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Sample records for air incinerator cai

  1. The Controlled-Air Incinerator at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Newmyer, J.N.

    1994-04-01

    The Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) at Los Alamos is being modified and upgraded to begin routine operations treating low-level mixed waste (LLMW), radioactively contaminated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes, low-level liquid wastes, and possibly transuranic (TRU) wastes. This paper describes those modifications. Routine waste operations should begin in late FY95.

  2. CONTROLLED AIR INCINERATION OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL-TREATED WOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research was initiated to determine the operating conditions necessary to effect complete thermal destruction (greater than 99.99%) of pentachlorophenol (PCP)-treated wood in a controlled air incinerator (CAI) and to provide a basis for evaluating the applicability of other ...

  3. Ready, set,...quit! A review of the controlled-air incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Reader, G.E.

    1996-05-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) has had a long and productive past as a research and development tool. It now appears that use of the CAI to treat LANL legacy and other wastes under the Federal Facilities Compliance Act is no longer viable due to numerous programmatic problems. This paper will review the history of the CAI. Various aspects associated with the CAI and how those aspects resulted in the loss of this Department of Energy asset as a viable waste treatment option will also be discussed. Included are past missions and tests-CAI capabilities, emissions, and permits; Federal Facility Compliance Act and associated Agreement; National Environmental Policy Act coverage; cost; budget impacts; public perception; the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Combustion Strategy; Independent Technical Review {open_quotes}Red{close_quotes} Team review; waste treatment alternative technologies; the New Mexico Environment Department; and future options and issues.

  4. Controlled air incinerator conceptual design study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This report presents a conceptual design study for a controlled air incinerator facility for incineration of low level combustible waste at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The facility design is based on the use of a Helix Process Systems controlled air incinerator. Cost estimates and associated engineering, procurement, and construction schedules are also provided. The cost estimates and schedules are presented for two incinerator facility designs, one with provisions for waste ash solidification, the other with provisions for packaging the waste ash for transport to an undefined location.

  5. 40 CFR 60.2969 - What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for which the incinerator or air curtain incinerator is being used, a description of the types of materials being burned in the incinerator or air curtain incinerator, a brief description of the size...

  6. 40 CFR 60.3061 - What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... disaster or emergency for which the incinerator or air curtain incinerator is being used, a description of the types of materials being burned in the incinerator or air curtain incinerator, a brief...

  7. 40 CFR 60.3061 - What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... disaster or emergency for which the incinerator or air curtain incinerator is being used, a description of the types of materials being burned in the incinerator or air curtain incinerator, a brief...

  8. 40 CFR 60.3061 - What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... disaster or emergency for which the incinerator or air curtain incinerator is being used, a description of the types of materials being burned in the incinerator or air curtain incinerator, a brief...

  9. 40 CFR 60.3061 - What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... disaster or emergency for which the incinerator or air curtain incinerator is being used, a description of the types of materials being burned in the incinerator or air curtain incinerator, a brief...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2969 - What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for which the incinerator or air curtain incinerator is being used, a description of the types of materials being burned in the incinerator or air curtain incinerator, a brief description of the size...

  11. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume I. Rationale, process, equipment, performance, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Neuls, A.S.; Draper, W.E.; Koenig, R.A.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-08-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawing, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

  12. Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator for radioactive waste. Volume II. Engineering design reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, R.A.; Draper, W.E.; Newmyer, J.M.; Warner, C.L.

    1982-10-01

    This two-volume report is a detailed design and operating documentation of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) and is an aid to technology transfer to other Department of Energy contractor sites and the commercial sector. Volume I describes the CAI process, equipment, and performance, and it recommends modifications based on Los Alamos experience. It provides the necessary information for conceptual design and feasibility studies. Volume II provides descriptive engineering information such as drawings, specifications, calculations, and costs. It aids duplication of the process at other facilities.

  13. Controlling air emissions from incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Foisy, M.B.; Li, R.; Chattapadhyay, A.

    1994-04-01

    Last year, EPA published final rules establishing technical standards for the use and disposal of wastewater biosolids (40 CFR, Part 503). Subpart E specifically regulates the operations of and emissions from municipal wastewater biosolids incinerators.

  14. Incinerator air emissions: Inhalation exposure perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, H.W.

    1995-12-01

    Incineration is often proposed as the treatment of choice for processing diverse wastes, particularly hazardous wastes. Where such treatment is proposed, people are often fearful that it will adversely affect their health. Unfortunately, information presented to the public about incinerators often does not include any criteria or benchmarks for evaluating such facilities. This article describes a review of air emission data from regulatory trial burns in a large prototype incinerator, operated at design capacity by the US Army to destroy chemical warfare materials. It uses several sets of criteria to gauge the threat that these emissions pose to public health. Incinerator air emission levels are evaluated with respect to various toxicity screening levels and ambient air levels of the same pollutants. Also, emission levels of chlorinated dioxins and furans are compared with emission levels of two common combustion sources. Such comparisons can add to a community`s understanding of health risks associated with an incinerator. This article focuses only on the air exposure/inhalation pathway as related to human health. It does not address other potential human exposure pathways or the possible effects of emissions on the local ecology, both of which should also be examined during a complete analysis of any major new facility.

  15. 40 CFR 60.2250 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... incinerators? (a) Within 60 days after your air curtain incinerator reaches the charge rate at which it will... for air curtain incinerators? Within 60 days after your air curtain incinerator reaches the...

  16. Electric controlled air incinerator for radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Hootman, H.E.; Warren, J.H.

    1981-04-07

    A two-stage incinerator is provided which includes a primary combustion chamber and an afterburner chamber for off-gases. The latter is formed by a plurality of vertical tubes in combination with associated manifolds which connect the tubes together to form a continuous tortuous path. Electrically-controlled heaters surround the tubes while electrically-controlled plate heaters heat the manifolds. A gravity-type ash removal system is located at the bottom of the first afterburner tube while an air mixer is disposed in that same tube just above the outlet from the primary chamber. A ram injector in combination with rotary magazine feeds waste to a horizontal tube forming the primary combustion chamber.

  17. Electric controlled air incinerator for radioactive wastes

    DOEpatents

    Warren, Jeffery H.; Hootman, Harry E.

    1981-01-01

    A two-stage incinerator is provided which includes a primary combustion chamber and an afterburner chamber for off-gases. The latter is formed by a plurality of vertical tubes in combination with associated manifolds which connect the tubes together to form a continuous tortuous path. Electrically-controlled heaters surround the tubes while electrically-controlled plate heaters heat the manifolds. A gravity-type ash removal system is located at the bottom of the first afterburner tube while an air mixer is disposed in that same tube just above the outlet from the primary chamber. A ram injector in combination with rotary magazine feeds waste to a horizontal tube forming the primary combustion chamber.

  18. Evaluation of pressure response in the Los Alamos controlled air incinerator during three incident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Vavruska, J.S.; Elsberry, K.; Thompson, T.K.; Pendergrass, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    The Los Alamos Controlled Air Incinerator (CAI) is a system designed to accept radioactive mixed waste containing alpha-emitting radionuclides. A mathematical model was developed to predict the pressure response throughout the offgas treatment system of the CAI during three hypothetical incident scenarios. The scenarios examined included: (1) loss of burner flame and failure of the flame safeguard system with subsequent reignition of fuel gas in the primary chamber, (2) pyrolytic gas buildup from a waste package due to loss of induced draft and subsequent restoration of induced draft, and (3) accidental charging of propellant spray cans in a solid waste package to the primary chamber during a normal feed cycle. For each of the three scenarios, the finite element computer model was able to determine the transient pressure surge and decay response throughout the system. Of particular interest were the maximum absolute pressures attainable at critical points in the system as well as maximum differential pressures across the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Modeling results indicated that all three of the scenarios resulted in maximum HEPA filter differential pressures well below the maximum allowable levels.

  19. COSTS OF AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT SYSTEMS FOR SEWAGE SLUDGE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capital and annual costs were calculated for applying six different air pollution control systems to municipal sewage sludge incinerators that were using multiple-hearth furnaces. The systems involved three principal types of air pollution equipment-wet scrubbers, fabric filters,...

  20. Microbiological Evaluation of a Large-Volume Air Incinerator

    PubMed Central

    Barbeito, Manuel S.; Taylor, Larry A.; Seiders, Reginald W.

    1968-01-01

    Two semiportable metal air incinerators, each with a capacity of 1,000 to 2,200 standard ft3 of air per min, were constructed to sterilize infectious aerosols created for investigative work in a microbiological laboratory. Each unit has about the same air-handling capacity as a conventional air incinerator with a brick stack but costs only about one-third as much. The units are unique in that the burner housing and combustion chamber are air-tight and utilize a portion of the contaminated air stream to support combustion of fuel oil. Operation is continuous. Aerosols of liquid and dry suspensions of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores and dry vegetative cells of Serratia marcescens were disseminated into the two incinerators to determine the conditions required for sterilization of contaminated air. With the latter organisms (concentration 2.03 × 107 cells/ft3 of air), a temperature of 525 F (274 C), measured at the firebox in front of the heat exchanger, was sufficient for sterilization. To sterilize 1.74 × 107 and 1.74 × 109 wet spores of B. subtilis per ft3, the required temperature ranged from 525 to 675 F (274 to 357 C) and 625 to 700 F (329 to 371 C), respectively. Air-sterilization temperature varied with each incinerator. This was because of innate differences of fabrication, different spore concentrations, and use of one or two burners With dry B. subtilis spores (1.86 × 108/ft3), a temperature of 700 F was required for sterilization. With dry spores, no difference was noted in the sterilization temperature for the two incinerators. PMID:4967758

  1. Clearing the air about sludge incinerator emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.M.; Kuchenrither, R.D.; Waltz, E.W.

    1994-12-31

    In 1990, a research needs assessment for wastewater treatment agencies conducted by the Water Environment Research Foundation recommended a three-year project to identify and quantify hydrocarbon constituents in emissions from municipal sewage sludge incinerators. The project was designed to evaluate existing emission test data and obtain additional information to more completely characterize hydrocarbon emissions, their associated health risk, and operational factors effecting emissions. This paper presents the results and findings from the first year of the project.

  2. 40 CFR 60.2969 - What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Which Construction is Commenced After December 9, 2004, or for Which Modification or Reconstruction is... this subpart during the approved time period. Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste,...

  3. 40 CFR 60.2969 - What are the requirements for temporary-use incinerators and air curtain incinerators used in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Which Construction is Commenced After December 9, 2004, or for Which Modification or Reconstruction is... this subpart during the approved time period. Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste,...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1445 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1445 Section 60.1445 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1445 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? If your air curtain incinerator...

  9. 40 CFR 62.14805 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and 40 CFR part 70 or 71 until you close your air curtain incinerator and at the time you restart it. ... curtain incinerator and then restart it? 62.14805 Section 62.14805 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... air curtain incinerator and then restart it? (a) If you close your incinerator but will reopen...

  10. 40 CFR 62.14805 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... and 40 CFR part 70 or 71 until you close your air curtain incinerator and at the time you restart it. ... curtain incinerator and then restart it? 62.14805 Section 62.14805 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... air curtain incinerator and then restart it? (a) If you close your incinerator but will reopen...

  11. A case study of air enrichment in rotary kiln incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Melo, G.F.; Lacava, P.T.; Carvalho, J.A. Jr.

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents a case study of air enrichment in an industrial rotary kiln type incineration unit. The study is based on mass and energy balances, considering the combustion reaction of a mixture composed by the residue and the auxiliary fuel with air enriched with oxygen. The steps are shown for the primary chamber (rotary kiln) and secondary chamber (afterburner). The residence times in the primary and secondary chamber are 2.0 and 3.2 sec, respectively. The pressure is atmospheric in both chambers. Based on constant chamber gas residence time and gas temperature, it is shown that the residue input rates can be increased by one order of magnitude as air is substituted by pure oxygen. As the residue consumption rate in the rotary kiln is also dependent on residue physical characteristics (mainly size), the study was also carried out for different percentages of oxygen in the oxidizer gas.

  12. INTEGRATING DISPERSION MODELING, RECEPTOR MODELING AND AIR MONITORING TO APPORTION INCINERATOR IMPACTS FOR EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    An approach combining air quality measurements, GIS, receptor and dispersion modeling to apportion the impact of incinerator sources to individuals living in surrounding neighborhoods was presented. his technique wall applied to a Health and Clean Air Study investigating the resp...

  13. 40 CFR 60.2850 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What must I do if I close my air... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2850 What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it? (a) If you close your incinerator but will reopen it prior to the final compliance date...

  14. 40 CFR 60.2850 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What must I do if I close my air... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2850 What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it? (a) If you close your incinerator but will reopen it prior to the final compliance date...

  15. 40 CFR 60.2850 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What must I do if I close my air... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators § 60.2850 What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it? (a) If you close your incinerator but will reopen it prior to the final compliance date...

  16. CAI in Thermodynamics at the USAF Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerley, Aaron R.; Winn, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Illustrates computer assisted instruction (CAI) at the United States Air Force (USAF) academy by presenting a sample CAI session involving thermodynamics. Comments on evaluation of the program. Future plans are included. (JN)

  17. Compliance testing of Consumat Silver Reclamation Incinerator Number 4, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.T.

    1989-07-01

    At the request of HQ SAC/SGPB compliance testing Consumeat Silver Reclamation Incinerator No. 4 (particulate emissions) was accomplished 26-28 Jan 89. Visible emissions were evaluated by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Control on-site observer. Results indicate the incinerator met the standard for visible emissions. The survey was to determine compliance with the emission standards as defined under Nebraska Air Pollution Control Rules and Regulations. Results indicate the incinerator met particulate standards.

  18. Methodology to apportion ambient air measurements to investigate potential effects on air quality near waste incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerjee, S.; Fox, D.L.; Stevens, R.K.; Shy, C.M.; Vescio, N.

    1993-01-01

    Ambient air samples at four sites located near two incinerators (a biomedical waste and a municipal incinerator) in the vicinity of Charlotte, North Carolina were acquired as part of a health effects study that is examining potential, short-term, lung dysfunctions associated with incinerator and other source emissions. Ambient monitoring was performed for one month intervals at a treatment and control community site for each of the two incinerator locations. Twelve-hour ambient samples were acquired by means of a Versatile Air Pollution Sampler (VAPS) which enabled sampling for fine (< 2.5 micrometers) and coarse (2.5 - 10 micrometers) particulate matter, acid-gases by diffusion sampling and fine carbon sampling on quartz filters. X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF) was used on the coarse and fine particulate filters to measure metals while Ion Chromatography (IC) analyzed acid gases. The Chemical Mass Balance Receptor Model (CMB) was then used on the average ambient data from each wind vector to apportion the contribution of ambient pollutants which were attributable to the sources of interest from a given wind direction.

  19. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  20. 40 CFR 60.1930 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1930 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1930 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of...

  1. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A...

  2. 40 CFR 62.15385 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15385 Section 62... Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15385 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1930 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1930 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1930 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of...

  4. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15380 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15380 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  9. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15385 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15385 Section 62... Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15385 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  15. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1930 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1930 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1930 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  19. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2971 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a)...

  20. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2971 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a)...

  1. 40 CFR 62.15385 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15385 Section 62... Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15385 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A...

  3. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  4. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  5. 40 CFR 62.15385 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15385 Section 62... Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15385 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1920 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1920 Section 60.1920 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1920 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?...

  7. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15380 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  8. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  9. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  11. 40 CFR 60.3066 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3066 Section 60... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3066 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1925 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1925 Section 60.1925 Protection of Environment... or Before August 30, 1999 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1925 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a)...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15380 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  15. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2971 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a)...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1930 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1930 Section 60... Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1930 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of...

  17. 40 CFR 60.1450 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1450 Section 60.1450 Protection of Environment... Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60.1450 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? (a) Use EPA Reference Method 9 in appendix A...

  18. 40 CFR 62.15375 - What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15375 Section 62.15375 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15375 What are the emission limits for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  19. 40 CFR 62.15380 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15380 Section 62.15380 Protection of Environment... Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 62.15380 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent...

  20. 40 CFR 60.3068 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste... Times for Other Solid Waste Incineration Units That Commenced Construction On or Before December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste §...

  1. 40 CFR 60.2850 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do if I close my air... must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it? (a) If you close your incinerator... of progress specified in § 60.2815. (b) If you close your incinerator but will restart it after...

  2. 40 CFR 60.2245 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Which Modification or Reconstruction Is Commenced on or After June 1, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60....2260). (1) 100 percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent mixture of only...

  3. 40 CFR 60.2245 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Which Modification or Reconstruction Is Commenced on or After June 1, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60....2260). (1) 100 percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent mixture of only...

  4. 40 CFR 60.2245 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Which Modification or Reconstruction Is Commenced on or After June 1, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators § 60....2260). (1) 100 percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent mixture of only...

  5. Flashback from waste gas incinerator into air supply piping

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.E.; Dowell, A.M. III; Mynaugh, J.B. )

    1992-04-01

    A waste gas incinerator experienced a flashback with a pressure wave in the Suction Vent Gas (SVG) system. Extensive damage resulted to the SVG flame arrestor, SVG fan, SVG valves, and incinerator piping. There were no injuries. The primary cause of the incident is believed to have been a fuel rich SVG stream that was rapidly introduced into the incinerator creating a puff.' This puff' allowed flame from the natural gas ring burner to blow back into the windbox igniting the fuel rich SVG. The combustion of gas in the ducting then created a pressure wave that blew apart the flame arrestor and caused the remainder of the damage.

  6. 40 CFR 60.2850 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerator and then restart it? 60.2850 Section 60.2850 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it? (a) If you close your incinerator but will reopen it prior to the final compliance date in your State plan, you must meet the...

  7. Technology documentation for selected radwaste incineration systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, D.L.

    1982-12-01

    Several incineration systems have been developed and demonstrated on a production scale for combustion of radioactive waste from contractor operated Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Demonstrated operating information and engineered design information is documented in this report on four of these systems; the Cyclone Incinerator (CI), Fluidized Bed Incinerator (FBI), Controlled-Air Incinerator (CAI) and Electric Controlled Air Incinerator (ECAI). The CI, FBI and CAI have been demonstrated with actual contaminated plant waste and the ECAI has been demonstrated with simulated waste using dysprosium oxide as a stand-in for plutonium oxide. The weight and volume reduction that can be obtained by each system processing typical solid plant transuranic (TRU) waste has been presented. Where a given system has been tested for other applications, such as combustion of resins, TBP-solvent mixtures, organic liquids, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB), resuts of these experiments have been included. This document is a compilation of reports prepared by the operating contractor personnel responsible for development of each of the systems. In addition, as a part of the program management responsibility, the Transuranic Waste System Office (TWSO) has provided an overview of the contractor supplied information.

  8. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2971 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Within 60 days after your air curtain...

  9. 40 CFR 60.2973 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste... Qualification Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2973 What... waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Prior to commencing construction on your air...

  10. 40 CFR 60.2971 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2971 Section 60... Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2971 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Within 60 days after your air curtain...

  11. 40 CFR 60.2973 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste... Qualification Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2973 What... waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Prior to commencing construction on your air...

  12. 40 CFR 60.2970 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2970 What is an air curtain incinerator? (a) An air...) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  13. 40 CFR 60.2970 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2970 What is an air curtain incinerator? (a) An air...) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  14. 40 CFR 60.2870 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators? 60.2870 Section 60.2870 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Emissions Guidelines...

  15. 40 CFR 60.2260 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators? 60.2260 Section 60.2260 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance...

  16. Costs of air-pollution-abatement systems for sewage-sludge incinerators. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Annamraju, G.; Shah, Y.M.; Arora, M.L.

    1986-11-01

    Capital and annual costs were calculated for applying six different air-pollution-control systems to municipal sewage-sludge incinerators that were using multiple-hearth furnaces. The systems involved three principal types of air pollution equipment - wet scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators - applied to three different plant sizes (plants incinerating 36, 72, and 300 tons of dry sludge per day in one, two, and eight multiple-hearth furnaces, respectively). Technical-feasibility studies indicated that all three types of controls could achieve a total particulate-removal efficiency of 99%.

  17. 40 CFR 60.3068 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste... Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3068... waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Keep records of results of all initial and annual opacity...

  18. 40 CFR 60.1455 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1455 Section 60... Reconstruction is Commenced After June 6, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60... percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of construction that includes four items: (1) Your intent...

  19. 40 CFR 60.1455 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1455 Section 60... Reconstruction is Commenced After June 6, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60... percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of construction that includes four items: (1) Your intent...

  20. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Yard Waste § 62.14815 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  1. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Yard Waste § 62.14815 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1455 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1455 Section 60... Reconstruction is Commenced After June 6, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60... percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of construction that includes four items: (1) Your intent...

  3. 40 CFR 60.3068 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste... Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3068... waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Keep records of results of all initial and annual opacity...

  4. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Yard Waste § 62.14815 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  5. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Yard Waste § 62.14815 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  6. 40 CFR 62.14815 - What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? 62.14815... Yard Waste § 62.14815 What are the emission limitations for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber and/or yard waste? (a) After the date the initial test for opacity...

  7. 40 CFR 60.1455 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1455 Section 60... Reconstruction is Commenced After June 6, 2001 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Yard Waste § 60... percent yard waste? (a) Provide a notice of construction that includes four items: (1) Your intent...

  8. Do waste incinerators induce adverse respiratory effects? An air quality and epidemiological study of six communities.

    PubMed

    Shy, C M; Degnan, D; Fox, D L; Mukerjee, S; Hazucha, M J; Boehlecke, B A; Rothenbacher, D; Briggs, P M; Devlin, R B; Wallace, D D

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to simultaneously measure air quality and respiratory function and symptoms in populations living in the neighborhood of waste incinerators and to estimate the contribution of incinerator emissions to the particulate air mass in these neighborhoods. We studied the residents of three communities having, respectively, a biomedical and a municipal incinerator, and a liquid hazardous waste-burning industrial furnace. We compared results with three matched-comparison communities. We did not detect differences in concentrations of particulate matter among any of the three pairs of study communities. Average fine particulate (PM2.5) concentrations measured for 35 days varied across study communities from 16 to 32 micrograms/m3. Within the same community, daily concentrations of fine particulates varied by as much as eightfold, from 10 to 80 micrograms/m3, and were nearly identical within each pair of communities. Direct measurements of air quality and estimates based on a chemical mass balance receptor model showed that incinerator emissions did not have a major or even a modest impact on routinely monitored air pollutants. A onetime baseline descriptive survey (n = 6963) did not reveal consistent community differences in the prevalence of chronic or acute respiratory symptoms between incinerator and comparison communities, nor did we see a difference in baseline lung function tests or in the average peak expiratory flow rate measured over a period of 35 days. Based on this analysis of the first year of our study, we conclude that we have no evidence to reject the null hypothesis of no acute or chronic respiratory effects associated with residence in any of the three incinerator communities. PMID:7588484

  9. Do Waste Incinerators Induce Adverse Respiratory Effects? An Air Quality and Epidemiological Study of Six Communities

    PubMed Central

    Shy, Carl M.; Degnan, Darrah; Fox, Donald L.; Mukerjee, Shaibal; Hazucha, Milan J.; Boehlecke, Brian A.; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Briggs, Patsy M.; Devlin, Robert B.; Wallace, Dennis D.; Stevens, Robert K.; Bromberg, Philip A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to simultaneously measure air quality and respiratory function and symptoms in populations living in the neighborhood of waste incinerators and to estimate the contribution of incinerator emissions to the particulate air mass in these neighborhoods. We studied the residents of three communities having, respectively, a biomedical and a municipal incinerator, and a liquid hazardous waste-burning industrial furnace. We compared results with three matched-comparison communities. We did not detect differences in concentrations of particulate matter among any of the three pairs of study communities. Average fine particulate (PM2.5) concentrations measured for 35 days varied across study communities from 16 to 32 μg/m3. Within the same community, daily concentrations of fine particulates varied by as much as eightfold, from 10 to 80 μg/m3, and were nearly identical within each pair of communities. Direct measurements of air quality and estimates based on a chemical mass balance receptor model showed that incinerator emissions did not have a major or even a modest impact on routinely monitored air pollutants. A one-time baseline descriptive survey (n = 6963) did not reveal consistent community differences in the prevalence of chronic or acute respiratory symptoms between incinerator and comparison communities, nor did we see a difference in baseline lung function tests or in the average peak expiratory flow rate measured over a period of 35 days. Based on this analysis of the first year of our study, we conclude that we have no evidence to reject the null hypothesis of no acute or chronic respiratory effects associated with residence in any of the three incinerator communities. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 4.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 5.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7. PMID:7588484

  10. S. 2458: A Bill to amend the Clean Air Act to establish a program for the control of the emissions of municipal solid waste incinerators, to initiate a program for the training of incinerator operators, to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to establish requirements for the disposal of incinerator ash from municipal solid waste incinerators, and for other purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, May 27, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    A bill has been introduced in the Senate to amend the Clean Air Act to establish a program for the control of the emissions of municipal solid waste incinerators. This bill will initiate a program for the training of incinerator operators and will amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to establish requirements for the disposal of incinerator ash from municipal solid waste incinerators.

  11. 40 CFR 60.3062 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3062 What is... this subpart. (1) 100 percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  12. 40 CFR 60.3062 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3062 What is... this subpart. (1) 100 percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  13. 40 CFR 60.2970 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2970 What is an air... percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  14. 40 CFR 60.3062 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3062 What is... this subpart. (1) 100 percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  15. 40 CFR 60.3062 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3062 What is... this subpart. (1) 100 percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  16. 40 CFR 60.3062 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3062 What is... this subpart. (1) 100 percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  17. 40 CFR 60.2970 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2970 What is an air... percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  18. 40 CFR 60.2970 - What is an air curtain incinerator?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2970 What is an air... percent wood waste. (2) 100 percent clean lumber. (3) 100 percent yard waste. (4) 100 percent mixture of only wood waste, clean lumber, and/or yard waste....

  19. METHODOLOGY TO APPORTION AMBIENT AIR MEASUREMENTS TO INVESTIGATE POTENTIAL SHORT-TERM RESPIRATORY EFFECTS NEAR WASTE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air samples at four sites located near two incinerators (a biomedical waste and a municipal incinerator) in the vicinity of Charlotte, North Carolina were acquired as part of a health effects study that is examining potential, short-term, lung dysfunctions associated with...

  20. IMPACTS OF DIOXIN EMISSIONS FROM THE SHINKAMPO INCINERATOR TO THE U.S. NAVAL AIR FACILITY AT ATSUGI, JAPAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Naval Air Facility at Atsugi, Japan (NAF Atsugi) is located in the Kanto Plain area on the island of Honshu, Japan. Directly to the south of the facility, in the Tade River Valley, was the Shinkampo Incinerator Complex (SIC). The Incinerator is no longer in op...

  1. PARAMETRIC EVALUATION OF VOC/HAP (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS-HAZARDOUS/TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS) DESTRUCTION VIA CATALYTIC INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the use of a pilot-scale catalytic incineration unit/solvent generation system to investigate the effectiveness of catalytic incineration as a way to destroy volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous/toxic air pollutants (HAPs). Objectives of the study ...

  2. 40 CFR 60.2974 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.2974 Section 60.2974 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... and Qualification Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste... incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator...

  3. 40 CFR 60.3069 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.3069 Section 60.3069 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard... incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator...

  4. 40 CFR 60.2974 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.2974 Section 60.2974 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... and Qualification Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste... incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator...

  5. 40 CFR 60.3069 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.3069 Section 60.3069 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard... incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator...

  6. 40 CFR 60.3064 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and then restart it? 60.3064... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3064 What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and...

  7. 40 CFR 60.2974 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.2974 Section 60.2974 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... and Qualification Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste... incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator...

  8. 40 CFR 60.3064 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and then restart it? 60.3064... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3064 What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and...

  9. 40 CFR 60.3069 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.3069 Section 60.3069 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard... incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator...

  10. 40 CFR 60.3064 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and then restart it? 60.3064... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3064 What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and...

  11. 40 CFR 60.3069 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.3069 Section 60.3069 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard... incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator...

  12. 40 CFR 60.3069 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.3069 Section 60.3069 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... December 9, 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard... incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator...

  13. 40 CFR 60.3064 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and then restart it? 60.3064... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3064 What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and...

  14. 40 CFR 60.3064 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and then restart it? 60.3064... Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3064 What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and...

  15. Operation of a 1/10 scale mixed water incinerator air pollution control system

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, W.

    1996-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the Savannah River Site is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes generated by site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the CIF air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing commercial and DOE incinerators, on-site air pollution control experience, and recommendations from contracted consultants. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, known as the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF) was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its current mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Due to the nature of the wastes to be incinerated at the CIF, High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas stream before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber.

  16. 40 CFR 60.3067 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3067 Section 60.3067... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3067 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9...

  17. 40 CFR 60.3067 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3067 Section 60.3067... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3067 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9...

  18. 40 CFR 60.3067 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3067 Section 60.3067... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3067 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9...

  19. 40 CFR 60.3067 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3067 Section 60.3067... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3067 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9...

  20. 40 CFR 60.3067 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3067 Section 60.3067... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3067 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9...

  1. Recycling of air pollution control residues from municipal solid waste incineration into lightweight aggregates.

    PubMed

    Quina, Margarida J; Bordado, João M; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2014-02-01

    This work focuses on the assessment of technological properties and on the leaching behavior of lightweight aggregates (LWA) produced by incorporating different quantities of air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration. Currently this hazardous waste has been mostly landfilled after stabilization/solidification. The LWA were produced by pelletizing natural clay, APC residues as-received from incineration plant, or after a washing treatment, a small amount of oil and water. The pellets were fired in a laboratory chamber furnace over calcium carbonate. The main technological properties of the LWA were evaluated, mainly concerning morphology, bulk and particle densities, compressive strength, bloating index, water adsorption and porosity. Given that APC residues do not own expansive (bloating) properties, the incorporation into LWA is only possible in moderate quantities, such as 3% as received or 5% after pre-washing treatment. The leaching behavior of heavy metals from sintered LWA using water or acid solutions was investigated, and despite the low acid neutralization capacity of the synthetic aggregates, the released quantities were low over a wide pH range. In conclusion, after a washing pre-treatment and if the percentage of incorporation is low, these residues may be incorporated into LWA. However, the recycling of APC residues from MSW incineration into LWA does not revealed any technical advantage. PMID:24238798

  2. Testing cleanable/reuseable HEPA prefilters for mixed waste incinerator air pollution control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, B.W.; Paul, J.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the US DOE Savannah River Site is undergoing preoperational testing. The CIF is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes from site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing incinerators, air pollution control experience, and recommendations from consultants. This approach resulted in a facility design using experience from other operating hazardous/radioactive incinerators. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Operation of the pilot facility has provided long-term performance data of integrated systems and critical facility components. This has reduced facility startup problems and helped ensure compliance with facility performance requirements. Technical support programs assist in assuring all stakeholders the CIF can properly treat combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive wastes. High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas strewn before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Skinner and CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Harry N.

    1984-01-01

    The author cites comments of B.F. Skinner supporting the benefits of carefully constructed computer assisted instruction (CAI) programs. Preliminary studies on military populations suggesting the value of CAI are discussed, as is the collection of information about software. (CL)

  4. Developing Large CAI Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Mary Jac M.; Smith, Lynn H.

    1983-01-01

    When developing large computer-assisted instructional (CAI) courseware packages, it is suggested that there be more attentive planning to the overall package design before actual lesson development is begun. This process has been simplified by modifying the systems approach used to develop single CAI lessons, followed by planning for the…

  5. Current Issues in CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Duncan N.

    A great deal of research has been done on instructional strategies and concepts of individualized instruction in computer-assisted instruction (CAI). Individualizing instruction within CAI can be defined in terms of an input output process which includes a stimulus array, cognitive processes, and response requirements. Research in these areas of…

  6. CAI Terminal Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Peter

    The bewildering number of available terminals which are offered to CAI users presents a rather formidable problem of which one to choose. This article surveys what appear to be evolving standards for terminals. The usefulness of these terminals for CAI purposes is discussed, together with the best known prototype exhibiting the particular feature.…

  7. 40 CFR 60.2973 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) through (3) of this section. (1) Notification of your intent to construct the air curtain incinerator. (2) Your planned initial startup date. (3) Types of materials you plan to burn in your air curtain... off site for the remaining 3 years. (c) Make all records available for submittal to the...

  8. 40 CFR 60.2973 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) through (3) of this section. (1) Notification of your intent to construct the air curtain incinerator. (2) Your planned initial startup date. (3) Types of materials you plan to burn in your air curtain... off site for the remaining 3 years. (c) Make all records available for submittal to the...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1930 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1930 Section 60.1930 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15385 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart A of 40 CFR part 60). (h) Keep a copy of all reports onsite for a period of 5 years. Equations ... reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 62.15385 Section 62... for Small Municipal Waste Combustion Units Constructed on or Before August 30, 1999 Air...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1455 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent yard waste? 60.1455 Section 60.1455 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY...

  12. 40 CFR 60.2973 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2973 Section 60.2973 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE...

  13. Life-cycle-assessment of the historical development of air pollution control and energy recovery in waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Anders; Riber, Christian; Fruergaard, Thilde; Hulgaard, Tore; Christensen, Thomas H

    2010-07-01

    Incineration of municipal solid waste is a debated waste management technology. In some countries it is the main waste management option whereas in other countries it has been disregarded. The main discussion point on waste incineration is the release of air emissions from the combustion of the waste, but also the energy recovery efficiency has a large importance. The historical development of air pollution control in waste incineration was studied through life-cycle-assessment modelling of eight different air pollution control technologies. The results showed a drastic reduction in the release of air emissions and consequently a significant reduction in the potential environmental impacts of waste incineration. Improvements of a factor 0.85-174 were obtained in the different impact potentials as technology developed from no emission control at all, to the best available emission control technologies of today (2010). The importance of efficient energy recovery was studied through seven different combinations of heat and electricity recovery, which were modelled to substitute energy produced from either coal or natural gas. The best air pollution control technology was used at the incinerator. It was found that when substituting coal based energy production total net savings were obtained in both the standard and toxic impact categories. However, if the substituted energy production was based on natural gas, only the most efficient recovery options yielded net savings with respect to the standard impacts. With regards to the toxic impact categories, emissions from the waste incineration process were always larger than those from the avoided energy production based on natural gas. The results shows that the potential environmental impacts from air emissions have decreased drastically during the last 35 years and that these impacts can be partly or fully offset by recovering energy which otherwise should have been produced from fossil fuels like coal or natural gas

  14. Evaluation of air pollution abatement systems for multiple-hearth sewage sludge incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Annamraju, G.; Gerstle, R.W.; Shah, Y.M.; Arora, M.L.

    1986-09-01

    Capital and annual costs were calculated for the application of six different air-pollution-control system options to municipal sewage-sludge incinerators that were using multiple-hearth furnaces. The systems involved three principal types of air-pollution equipment - wet scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators - applied to three different plant sizes (plants incinerating 36, 72, and 300 tons of dry sludge per day in one, two, and eight multiple-hearth furnaces, respectively). The six options were: (1) venturi/tray scrubber with a 40-inch pressure drop, (2) fabric filter system operating at 500 deg and equipped with an upstream temperature control, (3) fabric filter system operating at 500 deg and equipped with a heat exchanger and a scrubber for SO/sub 2/ reduction, (4) electrostatic precipitator (ESP) with upstream limited temperature and humidity control, (5) same as Option 4 but with an additional downstream wet scrubber for SO/sub 2/ reduction, and (6) ESP with upstream temperature control and an SO/sub 2/ scrubber. Technical feasibility studies indicated that all three types of controls could achieve a total particulate removal efficiency of 99 percent. The venturi/tray scrubber option entailed the lowest capital cost, but annual operating costs were highest because of the high pressure drops and increased energy use.

  15. Experience with the CAIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tighe, Michael F.

    1986-01-01

    Intermetrics' experience is that the Ada package construct, which allows separation of specification and implementation allows specification of a CAIS that is transportable across varying hardware and software bases. Additionally, the CAIS is an excellent basis for providing operating system functionality to Ada applications. By allowing the Byron APSE to be moved easily from system to system, and allowing significant re-writes of underlying code. Ada and the CAIS provide portability as well as transparency to change at the application operating system interface level.

  16. Carbon, CAIs and chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. D.; Russell, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that C is present in CAI's and chondrules. It can be distinguished from matrix C both by its thermal stability and isotopic composition, which implies that it was not introduced after parent body accretion. It is concluded that C must have been present in the chondrule and CAI precursor material. Therefore any models of chondrule and CAI formation and inferences drawn about solar system conditions during these events must take into account the consequences of the presence of C on inclusion chemistry, mineralogy, and oxidation state.

  17. 40 CFR 60.3065 - What must I do if I plan to permanently close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not..., 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60... waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not restart it? You must close the unit before the...

  18. 40 CFR 60.3065 - What must I do if I plan to permanently close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not..., 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60... waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not restart it? You must close the unit before the...

  19. 40 CFR 60.3065 - What must I do if I plan to permanently close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not..., 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60... waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not restart it? You must close the unit before the...

  20. 40 CFR 60.3065 - What must I do if I plan to permanently close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not..., 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60... waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not restart it? You must close the unit before the...

  1. 40 CFR 60.3065 - What must I do if I plan to permanently close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... close my air curtain incinerator that burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not..., 2004 Model Rule-Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60... waste, clean lumber, and yard waste and not restart it? You must close the unit before the...

  2. The CAIS 2 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legrand, Sue; Thall, Richard

    1986-01-01

    The Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS) is a proposed MIL-STD intended to promote the portability of Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) tools written in Ada. The standardized interfaces define a virtual operating system, from which portable tools derive their basic services, e.g., file management, input/output, communications, and process control. In the Ada world, such a virtual operating system is called a Kernel Ada Programming Support Environment (KAPSE). The CAIS is a standardized interface between KAPSEs and tools. The CAIS has been proposed as a starting point for standard interfaces to be used in the NASA Software Support Environment (SSE) for the Space Station Program. The status of the CAIS standardization effort and plans for further development are described.

  3. A COMPARISON: ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS VERSUS THE 1990 TOXICS RELEASE INVENTORY AIR RELEASES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incineration is often the preferred technology for disposing of hazardous waste, and remediating Superfund sites. The effective implementation of this technology is frequently impeded by strong public opposition `to hazardous waste' incineration HWI). One of the reasons cited for...

  4. COMPARISON OF ORGANIC EMISSIONS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS VERSUS THE 1990 TOXICS RELEASE INVENTORY AIR RELEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incineration is often the preferred technology for disposing of hazardous waste and remediating Superfund sites. he effective implementation of this technology is frequently impeded by strong public opposition to hazardous waste incineration (HWI). ne of the reasons cited for thi...

  5. 40 CFR 62.14805 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14805 What must I do if I close my... and 40 CFR part 70 or 71 until you close your air curtain incinerator and at the time you restart it....

  6. 40 CFR 62.14805 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14805 What must I do if I close my... and 40 CFR part 70 or 71 until you close your air curtain incinerator and at the time you restart it....

  7. 40 CFR 62.14825 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... yard waste? 62.14825 Section 62.14825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14825 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste?...

  8. 40 CFR 62.14825 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... yard waste? 62.14825 Section 62.14825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14825 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste?...

  9. 40 CFR 62.14805 - What must I do if I close my air curtain incinerator and then restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14805 What must I do if I close my... and 40 CFR part 70 or 71 until you close your air curtain incinerator and at the time you restart it....

  10. 40 CFR 62.14825 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... yard waste? 62.14825 Section 62.14825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14825 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste?...

  11. 40 CFR 62.14825 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... yard waste? 62.14825 Section 62.14825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14825 What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste?...

  12. 40 CFR 60.3063 - When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3063 Section 60.3063 Protection of... Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3063 When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Table 1 of this subpart specifies the...

  13. 40 CFR 60.3063 - When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3063 Section 60.3063 Protection of... Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3063 When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Table 1 of this subpart specifies the...

  14. 40 CFR 60.2972 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2972 Section 60.2972... Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2972 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of...

  15. 40 CFR 60.2972 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2972 Section 60.2972... Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2972 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of...

  16. 40 CFR 60.2974 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.2974 Section 60.2974 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2974 Am I required to apply for and..., and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator is subject to this subpart, you are required...

  17. 40 CFR 60.3063 - When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3063 Section 60.3063 Protection of... Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3063 When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Table 1 of this subpart specifies the...

  18. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Yard Waste § 62.14820 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820...

  19. 40 CFR 60.3063 - When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3063 Section 60.3063 Protection of... Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3063 When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Table 1 of this subpart specifies the...

  20. 40 CFR 60.2972 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2972 Section 60.2972... Yard Waste § 60.2972 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of this part to determine compliance...

  1. 40 CFR 60.2972 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2972 Section 60.2972... Yard Waste § 60.2972 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of this part to determine compliance...

  2. 40 CFR 60.2974 - Am I required to apply for and obtain a title V operating permit for my air curtain incinerator...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... yard waste? 60.2974 Section 60.2974 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Incinerators That Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2974 Am I required to apply for and..., and yard waste? Yes, if your air curtain incinerator is subject to this subpart, you are required...

  3. 40 CFR 60.2972 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.2972 Section 60.2972... Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.2972 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of appendix A of...

  4. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Yard Waste § 62.14820 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820...

  5. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Yard Waste § 62.14820 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, Appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820...

  6. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Yard Waste § 62.14820 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, Appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820...

  7. 40 CFR 60.3063 - When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? 60.3063 Section 60.3063 Protection of... Burn Only Wood Waste, Clean Lumber, and Yard Waste § 60.3063 When must I comply if my air curtain incinerator burns only wood waste, clean lumber, and yard waste? Table 1 of this subpart specifies the...

  8. 40 CFR 62.14820 - How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Yard Waste § 62.14820 How must I monitor opacity for air curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? (a) Use Method 9 of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A to... curtain incinerators that burn 100 percent wood wastes, clean lumber, and/or yard waste? 62.14820...

  9. 40 CFR 62.14810 - What must I do if I plan to permanently close my air curtain incinerator and not restart it?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units That Commenced Construction On or Before November 30, 1999 Air Curtain Incinerators That Burn 100 Percent Wood Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14810 What must I do if...

  10. Life-cycle assessment of selected management options for air pollution control residues from waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Fruergaard, Thilde; Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas

    2010-09-15

    Based on available technology and emission data seven selected management options for air-pollution-control (APC) residues from waste incineration were evaluated by life-cycle assessment (LCA) using the EASEWASTE model. Scenarios were evaluated with respect to both non-toxicity impact categories (e.g. global warming) and toxicity related impact categories (e.g. ecotoxicity and human toxicity). The assessment addressed treatment and final placement of 1 tonne of APC residue in seven scenarios: 1) direct landfilling without treatment (baseline), 2) backfilling in salt mines, 3) neutralization of waste acid, 4) filler material in asphalt, 5) Ferrox stabilization, 6) vitrification, and 7) melting with automobile shredder residues (ASR). The management scenarios were selected as examples of the wide range of different technologies available worldwide while at the same time using realistic technology data. Results from the LCA were discussed with respect to importance of: energy consumption/substitution, material substitution, leaching, air emissions, time horizon aspects for the assessment, and transportation distances. The LCA modeling showed that thermal processes were associated with the highest loads in the non-toxicity categories (energy consumption), while differences between the remaining alternatives were small and generally considered insignificant. In the toxicity categories, all treatment/utilization options were significantly better than direct landfilling without treatment (lower leaching), although the thermal processes had somewhat higher impacts than the others options (air emissions). Transportation distances did not affect the overall ranking of the management alternatives. PMID:20599249

  11. Statistical estimate of mercury removal efficiencies for air pollution control devices of municipal solid waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumitake; Kida, Akiko; Shimaoka, Takayuki

    2010-10-15

    Although representative removal efficiencies of gaseous mercury for air pollution control devices (APCDs) are important to prepare more reliable atmospheric emission inventories of mercury, they have been still uncertain because they depend sensitively on many factors like the type of APCDs, gas temperature, and mercury speciation. In this study, representative removal efficiencies of gaseous mercury for several types of APCDs of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) were offered using a statistical method. 534 data of mercury removal efficiencies for APCDs used in MSWI were collected. APCDs were categorized as fixed-bed absorber (FA), wet scrubber (WS), electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and fabric filter (FF), and their hybrid systems. Data series of all APCD types had Gaussian log-normality. The average removal efficiency with a 95% confidence interval for each APCD was estimated. The FA, WS, and FF with carbon and/or dry sorbent injection systems had 75% to 82% average removal efficiencies. On the other hand, the ESP with/without dry sorbent injection had lower removal efficiencies of up to 22%. The type of dry sorbent injection in the FF system, dry or semi-dry, did not make more than 1% difference to the removal efficiency. The injection of activated carbon and carbon-containing fly ash in the FF system made less than 3% difference. Estimation errors of removal efficiency were especially high for the ESP. The national average of removal efficiency of APCDs in Japanese MSWI plants was estimated on the basis of incineration capacity. Owing to the replacement of old APCDs for dioxin control, the national average removal efficiency increased from 34.5% in 1991 to 92.5% in 2003. This resulted in an additional reduction of about 0.86Mg emission in 2003. Further study using the methodology in this study to other important emission sources like coal-fired power plants will contribute to better emission inventories. PMID:20713298

  12. CAI Update: So You Want to Do CAI?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Carole

    1979-01-01

    Provides necessary characteristics to consider when selecting a CAI system plus a list of costs and capabilities available with the better known CAI systems. Characteristics of major CAI systems are presented in three categories--large/maxi, mini, and micro systems--in chart form. (JEG)

  13. Skill Specific CAI Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavine, Roberta Z.; Fechter, Sharon Ahern

    Advantages of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for grammar-oriented exercises are considered, and a learning module to help the student prepare for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam is described. The exercises are modeled on the TOEFL exam: the student is given a sentence, one part of which is incorrect and is asked to…

  14. Effect of municipal solid waste incinerator types on characteristics of ashes from different air pollution control devices.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chien-Hsing; Chuang, Kui-Hao

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the characteristics of fly and bottom ashes sampled from both fluidized bed (FB) and mass-burning (MB) municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs), respectively. Fly ashes from different locations at FB and MB MSWIs equipped with a cyclone, a semi-dry scrubber, and a bag filter as air pollution control devices were examined to provide the baseline information between physicochemical properties and leaching ability. Experimental results of leachability indicated that the bag filter fly ash (FB-FA(B)) from the FB incinerator meets Taiwan regulatory standards set through the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure. X-ray diffraction results revealed the presence of Cr5O12 and Pb2O3 in the cyclone fly ash (MB-FA(C)) and bag filter fly ash (MB-FA(B)), respectively, from the MB incinerator. To observe lead incorporation mechanism, mixture of simulate lead-laden waste with bed material were fired between 600 °C and 900 °C in a laboratory scale FB reactor. The results clearly demonstrate a substantial decrease in lead leaching ratio for products with an appropriate temperature. The concentration of Pb in the MB-FA(B) was 250 times that in the FB-FA(B), suggesting that incineration of MSW in FB is a good strategy for stabilizing hazardous metals. PMID:26226945

  15. Chemical-Stockpile Disposal Program. Evaluation of multiple-incinerator air-quality impacts, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground. Final report, November 1986-May 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the long-term additive ambient impact of certain toxic air pollutants that will potentially be emitted from the Chemical Agent Incinerator (AI) proposed for the Edgewood Area (EA) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland and from three additional planned or existing incinerators also located on the EA. This impact was determined in consideration of the existence and operation of three additional planned or existing incinerators also located on EA. Based on air-dispersion modeling conducted as part of an original analysis, emissions were estimated of chlorinated organics from the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center Decontamination/Detoxification Municipal Waste Incinerator (MWI), for downwind distances as great as the distance to the nearest boundary of the EA. Consequently, for this evaluation, only the MWI is considered to emit chlorinated organics.

  16. Characterization of air pollution control residues produced in a municipal solid waste incinerator in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Quina, Margarida J; Santos, Regina C; Bordado, João C; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    This study is mainly related with the physical and chemical characterization of a solid waste, produced in a municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process, which is usually referred as air pollution control (APC) residue. The moisture content, loss on ignition (LOI), particle size distribution, density, porosity, specific surface area and morphology were the physical properties addressed here. At the chemical level, total elemental content (TC), total availability (TA) and the leaching behaviour with compliance tests were determined, as well as the acid neutralization capacity (ANC). The main mineralogical crystalline phases were identified, and the thermal behaviour of the APC residues is also shown. The experimental work involves several techniques such as laser diffraction spectrometry, mercury porosimetry, helium pycnometry, gas adsorption, flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), ion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and simultaneous thermal analysis (STA). The results point out that the APC residues do not comply with regulations in force at the developed countries, and therefore the waste should be considered hazardous. Among the considered heavy metals, lead, zinc and chromium were identified as the most problematic ones, and their total elemental quantities are similar for several samples collected in an industrial plant at different times. Moreover, the high amount of soluble salts (NaCl, KCl, calcium compounds) may constitute a major problem and should be taken into account for all management strategies. The solubility in water is very high (more than 24% for a solid/liquid ratio of 10) and thus the possible utilizations of this residue are very limited, creating difficulties also in the ordinary treatments, such as in solidification/stabilization with binders. PMID:17728059

  17. Maxi CAI with a Micro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhold, George; And Others

    This paper describes an effective microprocessor-based CAI system which has been repeatedly tested by a large number of students and edited accordingly. Tasks not suitable for microprocessor based systems (authoring, testing, and debugging) were handled on larger multi-terminal systems. This approach requires that the CAI language used on the…

  18. Comparative Assessment of Particulate Air Pollution Exposure from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, Danielle C.; Fuller, Gary W.; Toledano, Mireille B.; Font, Anna; Elliott, Paul; Hansell, Anna L.; de Hoogh, Kees

    2013-01-01

    Background. Research to date on health effects associated with incineration has found limited evidence of health risks, but many previous studies have been constrained by poor exposure assessment. This paper provides a comparative assessment of atmospheric dispersion modelling and distance from source (a commonly used proxy for exposure) as exposure assessment methods for pollutants released from incinerators. Methods. Distance from source and the atmospheric dispersion model ADMS-Urban were used to characterise ambient exposures to particulates from two municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) in the UK. Additionally an exploration of the sensitivity of the dispersion model simulations to input parameters was performed. Results. The model output indicated extremely low ground level concentrations of PM10, with maximum concentrations of <0.01 μg/m3. Proximity and modelled PM10 concentrations for both MSWIs at postcode level were highly correlated when using continuous measures (Spearman correlation coefficients ~ 0.7) but showed poor agreement for categorical measures (deciles or quintiles, Cohen's kappa coefficients ≤ 0.5). Conclusion. To provide the most appropriate estimate of ambient exposure from MSWIs, it is essential that incinerator characteristics, magnitude of emissions, and surrounding meteorological and topographical conditions are considered. Reducing exposure misclassification is particularly important in environmental epidemiology to aid detection of low-level risks. PMID:23935644

  19. A Comparison of Organic Emissions from Hazardous Waste Incinerators Versus the 1990 Toxics Release Inventory Air Releases

    EPA Science Inventory

    Incineration is often the preferred technology for disposing of hazardous waste and remediating Superfund sites. The effective implementation of this technology is frequently impeded by strong public opposition to hazardous waste incineration (HWI). One of the reasons cited for t...

  20. CAI: VS CBE Languages. Authoring, How Soon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Carole A.

    This paper gives a view of CAI (computer assisted instruction), computers in education, CAI author languages, and concepts for authoring. Distinctions are drawn among CAI, CBE (computer based education), CMI (computer managed instruction), and CGM (computer managed materials), and the functions of each are described. CAI has been slow in coming…

  1. Emission testing of hospital pathological incinerator, Griffiss Air Force Base, New York. Final report for period ending 11 December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, M.M.

    1988-07-01

    At the request of HQ SAC/SGPB, personnel from the USAFOEHL conducted an air-emission survey of the exhaust from the hospital pathological incinerator at Griffiss AFB NY on 11 Dec 88. The survey results show that the facility is in compliance with the State of New York emission standards for particulate matter. The State has proposed revisions to the existing regulations and survey results show that the particulate and hydrogen chloride proposed emission standards would be met. The proposed regulations for minimum-temperature values in the primary and secondary chambers would not be met. The facility is in compliance with the existing particulate-matter standards and no further action is required. The facility is not in compliance with the proposed standards due to the temperatures in the primary and secondary chambers. Action is recommended to correct this situation, although, based on the proposed revision to the regulations, compliance will not be required until January 1, 1992.

  2. Municipal waste incinerators: air and biological monitoring of workers for exposure to particles, metals, and organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Maitre, A; Collot-Fertey, D; Anzivino, L; Marques, M; Hours, M; Stoklov, M

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate occupational exposure to toxic pollutants at municipal waste incinerators (MWIs). Methods: Twenty nine male subjects working near the furnaces in two MWIs, and 17 subjects not occupationally exposed to combustion generated pollutants were studied. Individual air samples were taken throughout the shift; urine samples were collected before and after. Stationary air samples were taken near potential sources of emission. Results: Occupational exposure did not result in the infringement of any occupational threshold limit value. Atmospheric exposure levels to particles and metals were 10–100 times higher in MWIs than at the control site. The main sources were cleaning operations for particles, and residue transfer and disposal operations for metals. MWI workers were not exposed to higher levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons than workers who are routinely in contact with vehicle exhaust. The air concentrations of volatile organic compounds and aldehydes were low and did not appear to pose any significant threat to human health. Only the measurement of chlorinated hydrocarbon levels would seem to be a reliable marker for the combustion of plastics. Urine metal levels were significantly higher at plant 1 than at plant 2 because of high levels of pollutants emanating from one old furnace. Conclusion: While biological monitoring is an easy way of acquiring data on long term personal exposure, air monitoring remains the only method that makes it possible to identify the primary sources of pollutant emission which need to be controlled if occupational exposure and environmental pollution are to be reduced. PMID:12883016

  3. Risk assessment applied to air emissions from a medium-sized Italian MSW incinerator.

    PubMed

    Morselli, Luciano; Passarini, Fabrizio; Piccari, Laura; Vassura, Ivano; Bernardi, Elena

    2011-10-01

    Risk assessment is a well established procedure for the analysis of the adverse impacts of pollutant substances emitted by waste treatment plants. The aim of the present study was the determination of the impact on human health associated with the activities of an incinerator in the Emilia-Romagna region (Northern Italy). The dispersion of heavy metals and organic pollutants monitored at plant stacks was predicted by the Gaussian model ISC3 (US-EPA). This analysis led to the estimation of risk, connected with various pollutants showing toxic and carcinogenic activities, for different receptors. The values obtained were first compared with the acceptability limits set by US-EPA, and then graphically represented as a territorial dispersion. A cautious approach was followed to calculate risk, by considering the worst, albeit realistic and reliable, estimate for the different parameters. The calculated exposure pathways resulted in different contributions depending on the receptor category (children and adults), even if direct exposure (via inhalation) is generally predominant. However, the resulting risk for both single pollutants studied and their combination all together proved to be within the acceptable limits (all lifetime individual risks being below 10(-6)), according to the procedure followed. The obtained results highlight the importance of using reliable monitoring data on the studied contamination source and, in particular, suggest the advisability of a more in-depth study on the pollution from incineration stacks. PMID:20813764

  4. Study of air pollution in the proximity of a waste incinerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrera, V.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Giannoni, M.; Becagli, S.; Frosini, D.

    2015-11-01

    Montale is a small town in Tuscany characterised by high PM10 levels. Close to the town there is a waste incinerator plant. There are many concerns in the population and in the press about the causes of the high levels of pollution in this area. Daily PM10 samples were collected for 1 year by the FAI Hydra Dual sampler and analysed by different techniques in order to obtain a complete chemical speciation (elements by PIXE and ICP-MS, ions by Ion Chromatography, elemental and organic carbon by a thermo-optical instrument); hourly fine (<2.5 μm) and coarse (2.5-10 μm) PM samples were collected for shorter periods by the Streaker sampler and hourly elemental concentrations were obtained by PIXE analysis. Positive Matrix Factorization identified and quantified the major aerosol sources. Biomass burning turned out to be the most important source with an average percentage contribution to PM10 of 27% of and even higher percentages during the winter period when there are the highest PM10 concentrations. The contribution of the incinerator source has been estimated as about 6% of PM10.

  5. Leachability of organic and inorganic contaminants in ashes from lime-based air pollution control devices on a municipal waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sawell, S.E.; Bridle, T.R.; Constable, T.W. )

    1987-01-01

    Concern for public health, coupled with the implementation of more stringent guidelines for exhaust gas emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration units, has resulted in the development of more efficient flue gas cleaning systems. While these systems help reduce emissions of airborne contaminants, they also increase the quantities of ash which require proper disposal. Although recent studies have identified MSW incinerator bottom ash as a relatively benign waste, they have also indicated that MSW incinerator flue gas ashes may not be environmentally acceptable for landfilling. In 1984, the Wastewater Technology Centre began conducting a series of studies on the leachability of MSW incinerator ash, under Environment Canada's National Incinerator Testing and Evaluation Program (NITEP). The studies were undertaken to obtain additional information on the chemical and physical characteristics of these ashes and to assist in the development of solid waste management criteria for their ultimate disposal. This paper focuses on the results from the second study in the series, which was conducted on residues collected from an air pollution control (APC) pilot plant built by FLAKT Canada.

  6. Health risk assessment of air emissions from a municipal solid waste incineration plant--a case study.

    PubMed

    Cangialosi, Federico; Intini, Gianluca; Liberti, Lorenzo; Notarnicola, Michele; Stellacci, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    A health risk assessment of long-term emissions of carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic air pollutants has been carried out for the municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) of the city of Taranto, Italy. Ground level air concentrations and soil deposition of carcinogenic (Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-Dioxins/Furans and Cd) and non-carcinogenic (Pb and Hg) pollutants have been estimated using a well documented atmospheric dispersion model. Health risk values for air inhalation, dermal contact, soil and food ingestion have been calculated based on a combination of these concentrations and a matrix of environmental exposure factors. Exposure of the surrounding population has been addressed for different release scenarios based on four pollutants, four exposure pathways and two receptor groups (children and adults). Spatial risk distribution and cancer excess cases projected from plant emissions have been compared with background mortality records. Estimated results based on the MSWI emissions show: (1) individual risks well below maximum acceptable levels, (2) very small incremental cancer risk compared with background level. PMID:17611096

  7. CAI in Advanced Literature Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Norman

    1981-01-01

    Ways that computer assisted instruction (CAI) can be useful in teaching English at upperclass and graduate levels are considered, with illustrations from PLATO lessons that have been composed and programmed. One lesson takes advantage of PLATO's graphic design capabilities, which enabled the teacher to design the runic figures and to show them in…

  8. Teacher's Handbook for CAI Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick; And Others

    The handbooks for the most widely used computer-assisted instruction (CAI) courses now available on computer terminals at the Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences at Stanford University are presented. Handbooks are included for the following courses: Strands Drill-and-practice (arithmetic fundamentals for fourth grade), Logic…

  9. Flexible Teaching Methods for CAI Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, D. G.

    Although much progress has been made in the ten years that computer-assisted instruction (CAI) has been researched, two major problems still exist. One is the high cost of CAI; the other is its lack of flexibility. The former problem will abate with improved technology and the creation of educational CAI utility systems. One possible solution to…

  10. 40 CFR 60.2870 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... available for submittal to the Administrator or for an inspector's onsite review. (c) Submit an initial... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY... records of results of all initial and annual opacity tests onsite in either paper copy or...

  11. Burden of disease attributable to air pollutants from municipal solid waste incinerators in Seoul, Korea: a source-specific approach for environmental burden of disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Kim, Jung-Wk; Lee, Hyun-Jung

    2011-05-01

    Few studies have attempted to quantify the integrated health burden, incorporating both mortality and morbidity as these factors pertain to air pollutants, on the population in the vicinity of the incinerators. The aims of this study are to estimate the attributable burden of disease caused by incinerators in Seoul, Korea and to present an approach based on source-specific exposure for the estimation of the environmental burden of disease (EBD). With particular attention on the development of a measurement means of the source-specific, exposure-based population attributable fraction (PAF), we integrated air dispersion modeling, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the population distribution of exposure, and the exposure-response relationship. We then estimated the PAFs caused by additional concentrations of four air pollutants (PM(10), NO(2,) SO(2), and CO) emitted from four municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) in Seoul in 2007. We, finally, estimated the attributable burden of disease, using the estimated PAF and the disability-adjusted life years (DALY) method developed by the Global Burden of Disease Group of the World Health Organization (WHO). The PAF for NO(2) to all-cause mortality was assessed at approximately 0.02% (95% CI: 0.003-0.036%), which was the highest among all air pollutants. The PAFs for respiratory and cardiovascular disease were 0.12% (95% CI: 0.01-0.16%) and 0.10% (95% CI: 0.04-0.16%), respectively. The sum of the attributable burden of disease for four pollutants was about 297 person-years (PYs) (95% CI: 121-472 PYs) when the incinerators observed to the emission standards. The attributable burdens of respiratory disease and cardiovascular disease were about 0.2% and 0.1%, respectively, of the total burden of respiratory disease and cardiovascular disease of Seoul citizens for the year 2007. Although the air emissions from one risk factor, an incinerator, are small, the burden of disease can be significant to the public health when

  12. The evaluation of the air quality impact of an incinerator by using MM5-CMAQ-EMIMO modeling system: North of Spain case study.

    PubMed

    San José, R; Pérez, J L; González, R M

    2008-07-01

    The use of sophisticated air pollution modeling systems to evaluate the impact of different industrial plant emissions is currently done in an extensive way. MM5-CMAQ (PSU/NCAR and EPA, USA) is one of the most applicable air quality modeling systems to evaluate those impacts. In this contribution we present the methodology and results obtained when applying the MM5-CMAQ air quality modeling system for evaluating the potential impact of an incinerator in San Sebastián (Basque Country, Spain). We have used the EMIMO (UPM, Spain) emission model to simulate the emissions from biogenic and anthropogenic sources including traffic and tertiary sector sources. The study includes the air quality impact of a highway located near the incinerator named A8 and 6 industrial plants which already exist. The impact study has been compared with the results obtained from this highway impact and the 6 industrial plants which are normally operating during the last 30 years. The system has been prepared to simulate also Cadmium, Arsenic, Nickel, Lead and Benzo(a)pyrene air quality impacts. The PCDD/F air concentrations have been determined for the 16 toxic dioxins and furans as determined in the bibliography. The criteria pollutants such as CO, NOx, SO(2), PM(10) and O(3) have also been determined according to the different EU Directives which limit the values of such a pollutants for different periods of time. PMID:18436306

  13. DETECTING WASTE COMBUSTION EMISSIONS: SEVERAL ADVANCED METHODS ARE USEFUL FOR SAMPLING AIR CONTAMINANTS FROM HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATOR STACKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper is an overview of sampling methods being recommended to EPA regulatory programs, to EPA engineering research and development projects, and to interested parties in the industrial community. The methods discussed are generally applicable to both incineration and processe...

  14. Genotoxicity, inflammation and physico-chemical properties of fine particle samples from an incineration energy plant and urban air.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Rank, Jette; White, Paul A; Lundstedt, Staffan; Gagne, Remi; Jacobsen, Nicklas R; Kristiansen, Jesper; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan

    2007-10-01

    Airborne particulate matter (PM) was sampled by use of an electrostatic sampler in an oven hall and a receiving hall in a waste-incineration energy plant, and from urban air in a heavy-traffic street and from background air in Copenhagen. PM was sampled for 1-2 weeks, four samples at each site. The samples were extracted and examined for mutagenicity in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, YG1041 and YG5161, for content of inorganic elements and for the presence of eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The induction of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression and the presence of DNA damage - tested by the comet assay - were determined after 24-h incubations with human A549 lung epithelial cells. The PM(2.5) concentration was about twofold greater in the oven hall than in the receiving hall. The particle size distribution in the receiving hall was similar to that in street air (maximum mode at about 25nm), but the distribution was completely different in the oven hall (maximum mode at about 150nm). Also chemically, the samples from the oven hall were highly different from the other samples. PM extracts from the receiving hall, street and background air were more mutagenic than the PM extracts from the oven hall. PM from all four sites caused similar levels of DNA damage in A549 cells; only the oven hall samples gave results that were statistically significantly different from those obtained with street-air samples. The receiving hall and the urban air samples were similarly inflammatory (relative IL-8 mRNA expression), whereas the oven hall did not cause a statistically significant increase in IL-8 mRNA expression. A principal component analysis separated the oven hall and the receiving hall by the first principal component. These two sites were separated from street and background air with the second principal component. Several clusters of constituents were identified. One cluster consisted of all the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), several groups of metals and one

  15. Numerical simulation and validation of SI-CAI hybrid combustion in a CAI/HCCI gasoline engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinyan; Xie, Hui; Xie, Liyan; Zhang, Lianfang; Li, Le; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Hua

    2013-02-01

    SI-CAI hybrid combustion, also known as spark-assisted compression ignition (SACI), is a promising concept to extend the operating range of CAI (Controlled Auto-Ignition) and achieve the smooth transition between spark ignition (SI) and CAI in the gasoline engine. In this study, a SI-CAI hybrid combustion model (HCM) has been constructed on the basis of the 3-Zones Extended Coherent Flame Model (ECFM3Z). An ignition model is included to initiate the ECFM3Z calculation and induce the flame propagation. In order to precisely depict the subsequent auto-ignition process of the unburned fuel and air mixture independently after the initiation of flame propagation, the tabulated chemistry concept is adopted to describe the auto-ignition chemistry. The methodology for extracting tabulated parameters from the chemical kinetics calculations is developed so that both cool flame reactions and main auto-ignition combustion can be well captured under a wider range of thermodynamic conditions. The SI-CAI hybrid combustion model (HCM) is then applied in the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3-D CFD) engine simulation. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data obtained from a single cylinder VVA engine. The detailed analysis of the simulations demonstrates that the SI-CAI hybrid combustion process is characterised with the early flame propagation and subsequent multi-site auto-ignition around the main flame front, which is consistent with the optical results reported by other researchers. Besides, the systematic study of the in-cylinder condition reveals the influence mechanism of the early flame propagation on the subsequent auto-ignition.

  16. Incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a laboratory incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Z.; Mcintosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports experimental results on the incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator. Temperature of the incinerator, excess air ratio and mean residence time were varied to simulate both complete and incomplete combustion conditions. The flue gas was monitored on line using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupling with a heated long path cell (LPC). Methane, toluene, benzene, chlorobenzene, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide in the flue gas were simultaneously analyzed. Experimental results indicate that benzene is a major product of incomplete combustion (PIC) besides carbon monoxide in the incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene, and is very sensitive to combustion conditions. This suggests that benzene is a target analyle to be monitored in full-scale incinerators.

  17. Incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a laboratory incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Zhuoxiong; McIntosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports results on incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator. The incinerator temperature, excess air ratio and mean residence time were varied to simulate both complete and incomplete combustion conditions. The flue gas was monitored on line using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupling with a heated long path cell (LPC). Methane, toluene, benzene, chlorobenzene, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide in the flue gas were simultaneously analyzed. Experimental results indicate that benzene is a major product of incomplete combustion (PIC), besides carbon monoxide, in the incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene and is very sensitive to the combustion conditions. This suggests that benzene is a target analyte to be monitored in full-scale incinerators.

  18. Incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a laboratory incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Zhuoxiong; McIntosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-12-31

    This paper reports results on incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator. The incinerator temperature, excess air ratio and mean residence time were varied to simulate both complete and incomplete combustion conditions. The flue gas was monitored on line using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupling with a heated long path cell (LPC). Methane, toluene, benzene, chlorobenzene, hydrogen chloride and carbon monoxide in the flue gas were simultaneously analyzed. Experimental results indicate that benzene is a major product of incomplete combustion (PIC), besides carbon monoxide, in the incineration of toluene and chlorobenzene and is very sensitive to the combustion conditions. This suggests that benzene is a target analyte to be monitored in full-scale incinerators.

  19. Characteristics of ashes from different locations at the MSW incinerator equipped with various air pollution control devices

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Geum-Ju; Kim, Ki-Heon; Seo, Yong-Chil; Kim, Sam-Cwan

    2004-07-01

    The characteristics of ashes from different locations at a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) equipped with a water spray tower (WST) as a cooling system, and a spray dryer adsorber (SDA), a bag filter (BF) and a selective catalytic reactor (SCR) as air pollution control devices (APCD) was investigated to provide the basic data for further treatment of ashes. A commercial MSWI with a capacity of 100 tons per day was selected. Ash was sampled from different locations during the normal operation of the MSWI and was analyzed to obtain chemical composition, basicity, metal contents and leaching behavior of heavy metals. Basicity and pH of ash showed a broad range between 0.08-9.07 and 3.5-12.3, respectively. Some major inorganics in ash were identified and could affect the basicity. This could be one of the factors to determine further treatment means. Partitioning of hazardous heavy metals such as Pb, Cu, Cr, Hg and Cd was investigated. Large portions of Hg and Cd were emitted from the furnace while over 90% of Pb, Cu and Cr remained in bottom ash. However 54% of Hg was captured by WST and 41% by SDA/BF and 3.6% was emitted through the stack, while 81.5% of Cd was captured by SDA/BF. From the analysis data of various metal contents in ash and leach analysis, such capturing of metal was confirmed and some heavy metals found to be easily released from ash. Based on the overall characteristics of ash in different locations at the MSWI during the investigation, some considerations and suggestions for determining the appropriate treatment methods of ash were made as conclusions.

  20. Assessment of long-term leaching from waste incineration air-pollution-control residues.

    PubMed

    Astrup, T; Mosbaek, H; Christensen, T H

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of long-term leaching from MSWI air-pollution-control (APC) residues is discussed with respect to use in environmental impact assessment, such as life-cycle assessment (LCA). A method was proposed for estimating leaching as a function of the liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio in a long-term perspective (L/S 5000l/kg). Data for changes in residue pH as a function of L/S was used in combination with pH dependent leaching data to predict leachate concentrations of Al, Ca, Cd, Ba, Mg, Ni, Pb, S, Pb, V and Zn as a function of L/S. Mass balance calculations were used to determine the element fractions leached with respect to L/S. The estimated long-term leaching from a semi-dry residue and a fly ash was compared with short-term leaching determined by batch tests at L/S 10l/kg, both carbonated and non-carbonated versions of the residues were investigated. Generally, very high L/S ratios above 2000l/kg were required to leach 20-30% of the solid contents. However, Ca and S were depleted at L/S 200-900l/kg. The long-term leachate concentrations were found to either remain at the same level as the initial leaching determined by the L/S 10 batch test, or to significantly decrease compared with the initial leaching. Only Al and Zn were found to show higher leachate concentrations at L/S ratios above 3000-5000l/kg. Carbonation generally prolonged the time needed for depletion from the solid residues; however, Ca and S were depleted faster than in the case of non-carbonated residues. This study shows that uncritical use of batch leaching data for assessing the potential leaching is highly problematic, and evaluations of residue disposal should include scenario specific quantification of the long-term leaching. PMID:16488595

  1. Evaluation of pilot-scale air pollution control devices on a municipal waterfall incinerator. Project report, June 1978-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, F.D.; Bruck, J.M.; Albrinck, D.N.

    1985-10-01

    The project report describes the results of a program for the testing of two pilot-scale pollution control devices, a fabric filter, and a venturi scrubber at the Braintree, Massachusetts Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator. It includes operation, sampling, and analytical efforts and outlines the plant operating conditions at the time of testing of the two pilot control devices. The Braintree Municipal Incinerator is a mass-burn, water-wall type consisting of two furnaces, each designed to burn 4.7 Mg (5 tons) per hour of unprocessed refuse.

  2. The Evolutionary Development of CAI Hardware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, John E.

    After six years of research in computer assisted instruction (CAI) using PLATO III, a decision was made at the University of Illinois to develop a larger system as a national CAI resource. This document describes the design specifications and problems in the development of PLATO IV, a system which is capable of accomodating up to 4,000 terminals…

  3. Computers for Your Classroom: CAI and CMI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David B.; Bozeman, William C.

    1981-01-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost computer systems provides a means of assisting classroom teachers in the performance of their duties. Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and computer-managed instruction (CMI) are two applications of computer technology with which school administrators should become familiar. CAI is a teaching medium in which…

  4. CAI Systems Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feingold, Samuel L.

    In considering the development of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems over the past eleven years, one can see a pattern of interaction between advances in computer hardware and software and continuing efforts to solve the basic problems of CAI: problems of achieving a natural-language capability, of keeping the cost low, and of making…

  5. 40 CFR 62.14825 - What are the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for air curtain incinerators that burn 100...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... yard waste? 62.14825 Section 62.14825 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units That... Wastes, Clean Lumber And/or Yard Waste § 62.14825 What are the recordkeeping and reporting...

  6. A risk management approach to CAIS development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Hal; Kerner, Judy; Alden, Tony; Belz, Frank; Tadman, Frank

    1986-01-01

    The proposed DoD standard Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS) was developed as a framework set of interfaces that will support the transportability and interoperability of tools in the support environments of the future. While the current CAIS version is a promising start toward fulfilling those goals and current prototypes provide adequate testbeds for investigations in support of completing specifications for a full CAIS, there are many reasons why the proposed CAIS might fail to become a usable product and the foundation of next-generation (1990'S) project support environments such as NASA's Space Station software support environment. The most critical threats to the viability and acceptance of the CAIS include performance issues (especially in piggybacked implementations), transportability, and security requirements. To make the situation worse, the solution to some of these threats appears to be at conflict with the solutions to others.

  7. Incineration method and system

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, J.G.; Lombana, L.A.

    1982-10-05

    The following disclosure teaches ways and means for incinerating organic wastes in a multiple hearth furnace equipped with an afterburner. In the furnace, the wastes are pyrolyzed in an oxygen deficient atmosphere which is regulated to only partially complete the oxidation of the organic substances which are pyrolyzed from the wastes. In the afterburner, air is introduced to complete the oxidation of the partially oxidized substances carried by gases and vapors from the furnace. The air supply to the afterburner is controlled so that, at temperatures above a predetermined temperature, the quantity of air introduced is increased with increasing temperatures and is decreased with decreasing temperatures. In other words, the pyrolyzing furnace is caused to operate with a deficiency of air over its operating range, while the afterburner is caused to operate with excess air and the amount of excess air supplied is used to control the operating temperature by quenching.

  8. Consolidated incineration facility technical support

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.; Looper, M.G.

    1993-12-31

    In 1996, the Savannah River Site plans to begin operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) leads an extensive technical support program designed to obtain incinerator and air pollution control equipment performance data to support facility start-up and operation. Key components of this technical support program include recently completed waste burn tests at both EPA`s Incineration Research Facility and at Energy and Environmental Research Corporation`s Solid Waste Incineration Test Facility. The main objectives for these tests were determining the fate of heavy metals, measuring organics destruction and removal efficiencies, and quantifying incinerator offgas particulate loading and size distribution as a function of waste feed characteristics and incineration conditions. In addition to these waste burning tests, the SRTC has recently completed installations of the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1/10 scale CIF offgas system pilot plant. This pilot facility will be used to demonstrate system operability and maintainability, evaluate and optimize equipment and instrument performance, and provide direct CIF start-up support. Technical support programs of this type are needed to resolve technical issues related with treatment and disposal of combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive waste. Implementation of this program will minimize facility start-up problems and help insure compliance with all facility performance requirements.

  9. INCINERABILITY INDEX: A MEASURE OF INCINERATOR PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since promulgation of the hazardous waste incinerator performance standards in January 1981, there has been a continuing interest in validating a real-time surrogate means of measuring incinerator compliance with the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) performance standard. ...

  10. CAIs in Semarkona (LL3.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Simon, J. I.; Ross, D. K.; Marhas, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the first forming solids of the Solar system. Their observed abundance, mean size, and mineralogy vary quite significantly between different groups of chondrites. These differences may reflect the dynamics and distinct cosmochemical conditions present in the region(s) of the protoplanetary disk from which each type likely accreted. Only about 11 such objects have been found in L and LL type while another 57 have been found in H type ordinary chondrites, compared to thousands in carbonaceous chondrites. At issue is whether the rare CAIs contained in ordinary chondrites truly reflect a distinct population from the inclusions commonly found in other chondrite types. Semarkona (LL3.00) (fall, 691 g) is the most pristine chondrite available in our meteorite collection. Here we report petrography and mineralogy of 3 CAIs from Semarkona

  11. Pulsating incinerator hearth

    SciTech Connect

    Basic, J.N. Sr.

    1984-10-09

    A pulsating hearth for an incinerator wherein the hearth is suspended on a fixed frame for movement in a limited short arc to urge random size particles burning in a pile on the hearth in a predetermined path intermittently across the surface of the heart. Movement is imparted to the hearth in periodic pulses preferably by inflating sets of air bags mounted on the frame, which stroke the hearth to move it a short distance from an initial position and jar it against the frame, thus impelling the burning particles a short distance by inertia and concurrently stoking the burning pile upon each stroke, and then returning the hearth to its initial position. The hearth may also have a plurality of nozzles connected to a source of air for delivering gently flowing air to the burning pile on the hearth.

  12. Occurrence and impact of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans in the air and soil around a municipal solid waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Ren, Yue; Chu, Jiazhi; Li, Nan; Zhen, Sen; Zhao, Hu; Fan, Shuang; Zhang, Hui; Xu, Pengjun; Qi, Li; Liang, Shuting; Zhao, Bin

    2016-06-01

    To assess the influence of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) on the environment in the vicinity of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs), we determined the levels of PCDD/Fs in air and soil samples collected around a MSWI, which is the largest in China. The International Toxicity Equivalency Quantity (I-TEQ) concentrations of PCDD/Fs in air samples were from 0.0300 to 1.03pgI-TEQ/m(3) (0.445-13.6pg/m(3)), with an average of 0.237pgI-TEQ/m(3), while in soil samples they ranged from 0.520 to 3.40pgI-TEQ/g (2.41-88.7pg/g) with an average of 1.49pgI-TEQ/g. The concentrations of PCDD/Fs in air and soil samples were comparable to other areas, and PeCDFs were the dominant contributors, which was different from stack gas homologue patterns. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that PCDD/Fs emission from the MSWI did not directly affect the profiles of PCDD/Fs in air and soils, so that vehicles and unidentified emission sources should be considered. The daily inhalation levels of PCDD/Fs for children (0.0110 to 0.392pgI-TEQ/(kg·day) and adults (0.00600 to 0.221pgI-TEQ/(kg·day) near the MSWI were lower than the tolerable daily intake of 1.00 to 4.00pg WHO-TEQ/(kg·day), but in winter the values were higher than in summer. These results can be used as basic data for assessing the risk of PCDD/Fs exposure in residents living around this MSWI, and more monitoring programs and studies should be carried out around MSWIs. PMID:27266321

  13. Simplified Tutorial Programming for Interactive CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelden, D. L.

    A validated instructional model generated on a large mainframe computer by the military was modified to a microcomputer format for use in programming tutorial computer assisted instruction (CAI) materials, and a simplified, compatible system of generating programs was identified--CP/M and MP/M from Digital Research Corporation. In order to…

  14. The Relevance of AI Research to CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearsley, Greg P.

    This article provides a tutorial introduction to Artificial Intelligence (AI) research for those involved in Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI). The general theme is that much of the current work in AI, particularly in the areas of natural language understanding systems, rule induction, programming languages, and socratic systems, has important…

  15. Man-Computer Communications and CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunka, S.

    A variety of direct and indirect instructional activities during the last ten years have employed computers. Within Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) programs, the following broad classes of instructional strategies have been generally accepted: tutorial, drill and practice, review, testing, remediation and diagnosis, problem solving, and…

  16. Magnesium Isotopic Composition of CAIs and Chondrules from CBb Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounelle, M.; Young, E. D.; Shahar, A.; Kearsley, A.

    2006-03-01

    We measured magnesium isotope ratios in 17 chondrules and 3 CAIs from the CBb chondrites HH 237 and QUE 94411 by LA-MC-ICPMS. We find no detectable 26Al excesses in the three CAIs and approximately normal (chondritic) d25Mg in CAIs and chondrules.

  17. Method and apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Korenberg, Jacob

    1990-01-01

    An incineration apparatus and method for disposal of infectious hazardous waste including a fluidized bed reactor containing a bed of granular material. The reactor includes a first chamber, a second chamber, and a vertical partition separating the first and second chambers. A pressurized stream of air is supplied to the reactor at a sufficient velocity to fluidize the granular material in both the first and second chambers. Waste materials to be incinerated are fed into the first chamber of the fluidized bed, the fine waste materials being initially incinerated in the first chamber and subsequently circulated over the partition to the second chamber wherein further incineration occurs. Coarse waste materials are removed from the first chamber, comminuted, and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. Any partially incinerated waste materials and ash from the bottom of the second chamber are removed and recirculated to the second chamber for further incineration. This process is repeated until all infectious hazardous waste has been completely incinerated.

  18. Quantitative Models of CAI Rim Layer Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, A.; Boynton, W. V.

    1995-09-01

    Many hypotheses have been proposed to account for the ~50 micrometer-thick layer sequences (Wark-Lovering rims) that typically surround coarse-grained Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs), but to date no consensus has emerged on how these rims formed. A two-step process-- flash heating of CAIs to produce a refractory residue on the margins of CAIs [1,2,3], followed by reaction and diffusion between CAIs or the refractory residue and an external medium rich in Mg, Si and other ferromagnesian and volatile elements to form the layers [3,4,5]-- may have formed the rims. We have tested the second step of this process quantitatively, and show that many, but not all, of the layering characteristics of CAI rims in the Vigarano, Leoville, and Efremovka CV3 chondrites can be explained by steady-state reaction and diffusion between CAIs and an external medium rich in Mg and Si. Moreover, observed variations in the details of the layering from one CAI to another can be explained primarily by differences in the identity and composition of the external medium, which appears to have included vapor alone, vapor + olivine, and olivine +/- clinopyroxene +/- vapor. An idealized layer sequence for CAI rims in Vigarano, Leoville, and Efremovka can be represented as MSF|S|AM|D|O, where MSF = melilite (M) + spinel (S) + fassaite (F) in the interior of CAIs; S = spinel-rich layer; AM = a layer consisting either of anorthite (A) alone, or M alone, or both A and M; D = a clinopyroxene layer consisting mainly of aluminous diopside (D) that is zoned to fassaite towards the CAI; and O = olivine-rich layer, composed mainly of individually zoned olivine grains that apparently pre-existed layer formation [3]. A or M are absent between the S and D layers in roughly half of the rims. The O layer varies considerably in thickness (0-60 micrometers thick) and in porosity from rim to rim, with olivine grains either tightly intergrown to form a compact layer or arranged loosely on the outer surfaces of the CAIs

  19. Risks of municipal solid waste incineration: an environmental perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Denison, R.A.; Silbergeld, E.K.

    1988-09-01

    The central focus of the debate over incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) has shifted from its apparent management advantages to unresolved risk issues. This shift is a result of the lack of comprehensive consideration of risks associated with incineration. We discuss the need to expand incinerator risk assessment beyond the limited view of incinerators as stationary air pollution sources to encompass the following: other products of incineration, ash in particular, and pollutants other than dioxins, metals in particular; routes of exposure in addition to direct inhalation; health effects in addition to cancer; and the cumulative nature of exposure and health effects induced by many incinerator-associated pollutants. Rational MSW management planning requires that the limitations as well as advantages of incineration be recognized. Incineration is a waste-processing--not a waste disposal--technology, and its products pose substantial management and disposal problems of their own. Consideration of the nature of these products suggests that incineration is ill-suited to manage the municipal wastestream in its entirety. In particular, incineration greatly enhances the mobility and bioavailability of toxic metals present in MSW. These factors suggest that incineration must be viewed as only one component in an integrated MSW management system. The potential for source reduction, separation, and recycling to increase the safety and efficiency of incineration should be counted among their many benefits. Risk considerations dictate that alternatives to the use of toxic metals at the production stage also be examined in designing an effective, long-term MSW management strategy.

  20. Mutagenicity of combustion emissions from a biomedical-waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Driver, J.H.; Rogers, H.W.; Claxton, L.D.

    1989-01-01

    The Ames Salmonella typhimurium (TA98) assay was used to determine the mutagenicity of stack fly ash from a medical/pathological waste incinerator. Stack fly ash also collected from a boiler plant adjacent to the incinerator and ambient air particles (upwind and downwind of the incinerator and boiler facilities) were collected and bioassayed. Downwind particulate mutagenicity (revertants per cubic meter of air) was significantly greater than upwind particulate mutagenicity. Mutagenic emission-rate estimates (revertants per kilogram waste feed) for the incinerator and boiler were less than estimates for ash and downwind ambient-air particulate samples collected during incinerator auxiliary burner failure and demonstrated significant increase in mutagenicity compared to samples collected during routine incinerator operation.

  1. Continuous emission monitor for incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

  2. Continuous emission monitor for incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Demirgian, J.

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

  3. Incinerator system

    SciTech Connect

    Rathmell, R.K.

    1986-10-07

    An incineration system is described which consists of: combustion chamber structure having an inlet, an outlet, and burner structure in the combustion chamber, heat exchanger structure defining a chamber, divider structure between the heat exchanger chamber and the combustion chamber, an array of tubes extending through the heat exchanger chamber to the inlet of the combustion chamber at the divider structure. The heat exchanger chamber has an inlet coupled to the outlet of the combustion chamber for flow of the combustion products discharged from the combustion chamber through the heat exchanger chamber over the tubes in heat exchange relation, and an outlet for discharge of products from the heat exchanger chamber, aspirator sleeve structure secured to the divider structure between the heat exchanger chamber and the combustion chamber. Each aspirator sleeve receives the outlet end of a heat exchanger tube in slip fit relation so that the heat exchanger tubes are free to thermally expand longitudinally within the aspirator sleeves, and means for flowing vapor through the heat exchanger tubes into the combustion chamber at sufficiently high velocity to produce a reduced pressure effect in the aspirator sleeves in the heat exchanger chamber to draw a minor fraction of combustion products through the aspirator sleeves into the combustion chamber for reincineration.

  4. Reduction of gas phase air toxics from combustion and incineration sources using the GE-Mitsui-BG activated coke process

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.G.; Tsuji, K.; Shiraishi, I.

    1998-04-01

    The dry desulfurization, denitification and air toxics removal process using activated coke (AC) was originally researched and developed during the 1960`s by Bergbau Forschung (BF), now called Deutsche Montan Technologies. Mitsui Mining Company (MMC) signed a licensing agreement with BF in 1982 to investigate, test and adapt the system to facilities in Japan. Japanese regulations are stricter than in the United States toward SOx/NOx pollutants, as well as flyash emissions from the utility industry, oil refineries and other industries. This process is installed on four coal-fired boilers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracker (FCC) units. These plants were constructed by MMC in Japan and Uhde GmbH in Germany. General Electric Environmental Services, Inc. (GEESI) signed a license agreement in 1992 with MMC and Mitsui and Company, Ltd. of Tokyo. Under this agreement, GEESI will market, design, fabricate and install the Mitsui-BF process for flue gas cleaning applications in North America. MMC also developed a technology to produce AC used in the dry DeSOx/DeNOx/Air Toxics removal process based on their own metallurgical coke manufacturing technology. This paper provides information on the details of MMC`s AC used in the dry DeSOx/DeNOx/Air Toxics removal process and of the DeSOx/DeNOx/Air Toxics removal process itself.

  5. Use plan for demonstration radioactive-waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, L.R.; McCampbell, M.R.; Thompson, J.D.

    1982-04-01

    The University of Maryland at Baltimore was awarded a grant from the Department of Energy to test a specially modified incinerator to burn biomedical radioactive waste. In preparation for the incinerator, the Radiation Safety Office devised a comprehensive plan for its safe and effective use. The incinerator plan includes a discussion of regulations regarding on-site incineration of radioactive waste, plans for optimum use in burning four principal waste forms, controlled air incineration technology, and standard health physics safety practices; a use plan, including waste categorization and segregation, processing, and ash disposition; safety procedures, including personnel and area monitoring; and methods to evaluate the incinerator's effectiveness by estimating its volume reduction factors, mass and activity balances, and by determining the cost effectiveness of incineration versus commercial shallow land burial.

  6. Sludge incineration in a spinning fluidized bed incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Swithenbank, J.; Basire, S.; Wong, W.Y.; Lu, Y.; Nasserzadeh, V.

    1999-07-01

    At the present time, the sewage treatment plants in the UK produce about 25 million tonnes of sewage sludge each year at a concentration of 4% solids. New regulations forbid sea dumping and in the near future new incinerators will be required to dispose of about five million tonnes per year. Bubbling fluidized bed incinerators are widely used to burn sewage sludge at a typical consumption rate of about 0.02 kg(dry)/s/m{sup 2}, and it follows that over 300 conventional fluidized bed incinerators of 3 meters bed diameter could be required to cope with the increased demand. At Sheffield University Waste Incineration Centre (SUWIC) research work is being carried out to develop a novel spinning fluidized bed incinerator. The key factor to note is that when air flows up through a bed of near mono-sized particles, it fluidizes when the pressure drop across the bed is equal to the weight of the bed. Normally, the weight of the bed is determined by gravity. However, if the bed is contained by a cylindrical air distributor plate that is rotating rapidly about its axis, then the effective weight of the bed can be increased dramatically. The airflow passing through the bed can be increased proportionally to the g level produced by the rotation and it follows that the process has been intensified. In exploratory tests with a spinning fluidized bed the authors have achieved combustion intensities with coal combustion as high as 100 MW/m{sup 3}. A problem with burning coal is that it was difficult to remove the heat and rotating water seals had to be used to transfer cooling water into the bed. In the case of sewage and other sludges, this problem does not exist since the flue gases can remove the small amount of heat released. The rotating fluidized bed sludge incinerator is a novel device, which is very compact. It is able to solve the turndown problem encountered with conventional fluidized beds by simply changing the rotation speed. Bearing in mind that a centrifugal sludge

  7. Investigation of novel incineration technology for hospital waste.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangsheng; Ma, Lanlan; Liu, Yushan; Kong, Guoxing

    2006-10-15

    Conventional incineration systems for hospital waste (HW) emit large amounts of particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, as well as dioxins, due to the large excess air ratio. Additionally, the final process residues--bottom and fly ashes containing high levels of heavy metals and dioxins--also constitute a serious environmental problem. These issues faced by HW incineration processes are very similar to those confronted by conventional municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators. In our previous work, we developed a novel technology integrating drying, pyrolysis, gasification, combustion, and ash vitrification (DPGCV) in one step, which successfully solved these issues in MSW incineration. In this study, many experiments are carried out to investigate the feasibility of employing the DPGCV technology to solve the issues faced by HW incineration processes, although there was no MSW incinerator used as a HW incinerator till now. Experiments were conducted in an industrial HW incineration plant with a capacity of 24 tons per day (TPD), located in Zhenzhou, Henan Province. Results illustrated that this DPGCV technology successfully solved these issues as confronted by the conventional HW incinerators and achieved the expected results for HW incineration as it did for MSW incineration. The outstanding performance of this DPGCV technology is due to the fact that the primary chamber acted as both gasifier for organic matter and vitrifying reactor for ashes, and the secondary chamber acted as a gas combustor. PMID:17120573

  8. NALDA (Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis) CAI (computer aided instruction)

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, B.H. ); France, P.A.; Frey, S.C.; Gaubas, N.F.; Hyland, K.J.; Lindsey, A.M.; Manley, D.O. ); Hunnum, W.H. ); Smith, D.L. )

    1990-07-01

    Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel developed a prototype computer aided instruction CAI system for the Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis (NALDA) system. The objective of this project was to provide a CAI prototype that could be used as an enhancement to existing NALDA training. The CAI prototype project was performed in phases. The task undertaken in Phase I was to analyze the problem and the alternative solutions and to develop a set of recommendations on how best to proceed. The findings from Phase I are documented in Recommended CAI Approach for the NALDA System (Duncan et al., 1987). In Phase II, a structured design and specifications were developed, and a prototype CAI system was created. A report, NALDA CAI Prototype: Phase II Final Report, was written to record the findings and results of Phase II. NALDA CAI: Recommendations for an Advanced Instructional Model, is comprised of related papers encompassing research on computer aided instruction CAI, newly developing training technologies, instructional systems development, and an Advanced Instructional Model. These topics were selected because of their relevancy to the CAI needs of NALDA. These papers provide general background information on various aspects of CAI and give a broad overview of new technologies and their impact on the future design and development of training programs. The paper within have been index separately elsewhere.

  9. Plutonium waste incineration using pyrohydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    Waste generated by Savannah River Site (SRS) plutonium operations includes a contaminated organic waste stream. A conventional method for disposing of the organic waste stream and recovering the nuclear material is by incineration. When the organic material is burned, the plutonium remains in the incinerator ash. Plutonium recovery from incinerator ash is highly dependent on the maximum temperature to which the oxide is exposed. Recovery via acid leaching is reduced for a high fired ash (>800{degree}C), while plutonium oxides fired at lower decomposition temperatures (400--800{degrees}C) are more soluble at any given acid concentration. To determine the feasibility of using a lower temperature process, tests were conducted using an electrically heated, controlled-air incinerator. Nine nonradioactive, solid, waste materials were batch-fed and processed in a top-heated cylindrical furnace. Waste material processing was completed using a 19-liter batch over a nominal 8-hour cycle. A processing cycle consisted of 1 hour for heating, 4 hours for reacting, and 3 hours for chamber cooling. The water gas shift reaction was used to hydrolyze waste materials in an atmosphere of 336% steam and 4.4% oxygen. Throughput ranged from 0.14 to 0.27 kg/hr depending on the variability in the waste material composition and density.

  10. Plutonium waste incineration using pyrohydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.L.

    1991-12-31

    Waste generated by Savannah River Site (SRS) plutonium operations includes a contaminated organic waste stream. A conventional method for disposing of the organic waste stream and recovering the nuclear material is by incineration. When the organic material is burned, the plutonium remains in the incinerator ash. Plutonium recovery from incinerator ash is highly dependent on the maximum temperature to which the oxide is exposed. Recovery via acid leaching is reduced for a high fired ash (>800{degree}C), while plutonium oxides fired at lower decomposition temperatures (400--800{degrees}C) are more soluble at any given acid concentration. To determine the feasibility of using a lower temperature process, tests were conducted using an electrically heated, controlled-air incinerator. Nine nonradioactive, solid, waste materials were batch-fed and processed in a top-heated cylindrical furnace. Waste material processing was completed using a 19-liter batch over a nominal 8-hour cycle. A processing cycle consisted of 1 hour for heating, 4 hours for reacting, and 3 hours for chamber cooling. The water gas shift reaction was used to hydrolyze waste materials in an atmosphere of 336% steam and 4.4% oxygen. Throughput ranged from 0.14 to 0.27 kg/hr depending on the variability in the waste material composition and density.

  11. Evaluation of medical waste incinerators in Alexandria.

    PubMed

    Labib, Ossama A; Hussein, Ahmed H; El-Shall, Waffaa I; Zakaria, Adel; Mohamed, Mona G

    2005-01-01

    Medical establishments play important roles in different activities by using of modern technology to serve the humans and the environment through different departments in the establishment and its firms. Medical wastes are considered as a hazardous waste because they contain toxic materials, infectious, or non-infectious wastes and they are considered as a hazard to millions of patients, health care workers, and visitors. Treatment processes for medical wastes comprise autoclaving, microwaving, chemical disinfection, irradiation, plasma system, and incineration. Incineration is a thermal process, which destroys most of the waste including microorganisms. Combustion process must be under controlled conditions to convert wastes containing hazardous materials into mineral residues and gases. Hospital waste incinerators may emit a number of pollutants depending on the waste being incinerated. These pollutants include particulate matter, acid gases, toxic metals, and toxic organic compounds products of incomplete combustion, e.g., dioxins, furans, and carbon monoxide, as well as sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides. So, there should be a reduction of emissions of most of these pollutants by air pollution control devices. This study was conducted in 51 medical establishments (ME) in Alexandria. To evaluate its incinerators. It was found that only 31.4% of total ME have their own incinerators to treat their medical waste. Also, the incinerators conditions were poor with incomplete combustion. So, the study recommend handling of all medical wastes of ME in Alexandria by the company which is responsible now for management of domestic solid wastes of the city. PMID:16900615

  12. Bacterial emissions from incineration of hospital waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.J.; Brenniman, G.R.; Logue, R.R.; Strand, V.A.

    1988-07-01

    This research examined the emissions from a hospital incinerator to determine if human pathogenic bacteria were being released into community air. Incineration of the hospital waste resulted in stack gas with excessively high particulate matter and hydrochloric acid which made sampling impossible. Incineration of a substitute waste consisting of paper products, water, and cultures of Bacillus subtilis (a spore producing bacteria) resulted in no viable Bacillus subtilis in the stack-gas samples. Eight bacteria species other than Bacillus subtilis were found in stack gas samples. The indoor air was similar to the stack gas in bacteria number and species composition. It was concluded that these bacteria were able to pass through the incinerator via excess air entering the secondary combustion chamber. One human pathogen (Staphylococcus aureus) was found in the indoor air samples and elevated levels of bacteria were found in hospital hallways adjacent to the incinerator where waste handling occurred.

  13. Research on TRIZ and CAIs Application Problems for Technology Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangdong; Li, Qinghai; Bai, Zhonghang; Geng, Lixiao

    In order to realize application of invent problem solve theory (TRIZ) and computer aided innovation software (CAIs) , need to solve some key problems, such as the mode choice of technology innovation, establishment of technology innovation organization network(TION), and achievement of innovative process based on TRIZ and CAIs, etc.. This paper shows that the demands for TRIZ and CAIs according to the characteristics and existing problem of the manufacturing enterprises. Have explained that the manufacturing enterprises need to set up an open TION of enterprise leading type, and achieve the longitudinal cooperation innovation with institution of higher learning. The process of technology innovation based on TRIZ and CAIs has been set up from researching and developing point of view. Application of TRIZ and CAIs in FY Company has been summarized. The application effect of TRIZ and CAIs has been explained using technology innovation of the close goggle valve product.

  14. Solid waste combustion for alpha waste incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Orloff, D.I.

    1981-02-01

    Radioactive waste incinerator development at the Savannah River Laboratory has been augmented by fundamental combustion studies at the University of South Carolina. The objective was to measure and model pyrolysis and combustion rates of typical Savannah River Plant waste materials as a function of incinerator operating conditions. The analytical models developed in this work have been incorporated into a waste burning transient code. The code predicts maximum air requirement and heat energy release as a function of waste type, package size, combustion chamber size, and temperature. Historically, relationships have been determined by direct experiments that did not allow an engineering basis for predicting combustion rates in untested incinerators. The computed combustion rates and burning times agree with measured values in the Savannah River Laboratory pilot (1 lb/hr) and full-scale (12 lb/hr) alpha incinerators for a wide variety of typical waste materials.

  15. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration.

    PubMed

    Holder, Amara L; Vejerano, Eric P; Zhou, Xinzhe; Marr, Linsey C

    2013-09-01

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which nanomaterials may enter incinerator waste streams and the fate of these nanomaterials during the incineration process. Although the literature on incineration of nanomaterials is scarce, results from studies of their behavior at high temperature or in combustion environments for other applications can help predict their fate within an incinerator. Preliminary evidence suggests nanomaterials may catalyze the formation or destruction of combustion by-products. Depending on their composition, nanomaterials may undergo physical and chemical transformations within the incinerator, impacting their partitioning within the incineration system (e.g., bottom ash, fly ash) and the effectiveness of control technology for removing them. These transformations may also drastically affect nanomaterial transport and impacts in the environment. Current regulations on incinerator emissions do not specifically address nanomaterials, but limits on particle and metal emissions may prove somewhat effective at reducing the release of nanomaterials in incinerator effluent. Control technology used to meet these regulations, such as fabric filters, electrostatic precipitators, and wet electrostatic scrubbers, are expected to be at least partially effective at removing nanomaterials from incinerator flue gas. PMID:23880913

  16. 17. Rear (west) side of incinerator. Incinerator control panel on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Rear (west) side of incinerator. Incinerator control panel on the right. Looking south towards scrubber cell. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

  17. Physical properties of CAI-rich asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanga, P.; Devogele, M.; Cellino, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Campins, H.; Bus, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Some L-type asteroids (collectively called "Barbarians") are known to exhibit an anomalous polarimetric behavior, whose origin - still to be elucidated - can be related to compositional and/or scattering effects. The fact that these asteroids belong to the same taxonomic class (following the De Meo 2009 classification, including NIR) implies that composition must play a role. Sunshine et al. 2008 showed that these asteroids contain high amounts of CAIs, possibly hinting to a formation in an early proto-planetary environment, very rich in refractory material. On the base of this evidence, we started an observational campaign to increase the data coverage of these objects, by obtaining new NIR spectra, photometric and polarimetric measurements. Our first results show that the peculiar features are not restricted to polarimetry. In particular we show the existence of an anomalous distribution of the rotation periods, and a possible relation between CAI abundance and albedos determined by WISE. We tentatively discuss a possible scenario justifying the different observed features.

  18. MUTAGENICITY OF COMBUSTION EMISSIONS FROM A BIOMEDICAL WASTER INCINERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ames Salmonella typhimurium (TA98) assay was used to determine the mutagenicity of stack fly ash from a medical/pathological waste incinerator. tack fly ash also collected from a boiler plant adjacent to the incinerator and ambient air particles (upwind and downwind of the in...

  19. HAZARDOUS MATERIAL INCINERATOR DESIGN CRITERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report surveys commercial incineration facilities; characterizes four major types of incinerators - liquid injection, fluidized bed, rotary kiln and multiple hearth; and discusses how thermochemical properties of wastes affect their incineration and how application of thermo...

  20. Titanium Isotopes in CAIs -- Heterogeneities in the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Schönbächler, M.; Halliday, A. N.

    2009-03-01

    We present Ti isotope data for CAIs from Allende and Efremovka. The new data demonstrate that n-rich isotopes, e.g., 50Ti, 62Ni, and 96Zr, are correlated in CAIs and that the n-rich addition was heteogeneously distributed in the early solar system.

  1. E-CAI: a novel server to estimate an expected value of Codon Adaptation Index (eCAI)

    PubMed Central

    Puigbò, Pere; Bravo, Ignacio G; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago

    2008-01-01

    Background The Codon Adaptation Index (CAI) is a measure of the synonymous codon usage bias for a DNA or RNA sequence. It quantifies the similarity between the synonymous codon usage of a gene and the synonymous codon frequency of a reference set. Extreme values in the nucleotide or in the amino acid composition have a large impact on differential preference for synonymous codons. It is thence essential to define the limits for the expected value of CAI on the basis of sequence composition in order to properly interpret the CAI and provide statistical support to CAI analyses. Though several freely available programs calculate the CAI for a given DNA sequence, none of them corrects for compositional biases or provides confidence intervals for CAI values. Results The E-CAI server, available at , is a web-application that calculates an expected value of CAI for a set of query sequences by generating random sequences with G+C and amino acid content similar to those of the input. An executable file, a tutorial, a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section and several examples are also available. To exemplify the use of the E-CAI server, we have analysed the codon adaptation of human mitochondrial genes that codify a subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (excluding those genes that lack a prokaryotic orthologue) and are encoded in the nuclear genome. It is assumed that these genes were transferred from the proto-mitochondrial to the nuclear genome and that its codon usage was then ameliorated. Conclusion The E-CAI server provides a direct threshold value for discerning whether the differences in CAI are statistically significant or whether they are merely artifacts that arise from internal biases in the G+C composition and/or amino acid composition of the query sequences. PMID:18230160

  2. Metamorphism of an Efremovka Type B CAI and Comparison with Other Settings of Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, T. J.; Aragane, H.; Enokido, Y.; Brearley, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    Primary minerals in a type B CAI from Efremovka are partially altered to feldspathoids, Fe-spinel and secondary anorthite. The extent of recrystallization is not as great as in typical Allende CAIs, but metamorphism has affected Efremovka CAIs.

  3. Shredder and incinerator technology for treatment of commercial transuranic wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Oma, K.H.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Ross, W.A.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes the selection and evaluation of process equipment to accomplish the shredding and incineration of commercial TRU wastes. The primary conclusions derived from this study are: Shredding and incineration technology appears effective for converting simulated commercial TRU wastes to a noncombustible form. The gas-heated controlled-air incinerator received the highest technical ranking. On a scale of 1 to 10, the incinerator had a Figure-of-Merit (FOM) number of 7.0. This compares to an FOM of 6.1 for the electrically heated controlled-air incinerator and an FOM of 5.8 for the rotary kiln incienrator. The present worth costs of the incineration processes for a postulated commercial reprocessing plant were lowest for the electrically heated and gas-heated controlled-air incinerators with costs of $16.3 M and $16.9 M, respectively (1985 dollars). Due to higher capital and operating costs, the rotary kiln process had a present worth cost of $20.8 M. The recommended process from the three evaluated for the commercial TRU waste application is the gas-heated controlled-air incinerator with a single stage of shredding for feed pretreatment. This process had the best cost-effectiveness ratio of 1.0 (normalized). The electrically heated controller-air incinerator had a rating of 1.2 and the rotary kiln rated a 1.5. Most of the simulated wastes were easily processed by the low-speed shredders evaluated. The HEPA filters proved difficult to process, however. Wood-framed HEPA filters tended to ride on the cutter wheels and spacers without being gripped and shredded. The metal-framed HEPA filters and other difficult to shred items caused the shredders to periodically reach the torque limit and go into an automatic reversal cycle; however, the filters were eventually processed by the units. All three incinerators were ineffective for oxidizing the aluminum metal used as spacers in HEPA filters.

  4. KEPONE INCINERATION TEST PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Kepone Incineration Test (KIT) program was undertaken to evaluate incineration as a method of destroying Kepone and Kepone-containing materials and to determine the range of operating variables required for complete destruction. The program was divided into two phases: (a) ex...

  5. INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cincinnati-based Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, ORD, U.S. EPA operates the Incineration Research Facility *IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. This facility's pilot-scale experimental incineration systems include a Rotary Kiln System and a Liquid Injection System. Each syste...

  6. MONITORING OF INCINERATOR EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring of Incinerator Emissions is a chapter to be included in a book entitled Hazardous Waste Incineration, edited by A. Sarofim and D. Pershing, and published by John Wiley and Sons. he chapter describes stack sampling and analysis procedures in use on hazardous waste incin...

  7. THE INCINERATION RESEARCH FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Cincinnati-based Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. EPA operates the Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas. his facility's pilot-scale experimental incineration systems include a Rotary Kiln System and a Liqui...

  8. 40 CFR 63.1219 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... either a waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system, either: (A) Emissions in excess of 0.20... oxygen, for incinerators not equipped with either a waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system... incinerators equipped with either a waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system; or (ii) Dioxins...

  9. 40 CFR 63.1219 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system, either: (A) Emissions in excess of 0.20 ng TEQ..., for incinerators not equipped with either a waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system... incinerators equipped with either a waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system; or (ii) Dioxins...

  10. 40 CFR 63.1219 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system, either: (A) Emissions in excess of 0.20 ng TEQ..., for incinerators not equipped with either a waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system... incinerators equipped with either a waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system; or (ii) Dioxins...

  11. 40 CFR 63.1219 - What are the replacement standards for hazardous waste incinerators?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system, either: (A) Emissions in excess of 0.20 ng TEQ..., for incinerators not equipped with either a waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system... incinerators equipped with either a waste heat boiler or dry air pollution control system; or (ii) Dioxins...

  12. Risks of municipal solid waste incineration: an environmental perspective.

    PubMed

    Denison, R A; Silbergeld, E K

    1988-09-01

    The central focus of the debate over incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) has shifted from its apparent management advantages to unresolved risk issues. This shift is a result of the lack of comprehensive consideration of risks associated with incineration. We discuss the need to expand incinerator risk assessment beyond the limited view of incinerators as stationary air pollution sources to encompass the following: other products of incineration, ash in particular, and pollutants other than dioxins, metals in particular; routes of exposure in addition to direct inhalation; health effects in addition to cancer; and the cumulative nature of exposure and health effects induced by many incinerator-associated pollutants. Rational MSW management planning requires that the limitations as well as advantages of incineration be recognized. Incineration is a waste-processing--not a waste disposal--technology, and its products pose substantial management and disposal problems of their own. Consideration of the nature of these products suggests that incineration is ill-suited to manage the municipal wastestream in its entirety. In particular, incineration greatly enhances the mobility and bioavailability of toxic metals present in MSW. These factors suggest that incineration must be viewed as only one component in an integrated MSW management system. The potential for source reduction, separation, and recycling to increase the safety and efficiency of incineration should be counted among their many benefits. Risk considerations dictate that alternatives to the use of toxic metals at the production stage also be examined in designing an effective, long-term MSW management strategy. PMID:3201012

  13. Assessment of combustion products of medical waste incinerators in Alexandria.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Adel M; Labib, Ossama A; Mohamed, Mona G; El-Shall, Waffaa I; Hussein, Ahmed H

    2005-01-01

    The emissions and ashes from medical waste incinerators might perform a threat to the environment and the public health. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the emissions and ashes of six medical wastes incinerators in six hospitals in Alexandria. Five air pollutants were sampled and analyzed in the emissions comprising smoke, lead, carbon monoxide, sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide . Ash samples were analyzed for bacterial count, volatile substances, lead and cadmium. Shape and color of ash were observed visually. The results of the present study have revealed that all the average values of gases in the six incinerators were within the limits stated in Egyptian environmental law, where as carbonaceous particulate (smoke) averages of the six incinerators have exceeded the maximum allowable limit in the law. On the other hand, lead concentration in emissions were far below the maximum allowable limit in the law. Incinerator No 6 emissions have been significantly higher in CO, NO2, SO2 and smoke concentration than the other five incinerators P<0.001, P<0.0006, P<0.0001, and P<0.002 respectively. There was no significant variation in bacterial count of ash samples at 20 degrees C and 37 degrees C between the six studied incinerators. Volatile substance percentage of ash samples in the six incinerators were much higher than the recommended percentage. There was a highly significant variation between the six incinerators (p<0.005). Lead and cadmium concentrations in ash samples were much higher than those in developed countries, meanwhile, more or less as those in developing countries. It is recommended to state specific realistic emissions limits for medical waste incinerators and to substitute sporadic incinerators in hospitals by two central incinerators in proper places outside the city. PMID:16900616

  14. FIELD EXPERIENCE IN SAMPLING HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper is for presentation at the 77th annual meeting of the Air Pollution Control Association, June 24-29, 1984. The paper contains much useful, pragmatic information gained through numerous hazardous waste incinerator trial burn-type investigations performed for EPA by the ...

  15. Creation and Distribution of CAIs in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Davis, S. S.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    CaAl rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found at 1 - 10% mass fraction in primitive chondrites appear to be several million years older than the dominant (chondrule) components in the same parent bodies. A prevalent concern is that it is difficult to retain CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We assess a hot inner (turbulent) nebula context for CAI formation, using analytical models of nebula evolution and particle diffusion. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for times of 1 - 3 x 10(exp 6) years. To match the CAI abundances quantitatively, we advocate an enhancement of the inner hot nebula in silicate-forming material, due to rapid inward migration of very primitive, silicate and carbon rich, meter-sized objects. 'Combustion' of the carbon into CO would make the CAI formation environment more reduced than solar, as certain observations imply. Abundant CO might also play a role in mass-independent chemical fractionation of oxygen isotopes as seen in CAIs and associated primitive, high-temperature condensates.

  16. New Titanium Isotope Data for Allende and Efremovka CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, Ingo; Schönbächler, Maria; Krähenbühl, Urs; Halliday, Alex N.

    2009-09-01

    We measured the titanium (Ti) isotope composition, i.e., 50Ti/47Ti, 48Ti/47Ti, and 46Ti/47Ti, in five calcium-rich-aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) from the oxidized CV3 chondrite Allende and in two CAIs from the reduced CV3 chondrite Efremovka. Our data indicate that CAIs are enriched in 50Ti/47Ti and 46Ti/47Ti and are slightly depleted in 48Ti/47Ti compared to normal Ti defined by ordinary chondrites, eucrites, ureilites, mesosiderites, Earth, Moon, and Mars. Some CAIs have an additional 50Ti excess of ~8ɛ relative to bulk carbonaceous chondrites, which are enriched in 50Ti by ~2ɛ relative to terrestrial values, leading to a total excess of ~10ɛ. This additional 50Ti excess is correlated with nucleosynthetic anomalies found in 62Ni and 96Zr, all indicating an origin from a neutron-rich stellar source. Bulk carbonaceous chondrites show a similar trend, however, the extent of the anomalies is either less than or similar to the smallest anomalies seen in CAIs. Mass balance calculations suggest that bulk Allende Ti possibly consists of a mixture of at least two Ti components, anomalous Ti located in CAIs and a normal component possibly for matrix and chondrules. This argues for a heterogeneous distribution of Ti isotopes in the solar system. The finding that anomalous Ti is concentrated in CAIs suggests that CAIs formed in a specific region of the solar system and were, after their formation, not homogeneously redistributed within the solar system. Combining the CAI data with improved model predictions for early solar system irradiation effects indicates that a local production scenario for the relatively short lived radionuclides can be excluded, because the production of, e.g., 10Be, 26Al, and 41Ca, would result in a significant collateral shift in Ti isotopes, which is not seen in the measured data.

  17. Nuclear waste incineration technology status

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, D.L.; Lehmkuhl, G.D.; Meile, L.J.

    1981-07-15

    The incinerators developed and/or used for radioactive waste combustion are discussed and suggestions are made for uses of incineration in radioactive waste management programs and for incinerators best suited for specific applications. Information on the amounts and types of radioactive wastes are included to indicate the scope of combustible wastes being generated and in existence. An analysis of recently developed radwaste incinerators is given to help those interested in choosing incinerators for specific applications. Operating information on US and foreign incinerators is also included to provide additional background information. Development needs are identified for extending incinerator applications and for establishing commercial acceptance.

  18. Hazardous and radioactive waste incineration studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vavruska, J. S.; Stretz, L. A.; Borduin, L. C.

    Development and demonstration of a transuranic (TRU) waste volume-reduction process is described. A production-scale controlled air incinerator using commercially available equipment and technology was modified for solid radioactive waste service. This unit successfully demonstrated the volume reduction of transuranic (TRU) waste with an average TRU content of about 20 nCi/g. The same incinerator and offgas treatment system is being modified further to evaluate the destruction of hazardous liquid wastes such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hazardous solid wastes such as pentachlorophenol (PCP)-treated wood.

  19. Astrophysics of CAI formation as revealed by silicon isotope LA-MC-ICPMS of an igneous CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Young, Edward D.

    2007-05-01

    Silicon isotope ratios of a typical CAI from the Leoville carbonaceous chondrite, obtained in situ by laser ablation MC-ICPMS, together with existing 25Mg/ 24Mg data, reveal a detailed picture of the astrophysical setting of CAI melting and subsequent heating. Models for the chemical and isotopic effects of evaporation of the molten CAI are used to produce a univariant relationship between PH 2 and time during melting. The result shows that this CAI was molten for a cumulative time of no more than 70 days and probably less than 15 days depending on temperature. The object could have been molten for an integrated time of just a few hours if isotope ratio zoning was eliminated after melting by high subsolidus temperatures (e.g., > 1300 K) for ˜ 500 yr. In all cases subsolidus heating sufficient to produce diffusion-limited isotope fractionation at the margin of the solidified CAI is required. These stable isotope data point to a two-stage history for this igneous CAI involving melting for a cumulative timescale of hours to months followed by subsolidus heating for years to hundreds of years. The thermobarometric history deduced from combining Si and Mg isotope ratio data implicates thermal processing in the disk, perhaps by passage through shockwaves, following melting. This study underscores the direct link between the meaning of stable isotope ratio zoning, or lack thereof, and the inferred astrophysical setting of melting and subsequent processing of CAIs.

  20. A CAI in the Ivuna CI1 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David R.; Zolensky, M.; Martinez, J.; Mikouchi, T.; Ohsumi, K.; Hagiya, K.; Satake, W.; Le, L.; Ross, D.; Peslier, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have recently discovered the first well-preserved calcium aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) in a CI1 chondrite (Ivuna). Previously, all CI1 chondrites were thought to be devoid of preserved CAI and chondrules due to the near total aqueous alteration to which their parent body (bodies) have been subjected. The CAI is roughly spherical, but with a slight teardrop geometry and a maximum diameter of 170 microns (fig. 1). It lacks any Wark-Lovering Rim. Incipient aqueous alteration, and probably shock, have rendered large portions of the CAI poorly crystalline. It is extremely fine-grained, with only a few grains exceeding 10 microns. We have performed electron microprobe analyses (EPMA), FEG-SEM imaging and element mapping, as well as electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) in order to determine the fundamental characteristics of this apparently unique object.

  1. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Robert C. W.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluidtight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC (about 1" WC) higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes.

  2. Apparatus for incinerating hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Chang, R.C.W.

    1994-12-20

    An apparatus is described for incinerating wastes, including an incinerator having a combustion chamber, a fluid-tight shell enclosing the combustion chamber, an afterburner, an off-gas particulate removal system and an emergency off-gas cooling system. The region between the inner surface of the shell and the outer surface of the combustion chamber forms a cavity. Air is supplied to the cavity and heated as it passes over the outer surface of the combustion chamber. Heated air is drawn from the cavity and mixed with fuel for input into the combustion chamber. The pressure in the cavity is maintained at least approximately 2.5 cm WC higher than the pressure in the combustion chamber. Gases cannot leak from the combustion chamber since the pressure outside the chamber (inside the cavity) is higher than the pressure inside the chamber. The apparatus can be used to treat any combustible wastes, including biological wastes, toxic materials, low level radioactive wastes, and mixed hazardous and low level transuranic wastes. 1 figure.

  3. Carbon monoxide formation and emissions during waste incineration in a grate-circulating fluidized bed incinerator.

    PubMed

    Yanguo Zhang; Qinghai Li; Aihong Meng; Changhe Chen

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of carbon monoxide (CO) formation and emissions in both grate drying bed incinerators and circulating fluidized bed (CFB) incinerators to simulate the two key parts of a combined grate and circulating fluidized bed (grate-CFB) incinerator in order to investigate pollutant emission control in municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion that occurs in a grate-CFB incinerator utilizing a patented technology. Polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene, kitchen waste, paper, textile, etc. were chosen to simulate the MSW. The effects of temperature, air staging, and moisture on the CO formation and emissions were analysed for both the grate drying bed combustion and the CFB combustion. In the grate drying bed, the low temperatures increased the carbon to CO conversion rate which also increased slightly with the moisture content. Industrial field tests in a commercial grate-CFB incinerator showed that the CO concentration at the grate drying bed exit was very high and decreased along furnace height. The carbon to CO conversion rates were 0-20% for the grate drying bed which exceeded the range of 0.8-16% measured in a grate drying bed exit of the commercial grate-CFB incinerator tests. In the commercial grate-CFB incinerator tests, at excess air ratios ranging from 1.5-2.0 or more, the CO emissions decreased to a low and stable level, whose corresponding carbon to CO conversion rates were far lower than 0-10%. The low CO emission is one of the factors enabling the polychlorinated dibenzodioxin/polychlorinated dibenzofuran emissions to satisfy the Chinese national regulations. PMID:20421246

  4. Incineration studies. October 1985-September 1988 (Citations from the Compendex data base). Report for October 1985-September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning incineration of municipal, industrial, agricultural, and shipboard wastes. Topics include incinerator design, air pollution control, materials and heat recovery, pyrolysis incineration, and economic evaluations. Some attention is given to waste-to-energy operations. (This updated bibliography contains 200 citations, 40 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  5. Electrochemical incineration of wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bockris, J. O. M.; Bhardwaj, R. C.; Tennakoon, C. L. K.

    1993-01-01

    There is an increasing concern regarding the disposal of human wastes in space vehicles. It is of utmost importance to convert such wastes into harmless products which can be recycled into an Environmental Life Support System (CELSS), which incorporates the growth of plants (e.g. wheat) and algae to supplement the diet of the astronauts. Chemical treatments have proven relatively unsatisfactory and tend to be increasingly so with increase of the mission duration. Similarly, the use of heat to destroy wastes and convert them to CO2 by the use of air or oxygen has the disadvantage and difficulty of dissipating heat in a space environment and to the inevitable presence of oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide in the effluent gases. In particular, electrochemical techniques offer several advantages including low temperatures which may be used and the absence of any NO and CO in the evolved gases. Successful research has been carried out in the electrochemical oxidation of wastes over the last several years. The major task for 1992 was to conduct parametric studies in preparation for the building of a breadboard system, i.e., an actual practical device to consume the daily waste output of one astronaut in 24 hours, electrochemical incineration of human wastes in space vehicles. One of the main objectives was to decide on the type of three dimensional or other electrode system that would suit this purpose. The various types of electrode systems which were considered for this purpose included: rotating disc electrode, micro-electrode (an array), vibrating electrode, jet electrode, and packed bed electrode.

  6. Summary of DOE Incineration Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, M.

    1998-07-01

    This document summarizes and compares operating capacities, waste acceptance criteria, and permits pertaining to the U.S. Department of Energy's three mixed waste incinerators. The information will assist Department evaluation of the incinerators.

  7. NEW TITANIUM ISOTOPE DATA FOR ALLENDE AND EFREMOVKA CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Leya, Ingo; Schoenbaechler, Maria; Kraehenbuehl, Urs; Halliday, Alex N.

    2009-09-10

    We measured the titanium (Ti) isotope composition, i.e., {sup 50}Ti/{sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Ti/{sup 47}Ti, and {sup 46}Ti/{sup 47}Ti, in five calcium-rich-aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) from the oxidized CV3 chondrite Allende and in two CAIs from the reduced CV3 chondrite Efremovka. Our data indicate that CAIs are enriched in {sup 50}Ti/{sup 47}Ti and {sup 46}Ti/{sup 47}Ti and are slightly depleted in {sup 48}Ti/{sup 47}Ti compared to normal Ti defined by ordinary chondrites, eucrites, ureilites, mesosiderites, Earth, Moon, and Mars. Some CAIs have an additional {sup 50}Ti excess of {approx}8{epsilon} relative to bulk carbonaceous chondrites, which are enriched in {sup 50}Ti by {approx}2{epsilon} relative to terrestrial values, leading to a total excess of {approx}10{epsilon}. This additional {sup 50}Ti excess is correlated with nucleosynthetic anomalies found in {sup 62}Ni and {sup 96}Zr, all indicating an origin from a neutron-rich stellar source. Bulk carbonaceous chondrites show a similar trend, however, the extent of the anomalies is either less than or similar to the smallest anomalies seen in CAIs. Mass balance calculations suggest that bulk Allende Ti possibly consists of a mixture of at least two Ti components, anomalous Ti located in CAIs and a normal component possibly for matrix and chondrules. This argues for a heterogeneous distribution of Ti isotopes in the solar system. The finding that anomalous Ti is concentrated in CAIs suggests that CAIs formed in a specific region of the solar system and were, after their formation, not homogeneously redistributed within the solar system. Combining the CAI data with improved model predictions for early solar system irradiation effects indicates that a local production scenario for the relatively short lived radionuclides can be excluded, because the production of, e.g., {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 41}Ca, would result in a significant collateral shift in Ti isotopes, which is not seen in the

  8. Electrochemical Membrane Incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Dennis C.; Houk, Linda L.; Feng, Jianren

    1998-12-08

    Electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone was evaluated as a model for the mineralization of carbon in toxic aromatic compounds. A Ti or Pt anode was coated with a film of the oxides of Ti, Ru, Sn and Sb. This quaternary metal oxide film was stable; elemental analysis of the electrolyzed solution indicated the concentration of these metal ions to be 3 {micro}g/L or less. The anode showed good reactivity for the electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone. The use of a dissolved salt matrix as the so-called ''supporting electrolyte'' was eliminated in favor of a solid-state electrolyte sandwiched between the anode and cathode.

  9. Electrochemical membrane incinerator

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Dennis C.; Houk, Linda L.; Feng, Jianren

    2001-03-20

    Electrochemical incineration of p-benzoquinone was evaluated as a model for the mineralization of carbon in toxic aromatic compounds. A Ti or Pt anode was coated with a film of the oxides of Ti, Ru, Sn and Sb. This quaternary metal oxide film was stable; elemental analysis of the electrolyzed solution indicated the concentration of these metal ions to be 3 .mu.g/L or less. The anode showed good reactivity for the electrochemical incineration of benzoquinone. The use of a dissolved salt matrix as the so-called "supporting electrolyte" was eliminated in favor of a solid-state electrolyte sandwiched between the anode and cathode.

  10. Court upholds lawsuit on incinerator hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    In the opinion of many environmentalists in Michigan, the world's largest municipal trash burner, Detroit's 4000 tpd facility is oversized, was built without serious consideration of recycling, emits unacceptable levels of toxic air pollutants, and lacks a plan for proper handling of ash. For those reasons, the Environmental Defense Fund sued Detroit in 1987 after the city ignored its written warnings about handling incinerator ash. The suit sought stricter air pollution controls, proper ash disposal, a smaller facility and serious focus on recycling. Recently, in a 2 to 1 decision, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit reinstated the EDF suit that had been dismissed by a lower court. The two-year effort to protect public health and the environment from hazards at the Detroit Incinerator has been upheld.

  11. Compact, closed-loop controlled waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schadow, K.C.; Seeker, W.R.

    1999-07-01

    Technologies for solid and liquid waste destruction in compact incinerators are being developed in collaboration between industry, universities, and a Government laboratory. This paper reviews progress on one technology, namely active combustion control to achieve efficient and controlled afterburning of air-starved reaction products. This technology which uses synchronized waste gas injection into acoustically stabilized air vortices was transitioned to a simplified afterburner design and practical operational conditions. The full-scale, simplified afterburner, which achieved CO and NO{sub x} emissions of about 30 ppm with a residence time of less than 50 msec, was integrated with a commercially available marine incinerator to increase throughput and reduce emissions. Closed-loop active control with diode laser sensors and novel control strategies was demonstrated on a sub-scale afterburner.

  12. PERMITTING HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication is a compilation of information presented at a seminar series designed to address the issues that affect the issuance of hazardous waste incineration permits and to improve the overall understanding of trial burn testing. pecifically, the document provides guidan...

  13. Nanomaterial disposal by incineration

    EPA Science Inventory

    As nanotechnology-based products enter into widespread use, nanomaterials will end up in disposal waste streams that are ultimately discharged to the environment. One possible end-of-life scenario is incineration. This review attempts to ascertain the potential pathways by which ...

  14. Incineration of hazardous wastes.

    PubMed

    Gannon, T; Ansbro, A R; Burns, R P

    1991-10-01

    Glaxo has practiced incineration of liquid and gaseous wastes for over twenty years and currently operate eleven liquid and gas incinerators in the United Kingdom and Singapore. The liquid incinerators burn, as their main streams, those solvents that cannot be recovered and recycled within the processes. The early installations were for readily combustible solvents only. However, there has been a progressive move into the destruction of more difficult and hazardous wastes, with the consequential requirements for more sophisticated technology, in the belief that the responsible destruction of waste should be tackled near to its source. The eventual aim is to be self-sufficient in this area of waste management. The incineration of hazardous liquid and gaseous waste has presented a series of design, operational and monitoring problems into account which have all been successfully overcome. The solutions take into account the environmental consequences of the operations from both liquid and gaseous emissions. In order to ensure minimal environmental impact and safe operation the best practicable technology is employed. Environmental assessment forms part of the process development and permitting procedures. PMID:24233930

  15. Use of Selected Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) in Health Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehler, David L.

    A pilot project examined the effectiveness of computer assisted instruction (CAI) in teaching selected concepts of health and fitness: coronary risk, lifestyle, and nutrition as related to weight control. A convenience sample of 58 students from two Concepts of Health and Fitness classes were randomly assigned to two groups, both of which used…

  16. Effects of Logo and CAI Environments on Cognition and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.

    1986-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of learning logo computer programing and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on specific cognitive skills, metacognitive skills, creativity, and achievement. The programing group scored significantly higher on measures of operational competence, two of three measures of metacognitive skills, and a measure of…

  17. MONIFORMS as Authoring Aids for the PLATO IV CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Russel E.

    An analysis of portions of the HumRRO (Human Resources Research Organization) developed computer-assisted instruction (CAI) course in COBOL programing, and a survey of representatives from Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) PLATO IV installations indicated a need for authoring aids that could be prepared and programed easily and quickly. The…

  18. Introductory CAI Dialogue in Differential Calculus for Freshman Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, C. S.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A project on computer based dialogue for freshmen is described and evaluated. The dialogue utilizes a CAI language written in Fortran that allows a designer to easily write and edit questions at his own desk without the use of a terminal. (Author/DT)

  19. An Intelligent CAI Monitor and Generative Tutor. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koffman, Elliot B.; And Others

    Design techniques for generative computer-assisted-instructional (CAI) systems are described in this report. These are systems capable of generating problems for students and of deriving and monitoring solutions; problem difficulty, instructional pace, and depth of monitoring are all individually tailored and parts of the solution algorithms can…

  20. CAI for the Developmentally Handicapped: Nine Years of Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallworth, H. J.; Brebner, Ann

    Initiated nine years ago by the University of Calgary Faculty of Education Computer Applications Unit in cooperation with the nearby Vocational and Rehabilitation Research Institute (VRRI), this project uses computer assisted instruction (CAI) to teach social and vocational skills to developmentally handicapped young adults, many of whom also have…

  1. 3M corporate incinerator environmental monitoring study and risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.B.; Elnabarawy, M.T.; Pilney, J.

    1998-12-31

    A one-year multi-media environmental monitoring study was performed around the 3M Cottage Grove Facility. Particulate metals from the 3M Corporate hazardous waste incinerator were the focus of the study. Two environmental media were of primary interest: area soil sampling was conducted to investigate the impact of past incinerator emissions on the environment, and ambient air monitoring was conducted to address current impacts. Over 180 soil samples were taken from both agricultural and forested land in the vicinity of the Facility. More than 25 chemical parameters were then quantified in the samples. The potential impacts of past emissions from the incinerator were assessed by comparing chemical concentrations from locations where incinerator impacts were expected to be greatest (based on air dispersion modeling) to chemical concentrations in matched samples from sites expected to be least impacted. The ambient air monitoring network consisted of six stations. Source-receptor modeling was used to determine the most likely contribution of the incinerator and six additional major area sources for the air monitoring (i.e. filter) data at each station. The model provided a best-fit analysis regarding the likely contributions of each source to the sample results. The results of these evaluations lead to the conclusion that the current emissions from this Facility do not present an unacceptable risk to human health.

  2. Distribution and Origin of 36Cl In Allende CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Matzel, J P; Jacobsen, B; Hutcheon, I D; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Yin, Q; Ramon, E C; Weber, P; Wasserburg, G J

    2009-12-11

    The abundance of short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in early solar system materials provide key information about their nucleosynthetic origin and can constrain the timing of early solar system events. Excesses of {sup 36}S ({sup 36}S*) correlated with {sup 35}Cl/{sup 34}S ratios provide direct evidence for in situ decay of {sup 36}Cl ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 0.3 Ma) and have been reported in sodalite (Na{sub 8}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24}Cl{sub 2}) and wadalite (Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 5}Si{sub 2}O{sub 16}Cl{sub 3}) in CAIs and chondrules from the Allende and Ningqiang CV carbonaceous chondrites. While previous studies demonstrate unequivocally that {sup 36}Cl was extant in the early solar system, no consensus on the origin or initial abundance of {sup 36}Cl has emerged. Understanding the origin of {sup 36}Cl, as well as the reported variation in the initial {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio, requires addressing when, where and how chlorine was incorporated into CAIs and chondrules. These factors are key to distinguishing between stellar nucleosynthesis or energetic particle irradiation for the origin of {sup 36}Cl. Wadalite is a chlorine-rich secondary mineral with structural and chemical affinities to grossular. The high chlorine ({approx}12 wt%) and very low sulfur content (<<0.01 wt%) make wadalite ideal for studies of the {sup 36}Cl-{sup 36}S system. Wadalite is present in Allende CAIs exclusively in the interior regions either in veins crosscutting melilite or in zones between melilite and anorthite associated with intergrowths of grossular, monticellite, and wollastonite. Wadalite and sodalite most likely resulted from open-system alteration of primary minerals with a chlorine-rich fluid phase. We recently reported large {sup 36}S* correlated with {sup 35}Cl/{sup 34}S in wadalite in Allende Type B CAI AJEF, yielding a ({sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl){sub 0} ratio of (1.7 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -5}. This value is the highest reported {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio and is {approx}5 times

  3. Effectiveness of CAI Package on Achievement in Physics of IX Standard Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheswari, I. Uma; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2015-01-01

    The present study is an experimental one in nature, to find out the effectiveness of CAI package on in Physics of IX std. students. For this purpose a CAI package was developed and validated. The validated CAI package formed an independent variable of this study. The dependent variable is students' achievements in physics content. In order to find…

  4. Harvard University Computer-Aided Instruction (CAI) Laboratory. Technical Report Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolurow, Lawrence M.; Peterson, Theodore I.

    This report is a detailed description of the Harvard CAI Laboratory, including its history, organization, functions, staffing, programs and support. Discussed are materials relating to CAI in general, such as psychological research, modes of instruction, advantages and implementation of CAI. Reviewed also are specific projects of this facility. A…

  5. Hazardous materials incineration system

    SciTech Connect

    Hladun, K.W.

    1982-03-23

    A hazardous materials incineration system is disclosed which includes a solid waste combustor of the inclined, oscillating or rocking type and a liquid waste combustor suitable to incinerate wastes in liquid form. The combustion products from both the solid waste combustor and the liquid waste combustor are fed to an afterburner which is equipped with burners to maintain elevated temperatures throughout the length of the afterburner chamber. The products of combustion exit the afterburner into a conditioning unit which eliminates larger particulate matter, cools the combustion products and releases certain additives into the moving gas stream prior to entry into a baghouse. All neutralized salts are withdrawn at the baghouse and the gaseous baghouse effluent is directed to a further aqueous liquor contact apparatus prior to exhausting to atmosphere through a forced draft stack system.

  6. AT-SEA INCINERATION OF HERBICIDE ORANGE ONBOARD THE M/T VULCANUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the at-sea incineration of three shiploads (approximately 10,400 metric tons) of U.S. Air Force-owned Herbicide Orange onboard the incinerator ship M/T Vulcanus, within an EPA-designated Pacific Ocean burn zone, west of Johnston Atoll. The first shipload, tra...

  7. STATUS OF U.S. EPA'S (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S) SLUDGE INCINERATOR REGULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a potential regulatory approach that the U.S. EPA could use for controlling sewage sludge incinerators. The approach utilizes a most exposed individual risk assessment to ensure that sludge incineration air emissions will not cause an unacceptable health risk...

  8. Solvent vapors controlled by pre-concentration, incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Concentration of solvent vapors in ventilation air exhausted from the workplace often is too dilute for efficient destruction or recovery. Several techniques are being developed to pre-concentrate the vapors before treating them in a catalytic incinerator. Molnbacka Industri AB (Forshaga, Sweden) has developed a system to control volatile organic compound emissions by using activated carbon adsorbers to pre-concentrate the solvent vapors. The technology uses carbon adsorption and desorption to concentrate dilute solvent vapors to a much smaller air stream for efficient destruction in a catalytic incinerator.

  9. Analysis of incinerator performance and metal emissions from recent trial and test burns

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Lee, H.T.; Kuo, T.H.

    1994-12-31

    Recent trial- and test-burn data from five rotary kiln incinerator facilities were analyzed for combustion performance and metal emissions. The incinerator facilities examined included: DuPont`s Gulf Coast Regional Waste Incinerator in Orange, Texas; Chemical Waste Management`s Incinerator in Port Arthur, Texas; Rollins Environmental Service`s Incinerator in Deer Park, Texas; Martin Marietta`s TSCA Incinerator in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and EPA`s Incineration Research Facility in Jefferson, Arkansas. The analysis involved the use of a PC-based computer program capable of performing material and energy balance calculations and predicting equilibrium compositions based on the minimization of system free energy. For each analysis, the feed data of waste and fuel and the corresponding operating parameters associated with incinerator and/or afterburner operation were input to the program and the program simulated the combustion performance under equilibrium conditions. In the analysis, the field-recorded performance data were compared with the simulated equilibrium results and the incinerator performance, including the quality of the field data, the combustion efficiency, the percent excess air, the heat loss, and the amount of air inleakage, was evaluated. In addition, the field-obtained metal data were analyzed for emission rate and metal balance. 13 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

  10. Alternatives to incineration: There's more than one way to remediate

    SciTech Connect

    Pellerin, C.

    1994-10-01

    Hazardous waste is everywhere. It comes from paints, motor oil, hair spray, household cleaners, automotive chemicals, and all kinds of toxic medical, industrial and military products. Most industrial processes - from which come cosmetics and pharmaceuticals, computers and garden pesticides - generate wastes that the EPA, acting under the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA), says can harm human health or the environment if not properly managed. As a waste-disposal technology, incineration has been around for about 500,000 years - an interesting spinoff of that timely Homo erectus discovery, fire. For millennia, incineration looked like a pretty good way to turn big piles of hazardous waste into air emissions, smaller piles of ash, and sometimes energy. And it's still a good idea. The EPA, for one, calls high-temperature incineration the best available technology for disposing of most hazardous waste. But incineration has drawbacks. When hazardous waste goes into an incinerator, it comes out as potentially harmful air emissions, although these emissions are strictly controlled, and ash ash that's treated to meet EPA standards and then disposed of in an authorized landfill. It doesn't just vanish into thin air.

  11. Dewatering and incinerating wastewater solids

    SciTech Connect

    Shamat, N.; Hart, J.

    1992-10-01

    The solids processing and incineration-energy recovery system at the Metropolitan Waste Control Commission (MWCC) wastewater treatment plant in St. Paul, Minn., is unique in the wastewater treatment field. The system consists of innovative processes including two types of solids dewatering devices-twin-roll filter presses and plate-and-frame diaphragm filter presses, and two new and four rehabilitated multiple-hearth incinerators. Four of the incinerators are equipped with energy recovery boilers, an economizer, heat wheels, and rotary solids dryers. The plant scum and the odorous gases generated from the thermal solids conditioning process are destroyed by combustion in the incinerators.

  12. Observations from a prototype implementation of the Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclimens, M.; Bowerman, R.; Howell, C.; Gill, H.; Hutchison, R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Common Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) Interface Set (CAIS), its purpose, and its history. The paper describes an internal research and development effort at the Mitre Corporation to implement a prototype version of the current CAIS specification and to rehost existing Ada software development tools onto the CAIS prototype. Based on this effort, observations are made on the maturity and functionality of the CAIS. These observations support the government's current policy of publicizing the CAIS specification as a baseline for public review in support of its evolution into a standard which can be mandated for use as Ada is today.

  13. Real-time analysis of incinerator emissions: The missing link

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, J.

    1994-11-01

    Incineration has long been, and continues to be, one of the most cost-effective technologies for disposing of the world's growing volume of municipal and hazardous waste. Yet anyone who has been involved in an attempt to site an incinerator in recent years knows the political nightmare this process has become. The public has become extremely suspicious of the health and environmental impact of incinerators, and not without reason. Incinerators have been known to release unacceptably high levels of toxic substances into the air, including dioxins, furans, and other pollutants. Worse, there are no monitoring devices that can continuously measure trace gases in incinerator emissions to allow operators to know exactly what substances are being released and allow for quick corrective action. To address the problems, several teams of university scientists are developing techniques for real-time emissions monitoring that may simultaneously allow industry to operate incinerators in the most efficient manner and assure the public that their health is being protected.

  14. CAIs in CO3 Meteorites: Parent Body or Nebular Alteration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, R. C.; Hutchison, R.; Huss, G. R.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    1992-07-01

    It is widely held that alteration of Ca Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in CV3 and CO3 meteorites occurred in the nebula (Hashimoto 1992). The CO3 chondrites, however, appear to define a metamorphic sequence dominated by parent body, and not nebular, metamorphic effects (Scott and Jones, 1990). To investigate the effects of metamorphism on CAIs we have studied inclusions from 4 CO chondrites: Colony (3.0), Felix (3.2), Lance (3.4), and Warrenton (3.6). In a section of Colony (74 mm^2) 81 CAIs, 30-870 micrometers long, comprise 52 nodular spinel-rich inclusions (fragments of Type-A CAI composed largely of spinel), 12 spinel-pyroxene inclusions, 10 melilite-rich inclusions, 2 hibonite-only inclusions, 2 CaAl4O7-bearing inclusions, and 3 spinel-pyroxene- olivine inclusions. Although a find, CAIs in Colony are relatively fresh, melilite in particular being little altered. In 79% of the spinel-bearing inclusions, spinel has <2wt% FeO, which otherwise ranges to 34.8%. Mg isotopic compositions were determined in 5 selected Colony inclusion; evidence of ^26Mg* from decay of ^26Al was found in 4 CAI. A hibonite-only inclusion has the largest ^26Mg* excess, delta^26Mg 32o/oo. Data show no evidence of isotopic disturbance and define a linear array with slope ^26Mg* /^27Al = (3.4+- 0.6) x 10^-5, like that obtained by Davis and Hinton (1986) in a hibonite-bearing spherule from Ornans. Despite Al/Mg ratios of up to 1500, CaAl4O7 in one inclusion shows no evidence of ^26Mg*; ^26Mg* < 4 x 10^-6. All three melilite-bearing inclusions from Colony C21 (angstrom k(sub)8.3-14.3), C56 (angstrom k(sub)10.5-16) and C62 (angstrom k(sub)15-21) show evidence of radiogenic ^26Mg*. Excess ^26Mg positively correlates with the Al/Mg ratios but the data do not define a unique initial value of ^26Al/^27Al. Data for melilite in C21, in particular, show evidence for disturbance of the Al-Mg system, as is common for Allende CAI (Podosek et al. 1991). Melilites in C56 in contrast show no evidence of

  15. The reduction of gas phase air toxics from combustion and incineration sources using the GE-Mitsui-BF activated coke process

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.G.; Tsuji, K.; Shiraishi, I.

    1998-07-01

    The dry desulfurization, denitrification and air toxics removal process using activated coke (AC) was originally researched and developed during the 1960's by Bergbau Forschung (BF), now called Deutsche Montan Technologies. Mitsui Mining Company (MMC) signed a licensing agreement with BF in 1982 to investigate, test and adapt the system to facilities in Japan. Japanese regulations are stricter than in the US toward SOx/NOx pollutants, as well as flyash emissions from the utility industry, oil refineries and other industries. This process is installed on four coal-fired boilers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracker (FCC) units. These plants were constructed by MMC in Japan and Uhde GmbH in Germany. General Electric Environmental Services, Inc. (GEESI) signed a license agreement in 1992 with MMC and Mitsui and Company, Ltd. Of Tokyo. Under this agreement, GEESI will market, design, fabricate and install the Mitsui-BF process for flue gas cleaning applications in North America. MMC also developed a technology to produce AC used in the dry DeSOx/DeNOx/Air Toxics removal process based on their own metallurgical coke manufacturing technology. This paper provides information on the details of MMC's AC used in the dry DeSOx/DeNOx/Air Toxics removal process and of the DeSOx/DeNOx/Air Toxics removal process itself.

  16. 41. BUILDINGS 2215, 2216, AND 2217, INCINERATORS. INCINERATORS AS MODIFIED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. BUILDINGS 2215, 2216, AND 2217, INCINERATORS. INCINERATORS AS MODIFIED WITH ENCLOSURES TO PREVENT GARBAGE FROM BEING BLOWN OFF THE PLATFORM WHEN UNLOADED, AND STEPS TO THE PLATFORM. Fort McCoy photograph, #57-13, October 1943. - Fort McCoy, Sparta, Monroe County, WI

  17. Replacement textures in CAI and implications regarding planetary metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeker, G. P.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Armstrong, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Formation by a secondary metamorphic event, rather than primary crystallization from a melt or a sequential nebular condensation, is indicated by textural and chemical features of five coarse grained, Ca- and Al-rich inclusions (CAI) from the Allende meteorite which contain embayed pyroxene surrounded by melilite. It is suggested that the most probable environment for a metamorphic process (requiring the addition of Ca derived from calcite or from the introduction of a fluid phase) is that of a small planetary body, rather than the solar nebula. These results are compatible with O isotopic heterogeneities within CAI, and offer a mechanism for the production of lower temperature alteration phases, together with the rim phases found in these inclusions.

  18. Oxygen Isotope Measurements of a Rare Murchison Type A CAI and Its Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, J. I.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Jacobsen, B.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) from CV chondrites commonly show oxygen isotope heterogeneity among different mineral phases within individual inclusions reflecting the complex history of CAIs in both the solar nebula and/or parent bodies. The degree of isotopic exchange is typically mineral-specific, yielding O-16-rich spinel, hibonite and pyroxene and O-16-depleted melilite and anorthite. Recent work demonstrated large and systematic variations in oxygen isotope composition within the margin and Wark-Lovering rim of an Allende Type A CAI. These variations suggest that some CV CAIs formed from several oxygen reservoirs and may reflect transport between distinct regions of the solar nebula or varying gas composition near the proto-Sun. Oxygen isotope compositions of CAIs from other, less-altered chondrites show less intra-CAI variability and 16O-rich compositions. The record of intra-CAI oxygen isotope variability in CM chondrites, which commonly show evidence for low-temperature aqueous alteration, is less clear, in part because the most common CAIs found in CM chondrites are mineralogically simple (hibonite +/- spinel or spinel +/- pyroxene) and are composed of minerals less susceptible to O-isotopic exchange. No measurements of the oxygen isotope compositions of rims on CAIs in CM chondrites have been reported. Here, we present oxygen isotope data from a rare, Type A CAI from the Murchison meteorite, MUM-1. The data were collected from melilite, hibonite, perovskite and spinel in a traverse into the interior of the CAI and from pyroxene, melilite, anorthite, and spinel in the Wark-Lovering rim. Our objectives were to (1) document any evidence for intra-CAI oxygen isotope variability; (2) determine the isotopic composition of the rim minerals and compare their composition(s) to the CAI interior; and (3) compare the MUM-1 data to oxygen isotope zoning profiles measured from CAIs in other chondrites.

  19. The reduction of gas phase air toxics from combustion and incineration sources using the GE-MITSUI-BE activated coke process

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    The dry desulfurization, denitrification and air toxics removal process using activated coke (AC) was originally researched and developed during the 1960s by Bergbau Forschung (BF), now called Deutsche Montan Technologies. Mitsui Mining Company (MMC) signed a licensing agreement with BF in 1982 to investigate, test and adapt the system to the facilities in Japan. Japanese regulations are stricter than in the U.S. toward SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} pollutants, as well as flyash emissions from the utility industry, oil refineries and other industries. This process is installed on flour coal-fired boilers and Fluidized Catalytic Cracker (FCC) units. These plants were constructed by MCC in Japan and Uhde GmbH in Germany. General Electric Environmental Systems, Inc. (GEESI) signed a license agreement in 1992 with MMC and Mitsui and Company, Ltd. of Tokyo. Under this agreement, GEESI will market, design, fabricate and install the Mitsui-BF press for flue gas cleaning applications in North America. MMC also developed a technology to produce AC used in the dry DeSO{sub x}/DeNO{sub x}/Air Toxics removal process based on their own metallurgical coke manufacturing technology. This paper provides information on the details of MMC`s AC used in the dry DeSO{sub x}/DeNO{sub x}/Air Toxics removal process.

  20. Mobility of organic carbon from incineration residues

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, Holger Svensson, Malin

    2008-07-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may affect the transport of pollutants from incineration residues when landfilled or used in geotechnical construction. The leaching of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) bottom ash and air pollution control residue (APC) from the incineration of waste wood was investigated. Factors affecting the mobility of DOC were studied in a reduced 2{sup 6-1} experimental design. Controlled factors were treatment with ultrasonic radiation, full carbonation (addition of CO{sub 2} until the pH was stable for 2.5 h), liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratio, pH, leaching temperature and time. Full carbonation, pH and the L/S ratio were the main factors controlling the mobility of DOC in the bottom ash. Approximately 60 weight-% of the total organic carbon (TOC) in the bottom ash was available for leaching in aqueous solutions. The L/S ratio and pH mainly controlled the mobilization of DOC from the APC residue. About 93 weight-% of TOC in the APC residue was, however, not mobilized at all, which might be due to a high content of elemental carbon. Using the European standard EN 13 137 for determination of total organic carbon (TOC) in MSWI residues is inappropriate. The results might be biased due to elemental carbon. It is recommended to develop a TOC method distinguishing between organic and elemental carbon.

  1. Numerical Investigation Into Effect of Fuel Injection Timing on CAI/HCCI Combustion in a Four-Stroke GDI Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Li; Zhao, Hua; Jiang, Xi; Kalian, Navin

    2006-02-01

    The Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) combustion, also known as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), was achieved by trapping residuals with early exhaust valve closure in conjunction with direct injection. Multi-cycle 3D engine simulations have been carried out for parametric study on four different injection timings in order to better understand the effects of injection timings on in-cylinder mixing and CAI combustion. The full engine cycle simulation including complete gas exchange and combustion processes was carried out over several cycles in order to obtain the stable cycle for analysis. The combustion models used in the present study are the Shell auto-ignition model and the characteristic-time combustion model, which were modified to take the high level of EGR into consideration. A liquid sheet breakup spray model was used for the droplet breakup processes. The analyses show that the injection timing plays an important role in affecting the in-cylinder air/fuel mixing and mixture temperature, which in turn affects the CAI combustion and engine performance.

  2. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R; Richter, F; Davis, A; Valley, J

    2009-06-18

    Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquids (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites whose

  3. Primary Reverse Oxygen-Isotope Evolution of Pyroxene in Compact Type A CAIs from the Efremovka and NWA-3118 CV3 Chondrites: Insights into Internal CAI Mixing Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, G. J.; Nagashima, K.; Ivanova, M. A.; Krot, A. N.

    2012-03-01

    ^1^6O-depleted Ti-Al-rich pyroxenes in compact Type A CAIs reflect the composition of the perovsites from which they first formed. Perovsite apparently exchanged oxygen very early, prior to melilite exchange and to initial melting of the CAIs.

  4. REAL-TIME MONITORING OF A HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATOR WITH A MOBILE LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an EPA project involving a mobile laboratory for continuous monitoring of emissions and operating parameters of hazardous waste incinerators. This Hazardous Air Pollutants Mobile Laboratory (HAPML), easily transported for use by research projects at a variety ...

  5. CLEANING OF MUNICIPAL WASTE INCINERATOR FLUE GAS IN EUROPE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives an overview of a substantial ongoing air pollution control program in West Germany, as it relates to emission of acid gases and other pollutants from municipal refuse incineration. It details emission regulations, control means used, and technical advancements acc...

  6. Hydrodynamics of a Multistage Wet Scrubber Incineration Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Said, M. M.; Manyele, S. V.; Raphael, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the hydrodynamics of the two stage counter-current cascade wet scrubbers used during incineration of medical waste. The dependence of the hydrodynamics on two main variables was studied: Inlet air flow rate and inlet liquid flow rate. This study introduces a new wet scrubber operating features, which are…

  7. Incineration treatment of arsenic-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Waterland, L.R.; King, C.; Richards, M.K.; Thurnau, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    An incineration test program was conducted at the US Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the potential of incineration as a treatment option for contaminated soils at the Baird and McGuire Superfund site in Holbrook, Massachusetts. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the incinerability of these soils in terms of the fate of arsenic and lead and the destruction of organic contaminants during the incineration process. The test program consisted of a series of bench-scale experiments with a muffle furnace and a series of incineration tests in a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator system.

  8. Dioxin analysis of Philadelphia northwest incinerator. Summary report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Milner, I.

    1986-01-01

    A study was conducted by US EPA Region 3 to determine the dioxin-related impact of the Philadelphia Northwest Incinerator on public health. Specifically, it was designed to assess quantitatively the risks to public health resulting from emissions into the ambient air of dioxins as well as the potential effect of deposition of dioxins on the soil in the vicinity of the incinerator. Volume 1 is an executive summary of the study findings. Volume 2 contains contractor reports, laboratory analysis results and other documentation.

  9. Oxygen Isotope Variations at the Margin of a CAI Records Circulation Within the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Justin I.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Simon, Steven B.; Matzel, Jennifer E. P.; Ramon, Erick C.; Weber, Peter K.; Grossman, Lawrence; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-03-01

    Micrometer-scale analyses of a calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) and the characteristic mineral bands mantling the CAI reveal that the outer parts of this primitive object have a large range of oxygen isotope compositions. The variations are systematic; the relative abundance of 16O first decreases toward the CAI margin, approaching a planetary-like isotopic composition, then shifts to extremely 16O-rich compositions through the surrounding rim. The variability implies that CAIs probably formed from several oxygen reservoirs. The observations support early and short-lived fluctuations of the environment in which CAIs formed, either because of transport of the CAIs themselves to distinct regions of the solar nebula or because of varying gas composition near the proto-Sun.

  10. Diesel exhaust filter-incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Martyniuk, E.T.

    1981-08-11

    A diesel engine exhaust particulate filter-incinerator comprising an enclosed filter panel having particulate deposition surfaces bordered by electrodes of a high voltage power supply. Periodic incineration is accomplished by the collection on the surfaces of particulates in amounts sufficient to conduct sufficient electric current along paths through the particulates to heat them to incineration temperature. Ignition and burn off of particulates may be automatically accomplished by maintaining a suitable voltage across the electrodes at the edges of the collection surfaces to initiate arc-like current flow before the collected particulates reach a level that would plug the filter. Specific embodiments of exemplary filter constructions are disclosed.

  11. Geiselbullach refuse incineration plant

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The vast diversity of wastes, heightened awareness of environmental problems, and unabating demand for power and raw materials, are making it imperative to minimize waste-dumping. Refuse incineration power plants present an ecologically and economically sound answer to this problem, since they also enable communities and large industrial facilities to convert their wastes into electricity and energy for district heating. The refuse produced each year by 1,000,000 people represents a resource equivalent to $30 million of fuel oil. This plant is now converting into energy the waste produced by a population of 280,000. The conversion and expansion were completed without any significant interruption to plant operation. The modernized plant complies fully with today's stringent legal requirements for obtaining an operating license in West Germany. Because landfill sites are becoming increasingly scarce everywhere, thermal processes that dispose of refuse and simultaneously generate electrical power and heat are creating a great deal of interest.

  12. Lessons learned from start-up testing of a mixed waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes Burns, H.; Burns, D.B.

    1997-05-01

    Start-up testing of a new mixed waste incinerator, the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF), has been completed at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS). The incinerator is equipped with an air pollution control system (APCS) that includes a wet quench and scrubber followed by dry air filtration using high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. The system was designed with optimum materials to maximize reliability, runtime, and ease of maintenance. Changes to the CIF operation and materials have been made to maximize system performance and minimize corrosion. This paper presents a brief overview of the incinerator design philosophy, pilot-scale testing results, and some of the lessons learned during the start-up testing of the CIF.

  13. Today's challange in MSW incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Vaux, W.G. . Research and Development Center)

    1988-01-01

    A decade ago, incinerator ash was of little concern. There wasn't much of it, and it was treated like soil of fill and therefore disposed of without much concern. Today, however, the situation is far different. Waste-to-energy plants reduce the amount of trash they process by 90%, but they require environmentally sound landfills to dispose of residue. This paper examines the management of incinerator ash. At its best, incinerator ash is well burned out; at worst, it is more pyrolized and contains unburned carbon. This latter case is likely following receipt of rain-saturated waste at the incinerator. Ash contains about 15 to 20 weight of unburnables; for example metal cans, ceramics, other metals and so on. According to the author, recent work on presence of combustion products in the ash does not show appreciable levels of dioxins leaching form ash.

  14. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  15. Incineration of different types of medical wastes: emission factors for gaseous emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvim-Ferraz, M. C. M.; Afonso, S. A. V.

    Previous research works showed that to protect public health, the hospital incinerators should be provided with air pollution control devices. As most hospital incinerators do not possess such equipment, efficient methodologies should be developed to evaluate the safety of incineration procedure. Emission factors (EF) can be used for an easy estimation of legal parameters. Nevertheless, the actual knowledge is yet very scarce, mainly because EF previously published do not include enough information about the incinerated waste composition, besides considering many different waste classifications. This paper reports the first EF estimated for CO, SO 2, NO x and HCl, associated to the incineration of medical waste, segregated in different types according to the classification of the Portuguese legislation. The results showed that those EF are strongly influenced by incinerated waste composition, directly affected by incinerated waste type, waste classification, segregation practice and management methodology. The correspondence between different waste classifications was analysed comparing the estimated EF with the sole results previously published for specific waste types, being observed that the correspondence is not always possible. The legal limit for pollutant concentrations could be obeyed for NO x, but concentrations were higher than the limit for CO (11-24 times), SO 2 (2-5 times), and HCl (9-200 times), confirming that air pollution control devices must be used to protect human health. The small heating value of medical wastes with compulsory incineration implied the requirement of a bigger amount of auxiliary fuel for their incineration, which affects the emitted amounts of CO, NO x and SO 2 (28, 20 and practically 100% of the respective values were related with fuel combustion). Nevertheless, the incineration of those wastes lead to the smallest amount of emitted pollutants, the emitted amount of SO 2 and NO x reducing to 93% and the emitted amount of CO

  16. Conceptual design report for waste incineration development activity. Internal technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.A.; Maughan, R.Y.; Withers, S.R.

    1981-11-01

    This project consists of establishing the Waste Incineration Development Activity (WIDA) in the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF). The purpose of this project is to develop the capability to incinerate low-level beta/gamma contamination waste. After process development has been completed, and incineration system reliability has been proven, the incinerator will be used for volume reduction of the Idaho National Engineering Lab's (INEL) combustible contaminated waste. Future development activities to be performed within the WIDA include ash solidification, alternate off-gas treatment, nuclide migration studies, and remotization of the incineration and ash solidification processes. This project will include systems to characterize the waste and convey the waste to the incinerator, incinerate the waste, cool and drum the resulting ash, and condition and filter the off-gas. Equipment to be installed in support of this task include an x-ray system, conveyors, a controlled air incinerator, ash handling equipment, a heat-exchanger, high temperature ducting, a spark arrester, exhaust fans, HEPA filters and an auxiliary power supply. This project is estimated to cost $1,900,000. Design will be performed by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and construction by Morrison-Knudsen Co. utilizing fixed price subcontracts. Design is scheduled to be completed by the end of February 1982 and construction by the end of July 1982. This schedule assumes funding is and will remain available from the first day of fiscal year 82. Any funding deficiency will directly affect EG and G's ability to meet this schedule.

  17. Coordinated Oxygen Isotopic and Petrologic Studies of CAIS Record Varying Composition of Protosolar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Justin I.; Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, S. B.; Weber, P. K.; Grossman, L.; Ross, D. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) record the O-isotope composition of Solar nebular gas from which they grew [1]. High spatial resolution O-isotope measurements afforded by ion microprobe analysis across the rims and margin of CAIs reveal systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 and suggest formation from a diversity of nebular environments [2-4]. This heterogeneity has been explained by isotopic mixing between the O-16-rich Solar reservoir [6] and a second O-16-poor reservoir (probably nebular gas) with a "planetary-like" isotopic composition [e.g., 1, 6-7], but the mechanism and location(s) where these events occur within the protoplanetary disk remain uncertain. The orientation of large and systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 reported by [3] for a compact Type A CAI from the Efremovka reduced CV3 chondrite differs dramatically from reports by [4] of a similar CAI, A37 from the Allende oxidized CV3 chondrite. Both studies conclude that CAIs were exposed to distinct, nebular O-isotope reservoirs, implying the transfer of CAIs among different settings within the protoplanetary disk [4]. To test this hypothesis further and the extent of intra-CAI O-isotopic variation, a pristine compact Type A CAI, Ef-1 from Efremovka, and a Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende were studied. Our new results are equally intriguing because, collectively, O-isotopic zoning patterns in the CAIs indicate a progressive and cyclic record. The results imply that CAIs were commonly exposed to multiple environments of distinct gas during their formation. Numerical models help constrain conditions and duration of these events.

  18. The Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing autoinducer CAI-1: analysis of the biosynthetic enzyme CqsA

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Bolitho, M; Higgins, D; Lu, W; Ng, W; Jeffrey, P; Rabinowitz, J; Semmelhack, M; Hughson, F; Bassler, B

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes the disease cholera, controls virulence factor production and biofilm development in response to two extracellular quorum-sensing molecules, called autoinducers. The strongest autoinducer, called CAI-1 (for cholera autoinducer-1), was previously identified as (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one. Biosynthesis of CAI-1 requires the enzyme CqsA. Here, we determine the CqsA reaction mechanism, identify the CqsA substrates as (S)-2-aminobutyrate and decanoyl coenzyme A, and demonstrate that the product of the reaction is 3-aminotridecan-4-one, dubbed amino-CAI-1. CqsA produces amino-CAI-1 by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent acyl-CoA transferase reaction. Amino-CAI-1 is converted to CAI-1 in a subsequent step via a CqsA-independent mechanism. Consistent with this, we find cells release {ge}100 times more CAI-1 than amino-CAI-1. Nonetheless, V. cholerae responds to amino-CAI-1 as well as CAI-1, whereas other CAI-1 variants do not elicit a quorum-sensing response. Thus, both CAI-1 and amino-CAI-1 have potential as lead molecules in the development of an anticholera treatment.

  19. Environmental assessment of incinerator residue utilisation.

    PubMed

    Toller, S; Kärrman, E; Gustafsson, J P; Magnusson, Y

    2009-07-01

    Incineration ashes may be treated either as a waste to be dumped in landfill, or as a resource that is suitable for re-use. In order to choose the best management scenario, knowledge is needed on the potential environmental impact that may be expected, including not only local, but also regional and global impact. In this study, A life cycle assessment (LCA) based approach was outlined for environmental assessment of incinerator residue utilisation, in which leaching of trace elements as well as other emissions to air and water and the use of resources were regarded as constituting the potential environmental impact from the system studied. Case studies were performed for two selected ash types, bottom ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) and wood fly ash. The MSWI bottom ash was assumed to be suitable for road construction or as drainage material in landfill, whereas the wood fly ash was assumed to be suitable for road construction or as a nutrient resource to be recycled on forest land after biofuel harvesting. Different types of potential environmental impact predominated in the activities of the system and the use of natural resources and the trace element leaching were identified as being relatively important for the scenarios compared. The scenarios differed in use of resources and energy, whereas there is a potential for trace element leaching regardless of how the material is managed. Utilising MSWI bottom ash in road construction and recycling of wood ash on forest land saved more natural resources and energy than when these materials were managed according to the other scenarios investigated, including dumping in landfill. PMID:19362462

  20. The Graphics Terminal Display System; a Powerful General-Purpose CAI Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornbeck, Frederick W., Brock, Lynn

    The Graphic Terminal Display System (GTDS) was created to support research and development in computer-assisted instruction (CAI). The system uses an IBM 360/50 computer and interfaces with a large-screen graphics display terminal, a random-access slide projector, and a speech synthesizer. An authoring language, GRAIL, was developed for CAI, and…

  1. Knowledge-Based CAI: CINS for Individualized Curriculum Sequencing. Final Technical Report No. 290.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wescourt, Keith T.; And Others

    This report describes research on the Curriculum Information Network (CIN) paradigm for computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in technical subjects. The CIN concept was first conceived and implemented in the BASIC Instructional Program (BIP). The primary objective of CIN-based CAI and the BIP project has been to develop procedures for providing each…

  2. Less Equals More: Coaching/Prompting CAI as a Tool Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Ted L.

    Recent reviews of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in various journals suggest that the technological and economic barriers to its adoption and use may be overcome in the very near future, and that CAI will be feasible in a number of educational settings. Computer hardware costs have dropped dramatically in recent years, and a variety of…

  3. Learner Control of Instructional Sequencing within an Adaptive Tutorial CAI Environment. Technical Report 75-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Robert J.; And Others

    A study to test the effects of learner control of the sequencing of instructional tasks when using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems is described. Using a series of CAI modules to teach the COBOL programing language to military personnel, students were able to control various aspects of their learning environment. Among the research…

  4. Curricular and Computer System Compatibility of CAI Programs for Multi-University Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Keith A.

    A brief introduction to developmental efforts in computer assisted instruction (CAI) at Pennsylvania State University is followed by a description of a program of mobile CAI facilities inaugurated in 1970 as part of the inservice continuing education program for teachers. The paper includes very brief descriptions of the graduate level courses…

  5. Audio-Tutorial and CAI Aids for Problem Solving in Introductory Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower, Stephen K.

    1970-01-01

    Starting from a successful audio-tutorial program, the author initiated a computer assisted tutorial program in solving chemistry problems. Discusses the advantages of computer assisted instruction (CAI) over audiotapes and the advantages of both over conventional instructional methods. Presents a flow chart of a CAI program on a calorimetry…

  6. CAI-BASIC: A Program to Teach the Programming Language BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Thomas Anthony

    A computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program was designed which fulfills the objectives of teaching a simple programing language, interpreting student responses, and executing and editing student programs. The CAI-BASIC program is written in FORTRAN IV and executes on IBM-2741 terminals while running under a time-sharing system on an IBM-360-70…

  7. Petrological Investigations of CAIs from Efremovka and NWA 3118 CV3 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Lorenz, C. A.; Korochantseva, E. V.; MacPherson, G. J.

    2010-03-01

    Several new big CAIs were extracted from the Efremovka and NWA 3118 CV3 chondrites to analyze petrology, chemistry and isotopic compositions. Here we report preliminary results on mineralogy, petrology and bulk chemistry of two CAIs, of Type B1 and of Type A.

  8. Learning with Computers: Implementation of an Integrated Learning System for Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Criminal Justice, Huntsville. Windham School System.

    This publication provides information on implementation of an integrated learning system for computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in adult learning environments. The first of the document's nine chapters is an introduction to computer-delivered instruction that addresses the appropriateness of computers in instruction and types of CAI activities.…

  9. Effects of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) on Secondary School Students' Performance in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere; Afolabi, Adedeji Olufemi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on secondary school students' performance in biology. Also, the influence of gender on the performance of students exposed to CAI in individualised or cooperative learning settings package was examined. The research was a quasi experimental involving a 3 x 2 factorial…

  10. An Object-Oriented Architecture for a Web-Based CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakabayashi, Kiyoshi; Hoshide, Takahide; Seshimo, Hitoshi; Fukuhara, Yoshimi

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an object-oriented World Wide Web-based CAI (Computer-Assisted Instruction) system. The goal of the design is to provide a flexible CAI/ITS (Intelligent Tutoring System) framework with full extendibility and reusability, as well as to exploit Web-based software technologies such as JAVA, ASP (a…

  11. Distribution of vanadium and melting of opaque assemblages in Efremovka CAI's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, I.; Grossman, L.

    1993-03-01

    A petrographic and chemical study of compact Type A CAI's from the Efremovka CV3 chondrite strongly suggests that the opaque assemblages (OA's) that they contain were molten at temperatures below the CAI silicate solidus, and that the V-rich magnetite presently observed in association with OA's formed by in situ oxidation of their FeNi.

  12. Computer-Aided Technical Training Using Electronic Equipment On-Line with the CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggett, Geoffrey; And Others

    This report describes an experimental course in the operation and troubleshooting of a communications transceiver, the AN/URC-32, in which the transceiver is used as part of an instructional station in a CAI system. The transceiver and the CAI system are hard-wired together to form a single training system. The system is presently operating in the…

  13. Distribution of vanadium and melting of opaque assemblages in Efremovka CAI's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casanova, I.; Grossman, L.

    1993-01-01

    A petrographic and chemical study of compact Type A CAI's from the Efremovka CV3 chondrite strongly suggests that the opaque assemblages (OA's) that they contain were molten at temperatures below the CAI silicate solidus, and that the V-rich magnetite presently observed in association with OA's formed by in situ oxidation of their FeNi.

  14. A Study of Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) over Classroom Lecture (CRL) at ICS Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaousar, Tayyeba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with classroom lecture and computer-assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypotheses of…

  15. CAI in New York City: Report on the First Year's Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Cornelius F.

    1969-01-01

    "The nation's largest CAI operation in a public school system concluded its first full year of operation in June, 1969. The results indicate a very definite success for education's most closely watched use of technology. Three major criteria for success of such a project are 1) acceptance of CAI by the schools and their pupils, 2) per pupil costs…

  16. A Multi-Media CAI Terminal Based upon a Microprocessor with Applications for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brebner, Ann; Hallworth, H. J.

    The design of the CAI interface described is based on the microprocessor in order to meet three basic requirements for providing appropriate instruction to the developmentally handicapped: (1) portability, so that CAI can be taken into the customary learning environment; (2) reliability; and (3) flexibility, to permit use of new input and output…

  17. Nebular History of the Allende FoB CAI SJ101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petaev, M. I.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2009-03-01

    We compare petrologic and chemical characteristics of a unique FoB CAI SJ101 with the results of thermodynamic modeling of condensation of its precursors in a system of solar composition and speculate about nebular formation history of this CAI.

  18. INAA of CAIs from the Maralinga CK4 chondrite: Effects of parent body thermal metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.; Keller, L. P.; Martinez, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Maralinga is an anomalous CK4 carbonaceous chondrite which contains numerous Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAI's) unlike the other members of the CK group. These CAI's are characterized by abundant green hercynitic spinel intergrown with plagioclase and high-Ca clinopyroxene, and a total lack of melilite. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to further characterize the meteorite, with special focus on the CAI's. High sensitivity INAA was done on eight sample disks about 100-150 microns in diameter obtained from a normal 30 micron thin section with a diamond microcoring device. The CAI's are enriched by 60-70X bulk meteorite values in Zn, suggesting that the substantial exchange of Fe for Mg that made the spinel in the CAI's hercynitic also allowed efficient scavenging of Zn from the rest of the meteorite during parent body thermal metamorphism. Less mobile elements appear to have maintained their initial heterogeneity.

  19. Advanced two-stage incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Rehmat, A.; Khinkis, M.

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is developing an advanced incinerator that combines the fluidized-bed agglomeration/incineration and cyclonic combustion/incineration technologies that have been developed separately at IGT over many years. This combination results in a unique and extremely flexible incinerator for solid, sludge, liquid, and gaseous wastes. This system can operate over a wide range of conditions in the first stage, from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration), including gasification of high-Btu wastes. In the combined system, solid, liquid, and gaseous organic wastes would be easily and efficiently destroyed (>99.99% destruction and removal efficiency (DRE)), whereas solid inorganic contaminants would be contained within a glassy matrix, rendering them benign and suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. This technology is different from other existing technologies because of its agglomeration and encapsulation capability and its flexibility with respect to the types wastes it can handle. Both the fluidized-bed as well as the cyclonic incineration technologies have been fully developed and tested separately at pilot scales. 12 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Compound CAIs Containing Zr-Y-Sc-Rich Inclusions from NWA 3118 and Efremovka CV3 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Krot, A. N.; Nagashima, K.; Lorenz, C. A.; Logan, M. A. V.; Kononkova, N. N.; MacPherson, G. J.

    2011-03-01

    CAIs enriched in Zr, Sc and Y provide important records of the refractory element fractionation in the early solar nebula. We discribed mineralogy, petrology and oxygen isotopes of two Zr-rich CAIs from NWA 3118 and from Efremovka.

  1. ACTIVELY CONTROLLED AFTERBURNER FOR COMPACT WASTE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a continuing research program directed at developing technology for compact shipboard incinerators, active control of fluid dynamics has been used to enhance mixing in incinerator afterburner (AB) experiments and increase the DRE for a waste surrogate. Experiments were conduc...

  2. Environmental impact assessment of the incineration of municipal solid waste with auxiliary coal in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Xing, Wei; Lu, Wenjing; Zhang, Xu; Christensen, Thomas H

    2012-10-01

    The environmental impacts of waste incineration with auxiliary coal were investigated using the life-cycle-based software, EASEWASTE, based on the municipal solid waste (MSW) management system in Shuozhou City. In the current system, MSW is collected, transported, and incinerated with 250 kg of coal per ton of waste. Based on observed environmental impacts of incineration, fossil CO(2) and heavy metals were primary contributors to global warming and ecotoxicity in soil, respectively. Compared with incinerators using excess coal, incineration with adequate coal presents significant benefits in mitigating global warming, whereas incineration with a mass of coal can avoid more impacts to acidification, photochemical ozone and nutrient enrichment because of increased electricity substitution and reduced emission from coal power plants. The "Emission standard of air pollutants for thermal power plants (GB13223-2011)" implemented in 2012 introduced stricter policies on controlling SO(2) and NO(x) emissions from coal power plants. Thus, increased use of auxiliary coal during incineration yields fewer avoided impacts on acidification and nutrient enrichment. When two-thirds of ash is source-separated and landfilled, the incineration of rest-waste presents better results on global warming, acidification, nutrient enrichment, and even ecotoxicity in soil. This process is considered a promising solution for MSW management in Shuozhou City. Weighted normalized environmental impacts were assessed based on Chinese political reduction targets. Results indicate that heavy metal and acidic gas emissions should be given more attention in waste incineration. This study provides scientific support for the management of MSW systems dominated by incineration with auxiliary coal in China. PMID:22683228

  3. Assessment of incineration and melting treatment technologies for RWMC buried waste

    SciTech Connect

    Geimer, R.; Hertzler, T.; Gillins, R.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report provides an identification, description, and ranking evaluation of the available thermal treatment technologies potentially capable of treating the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) buried mixed waste. The ranking evaluation focused separately upon incinerators for treatment of combustible wastes and melters for noncombustible wastes. The highest rank incinerators are rotary kilns and controlled air furnaces, while the highest rank melters are the hearth configuration plasma torch, graphite electrode arc, and joule-heated melters. 4 refs.

  4. HANDBOOK: HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION MEASUREMENT GUIDANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This publication, Volume III of the Hazardous Waste Incineration Guidance Series, contains general guidance to permit writers in reviewing hazardous waste incineration permit applications and trial burn plans. he handbook is a how-to document dealing with how incineration measure...

  5. INCINERATION TREATMENT OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An incineration test program was conducted at the US Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the potential of incineration as a treatment option for contaminated soils at the Baird and McGuire Superfund site in Holbrook, Massachusetts. he purp...

  6. INCINERATION TREATMENT OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    An incineration test program was conducted at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the potential of incineration as a treatment option for contaminated soils at the Baird and McGuire Superfund site in Holbrook, Massachusetts. The p...

  7. Emission of ultrafine particles from the incineration of municipal solid waste: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Alan M.; Harrison, Roy M.

    2016-09-01

    Ultrafine particles (diameter <100 nm) are of great topical interest because of concerns over possible enhanced toxicity relative to larger particles of the same composition. While combustion processes, and especially road traffic exhaust are a known major source of ultrafine particle emissions, relatively little is known of the magnitude of emissions from non-traffic sources. One such source is the incineration of municipal waste, and this article reviews studies carried out on the emissions from modern municipal waste incinerators. The effects of engineering controls upon particle emissions are considered, as well as the very limited information on the effects of changing waste composition. The results of measurements of incinerator flue gas, and of atmospheric sampling at ground level in the vicinity of incinerators, show that typical ultrafine particle concentrations in flue gas are broadly similar to those in urban air and that consequently, after the dispersion process dilutes incinerator exhaust with ambient air, ultrafine particle concentrations are typically indistinguishable from those that would occur in the absence of the incinerator. In some cases the ultrafine particle concentration in the flue gas may be below that in the local ambient air. This appears to be a consequence of the removal of semi-volatile vapours in the secondary combustion zone and abatement plant, and the high efficiency of fabric filters for ultrafine particle collection.

  8. Solvent recovery combines with catalytic incineration to effectively control fumes

    SciTech Connect

    Goodstein, S.; Flachmeyer, T.; Wickersham, C.P.

    1985-11-01

    The engineering staff at Key Pharmaceuticals Inc. was charged with the challenge to design, construct and troubleshoot a new facility which would manufacture pharmaceutical products used to combat bronchial asthma. An Environmental Assessment was required which would outline the proposed procedures to remove or destroy the solvents used in production, thereby preventing their release to the atmosphere. Since the solvents required in the manufacturing process represented two different classes of materials, chlorinated and non-chlorinated solvents, the treatment decision became complicated. Single system treatment options were not viable. A solvent recovery system and a catalytic incinerator were installed in a parallel arrangement to treat chlorinated and non-chlorinated solvents, respectively. This arrangement was possible because the two types of solvents are mutually exclusive in their manufacturing uses. Solvent-laden air is forced into the carbon adsorption unit by a blower. Cylindrically wound carbon filter elements remove the chlorinated solvents, and clean air exits through a top outlet. For non-chlorinated solvents, catalytic incineration via a platinum metal catalyst on a ceramic honeycomb substrate is controlled by regulating inlet and outlet temperatures. The catalyst increases the chemical oxidation rate to permit the reaction to proceed at a lower energy level than would be experienced with a thermal incinerator. The catalytic incinerator has treated process exhausts with normal solvent concentrations of 1000-1200 ppm and as high as 2000 ppm - with a conversion rate of 97%, well above regulatory compliance requirements. The management at Key Pharmaceutical feels that the reliability and performance levels exhibited by both the catalytic incinerator and the carbon adsorption solvent recovery system warranted the high initial capital expense.

  9. Consolidated Incineration Facility model videotape

    SciTech Connect

    Krolewski, J F; Augsburger, S T

    1988-01-01

    A Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) is in final design for construction at the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina. The CIF will detoxify and volume reduce combustible radioactive, hazardous and mixed waste. A study model was constructed during scope development for project authorization to assist with equipment layout and insure sufficient maintenance access. To facilitate the Department of Energy Validation process, a videotape of the model was developed. This ten minute videotape includes general information about the incineration process and a tour of the study model with a discussion of activities in each area. The videotape will be shown and the current status and schedule for the CIF presented.

  10. Two Generations of Sodic Metasomatism in an Allende Type B CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-Aluminum rich inclusions (CAI) in Allende, along with other chondritic compo-nents, experienced variable amounts and types of alter-ation of their mineralogy and chemistry. In CAIs, one of the principal types of alteration led to the depo-sition of nepheline and sodalite. Here we extend initial obervations of alteration in an Allende CAI, focus-ing on occurences of nepheline and a nepheline-like phase with unusally high Ca (referred to as "calcic nepheline" in this abstract). Detailed petrographic and microchemical observations of alteration phases in an Allende Type B CAI (TS4) show that two separate generations of "nepheline", with very distinct composi-tions, crystallized around the margins and in the interi-or of this CAI. We use observations of micro-faults as potential temporal markers, in order to place constraints on the timing of alteration events in Allende. These observa-tions of micro-faulting that truncate and offset one gen-eration of "nepheline" indicate that some "nepheline" crystallized before incorporation of the CAI into the Allende parent-body. Some of the sodic metasomatism in some Allende CAIs occurred prior to Allende par-ent-body assembly. The earlier generation of "calcic-nepheline" has a very distinctive, calcium-rich compo-sition, and the second generation is low in calcium, and matches the compositions of nephelines found in near-by altered chondrules, and in the Allende matrix.

  11. Evaluation of volatile organic emissions from hazardous waste incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sedman, R.M.; Esparza, J.R. )

    1991-08-01

    Conventional methods of risk assessment typically employed to evaluate the impact of hazardous waste incinerators on public health must rely on somewhat speculative emissions estimates or on complicated and expensive sampling and analytical methods. The limited amount of toxicological information concerning many of the compounds detected in stack emissions also complicates the evaluation of the public health impacts of these facilities. An alternative approach aimed at evaluating the public health impacts associated with volatile organic stack emissions is presented that relies on a screening criterion to evaluate total stack hydrocarbon emissions. If the concentration of hydrocarbons in ambient air is below the screening criterion, volatile emissions from the incinerator are judged not to pose a significant threat to public health. Both the screening criterion and a conventional method of risk assessment were employed to evaluate the emissions from 20 incinerators. Use of the screening criterion always yielded a substantially greater estimate of risk than that derived by the conventional method. Since the use of the screening criterion always yielded estimates of risk that were greater than that determined by conventional methods and measuring total hydrocarbon emissions is a relatively simple analytical procedure, the use of the screening criterion would appear to facilitate the evaluation of operating hazardous waste incinerators.

  12. Evaluation of volatile organic emissions from hazardous waste incinerators.

    PubMed Central

    Sedman, R M; Esparza, J R

    1991-01-01

    Conventional methods of risk assessment typically employed to evaluate the impact of hazardous waste incinerators on public health must rely on somewhat speculative emissions estimates or on complicated and expensive sampling and analytical methods. The limited amount of toxicological information concerning many of the compounds detected in stack emissions also complicates the evaluation of the public health impacts of these facilities. An alternative approach aimed at evaluating the public health impacts associated with volatile organic stack emissions is presented that relies on a screening criterion to evaluate total stack hydrocarbon emissions. If the concentration of hydrocarbons in ambient air is below the screening criterion, volatile emissions from the incinerator are judged not to pose a significant threat to public health. Both the screening criterion and a conventional method of risk assessment were employed to evaluate the emissions from 20 incinerators. Use of the screening criterion always yielded a substantially greater estimate of risk than that derived by the conventional method. Since the use of the screening criterion always yielded estimates of risk that were greater than that determined by conventional methods and measuring total hydrocarbon emissions is a relatively simple analytical procedure, the use of the screening criterion would appear to facilitate the evaluation of operating hazardous waste incinerators. PMID:1954928

  13. Operation and maintenance of hospital medical-waste incinerators. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Neulicht, R.M.; Turner, M.B.; Chaput, L.S.; Wallace, D.D.; Smith, S.G.

    1989-03-01

    This document identifies the operation and maintenance (O M) procedures that should be practiced on hospital medical-waste incinerators and associated air pollution control equipment to minimize air emissions. Proper O M, in addition to reducing air emissions, improves equipment reliability and performance, prolongs equipment life, and helps to ensure proper ash burnout. The document provides general guidance on proper O M procedures with the intention of identifying good operating practices. The document is intended as a technical guide for use by federal, state, and local agency personnel, hospital waste management personnel, and hospital-incinerator operators. The document presents background information on hospital medical-waste incineration systems including a summary of combustion principles and descriptions of the types of incinerators typically used for hospital medical wastes. Background information on add-on air pollution-control systems is presented. Key operating parameters and good operating practices for the incineration and air pollution systems are identified and discussed. General guidance on maintenance of the systems is provided.

  14. Effects of Computer-assisted Instruction (CAI) on 11th Graders' Attitudes to Biology and CAI and Understanding of Reproduction in Plants and Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyibo, Kola; Hudson, Ann

    2000-02-01

    This study investigated whether the use of the combination of the lecture, discussion and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) significantly improved the experimental students' attitudes to biology and the computer/CAI and their understanding of reproduction in plants and animals. The sample comprised 77 Jamaican grade 11 female students from two traditional high schools in Kingston. Attitudes to a biology questionnaire, attitudes to the computer/CAI questionnaire and a biology achievement test (BAT) were used for data collection. The results indicated that the experimental subjects' post-test attitudes to biology and the computer/CAI were significantly better than those of the control group subjects taught with the lecture and discussion methods; the experimental subjects significantly outscored the control group subjects on the post-test BAT; there were significant differences in their post-test BAT means based on their attitudes to biology in favour of experimental subjects with highly favourable attitudes to biology, but there were no significant differences in their means attributable to their post-test attitudes to the computer/CAI; there was a positive statistically significant but weak relationship between the experimental subjects' post-test attitudes to biology and their post-test BAT scores.

  15. Microstructural Investigation of a Wark-Lovering Rim on a Vigarano CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J.; Keller, L. P.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.; Simon, J. I.

    2015-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multi-layered mineral sequences that surround many CAIs. These rim layers consist of the primary minerals found in the CAI interiors, but vary in their mineralogy. Several models for their origin have been proposed including condensation, reaction with a nebular gas, evaporation, or combinations of these. However, there still is little consensus on how and when the rims formed. Here, we describe the microstructure and mineralogy of a WL rim on a type B CAI from the Vigarano CV(sub red) chondrite using FIB/TEM to better understand the astrophysical significance of WL rim formation.

  16. Combustion science for incineration technology

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, J.O.L.

    1994-12-31

    The major impediments to public acceptance, of incineration as a waste disposal technology are emissions of organic compounds, dioxins, and toxic metals. Combustion science provides insight into mechanisms governing each of these three issues. It accomplishes two things: It identifies potential problems before they occur in the field, and it proposes solutions to known problems after they have occurred. In this paper, the practical relevance of combustion science to incineration technology issues is reviewed, and important gaps and needs are identified. Turbulent mixing plays a most important role in the destruction of organic wastes in practical units. Emissions of products of incomplete combustion are also more often governed by the effects of physical combustion processes on kinetics, rather than by chemical kinetics alone. For example, incinerator failure modes can arise through wayward trajectories of rogue droplets after atomization, or, in rotary kilns, through the formation of puffs, caused by the transient release of waste from containerized sorbents and subsequent incomplete mixing. Prediction of these phenomena requires a detailed knowledge of the fundamentals of turbulent reactive flows. Toxic metals are transformed in the incinerator environment, and the high temperatures can be exploited to allow these metals to be managed. Metal/sorbent chemistry at high temperature is not known, but it is important, since it can control the ultimate impact of these metals upon the environment. 48 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Enviromental impact of a hospital waste incineration plant in Krakow (Poland).

    PubMed

    Gielar, Agnieszka; Helios-Rybicka, Edeltrauda

    2013-07-01

    The environmental impact of a hospital waste incineration plant in Krakow was investigated. The objective of this study was to assess the degree of environmental effect of the secondary solid waste generated during the incineration process of medical waste. The analysis of pollution of the air emissions and leaching test of ashes and slag were carried out. The obtained results allowed us to conclude that (i) the hospital waste incineration plant significantly solves the problems of medical waste treatment in Krakow; (ii) the detected contaminant concentrations were generally lower than the permissible values; (iii) the generated ashes and slag contained considerable concentrations of heavy metals, mainly zinc, and chloride and sulfate anions. Ashes and slag constituted 10-15% of the mass of incinerated wastes; they are more harmful for the environment when compared with untreated waste, and after solidification they can be deposited in the hazardous waste disposal. PMID:23640706

  18. Status of US EPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) sludge-incinerator regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Crumpler, E.P.; Rubin, A.B.; Bostian, H.E.

    1988-11-01

    This report describes a potential regulatory approach that the U.S. EPA could use for controlling sewage-sludge incinerators. The approach utilizes a most-exposed individual risk assessment to ensure that sludge-incineration air emissions will not cause an unacceptable health risk. An incinerator facility can demonstrate compliance using a three-tiered system which proceeds from a simple worst case calculation to a more resource intensive site-specific demonstration. A key part of the tiering system is development of an accurate and reliable emissions data base for U.S. sludge incinerators that can be used to develop reasonable worst case emission-control factors. The results of testing to date are discussed in the paper.

  19. Further Investigations of Minor Element Distributions in Spinels in Type B CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D. J.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2004-03-01

    We have measured minor element concentrations in spinels from type B CAIs in Efremovka and Allende. We find a correlation of V and Ti that supports previous interpretations of additional remelting and crystallization events for these objects.

  20. Furnace for the selective incineration or carbonization of waste materials

    SciTech Connect

    Angelo, J.F. II

    1988-03-29

    A combustion device for selectively incinerating, or carbonizing a carbonaceous feed material by a process of controlled devolatilization is described comprising: a. an elongated cylindrical siln inclined slightly from the horizontal and having an upper end and a lower end; b. means operable to introduce a solid carbonaceous feed material into the upper end of the kiln; c. means operable to elevate the temperature of the feed material in the kiln to either incineration or carbonizing temperature, only until the desired temperature is obtained; d. means located in an upper portion of the kiln to introduce air into the full length of the kiln into the upper portion thereof only; e. draft inducing means operable to create a draft in the kiln toward an outlet end thereof, and f. afterburner means interconnected to the draft outlet of the kiln, and operable to produce combustion of combustible gaseous or solid components entrained in the draft.

  1. The early days of incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Valenti, M.

    1995-05-01

    Landfills reaching capacity, beaches fouled with trash, neighborhood residents protesting waste disposal sites in their backyards, and municipalities forced to recycle. Sound familiar? These issues might have been taken from today`s headlines, but they were also problems facing mechanical engineers a century ago. Conditions such as these were what led engineers to design the first incinerators for reducing the volume of municipal garbage, as well as for producing heat and electricity. The paper discusses these early days.

  2. Fluidization and incineration of pulp and paper mill sludge in BFB

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, C.; Chen, X.; Huang, C.; Lan, J.; Duan, Y.; Cui, G.; Wang, W.

    1999-07-01

    Incineration followed by landfilling of its residual is one of the most prospective methods for pulp and paper mill sludge disposal, which offers substantial volume reductions and heat recovery. Compared with conventional firing technologies, fluidized bed incineration is suitable for combustion of pulp and paper sludge with high moisture content of about 60%. Fluidization test of paper mill sludge with moisture of 12.75% was conducted in a cold bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) model. Particle size and weight fraction of silica sand mixed with sludge as dual-component bed materials for better fluidization are optimized. Minimum fluidizing velocity of the mixed bed materials and terminal velocity of the sludge are determined. Incineration tests of the sludge with different moisture contents were carried out in both a pilot BFB combustor and a commercial BFB incinerator with treatment capacity of 143 tons per day. Distribution of temperature along the column, combustion efficiency, pollutant emission in flue gas and combustion portions in the dense bed and the freeboard were measured and calculated. The results indicate that the sludge with less than 43% moisture content can be burned stably in the pilot BFB combustor and the sludge with even higher moisture content in the commercial incinerator without any supplemental fuel. Emission of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O is very low and can meet the emission requirements. A mathematical model for incineration of the pulp and paper mill sludge alone is developed. Design considerations of the incinerator for choosing proper moisture content of the sludge, preheated air temperature, the portion of the primary air to the total air are given in the paper.

  3. 8. Front (east) side of incinerator and glove boxes. Ash ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Front (east) side of incinerator and glove boxes. Ash canning hood to the left, combustion chamber in the middle, incinerator hood to the right. Looking west. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

  4. 16. Rear (west) side of incinerator. Glove boxes to the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Rear (west) side of incinerator. Glove boxes to the left. Metal catwalk in the middle. Incinerator control panel to the right. Looking south towards scrubber cell. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste Incinerator Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA

  5. Tungsten and hafnium distribution in calcium aluminum inclusions (CAIs) from Allende and Efremovka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humayun, Munir; Simon, Steven B.; Grossman, Lawrence

    2007-09-01

    Recent 182Hf- 182W age determinations on Allende Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) and on iron meteorites indicate that CAIs have initial ɛ182W (-3.47 ± 0.20, 2 σ) identical to that of magmatic iron meteorites after correction of cosmogenic 182W burn-out (-3.47 ± 0.35, 2 σ). Either the Allende CAIs were isotopically disturbed or the differentiation of magmatic irons (groups IIAB, IID, IIIAB, and IVB) all occurred <1 m.y. after CAI formation. To assess the extent of isotopic disturbance, we have analyzed the elemental distribution of Hf and W in two CAIs, Ef2 from Efremovka (CV3 reduced), and Golfball from Allende (CV3 oxidized). Fassaite is the sole host of Hf (10-25 ppm) and, therefore, of radiogenic W in CAIs, with 180Hf/ 184W > 10 3, which is lowered by the ubiquitous presence of metal inclusions to 180Hf/ 184W > 10 in bulk fassaite. Metal alloy (Ni ˜ 50%) is the sole host of W (˜500 ppm) in Ef2, while opaque assemblages (OAs) and secondary veins are the hosts of W in Golfball. A large metal alloy grain from Ef2, EM2, has 180Hf/ 184W < 0.006. Melilite has both Hf and W below detection limits (<0.01 ppm), but the presence of numerous metallic inclusions or OAs makes melilite a carrier for W, with 180Hf/ 184W < 1 in bulk melilite. Secondary processes had little impact on the 182Hf- 182W systematics of Ef2, but a vein cross-cutting fassaite in Golfball has >100 ppm W with no detectable Pt or S. This vein provides evidence for transport of oxidized W in the CAI. Because of the ubiquitous distribution of OAs, interpretations of the 182Hf- 182W isochron reported for Allende CAIs include: (i) all W in the OAs was derived by alteration of CAI metal, or (ii) at least some of the W in OAs may have been equilibrated with radiogenic W during metamorphism of Allende. Since (ii) cannot be ruled out, new 182Hf- 182W determinations on CAIs from reduced CV3 chondrites are needed to firmly establish the initial W isotopic composition of the solar system.

  6. Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) on 11th Graders' Attitudes to Biology and CAI and Understanding of Reproduction in Plants and Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soyibo, Kola; Hudson, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Investigates whether the use of the combination of lecture, discussion, and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) significantly improved students' attitudes toward biology and their understanding of reproduction in plants and animals. Studies grade 11 Jamaican female students (n=77) from two traditional high schools in Kingston. (Contains 19…

  7. Correlates of aldosterone-induced increases in Cai2+ and Isc suggest that Cai2+ is the second messenger for stimulation of apical membrane conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Petzel, D; Ganz, M B; Nestler, E J; Lewis, J J; Goldenring, J; Akcicek, F; Hayslett, J P

    1992-01-01

    Studies were performed on monolayers of cultured A6 cells, grown on permeable filters, to determine the second messenger system involved in the aldosterone-induced increase in electrogenic sodium transport. Addition of aldosterone (1 microM) to the solution bathing the basal surface of cells caused both an increase in Isc and threefold transient rise in intracellular calcium Cai2+ after a delay of approximately 60 min. Because both events were inhibited by actinomycin D and cyclohexamide, they appeared to require transcriptional and translational processes. Addition of BAPTA to the bathing media to chelate Cai2+ reduced Isc and the delayed Cai2+ transient; 50 microM BAPTA inhibited Isc and the rise in Cai2+ by greater than 80%. Further studies suggested that the action of aldosterone to increase Isc may be dependent on a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, because W-7 and trifluoperazine reduced the aldosterone-induced Isc in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these observations suggest that calcium is a second messenger for the action of aldosterone on sodium transport, and suggest, for the first time, that agonists which bind to intracellular receptors can utilize, via delayed processes dependent on de novo transcription and translation, intracellular second messenger systems to regulate target cell function. PMID:1729267

  8. Diesel engine exhaust particulate filter with intake throttling incineration control

    SciTech Connect

    Ludecke, O.; Rosebrock, T.

    1980-07-08

    A description is given of a diesel engine exhaust filter and particulate incineration system in combination with a diesel engine having a normally unthrottled air induction system for admitting combustion air to the engine and an exhaust system for carrying off spent combustion products exhausted from the engine, said filter and incineration system comprising: a combustion resistant filter disposed in the exhaust system and operative to collect and retain portions of the largely carbonaceous particulate matter contained in the engine exhaust products, said fiber being capable of withstanding without substantial damage internal temperatures sufficient to burn the collected particulate matter, a throttle in the indication system and operable to restrict air flow into the engine to reduce the admittance of excess combustion air and thereby increase engine exhaust gas temperature, and means to actuate said throttle periodically during engine operation to an air flow restricting burn mode capable of raising the particulates in said filter to their combustion temperature under certain engine operating conditions and to maintain said throttle mode for an interval adequate to burn retained particulates in the filter.

  9. Search for extinct 36Cl: Vigarano CAIs, the Pink Angel from Allende, and a Ningqiang chondrule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Daisuke; Ott, Ulrich; Hoppe, Peter; El Goresy, Ahmed

    2008-12-01

    We have searched for excesses of 36S derived from the decay of extinct 36Cl in sodalite, a secondary Cl-rich mineral, in Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the Vigarano and Allende CV3 chondrites and in a chondrule from the Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite. The presence of sodalite in two CAIs from Vigarano and its absence from surrounding CAI fragments suggests sodalite formation after CAI fragmentation. As for sodalite in the Allende Pink Angel CAI, oxygen isotopic compositions have been interpreted as indicative of high temperature interactions, thus suggesting formation prior to accretion to the parent body, probably in a nebular setting. Sodalite in the Ningqiang chondrule is considered to have formed via alkali-Ca exchange, which is believed to have occurred before accretion to the parent body. Sodalites in the Vigarano CAIs and in the Ningqiang chondrule show no clear evidence for the presence of radiogenic 36S. The inferred 2 σ upper limits for 36Cl/ 35Cl at the time of sodalite formation are 1.6 × 10 -6 (Vigarano CAIs) and 3.3 × 10 -6 (Ningqiang chondrule), respectively. In the Pink Angel CAI sodalite exhibits small 36S excesses which weakly correlate with 35Cl/ 34S ratios. The inferred 36Cl/ 35Cl ratio of (1.8 ± 2.2) × 10 -6 (2 σ error) is lower than that found by Hsu et al. [Hsu, W., Guan, Y., Leshin, L. A., Ushikubo, T. and Wasserburg, G. J. (2006) A late episode of irradiation in the early solar system: Evidence from extinct 36Cl and 26Al in meteorites. Astrophys. J. 640, 525-529], thus indicative of heterogeneous distribution of 36Cl in this CAI. Spallation reactions induced by energetic particles from the young Sun are suggested for the origin of 36Cl, similar to the case of 10Be. While 10Be appears to be present in roughly equal abundance in all studied CAIs, our study indicates the level of 36Cl abundances to be variable so that there seems to be no simple relationship between 10Be and 36Cl. This would be expected if trapped cosmic rays rather

  10. Operations and research at the U. S. EPA Incineration Research Facility: Annual report for FY90

    SciTech Connect

    Waterland, L.R.; Lee, J.W.

    1991-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility in Jefferson, Arkansas, is an experimental facility that houses two pilot-scale incinerators and the associated waste handling, emission control, process control, and safety equipment, as well as onsite laboratory facilities. During fiscal year 1990, two major test programs were completed at the facility: an evaluation of the thermal-stability-based principal organic hazardous constituent incinerability ranking for the Office of Solid Waste (OSW), and an incinerability evaluation of five contaminated materials from the Purity Oil Sales and the McColl Superfund sites for Region 9 and the Office of Emergency and Remedial Response (OERR). In addition, results of two test programs completed in FY89 were reported: an evaluation of the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with a single-stage ionizing wet scrubber for air pollution control for OSW, and an incinerability evaluation of arsenic and pesticide contaminated soils from the Baird and McGuire Superfund site for Region 1 and OERR. Several facility and equipment construction and upgrade efforts were also completed.

  11. Dioxin formation from waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Shibamoto, Takayuki; Yasuhara, Akio; Katami, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    There has been great concern about dioxins-polychlorinated dibenzo dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzo furans (PCDFs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-causing contamination in the environment because the adverse effects of these chemicals on human health have been known for many years. Possible dioxin-contamination has received much attention recently not only by environmental scientists but also by the public, because dioxins are known to be formed during the combustion of industrial and domestic wastes and to escape into the environment via exhaust gases from incinerators. Consequently, there is a pressing need to investigate the formation mechanisms or reaction pathways of these chlorinated chemicals to be able to devise ways to reduce their environmental contamination. A well-controlled small-scale incinerator was used for the experiments in the core references of this review. These articles report the investigation of dioxin formation from the combustion of various waste-simulated samples, including different kinds of paper, various kinds of wood, fallen leaves, food samples, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyvinylidene chloride, polyethylene tetraphthalate (PET), and various kinds of plastic products. These samples were also incinerated with inorganic chlorides (NaCl, KCl, CuCI2, MgCl2, MnCl2, FeCl2, CoCl2, fly ash, and seawater) or organic chlorides (PVC, chlordane, and pentachlorophenol) to investigate the role of chlorine content and/or the presence of different metals in dioxin formation. Some samples, such as newspapers, were burned after they were impregnated with NaCl or PVC, as well as being cocombusted with chlorides. The roles of incineration conditions, including chamber temperatures, O2 concentrations, and CO concentrations, in dioxin formation were also investigated. Dioxins (PCDDs, PCDFs, and coplanar-PCBs) formed in the exhaust gases from a controlled small-scale incinerator, where experimental waste

  12. Rotary kiln incineration of dichloromethane and xylene: A comparison of incinerability characteristics under various operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Cundy, V.A.; Lu, C.; Cook, C.A.; Sterling, A.M.; Leger, C.B.; Jakway, A.L.; Montestruc, A.N.; Conway, R. ); Lester, T.W. )

    1991-08-01

    Comparisons are made, for the first time, between the combustion characteristics of dicholoromethane and xylene in an industrial rotary kiln incinerator. The comparisons are made under different operating conditions, including variable kiln rotation rate and operation both with and without turbulence air. Continuous gas composition and temperature measurements and batch gas composition measurements were obtained from two vertical locations near the exit region of the rotary kiln. The measurements show that there is significant vertical stratification at the exit of the kiln. Addition of turbulence air enhanced combustion conditions throughout the kiln during xylene processing. During dichloromethane processing, however, the addition of turbulence air had minimal effect and only promoted greater bulk mixing; chlorinated compounds transported from the lower kiln during operation with turbulence air were not efficiently processed in the upper kiln. Evolution of test liquids from the bed was not constant but rather was characterized by intermittent peaks. The field-scale data of this work suggest that the evolution rate of the test liquid was increased as kiln rotation rate increased. Many of the differences between xylene and dichloromethane processing during these experiments are explained by a simple stoichiometric analysis.

  13. Source-emission testing of classified-waste incinerator, Griffiss AFB, New York. Final report, 19-23 September 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.T.

    1989-04-01

    At the request of 416 Strategic Hospital/SGPB, personnel of the AFOEHL Air Quality Function conducted source-emission testing for particulates, hydrogen chloride, and opacity on the classified-waste incinerator at Griffiss AFB. The New York Department of Environmental Conservation (NYDEC) required testing for permit compliance. Particulate emissions were well above the emission limits allowed by the State of New York. Action is recommended to bring the classified waste incinerator into compliance.

  14. Experimental Determination of Li, Be and B Partitioning During CAI Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Brenan, J M; Phinney, D L

    2005-01-12

    The main focus of the work is to develop a better understanding of the distribution of the elements B, Be and Li in melilite, fassaitic clinop clinopy-roxene, anorthite and spinel, which are the primary constituents of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). These elements are the parent or decay products of short-lived nuclides (specifically, {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be) formed by cosmic ray spallation reactions on silicon and oxygen. Recent observations suggest that some CAIs contain ''fossil'' {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be in the form of ''excess'' amounts of their decay products (B and Li). The exact timing of {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be production is unknown, but if it occurred early in CAI history, it could constrain the birthplace of CAIs to be within a limited region near the infant sun. Other interpretations are possible, however, and bear little significance to early CAI genesis. In order to interpret the anomalies as being ''primary'', and thus originating at high temperature, information on the intermineral partitioning of both parent and daughter elements is required.

  15. The ethnoecology of Caiçara metapopulations (Atlantic Forest, Brazil): ecological concepts and questions

    PubMed Central

    Begossi, Alpina

    2006-01-01

    The Atlantic Forest is represented on the coast of Brazil by approximately 7,5% of remnants, much of these concentrated on the country's SE coast. Within these southeastern remnants, we still find the coastal Caiçaras who descend from Native Indians and Portuguese Colonizers. The maintenance of such populations, and their existence in spite of the deforestation that occurred on the Atlantic Forest coast, deserves especial attention and analysis. In this study, I address, in particular, the Caiçaras who live on the coast of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro States, illustrating with examples of coastal inhabitants from other areas, such as Bahia State (NE coast) and of other forested areas (riverine caboclos of the Amazon). The major focus of this study, based on previous research, performed since 1986 in several populations or villages of the Atlantic Forest coast, is to understand the resilience of the Caiçaras, which is analyzed using ecological concepts, such as metapopulation, resilience and adaptive cycles. The Caiçara populations are located on islands (Búzios, Comprida, Grande, Ilhabela, Jaguanum, Gipóia) and on the coast (Bertioga, Puruba, Picinguaba, among others). Information gathered about the Caiçaras regarding the economic cycles of the local regions, along with ecological, historical and economic data available, are used to understand such resilience, and are complemented with comparative examples from the Brazilian Amazon and with variables such as the local restrictions imposed by environmental governmental agencies. PMID:17010204

  16. The Formation Of The First Solids In The Solar System: An Investigation Of CAI Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillifet, Esther; Baillié, K.; Charnoz, S.; Aléon, J.

    2012-10-01

    Chondritic meteorites are primitive bodies and therefore an important source of information on the first moments of planets formation. Chondrites contain several materials especially calcium and aluminum rich inclusions (CAIs), known to be the oldest objects of the solar system (4.567 Gyr - Amelin et al., 2002; Connelly et al., 2008) and thus the first solids to be formed. CAIs appear in various textures, sizes and compositions in chondrites. Though, all of them should have formed at high temperature (1300-1800 K) in the same region of the solar nebula by condensation from the gas (e.g. Grossman, 1972; Yoneda & Grossman, 1995; Petaev & Wood, 1998; Ebel & Grossman 2000). To answer this problem we study the CAI formation within the solar nebula using numerical simulations. For this work we developed a self consistent thermodynamical model of the solar nebula (see associated talk from Baillié et. al ) based on previous works (Calvet et. al, 1991; Hueso & Guillot, 2005; Dullemond, Dominik and Natta, 2001). Using this model, we simulate the young system with Lagrangian Implicit Disk Transport code (LIDT - Charnoz et. al, 2010). We will focus on the very first instants of the CAIs within the few years following their condensation. We will report our first results in terms of thermal history and investigate if turbulence-driven transport may explain the CAI diversity.

  17. Mineralogy and Petrology of EK-459-5-1, A Type B1 CAI from Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffcoat, C. R.; Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Lapen, T. J.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are a type of coarse-grained clast composed of Ca-, Al-, and Mg-rich silicates and oxides found in chondrite meteorites. Type B (CAIs) are exclusively found in the CV chondrite meteorites and are the most well studied type of inclusion found in chondritic meteorites. Type B1 CAIs are distinguished by a nearly monomineralic rim of melilite that surrounds an interior predominantly composed of melilite, fassaite (Ti and Al-rich clinopyroxene), anorthite, and spinel with varying amounts of other minor primary and secondary phases. The formation of Type B CAIs has received considerable attention in the course of CAI research and quantitative models, experimental results and observations from Type B inclusions remain largely in disagreement. Recent experimental results and quantitative models have shown that the formation of B1 mantles could have occurred by the evaporative loss of Si and Mg during the crystallization of these objects. However, comparative studies suggest that the lower bulk SiO2 compositions in B1s result in more prior melilite crystallization before the onset of fassaite and anorthite crystallization leading to the formation of thick melilite rich rims in B1 inclusions. Detailed petrographic and cosmochemical studies of these inclusions will further our understanding of these complex objects.

  18. Study monitors health effects of incinerators

    SciTech Connect

    Messer, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Waste-burning facilities could face tougher EPA regulations if a study of complying incinerators find stack emissions contribute to respiratory disease. A study is underway to determine what, if any, are the adverse health effects on humans resulting from waste burning. Volunteers living in a 2 mile radius of an incinerator were chosen for microscopic examination of cells flushed from their nasal passages.

  19. BEHAVIOUR OF METALS IN MUNICIPAL SLUDGE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emission of toxic metals from sewage sludge incinerators can present a risk to human health and the environment. ignificant base of data on the behaviour of metals in sludge incinerators has been compiled. hese data were examined in detail to identify the mechanisms responsib...

  20. METAL BEHAVIOR DURING MEDICAL WASTE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Medical waste contains toxic metals such as lead, cadmium, and mercury. onsequently, the incineration of medical waste may result in the emissions of trace metals into the environment, if incinerators are not properly designed and operated. PA's Risk Reduction Engineering Laborat...

  1. INCINERATION DATA ON ARSENIC AND LEAD EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since 1988, nine test programs have been conducted at the Environmental Protection Agency Incineration Research Facility aimed at evaluating the fate of trace metals in the rotary kiln incineration of hazardous wastes and Superfund site materials. esults of six of those test prog...

  2. 46 CFR 63.25-9 - Incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1). Incinerators in compliance with ISO 13617 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1), are considered to meet IMO MEPC.76(40). Incinerators in compliance with both ASTM F 1323 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1) and Annexes A1-A3 of IMO MEPC.76(40)...

  3. 46 CFR 63.25-9 - Incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1). Incinerators in compliance with ISO 13617 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1), are considered to meet IMO MEPC.76(40). Incinerators in compliance with both ASTM F 1323 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1) and Annexes A1-A3 of IMO MEPC.76(40)...

  4. 46 CFR 63.25-9 - Incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1). Incinerators in compliance with ISO 13617 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1), are considered to meet IMO MEPC.76(40). Incinerators in compliance with both ASTM F 1323 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1) and Annexes A1-A3 of IMO MEPC.76(40)...

  5. 46 CFR 63.25-9 - Incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1). Incinerators in compliance with ISO 13617 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1), are considered to meet IMO MEPC.76(40). Incinerators in compliance with both ASTM F 1323 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1) and Annexes A1-A3 of IMO MEPC.76(40)...

  6. 46 CFR 63.25-9 - Incinerators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1). Incinerators in compliance with ISO 13617 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1), are considered to meet IMO MEPC.76(40). Incinerators in compliance with both ASTM F 1323 (incorporated by reference; see 46 CFR 63.05-1) and Annexes A1-A3 of IMO MEPC.76(40)...

  7. FUEL-EFFICIENT SEWAGE SLUDGE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was performed to evaluate the status of incineration with low fuel use as a sludge disposal technology. The energy requirements, life-cycle costs, operation and maintenance requirements, and process capabilities of four sludge incineration facilities were evaluated. These...

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION RESIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the study was to provide data on the quantities and characteristics of solid and liquid discharges from hazardous waste incineration facilities. A total of 10 facilities were sampled comprising major incineration designs and flue gas treatment devices. All inlet an...

  9. Air emissions testing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    The article presents a brief overview of air emission sampling methods and analysis procedures related to stationary sources such as incinerators, power plants, and industrial boilers. It is intended primarily for the laboratory chemist or manager who is familiar with samples and methods associated with water or waste sources, but not with those associated with air and stack gas emissions.

  10. Health-risk assessment of incinerator stack emissions: Trace metals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jinhong.

    1990-01-01

    The research presented in this dissertation centers on the development of a method for health risk assessment of incinerator stack emissions within the context of multiple exposure pathways and on its application to a problem of contemporary interest. The emphasis is on toxic metal emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerators. A comparison of the amount of metal emissions shows that toxic metal emissions from MSW incinerators are generally of the same order of magnitude as those from hazardous waste incinerators. A hazard index for stack emitted metals based on toxicity and quantity are developed in this dissertation to screen metals which are important from a risk view-point. From this hazard index, lead and mercury are added to the known carcinogenic metals, i.e., arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, and nickel as candidates for the assessment. The method presented in this dissertation consists of hazard identification and hazard quantification. If a substance is identified as a potential human carcinogen, the carcinogenicity may be related to the chemical form of a substance and the route of exposure. Regarding the carcinogenic potency of a pollutant, the chemical form of a substance and the route of exposure is investigated. This type of information with regard to carcinogenic uncertainty is incorporated into hazard quantification. The appropriate carcinogenic group of a pollutant is also identified. In order to quantify the human health risks for the 7 metals, the following are determined in this dissertation: emission factors; mass particle-size distributions; air dispersion models; exposure assessment models; population data; and unit risks or cancer potency factors.

  11. A FIB/TEM Study of a Complex Wark-Lovering Rim on a Vigarano CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multilayered mineral sequences that surround most Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). Several processes have been proposed for WL rim formation, including condensation, flash-heating or reaction with a nebular reservoir, or combinations of these [e.g. 1-7], but no consensus exists. Our previous coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and NanoSIMS O isotopic measurements showed that a WL rim experienced flash heating events in a nebular environment with planetary O isotopic composition, distinct from the (16)O-rich formation environment [6]. Our efforts have focused on CAIs from the CV(sub red) chondrites, especially Vigarano, because these have escaped much of the parent body alteration effects that are common in CAIs from CV(sub ox) group.

  12. Deriving High Resolution UV Aerosol Optical Depth over East Asia using CAI-OMI Joint Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring aerosols using near UV spectral region have been successfully performed over decades by Ozong Monitoring Instruments (OMI) with benefit of strong aerosol signal over continuous dark surface reflectance, both land and ocean. However, because of big foot print of OMI, the cloud contamination error was a big issue in the UV aerosol algorithm. In the present study, high resolution UV aerosol optical depth (AOD) over East Asia was derived by collaborating the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite/Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (GOSAT/TANSO)-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) and OMI together. AOD of 0.1 degree grid resolution was retrieved using CAI band 1 (380nm) by bring OMI lv.2 aerosol type, single scattering albedo, and aerosol layer peak height in 1 degree grid resolution. Collocation of the two dataset within the 0.5 degree grid with time difference of OMI and CAI less than 5 minute was selected. Selected region becomes wider as it goes to the higher latitude. Also, calculated degradation factor of 1.57 was applied to CAI band1 (380nm) by comparing normalized radiance and Lambertian Equivalent Reflectivity (LER) of both sensors. The calculated degradation factor was reasonable over dark scene, but inconsistent over cirrus cloud and bright area. Then, surface reflectance was developed by compositing CAI LER minimum data over three month period, since the infrequent sampling rate associated with the three-day recursion period of GOSAT and the narrow CAI swath of 1000 km. To retrieve AOD, look up table (LUT) was generated using radiative transfer model VLIDORT NGST. Finally, the retrieved AOD was validated with AERONET ground based measurement data during the Dragon-NE Asia campaign in 2012.

  13. Verification of new cloud discrimination algorithm using GOSAT TANSO-CAI in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ishida, H.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) was launched in 2009 to measure the global atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations. GOSAT is equipped with two sensors: the Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI). The presence of clouds in the instantaneous field-of-view (IFOV) of the FTS leads to incorrect estimates of the concentrations. Thus, the FTS data which are suspected to be cloud-contaminated must be identified using a CAI cloud discrimination algorithm and rejected. Conversely, overestimation of clouds leads to reduce the amount of the FTS data which can be used to estimate the greenhouse gases concentrations. It becomes a serious problem in the region of tropical rainforest such as the Amazon, where there are very few remaining FTS data by cloud cover. The preparation for the launch of the GOSAT-2 in fiscal 2017 has been progressing. To improve the accuracy of estimates of the greenhouse gases concentrations, we need to refine the existing CAI cloud discrimination algorithm. For the reason, a new cloud discrimination algorithm using support vector machines (SVM) was developed. Visual inspections can use the locally optimized thresholds, though the existing CAI cloud discrimination algorithm uses the common thresholds all over the world. Thus, it is certain that the accuracy of visual inspections is better than these algorithms in the limited region without areas such as ice and snow, where it is difficult to discriminate between clouds and ground surfaces. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of the new cloud discrimination algorithm by comparing with the existing CAI cloud discrimination algorithm and visual inspections of the same CAI images in the Amazon. We will present our latest results.

  14. Arginine oscillation explains Na+ independence in the substrate/product antiporter CaiT

    PubMed Central

    Kalayil, Sissy; Schulze, Sabrina; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Most secondary-active transporters transport their substrates using an electrochemical ion gradient. In contrast, the carnitine transporter (CaiT) is an ion-independent, l-carnitine/γ-butyrobetaine antiporter belonging to the betaine/carnitine/choline transporter family of secondary transporters. Recently determined crystal structures of CaiT from Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis revealed an inverted five-transmembrane-helix repeat similar to that in the amino acid/Na+ symporter LeuT. The ion independence of CaiT makes it unique in this family. Here we show that mutations of arginine 262 (R262) make CaiT Na+-dependent. The transport activity of R262 mutants increased by 30–40% in the presence of a membrane potential, indicating substrate/Na+ cotransport. Structural and biochemical characterization revealed that R262 plays a crucial role in substrate binding by stabilizing the partly unwound TM1′ helix. Modeling CaiT from P. mirabilis in the outward-open and closed states on the corresponding structures of the related symporter BetP reveals alternating orientations of the buried R262 sidechain, which mimic sodium binding and unbinding in the Na+-coupled substrate symporters. We propose that a similar mechanism is operative in other Na+/H+-independent transporters, in which a positively charged amino acid replaces the cotransported cation. The oscillation of the R262 sidechain in CaiT indicates how a positive charge triggers the change between outward-open and inward-open conformations as a unifying critical step in LeuT-type transporters. PMID:24101465

  15. High expression of CAI2, a 9p21-embedded long non-coding RNA, contributes to advanced stage neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Barnhill, Lisa M.; Williams, Richard T.; Cohen, Olga; Kim, Youngjin; Batova, Ayse; Mielke, Jenna A.; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Bao, Lei; Yu, Alice L.; Diccianni, Mitchell B.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer with significant genomic and biological heterogeneity. p16 and ARF, two important tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 9p21, are inactivated commonly in most cancers but paradoxically overexpressed in neuroblastoma. Here we report that exon γ in p16 is also part of an undescribed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that we have termed CAI2 (CDKN2A/ARF Intron 2 lncRNA). CAI2 is a single exon gene with a poly A signal located in but independent of the p16/ARF exon 3. CAI2 is expressed at very low levels in normal tissue but is highly expressed in most tumor cell lines with an intact 9p21 locus. Concordant expression of CAI2 with p16 and ARF in normal tissue along with the ability of CAI2 to induce p16 expression suggested that CAI2 may regulate p16 and/or ARF. In neuroblastoma cells transformed by serial passage in vitro, leading to more rapid proliferation, CAI2, p16 and ARF expression all increased dramatically. A similar relationship was also observed in primary neuroblastomas where CAI2 expression was significantly higher in advanced stage neuroblastoma, independently of MYCN amplification. Consistent with its association with high risk disease, CAI2 expression was also significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes, although this effect was reduced when adjusted for MYCN amplification. Taken together, our findings suggested that CAI2 contributes to the paradoxical overexpression of p16 in neuroblastoma, where CAI2 may offer a useful biomarker of high-risk disease. PMID:25028366

  16. The effects of gender and cooperative learning with CAI on college students' computer science achievement and attitudes toward computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ching-Heng

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of gender and cooperative learning with CAI on college students' computer science achievement and attitudes toward computers, when the effects of computer ownership, prior computer instruction, previous software and programming experience were controlled. The participants were 155 undergraduates enrolled in introductory computer courses at two colleges in North Taiwan during the Fall 1996 semester. Before the treatment period, they were asked to fill out the Background Data Form, instructed with cooperative learning strategy, and trained on cooperative and individual learning with CAI. During the treatment period, they were randomly assigned to the treatment (78 students) or the control group (77 students). The treatment group students used a CAI program on computer numbering, encoding, and hardware systems with their partner throughout all six CAI sessions. The control group students used the same CAI program individually within the six CAI sessions. After the 6-week treatment period, both groups were posttested by a 40-item multiple-choice Computer Science Achievement Test (CSAT) and a 30-item Computer Attitude Scale (CAS). Data for both posttests were collected from 153 students (77 in the treatment, 76 in the control group; 62 males, 91 females) and analyzed by MANCOVA and follow-up univariate hierarchical MRC analyses for ANCOVAs. Based on the covariate-adjusted CSAT scores, the results indicated that students using CAI cooperatively had a significantly higher mean than those using CAI individually. Neither gender nor interaction effects were found. Regarding the covariate-adjusted CAS scores, the results showed that males had a significantly higher mean than females. No treatment or interaction effects were found. Due to the higher computer achievement resulted from cooperative learning with CAI, this study suggested that instructors apply cooperative learning strategy in CAI settings in computer courses

  17. TESTING OF TOXICOLOGY AND EMISSIONS SAMPLING METHODOLOGY FOR OCEAN INCINERATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report addresses the development and testing of a system to expose marine organisms to hazardous waste emissions in order to assess the potential toxicity of incinerator plumes at sea as they contact the marine environment through air-sea exchange and initial mixing. A sampli...

  18. Processing of refractory meteorite inclusions (CAIs) in parent-body atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, Morris; Bunch, T. E.; Cassen, Pat; Reynolds, Ray T.; Chang, S.

    1990-01-01

    Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in refractory meteorites are shown to have been subject to partial melting during a suitably high gas density/small scale height regime arising during gasdynamic deceleration in a temporary atmosphere around an accreting parent body. The presence of dust in such an atmosphere would have increased the pressure gradient with height, lowering the boiloff rate, and permitting dust particles to become trapped in the partially melted material. CAIs may therefore be studied as probes of a primitive atmosphere.

  19. 33 CFR 159.131 - Safety: Incinerating device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety: Incinerating device. 159... (CONTINUED) POLLUTION MARINE SANITATION DEVICES Design, Construction, and Testing § 159.131 Safety: Incinerating device. An incinerating device must not incinerate unless the combustion chamber is closed,...

  20. Source-emission testing of hospital and classified-waste incinerators, Plattsburgh AFB, New York. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.A.

    1988-07-01

    Source-emission testing for particulates and hydrogen chloride emissions was conducted on the USAF Hospital pathological incinerator at Plattsburgh AFB. This survey was requested to evaluate emissions with respect to a proposed New York State Standard for medical care facility-waste incinerators. The 380 BMW/MSS classified-waste incinerator was also tested because of concerns that similar emissions could be produced from this unit. Results indicate that the hospital incinerator did not meet the present air-emission standards or proposed standards with the exception of hydrogen chloride (HCl) emissions. The classified-waste incinerator met both standards with respect to visible emissions but did not meet the standards for particulate emissions. Although not required by present or proposed regulations, the classified waste incinerator was evaluated for HCl emissions; results indicate that this unit met the proposed HCl emissions standards for infectious waste incinerators. Since only one sample run of the three required by testing methods could be accomplished on the classified-waste unit, results should only be used as an indicator of performance and not as definite evidence of either meeting or failing to meet regulations.

  1. Testing fluidized bed incinerators for energy-efficient operation for the Southtowns Sewage Treatment Agency. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    Two methods for improving the energy efficiency of fluidized bed sludge incinerators were evaluated. The first method used paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents for municipal sludge instead of lime and ferric chloride. Automatic control of the incinerator was the second method evaluated for energy savings. To evaluate the use of paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents, varying quantities of paper pulp were added to the liquid sludge to determine the optimal sludge-to-paper pulp ratio. The effect of the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge on plant operations also was evaluated. When compared to sludge conditioned with lime and ferric chloride, the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge had similar cake release and feed characteristics, higher BTU values for the dry sludge solids, required less auxiliary fuel for incineration, and generated less ash for disposal. The paper pulp and polymer did not have any appreciable negative effects on the operation of the wastewater treatment plant. It was estimated that processing and incinerating the sludge conditioned with paper pulp and polymer resulted in a cost savings of up to $91.73 per dry ton of activated sludge solids. To evaluate the effect of automatic control, all the incinerator operating parameters including air flow rates, fuel oil feed rates, and sludge feed rates, were automatically monitored and controlled to minimize auxiliary fuel oil use and to keep the incinerator running at optimal conditions. Although effective, the estimated cost savings for automatic control of the incinerator were small.

  2. Microbiological Safety Evaluation of an Industrial Refuse Incinerator

    PubMed Central

    Barbeito, Manuel S.; Gremillion, Gardner G.

    1968-01-01

    An industrial refuse incinerator was tested to determine minimal operating temperatures required to prevent release of viable microorganisms into the atmosphere. A liquid suspension of Bacillus subtilis var. niger spores was disseminated into the firebox as an aerosol, and dry spores mixed with animal bedding were dumped into the firebox. The minimal requirement for wet spores was 575 F (302 C) for the firebox air temperature and 385 F (196 C) for the firebrick refractory lining. When dry spores were used, these temperatures were 700 and 385 F (371 and 196 C), respectively. Images Fig. 1 PMID:4967068

  3. An investigation of environmental levels of cadmium and lead in airborne matter and surface soils within the locality of a municipal waste incinerator.

    PubMed

    Collett, R S; Oduyemi, K; Lill, D E

    1998-01-19

    The results of an investigation into the environmental impact of heavy metals in the airborne emissions from the Baldovie municipal waste incinerator, Scotland, are presented. A sampling network of 1-km grid squares covering a 7 x 9 km area was established over the incinerator plant and its surroundings. Surface soil core samples were collected from within each 1 km2 and analysed for cadmium and lead content. The spatial distribution of lead levels in soils showed a marked variation downwind from the Baldovie incinerator in comparison with the background level for the area but remained well within the typical range of lead in rural, unpolluted, British soils. A comparison of the observed levels of lead in local soils, with the predicted downwind long-term ground level lead distribution in air indicates that atmospheric emissions of lead originating from the Baldovie incinerator directly determine concentrations of lead in soils within a radius of 5 km of the incinerator. An empirical relationship between the levels of lead in soils and the long-term levels in air was established. In the case of cadmium, the spatial distribution of the heavy metal showed neither a marked nor extensive contamination of the sampled area around the incinerator and remained within the typical range of cadmium levels in rural, unpolluted, British soils. The work concludes that atmospheric emissions of lead from the Baldovie incinerator significantly determines the local distribution of lead in soils within the immediate vicinity of the incinerator. PMID:9514037

  4. Stable Magnesium Isotope Variation in Melilite Mantle of Allende Type B1 CAI EK 459-5-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Jeffcoat, C. R.; Lapen, T. J.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Ross, D. K.

    2014-01-01

    Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the earliest formed crystalline material in our solar system and they record early Solar System processes. Here we present petrographic and delta Mg-25 data of melilite mantles in a Type B1 CAI that records early solar nebular processes.

  5. The Interplay between Different Forms of CAI and Students' Preferences of Learning Environment in the Secondary Science Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chun-Yen; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2005-01-01

    This evaluation study investigated the effects of a teacher-centered versus student-centered computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on 10th graders' earth science student learning outcomes. This study also explored whether the effects of different forms of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on student learning outcomes were influenced by student…

  6. Gender Role, Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation in CAIS ("XY-Women") Compared With Subfertile and Infertile 46,XX Women.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Franziska; Fliegner, Maike; Krupp, Kerstin; Rall, Katharina; Brucker, Sara; Richter-Appelt, Hertha

    2016-01-01

    The perception of gender development of individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) as unambiguously female has recently been challenged in both qualitative data and case reports of male gender identity. The aim of the mixed-method study presented was to examine the self-perception of CAIS individuals regarding different aspects of gender and to identify commonalities and differences in comparison with subfertile and infertile XX-chromosomal women with diagnoses of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKHS) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The study sample comprised 11 participants with CAIS, 49 with MRKHS, and 55 with PCOS. Gender identity was assessed by means of a multidimensional instrument, which showed significant differences between the CAIS group and the XX-chromosomal women. Other-than-female gender roles and neither-female-nor-male sexes/genders were reported only by individuals with CAIS. The percentage with a not exclusively androphile sexual orientation was unexceptionally high in the CAIS group compared to the prevalence in "normative" women and the clinical groups. The findings support the assumption made by Meyer-Bahlburg ( 2010 ) that gender outcome in people with CAIS is more variable than generally stated. Parents and professionals should thus be open to courses of gender development other than typically female in individuals with CAIS. PMID:26133743

  7. Dioxin analysis of Philadelphia Northwest Incinerator. Summary report. Volume 2. Appendices A - F. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Neulicht, R.

    1985-10-31

    A study was conducted by US EPA Region 3 to determine the dioxin-related impact of the Philadelphia Northwest Incinerator on public health. Specifically, it was designed to assess quantitatively the risks to public health resulting from emissions into the ambient air of dioxins as well as the potential effect of deposition of dioxins on the soil in the vicinity of the incinerator. Volume 1 is an executive summary of the study findings. Volume 2 contains contractor reports, laboratory analysis results and other documentation.

  8. Continuous emissions monitoring of mixed waste incinerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, Gerard P.; Bentley, G. E.; Crain, J. S.; Fry, Herbert A.; Funk, David J.; Moore, David S.; Oldenborg, Richard C.; Palmer, Byron A.; Swanson, Basil I.

    1993-03-01

    A system for the real-time monitoring of emissions from incinerators must be developed which can address the needs of the DOE community and others involved in mixed waste incineration. These needs are an outgrowth of the ever-increasing waste storage problems and the growing concern of the public, as witnessed by the stricter compliance requirements of federal and state agencies, that the products of incineration are hazardous to their health and injurious to the environment. This paper focuses on the technologies being developed here at Los Alamos and other laboratories which address the detection of a broad spectrum of toxic and hazardous chemicals.

  9. IOW refuse incinerator to warm prisoners

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, D.

    1981-09-22

    Talks are underway for the possible construction of an incinerator on the Isle of Wight that would serve the prisons with heat. Construction would start in January 1985 and after a six-month trial period, the incinerator would be in full operation by 1987. Annual saving in energy terms would be as much as 1 million gallons of oil a year if a local hospital would also be linked to the heating scheme. The estimated cost of processing refuse by the incinerator is 7 pounds/tonne as opposed to the present 6 pounds/tonne by landfill disposal.

  10. Characterization of hazardous-waste incineration residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Van Buren, D.; Poe, G.; Castaldini, C.

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide data on the quantities and characteristics of solid and liquid discharges from hazardous-waste-incineration facilities. A total of 10 facilities were sampled comprising major incineration designs and flue-gas-treatment devices. All inlet and outlet liquid and solid streams were sampled and subjected to extensive analyses for organic and inorganic pollutant concentrations. Laboratory analyses for solid discharge streams also included leachate evaluations using standard EPA toxicity tests for metals and a draft TCLP toxicity procedure for volatile and semivolatile organics and metals. Monitored data on incinerator facility operation were then used to determine the discharge rates of detected pollutants.

  11. Environmental impacts of post-consumer material managements: recycling, biological treatments, incineration.

    PubMed

    Valerio, F

    2010-11-01

    The environmental impacts of recycling, mechanical biological treatments (MBT) and waste-to-energy incineration, the main management strategies to respond to the increasing production of post-consumer materials are reviewed and compared. Several studies carried out according to life-cycle assessment (LCA) confirm that the lowest environmental impact, on a global scale, is obtained by recycling and by biological treatments (composting and anaerobic fermentations) if compost is used in agriculture. The available air emission factors suggest that, on a local scale, mechanical biological treatments with energy recovery of biogas, may be intrinsically safer than waste-to-energy incinerators. Several studies confirm the capability of biological treatments to degrade many toxic xenobiotic contaminating urban wastes such as dioxins and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, an important property to be improved, for safe agricultural use of compost. Further LCA studies to compare the environmental impact of MBTs and of waste-to-energy incinerators are recommended. PMID:20573498

  12. Incinerator development program for processing transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hedahl, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    In the fall of 1981, two short-term tests were conducted on a controlled air and a rotary kiln incinerator to assess their potential for processing transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The primary purpose of the test program was a proof-of-principle verification that the incinerators could achieve near-complete combustion of the combustible portion of the waste, while mixed with high percentages of noncombustible and metal waste materials. Other important test objectives were to obtain system design information including off-gas and end-product characteristics and incinerator operating parameters. Approximately 7200 kg of simulated (non-TRU) waste from the INEL were processed during the two tests.

  13. Learner Control of Instructional Sequencing Within an Adaptive Tutorial CAI Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Robert J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This study was designed to test effects of a specified degree of learner control over the sequencing of instructional materials in a self contained tutorial CAI course in COBOL programming. Findings describe contributions and interactions of learner controlled variables with respect to instructional effectiveness and efficiency. (RAO)

  14. Role of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) in an Introductory Computer Concepts Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the role of computer assisted instruction (CAI) in undergraduate education via a survey of related literature and specific applications. Describes an undergraduate computer concepts course and includes appendices of instructions, flowcharts, programs, sample student work in accounting, COBOL instructional model, decision logic in a…

  15. C.A.I. as a Means for Educational Justice in Primary Schools: A Greek Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raptis, Nicos

    This study examines the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on the inequalities in education among children of less privileged backgrounds. A natural science lesson was taught to 116 children at the fifth level of the Greek primary school. Subjects went to two different public schools, one of which was in a privileged area, and the…

  16. A Pseudo-Language for Creating CAI Programs on APL Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gucker, Edward J.

    1973-01-01

    Encourages the use of APL as a language for computer assisted instruction (CAI) instead of such languages as BASIC or COURSEWRITER. Describes a set of APL functions that can simulate to some extent the features of COURSEWRITER, while permitting a more experienced course author to use the full mathematical power of APL. (Author/JF)

  17. Performance assessment of the cellulose absorption index (CAI) method for estimating crop residue cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate and quick field estimation of crop residues are important for carbon sequestration and biofuel production programs. Landscape-scale assessment of this vital information has promoted the use of remote sensing technology. The cellulose absorption index (CAI) technique has outperformed other ...

  18. Assessing the Impact of Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) in Undergraduate Latin American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child, Jack

    This paper assesses the impact of using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in three American University undergraduate classes, a General Education survey course on Latin America (taught in English), and two Spanish language courses. The courses utilized both commercial software programs and software programs authored by faculty using Macintosh…

  19. CAI for the Visually Handicapped: Promising Collaboration Between Two and Four-Year Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, William K.; And Others

    This report describes the efforts of the Office of Research and Extension of the North Carolina State University (NCSU) School of Education to develop vocal computer-assisted instruction (CAI) tutorials for blind junior college students, the rationale behind those efforts, the costs and means of funding for the project, and suggested ways in which…

  20. 35 Secondary V Students Comment on Their Experience With C.A.I. (Preliminary Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gateau, Bernard

    An instrument has been designed and used to quantify the degree of student dissatisfaction with computer-assisted instruction (CAI) experiences. The instrument, entitled PERPI-LPI, was derived from the service test Perceptions Etudiantes de la Relation Professeur-Etudiants (Student Observations on the Teacher-Student Relationship). It measures the…

  1. On the Design and Development of Pedagogy-First CAI Tools for CS Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadaparty, K.; And Others

    This paper presents the implications of an ongoing project on the design and development of multimedia instructional material for teaching and learning computer science topics at both graduate and undergraduate levels. Important pedagogical requirements that CAI software should satisfy include: (1) animation of the changes in tree topologies; (2)…

  2. Evaluation of Title I CAI Programs at Minnesota State Correctional Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Richard S.; Welch, Wayne W.

    Three Minnesota correctional institutions used computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on PLATO terminals to improve reading and mathematics skills: (1) the State Reformatory for Men, St. Cloud (males, ages 17-21); (2) the Minnesota Home School, Sauk Centre (males and females, ages 12-18); and (3) the State Training School, Red Wing (males, ages…

  3. Web Pages: An Effective Method of Providing CAI Resource Material in Histology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    Presents research that introduces computer-aided instruction (CAI) resource material as an integral part of the second-year histology course at the University of Natal Medical School. Describes the ease with which this software can be developed, using limited resources and available skills, while providing students with valuable learning…

  4. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Engineering Dynamics. CAI-Systems Memo Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, John W.

    A 90-minute computer-assisted instruction (CAI) unit course supplemented by a 1-hour lecture on the dynamic nature of three-dimensional rotations and Euler angles was given to 29 undergraduate engineering students. The area of Euler angles was selected because it is essential to problem-working in three-dimensional rotations of a rigid body, yet…

  5. The Anatomy and Bulk Composition of CAI Rims in the Vigarano (CV3) Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, A.; Boynton, W. V.

    1993-07-01

    A striking feature of Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in chondrites is the presence of mineralogical layers that typically form rim sequences up to 50 micrometers thick [1]. Many ideas regarding the origin of CAI rims have been proposed, but none are entirely satisfactory. The detailed mineralogy and bulk compositions of relatively unaltered CAI rims in the Vigarano (CV3) chondrite described here provide constraints on hypotheses of rim formation. Rim Mineralogy: CAIs in Vigarano consist of melilite (mel)- and spinel (sp)- rich varieties, both of which are rimmed [2]. Around mel-rich objects, the layer sequence is CAI interior --> sp-rich layer (sometimes absent) --> mel/anorthite (anor) layer --> Ti-Al-rich clinopyroxene (Tpx) layer --> Al- diopside (Al-diop) layer --> olivine (ol) +/- Al-diop layer --> host matrix. The sequence around sp-rich objects differs from this in that the mel/anor layer is absent. Both the sp-rich layer around mel-cored CAIs and the cores of sp-rich CAIs in Vigarano are largely comprised of a fine-grained (<=1 micrometer) intergrowth of sp, Tpx, and minor mel and perovskite. These intergrowths are typically so fine grained that little internal texture is discernible. Mixing calculations suggest the presence of ~10 vol% Tpx in the sp-rich layer of two mel-cored CAIs, and the presence of ~35 vol% Tpx within one sp-cored CAI. The mel/anor layer is sometimes monomineralic, consisting of mel alone, or bimineralic, consisting of both mel and anor. Where bimineralic, anor typically occurs in the outer part of the layer. In places, anor (An(sub)99-100) has partially altered to nepheline and voids. Rim mel is systematically less gehlenitic than mel in the CAI interiors, especially compared to mel in the interior adjacent to the rims. The Tpx layer (>2 and up to 15 wt% TiO2) and Al-diop layer (<2 wt% TiO2) are monomineralic and show chemical zoning trends radial to the CAIs. Moving outward, TiO2 and Al2O3 generally decrease, while SiO2 and Mg

  6. A Cross-National CAI Tool To Support Learning Operations Decision-Making and Market Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, Robert J.; Afanasiev, Mikhail Y.; Dologite, Dorothy G.

    1999-01-01

    Describes bicultural (United States and Russia) development of a computer-aided instruction (CAI) tool to learn management decision-making using information systems technologies. The program has been used with undergraduate and graduate students in both countries; it integrates free and controlled market concepts and combines traditional computer…

  7. Implementing CAI at San Juan College: Toward the Campus of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, John B.

    In 1991, a study was conducted at San Juan College (SJC) to examine existing research, issues, and faculty attitudes and needs regarding computer-assisted instruction (CAI). A faculty needs assessment survey was prepared and conducted, a review of the research literature was undertaken, and initial guidelines were drafted for the utilization of…

  8. Comparison of in situ vitrification and rotary kiln incineration for soils treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, T.L. )

    1991-09-01

    In the hazardous waste community, the term thermal destruction' is a catchall phrase that broadly refers to high temperature destruction of hazardous contaminants. Included in the thermal destruction category are treatment technologies such as rotary kiln incineration, fluidized bed incineration, infrared thermal treatment, wet air oxidation, pyrolytic incineration, and vitrification. Among them, conventional rotary kiln incineration, a disposal method for many years, is the most well established, and often serves as a barometer to gauge the relative success of similar technologies. Public sentiment on an environmental issues and increasingly stringent environmental regulations has, over time, spurred design and development of innovative thermal treatment processes directed toward reducing harmful emissions and residuals that may require further treatment or disposal. In situ vitrification (ISV), a technology that combines heat and immobilization, is one such innovative and relatively new technology. This paper presents a comparison of ISV and rotary kiln incineration for soils treatment in the areas of process performance, process residuals, process limitations, applicable or relevant and appropriate (ARARs) regulations, criteria and limitations, and costs.

  9. Control efficiency determination of sudden expansion incinerator bldg 348, Kelly AFB, Texas. Final report, 19 July 1995-11 January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    Compliance emissions testing and Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) destruction efficiency determination were conducted on the Sudden Expansion (SUE) Incinerator located at the Kelly AFB Fuel Accessory Test Facility, Bldg 348. The purpose of the Kelly AFB SUE Incinerator is to destroy calibration fluid vapors emitted from fuel accessory test stands located in Bldg 348. The incinerator can also be used to destroy liquid waste calibration fluid by burning it as a supplemental fuel. Emissions testing was conducted during combustion of both vapors and liquid calibration fluid. For purposes of determining the incinerator VOC destruction efficiency, monitoring for Total VOC concentration in the inlet air stream was conducted on 19-20 July 1995. Emissions testing of the incinerator exhaust was conducted on 10-11 January 1996 and included monitoring for Total VOC, oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and visible emissions.

  10. Operations and research at the US EPA Incineration Research Facility: Annual report for FY93. Report for October 1992-September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Waterland, L.R.

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jefferson, Arkansas, is an experimental facility that houses a pilot-scale rotary kiln incineration system (RKS) and the associated waste handling, emission control, process control, and safety equipment; as well as onsite laboratory facilities. During fiscal year 1993, two major test programs were completed at the IRF: an evaluation of rotary kiln incinerator operation at low to moderate temperatures, and a series of tests in which simulated mixed wastes were incinerated to support the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. Results of a pilot-scale test program previously completed, a parametric evaluation of the fate of trace metals fed to a rotary kiln incinerator equipped with a Calvert Flux-Force/Condensation scrubber system, were reported during FY93. Finally, a fabric filter air pollution control system, including flue gas reheat, was incorporated into the RKS. This report summarizes all efforts completed or onging at the IRF during FY93.

  11. Does incineration turn infectious waste aseptic?

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, K; Inden, K; Kunishima, H; Ueno, K; Hatta, M; Gunji, Y; Watanabe, I; Kaku, M

    2005-08-01

    Incineration of infectious waste is considered to be biologically safe. We performed basic experiments to confirm that bacillus spores are killed by incineration in a muffle furnace. Biological samples containing 10(6) spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus were placed in stainless steel Petri dishes and then into hot furnaces. The furnace temperature and duration of incineration were 300 degrees C for 15 min, 300 degrees C for 30 min, 500 degrees C for 15 min, 500 degrees C for 30 min and 1100 degrees C for 3 min. We confirmed that all spores of B. stearothermophilus were killed at each of these settings. The effect of incineration seems to be equivalent to that of sterilization, based on the satisfactory sterilization assurance level of 10(-6). PMID:15963601

  12. THERMODYNAMIC FUNDAMENTALS USED IN HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermodynamics is the basic foundation of many engineeringpractices. nvironmental engineering is no exception, it is usingthermodynamic principles in many applications. n particular,those who are involved in the incineration of various wastes suchas hazardous and municipal wastes...

  13. An ion microprobe study of CAIs from CO3 meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Greenwood, R. C.; Fahey, A. J.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    When attempting to interpret the history of Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) it is often difficult to distinguish between primary features inherited from the nebula and those produced during secondary processing on the parent body. We have undertaken a systematic study of CAIs from 10 CO chondrites, believed to represent a metamorphic sequence with the goal of distinguishing primary and secondary features. ALHA 77307 (3.0), Colony (3.0), Kainsaz (3.1), Felix (3.2), ALH 82101 (3.3), Ornans (3.3), Lance (3.4), ALHA 77003 (3.5), Warrenton (3.6), and Isna (3.7) were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. We have identified 141 CAIs within these samples, and studied in detail the petrology of 34 inclusions. The primary phases in the lower petrologic types are spinel, melilite, and hibonite. Perovskite, FeS, ilmenite, anorthite, kirschsteinite, and metallic Fe are present as minor phases. Melilite becomes less abundant in higher petrologic types and was not detected in chondrites of type 3.5 and above, confirming previous reports that this mineral easily breaks down during heating. Iron, an element that would not be expected to condense at high temperatures, has a lower abundance in spinel from low-petrologic-type meteorites than those of higher grade, and CaTiO3 is replaced by FeTiO3 in meteorites of higher petrologic type. The abundance of CAIs is similar in each meteorite. Eight inclusions have been analyzed by ion probe. The results are summarized. The results obtained to date show that CAIs in CO meteorites, like those from other meteorite classes, contain Mg* and that Mg in some inclusions has been redistributed.

  14. Chronology of chrondrule and CAI formation: Mg-Al isotopic evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, G. J.; Davis, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Details of the chondrule and Ca-Al-rich inclusion (CAI) formation during the earliest history of the solar system are imperfectly known. Because CAI's are more 'refractory' than ferromagnesian chondrules and have the lowest recorded initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of any solar system materials, the expectation is that CAI's formed earlier than chondrules. But it is not known, for example, if CAI formation had stopped by the time chondrule formation began. Conventional (absolute) age-dating techniques cannot adequately resolve small age differences (less than 10(exp 6) years) between objects of such antiquity. One approach has been to look at systematic differences in the daughter products of short-lived radionuclides such as Al-26 and I-129. Unfortunately, neither system appears to be 'well-behaved.' One possible reason for this circumstance is that later secondary events have partially reset the isotopic systems, but a viable alternative continues to be large-scale (nebular) heterogeneity in initial isotopic abundances, which would of course render the systems nearly useless as chronometers. In the past two years the nature of this problem has been redefined somewhat. Examination of the Al-Mg isotopic database for all CAI's suggests that the vast majority of inclusions originally had the same initial Al-26/Al-27 abundance ratio, and that the ill-behaved isotopic systematics now observed are the results of later partial reequilibration due to thermal processing. Isotopic heterogeneities did exist in the nebula, as demonstrated by the existence of so-called FUN inclusions in CV3 chondrites and isotopically anomalous hibonite grains in CM2 chondrites, which had little or no live Al-26 at the time of their formation. But, among the population of CV3 inclusions at least, FUN inclusions appear to have been a relatively minor nebular component.

  15. Phosphate bonded solidification of radioactive incinerator wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, B. W.; Langton, C. A.; Singh, D.

    1999-12-03

    The incinerator at the Department of Energy Savannah River Site burns low level radioactive and hazardous waste. Ash and scrubber system waste streams are generated during the incineration process. Phosphate Ceramic technology is being tested to verify the ash and scrubber waste streams can be stabilized using this solidification method. Acceptance criteria for the solid waste forms include leachability, bleed water, compression testing, and permeability. Other testing on the waste forms include x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  16. Synchronizing the Absolute and Relative Clocks: Pb-Pb and Al-Mg Systematics in CAIs from the Allende and NWA 2364 CV3 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Wadhwa, M.

    2009-03-01

    A Pb-Pb internal isochron of a type-B CAI from the NWA 2364 CV3 chondrite gives an absolute age of 4568.6 ± 0.2 Ma which contrasts with previous internal Pb-Pb ages of CAIs from Allende and Efremovka. Al-Mg systematics are also reported for CV3 CAIs.

  17. Pollutant emission characteristics of rice husk combustion in a vortexing fluidized bed incinerator.

    PubMed

    Duan, Feng; Chyang, Chiensong; Chin, Yucheng; Tso, Jim

    2013-02-01

    Rice husk with high volatile content was burned in a pilot scale vortexing fluidized bed incinerator. The fluidized bed incinerator was constructed of 6 mm stainless steel with 0.45 m in diameter and 5 m in height. The emission characteristics of CO, NO, and SO2 were studied. The effects of operating parameters, such as primary air flow rate, secondary air flow rate, and excess air ratio on the pollutant emissions were also investigated. The results show that a large proportion of combustion occurs at the bed surface and the freeboard zone. The SO2 concentration in the flue gas decreases with increasing excess air ratio, while the NOx concentration shows reverse trend. The flow rate of secondary air has a significant impact on the CO emission. For a fixed primary air flowrate, CO emission decreases with the secondary air flowrate. For a fixed excess air ratio, CO emission decreases with the ratio of secondary to primary air flow. The minimum CO emission of 72 ppm is attained at the operating condition of 40% excess air ratio and 0.6 partition air ratio. The NOx and SO2 concentrations in the flue gas at this condition are 159 and 36 ppm, which conform to the EPA regulation of Taiwan. PMID:23596954

  18. Metallic elements fractionation in municipal solid waste incineration residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Piotr R.; Kasina, Monika; Michalik, Marek

    2016-04-01

    Municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) residues are represented by three main materials: bottom ash, fly ash and air pollution control (APC) residues. Among them ˜80 wt% is bottom ash. All of that materials are products of high temperature (>1000° C) treatment of waste. Incineration process allows to obtain significant reduction of waste mass (up to 70%) and volume (up to 90%) what is commonly used in waste management to reduce the amount need to be landfilled or managed in other way. Incineration promote accumulation non-combustible fraction of waste, which part are metallic elements. That type of concentration is object of concerns about the incineration residues impact on the environment and also gives the possibility of attempts to recover them. Metallic elements are not equally distributed among the materials. Several factors influence the process: melting points, volatility and place and forms of metallic occurrence in the incinerated waste. To investigate metallic elements distribution in MSWI residues samples from one of the biggest MSW incineration plant in Poland were collected in 2015. Chemical analysis with emphasis on the metallic elements content were performed using inductively coupled plasma optical emission (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The bottom ash was a SiO2-CaO-Al2O3-Fe2O3-Na2O rich material, whereas fly ash and APC residues were mostly composed of CaO and SiO2. All of the materials were rich in amorphous phase occurring together with various, mostly silicate crystalline phases. In a mass of bottom ash 11 wt% were metallic elements but also in ashes 8.5 wt% (fly ash) and ˜4.5 wt% (APC residues) of them were present. Among the metallic elements equal distribution between bottom and fly ash was observed for Al (˜3.85 wt%), Mn (770 ppm) and Ni (˜65 ppm). In bottom ash Fe (5.5 wt%), Cr (590 ppm) and Cu (1250 ppm) were concentrated. These values in comparison to fly ash were 5-fold higher for Fe, 3-fold for Cu and 1.5-fold for

  19. Evaluation of the thermal stability POHC incinerability ranking in a pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.W.; Waterland, L.R.; Whitworth, W.E.; Carroll, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed at EPA's Incineration Research Facility to evaluate the thermal stability-based POHC incinerability ranking. In the tests, mixtures of 12 POHCs with predicted incinerability spanning the range of most to least difficult to incinerate class were combined with a clay-based sorbent and batch-fed to the facility's pilot-scale rotary kiln incinerator via a fiberpack drum ram feeder. Kiln operating conditions were varied to include a baseline operating condition, three modes of attempted incineration failure, and a worst case combination of the three failure modes. Kiln exit POHC DREs were in the 99.99 percent range for the volatile POHCs for the baseline, mixing failure (increased charge mass), and matrix failure (decreased feed H/C) tests. Semivolatile POHCs were not detected in the kiln exit for these tests; corresponding DREs were generally greater than 99.999 percent. The thermal failure (low kiln temperature) and worst case (combination of thermal, mixing, and matrix failure) tests resulted in substantially decreased kiln exit POHC DREs. These ranged from 99 percent or less for Freon 113 to greater than 99.999 percent for the less stable-ranked semivolatile POHCs. General agreement between relative kiln exit POHC DRE and predicted incinerability class was observed.

  20. Experimental incineration of low level radioactive samples.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Y; Hanafusa, T; Nagamatsu, T; Okada, S

    2000-08-01

    To determine the volume reduction potential for incineration of radioactivity in low-level radioactive waste, an incineration experiment was performed at the Okayama University Radioisotope Center (OURIC). Solid low-level radioactive samples (LLRS) were prepared for 15 routinely used radionuclides (45Ca, 1251, 32p, 33p, 35S, 59Fe, 123I, 131I, 67Ga, 99mTc, 111In, 3H, 14C, 51Cr, and 201Tl). For each radionuclide, incinerated one at a time, the smoke duct radioisotope concentration was less than 1/10 of the regulatory concentration limit (The Japanese law concerning prevention of radiation hazard due to radioisotopes, etc.). The radionuclide-containing combustible and semi-combustible LLRS were incinerated at the AP-1 50R furnace erected at OURIC, and the distribution of radioactivity inside and outside the furnace was measured. In the experimental incineration of LLRS containing these 15 radionuclides, the fractions released (RF) in the gas phase of the final smoke duct ranged from 0.165 to 0.99. The radioactivities remaining in the incineration residue were 99mTc, 87%; 59Fe, 83.1%; 45Ca, 75%; 51Cr, 62.1%; 33P, 62.0%; 32P, 61.1%; 67Ga, 57.7%; 35S, 26.0%; 111In, 21.1%; 201Tl, 16.6%; 123I, 11.9%; 131I, 8.2%; 125I, 2.4%; 14C, 0.39%; 3H, 0.04%. In the incineration of LLR S containing 35S, the rate of adhesion to the furnace wall was lower at high-temperature (809 degrees C) incineration than at low-temperature (376 degrees C) incineration. For LLRS containing one of the three radioiodines, 123I, 125I, or 131I, no such difference was observed between low (372 degrees C) and high (827 degrees C) temperature incineration (RF varied from 0.82 to 0.94). PMID:10910400

  1. Comparison of the composition and properties of municipal solid-waste incinerator ashes based on incinerator configuration and operation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ontiveros, J.L.

    1988-05-01

    Disposal of municipal solid wastes(MSW) is becoming a problem nationwide. Many sanitary landfills are either closing or approaching maximum capacity. With new landfills becoming difficult to site, alternative methods must be used to reduce the volume being disposed in landfills. Incineration, through thermal destruction, reduces the volume of MSW by up to 85%. However, problems do exist with the resulting fly and bottom ashes. Metals are not destroyed by this process, but are concentrated within the ashes. A majority of the ashes fail EPA's Extraction Procedure Toxicity Test by exceeding either cadmium or lead concentration limits. The objectives of this dissertation were threefold: i) examine the physical and chemical properties of ashes; ii) determine ash composition and morphology; and iii) determine extractive behavior of cadmium, chromium, and lead in an aqueous environment. Three different incinerators, from Canada, Massachusetts, and New Jersey, burning primarily residential MSW, were chosen to determine equipment and operational effects on ash composition and extractive behavior. Supplemental combustion air provided more complete combustion. Cadmium, potassium and sodium preferentially partitioned to the fly ash with lead partitioning differently between fly and bottom ashes depending on the incinerator. Fly ash morphology and composition did not vary significantly between incinerators. The ash matrices were composed primarily of complex, multi-substituted aluminosilicates, amorphous glass, and iron oxides. CaSO/sub 4/, NaCl and KCl were the predominate species. SEM micrographs showed a variety of shapes throughout the particle ranges with crystals heavily dispersed on the surfaces.

  2. Energy recovery and cogeneration from an existing municipal incinerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crego, D. F.; Eller, V. L.; Stephenson, J. W.

    1982-02-01

    An existing 727 TPD incinerator burning mixed municipal refuse was deemed to be a feasible candidate for a cogeneration energy retrofit. It is indicated that equipment and construction of the retrofit will cost $17.6 million or $24,200/rated tonne in 1980 dollars; air pollution control equipment will cost 10.4 million or $14,300/tonne. Furnace temperature and gas samplings along with pilot air pollution control equipment tests were conducted. Refuse was characterized on both wet and dry seasons. Final design is based upon burning 155,000 TPY of refuse from which can be generated, sufficient steam and electricity for inhouse use and an additional amount of 64 million kWh for sale.

  3. 77 FR 9625 - Presentation of Final Conventional Conformance Test Criteria and Common Air Interface (CAI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ...The U.S. Department of Commerce's (DOC) National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Law Enforcement Standards Office (OLES), in partnership with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Office for Interoperability and Compatibility (OIC), will hold a public meeting on Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 1 p.m. Mountain Time, via teleconference. The purpose of the meeting is to present......

  4. Compound ultrarefractory CAI-bearing inclusions from CV3 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Marina A.; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; MacPherson, Glenn J.

    2012-12-01

    Abstract-Two compound calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>), 3N from the oxidized CV chondrite Northwest Africa (NWA) 3118 and 33E from the reduced CV chondrite Efremovka, contain ultrarefractory (UR) inclusions. 3N is a forsterite-bearing type B (FoB) <span class="hlt">CAI</span> that encloses UR inclusion 3N-24 composed of Zr,Sc,Y-rich oxides, Y-rich perovskite, and Zr,Sc-rich Al,Ti-diopside. 33E contains a fluffy type A (FTA) <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and UR <span class="hlt">CAI</span> 33E-1, surrounded by Wark-Lovering rim layers of spinel, Al-diopside, and forsterite, and a common forsterite-rich accretionary rim. 33E-1 is composed of Zr,Sc,Y-rich oxides, Y-rich perovskite, Zr,Sc,Y-rich pyroxenes (Al,Ti-diopside, Sc-rich pyroxene), and gehlenite. 3N-24's UR oxides and Zr,Sc-rich Al,Ti-diopsides are 16O-poor (Δ17O approximately -2‰ to -5‰). Spinel in 3N-24 and spinel and Al-diopside in the FoB <span class="hlt">CAI</span> are 16O-rich (Δ17O approximately -23 ± 2‰). 33E-1's UR oxides and Zr,Sc-rich Al,Ti-diopsides are 16O-depleted (Δ17O approximately -2‰ to -5‰) vs. Al,Ti-diopside of the FTA <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and spinel (Δ17O approximately -23 ± 2‰), and Wark-Lovering rim Al,Ti-diopside (Δ17O approximately -7‰ to -19‰). We infer that the inclusions experienced multistage formation in nebular regions with different oxygen-isotope compositions. 3N-24 and 33E-1's precursors formed by evaporation/condensation above 1600 °C. 3N and 33E's precursors formed by condensation and melting (3N only) at significantly lower temperatures. 3N-24 and 3N's precursors aggregated into a compound object and experienced partial melting and thermal annealing. 33E-1 and 33E avoided melting prior to and after aggregation. They acquired Wark-Lovering and common forsterite-rich accretionary rims, probably by condensation, followed by thermal annealing. We suggest 3N-24 and 33E-1 originated in a 16O-rich gaseous reservoir and subsequently experienced isotope exchange in a 16O-poor gaseous reservoir. Mechanism and timing of oxygen-isotope exchange remain</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22472558','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22472558"><span id="translatedtitle">Numerical study of radiation effect on the municipal solid waste combustion characteristics inside an <span class="hlt">incinerator</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wang, Jingfu Xue, Yanqing; Zhang, Xinxin; Shu, Xinran</p> <p>2015-10-15</p> <p>Highlights: • A 3-D model for the MSW <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> with preheated <span class="hlt">air</span> was developed. • Gas radiative properties were obtained from a statistical narrow-band model. • Non-gray body radiation model can provide more accurate simulation results. - Abstract: Due to its advantages of high degree volume reduction, relatively stable residue, and energy reclamation, <span class="hlt">incineration</span> becomes one of the best choices for Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal. However, detailed measurements of temperature and gas species inside a furnace are difficulty by conventional experimental techniques. Therefore, numerical simulation of MSW <span class="hlt">incineration</span> in the packed bed and gas flow field was applied. In this work, a three dimensional (3-D) model of <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> system, including flow, heat transfer, detailed chemical mechanisms, and non-gray gas models, was developed. Radiation from the furnace wall and the flame formed above the bed is of importance for drying and igniting the waste. The preheated <span class="hlt">air</span> with high temperature is used for the MSW combustion. Under the conditions of high temperature and high pressure, MSW combustion produces a variety of radiating gases. The wavelength-depend radiative properties of flame adopted in non-gray radiation model were obtained from a statistical narrow-band model. The influence of radiative heat transfer on temperature, flow field is researched by adiabatic model (without considering radiation), gray radiation model, and non-gray radiation model. The simulation results show that taking into account the non-gray radiation is essential.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22300361','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22300361"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantifying capital goods for waste <span class="hlt">incineration</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Brogaard, L.K.; Riber, C.; Christensen, T.H.</p> <p>2013-06-15</p> <p>Highlights: • Materials and energy used for the construction of waste <span class="hlt">incinerators</span> were quantified. • The data was collected from five <span class="hlt">incineration</span> plants in Scandinavia. • Included were six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. • The capital goods contributed 2–3% compared to the direct emissions impact on GW. - Abstract: Materials and energy used for the construction of modern waste <span class="hlt">incineration</span> plants were quantified. The data was collected from five <span class="hlt">incineration</span> plants (72,000–240,000 tonnes per year) built in Scandinavia (Norway, Finland and Denmark) between 2006 and 2012. Concrete for the buildings was the main material used amounting to 19,000–26,000 tonnes per plant. The quantification further included six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. The energy used for the actual on-site construction of the <span class="hlt">incinerators</span> was in the range 4000–5000 MW h. In terms of the environmental burden of producing the materials used in the construction, steel for the building and the machinery contributed the most. The material and energy used for the construction corresponded to the emission of 7–14 kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted throughout the lifetime of the <span class="hlt">incineration</span> plant. The assessment showed that, compared to data reported in the literature on direct emissions from the operation of <span class="hlt">incinerators</span>, the environmental impacts caused by the construction of buildings and machinery (capital goods) could amount to 2–3% with respect to kg CO{sub 2} per tonne of waste combusted.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6160475','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6160475"><span id="translatedtitle">Kiln control for <span class="hlt">incinerating</span> waste</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Byerly, H.L.; Kuhn, B.R.; Matter, D.C.; Vassiliou, E.</p> <p>1993-07-20</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">incinerating</span> kiln device is described capable of controlling the viscosity of molten slag contained within and discharged from the kiln, the device comprising a rotary kiln having a substantially cylindrical shape, an outside skin, a center axis, an inlet, and an outlet opposite the inlet, the kiln being inclined so that the slag exits from the outlet at a discharge position, and wherein the center axis and a line crossing the center axis and having the direction of gravity define a plane of zero position, the distance between the discharge position and the plane of zero position being an indirect measure of the angular viscosity of the slag, the higher said distance the higher the angular viscosity; first detection means at the outlet of the kiln for detecting the distance between the discharge position and the plane of zero position, thus determining the angular viscosity of the slag; and means for correcting the viscosity of the slag, if the distance between the plane of zero position and the discharge position deviates from a desired value, by feeding an additive to the inlet of the kiln.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23973476','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23973476"><span id="translatedtitle">Flow analysis of heavy metals in a pilot-scale <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> for residues from waste electrical and electronic equipment dismantling.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Long, Yu-Yang; Feng, Yi-Jian; Cai, Si-Shi; Ding, Wei-Xu; Shen, Dong-Sheng</p> <p>2013-10-15</p> <p>The large amount of residues generated from dismantling waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) results in a considerable environmental burden. We used material flow analysis to investigate heavy metal behavior in an <span class="hlt">incineration</span> plant in China used exclusively to <span class="hlt">incinerate</span> residues from WEEE dismantling. The heavy metals tested were enriched in the bottom and fly ashes after <span class="hlt">incineration</span>. However, the contents of heavy metals in the bottom ash, fly ash and exhaust gas do not have a significant correlation with that of the input waste. The evaporation and recondensation behavior of heavy metals caused their contents to differ with <span class="hlt">air</span> pollution control equipment because of the temperature difference during gas venting. Among the heavy metals tested, Cd had the strongest tendency to transfer during <span class="hlt">incineration</span> (TCd=69.5%) because it had the lowest melting point, followed by Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn. The exchangeable and residual fractions of heavy metals increased substantially in the <span class="hlt">incineration</span> products compared with that of the input residues. Although the mass of residues from WEEE dismantling can be reduced by 70% by <span class="hlt">incineration</span>, the safe disposal of the metal-enriched bottom and fly ashes is still required. PMID:23973476</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23263763','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23263763"><span id="translatedtitle">An assessment of dioxin contamination from the intermittent operation of a municipal waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> in Japan and associated remediation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Takeda, Nobuo; Takaoka, Masaki</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>Significant dioxin (polychlorinated dibenzo-para-dioxins (PCDDs)/polychlorinated dibenzo-furans (PCDFs)) pollution from a municipal solid waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> was discovered in 1997 in Osaka prefecture/Japan. The cause and mechanism of pollution was identified by a detailed assessment of the environment and <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> plant. The primary sources of PCDD/PCDF pollution were high dioxin releases from an intermittently operated waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> with PCDD/PCDF emissions of 150 ng-TEQ/Nm(3). PCDD/PCDF also accumulated in the wet scrubber system (3,000 μg TEQ/L) by adsorption and water recirculation in the <span class="hlt">incinerator</span>. Scrubber water was <span class="hlt">air</span>-cooled with a cooling tower located on the roof of the <span class="hlt">incinerator</span>. High concentrations of dioxins in the cooling water were released as aerosols into the surrounding and caused heavy soil pollution in the area near the plant. These emissions were considered as the major contamination pathway from the plant. Decontamination and soil remediation in and around the <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> plant were conducted using a variety of destruction technologies (including <span class="hlt">incineration</span>, photochemical degradation and GeoMelt technology). Although the soil remediation process was successfully finished in December 2006 about 3% of the waste still remains. The case demonstrates that releases from <span class="hlt">incinerators</span> which do not use best available technology or which are not operated according to best environmental practices can contaminate their operators and surrounding land. This significant pollution had a large impact on the Japanese government's approach toward controlling dioxin pollution. Since this incident, a ministerial conference on dioxins has successfully strengthened control measures. PMID:23263763</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22304595','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22304595"><span id="translatedtitle">Generation and distribution of PAHs in the process of medical waste <span class="hlt">incineration</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Chen, Ying; Zhao, Rongzhi; Xue, Jun; Li, Jinhui</p> <p>2013-05-15</p> <p>Highlights: ► PAHs generation and distribution features of medical waste <span class="hlt">incineration</span> are studied. ► More PAHs were found in fly ash than that in bottom ash. ► The highest proportion of PAHs consisted of the seven most carcinogenic ones. ► Increase of free oxygen molecule and burning temperature promote PAHs degradation. ► There is a moderate positive correlation between total PCDD/Fs and total PAHs. - Abstract: After the deadly earthquake on May 12, 2008 in Wenchuan county of China, several different <span class="hlt">incineration</span> approaches were used for medical waste disposal. This paper investigates the generation properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during the <span class="hlt">incineration</span>. Samples were collected from the bottom ash in an open burning slash site, surface soil at the open burning site, bottom ash from a simple <span class="hlt">incinerator</span>, bottom ash generated from the municipal solid waste (MSW) <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> used for medical waste disposal, and bottom ash and fly ash from an <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> exclusively used for medical waste. The species of PAHs were analyzed, and the toxicity equivalency quantities (TEQs) of samples calculated. Analysis results indicate that the content of total PAHs in fly ash was 1.8 × 10{sup 3} times higher than that in bottom ash, and that the strongly carcinogenic PAHs with four or more rings accumulated sensitively in fly ash. The test results of samples gathered from open burning site demonstrate that Acenaphthylene (ACY), Acenaphthene (ACE), Fluorene (FLU), Phenanthrene (PHE), Anthracene (ANT) and other PAHs were inclined to migrate into surrounding environment along <span class="hlt">air</span> and surface watershed corridors, while 4- to 6-ring PAHs accumulated more likely in soil. Being consistent with other studies, it has also been confirmed that increases in both free oxygen molecules and combustion temperatures could promote the decomposition of polycyclic PAHs. In addition, without the influence of combustion conditions, there is a positive correlation between</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750022313','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750022313"><span id="translatedtitle">Alternative communication network designs for an operational Plato 4 <span class="hlt">CAI</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mobley, R. E., Jr.; Eastwood, L. F., Jr.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>The cost of alternative communications networks for the dissemination of PLATO IV computer-aided instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) was studied. Four communication techniques are compared: leased telephone lines, satellite communication, UHF TV, and low-power microwave radio. For each network design, costs per student contact hour are computed. These costs are derived as functions of student population density, a parameter which can be calculated from census data for one potential market for <span class="hlt">CAI</span>, the public primary and secondary schools. Calculating costs in this way allows one to determine which of the four communications alternatives can serve this market least expensively for any given area in the U.S. The analysis indicates that radio distribution techniques are cost optimum over a wide range of conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15858367','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15858367"><span id="translatedtitle">Germination of white radish, buckwheat and qing-geng-<span class="hlt">cai</span> under low pressure in closed environment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hinokuchi, Tsutomu; Oshima, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi</p> <p>2004-11-01</p> <p>In order to cultivate plants under low pressure in closed environment, the germination rate of seeds of white radish was investigated under low pressure, low oxygen partial pressure and condition of pure oxygen. The result of these experiments showed that the germination rate was affected by the oxygen partial pressure. From this fact, it is possible to lower the total pressure by using only the pure oxygen in germination. Furthermore, the germination rates of seeds of buckwheat and qing-geng-<span class="hlt">cai</span> were also investigated in pure oxygen for the comparison. Consequently, though tendency in germination rate of white radish was similar to qing-geng-<span class="hlt">cai</span>, it was different from buckwheat. PMID:15858367</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991Geokh.....1307F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991Geokh.....1307F"><span id="translatedtitle">Metal phase in a B1-type <span class="hlt">CAI</span> fragment of the CV Efremovka chondrite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fisenko, A. V.; Ignatenko, K. I.; Lavrukhina, A. K.</p> <p>1991-09-01</p> <p>Results are presented from petrographical, mineralogical, and chemical analyses of metal particles in two B1-type <span class="hlt">CAI</span> fragments obtained from the Efremovka CV chondrite. The fragments were found to have a broken outer border consisting mainly of grains of Ca phosphates and a Fe/Ni phase. Both fragments are associated with V2O3-rich pyroxene. All individual particles and veins of the fragments are made up from high-Ni tenite, sometimes enriched in V. It is suggested that all features of the metal phase of this chondrite are a consequence of oxidation, or of partial evaporation of the metal followed by its oxidation, and that the characteristics of the metal phase of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> phase of the Efremovka chondrite may correspond to those of the protomatter of some fremdlings, such as the Allende chondrite.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5253721','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5253721"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Incineration</span> data on arsenic and lead emissions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Waterland, L.R.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Since 1988, nine test programs have been conducted at the Environmental Protection Agency <span class="hlt">Incineration</span> Research Facility aimed at evaluating the fate of trace metals in the rotary kiln <span class="hlt">incineration</span> of hazardous wastes and Superfund site materials. Results of six of those test programs have been reported to date. Of these six, two were parametric test series using a synthetic hazardous waste formulation and four were <span class="hlt">incineration</span> treatability test programs using contaminated Superfund site materials. Results of these six text programs show remarkably consistent arsenic and lead partitioning behavior among the <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> system discharge streams. Overall test programs lead exhibits relatively nonvolatile behavior over a kiln temperature range from nominally 815 C (1,500 F) to 980 C (1,800F) provided no chlorine is present in the feed material. Arsenic also exhibits relatively nonvolatile behavior over the same temperature range regardless of whether the feed contains chlorine at levels up to nominally 8 percent. Arsenic may be more volatile in the <span class="hlt">incineration</span> of environmental samples such as Superfund site wastes than it is from a synthetic waste in which arsenic is introduced as As2O3 in aqueous solution. However, even with environmental samples, behavior is relatively nonvolatile. Lead volatility significantly increases at all kiln temperatures as feed chlorine content increases from 0 to as high as 8 percent.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23561797','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23561797"><span id="translatedtitle">Quantifying capital goods for waste <span class="hlt">incineration</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brogaard, L K; Riber, C; Christensen, T H</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Materials and energy used for the construction of modern waste <span class="hlt">incineration</span> plants were quantified. The data was collected from five <span class="hlt">incineration</span> plants (72,000-240,000 tonnes per year) built in Scandinavia (Norway, Finland and Denmark) between 2006 and 2012. Concrete for the buildings was the main material used amounting to 19,000-26,000 tonnes per plant. The quantification further included six main materials, electronic systems, cables and all transportation. The energy used for the actual on-site construction of the <span class="hlt">incinerators</span> was in the range 4000-5000 MW h. In terms of the environmental burden of producing the materials used in the construction, steel for the building and the machinery contributed the most. The material and energy used for the construction corresponded to the emission of 7-14 kg CO2 per tonne of waste combusted throughout the lifetime of the <span class="hlt">incineration</span> plant. The assessment showed that, compared to data reported in the literature on direct emissions from the operation of <span class="hlt">incinerators</span>, the environmental impacts caused by the construction of buildings and machinery (capital goods) could amount to 2-3% with respect to kg CO2 per tonne of waste combusted. PMID:23561797</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=126280&keyword=chlorofluorocarbon&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=65330744&CFTOKEN=46250222','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=126280&keyword=chlorofluorocarbon&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=65330744&CFTOKEN=46250222"><span id="translatedtitle">EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF PIC FORMATION IN CFC <span class="hlt">INCINERATION</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The report gives results of the collection of combustion emission characterization data from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) <span class="hlt">incineration</span>. A bench scale test program to provide emission characterization data from CFC <span class="hlt">incineration</span> was developed and performed, with emphasis on the format...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NatNa...7..487W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012NatNa...7..487W"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental, health and safety issues: <span class="hlt">Incinerator</span> filters nanoparticles</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wiesner, Mark R.; Plata, Desiree L.</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>Cerium oxide nanoparticles introduced into a full-scale <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> are properly filtered and remain in ash residues, but other risks from nanoparticles generated or altered by <span class="hlt">incinerators</span> should not be overlooked.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/wa0562.photos.370802p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/wa0562.photos.370802p/"><span id="translatedtitle">13. Southwest corner of burning hood and <span class="hlt">incinerator</span>. North wall ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>13. Southwest corner of burning hood and <span class="hlt">incinerator</span>. North wall of scrubber cell room. Looking southwest. - Plutonium Finishing Plant, Waste <span class="hlt">Incinerator</span> Facility, 200 West Area, Richland, Benton County, WA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=43716&keyword=strontium&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=64265422&CFTOKEN=67321447','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=43716&keyword=strontium&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=64265422&CFTOKEN=67321447"><span id="translatedtitle">BEHAVIOR OF ARSENIC IN A ROTARY KILN <span class="hlt">INCINERATOR</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Changes in waste disposal patterns prompted by newly enacted legislation has resulted in a significant change in the composition of hazardous wastes presented for <span class="hlt">incineration</span>. etal containing wastes that were historically landfilled are now being <span class="hlt">incinerated</span> with increasing freq...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=36764&keyword=moon&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=76732359&CFTOKEN=10894897','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=36764&keyword=moon&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=76732359&CFTOKEN=10894897"><span id="translatedtitle">OFFSHORE PLATFORM HAZARDOUS WASTE <span class="hlt">INCINERATION</span> FACILITY: FEASIBILITY STUDY</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>This report describes a program conducted to evaluate the technical and environmental feasibility of using a proposed offshore platform <span class="hlt">incineration</span> facility in the destruction of hazardous wastes and for <span class="hlt">incineration</span> research.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=128801&keyword=unburned+AND+hydrocarbon&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=64079919&CFTOKEN=46629227','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=128801&keyword=unburned+AND+hydrocarbon&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=64079919&CFTOKEN=46629227"><span id="translatedtitle">OBSERVATIONS ON WASTE DESTRUCTION IN LIQUID INJECTION <span class="hlt">INCINERATORS</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Various factors affecting the performance of a subscale liquid injection <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> simulator are discussed. The mechanisms by which waste escapes <span class="hlt">incineration</span> within the spray flame are investigated for variations in atomization quality, flame stoichiometry. and the initial was...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940011928','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940011928"><span id="translatedtitle">Limited subsolidus diffusion in type B1 <span class="hlt">CAI</span>: Evidence from Ti distribution in spinel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Meeker, G. P.; Quick, J. E.; Paque, Julie M.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Most models of calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) have focused on early stages of formation by equilibrium crystallization of a homogeneous liquid. Less is known about the subsolidus cooling history of <span class="hlt">CAI</span>. Chemical and isotopic heterogeneties on a scale of tens to hundreds of micrometers (e.g. MacPherson et al. (1989) and Podosek, et al. (1991)) suggest fairly rapid cooling with a minimum of subsolidus diffusion. However, transmission electron microscopy indicates that solid state diffusion may have been an important process at a smaller scale (Barber et al. 1984). If so, chemical evidence for diffusion could provide constraints on cooling times and temperatures. With this in mind, we have begun an investigation of the Ti distribution in spinels from two type B1 <span class="hlt">CAI</span> from Allende to determine if post-crystallization diffusion was a significant process. The type B1 <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>, 3529Z and 5241 have been described by Podosek et al. (1991) and by El Goresy et al. (1985) and MacPherson et al. (1989). We have analyzed spinels in these inclusions using the electron microprobe. These spinels are generally euhedral, range in size from less than 10 to 15 micron and are poikilitically enclosed by millimeter-sized pyroxene, melilite, and anorthite. Analyses were obtained from both the mantles and cores of the inclusions. Compositions of pyroxene in the vicinity of individual spinel grains were obtained by analyzing at least two points on opposite sides of the spinel and averaging the compositions. The pyroxene analyses were obtained within 15 microns of the spinel-pyroxene interface. No compositional gradients were observed within single spinel crystals. Ti concentrations in spinels included within pyroxene, melilite, and anorthite are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18409611','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18409611"><span id="translatedtitle">Occurrence and profiles of chlorinated and brominated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in waste <span class="hlt">incinerators</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Horii, Yuichi; Ok, Gon; Ohura, Takeshi; Kannanct, Kurunthachalam</p> <p>2008-03-15</p> <p>Chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (CIPAHs) have been reported to occur in urban <span class="hlt">air</span>. Nevertheless, sources of CIPAHs in urban <span class="hlt">air</span> have not been studied, due to the lack of appropriate analytical methods and standards. In this study, we measured concentrations of 20 CIPAHs and 11 brominated PAHs (BrPAHs) in fly ash and bottom ash from 11 municipal/hazardous/industrial waste <span class="hlt">incinerators</span>, using analytical standards synthesized in our laboratory. Concentrations of total CIPAHs and BrPAHs in ash samples ranged from <0.06 to 6990 ng/g and from <0.14 to 1235 ng/g, respectively. The concentrations of CIPAHs were approximately 100-fold higher than the concentrations of BrPAHs. 6-CIBaP and 1-CIPyr were the dominant compounds in fly ash samples. The profiles of halogenated PAHs were similar to the profiles reported previously for urban <span class="hlt">air</span>. 1-BrPyr was the predominant BrPAH in fly ash. Concentrations of 6-CIBaP, 9,10-Cl2Phe, 9-CIAnt, and 6-BrBaP in fly ash were significantly correlated with the corresponding parent PAH concentrations. Significant correlation between sigmaCIPAH and sigmaPAH concentrations suggests that direct chlorination of parent PAHs is the mechanism of formation of CIPAHs during <span class="hlt">incineration</span> of wastes; nevertheless, a comparable correlation was not found for BrPAHs. There was no significant correlation between the capacity and temperature of an <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> and the concentrations of sigmaCl-/BrPAHs in ash samples, although lower concentrations of all halogenated PAHs were found in stoker-type <span class="hlt">incinerators</span> than in fixed grate-type <span class="hlt">incinerators</span>. Toxicity equivalency quotients (TEQs) for CIPAHs in ash samples were calculated with CIPAH potencies. Average TEQ concentrations of CIPAHs in fly ash and bottom ash were15800 pg-TEQ/g and 67 pg-TEQ/g, respectively. Our results suggest that the extent of dioxin-like toxicity contributed by CIPAHs in ash generated during waste <span class="hlt">incineration</span> is similar to that reported previously for dioxins. Waste</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007LPI....38.1781S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007LPI....38.1781S"><span id="translatedtitle">Al-26 and Be-10 in Efremovka and Acfer <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>: Constraints on the Origin of Short-lived Radionuclides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Srinivasan, G.; Chaussidon, M.; Bischoff, A.</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>In this abstract we present aluminum-26 and beryllium-10 abundances in Efremovka and Acfer <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. These measurements help us to constrain the origin of short-lived radionuclides aluminum-26, beryllium-10.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/61971','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/61971"><span id="translatedtitle">An investigation of the efficiency of plasma <span class="hlt">incineration</span> for destruction of aromatics in <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> ash</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Retarides, C.J.; Chevis, E.A.; Busch, K.L.</p> <p>1994-12-31</p> <p>Plasma <span class="hlt">incineration</span> is being investigated as a means for the vitrification of ash from a conventional <span class="hlt">incinerator</span>. <span class="hlt">Incinerator</span> ash, consisting of 20% bottom ash and 80% fly ash, is introduced into a plasma <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> operated at a power of 100 kW. The sample is vitrified, leaving a glassy material that is more dense and therefore less voluminous than the ash, for disposal. Volume reduction by up to a factor of twenty may be achieved through this process. The resulting material can be used as concrete fill or can be disposed of in a landfill at a much lower cost than the original ash. Plasma <span class="hlt">incineration</span> should also result in the nearly complete destruction of hazardous organic compounds. Plasma temperatures commonly reach more than 3000 Kelvin resulting in the thermal destruction of most organic compounds. The extent of the destruction of organic compounds found in <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> ash has been investigated. Plasma <span class="hlt">incineration</span> was completed at the Georgia Tech Research Institute Plasma Research Center (GTRI). All ash vitrified product samples were obtained from GTRI.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/828319','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/828319"><span id="translatedtitle">Test Operation of Oxygen-Enriched <span class="hlt">Incinerator</span> for Wastes From Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Facility</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kim, J.-G.; Yang, H.cC.; Park, G.-I.; Kim, I.-T.; Kim, J.-K.</p> <p>2002-02-26</p> <p>The oxygen-enriched combustion concept, which can minimize off-gas production, has been applied to the <span class="hlt">incineration</span> of combustible uranium-containing wastes from a nuclear fuel fabrication facility. A simulation for oxygen combustion shows the off-gas production can be reduced by a factor of 6.7 theoretically, compared with conventional <span class="hlt">air</span> combustion. The laboratory-scale oxygen enriched <span class="hlt">incineration</span> (OEI) process with a thermal capacity of 350 MJ/h is composed of an oxygen feeding and control system, a combustion chamber, a quencher, a ceramic filter, an induced draft fan, a condenser, a stack, an off-gas recycle path, and a measurement and control system. Test burning with cleaning paper and office paper in this OEI process shows that the thermal capacity is about 320 MJ/h, 90 % of design value and the off-gas reduces by a factor of 3.5, compared with <span class="hlt">air</span> combustion. The CO concentration for oxygen combustion is lower than that of <span class="hlt">air</span> combustion, while the O2 concentration in off-gas is kept above 25 vol % for a simple <span class="hlt">incineration</span> process without any grate. The NOx concentration in an off-gas stream does not reduce significantly due to <span class="hlt">air</span> incoming by leakage, and the volume and weight reduction factors are not changed significantly, which suggests a need for an improvement in sealing.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/347827','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/347827"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Incinerator</span> thermal release valve risk assessment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stevens, J.B.</p> <p>1998-12-31</p> <p>Human health risk assessments were conducted on emissions from several types of <span class="hlt">incinerators</span>--a hazardous waste combustor, a medical waste/tire combustor, and a refuse derived fuel combustor in three different states. As part of these studies, the short-term emissions from thermal release valves operating during upset conditions were additionally evaluated. The latter assessments addressed two specific risk-related questions: (1) what are the incremental long-term risks/hazards associated with these short-term emissions; (2) what are the acute health hazards associated with these emissions? For each study, emission estimates for both the <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> stack and the thermal release valve were obtained from the facility. Stack testing was utilized to obtain stack gas concentrations of emissions at one facility; engineering estimates were used to ascertain emissions from the thermal release valve. The two facilities were proposed <span class="hlt">incinerators</span>, so literature-derived emissions were used throughout.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23756039','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23756039"><span id="translatedtitle">Alkali activation processes for <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> residues management.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lancellotti, Isabella; Ponzoni, Chiara; Barbieri, Luisa; Leonelli, Cristina</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Incinerator</span> bottom ash (BA) is produced in large amount worldwide and in Italy, where 5.1 millionstons of municipal solid residues have been <span class="hlt">incinerated</span> in 2010, corresponding to 1.2-1.5 millionstons of produced bottom ash. This residue has been used in the present study for producing dense geopolymers containing high percentage (50-70 wt%) of ash. The amount of potentially reactive aluminosilicate fraction in the ash has been determined by means of test in NaOH. The final properties of geopolymers prepared with or without taking into account this reactive fraction have been compared. The results showed that due to the presence of both amorphous and crystalline fractions with a different degree of reactivity, the <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> BA geopolymers exhibit significant differences in terms of Si/Al ratio and microstructure when reactive fraction is considered. PMID:23756039</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6472703','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6472703"><span id="translatedtitle">Energy utilization: municipal waste <span class="hlt">incineration</span>. Final report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>LaBeck, M.F.</p> <p>1981-03-27</p> <p>An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating <span class="hlt">incinerators</span> designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10116944','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10116944"><span id="translatedtitle">Recommendations for continuous emissions monitoring of mixed waste <span class="hlt">incinerators</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Quigley, G.P.</p> <p>1992-02-01</p> <p>Considerable quantities of <span class="hlt">incinerable</span> mixed waste are being stored in and generated by the DOE complex. Mixed waste is defined as containing a hazardous component and a radioactive component. At the present time, there is only one <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> in the complex which has the proper TSCA and RCRA permits to handle mixed waste. This report describes monitoring techniques needed for the <span class="hlt">incinerator</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=29623&keyword=hearth&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=59288530&CFTOKEN=86563958','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=29623&keyword=hearth&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=59288530&CFTOKEN=86563958"><span id="translatedtitle">FUEL EFFICIENT <span class="hlt">INCINERATION</span> FOR DISPOSAL OF SEWAGE SLUDGE</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The City of Indianapolis, Indiana, demonstrated that 34 to 70 percent of the fuel used for sewage sludge <span class="hlt">incineration</span> could be saved. These savings were the result of study of how sewage sludge <span class="hlt">incineration</span> in a multiple hearth <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> works, adding instrumentation and contro...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol26/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol26-sec264-344.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title40-vol26/pdf/CFR-2011-title40-vol26-sec264-344.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-07-01</p> <p>... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES <span class="hlt">Incinerators</span> § 264.344 Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits. (a) The owner or operator of a... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol25/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol25-sec264-344.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title40-vol25/pdf/CFR-2010-title40-vol25-sec264-344.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES <span class="hlt">Incinerators</span> § 264.344 Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits. (a) The owner or operator of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol27/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol27-sec264-344.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title40-vol27/pdf/CFR-2012-title40-vol27-sec264-344.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES <span class="hlt">Incinerators</span> § 264.344 Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits. (a) The owner or operator of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol26/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol26-sec264-344.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title40-vol26/pdf/CFR-2014-title40-vol26-sec264-344.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES <span class="hlt">Incinerators</span> § 264.344 Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits. (a) The owner or operator of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol27/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol27-sec264-344.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title40-vol27/pdf/CFR-2013-title40-vol27-sec264-344.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">40 CFR 264.344 - Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits... WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR OWNERS AND OPERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE TREATMENT, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL FACILITIES <span class="hlt">Incinerators</span> § 264.344 Hazardous waste <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> permits. (a) The owner or operator of...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10130360','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10130360"><span id="translatedtitle">Conceptual process description of M division <span class="hlt">incinerator</span> project</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Thompson, T.K.</p> <p>1989-04-13</p> <p>This interoffice memorandum describes an <span class="hlt">incineration</span> system to be used for <span class="hlt">incinerating</span> wood. The system is comprised of a shredder and an <span class="hlt">incinerator</span>. The entire process is described in detail. A brief study of particulates, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen oxides emission is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25186361','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25186361"><span id="translatedtitle">Crystal structures of hydrates of simple inorganic salts. II. Water-rich calcium bromide and iodide hydrates: CaBr2 · 9H2O, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>2 · 8H2O, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>2 · 7H2O and <span class="hlt">CaI</span>2 · 6.5H2O.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Voigt, Wolfgang</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Single crystals of calcium bromide enneahydrate, CaBr(2) · 9H2O, calcium iodide octahydrate, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>(2) · 8H2O, calcium iodide heptahydrate, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>(2) · 7H2O, and calcium iodide 6.5-hydrate, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>(2) · 6.5H2O, were grown from their aqueous solutions at and below room temperature according to the solid-liquid phase diagram. The crystal structure of <span class="hlt">CaI</span>(2) · 6.5H2O was redetermined. All four structures are built up from distorted Ca(H2O)8 antiprisms. The antiprisms of the iodide hydrate structures are connected either via trigonal-plane-sharing or edge-sharing, forming dimeric units. The antiprisms in calcium bromide enneahydrate are monomeric. PMID:25186361</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011oss..prop....6K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011oss..prop....6K"><span id="translatedtitle">Mineralogy and isotope chemistry of FUN (fractionation and nuclear isotope effects) and F (fractionation) <span class="hlt">CAIs</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krot, Alexander</p> <p></p> <p>To understand the origin and formation conditions of FUN (Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear isotope effects) and F (fractionation) Ca,Al-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>), and their significance for constraining the origin of 26Al and O-isotopic compositions of the primordial dust and gas in the early Solar System, we propose to study mineralogy, petrology, oxidation state of Ti, trace element abundances, and O-, Mg-, Si-, Ca-, and Ti- isotope compositions of FUN and F <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> previously identified in CV and CR chondrites. Twelve out of ~20 FUN and F <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> known will be available for mineralogical study and isotope measurements; these include 1623-5, C1, EK1-4-1, CG-14, BG82DH8, B7F6, B7H10, BG82HB1, KT-1, AXCAI-2771, TE, and Gao-Guenie (b) #3. We will also search for additional FUN and F inclusions among Allende and Efremovka <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with large mass-dependent fractionation effects in Mg. This interdisciplinary research will be done in collaboration with I. Hutcheon (NanoSIMS), G. Huss (SIMS), S. Sutton (XANES), R. Mendybaev and A. Davis (evaporation experiments), F. Ciesla (modeling of evolution of O-isotope reservoirs in the solar nebula), and B. Meyer (modeling of Galactic chemical evolution of O-isotope compositions of dust and gas in the protosolar molecular cloud, and of stellar origin of short-lived radionuclides). The research proposed here is highly relevant to the Science Goals and Objectives of NASA and the Origins of Solar Systems Program, specifically ascertain the content, origin, and history of the solar system, and the potential for life elsewhere and increase the understanding of the chemical origin of the Solar System and the processes by which its planets and small bodies have evolved to their present states¿. Our interdisciplinary research (mineralogical and isotopic studies of the earliest solar-system solids, and astrophysical modeling) is designed to understand the origin of 26Al-poor <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with large mass-dependent isotope fractionation effects, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011oss..prop.1106K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011oss..prop.1106K"><span id="translatedtitle">Mineralogy and isotope chemistry of FUN (fractionation and nuclear isotope effects) and F (fractionation) <span class="hlt">CAIs</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krot, Alexander</p> <p></p> <p>To understand the origin and formation conditions of FUN (Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear isotope effects) and F (fractionation) Ca,Al-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>), and their significance for constraining the origin of 26Al and O-isotopic compositions of the primordial dust and gas in the early Solar System, we propose to study mineralogy, petrology, oxidation state of Ti, trace element abundances, and O-, Mg-, Si-, Ca-, and Ti- isotope compositions of FUN and F <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> previously identified in CV and CR chondrites. Twelve out of ~20 FUN and F <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> known will be available for mineralogical study and isotope measurements; these include 1623-5, C1, EK1-4-1, CG-14, BG82DH8, B7F6, B7H10, BG82HB1, KT-1, AXCAI-2771, TE, and Gao-Guenie (b) #3. We will also search for additional FUN and F inclusions among Allende and Efremovka <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with large mass-dependent fractionation effects in Mg. This interdisciplinary research will be done in collaboration with I. Hutcheon (NanoSIMS), G. Huss (SIMS), S. Sutton (XANES), R. Mendybaev and A. Davis (evaporation experiments), F. Ciesla (modeling of evolution of O-isotope reservoirs in the solar nebula), and B. Meyer (modeling of Galactic chemical evolution of O-isotope compositions of dust and gas in the protosolar molecular cloud, and of stellar origin of short-lived radionuclides). The research proposed here is highly relevant to the Science Goals and Objectives of NASA and the Origins of Solar Systems Program, specifically ascertain the content, origin, and history of the solar system, and the potential for life elsewhere and increase the understanding of the chemical origin of the Solar System and the processes by which its planets and small bodies have evolved to their present states. Our interdisciplinary research (mineralogical and isotopic studies of the earliest solar-system solids, and astrophysical modeling) is designed to understand the origin of 26Al-poor <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with large mass-dependent isotope fractionation effects, and</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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