soot are investigated. The results obtained from these flames are of special interest for "rich-quenched-lean" (RQL) combustion concepts applied in modern gas turbines. In RQL combustion, the fuel is initially oxidized by air under fuel-rich conditions in a first stage followed by a fuel-lean combustion step in a second stage. To mimic soot formation and oxidation in RQL combustion, soot particle measurements in highly turbulent, non-premixed swirling natural gas/ethylene-confined flames at imposed air inlet velocity oscillations are performed using simultaneous 2-Colour-Time-Resolved-Laser-Induced Incandescence (simultaneous 2-Colour-TIRE-LII). The latter technique is combined with line-of-sight averaged OH*-chemiluminescence imaging, measurements of the velocity field by high-speed particle imaging velocimetry under reactive combustion conditions and measurements of the mean temperature field obtained by a thermocouple. A natural gas/ethylene mixture (Φ = 1.56, 42 % C2H4, 58 % natural gas, P th = 17.6 kW at atmospheric pressure) is used as a fuel, which is oxidized by air under fuel-rich conditions in the first combustion chamber.

  8. Studies on the Tempo of Bubble Formation in Recently Cavitated Vessels: A Model to Predict the Pressure of Air Bubbles1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. PMID:25907963

  9. Final Report for Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-97ER45666 ?Interface Diffusion and Deep Level Formation of SiC and Other Wide Gap Materials?

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard J. Brillson

    2006-03-24

    This final report describes the research effort focusing on the nature of charge transfer and localized electronic structure at semiconductor interfaces, one of the most fundamental issues in the solid state. The basic charge exchange between two materials in general is directly connected with the systematic atomic bonding changes and redistribution that occurs at the nanoscale interface. Our programhas extended our understanding of the atomic-scale nature of electrostatic barrier formation, heterojunction band offsets, and the optical and electronic features of impurity confinement in a set of model materials systems, including nanometer-scale wide band gap semiconductor and insulator structures. This fundamentally new class of materials investigation utilizes a powerful and unique combination of techniques that are revealing the atomic-scale movement, chemical bonding, and resultant charge transfer across well-defined model interfaces.

  10. Air/water interfacial formation of freestanding, stimuli-responsive, self-healing catecholamine Janus-faced microfilms.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seonki; Schaber, Clemens F; Dening, Kirstin; Appel, Esther; Gorb, Stanislav N; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-12-01

    A catecholamine freestanding film is discovered to be spontaneously formed at the air-water interface, and the film has unique properties of robust surface adhesiveness, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive properties. The interfacial film-producing procedure is a simple single step containing polyamines and catechol(amine)s. It is found that oxygen-rich regions existing at an air-water interface greatly accelerate the catecholamine crosslinking reaction. PMID:25220108

  11. Air/water interfacial formation of freestanding, stimuli-responsive, self-healing catecholamine Janus-faced microfilms.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seonki; Schaber, Clemens F; Dening, Kirstin; Appel, Esther; Gorb, Stanislav N; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-12-01

    A catecholamine freestanding film is discovered to be spontaneously formed at the air-water interface, and the film has unique properties of robust surface adhesiveness, self-healing, and stimuli-responsive properties. The interfacial film-producing procedure is a simple single step containing polyamines and catechol(amine)s. It is found that oxygen-rich regions existing at an air-water interface greatly accelerate the catecholamine crosslinking reaction.

  12. Multifrequency gap solitons in nonlinear photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping; Zhang, Zhao-Qing

    2003-11-21

    We predict the existence of multifrequency gap solitons (MFGSs) in both one- and two-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals. A MFGS is a single intrinsic mode possessing multiple frequencies inside the gap. Its existence is a result of synergic nonlinear coupling among solitons or soliton trains at different frequencies. Its formation can either lower the threshold fields of the respective frequency components or stabilize their excitations. These MFGSs form a new class of stable gap solitons.

  13. Modeling and three-dimensional simulation of the neutral dynamics in an air discharge confined in a microcavity. I. Formation and free expansion of the pressure waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichwald, O.; Yousfi, M.; Bayle, P.; Jugroot, M.

    1998-11-01

    A three-dimensional numerical analysis of the neutral dynamics is performed in the case of a short-gap (0.5 mm) spark discharge in air confined in microcavities at atmospheric pressure (760 Torr) and ambient temperature (293 K). This work is undertaken in the framework of silicon microsystems bearing a micropump actuated by pressure waves which result from a discharge. The short-gap discharge characteristics are taken from experimental results namely 470 ns for the duration and 13.5 W for the maximum injected power. The neutral gas evolution is described by the classical transport equations and solved by a powerful numerical monotonic upstream-centered scheme for conversion laws. The gas-solid interaction occurring in thermal and hydrodynamic boundary layers is taken into account assuming that the microcavity temperature remains invariant (293 K). This article (part I) is devoted to the first evolution phase of the neutral dynamics whose the duration corresponds to the discharge time. Our results clearly show that the first phase can again be split into a neutral inertia phase (during which the thermal energy transferred is stored in the ionized channel) followed by a free expansion one where this thermal energy is dissipated in the microcavity volume. The latter phase is analyzed before the neutral heterogeneities reach the microcavity's walls. We also discuss the specific gas behaviors of the gas nearby the electrode surfaces, following heat exchanges and viscous stress.

  14. Formative research on the primo vascular system and acceptance by the korean scientific community: the gap between creative basic science and practical convergence technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon Gi

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to trace the formative process of primo vascular system (PVS) research over the past decade and to describe the characteristics of the Korean scientific community. By publishing approximately 30 papers in journals ranking in the Science Citation Index (Expanded), the PVS research team actively convinced domestic and international scientists of the anatomical existence of the PVS and its possible application to Korean and Western medicine. In addition, by sharing the PVS observation technique, the team promoted the dissemination and further pursuit of the research. In 2012, however, PVS researchers performed smaller scale research without advancing to a higher level as compared to the early days. The main reasons were found to be the Korean Research and Development policy of supporting creative, small-scale basic research and applied research of Western scientific fields that promised potentially greater success on an extensive scale; the indifference concerning, and the disbelief in, the existence of a new circulatory system were shown by the Western medical community. In addition, the Oriental medical community was apathetic about working with the PVS team. Professors Kwang-Sup Soh and Byung-Cheon Lee were the prime movers of PVS research under difficult conditions. Spurred by their belief in the existence and significance of the PVS, they continued with their research despite insufficient experimental data. The Korean scientific community is not ready to promote the Korea-oriented creative field of the PVS team.

  15. Formative research on the primo vascular system and acceptance by the korean scientific community: the gap between creative basic science and practical convergence technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon Gi

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to trace the formative process of primo vascular system (PVS) research over the past decade and to describe the characteristics of the Korean scientific community. By publishing approximately 30 papers in journals ranking in the Science Citation Index (Expanded), the PVS research team actively convinced domestic and international scientists of the anatomical existence of the PVS and its possible application to Korean and Western medicine. In addition, by sharing the PVS observation technique, the team promoted the dissemination and further pursuit of the research. In 2012, however, PVS researchers performed smaller scale research without advancing to a higher level as compared to the early days. The main reasons were found to be the Korean Research and Development policy of supporting creative, small-scale basic research and applied research of Western scientific fields that promised potentially greater success on an extensive scale; the indifference concerning, and the disbelief in, the existence of a new circulatory system were shown by the Western medical community. In addition, the Oriental medical community was apathetic about working with the PVS team. Professors Kwang-Sup Soh and Byung-Cheon Lee were the prime movers of PVS research under difficult conditions. Spurred by their belief in the existence and significance of the PVS, they continued with their research despite insufficient experimental data. The Korean scientific community is not ready to promote the Korea-oriented creative field of the PVS team. PMID:24290796

  16. Mechanisms of the formation of magnetic characteristics of a cobalt-based amorphous magnetically soft alloy under heat treatment in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skulkina, N. A.; Ivanov, O. A.; Stepanova, E. A.; Shubina, L. N.; Kuznetsov, P. A.; Mazeeva, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Physical causes of the formation of magnetic characteristics of cobalt-based alloys with a near to zero saturation magnetostriction under heat treatment in air have been studied using the Co-Fe-Ni-Cr-Si-B amorphous magnetically soft alloy as an example. The results of the study have shown the possibility of using the vapor treatment of surfaces of ribbons made of amorphous magnetically soft alloys to determine the sign of magnetostriction. The dependence of the sign of magnetostriction on the structural state of a ribbon, which is produced by the heat treatment, has been experimentally found. It has been established that physical causes of the formation of magnetic characteristics of the cobalt-based alloys are the same as those for iron-based alloys. Changes in the magnetic characteristics after annealing result from the relaxation of quenchinginduced internal stresses, as well as from the effect of stresses induced by hydrogen and oxygen atoms incorporated into the surface of the ribbon in the course of its interaction with water vapor in air and by the formation of an amorphous-crystalline surface layer.

  17. Indoor transient SOA formation from ozone + α-pinene reactions: Impacts of air exchange and initial product concentrations, and comparison to limonene ozonolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssefi, Somayeh; Waring, Michael S.

    2015-07-01

    The ozonolysis of reactive organic gases (ROG), e.g. terpenes, generates secondary organic aerosol (SOA) indoors. The SOA formation strength of such reactions is parameterized by the aerosol mass fraction (AMF), a.k.a. SOA yield, which is the mass ratio of generated SOA to oxidized ROG. AMFs vary in magnitude both among and for individual ROGs. Here, we quantified dynamic SOA formation from the ozonolysis of α-pinene with 'transient AMFs,' which describe SOA formation due to pulse emission of a ROG in an indoor space with air exchange, as is common when consumer products are intermittently used in ventilated buildings. We performed 19 experiments at low, moderate, and high (0.30, 0.52, and 0.94 h-1, respectively) air exchange rates (AER) at varying concentrations of initial reactants. Transient AMFs as a function of peak SOA concentrations ranged from 0.071 to 0.25, and they tended to increase as the AER and product of the initial reactant concentrations increased. Compared to our similar research on limonene ozonolysis (Youssefi and Waring, 2014), for which formation strength was driven by secondary ozone reactions, the AER impact for α-pinene was opposite in direction and weaker, while the initial reactant product impact was in the same direction but stronger for α-pinene than for limonene. Linear fits of AMFs for α-pinene ozonolysis as a function of the AER and initial reactant concentrations are provided so that future indoor models can predict SOA formation strength.

  18. Nitric oxide formation in a lean, premixed-prevaporized jet A/air flame tube: An experimental and analytical study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Chi-Ming; Bianco, Jean; Deur, John M.; Ghorashi, Bahman

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study was performed on a lean, premixed-prevaporized Jet A/air flame tube. The NO(x) emissions were measured in a flame tube apparatus at inlet temperatures ranging from 755 to 866 K (900 to 1100 F), pressures from 10 to 15 atm, and equivalence ratios from 0.37 to 0.62. The data were then used in regressing an equation to predict the NO(x) production levels in combustors of similar design. Through an evaluation of parameters it was found that NO(x) is dependent on adiabatic flame temperature and combustion residence time, yet independent of pressure and inlet air temperature for the range of conditions studied. This equation was then applied to experimental data that were obtained from the literature, and a good correlation was achieved.

  19. Real-time measurements of secondary organic aerosol formation and aging from ambient air in an oxidation flow reactor in the Los Angeles area

    DOE PAGES

    Ortega, Amber M.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Peng, Zhe; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Day, Douglas A.; Li, Rui; Cubison, Michael J.; Brune, William H.; Graus, Martin; et al

    2016-06-15

    Field studies in polluted areas over the last decade have observed large formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that is often poorly captured by models. The study of SOA formation using ambient data is often confounded by the effects of advection, vertical mixing, emissions, and variable degrees of photochemical aging. An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) was deployed to study SOA formation in real-time during the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) campaign in Pasadena, CA, in 2010. A high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) alternated sampling ambient andmore » reactor-aged air. The reactor produced OH concentrations up to 4 orders of magnitude higher than in ambient air. OH radical concentration was continuously stepped, achieving equivalent atmospheric aging of 0.8 days–6.4 weeks in 3 min of processing every 2 h. Enhancement of organic aerosol (OA) from aging showed a maximum net SOA production between 0.8–6 days of aging with net OA mass loss beyond 2 weeks. Reactor SOA mass peaked at night, in the absence of ambient photochemistry and correlated with trimethylbenzene concentrations. Reactor SOA formation was inversely correlated with ambient SOA and Ox, which along with the short-lived volatile organic compound correlation, indicates the importance of very reactive (τOH ~ 0.3 day) SOA precursors (most likely semivolatile and intermediate volatility species, S/IVOCs) in the Greater Los Angeles Area. Evolution of the elemental composition in the reactor was similar to trends observed in the atmosphere (O : C vs. H : C slope ~ –0.65). Oxidation state of carbon (OSc) in reactor SOA increased steeply with age and remained elevated (OSC ~ 2) at the highest photochemical ages probed. The ratio of OA in the reactor output to excess CO (ΔCO, ambient CO above regional background) vs. photochemical age is similar to previous studies at low to moderate ages and

  20. Real-time measurements of secondary organic aerosol formation and aging from ambient air in an oxidation flow reactor in the Los Angeles area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Amber M.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Peng, Zhe; Palm, Brett B.; Hu, Weiwei; Day, Douglas A.; Li, Rui; Cubison, Michael J.; Brune, William H.; Graus, Martin; Warneke, Carsten; Gilman, Jessica B.; Kuster, William C.; de Gouw, Joost; Gutiérrez-Montes, Cándido; Jimenez, Jose L.

    2016-06-01

    Field studies in polluted areas over the last decade have observed large formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) that is often poorly captured by models. The study of SOA formation using ambient data is often confounded by the effects of advection, vertical mixing, emissions, and variable degrees of photochemical aging. An oxidation flow reactor (OFR) was deployed to study SOA formation in real-time during the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) campaign in Pasadena, CA, in 2010. A high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) alternated sampling ambient and reactor-aged air. The reactor produced OH concentrations up to 4 orders of magnitude higher than in ambient air. OH radical concentration was continuously stepped, achieving equivalent atmospheric aging of 0.8 days-6.4 weeks in 3 min of processing every 2 h. Enhancement of organic aerosol (OA) from aging showed a maximum net SOA production between 0.8-6 days of aging with net OA mass loss beyond 2 weeks. Reactor SOA mass peaked at night, in the absence of ambient photochemistry and correlated with trimethylbenzene concentrations. Reactor SOA formation was inversely correlated with ambient SOA and Ox, which along with the short-lived volatile organic compound correlation, indicates the importance of very reactive (τOH ˜ 0.3 day) SOA precursors (most likely semivolatile and intermediate volatility species, S/IVOCs) in the Greater Los Angeles Area. Evolution of the elemental composition in the reactor was similar to trends observed in the atmosphere (O : C vs. H : C slope ˜ -0.65). Oxidation state of carbon (OSc) in reactor SOA increased steeply with age and remained elevated (OSC ˜ 2) at the highest photochemical ages probed. The ratio of OA in the reactor output to excess CO (ΔCO, ambient CO above regional background) vs. photochemical age is similar to previous studies at low to moderate ages and also extends to

  1. Thin plate gap bridging study for Nd:YAG pulsed laser lap welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Robert Allen; Fuerschbach, Phillip William; Bernal, John E.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2006-01-01

    In an on going study of gap bridging for thin plate Nd:YAG laser lap welds, empirical data, high speed imaging, and computer modeling were utilized to better understand surface physics attributed to the formation and solidification of a weld pool. Experimental data indicates better gap bridging can be achieved through optimized laser parameters such as pulse length, duration, and energy. Long pulse durations at low energies generating low peak powers were found to create the highest percent of gap bridging ability. At constant peak power, gap-bridging ability was further improved by using a smaller spot diameter resulting in higher irradiances. Hence, welding in focus is preferable for bridging gaps. Gas shielding was also found to greatly impact gap-bridging ability. Gapped lap welds that could not be bridged with UHP Argon gas shielding, were easily bridged when left unshielded and exposed to only air. Incident weld angle and joint offset were also investigated for their ability to improve gap bridging. Optical filters and brightlight surface illumination enabled high-speed imaging to capture the fluid dynamics of a forming and solidifying weld pool. The effects of various laser parameters and the weld pool's interaction with the laser beam could also be observed utilizing the high-speed imaging. The work described is used to develop and validate a computer model with improved weld pool physics. Finite element models have been used to derive insight into the physics of gap bridging. The dynamics of the fluid motion within the weld pool in conjunction with the free surface physics have been the primary focus of the modeling efforts. Surface tension has been found to be a more significant factor in determining final weld pool shape than expected.

  2. The Impact of Post Harvest Agricultural Crop Residue Fires on Volatile Organic Compounds and Formation of Secondary Air Pollutants in the N.W. Indo-Gangetic Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Chandra, P.; Kumar, V.; Sarkar, C.

    2015-12-01

    The N.W. Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) is an agriculturally and demographically important region of the world. Every year during the post harvest months of April-May and October-November, large scale open burning of wheat straw and paddy straw occurs in the region impairing the regional air quality and resulting in air pollution episodes. Here, using online in-situ measurements from the IISER Mohali Atmospheric Chemistry Facility (Sinha et al., Atmos Chem Phys, 2014), which is located at a regionally representative suburban site in the agricultural state of Punjab, India, we investigated the effects of this activity on gas phase chemistry. The online data pertaining to the pre harvest and post harvest paddy residue fires in 2012, 2013 and 2014 were analyzed to understand the effect of this anthropogenic activity on atmospheric chemistry and regional air quality with respect to health relevant VOCs such as benzenoids and isocyanic acid and trace gases such as ozone and carbon monoxide. These compounds showed marked increases (factor of 2-3 times higher) in their concentrations which correlated with the biomass combustion tracers such as acetonitrile. Emissions from the paddy residue fires did not result in significant enhancement of ambient ozone in 2012 but instead sustained hourly daytime ozone concentrations at ~ 50 ppb during the late post monsoon season, despite decreases in solar radiation and temperature. Results of such massive perturbations to ambient chemical composition, reactivity and formation of secondary pollutants and its implications for human health will be presented in this paper.

  3. Formation of Langmuir Monolayers of Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles at Air/Aqueous Interfaces by the Addition of Ions to the Subphase: Effect of Ion Concentration and Type.

    PubMed

    Iwafuji, Yuya; McNamee, Cathy E

    2015-09-17

    A Langmuir monolayer of bare, hydrophilic TiO2 nanoparticles (diameter = 75 nm) was formed at an air/pH 5.8 aqueous interface by adding salt to the subphase. The effect of the concentration and type of salt in the subphase on the surface pressure-area per particle isotherms was determined. Increasing the concentration of NaCl from 0 to 3.8 M increased the maximum surface pressure (Πmax) and shifted the isotherms to a larger area per particle. The ion type also affected the area at which the close packing commenced and the value of Πmax. The presence of salt in the subphase also stabilized SiO2 nanoparticles, suggesting that the ions in the subphase interacted with the dioxide groups on the particles. The combination of structure making or borderline ions with structure breaking ions (LiCl, MgCl2, NaCl, and CaCl2) appeared to stabilize the particulate monolayers more than the combination of structure breaking ions (KBr and KCl). These results suggested that the particles were stabilized by a hydrogen bond network between the particles or the formation of a salt bridge between the particles. Attractions between particles at the air/aqueous interface caused the particles to aggregate, resulting in the particles becoming more stable at the air/aqueous interface.

  4. Impacts of the Denver Cyclone on regional air quality and aerosol formation in the Colorado Front Range during FRAPPÉ 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vu, Kennedy T.; Dingle, Justin H.; Bahreini, Roya; Reddy, Patrick J.; Apel, Eric C.; Campos, Teresa L.; DiGangi, Joshua P.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Fried, Alan; Herndon, Scott C.; Hills, Alan J.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.; Huey, Greg; Kaser, Lisa; Montzka, Denise D.; Nowak, John B.; Pusede, Sally E.; Richter, Dirk; Roscioli, Joseph R.; Sachse, Glen W.; Shertz, Stephen; Stell, Meghan; Tanner, David; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Walega, James; Weibring, Peter; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Pfister, Gabriele; Flocke, Frank

    2016-09-01

    We present airborne measurements made during the 2014 Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPÉ) project to investigate the impacts of the Denver Cyclone on regional air quality in the greater Denver area. Data on trace gases, non-refractory submicron aerosol chemical constituents, and aerosol optical extinction (βext) at λ = 632 nm were evaluated in the presence and absence of the surface mesoscale circulation in three distinct study regions of the Front Range: In-Flow, Northern Front Range, and the Denver metropolitan area. Pronounced increases in mass concentrations of organics, nitrate, and sulfate in the Northern Front Range and the Denver metropolitan area were observed during the cyclone episodes (27-28 July) compared to the non-cyclonic days (26 July, 2-3 August). Organic aerosols dominated the mass concentrations on all evaluated days, with a 45 % increase in organics on cyclone days across all three regions, while the increase during the cyclone episode was up to ˜ 80 % over the Denver metropolitan area. In the most aged air masses (NOx / NOy < 0.5), background organic aerosols over the Denver metropolitan area increased by a factor of ˜ 2.5 due to transport from Northern Front Range. Furthermore, enhanced partitioning of nitric acid to the aerosol phase was observed during the cyclone episodes, mainly due to increased abundance of gas phase ammonia. During the non-cyclone events, βext displayed strong correlations (r = 0.71) with organic and nitrate in the Northern Front Range and only with organics (r = 0.70) in the Denver metropolitan area, while correlation of βext during the cyclone was strongest (r = 0.86) with nitrate over Denver. Mass extinction efficiency (MEE) values in the Denver metropolitan area were similar on cyclone and non-cyclone days despite the dominant influence of different aerosol species on βext. Our analysis showed that the meteorological patterns associated with the Denver Cyclone increased aerosol

  5. Prediction of hydrodynamics and chemistry of confined turbulent methane-air flames with attention to formation of oxides of nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elghobashi, S.; Spalding, D. B.; Srivatsa, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A formulation of the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and reacting chemical species in a tubular combustor is presented. A numerical procedure for the solution of the governing differential equations is described, and models for chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetics calculations are presented. The chemical equilibrium model is used to characterize the hydrocarbon reactions. The chemical kinetics model is used to predict the concentrations of the oxides of nitrogen. The combustor consists of a cylindrical duct of varying cross sections with concentric streams of gaseous fuel and air entering the duct at one end. Four sample cases with specified inlet and boundary conditions are considered, and the results are discussed

  6. Provenance of the Lower Paleozoic Balcarce Formation (Tandilia System, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina): Implications for paleogeographic reconstructions of SW Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Udo; Spalletti, Luis A.

    2009-07-01

    Lower Paleozoic moderately sorted quartz-arenites from the Balcarce Formation deposited in eastern Argentina (Tandilia System) comprise mainly detrital material derived from old upper crustal material. The sources were magmatic, sedimentary, and subordinated felsic metamorphic terranes. High concentrations of tourmaline and Ti-rich heavy minerals, including zircon and nearly euhedral chromite, are common. Trace element concentrations (Nb, Cr) on rutile indicate pelitic and metabasaltic sources, respectively. Major element analyses on chromites indicate a basic volcanic protolith of mid-oceanic ridge origin, which was exposed close to the depositional basin. The delivery of chromite may be associated with convergent tectonics causing the consumption and obduction of oceanic crust during pre-Upper Ordovician times. The oblique/orthogonal collision of the Precordillera Terrane with the western border of the Rio de la Plata Craton, west of the Balcarce Basin or source further to the east from a Lower Palaeozoic extensional basin are possibilities. Geochemical and petrographic data exclude the underlying Precambrian and Cambrian sedimentary rocks as dominant sources, and favour the basement of the Río de La Plata Craton, including Cambrian rift-related granites of South Africa and the Sierras Australes (eastern Argentina), as main suppliers of detritus. Trace element geochemistry of recycled pyroclastic material, associated with the quartz-arenites, also suggests volcanic arc sources. The provenance of the pyroclastic material may either be the Puna-Famatina arc, located in north and central Argentina, or a hypothetical active margin further to the south. These ash layers are equivalent in age to volcanic zircons found in the Devonian Bokkeveld Group in western South Africa. The deposition of a glacial diamictite of Hirnantian age (Sierra del Volcán Diamictite) is interpreted as a member of the Balcarce Formation. Based on the stratigraphic re-location of the glacial

  7. Behind the Pay Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dey, Judy Goldberg; Hill, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Women have made remarkable gains in education during the past three decades, yet these achievements have resulted in only modest improvements in pay equity. The gender pay gap has become a fixture of the U.S. workplace and is so ubiquitous that many simply view it as normal. "Behind the Pay Gap" examines the gender pay gap for college graduates.…

  8. Practice Gaps in Pruritus.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    There are several practice gaps in the evaluation and management of itch. These gaps include a dearth of objective measures of itch, infrequent use of validated patient-reported outcomes for itch, non-evidence-based treatment, and lack of consensus about the ideal workup for generalized itch. The present article reviews these gaps and presents potential solutions. PMID:27363881

  9. NO formation in the burnout region of a partially premixed methane-air flame with upstream heat loss

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of temperature and NO concentration in laminar, partially premixed methane-air flames stabilized on a ceramic burner in coflow are reported. The NO concentration and temperature were determined by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), respectively. Upstream heat loss to the burner was varied by changing the exit velocity of the fuel-air mixture at a constant equivalence ratio of 1,3; this alters the structure of the flame from an axisymmetric Bunsen-type to a strongly stabilized flat flame. To facilitate analysis of the results, a method is derived for separating the effects of dilution from those of chemical reaction based on the relation between the measured temperature and the local mixture fraction, including the effects of upstream heat loss. Using this method, the amount of NO formed during burnout of the hot, fuel-rich combustion products can be ascertained. In the Bunsen-type flame, it is seen that {approximately}40 ppm of NO are produced in this burnout region, at temperatures between {approximately}2,100 K and {approximately}1,900 K, probably via the Zeldovich mechanism. Reducing the exit velocity of 12 cm/s reduces the flame temperature substantially, and effectively eliminates this contribution. At velocities of 12 and 8 cm/s, {approximately}10 ppm of NO are formed in the burnout region, even though the gas temperatures are too low for Zeldovich NO to be significant. Although the mechanism responsible for these observations is as yet unclear, the results are consistent with the idea that the low temperatures in the fuel-rich gases caused by upstream heat loss retard the conversion of HCN (formed via the Fenimore mechanism) to NO, with this residual HCN then being converted to NO during burnout.

  10. Rho/RacGAPs

    PubMed Central

    Csépányi-Kömi, Roland; Lévay, Magdolna; Ligeti, Erzsébet

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory proteins such as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) determine the activity of small GTPases. In the Rho/Rac family, the number of GEFs and GAPs largely exceeds the number of small GTPases, raising the question of specific or overlapping functions. In our recent study we investigated the first time ARHGAP25 at the protein level, determined its activity as RacGAP and showed its involvement in phagocytosis. With the discovery of ARHGAP25, the number of RacGAPs described in phagocytes is increased to six. We provide data that indicate the specific functions of selected Rho/RacGAPs and we show an example of differential regulation of a Rho/Rac family GAP by different kinases. We propose that the abundance of Rho/Rac family GAPs is an important element of the fine spatiotemporal regulation of diverse cellular functions. PMID:22751505

  11. Investigation of NOx formation and removal mechanisms in hydrocarbon-air flames. Annual report, June 1987-June 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T.

    1988-07-01

    In this research program, the kinetics of NOx formation and removal in combustion of gaseous fuels are being investigated. The program addresses uncertainties in reaction mechanism and rate parameters and the coupling of NO formation and removal reactions with the hydrocarbon combustion reactions. Significant progress was made on development of a detailed kinetics model for predicting CH profiles in the pyrolysis of highly dilute CH/sub 4//Ar and C/sub 2/H/sub 6//Ar mixtures. The model was used in the analysis of data from the kinetics experiments described below. Kinetics experiments using a CH laser diagnostic were performed with C/sub 2/H/sub 6//Ar mixtures alone and with varying amounts of N/sub 2/ or NO to determine the rates of CH + N/sub 2/ -> products; and CH + NO -> products. In addition, atomic resonance absorption was applied to detect N atoms and O atoms and laser absorption to detect OH in order to determine the products of reactions. Analysis of the data from these experiments is in progress. Finally, in the absence of a CH/sub 2/ diagnostic, the authors have attempted to determine the rate of CH/sub 2/ + N/sub 2/ -> HCN + NH indirectly by measuring production of NH using a laser-absorption technique.

  12. Simulation study on the effect of air distribution on the bed height and bubble formation in bubbling fluidization reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    bin Ibrahim, Muhamad Hilmee; Mohd Najib, Nur Khadijah; Karuppanan, Saravanan; Sinnathambi, Chandra Mohan

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the numerical study on the effect of inlet air distribution in the Bubbling Fluidized Bed (BFB) riser of diameter 0.18 m and 1.44 m of length using a 3-hole orifice plate. A 2D model has been developed and meshed using Gambit software version 2.4.6 and was simulated using CFD code, fluent version 6.3. Laminar model has been used for the modeling and Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase model coupled with kinetic theory of granular flow was employed. For the drag, Gidaspow Drag Model was used to calculate the phase interaction between the gas and solid particles. The simulation results obtained for the validation purpose showed good agreement with the results available in the literature. The model with orifice plate gives a better and clear bubble shape with improved turbulent and better mixing compared to the model without the orifice plate. The model with orifice plate is also more realistic and ideal as compared to the model without the orifice plate.

  13. Body fat does not affect venous bubble formation after air dives of moderate severity: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Schellart, Nico A M; van Rees Vellinga, Tjeerd P; van Hulst, Rob A

    2013-03-01

    For over a century, studies on body fat (BF) in decompression sickness and venous gas embolism of divers have been inconsistent. A major problem is that age, BF, and maximal oxygen consumption (Vo2max) show high multicollinearity. Using the Bühlmann model with eight parallel compartments, preceded by a blood compartment in series, nitrogen tensions and loads were calculated with a 40 min/3.1 bar (absolute) profile. Compared with Haldanian models, the new model showed a substantial delay in N2 uptake and (especially) release. One hour after surfacing, an increase of 14-28% in BF resulted in a whole body increase of the N2 load of 51%, but in only 15% in the blood compartment. This would result in an increase in the bubble grade of only 0.01 Kisman-Masurel (KM) units at the scale near KM = I-. This outcome was tested indirectly by a dry dive simulation (air breathing) with 53 male divers with a small range in age and Vo2max to suppress multicollinearity. BF was determined with the four-skinfold method. Precordial Doppler bubble grades determined at 40, 80, 120, and 160 min after surfacing were used to calculate the Kisman Integrated Severity Score and were also transformed to the logarithm of the number of bubbles/cm(2) (logB). The highest of the four scores yielded logB = -1.78, equivalent to KM = I-. All statistical outcomes of partial correlations with BF were nonsignificant. These results support the model outcomes. Although this and our previous study suggest that BF does not influence venous gas embolism (Schellart NAM, van Rees Vellinga TP, van Dijk FH, Sterk W. Aviat Space Environ Med 83: 951-957, 2012), more studies with different profiles under various conditions are needed to establish whether BF remains (together with age and Vo2max) a basic physical characteristic or will become less important for the medical examination and for risk assessment.

  14. Method and radial gap machine for high strength undiffused brushless operation

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.

    2006-10-31

    A radial gap brushless electric machine (30) having a stator (31) and a rotor (32) and a main air gap (34) also has at least one stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) separated from the rotor (32) by a secondary air gap (35e, 35f, 36e, 36f) so as to induce a secondary flux in the rotor (32) which controls a resultant flux in the main air gap (34). Permanent magnetic (PM) material (38) is disposed in spaces between the rotor pole portions (39) to inhibit the second flux from leaking from the pole portions (39) prior to reaching the main air gap (34). By selecting the direction of current in the stationary excitation coil (35a, 36a) both flux enhancement and flux weakening are provided for the main air gap (34). A method of non-diffused flux enhancement and flux weakening for a radial gap machine is also disclosed.

  15. A first principles analysis of the effect of hydrogen concentration in hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the formation of strained Si-Si bonds and the optical and mobility gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Legesse, Merid; Nolan, Michael Fagas, Giorgos

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we use a model of hydrogenated amorphous silicon generated from molecular dynamics with density functional theory calculations to examine how the atomic geometry and the optical and mobility gaps are influenced by mild hydrogen oversaturation. The optical and mobility gaps show a volcano curve as the hydrogen content varies from undersaturation to mild oversaturation, with largest gaps obtained at the saturation hydrogen concentration. At the same time, mid-gap states associated with dangling bonds and strained Si-Si bonds disappear at saturation but reappear at mild oversaturation, which is consistent with the evolution of optical gap. The distribution of Si-Si bond distances provides the key to the change in electronic properties. In the undersaturation regime, the new electronic states in the gap arise from the presence of dangling bonds and strained Si-Si bonds, which are longer than the equilibrium Si-Si distance. Increasing hydrogen concentration up to saturation reduces the strained bonds and removes dangling bonds. In the case of mild oversaturation, the mid-gap states arise exclusively from an increase in the density of strained Si-Si bonds. Analysis of our structure shows that the extra hydrogen atoms form a bridge between neighbouring silicon atoms, thus increasing the Si-Si distance and increasing disorder in the sample.

  16. Atlantic tropical cyclone formation: Pre-genesis evolution of tropical easterly waves and impacts of the middle to upper tropospheric dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankes, Isaac E.

    This study first provides an overview of the dynamic and thermodynamic evolution of tropical easterly waves (TEWs) for 164 named tropical storms over the Atlantic during 1989-2010 July-October. The evolution of precipitation and the low-level convergence suggests that convection begins to organize near the center of the wave critical layer about one day prior to genesis, along with the rapid intensification of vorticity. The composites derived from the ERA-Interim reanalysis reveal higher specific humidity and equivalent potential temperature near the center of the wave critical layer, especially in the middle troposphere within one day prior to genesis. The study then focuses on the formation of the Cape Verde storms over the East Atlantic. There are two groups of easterly waves over West Africa, one to the south and the other to the north of the African Easterly Jet (AEJ), which sometimes merge near the coast of West Africa. Three groups of waves are identified in order to determine the role of wave merger in tropical cyclogenesis over the East Atlantic: non-merger developers, merger developers, and merger non-developers. Relative to non-mergers, it is found that merger developers have a weaker circulation near the surface at the early stages but the merger of a southern wave with a northern wave leads to a stronger and deeper wave pouch, which is more conducive to tropical cyclogenesis. It is also found that dry air intrusion west of the wave trough in the middle and upper troposphere inhibits deep convection and leads to the nondevelopment of some mergers, but that boundary layer dry air in the northern waves moistens quickly over the ocean and does not impede development. The interannual variability of the middle and upper tropospheric dry air and its impacts on tropical cyclone activity over the Atlantic are further examined using the EOF analysis and composite analysis. It is found that the interannual variability of the upper-tropospheric (300-500 hPa) dry

  17. Formation of Stylet Sheaths in āere (in air) from eight species of phytophagous hemipterans from six families (Suborders: Auchenorrhyncha and Sternorrhyncha).

    PubMed

    Morgan, J Kent; Luzio, Gary A; Ammar, El-Desouky; Hunter, Wayne B; Hall, David G; Shatters, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    Stylet sheath formation is a common feature among phytophagous hemipterans. These sheaths are considered essential to promote a successful feeding event. Stylet sheath compositions are largely unknown and their mode of solidification remains to be elucidated. This report demonstrates the formation and solidification of in āere (in air) produced stylet sheaths by six hemipteran families: Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae, Asian citrus psyllid), Aphis nerii (Aphididae, oleander/milkweed aphid), Toxoptera citricida (Aphididae, brown citrus aphid), Aphis gossypii (Aphididae, cotton melon aphid), Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Aleyrodidae, whitefly), Homalodisca vitripennis (Cicadellidae, glassy-winged sharpshooter), Ferrisia virgata (Pseudococcidae, striped mealybug), and Protopulvinaria pyriformis (Coccidae, pyriform scale). Examination of in āere produced stylet sheaths by confocal and scanning electron microscopy shows a common morphology of an initial flange laid down on the surface of the membrane followed by continuous hollow core structures with sequentially stacked hardened bulbous droplets. Single and multi-branched sheaths were common, whereas mealybug and scale insects typically produced multi-branched sheaths. Micrographs of the in āere formed flanges indicate flange sealing upon stylet bundle extraction in D. citri and the aphids, while the B. tabaci whitefly and H. vitripennis glassy-winged sharpshooter flanges remain unsealed. Structural similarity of in āere sheaths are apparent in stylet sheaths formed in planta, in artificial diets, or in water. The use of 'Solvy', a dissolvable membrane, for intact stylet sheath isolation is reported. These observations illustrate for the first time this mode of stylet sheath synthesis adding to the understanding of stylet sheath formation in phytophagous hemipterans and providing tools for future use in structural and compositional analysis.

  18. Geotechnical Feasibility Analysis of Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) in Bedded Salt Formations: a Case Study in Huai'an City, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guimin; Li, Yinping; Daemen, Jaak J. K.; Yang, Chunhe; Wu, Yu; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Yanlong

    2015-09-01

    The lower reaches of the Yangtze River is one of the most developed regions in China. It is desirable to build compressed air energy storage (CAES) power plants in this area to ensure the safety, stability, and economic operation of the power network. Geotechnical feasibility analysis was carried out for CAES in impure bedded salt formations in Huai'an City, China, located in this region. First, geological investigation revealed that the salt groups in the Zhangxing Block meet the basic geological conditions for CAES storage, even though the possible unfavorable characteristics of the salt formations include bedding and different percentages of impurities. Second, mechanical tests were carried out to determine the mechanical characteristics of the bedded salt formations. It is encouraging that the samples did not fail even when they had undergone large creep deformation. Finally, numerical simulation was performed to evaluate the stability and volume shrinkage of the CAES under the following conditions: the shape of a single cavern is that of a pear; the width of the pillar is adopted as two times the largest diameter; three regular operating patterns were adopted for two operating caverns (internal pressure 9-10.5 MPa, 10-11.5 MPa, and 11-12.5 MPa), while the other two were kept at high pressure (internal pressure 10.5, 11.5, and 12.5 MPa) as backups; an emergency operating pattern in which two operating caverns were kept at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) for emergency while the backups were under operation (9-10.5 MPa), simulated for 12 months at the beginning of the 5th year. The results of the analysis for the plastic zone, displacement, and volume shrinkage support the feasibility of the construction of an underground CAES power station.

  19. Formation of Stylet Sheaths in āere (in air) from eight species of phytophagous hemipterans from six families (Suborders: Auchenorrhyncha and Sternorrhyncha).

    PubMed

    Morgan, J Kent; Luzio, Gary A; Ammar, El-Desouky; Hunter, Wayne B; Hall, David G; Shatters, Robert G

    2013-01-01

    Stylet sheath formation is a common feature among phytophagous hemipterans. These sheaths are considered essential to promote a successful feeding event. Stylet sheath compositions are largely unknown and their mode of solidification remains to be elucidated. This report demonstrates the formation and solidification of in āere (in air) produced stylet sheaths by six hemipteran families: Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae, Asian citrus psyllid), Aphis nerii (Aphididae, oleander/milkweed aphid), Toxoptera citricida (Aphididae, brown citrus aphid), Aphis gossypii (Aphididae, cotton melon aphid), Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Aleyrodidae, whitefly), Homalodisca vitripennis (Cicadellidae, glassy-winged sharpshooter), Ferrisia virgata (Pseudococcidae, striped mealybug), and Protopulvinaria pyriformis (Coccidae, pyriform scale). Examination of in āere produced stylet sheaths by confocal and scanning electron microscopy shows a common morphology of an initial flange laid down on the surface of the membrane followed by continuous hollow core structures with sequentially stacked hardened bulbous droplets. Single and multi-branched sheaths were common, whereas mealybug and scale insects typically produced multi-branched sheaths. Micrographs of the in āere formed flanges indicate flange sealing upon stylet bundle extraction in D. citri and the aphids, while the B. tabaci whitefly and H. vitripennis glassy-winged sharpshooter flanges remain unsealed. Structural similarity of in āere sheaths are apparent in stylet sheaths formed in planta, in artificial diets, or in water. The use of 'Solvy', a dissolvable membrane, for intact stylet sheath isolation is reported. These observations illustrate for the first time this mode of stylet sheath synthesis adding to the understanding of stylet sheath formation in phytophagous hemipterans and providing tools for future use in structural and compositional analysis. PMID:23638086

  20. Characteristics and formation mechanism of a heavy air pollution episode caused by biomass burning in Chengdu, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Xie, Shao-Dong

    2014-03-01

    To track the chemical characteristics and formation mechanism of biomass burning pollution, the hourly variations of meteorological factors and pollutant concentrations during a heavy pollution on 18-21 May, 2012 in Chengdu are presented in this study. The episode was the heaviest and most long-lasting pollution event in the historical record of Chengdu caused by a combination of stagnant dispersion conditions and enhanced PM2.5 emission from intensive biomass burning, with peak values surpassing 500 μg m(-3). The event was characterized by three nighttime peaks, relating to the burning practice and decreased boundary layer height at night. The prevailing northeasterly wind during nighttime preferentially brought more pollutants to the urban regions from northern suburbs of Chengdu, where dense fire spots were observed. Due to the obstruction of hilly topography and weak wind speed, minor regional features were reflected from the PM10 variations in nearby cities, whereas the long-distance transport of the plume impacted extensive regions in northern and eastern China. Carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations increased by more than 200%, while exceptionally high PM2.5 levels of 190.1 and 268.4 μg m(-3) on 17 May and 18 May, were observed and showed high correlation with CO (r=0.75). The relative contribution of biomass burning smoke to organic carbon was estimated from OC/EC ratios (organic carbon/elemental carbon) and elevated to 81.3% during the episode, indicating a significant impact on urban aerosol levels. The occurrence of high PM2.5/PM10 ratios (>0.80) and K(+)/EC ratios (>1.0), along with the increased carbonaceous concentrations and their fraction in PM2.5 (>40%) and high OC/EC ratios (about 8), could be used as immediate indicators for biomass burning pollution in cities. In addition, the heavy pollution involved a mixture of anthropogenic sources, reflected from the high SOR and NOR values and increases in the EFs (enrichment factors) of Mo, Zn, Cd, and Pb.

  1. Ionizing radiation and genetic risks. XVII. Formation mechanisms underlying naturally occurring DNA deletions in the human genome and their potential relevance for bridging the gap between induced DNA double-strand breaks and deletions in irradiated germ cells.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Krishnaswami; Taleei, Reza; Rahmanian, Shirin; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2013-01-01

    While much is known about radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their repair, the question of how deletions of different sizes arise as a result of the processing of DSBs by the cell's repair systems has not been fully answered. In order to bridge this gap between DSBs and deletions, we critically reviewed published data on mechanisms pertaining to: (a) repair of DNA DSBs (from basic studies in this area); (b) formation of naturally occurring structural variation (SV) - especially of deletions - in the human genome (from genomic studies) and (c) radiation-induced mutations and structural chromosomal aberrations in mammalian somatic cells (from radiation mutagenesis and radiation cytogenetic studies). The specific aim was to assess the relative importance of the postulated mechanisms in generating deletions in the human genome and examine whether empirical data on radiation-induced deletions in mouse germ cells are consistent with predictions of these mechanisms. The mechanisms include (a) NHEJ, a DSB repair process that does not require any homology and which functions in all stages of the cell cycle (and is of particular relevance in G0/G1); (b) MMEJ, also a DSB repair process but which requires microhomology and which presumably functions in all cell cycle stages; (c) NAHR, a recombination-based DSB repair mechanism which operates in prophase I of meiosis in germ cells; (d) MMBIR, a microhomology-mediated, replication-based mechanism which operates in the S phase of the cell cycle, and (e) strand slippage during replication (involved in the origin of small insertions and deletions (INDELs). Our analysis permits the inference that, between them, these five mechanisms can explain nearly all naturally occurring deletions of different sizes identified in the human genome, NAHR and MMBIR being potentially more versatile in this regard. With respect to radiation-induced deletions, the basic studies suggest that those arising as a result of the operation

  2. Conditions for electron runaway under leader breakdown of long gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Ul'yanov, K. N.

    2008-04-15

    An original hydrodynamic model in which inelastic collisions in the equations of motion and energy balance play a decisive role is developed and applied to simulate electron avalanches in strong electric fields. The mean energy and drift velocity of electrons, as well as the ionization coefficient and electric field in a wide range of mean electron energies, are determined for helium and xenon. A criterion is derived for the runaway of the average electron in discharges with ionization multiplication. It is shown that runaway can take place at any value of E/p, provided that the momentum mean free path exceeds the gap length. The voltage corresponding to electron runaway is found for helium, xenon, and air as a function of the electric field, the electron mean energy, and the parameter pd. Conditions for the formation of a precursor in electronegative gases are analyzed. It is shown that the presence of a precursor with a high electric conductance is necessary for the formation of a new leader step. The voltage and time ranges corresponding to efficient electron runaway and X-ray generation during leader breakdown in air are determined.

  3. Investigating the pathway for the photochemical formation of VOCs in presence of an organic monolayer at the air/water interface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinel, Liselotte; Rossignol, Stéphanie; Ciuraru, Raluca; George, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Investigating the pathway for the photochemical formation of VOCs in presence of an organic monolayer at the air/water interface. Liselotte Tinel, Stéphanie Rossignol, Raluca Ciuraru and Christian George Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR5256, IRCELYON, Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon, Villeurbanne, F-69626, France Recently the surface microlayer (SML) has received growing attention for its role in the deposition and emission of trace gases. This SML is presumably a highly efficient environment for photochemical reactions thanks to its physical and chemical properties, showing enrichment in chromophores [1]. Still, little is known about the possible photochemical processes that could influence the emission and deposition of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the SML. A recent study underlines the particularity of the presence of an organic microlayer, showing enhanced formation of peptide bonds at the air-water interface, although this reaction is thermodynamically disfavoured in bulk water [2]. Also, emissions of small gas phase carbonyl compounds formed photochemically by dissolved organic matter have been measured above natural water and glyoxal, for example, measured above the open ocean is thought to be photochemically produced [3, 4]. This study presents the results of a set of laboratory studies set up in order to better understand the role of the SML in the photochemical production of VOCs. Recently, our group has shown the formation of VOCs by light driven reactions in a small quartz reactor (14mL) containing aqueous solutions of humic acids (HA) in the presence of an organic (artificial or natural) microlayer [5]. The main VOCs produced were oxidized species, such as aldehydes, ketones and alcohols, as classically can be expected by the oxidation of the organics present at the interface initiated by triplet excited chromophores present in the HA. But also alkenes, dienes, including isoprene and

  4. Narrowing Participation Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Kirtley, Karmen; Matassa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shrinking the achievement gap in mathematics is a tall order. One way to approach this challenge is to think about how the achievement gap manifests itself in the classroom and take concrete action. For example, opportunities to participate in activities that involve mathematical reasoning and argumentation in a safe and supportive manner are…

  5. The National "Expertise Gap"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation's report, "Diversity and the Ph.D.," released in May, which documents in troubling detail the exact dimensions of what the foundation's president, Dr. Robert Weisbuch, is calling the national "expertise gap." Weisbuch states that the expertise gap extends beyond the…

  6. Confronting the Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about the large achievement gap between children of color and their white peers. The reasons for the achievement gap are varied. First, many urban minorities come from a background of poverty. One of the detrimental effects of growing up in poverty is receiving inadequate nourishment at a time when bodies and brains are rapidly…

  7. California: Emigrant Gap

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Emigrant Gap Fire, California     View Larger ... The most prominent plume arises from the Emigrant Gap Fire, located about 40 kilometers west of Lake Tahoe. The animated panorama ... left is Mount Shasta. As of August 30, 2001, the US Forest Service reported the total year-to-date area burned in Northern ...

  8. Knowledge Gaps, Social Locators, and Media Schemata: Gaps, Reverse Gaps, and Gaps of Disaffection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredin, Eric S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studies a public school controversy and finds a knowledge gap--a gap of disaffection. Finds that, among women only, higher education leads to greater knowledge but does so partly through reduced trust of government and lower perceived fairness of the news media. Shows similar findings with other less powerful groups. (SR)

  9. The Parenting Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Richard V.; Howard, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    The parenting gap is a big factor in the opportunity gap. The chances of upward social mobility are lower for children with parents struggling to do a good job--in terms of creating a supportive and stimulating home environment. Children lucky enough to have strong parents are more likely to succeed at all the critical life stages, which means…

  10. Long-term aerosol and trace gas measurements in Eastern Lapland, Finland: the impact of Kola air pollution to new particle formation and potential CCN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrö, Ella-Maria; Väänänen, Riikka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Virkkula, Aki; Asmi, Ari; Nieminen, Tuomo; Dal Maso, Miikka; Petäjä, Tuukka; Keronen, Petri; Aalto, Pasi; Riipinen, Ilona; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Hari, Pertti; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-05-01

    Sulphur and primary emissions have been decreasing largely all over Europe, resulting in improved air quality and decreased direct radiation forcing by aerosols. The smelter industry in Kola Peninsula is one of largest sources of anthropogenic SO2 within the Arctic domain and since late 1990s the sulphur emissions have been decreasing rapidly (Paatero et al., 2008; Prank et al., 2010). New particle formation (NPF) is tightly linked with the oxidizing product of SO2, namely sulphuric acid (H2SO4), since it is known to be the key component in atmospheric nucleation (Sipilä et al., 2010). Thus, decreasing sulphur pollution may lead to less NPF. However, low values of condensation sink (CS), which is determined by the amount of pre-existing particles, favours NPF. We used 14 years (1998-2011) of aerosol number size distribution and trace gas data from SMEAR I station in Eastern Lapland, Finland, to investigate these relationships between SO2, NPF and CS. The station is a clean background station with occasional sulphur pollution episodes when the air masses arrive over Kola Peninsula. We found that while SO2 decreased by 11.3 % / year, the number of clear NPF event days was also decreasing by 9.9 % / year. At the same time, CS was decreasing also (-8.0 % / year) leading to formation of more particles per single NPF event (J3 increased by 29.7 % / year in 2006-2011) but the low vapour concentrations of H2SO4 (proxy decreased by 6.2 % / year) did not allow them to grow into climatically relevant sizes. Over the time, concentrations of potential CCN (cloud condensing nuclei) were also decreasing with more moderate pace, -4.0 % / year. The events started on average earlier after sunrise when the SO2 concentration during the start of the event was higher and NPF occurred more frequently in air masses which were travelling over Kola. Despite the total decrease in sulphur pollution originating from Kola there is currently no evidence of cleaning of the emissions, rather the

  11. Study on the formation and transport of ozone in relation to the air quality management and vegetation protection in Tenerife (Canary Islands).

    PubMed

    Guerra, Juan-Carlos; Rodríguez, Sergio; Arencibia, M-Teresa; García, M-Dolores

    2004-09-01

    An experimental study on the formation and transport of ozone in ambient air was performed in Tenerife (Canary Islands) in order to investigate the processes affecting ozone levels and air quality. The special features of Tenerife (prevalence of the trade wind pattern (NE), orography and the specific location of the local ozone sources) permit to quantify the role of the 'long-range transport from northern latitudes' versus the 'formation and transport of ozone downwind of the main urban areas' of Tenerife. Levels of O(3), NO(2) and O(X) were monitored in different types of environments to achieve this purpose. The results showed that: (1) upwind of the urban areas ozone is mainly transported from the ocean by trade winds, (2) local ozone titration (by NO) and ozone replenishment from the ocean are the main causes of ozone variations in urban and suburban areas, and (3) photochemical ozone production occurs downwind of the urban areas. Photochemical production causes daylight O(3) and O(X) levels downwind of urban areas to be frequently (60% and 35% days/year, respectively) higher than upwind of the urban sites (O(3) and O(X) excess frequently in the range 5-20 ppbv). Due to the above processes, different daily ozone cycles occur in short distances (<30 km), with maximum O(3) levels during daylight or night depending on the site. Ozone phytotoxicity was assessed by calculating the AOT40 index upwind and downwind of the main urban areas. The critical value for the 5-day-AOT40 index was simultaneously exceeded at the two sites (few times/year) during long-range transport events. During the additional exceedances of the critical value downwind of the urban area, relatively high 5-day-AOT40 values were recorded upwind of the urban site. Thus, long-range transport from northern latitudes may produce relatively high 5-days-AOT40 levels in the oceanic boundary layer. These results are important for the protection of the large number of endemic plants in the Canaries. The

  12. SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Neal, R.B.

    1957-12-17

    An improved triggered spark gap switch is described, capable of precisely controllable firing time while switching very large amounts of power. The invention in general comprises three electrodes adjustably spaced and adapted to have a large potential impressed between the outer electrodes. The central electrode includes two separate elements electrically connected togetaer and spaced apart to define a pair of spark gaps between the end electrodes. Means are provided to cause the gas flow in the switch to pass towards the central electrode, through a passage in each separate element, and out an exit disposed between the two separate central electrode elements in order to withdraw ions from the spark gap.

  13. Formation of gas-phase carbonyls from heterogeneous oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids at the air-water interface and of the sea surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Leithead, A.; Finewax, Z.; Thalman, R.; Vlasenko, A.; Vagle, S.; Miller, L. A.; Li, S.-M.; Bureekul, S.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Volkamer, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-02-01

    Motivated by the potential for reactive heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the ocean surface, gas-phase products were observed when a reactive sea surface microlayer (SML) component, i.e. the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), was exposed to gas-phase ozone at the air-seawater interface. Similar oxidation experiments were conducted with SML samples collected from two different oceanic locations, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and from the west coast of Canada. Online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) University of Colorado light-emitting diode cavity-enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS) were used to detect oxygenated gas-phase products from the ozonolysis reactions. The LA studies indicate that oxidation of a PUFA monolayer on seawater gives rise to prompt and efficient formation of gas-phase aldehydes. The products are formed via the decomposition of primary ozonides which form upon the initial reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bonds in the PUFA molecules. In addition, two highly reactive dicarbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glyoxal, were also generated, likely as secondary products. Specific yields relative to reactant loss were 78%, 29%, 4% and < 1% for n-hexanal, 3-nonenal, MDA and glyoxal, respectively, where the yields for MDA and glyoxal are likely lower limits. Heterogeneous oxidation of SML samples confirm for the first time that similar carbonyl products are formed via ozonolysis of environmental samples.

  14. The role of formation of continues thermally grown oxide layer on the nanostructured NiCrAlY bond coat during thermal exposure in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daroonparvar, Mohammadreza; Hussain, Mohammad Sakhawat; Yajid, Muhammad Azizi Mat

    2012-11-01

    In recent years, the life expectancy of thermal barrier coatings is expected to be improved by applying the nanostructured NiCrAlY bond coat. The present paper reviews the main technique used in the synthesis of nano-crystalline NiCrAlY powders using a planetary ball mill and investigates the microstructural evolution of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer on the conventional and nanostructured atmospheric plasma sprayed (APS) NiCrAlY coatings in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems during oxidation. Microstructural characterization showed that the growth of Ni(Cr,Al)2O4 (as spinel) and NiO on the surface of Al2O3 layer (as pure TGO) in nano TBC system was much lower compared to that of normal TBC system during thermal exposure at 1150 °C. These two oxides play a detrimental role in causing crack nucleation and growth, reducing the life of the TBC in air. This microstructure optimization of TGO layer is primarily associated with the formation of a continuous, dense, uniform Al2O3 layer (at first 24 h of isothermal oxidation at 1000 °C) over the nanostructured NiCrAlY coating.

  15. Gaps in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    The first plenary of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study Original Version provides background for the curriculum and identifies gaps in current and desired comprehensive cancer care.

  16. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Billy E.; Groves, Scott E.; Larsen, Greg J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.

    2006-11-14

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  17. Photonic band gap materials

    SciTech Connect

    Soukoulis, C.M. |

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the theoretical and experimental efforts in obtaining a photonic band gap, a frequency band in three-dimensional dielectric structures in which electromagnetic waves are forbidden, is presented.

  18. Robotic Tube-Gap Inspector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Gutow, David A.; Maslakowski, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Robotic vision system measures small gaps between nearly parallel tubes. Robot-held video camera examines closely spaced tubes while computer determines gaps between tubes. Video monitor simultaneously displays data on gaps.

  19. Influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechereau, François; Bonaventura, Zdeněk; Bourdon, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents simulations of an atmospheric pressure air discharge in a point-to-plane geometry with a dielectric layer parallel to the cathode plane. Experimentally, a discharge reignition in the air gap below the dielectrics has been observed. With a 2D fluid model, it is shown that due to the fast rise of the high voltage applied and the sharp point used, a first positive spherical discharge forms around the point. Then this discharge propagates axially and impacts the dielectrics. As the first discharge starts spreading on the upper dielectric surface, in the second air gap with a low preionization density of {{10}4}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , the 2D fluid model predicts a rapid reignition of a positive discharge. As in experiments, the discharge reignition is much slower, a discussion on physical processes to be considered in the model to increase the reignition delay is presented. The limit case with no initial seed charges in the second air gap has been studied. First, we have calculated the time to release an electron from the cathode surface by thermionic and field emission processes for a work function φ \\in ≤ft[3,4\\right] eV and an amplification factor β \\in ≤ft[100,220\\right] . Then a 3D Monte Carlo model has been used to follow the dynamics of formation of an avalanche starting from a single electron emitted at the cathode. Due to the high electric field in the second air gap, we have shown that in a few nanoseconds, a Gaussian cloud of seed charges is formed at a small distance from the cathode plane. This Gaussian cloud has been used as the initial condition of the 2D fluid model in the second air gap. In this case, the propagation of a double headed discharge in the second air gap has been observed and the reignition delay is in rather good agreement with experiments.

  20. THE DYNAMICALLY DISRUPTED GAP IN HD 142527

    SciTech Connect

    Casassus, S.; Perez M, S.; Menard, F.; Jordan, A.; Cuadra, J.; Schreiber, M. R.; Hales, A. S.; Ercolano, B.

    2012-08-01

    The vestiges of planet formation have been observed in debris disks harboring young and massive gaseous giants. The process of giant planet formation is terminated by the dissipation of gas in the protoplanetary disk. The gas-rich disk around HD 142527 features a small inner disk, a large gap from {approx}10 to {approx}140 AU, and a massive outer disk extending out to {approx}300 AU. The gap could have been carved out by a giant planet. We have imaged the outer regions of this gap using the adaptive optics camera NICI on Gemini South. Our images reveal that the disk is dynamically perturbed. The outer boundary of the roughly elliptical gap appears to be composed of several segments of spiral arms. The stellar position is offset by 0.''17 {+-} 0.''02 from the centroid of the cavity, consistent with earlier imaging at coarser resolutions. These transient morphological features are expected in the context of disk evolution in the presence of a perturbing body located inside the cavity. We perform hydrodynamical simulations of the dynamical clearing of a gap in a disk. A 10 M{sub jup} body in a circular orbit at r = 90 AU perturbs the whole disks, even after thousands of orbits. By then the model disk has an eccentric and irregular cavity, flanked by tightly wound spiral arms, but it is still evolving far from steady state. A particular transient configuration that is a qualitative match to HD 142527 is seen at 1.7 Myr.

  1. Simulations of nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharges in atmospheric pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Soo Bak, Moon; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2013-03-21

    This paper describes simulations of nanosecond pulse plasma formation between planer electrodes covered by dielectric barriers in air at atmospheric pressure and 340 K. The plasma formation process starts as electrons detach from negative ions of molecular oxygen that are produced from the previous discharge pulse. An ionization front is found to form close to the positively biased electrode and then strengthens and propagates towards the grounded electrode with increasing gap voltage. Charge accumulation and secondary emission from the grounded electrode eventually lead to sheath collapse. One interesting feature is a predicted reversal in gap potential due to the accumulated charge, even when there is no reversal in applied potential. The simulation results are compared to recent measurement of mid-gap electric field under the same discharge conditions [Ito et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 065002 (2011)].

  2. Gap Cycling for SWIFT

    PubMed Central

    Corum, Curtis A.; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Snyder, Carl J.; Garwood, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Purpose SWIFT (SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation) is a non-Cartesian MRI method with unique features and capabilities. In SWIFT, radiofrequency (RF) excitation and reception are performed nearly simultaneously, by rapidly switching between transmit and receive during a frequency-swept RF pulse. Because both the transmitted pulse and data acquisition are simultaneously amplitude-modulated in SWIFT (in contrast to continuous RF excitation and uninterrupted data acquisition in more familiar MRI sequences), crosstalk between different frequency bands occurs in the data. This crosstalk leads to a “bulls-eye” artifact in SWIFT images. We present a method to cancel this inter-band crosstalk by cycling the pulse and receive gap positions relative to the un-gapped pulse shape. We call this strategy “gap cycling.” Methods We carry out theoretical analysis, simulation and experiments to characterize the signal chain, resulting artifacts, and their elimination for SWIFT. Results Theoretical analysis reveals the mechanism for gap-cycling’s effectiveness in canceling inter-band crosstalk in the received data. We show phantom and in-vivo results demonstrating bulls-eye artifact free images. Conclusion Gap cycling is an effective method to remove bulls-eye artifact resulting from inter-band crosstalk in SWIFT data. PMID:24604286

  3. Formation of gas-phase carbonyls from heterogeneous oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids at the air-water interface and of the sea surface microlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S.; Gonzalez, L.; Leithead, A.; Finewax, Z.; Thalman, R.; Vlasenko, A.; Vagle, S.; Miller, L.; Li, S.-M.; Bureekul, S.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Volkamer, R.; Abbatt, J.

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by the potential for reactive heterogeneous chemistry occurring at the ocean surface, gas-phase products were observed when a reactive sea surface microlayer (SML) component, i.e. the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) linoleic acid (LA), was exposed to gas-phase ozone at the air-seawater interface. Similar oxidation experiments were conducted with SML samples collected from two different oceanic locations, in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean and from the west coast of Canada. Online proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and light-emitting diode cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS) were used to detect oxygenated gas-phase products from the ozonolysis reactions. The LA studies indicate that oxidation of a PUFA monolayer on seawater gives rise to prompt and efficient formation of gas phase aldehydes. The products are formed via the decomposition of primary ozonides which form upon the initial reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bonds in the PUFA molecules. In addition, two highly reactive di-carbonyls, malondialdehyde (MDA) and glyoxal, were also generated, likely as secondary products. Specific yields relative to reactant loss were 78%, 29%, 4% and <1% for n-hexanal, 3-nonenal, MDA and glyoxal, respectively, where the yields for MDA and glyoxal are likely lower limits. Heterogeneous oxidation of SML samples confirm for the first time that similar carbonyl products are formed via ozonolysis of environmental samples. The potential impact of such chemistry on the atmosphere of the marine boundary layer is discussed.

  4. Numerical Simulation of Supersonic Gap Flow

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xu; Haiming, Huang; Guo, Huang; Song, Mo

    2015-01-01

    Various gaps in the surface of the supersonic aircraft have a significant effect on airflows. In order to predict the effects of attack angle, Mach number and width-to-depth ratio of gap on the local aerodynamic heating environment of supersonic flow, two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved by the finite volume method, where convective flux of space term adopts the Roe format, and discretization of time term is achieved by 5-step Runge-Kutta algorithm. The numerical results reveal that the heat flux ratio is U-shaped distribution on the gap wall and maximum at the windward corner of the gap. The heat flux ratio decreases as the gap depth and Mach number increase, however, it increases as the attack angle increases. In addition, it is important to find that chamfer in the windward corner can effectively reduce gap effect coefficient. The study will be helpful for the design of the thermal protection system in reentry vehicles. PMID:25635395

  5. MULTIPLE SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Schofield, A.E.

    1958-07-22

    A multiple spark gap switch of unique construction is described which will permit controlled, simultaneous discharge of several capacitors into a load. The switch construction includes a disc electrode with a plurality of protuberances of generally convex shape on one surface. A firing electrode is insulatingly supponted In each of the electrode protuberances and extends substantially to the apex thereof. Individual electrodes are disposed on an insulating plate parallel with the disc electrode to form a number of spark gaps with the protuberances. These electrodes are each connected to a separate charged capacitor and when a voltage ls applied simultaneously between the trigger electrodes and the dlsc electrode, each spark gap fires to connect its capacitor to the disc electrode and a subsequent load.

  6. Precision gap particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Miles, Robin; Jones, II., Leslie M.; Stockton, Cheryl

    2004-06-08

    A system for separating particles entrained in a fluid includes a base with a first channel and a second channel. A precision gap connects the first channel and the second channel. The precision gap is of a size that allows small particles to pass from the first channel into the second channel and prevents large particles from the first channel into the second channel. A cover is positioned over the base unit, the first channel, the precision gap, and the second channel. An port directs the fluid containing the entrained particles into the first channel. An output port directs the large particles out of the first channel. A port connected to the second channel directs the small particles out of the second channel.

  7. Bridging NCL research gaps.

    PubMed

    Stehr, Frank; van der Putten, Herman

    2015-10-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses, collectively called NCLs, are rare and fatal lysosomal storage diseases that mainly affect children. Due to the fact that NCLs are both rare and heterogeneous (mutations in thirteen different genes) significant gaps exist in both preclinical and clinical research. Altogether, these gaps are major hurdles to bring therapies to patients while the need for new therapies is urgent to help them and their families. To define gaps and discuss solutions, a round table discussion involving teams and different stake holders took place during the 14th International Conference on Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease) in Cordóba, Argentina. Topics covered by the teams and their leaders (in parentheses) included basic and translational research gaps with regard to large animal models (I. Tammen, D.N. Palmer), human NCL pathology and access to human tissue (J.D. Cooper, H.H. Goebel), rare NCLs (S. Hofman, I. Noher), links of NCLs to other diseases (F.M. Platt), gaps between clinic and clinical trials (H. Adams, A. Schulz), international collaborative efforts working towards a cure (S.E. Mole, H. Band) perspectives on palliative care from patient organizations (M. Frazier, A. West), and issues NCL researchers face when progressing to independent career in academia (M. Bond). Thoughts presented by the team leaders include previously unpublished opinions and information on the lack of understanding of disease pathomechanisms, gene function, assays for drug discovery and target validation, natural history of disease, and biomarkers for monitoring disease progression and treatment effects. This article is not intended to review the NCL literature. It includes personal opinions of the authors and it provides the reader with a summary of gaps discussed and solutions proposed by the teams. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Current Research on the Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinoses (Batten Disease). PMID:26056946

  8. Homolumo gap from dynamical energy levels

    SciTech Connect

    Andric, I.; Jonke, L.; Jurman, D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2009-11-15

    We introduce a dynamical matrix model where the matrix is interpreted as a Hamiltonian representing interaction of a bosonic system with a single fermion. We show how a system of second-quantized fermions influences the ground state of the whole system by producing a gap between the highest eigenvalue of the occupied single-fermion states and the lowest eigenvalue of the unoccupied single-fermion states. We describe the development of the gap in both the strong and weak coupling regimes, while for the intermediate coupling strength we expect formation of homolumo kinks.

  9. Sculpting the band gap: a computational approach.

    PubMed

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D A

    2015-01-01

    Materials with optimized band gap are needed in many specialized applications. In this work, we demonstrate that Hellmann-Feynman forces associated with the gap states can be used to find atomic coordinates that yield desired electronic density of states. Using tight-binding models, we show that this approach may be used to arrive at electronically designed models of amorphous silicon and carbon. We provide a simple recipe to include a priori electronic information in the formation of computer models of materials, and prove that this information may have profound structural consequences. The models are validated with plane-wave density functional calculations. PMID:26490203

  10. Mind the Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litim, Daniel F.

    We discuss an optimisation criterion for the exact renormalisation group based on the inverse effective propagator, which displays a gap. We show that a simple extremisation of the gap stabilises the flow, leading to better convergence of approximate solutions towards the physical theory. This improves the reliability of truncations, most relevant for any high precision computation. These ideas are closely linked to the removal of a spurious scheme dependence and a minimum sensitivity condition. The issue of predictive power and a link to the Polchinski RG are discussed as well. We illustrate our findings by computing critical exponents for the Ising universality class.

  11. Spark gap electrode erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krompholz, H.; Kristiansen, M.

    1984-12-01

    The results of a one-year contract on electrode erosion phenomena are summarized. The arc voltage drop in a spark gap was measured for various electrode, gas, and pressure combinations. A previously developed model of self breakdown voltage distribution was extended. A jet model for electrode erosion was proposed and an experimental arrangement for testing the model was constructed. The effects of inhomogeneities and impurities in the electrodes were investigated. Some of the work described here is scheduled for completion in 1985 under a current grant (AFOSR 84-0032). The areas of investigation described here include: (1) Self breakdown voltage distributions; (2) Electrode erosion; (3) Spark gap voltage recovery.

  12. Health risk assessment of migrant workers' exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls in air and dust in an e-waste recycling area in China: Indication for a new wealth gap in environmental rights.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yalin; Hu, Jinxing; Lin, Wei; Wang, Ning; Li, Cheng; Luo, Peng; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Wang, Wenbo; Su, Xiaomei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Yindong; Huang, Ronglang; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Migrant workers who work and live in polluted environment are a special vulnerable group in the accelerating pace of urbanization and industrialization in China. In the electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area, for example, migrant workers' exposure to pollutants, such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), is the result of an informal e-waste recycling process. A village in an electronic waste recycling area where migrant workers gather was surveyed. The migrant workers' daily routines were simulated according to the three-space transition: work place-on the road-home. Indoor air and dust in the migrant workers' houses and workplaces and the ambient air on the roads were sampled. The PCB levels of the air and dust in the places corresponding to the migrant workers are higher than those for local residents. The migrant workers have health risks from PCBs that are 3.8 times greater than those of local residents. This is not only caused by the exposure at work but also by their activity patterns and the environmental conditions of their dwellings. These results revealed the reason for the health risk difference between the migrant workers and local residents, and it also indicated that lifestyle and economic status are important factors that are often ignored compared to occupational exposure. PMID:26641519

  13. Health risk assessment of migrant workers' exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls in air and dust in an e-waste recycling area in China: Indication for a new wealth gap in environmental rights.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yalin; Hu, Jinxing; Lin, Wei; Wang, Ning; Li, Cheng; Luo, Peng; Hashmi, Muhammad Zaffar; Wang, Wenbo; Su, Xiaomei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Yindong; Huang, Ronglang; Shen, Chaofeng

    2016-02-01

    Migrant workers who work and live in polluted environment are a special vulnerable group in the accelerating pace of urbanization and industrialization in China. In the electronic waste (e-waste) recycling area, for example, migrant workers' exposure to pollutants, such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls), is the result of an informal e-waste recycling process. A village in an electronic waste recycling area where migrant workers gather was surveyed. The migrant workers' daily routines were simulated according to the three-space transition: work place-on the road-home. Indoor air and dust in the migrant workers' houses and workplaces and the ambient air on the roads were sampled. The PCB levels of the air and dust in the places corresponding to the migrant workers are higher than those for local residents. The migrant workers have health risks from PCBs that are 3.8 times greater than those of local residents. This is not only caused by the exposure at work but also by their activity patterns and the environmental conditions of their dwellings. These results revealed the reason for the health risk difference between the migrant workers and local residents, and it also indicated that lifestyle and economic status are important factors that are often ignored compared to occupational exposure.

  14. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  15. Graphene: Mind the gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, Kostya

    2007-10-01

    Research now shows that interaction with silicon carbide substrate leads to the opening of a semiconductor gap in epitaxial graphene. This is an important first step towards bandgap engineering in this two-dimensional crystal, and its incorporation in electronic devices.

  16. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  17. Crossing the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockette, Tim

    2009-01-01

    In a nation where education is funded largely by local property taxes, schools in wealthy communities have plenty of funds to spend on programs that get their kids ready for college. Schools in poor communities scrimp and save to get the job done--or hope that funding from the state will help fill in the gap. This article describes how students…

  18. Closing the Performance Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggins, Cheryl G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how the principal of a K-2, 400-student suburban elementary school near Flint, Michigan, worked with her staff and superintendent to develop and implement a strategic plan to close the student achievement gap. Reports significant improvement in reading and math scores after 1 year. (PKP)

  19. STEMMING the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Jim; Valentine, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    America has a gap when it comes to youth pursuing science and technology careers. In an effort to improve the knowledge and application of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), after-school programs can work in conjunction with formal in-school curriculum to improve science education. One organization that actively addresses this…

  20. Gaining on the Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    About three-quarters of the 2009 graduates of the highly diverse Arlington, Virginia, Public Schools completed one or more Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate courses during their high school careers. That figure serves as one indicator of a decade-long initiative to eliminate achievement gaps while raising achievement for all…

  1. Multiple gap photovoltaic device

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A multiple gap photovoltaic device having a transparent electrical contact adjacent a first cell which in turn is adjacent a second cell on an opaque electrical contact, includes utilizing an amorphous semiconductor as the first cell and a crystalline semiconductor as the second cell.

  2. Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Marjorie

    1964-01-01

    Dr Marjorie Clifton describes the classification of gaseous and nongaseous constituents of air pollution and then outlines the methods of measuring these. The National Survey embraced 150 towns of all sizes throughout England and Wales and provided data on smoke and sulphur dioxide in relation to climate, topography, industrialization, population density, fuel utilization and urban development. Dr W C Turner discusses the relationship between air pollution and mortality from respiratory conditions, and particularly the incidence of chronic bronchitis. He postulates a theory that such respiratory conditions arise as an allergy to the spores of certain moulds, spore formation being encouraged by the air humidity in Greatv Britain and overcrowded and damp living conditions. He describes the results of a twenty-week study undertaken in 1962-3, showing associations between respiratory disease and levels of air pollution. Dr Stuart Carne undertook a survey in general practice to plot the patterns of respiratory illness in London during the winter of 1962-3. There were two peaks of respiratory illnesses coinciding with the fog at the beginning of December and the freeze-up from the end of December until the beginning of March. PMID:14178955

  3. Modeling ozone and aerosol formation and transport in the pacific northwest with the community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Susan M; Lamb, Brian K; Chen, Jack; Claiborn, Candis; Finn, Dennis; Otterson, Sally; Figueroa, Cristiana; Bowman, Clint; Boyer, Mike; Wilson, Rob; Arnold, Jeff; Aalbers, Steven; Stocum, Jeffrey; Swab, Christopher; Stoll, Matt; Dubois, Mike; Anderson, Mary

    2006-02-15

    The Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system was used to investigate ozone and aerosol concentrations in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) during hot summertime conditions during July 1-15, 1996. Two emission inventories (El) were developed: emissions for the first El were based upon the National Emission Trend 1996 (NET96) database and the BEIS2 biogenic emission model, and emissions for the second El were developed through a "bottom up" approach that included biogenic emissions obtained from the GLOBEIS model. The two simulations showed that elevated PM2.5 concentrations occurred near and downwind of the Interstate-5 corridor along the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and in forested areas of central Idaho. The relative contributions of organic and inorganic aerosols varied by region, but generally organic aerosols constituted the largest fraction of PM2.5. In wilderness areas near the 1-5 corridor, organic carbon from anthropogenic sources contributed approximately 50% of the total organic carbon with the remainder from biogenic precursors, while in wilderness areas in Idaho, biogenic organic carbon accounted for 80% of the total organic aerosol. Regional analysis of the secondary organic aerosol formation in the Columbia River Gorge, Central Idaho, and the Olympics/Puget Sound showed that the production rate of secondary organic carbon depends on local terpene concentrations and the local oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere, which was strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions. Comparison with observations from 12 IMPROVE sites and 21 ozone monitoring sites showed that results from the two El simulations generally bracketed the average observed PM parameters and that errors calculated for the model results were within acceptable bounds. Analysis across all statistical parameters indicated that the NW-AIRQUEST El solution performed better at predicting PM2.5, PM1, and beta(ext) even though organic carbon PM was over-predicted, and the NET96 El

  4. Modeling ozone and aerosol formation and transport in the pacific northwest with the community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Susan M; Lamb, Brian K; Chen, Jack; Claiborn, Candis; Finn, Dennis; Otterson, Sally; Figueroa, Cristiana; Bowman, Clint; Boyer, Mike; Wilson, Rob; Arnold, Jeff; Aalbers, Steven; Stocum, Jeffrey; Swab, Christopher; Stoll, Matt; Dubois, Mike; Anderson, Mary

    2006-02-15

    The Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system was used to investigate ozone and aerosol concentrations in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) during hot summertime conditions during July 1-15, 1996. Two emission inventories (El) were developed: emissions for the first El were based upon the National Emission Trend 1996 (NET96) database and the BEIS2 biogenic emission model, and emissions for the second El were developed through a "bottom up" approach that included biogenic emissions obtained from the GLOBEIS model. The two simulations showed that elevated PM2.5 concentrations occurred near and downwind of the Interstate-5 corridor along the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and in forested areas of central Idaho. The relative contributions of organic and inorganic aerosols varied by region, but generally organic aerosols constituted the largest fraction of PM2.5. In wilderness areas near the 1-5 corridor, organic carbon from anthropogenic sources contributed approximately 50% of the total organic carbon with the remainder from biogenic precursors, while in wilderness areas in Idaho, biogenic organic carbon accounted for 80% of the total organic aerosol. Regional analysis of the secondary organic aerosol formation in the Columbia River Gorge, Central Idaho, and the Olympics/Puget Sound showed that the production rate of secondary organic carbon depends on local terpene concentrations and the local oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere, which was strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions. Comparison with observations from 12 IMPROVE sites and 21 ozone monitoring sites showed that results from the two El simulations generally bracketed the average observed PM parameters and that errors calculated for the model results were within acceptable bounds. Analysis across all statistical parameters indicated that the NW-AIRQUEST El solution performed better at predicting PM2.5, PM1, and beta(ext) even though organic carbon PM was over-predicted, and the NET96 El

  5. Deterministic multidimensional nonuniform gap sampling.

    PubMed

    Worley, Bradley; Powers, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Born from empirical observations in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data relating to gaps between sampled points, the Poisson-gap sampling method has enjoyed widespread use in biomolecular NMR. While the majority of nonuniform sampling schemes are fully randomly drawn from probability densities that vary over a Nyquist grid, the Poisson-gap scheme employs constrained random deviates to minimize the gaps between sampled grid points. We describe a deterministic gap sampling method, based on the average behavior of Poisson-gap sampling, which performs comparably to its random counterpart with the additional benefit of completely deterministic behavior. We also introduce a general algorithm for multidimensional nonuniform sampling based on a gap equation, and apply it to yield a deterministic sampling scheme that combines burst-mode sampling features with those of Poisson-gap schemes. Finally, we derive a relationship between stochastic gap equations and the expectation value of their sampling probability densities.

  6. Deterministic multidimensional nonuniform gap sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley; Powers, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Born from empirical observations in nonuniformly sampled multidimensional NMR data relating to gaps between sampled points, the Poisson-gap sampling method has enjoyed widespread use in biomolecular NMR. While the majority of nonuniform sampling schemes are fully randomly drawn from probability densities that vary over a Nyquist grid, the Poisson-gap scheme employs constrained random deviates to minimize the gaps between sampled grid points. We describe a deterministic gap sampling method, based on the average behavior of Poisson-gap sampling, which performs comparably to its random counterpart with the additional benefit of completely deterministic behavior. We also introduce a general algorithm for multidimensional nonuniform sampling based on a gap equation, and apply it to yield a deterministic sampling scheme that combines burst-mode sampling features with those of Poisson-gap schemes. Finally, we derive a relationship between stochastic gap equations and the expectation value of their sampling probability densities.

  7. Heat and moisture transfer in gaps between sweating imitation skin and nonwoven cloth: effect of gap space and alignment of skin and clothing on the moisture transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozumi, Yoshio; Akaki, Kenichi; Tanabe, Naomasa

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates heat and moisture transfer between a sweating film and a nonwoven sheet both experimentally and numerically. A mathematical model based on heat conduction and moisture diffusion in both the air gap and cloth is presented. The evaporation rate and surface temperature of the sweating film are well predicted under various conditions such as air gap height, heating conditions, and sweating film orientation by evaluating the effective thermal conductivity and diffusion coefficient from the empirical equations of the Nusselt number for a fluid layer, even though the air gap height is sufficiently large to cause natural convections.

  8. Mind the Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staedter, Tracy

    2007-03-01

    A new finding gets scientists one step closer to understanding what causes the gap in the Van Allen radiation belts. The discovery could help better predict fluxes of energetic particles that have the potential for damaging spacecraft and satellites and harming astronauts. An improved understanding could also give space physicists better insight into the radiation belts of other planets, including Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, all of which have strong magnetic fields.

  9. Minding the Gap

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Millicent Anne

    2015-02-23

    Neutron & X-ray scattering provides nano- to meso-scale details of complex fluid structure; 1D electronic density maps dervied from SAXS yield molecular level insights; Neutron reflectivity provides substructure details of substrate supported complex fluids; Complex fluids composition can be optimized to support a wide variety of both soluble and membrane proteins; The water gap dimensions can be finely tuned through polymer component.

  10. Gender gaps within management.

    PubMed

    Ronk, L L

    1993-05-01

    Traditional roles need not become self-fulfilling prophecies if managers can bridge the gender gap. Feminine, as well as masculine, characteristics can be incorporated into managerial styles to enhance effective leadership. Autonomy, decision-making and assertiveness are as important as nurturing and caring. What are little girls made of? Little girls are made of sugar and spice and everything nice. What are little boys made of? Little boys are made of rats and snails and puppy dog tails.

  11. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Pablo H C G; Miranda, Fábio; Veras, Adonney; de Melo, Diego Magalhães; Soares, Siomar; Pinheiro, Kenny; Guimarães, Luis; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer.

  12. GapBlaster-A Graphical Gap Filler for Prokaryote Genomes.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Pablo H C G; Miranda, Fábio; Veras, Adonney; de Melo, Diego Magalhães; Soares, Siomar; Pinheiro, Kenny; Guimarães, Luis; Azevedo, Vasco; Silva, Artur; Ramos, Rommel T J

    2016-01-01

    The advent of NGS (Next Generation Sequencing) technologies has resulted in an exponential increase in the number of complete genomes available in biological databases. This advance has allowed the development of several computational tools enabling analyses of large amounts of data in each of the various steps, from processing and quality filtering to gap filling and manual curation. The tools developed for gap closure are very useful as they result in more complete genomes, which will influence downstream analyses of genomic plasticity and comparative genomics. However, the gap filling step remains a challenge for genome assembly, often requiring manual intervention. Here, we present GapBlaster, a graphical application to evaluate and close gaps. GapBlaster was developed via Java programming language. The software uses contigs obtained in the assembly of the genome to perform an alignment against a draft of the genome/scaffold, using BLAST or Mummer to close gaps. Then, all identified alignments of contigs that extend through the gaps in the draft sequence are presented to the user for further evaluation via the GapBlaster graphical interface. GapBlaster presents significant results compared to other similar software and has the advantage of offering a graphical interface for manual curation of the gaps. GapBlaster program, the user guide and the test datasets are freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/gapblaster2015/. It requires Sun JDK 8 and Blast or Mummer. PMID:27171416

  13. Three-dimensionally ordered array of air bubbles in a polymer film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasarao, M.; Collings, D.; Philips, A.; Patel, S.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    We report the formation of a three-dimensionally ordered array of air bubbles of monodisperse pore size in a polymer film through a templating mechanism based on thermocapillary convection. Dilute solutions of a simple, coil-like polymer in a volatile solvent are cast on a glass slide in the presence of moist air flowing across the surface. Evaporative cooling and the generation of an ordered array of breath figures leads to the formation of multilayers of hexagonally packed water droplets that are preserved in the final, solid polymer film as spherical air bubbles. The dimensions of these bubbles can be controlled simply by changing the velocity of the airflow across the surface. When these three-dimensionally ordered macroporous materials have pore dimensions comparable to the wavelength of visible light, they are of interest as photonic band gaps and optical stop-bands.

  14. SOUTHWEST REGIONAL GAP LAND COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gap Analysis Program is a national inter-agency program that maps the distribution

    of plant communities and selected animal species and compares these distributions with land

    stewardship to identify gaps in biodiversity protection. GAP uses remote satellite imag...

  15. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  16. Bridging Gaps Between Refractory Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haney, J. W. J.

    1982-01-01

    Excessively large gaps between tiles on Space Shuttle eliminated without time-consuming and costly procedure of removing and replacing tiles. Ceramic tile silver is bonded in gap. Bonded silver prevents airframe under gap from getting too hot during reentry and presents aerodynamically smooth exterior surface.

  17. Studies on the cell biology of interendothelial cell gaps

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.

    2012-01-01

    Pain, redness, heat, and swelling are hallmarks of inflammation that were recognized as early as the first century AD. Despite these early observations, the mechanisms responsible for swelling, in particular, remained an enigma for nearly two millennia. Only in the past century have scientists and physicians gained an appreciation for the role that vascular endothelium plays in controlling the exudation that is responsible for swelling. One of these mechanisms is the formation of transient gaps between adjacent endothelial cell borders. Inflammatory mediators act on endothelium to reorganize the cytoskeleton, decrease the strength of proteins that connect cells together, and induce transient gaps between endothelial cells. These gaps form a paracellular route responsible for exudation. The discovery that interendothelial cell gaps are causally linked to exudation began in the 1960s and was accompanied by significant controversy. Today, the role of gap formation in tissue edema is accepted by many, and significant scientific effort is dedicated toward developing therapeutic strategies that will prevent or reverse the endothelial cell gaps that are present during the course of inflammatory illness. Given the importance of this field in endothelial cell biology and inflammatory disease, this focused review catalogs key historical advances that contributed to our modern-day understanding of the cell biology of interendothelial gap formation. PMID:21964402

  18. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  19. Mind the gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwat, M. S.; Krassnigg, A.; Maris, P.; Roberts, C. D.

    2007-03-01

    In this summary of the application of Dyson-Schwinger equations to the theory and phenomenology of hadrons, some deductions following from a nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncation are highlighted, notable amongst which are results for pseudoscalar mesons. We also describe inferences from the gap equation relating to the radius of convergence of a chiral expansion, applications to heavy-light and heavy-heavy mesons, and quantitative estimates of the contribution of quark orbital angular momentum in pseudoscalar mesons; and recapitulate upon studies of nucleon electromagnetic form factors.

  20. Photonic band gap materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassagne, D.

    Photonic band gap materials Photonic band gap materials are periodic dielectric structures that control the propagation of electromagnetic waves. We describe the plane wave method, which allows to calculate the band structures of photonic crystals. By symmetry analysis and a perturbative approach, we predict the appearance of the low energy photonic band gaps of hexagonal structures. We propose new two-dimensional structures called graphite and boron nitride. Using a transfer matrix method, we calculate the transmission of the graphite structure and we show the crucial role of the coupling with external modes. We study the appearance of allowed modes in the photonic band gap by the introduction of localized defects in the periodicity. Finally, we discuss the properties of opals formed by self-organized silica microspheres, which are very promising for the fabrication of three-dimensional photonic crystals. Les matériaux à bandes interdites photoniques sont des structures diélectriques périodiques qui contrôlent la propagation des ondes électromagnétiques. Nous décrivons la méthode des ondes planes qui permet de calculer les structures de bandes des cristaux photoniques. Par une analyse de la symétrie et une approche perturbative, nous précisons les conditions d'existence des bandes interdites de basse énergie. Nous proposons de nouvelles structures bidimensionnelles appelées graphite et nitrure de bore. Grâce à une méthode de matrices de transfert, nous calculons la transmission de la structure graphite et nous mettons en évidence le rôle fondamental du couplage avec les modes extérieurs. Nous étudions l'apparition de modes permis dans la bande interdite grâce à l'introduction de défauts dans la périodicité. Enfin, nous discutons les propriétés des opales constituées de micro-billes de silice auto-organisées, qui sont très prometteuses pour la fabrication de cristaux photoniques tridimensionnels.

  1. Study of Discharging Characteristics of Hollow Cathode Surge Protective Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xueling; Chen, Jingliang; Xu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2010-02-01

    A hollow cathode surge protective gap (HCSPG) was designed, and the discharge characteristics was investigated in an air and nitrogen gas environment. For both the gap spacing D and the hole diameter varphi of HCSPG of 3 mm, the voltage protective value Up of HCSPG is about 3.5 kV and its converting time tc exceeds 100 ns at an air pressure from 10 Pa to 100 Pa. The maximum converting time tc from glow to arc discharging reaches 1600 ns at an air pressure of 100 Pa, while the minimum converting time tc is 120 ns at 10 Pa. For a triggered HCSPG, Up is reduced to about 1.6 kV while the converting time is 120 ns with a semiconductor trigger device and 50 ns with a dielectric porcelain trigger device under an air pressure of 100 Pa.

  2. Turbine blade tip gap reduction system

    DOEpatents

    Diakunchak, Ihor S.

    2012-09-11

    A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

  3. Gapped domain walls, gapped boundaries, and topological degeneracy.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian; Wang, Juven C; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2015-02-20

    Gapped domain walls, as topological line defects between (2+1)D topologically ordered states, are examined. We provide simple criteria to determine the existence of gapped domain walls, which apply to both Abelian and non-Abelian topological orders. Our criteria also determine which (2+1)D topological orders must have gapless edge modes, namely, which (1+1)D global gravitational anomalies ensure gaplessness. Furthermore, we introduce a new mathematical object, the tunneling matrix W, whose entries are the fusion-space dimensions W(ia), to label different types of gapped domain walls. By studying many examples, we find evidence that the tunneling matrices are powerful quantities to classify different types of gapped domain walls. Since a gapped boundary is a gapped domain wall between a bulk topological order and the vacuum, regarded as the trivial topological order, our theory of gapped domain walls inclusively contains the theory of gapped boundaries. In addition, we derive a topological ground state degeneracy formula, applied to arbitrary orientable spatial 2-manifolds with gapped domain walls, including closed 2-manifolds and open 2-manifolds with gapped boundaries.

  4. Gap analysis: Concepts, methods, and recent results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jennings, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    Rapid progress is being made in the conceptual, technical, and organizational requirements for generating synoptic multi-scale views of the earth's surface and its biological content. Using the spatially comprehensive data that are now available, researchers, land managers, and land-use planners can, for the first time, quantitatively place landscape units - from general categories such as 'Forests' or 'Cold-Deciduous Shrubland Formation' to more categories such as 'Picea glauca-Abies balsamea-Populus spp. Forest Alliance' - in their large-area contexts. The National Gap Analysis Program (GAP) has developed the technical and organizational capabilities necessary for the regular production and analysis of such information. This paper provides a brief overview of concepts and methods as well as some recent results from the GAP projects. Clearly, new frameworks for biogeographic information and organizational cooperation are needed if we are to have any hope of documenting the full range of species occurrences and ecological processes in ways meaningful to their management. The GAP experience provides one model for achieving these new frameworks.

  5. The Gap-Tpc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, B.; Anastasio, A.; Boiano, A.; Catalanotti, S.; Cocco, A. G.; Covone, G.; Di Meo, P.; Longo, G.; Vanzanella, A.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Fiorillo, G.

    2016-02-01

    Several experiments have been conducted worldwide, with the goal of observing low-energy nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs scattering off target nuclei in ultra-sensitive, low-background detectors. In the last few decades noble liquid detectors designed to search for dark matter in the form of WIMPs have been extremely successful in improving their sensitivities and setting the best limits. One of the crucial problems to be faced for the development of large size (multi ton-scale) liquid argon experiments is the lack of reliable and low background cryogenic PMTs: their intrinsic radioactivity, cost, and borderline performance at 87 K rule them out as a possible candidate for photosensors. We propose a brand new concept of liquid argon-based detector for direct dark matter search: the Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode Time Projection Chamber (GAP-TPC) optimized in terms of residual radioactivity of the photosensors, energy and spatial resolution, light and charge collection efficiency.

  6. Formative Assessment: Simply, No Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the types of assessment the closest to daily reading instruction is formative assessment. In contrast to summative assessment, which occurs after instruction, formative assessment involves forming judgments frequently in the flow of instruction. Key features of formative assessment include identifying gaps between where students are and…

  7. Undecidability of the spectral gap.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Toby S; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M

    2015-12-10

    The spectral gap--the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system--is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding 'halting problem'. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  8. The formation of surface multilayers at the air-water interface from sodium diethylene glycol monoalkyl ether sulfate/AlCl3 solutions: the role of the alkyl chain length.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Webster, John P R

    2013-10-15

    The influence of the alkyl chain length on surface multilayer formation at the air-water interface for the anionic surfactant sodium diethylene glycol monoalkyl ether sulfate, SAE2S, in the presence of Al(3+) multivalent counterions, in the form of AlCl3, is described. In the absence of electrolyte, the saturated monolayer adsorption is determined by the headgroup geometry and is independent of the alkyl chain length. In the presence of Al(3+) counterions, surface multilayer formation occurs, due to the strong SAE2S/Al(3+) binding and complexation. The neutron reflection data show that the alkyl chain length of the surfactant has a significant impact upon the evolution of the surface multilayer structure with surfactant and AlCl3 concentration. Increasing the alkyl chain length from decyl to tetradecyl results in the surface multilayer formation occurring at lower surfactant and AlCl3 concentrations. At the short alkyl chain lengths, decyl and dodecyl, the regions of multilayer formation with a small number of bilayers are increasingly extended with decreasing alkyl chain length. For the alkyl chain lengths of tetradecyl and hexadecyl, the surface behavior is further affected by decreases in the surfactant solubility in the presence of AlCl3, and this ultimately dominates the surface behavior at the longer alkyl chain lengths.

  9. Nature of the Kirkwood gaps in the asteroid belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.; Murray, C. D.

    1983-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the Kirkwood gaps are not merely regions of low asteroidal number density, but are regions in a-e-sin 1/2 I space where libration of some argument is possible. It is argued that neither the statistical nor the cosmogonic hypothesis of gap formation can account for these new observations. It is shown that the present distribution of asteroidal semimajor axes can be used to deduce the present semimajor axis of Jupiter to an accuracy of one part in five thousand. Thus, there has been very little change in the orbital period of Jupiter since the time of formation of the present gaps. This observation eliminates the possibility that the observed gaps were formed by resonance sweeping at the time of the dispersal of the accretion disk. It is concluded that the gaps have been formed by the gravitational action of Jupiter on individual asteroids and that gap formation has probably continued throughout the lifetime of the solar system.

  10. Hydrogeologic Model for the Gable Gap Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Bruce A.; Last, George V.; Thomas, Gregory S.; Thompson, Michael D.; Ludwig, Jami L.; Lanigan, David C.

    2010-09-30

    Gable Gap is a structural and topographic depression between Gable Mountain and Gable Butte within the central Hanford Site. It has a long and complex geologic history, which includes tectonic uplift synchronous with erosional downcutting associated with the ancestral Columbia River during both Ringold and Cold Creek periods, and by the later Ice Age (mostly glacial Lake Missoula) floods. The gap was subsequently buried and partially backfilled by mostly coarse-grained, Ice Age flood deposits (Hanford formation). Erosional remnants of both the Ringold Formation and Cold Creek unit locally underlie the high-energy flood deposits. A large window exists in the gap where confined basalt aquifers are in contact with the unconfined suprabasalt aquifer. Several paleochannels, of both Hanford and Ringold Formation age, were eroded into the basalt bedrock across Gable Gap. Groundwater from the Central Plateau presently moves through Gable Gap via one or more of these shallow paleochannels. As groundwater levels continue to decline in the region, groundwater flow may eventually be cut off through Gable Gap.

  11. A Comparative Study of O3 Formation in the Houston Urban and Industrial Plumes During the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study

    SciTech Connect

    Daum, Peter H.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, Stephen R.; Nunnermacker, L. J.; Lee, Y.- N.; Weinstein-Lloyd, Judy; Zheng, J.; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2003-12-02

    Photochemical box model calculations constrained by observations of NOx, VOCs, O3 and other stable species indicate that the instantaneous ozone formation rate was much lower over downtown Houston than it was over the Ship Channel. The much faster O3 formation rates and higher concentrations observed over the Ship Channel are attributed to the much higher hydrocarbon reactivity, the majority of which was contributed by low molecular weight alkenes. These high hydrocarbon reactivities also caused O3 over the ship Channel to be produced with much higher efficiency than over urban Houston.

  12. Terminology gap in hydrological cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    Water is central to life on Earth. People have been trying to understand how water moves in the hydrosphere throughout the human history. In the 9th century BC, the famous Greek poet Homer described the hydrological cycle in Iliad as "okeanos whose stream bends back in a circle" with a belief that rivers are ocean-fed from subterranean seas. Later, Aristotle (4th century BC) claimed that most of the water came from underground caverns in which air was transformed into water. It was only until 1674, French scientist Perrault developed the correct concept of the water cycle. In modern times, scientists are interested in understanding the individual processes of the hydrological cycle with a keen focus on runoff which supplies water to rivers, lakes, and oceans. Currently, the prevailing concepts on runoff processes include 'infiltration excess runoff' and 'saturation excess runoff'. However, there is no term to describe another major runoff due to the excess beyond the soil water holding capacity (i.e., the field capacity). We argue that a new term should be introduced to fill this gap, and it could be called 'holding excess runoff' which is compatible with the convention. This new term is significant in correcting a half-century misnomer where 'holding excess runoff' has been incorrectly named as 'saturation excess runoff', which was introduced by the Xinanjiang model in China in 1960s. Similar concept has been adopted in many well-known hydrological models such as PDM and HBV in which the saturation refers to the field capacity. The term 'holding excess runoff' resolves such a common confusion in the hydrological community.

  13. Evaluating the Role of the Air-Solution Interface on the Mechanism of Subvisible Particle Formation Caused by Mechanical Agitation for an IgG1 mAb.

    PubMed

    Ghazvini, Saba; Kalonia, Cavan; Volkin, David B; Dhar, Prajnaparamita

    2016-05-01

    Mechanical agitation of monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions often leads to protein particle formation. In this study, various formulations of an immunoglobulin G (IgG) 1 mAb were subjected to different controlled interfacial stresses using a Langmuir trough, and protein particles formed at the interface and measured in bulk solution were characterized using atomic force microscopy and flow digital imaging. Results were compared to mAb solutions agitated in glass vials and unstressed controls. At lower pH, mAb solutions exhibited larger hysteresis in their surface pressure versus area isotherms and increased number of particles in bulk solution, when subjected to interfacial stresses. mAb samples subjected to 750-1000 interfacial compression-expansion cycles in 6 h contained high particle numbers in bulk solution, and displayed similar particulation trends when agitated in vials. At compression rates of 50 cycles in 6 h, however, particle levels in mAb solutions were comparable to unstressed controls, despite protein aggregates being present at the air-solution interface. These results suggest that while the air-solution interface serves as a nucleation site for initiating protein aggregation, the number of protein particles measured in bulk mAb solutions depends on the total number of compression cycles that proteins at the air-solution interface are subjected to within a fixed time. PMID:27025981

  14. A new inclination shallowing correction of the Mauch Chunk Formation of Pennsylvania, based on high field-AIR results: Implications for the Carboniferous North American APW path and Pangea reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, D.; Kodama, K. P.

    2010-12-01

    A new rock-magnetic study was performed on samples of the Lower Carboniferous Mauch Chunk Formation of Pennsylvania. These red beds had been sampled for an inclination shallowing study by Tan and Kodama (2002). High anisotropy values lead Kodama (2009) to suspect that the Formation had been affected by strain. However, more detailed rock-magnetic measurements also show that both magnetite and hematite contribute to the remanence, leading to the application of a high field anisotropy of isothermal remanence magnetization (hf-AIR) technique specifically designed to isolate the anisotropy of the hematite, the characteristic remanence carrier. The newly measured fabric has a smaller anisotropy than Kodama (2009) observed (~9-17% as opposed to ~25-40%) and shows a pronounced ENE-WSW magnetic lineation that is sub-parallel to the trend of the Appalachians and interpretable as a hematite intersection lineation that occurred during local NNW-directed shortening. Results also yield a much different AIR/ anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) relationship than previously reported. We attribute the differences in the AIR/AMS relationship to varying concentrations of magnetite. Because the AIR/AMS relationship has been used to constrain the individual particle anisotropy we suggest this approach to determine grain anisotropy is invalid, at least until the AIR/AMS relationship for single domain hematite only is measured. The measured magnetic fabric yields a new inclination correction with a corrected paleopole that is in better agreement with recently corrected Carboniferous paleopoles than the previously corrected Mauch Chunk paleopole, defining a more consistent APW path. The corrected paleopoles allow calculation of new mean Early (~325 Ma) and Late (~312 Ma) Carboniferous inclination-corrected paleopoles for North America, which can be compared to coeval, but uncorrected, paleopoles from Gondwana. Results suggest a Pangea B assemblage unless Gondwanan sedimentary

  15. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1986-08-19

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility is disclosed. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length. 4 figs.

  16. Undecidability of the spectral gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Perez-Garcia, David; Wolf, Michael M.

    2015-12-01

    The spectral gap—the energy difference between the ground state and first excited state of a system—is central to quantum many-body physics. Many challenging open problems, such as the Haldane conjecture, the question of the existence of gapped topological spin liquid phases, and the Yang-Mills gap conjecture, concern spectral gaps. These and other problems are particular cases of the general spectral gap problem: given the Hamiltonian of a quantum many-body system, is it gapped or gapless? Here we prove that this is an undecidable problem. Specifically, we construct families of quantum spin systems on a two-dimensional lattice with translationally invariant, nearest-neighbour interactions, for which the spectral gap problem is undecidable. This result extends to undecidability of other low-energy properties, such as the existence of algebraically decaying ground-state correlations. The proof combines Hamiltonian complexity techniques with aperiodic tilings, to construct a Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the evolution of a quantum phase-estimation algorithm followed by a universal Turing machine. The spectral gap depends on the outcome of the corresponding ‘halting problem’. Our result implies that there exists no algorithm to determine whether an arbitrary model is gapped or gapless, and that there exist models for which the presence or absence of a spectral gap is independent of the axioms of mathematics.

  17. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Y.

    1984-02-16

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchrotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions with an axial gap therebetween. An outer pipe cooperates with the first beam pipe portion to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips cooperate with the first beam pipe portion to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  18. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOEpatents

    Yin, Yan

    1986-01-01

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  19. A novel multi-level interconnect scheme with air as low K inter-metal dielectric for ultradeep submicron application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chung-Hui; Fang, Yean-Kuen; Lin, Chun-Sheng; Yang, Chih-Wei; Hsieh, Jang-Cheng

    2001-01-01

    In this letter, a novel multi-level interconnect scheme with air as the low K inter-metal dielectric for ultra large scale integrated circuit (ULSI) application in ultradeep submicron (UDSM) range is proposed. The detailed process integration with copper dual damascene processing is described. The feasibility of the scheme is examined by trimethylaluminum Raphael simulation for the effective dielectric constant and the cutoff frequency in a standard divide by three counter. The simulation results are also compared with these reported air gap formation technologies. The results show the developed multi-level interconnect system is suitable for UDSM application.

  20. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  1. Gap Assessment (FY 13 Update)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Getman, Dan

    2013-09-30

    each data category. The first file contains the grid and is in the SHP file format (shape file.) Each populated grid cell represents a 10k area within which data is known to exist. The second file is a CSV (comma separated value) file that contains all of the individual layers that intersected with the grid. This CSV can be joined with the map to retrieve a list of datasets that are available at any given site. The attributes in the CSV include: 1. grid_id : The id of the grid cell that the data intersects with 2. title: This represents the name of the WFS service that intersected with this grid cell 3. abstract: This represents the description of the WFS service that intersected with this grid cell 4. gap_type: This represents the category of data availability that these data fall within. As the current processing is pulling data from NGDS, this category universally represents data that are available in the NGDS and are ready for acquisition for analytic purposes. 5. proprietary_type: Whether the data are considered proprietary 6. service_type: The type of service 7. base_url: The service URL

  2. Molecular assemblies of 4-(hexadecyloxy)-n-(pyridinylmethylene)anilines at the air-water interface and Cu(II)-promoted vesicle formation via metal coordination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Miao, Wangen; Liu, Huijin; Zhang, Xianfeng; Du, Xuezhong

    2010-09-01

    The molecular assemblies of 4-(hexadecyloxy)-N-(pyridinylmethylene)anilines (HPA) at the air-water interface on pure water and aqueous Cu(II) subphases have been investigated using in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). The Schiff base units were oriented with their long axes almost perpendicular to the water surface, and both imine and pyridinyl nitrogen atoms of the Schiff base units were coordinated to Cu(II) ions together with their geometrical conversions. The alkyl chains in the monolayers were quantitatively determined on the assumption that the HPA monolayers at the air-water interface were composed of sublayers of alkyl chains and Schiff base units, and the chain orientation angle on pure water was 30 +/- 2 degrees and increased to 37 +/- 2 degrees on the aqueous Cu(II) subphase. The HPA amphiphiles could not be dispersed in pure water but could self-organize into vesicles with metal-coordinated headgroups and interdigitated-packed alkyl chains in the presence of Cu(II) ions in aqueous solution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), UV-vis spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to investigate the aggregate structures and specific properties of the coordinated vesicles. PMID:20698514

  3. Air pollution from aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heywood, J. B.; Fay, J. A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1979-01-01

    A series of fundamental problems related to jet engine air pollution and combustion were examined. These include soot formation and oxidation, nitric oxide and carbon monoxide emissions mechanisms, pollutant dispension, flow and combustion characteristics of the NASA swirl can combustor, fuel atomization and fuel-air mixing processes, fuel spray drop velocity and size measurement, ignition and blowout. A summary of this work, and a bibliography of 41 theses and publications which describe this work, with abstracts, is included.

  4. Measuring the Gap

    PubMed Central

    She, Xinshu; Zhao, Deqing; Scholnick, Jenna

    2016-01-01

    China is a large country where rapid development is accompanied by growing inequalities. How economic inequalities translate to health inequalities is unknown. Baseline health assessment is lacking among rural Chinese children. We aimed at assessing baseline student health of rural Chinese children and comparing them with those of urban children of similar ages. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the 2003 Global School-Based Student Health Survey among 100 students Grade 4 to 6 from rural Guizhou, China. Results were summarized and compared with public data from urban Beijing using multivariate logistic regression models. Rural children are more likely to not wash their hands before a meal (odds ratio [OR] = 5.71, P < .01) and after using the toilet (OR = 5.41, P < .01). They are more likely to feel sick or to get into trouble after drinking (OR = 7.28, P < .01). They are more likely to have used drugs (OR = 8.54, P < .01) and to have no close friends (OR = 8.23, P < .01). An alarming percentage of rural (8.22%) and urban (14.22%) children have had suicidal ideation in the past year (OR = 0.68, P > .05). Rural parents are more likely to not know their children’s whereabouts (OR = 1.81, P < .05). Rural children are more than 4 times likely to have serious injuries (OR = 4.64, P < .01) and to be bullied (OR = 4.01, P < .01). In conclusion, school-age rural Chinese children exhibit more health risk behaviors and fewer protective factors at baseline compared to their urban counterparts. Any intervention aimed at improving child health should take this distributive gap into consideration. PMID:27335999

  5. Paramagnetically induced gapful topological superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daido, Akito; Yanase, Youichi

    2016-08-01

    We propose a generic scenario for realizing gapful topological superconductors (TSCs) from gapless spin-singlet superconductors (SCs). Noncentrosymmetric nodal SCs in two dimensions are shown to be gapful under a Zeeman field, as a result of the cooperation of inversion-symmetry breaking and time-reversal-symmetry breaking. In particular, non-s -wave SCs acquire a large excitation gap. Such paramagnetically induced gapful SCs may be classified into TSCs in the symmetry class D specified by the Chern number. We show nontrivial Chern numbers over a wide parameter range for spin-singlet SCs. A variety of the paramagnetically induced gapful TSCs are demonstrated, including D +p -wave TSC, extended S +p -wave TSC, p +D +f -wave TSC, and s +P -wave TSC. Natural extension toward three-dimensional Weyl SCs is also discussed.

  6. Mind the Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers have been able to study planet-forming discs around young Sun-like stars in unsurpassed detail, clearly revealing the motion and distribution of the gas in the inner parts of the disc. This result, which possibly implies the presence of giant planets, was made possible by the combination of a very clever method enabled by ESO's Very Large Telescope. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 27a/08 Planet-forming Disc Planets could be home to other forms of life, so the study of exoplanets ranks very high in contemporary astronomy. More than 300 planets are already known to orbit stars other than the Sun, and these new worlds show an amazing diversity in their characteristics. But astronomers don't just look at systems where planets have already formed - they can also get great insights by studying the discs around young stars where planets may currently be forming. "This is like going 4.6 billion years back in time to watch how the planets of our own Solar System formed," says Klaus Pontoppidan from Caltech, who led the research. Pontoppidan and colleagues have analysed three young analogues of our Sun that are each surrounded by a disc of gas and dust from which planets could form. These three discs are just a few million years old and were known to have gaps or holes in them, indicating regions where the dust has been cleared and the possible presence of young planets. The new results not only confirm that gas is present in the gaps in the dust, but also enable astronomers to measure how the gas is distributed in the disc and how the disc is oriented. In regions where the dust appears to have been cleared out, molecular gas is still highly abundant. This can either mean that the dust has clumped together to form planetary embryos, or that a planet has already formed and is in the process of clearing the gas in the disc. For one of the stars, SR 21, a likely explanation is the presence of a massive giant planet orbiting at less than 3.5 times the distance

  7. GAP Analysis Bulletin Number 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, Jill; Gergely, Kevin; Aycrigg, Jocelyn; Canonico, Gabrielle; Davidson, Anne; Coffey, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    The Mission of the Gap Analysis Program (GAP) is to promote conservation by providing broad geographic information on biological diversity to resource managers, planners, and policy makers who can use the information to make informed decisions. As part of the National Biological Information Infrastructure (NBII) ?a collaborative program to provide increased access to data and information on the nation?s biological resources--GAP data and analytical tools have been used in hundreds of applications: from basic research to comprehensive state wildlife plans; from educational projects in schools to ecoregional assessments of biodiversity. The challenge: keeping common species common means protecting them BEFORE they become threatened. To do this on a state or regional basis requires key information such as land cover descriptions, predicted distribution maps for native animals, and an assessment of the level of protection currently given to those plants and animals. GAP works cooperatively with Federal, state, and local natural resource professionals and academics to provide this kind of information. GAP activities focus on the creation of state and regional databases and maps that depict patterns of land management, land cover, and biodiversity. These data can be used to identify ?gaps? in conservation--instances where an animal or plant community is not adequately represented on the existing network of conservation lands. GAP is administered through the U.S. Geological Survey. Through building partnerships among disparate groups, GAP hopes to foster the kind of collaboration that is needed to address conservation issues on a broad scale. For more information, contact: John Mosesso National GAP Director 703-648-4079 Kevin Gergely National GAP Operations Manager 208-885-3565

  8. Method and apparatus for wind turbine air gap control

    DOEpatents

    Grant, James Jonathan; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya; Qu, Ronghai

    2007-02-20

    Methods and apparatus for assembling a wind turbine generator are provided. The wind turbine generator includes a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis, a rotor rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis wherein the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to a radially outer periphery of the rotor such that an airgap is defined between the stator windings and the magnetic elements and the plurality of magnetic elements including a radially inner periphery having a first diameter. The wind turbine generator also includes a bearing including a first member in rotatable engagement with a radially inner second member, the first member including a radially outer periphery, a diameter of the radially outer periphery of the first member being substantially equal to the first diameter, the rotor coupled to the stator through the bearing such that a substantially uniform airgap is maintained.

  9. Aqueous-phase chemistry and bactericidal effects from an air discharge plasma in contact with water: evidence for the formation of peroxynitrite through a pseudo-second-order post-discharge reaction of H2O2 and HNO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukes, P.; Dolezalova, E.; Sisrova, I.; Clupek, M.

    2014-02-01

    The formation of transient species (OH·, NO2·, NO radicals) and long-lived chemical products (O3, H2O2, NO_{3}^{-} , NO_{2}^{-} ) produced by a gas discharge plasma at the gas-liquid interface and directly in the liquid was measured in dependence on the gas atmosphere (20% oxygen mixtures with nitrogen or with argon) and pH of plasma-treated water (controlled by buffers at pH 3.3, 6.9 or 10.1). The aqueous-phase chemistry and specific contributions of these species to the chemical and biocidal effects of air discharge plasma in water were evaluated using phenol as a chemical probe and bacteria Escherichia coli. The nitrated and nitrosylated products of phenol (4-nitrophenol, 2-nitrophenol, 4-nitrocatechol, 4-nitrosophenol) in addition to the hydroxylated products (catechol, hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone) evidenced formation of NO2·, NO· and OH· radicals and NO+ ions directly by the air plasma at the gas-liquid interface and through post-discharge processes in plasma-activated water (PAW) mediated by peroxynitrite (ONOOH). Kinetic study of post-discharge evolution of H2O2 and NO_{2}^{-} in PAW has demonstrated excellent fit with the pseudo-second-order reaction between H2O2 and NO_{2}^{-} . The third-order rate constant k = 1.1 × 103 M-2 s-1 for the reaction NO_{2}^{-} +H_{2}O_{2}+H^{+}\\to ONOOH+H_{2}O was determined in PAW at pH 3.3 with the rate of ONOOH formation in the range 10-8-10-9 M s-1. Peroxynitrite chemistry was shown to significantly participate in the antibacterial properties of PAW. Ozone presence in PAW was proved indirectly by pH-dependent degradation of phenol and detection of cis,cis-muconic acid, but contribution of ozone to the inactivation of bacteria by the air plasma was negligible.

  10. AIRE-Linux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Xu, Benda; Peng, Chuan; Yang, Yang; Huo, Zhuoxi

    2015-08-01

    AIRE-Linux is a dedicated Linux system for astronomers. Modern astronomy faces two big challenges: massive observed raw data which covers the whole electromagnetic spectrum, and overmuch professional data processing skill which exceeds personal or even a small team's abilities. AIRE-Linux, which is a specially designed Linux and will be distributed to users by Virtual Machine (VM) images in Open Virtualization Format (OVF), is to help astronomers confront the challenges. Most astronomical software packages, such as IRAF, MIDAS, CASA, Heasoft etc., will be integrated into AIRE-Linux. It is easy for astronomers to configure and customize the system and use what they just need. When incorporated into cloud computing platforms, AIRE-Linux will be able to handle data intensive and computing consuming tasks for astronomers. Currently, a Beta version of AIRE-Linux is ready for download and testing.

  11. Three-dimensional patterns in dielectric barrier discharge with "H" shaped gas gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xing; Dong, Lifang; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Ying; Liu, Weibo; Fan, Weili; Pan, Yuyang

    2016-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) patterns are obtained for the first time in dielectric barrier discharge by a special designed device with "H" shaped gas gap which consists of a single gas layer gap and two double gas layer gaps. Three dimensional spatiotemporal characteristics of discharge are investigated by photomultiplier and intensified charge-coupled device camera. Results show that the discharge first generates in the single gas layer gap and the coupled filaments in the double gas layer gap present the simultaneity characteristics. The formation of 3D patterns is determined by the distribution of the effective field of the applied field and the wall charge field.

  12. The Dynamically Disrupted Gap in HD 142527

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casassus, S.; Perez M., S.; Jordán, A.; Ménard, F.; Cuadra, J.; Schreiber, M. R.; Hales, A. S.; Ercolano, B.

    2012-08-01

    The vestiges of planet formation have been observed in debris disks harboring young and massive gaseous giants. The process of giant planet formation is terminated by the dissipation of gas in the protoplanetary disk. The gas-rich disk around HD 142527 features a small inner disk, a large gap from ~10 to ~140 AU, and a massive outer disk extending out to ~300 AU. The gap could have been carved out by a giant planet. We have imaged the outer regions of this gap using the adaptive optics camera NICI on Gemini South. Our images reveal that the disk is dynamically perturbed. The outer boundary of the roughly elliptical gap appears to be composed of several segments of spiral arms. The stellar position is offset by 0farcs17 ± 0farcs02 from the centroid of the cavity, consistent with earlier imaging at coarser resolutions. These transient morphological features are expected in the context of disk evolution in the presence of a perturbing body located inside the cavity. We perform hydrodynamical simulations of the dynamical clearing of a gap in a disk. A 10 M jup body in a circular orbit at r = 90 AU perturbs the whole disks, even after thousands of orbits. By then the model disk has an eccentric and irregular cavity, flanked by tightly wound spiral arms, but it is still evolving far from steady state. A particular transient configuration that is a qualitative match to HD 142527 is seen at 1.7 Myr. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). The Gemini run ID is

  13. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagdal, K.T.; King, E.L.; Follstaedt, D.W.

    1992-03-03

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment. 6 figs.

  14. Pneumatic gap sensor and method

    DOEpatents

    Bagdal, Karl T.; King, Edward L.; Follstaedt, Donald W.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring and maintaining a predetermined width in the gap between a casting nozzle and a casting wheel, wherein the gap is monitored by means of at least one pneumatic gap sensor. The pneumatic gap sensor is mounted on the casting nozzle in proximity to the casting surface and is connected by means of a tube to a regulator and a transducer. The regulator provides a flow of gas through a restictor to the pneumatic gap sensor, and the transducer translates the changes in the gas pressure caused by the proximity of the casting wheel to the pneumatic gap sensor outlet into a signal intelligible to a control device. The relative positions of the casting nozzle and casting wheel can thereby be selectively adjusted to continually maintain a predetermined distance between their adjacent surfaces. The apparatus and method enables accurate monitoring of the actual casting gap in a simple and reliable manner resistant to the extreme temperatures and otherwise hostile casting environment.

  15. Ion Engine Grid Gap Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, Gerge C.; Frandina, Michael M.

    2004-01-01

    A simple technique for measuring the grid gap of an ion engine s ion optics during startup and steady-state operation was demonstrated with beam extraction. The grid gap at the center of the ion optics assembly was measured with a long distance microscope that was focused onto an alumina pin that protruded through the center accelerator grid aperture and was mechanically attached to the screen grid. This measurement technique was successfully applied to a 30 cm titanium ion optics assembly mounted onto an NSTAR engineering model ion engine. The grid gap and each grid s movement during startup from room temperature to both full and low power were measured. The grid gaps with and without beam extraction were found to be significantly different. The grid gaps at the ion optics center were both significantly smaller than the cold grid gap and different at the two power levels examined. To avoid issues associated with a small grid gap during thruster startup with titanium ion optics, a simple method was to operate the thruster initially without beam extraction to heat the ion optics. Another possible method is to apply high voltage to the grids prior to igniting the discharge because power deposition to the grids from the plasma is lower with beam extraction than without. Further testing would be required to confirm this approach.

  16. Effect of impurity doping in gapped bilayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Qi; Yan, Baoming; Jia, Zhenzhao; Niu, Jingjing; Yu, Dapeng; Wu, Xiaosong

    2015-10-19

    Impurity doping plays a pivotal role in semiconductor electronics. We study the doping effect in a two-dimensional semiconductor, gapped bilayer graphene. By employing in situ deposition of calcium on the bilayer graphene, dopants are controllably introduced. Low temperature transport results show a variable range hopping conduction near the charge neutrality point persisting up to 50 K, providing evidence for the impurity levels inside the gap. Our experiment confirms a predicted peculiar effect in the gapped bilayer graphene, i.e., formation of in-gap states even if the bare impurity level lies in the conduction band. The result provides perspective on the effect of doping and impurity levels in semiconducting bilayer graphene.

  17. Electronic properties of Janus silicene: new direct band gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Minglei; Ren, Qingqiang; Wang, Sake; Yu, Jin; Tang, Wencheng

    2016-11-01

    Using first-principles calculations, we propose a new class of materials, Janus silicene, which is silicene asymmetrically functionalized with hydrogen and halogen atoms. Formation energies and phonon dispersion indicated that all the Janus silicene systems exhibit good kinetic stability. As compared to silicane, all Janus silicene systems are direct band gap semiconductors. The band gap of Janus silicene can take any value between 1.91 and 2.66 eV by carefully tuning the chemical composition of the adatoms. In addition, biaxial elastic strain can further reduce the band gap to 1.11 eV (under a biaxial tensile strain up to 10%). According to moderate direct band gap, these materials demonstrate potential applications in optoelectronics, exhibiting a very wide spectral range, and they are expected to be highly stable under ambient conditions.

  18. Implications of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Granite, E.J.; King, W.P.; Stanko, D.C.; Pennline, H.W.

    2008-09-01

    Titanium dioxide is a well-known photooxidation catalyst. It will oxidize mercury in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun and oxygen and/or moisture to form mercuric oxide. Several companies manufacture self-cleaning windows. These windows have a transparent coating of titanium dioxide. The titanium dioxide is capable of destroying organic contaminants in air in the presence of ultraviolet light from the sun, thereby keeping the windows clean. The commercially available self-cleaning windows were used to sequester mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures. Samples of the self-cleaning glass were placed into specially designed photo-reactors in order to study the removal of elemental mercury from oxygen–nitrogen mixtures resembling air. The possibility of removing mercury from ambient air with a self-cleaning glass apparatus is examined. The intensity of 365-nm ultraviolet light was similar to the natural intensity from sunlight in the Pittsburgh region. Passive removal of mercury from the air may represent an option in lieu of, or in addition to, point source clean-up at combustion facilities. There are several common band-gap semiconductor oxide photocatalysts. Sunlight (both the ultraviolet and visible light components) and band-gap semiconductor particles may have a small impact on the global cycle of mercury in the environment. The potential environmental consequences of mercury interactions with band-gap semiconductor oxides are discussed. Heterogeneous photooxidation might impact the global transport of elemental mercury emanating from flue gases.

  19. Simulation of a runaway electron avalanche developing in an atmospheric pressure air discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Oreshkin, E. V.; Barengolts, S. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-12-15

    To gain a better understanding of the operation of atmospheric pressure air discharges, the formation of a runaway electron beam at an individual emission site on the cathode has been numerically simulated. The model provides a description of the dynamics of the fast electrons emitted into an air gap from the surface of the emission zone by solving numerically two-dimensional equations for the electrons. It is supposed that the electric field at the surface of the emission zone is enhanced, providing conditions for continuous acceleration of the emitted electrons. It is shown that the formation of a runaway electron beam in a highly overvolted discharge is largely associated with avalanche-type processes and that the number of electrons in the avalanche reaches 50% of the total number of runaway electrons.

  20. Energy levels of exciton in a gapped graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallah, Farhang; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2013-08-01

    A theory is presented for exciton formation in a graphene sheet using the center-of-mass approximation. The energy levels and wavefunctions of exciton are calculated analytically which show that the exciton can form if the band gap of graphene is not zero. We show that the energy gap of graphene plays the role of the mass which if not zero, leads to formation of the excitons. It is shown that the main quantum number of the exciton ground state changes with the graphene dielectric constant. Also, all of the states are found to be four-fold degenerate. The binding energy of exciton can reach as high as 1/4 of the energy gap of graphene which is notable among the conventional quasi-2D systems. This result can play an important rule in the photonics of graphene.