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Sample records for air ions created

  1. Air ions and aerosol science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, Hannes

    1996-03-01

    Collaboration between Gas Discharge and Plasma Physics, Atmospheric Electricity, and Aerosol Science is a factor of success in the research of air ions. The concept of air ion as of any carrier of electrical current through the air is inherent to Atmospheric Electricity under which a considerable statistical information about the air ion mobility spectrum is collected. A new model of air ion size-mobility correlation has been developed proceeding from Aerosol Science and joining the methods of neighboring research fields. The predicted temperature variation of the mobility disagrees with the commonly used Langevin rule for the reduction of air ion mobilities to the standard conditions. Concurrent errors are too big to be neglected in applications. The critical diameter distinguishing cluster ions and charged aerosol particles has been estimated to be 1.4-1.8 nm.

  2. Trails of Kilovolt Ions Created by Subsurface Channeling

    SciTech Connect

    Redinger, Alex; Standop, Sebastian; Michely, Thomas; Rosandi, Yudi; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2010-02-19

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy, we observe the damage trails produced by keV noble-gas ions incident at glancing angles onto Pt(111). Surface vacancies and adatoms aligned along the ion trajectory constitute the ion trails. Atomistic simulations reveal that these straight trails are produced by nuclear (elastic) collisions with surface layer atoms during subsurface channeling of the projectiles. In a small energy window around 5 keV, Xe{sup +} ions create vacancy grooves that mark the ion trajectory with atomic precision. The asymmetry of the adatom production on the two sides of the projectile path is traced back to the asymmetry of the ion's subsurface channel.

  3. Bursts of intermediate ions in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, U.; Salm, J.; Tammet, H.

    1998-06-01

    The mobility spectrum of air ions has been measured at Tahkuse Observatory in Estonia for several years. The average concentration of intermediate ions with mobilities of 0.05-0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 in atmospheric air is about 50 cm-3. On the level of this low background, high concentration bursts of intermediate air ions occur occasionally. A burst can be followed by subsequent evolution of intermediate ions into larger ones. To explain the bursts of intermediate air ions, two hypotheses can be advanced: (1)A burst of neutral particles occurs due to homogeneous nucleation, and the particles are charged by the attachment of cluster ions. (2) The cluster ions grow by ion-induced nucleation in proper environmental conditions.

  4. Mobility spectrum of air ions at Tahkuse Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horrak, U.; Iher, H.; Luts, A.; Salm, J.; Tammet, H.

    1994-05-01

    Mobility spectra of air ions have been measured at a rural site in Estonia during several periods. The annual average mobility spectrum of natural small air ions is presented. The concentrations of two groups of air ions with mobilities 0.32-0.5 sq cm/(V s) and 0.5-2.5 sq cm/(V s) are not correlated; this fact indicates the different nature of the ions of the two groups. The air ions with mobilities 0.5-2.5 sq cm/(V s) are interpreted as cluster ions and the air ions with mobilities 0.32-0.5 sq cm/(V s) as charged aerosol particles that can be created in the process of ion-induced nucleation. A half-year average mobility spectrum of the large ions with mobilities 3.2 x 10(exp -4) - 1.5/(V s) is presented. The spectrum is well interpreted on the basis of the average size distribution of aerosol particles and on the theory of diffusion charging of the particles.

  5. Hybrid membrane contactor system for creating semi-breathing air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeev, D. V.

    2012-02-01

    Typically, the equipment to create an artificial climate does not involve changing the composition of the respiratory air. In particular in medical institutions assumes the existence of plant of artificial climate and disinfection in operating rooms and intensive care wards. The use of a hybrid membrane-absorption systems for the generation of artificial atmospheres are improving the respiratory system, blood is enriched or depleted of various gases, resulting in increased stamina, there is a better, faster or slower metabolism, improves concentration and memory. Application of the system contributes to easy and rapid recovery after the operation. By adding a special component, with drug activity, air ionization, and adjust its composition, you can create a special, more favorable for patients with the atmosphere. These factors allow for the treatment and rehabilitation of patients and reduce mortality of heavy patients.

  6. Swirls and splashes: air vortices created by drop impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Mauser, Kelly W.; Latka, Andrzej; Nagel, Sidney R.

    2013-03-01

    A drop impacting a solid surface with sufficient velocity will splash and emit many small droplets. While liquid and substrate properties are clearly important for determining the splashing threshold, it has been shown that removing the ambient air suppresses splashing completely. However, the mechanism underlying how the surrounding gas affects splashing remains unknown. As has been recently shown, there is no air beneath the liquid that could cause the splash - thus where does the air matter? We use modified Schlieren optics combined with high-speed video imaging to visualize the air vortices created by the rapid spreading of the drop after it hit the substrate. In the first moments after impact, these vortices remain bound to the spreading drop, creating a low-pressure zone that travels with the advancing lamella. At a later time, after the occurrence of the splash, the vortices detach from the drop. We discuss possible connections between the forces generated by the vortices on the liquid lamella and the initiation of a splash.

  7. Extreme atmospheric electron densities created by extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutjes, Casper; Camporeale, Enrico; Ebert, Ute; Buitink, Stijn; Scholten, Olaf; Trinh, Gia

    2016-04-01

    A sufficient density of free electrons and strong electric fields are the basic requirements to start any electrical discharge. In the context of thunderstorm discharges it has become clear that in addition droplets and or ice particles are required to enhance the electric field to values above breakdown. In our recent study [1] we have shown that these three ingredients have to interplay to allow for lightning inception, triggered by an extensive air shower event. The extensive air showers are a very stochastic natural phenomenon, creating highly coherent bursts of extreme electron density in our atmosphere. Predicting these electron density bursts accurately one has to take the uncertainty of the input variables into account. To this end we use uncertainty quantification methods, like in [2], to post-process our detailed Monte Carlo extensive air shower simulations, done with the CORSIKA [3] software package, which provides an efficient and elegant way to determine the distribution of the atmospheric electron density enhancements. We will present the latest results. [1] Dubinova, A., Rutjes, C., Ebert, E., Buitink, S., Scholten, O., and Trinh, G. T. N. "Prediction of Lightning Inception by Large Ice Particles and Extensive Air Showers." PRL 115 015002 (2015) [2] G.J.A. Loeven, J.A.S. Witteveen, H. Bijl, Probabilistic collocation: an efficient nonintrusive approach for arbitrarily distributed parametric uncertainties, 45th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting, Reno, Nevada, 2007, AIAA-2007-317 [3] Heck, Dieter, et al. CORSIKA: A Monte Carlo code to simulate extensive air showers. No. FZKA-6019. 1998.

  8. Self-aligned nanostructures created by swift heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, Hans-Gregor; Nix, Anne-Katrin; Hofsaess, Hans; Krauser, Johann; Trautmann, Christina; Weidinger, Alois

    2010-05-15

    In tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) swift heavy ions create conducting tracks of about 8 nm in diameter. To apply these nanowires and implement them into nanodevices, they have to be contacted and gated. In the present work, we demonstrate the fabrication of conducting vertical nanostructures in ta-C together with self-aligned gate electrodes. A multilayer assembly is irradiated with GeV heavy ions and subsequently exposed to several selective etching processes. The samples consist of a Si wafer as substrate covered by a thin ta-C layer. On top is deposited a SiN{sub x} film for insulation, a Cr layer as electrode, and finally a polycarbonate film as ion track template. Chemical track etching opens nanochannels in the polymer which are self-aligned with the conducting tracks in ta-C because they are produced by the same ions. Through the pores in the polymer template, the Cr and SiN{sub x} layers are opened by ion beam sputtering and plasma etching, respectively. The resulting structure consists of nanowires embedded in the insulating carbon matrix with a built in gate electrode and has potential application as gated field emission cathode.

  9. Rocket having barium release system to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, B. W.; Stokes, C. S.; Smith, E. W.; Murphy, W. J. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A chemical system for releasing a good yield of free barium atoms and barium ions to create ion clouds in the upper atmosphere and interplanetary space for the study of the geophysical properties of the medium is presented.

  10. Statistical characterization of air ion mobility spectra at Tahkuse Observatory: Classification of air ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, U.; Salm, J.; Tammet, H.

    2000-04-01

    A database of 8615 hourly averaged air ion mobility spectra in the range of 0.00041-3.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 was measured at Tahkuse Observatory, Estonia, during 14 months in 1993-1994. The average mobility spectrum over the whole period shows distinct peaks of small and large ions. Intermediate ions with mobilities of 0.034-0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 are of low concentration of about 50 cm-3 in the average spectrum. They experience occasional bursts of up to about 900 cm-3 during 6-10 hours at daytime. The number of burst events recorded during 14 months was 101, with maximum frequency in spring and minimum frequency in winter. Physically, large and intermediate ions can be called aerosol ions, and small ions can be called cluster ions. The principal component analysis was applied to detect the structure of an air ion mobility spectrum. As a result, the mobility spectrum in the range of 0.00041-3.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 (diameters of 0.36-79 nm) was divided into five classes: small cluster, big cluster, intermediate, light large, and heavy large ions. The boundaries between the classes are 1.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 (diameter of 0.85 nm), 0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 (1.6 nm), 0.034 cm2 V-1 s-1 (7.4 nm), and 0.0042 cm2 V-1 s-1 (22 nm). The five principal components that are closely correlated with the respective ion classes explain 92% of total variance. The classification of aerosol ions is in accord with the three-modal structure of the size spectrum of submicron aerosol particles.

  11. Creating new cities through the large air-cushion vehicle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.; Finnegan, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    The air-cushion vehicle (ACV) can travel over concrete roads, grass, sand, mud, swamp, snow, ice, and water. This mobility makes possible a totally new geographical freedom in choosing transportation routes, locating ports, and laying out a city. By the 1980s fleets of large ACV freighters could begin carrying ocean-going cargo. The mobility of an ACV fleet would allow placing hoverports away from areas now crowded. New cities could rise along shallow or reef-bound seacoasts and rivers, just as cities once rose around deep-water seaports.

  12. Design and construction of cage environments for air ion and electric field research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, M. G.; Kellogg, E. W.

    1987-06-01

    This report describes the design and construction of cage environments suitable for chronic exposures of large groups of mice to air ions and electric fields. These environments provide defined and reproducible ion densities, ion flux, DC electric fields, sound levels, air temperature and air quality. When used during a 2 year study, these cage environments served as a durable and reliable continuous exposure system. Three environmental chambers (cubicles) housed a total of 12 cages and provided control of air temperature, air purity and lighting. Exposure cages had grounded metal exterior walls, a plexiglass door and interior walls lined with formica. An internal isolated field plate supplemented with guard wires, energized with ca 1000 VDC, created about a 2 kV/m electric field at the grounded cage floor. Air ions resulted from the beta emission of sealed tritium foils mounted on the field plate. Cages provided high ion (1.3×105 ions/cc), low ion (1.6×103 ions/cc) and field only (ion depleted < 50 ions/cc) conditions for both polarities with similar electric fields in ionized and field only cages. Detailed mapping of the floor level ion flux using 100 cm2 flat probes gave average fluxes of 880 fA cm-2 in high ion cages and 10 fA cm-2 in low ion cages. Whole body currents measured using live anesthethized mice in high ion cages averaged 104±63 pA. Both ion flux and whole body currents remained constant over time, indicating no charge accumulation on body fur or cage wall surfaces in this exposure system.

  13. Air-Microfluidics: Creating Small, Low-cost, Portable Air Quality Sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air-microfluidics shows great promise in dramatically reducing the size, cost, and power requirements of future air quality sensors without compromising their accuracy. Microfabrication provides a suite of relatively new tools for the development of micro electro mechanical syste...

  14. Ions in oceanic and continental air masses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D.J.; Eisele, F.L. )

    1991-01-20

    Measurements of tropospheric ions and several trace atmospheric neutral species have been performed at Cheeka Peak Research Station and at Mauna Loa Observatory. Two new positive ion species at masses 114 and 102 have been identified as protonated caprolactam and a saturated 6-carbon primary amine, respectively. In the negative ion spectrum, methane sulfonic acid (MSA) has been identified as the parent species responsible for an ion commonly observed at mass 95 during these two studies. The diurnal variations of gas phase H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and MSA were also measured at Cheeka Peak and have typically been found to be present in the sub-ppt range. Ion assisted measurements at Mauna Loa Observatory of pyridine and ammonia indicate concentrations of 2.5 and 70 ppt, respectively, with at least a factor of 2 uncertainty. Interesting variations and potential sources of several of the observed ions are also discussed.

  15. Air ions and respiratory function outcomes: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background From a mechanistic or physical perspective there is no basis to suspect that electric charges on clusters of air molecules (air ions) would have beneficial or deleterious effects on respiratory function. Yet, there is a large lay and scientific literature spanning 80 years that asserts exposure to air ions affects the respiratory system and has other biological effects. Aims This review evaluates the scientific evidence in published human experimental studies regarding the effects of exposure to air ions on respiratory performance and symptoms. Methods We identified 23 studies (published 1933–1993) that met our inclusion criteria. Relevant data pertaining to study population characteristics, study design, experimental methods, statistical techniques, and study results were assessed. Where relevant, random effects meta-analysis models were utilized to quantify similar exposure and outcome groupings. Results The included studies examined the therapeutic benefits of exposure to negative air ions on respiratory outcomes, such as ventilatory function and asthmatic symptoms. Study specific sample sizes ranged between 7 and 23, and studies varied considerably by subject characteristics (e.g., infants with asthma, adults with emphysema), experimental method, outcomes measured (e.g., subjective symptoms, sensitivity, clinical pulmonary function), analytical design, and statistical reporting. Conclusions Despite numerous experimental and analytical differences across studies, the literature does not clearly support a beneficial role in exposure to negative air ions and respiratory function or asthmatic symptom alleviation. Further, collectively, the human experimental studies do not indicate a significant detrimental effect of exposure to positive air ions on respiratory measures. Exposure to negative or positive air ions does not appear to play an appreciable role in respiratory function. PMID:24016271

  16. Excitations of low-frequency hydromagnetic waves by freshly created ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, C. P.; Gaffey, J. D.; Dong, J. Q.

    1988-01-01

    Low-frequency hydromagnetic waves excited by newborn ions in the solar wind plasma are studied. The freshly created ions appear in the solar wind frame with a ring beam distribution. Both Alfven and fast magnetosonic waves are made unstable by the presence of the newborn ions. The dependence of the growth rate of both waves on the newborn ion density, the angle between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and solar wind flow, and the angle of wave propagation relative to the IMF is investigated. Analytic approximations for the growth rates are presented, and numerical solutions of the dispersion equation are shown. The approximations are quite close to the numerically determined growth rates. It is found that the waves grow preferentially in the direction parallel to the IMF, and that the growth rates increase with both newborn ion density and the angle between the IMF and the solar wind flow.

  17. Air, aqueous and thermal stabilities of Ce3+ ions in cerium oxide nanoparticle layers with substrates.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Tamaki; Traversa, Enrico

    2014-06-21

    Abundant oxygen vacancies coexisting with Ce(3+) ions in fluorite cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have the potential to enhance catalytic ability, but the ratio of unstable Ce(3+) ions in CNPs is typically low. Our recent work, however, demonstrated that the abundant Ce(3+) ions created in cerium oxide nanoparticle layers (CNPLs) by Ar ion irradiation were stable in air at room temperature. Ce valence states in CNPs correlate with the catalytic ability that involves redox reactions between Ce(3+) and Ce(4+) ions in given application environments (e.g. high temperature in carbon monoxide gas conversion and immersion conditions in biomedical applications). To better understand the mechanism by which Ce(3+) ions achieve stability in CNPLs, we examined (i) extra-long air-stability, (ii) thermal stability up to 500 °C, and (iii) aqueous stability of Ce(3+) ions in water, buffer solution and cell culture medium. It is noteworthy that air-stability of Ce(3+) ions in CNPLs persisted for more than 1 year. Thermal stability results showed that oxidation of Ce(3+) to Ce(4+) occurred at 350 °C in air. Highly concentrated Ce(3+) ions in ultra-thin CNPLs slowly oxidized in water within 1 day, but stability was improved in the cell culture medium. Ce(3+) stability of CNPLs immersed in the medium was associated with phosphorus adsorption on the Ce(3+) sites. This study also illuminates the potential interaction mechanisms of stable Ce(3+) ions in CNPLs. These findings could be utilized to understand catalytic mechanisms of CNPs with abundant oxygen vacancies in their application environments. PMID:24812662

  18. Variability of air ion concentrations in urban Paris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, V. N.; Herrmann, E.; Manninen, H. E.; Hussein, T.; Hakala, J.; Nieminen, T.; Aalto, P. P.; Merkel, M.; Wiedensohler, A.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Hämeri, K.

    2015-12-01

    Air ion concentrations influence new particle formation and consequently the global aerosol as potential cloud condensation nuclei. We aimed to evaluate air ion concentrations and characteristics of new particle formation events (NPF) in the megacity of Paris, France, within the MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric Pollution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) project. We measured air ion number size distributions (0.8-42 nm) with an air ion spectrometer and fine particle number concentrations (> 6 nm) with a twin differential mobility particle sizer in an urban site of Paris between 26 June 2009 and 4 October 2010. Air ions were size classified as small (0.8-2 nm), intermediate (2-7 nm), and large (7-20 nm). The median concentrations of small and large ions were 670 and 680 cm-3, respectively, (sum of positive and negative polarities), whereas the median concentration of intermediate ions was only 20 cm-3, as these ions were mostly present during new particle formation bursts, i.e. when gas-to-particle conversion produced fresh aerosol particles from gas phase precursors. During peaks in traffic-related particle number, the concentrations of small and intermediate ions decreased, whereas the concentrations of large ions increased. Seasonal variations affected the ion population differently, with respect to their size and polarity. NPF was observed in 13 % of the days, being most frequent in spring and late summer (April, May, July, and August). The results also suggest that NPF was favoured on the weekends in comparison to workdays, likely due to the lower levels of condensation sinks in the mornings of weekends (CS weekdays 09:00: 18 × 10-3 s-1; CS weekend 09:00: 8 × 10-3 s-1). The median growth rates (GR) of ions during the NPF events varied between 3 and 7 nm h-1, increasing with the ion size and being higher on workdays than on weekends for intermediate and large ions. The median GR of

  19. Detection of artificially created negative ion clouds with incoherent scatter radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultan, Peter J.; Mendillo, Michael; Oliver, William L.; Holt, John M.

    1992-01-01

    The physical mechanisms by which negative ions change the shape of the incoherent scatter spectrum, and the way in which shape changes may be used to detect the presence of heavy positive and negative ions in an ambient ionosphere are investigated. In order to detect heavy negative ions, the temperature structure of the ionosphere is fixed to a prevent average measurement, and any changes in spectral shape during the experiment are interpreted as being caused by changes in composition, and not by changes in the temperature ratio Te/Ti. The spatial and temporal development of heavy negative ion plasma clouds created during four active chemical release experiments was observed. Concentrations of 10-40-percent SF6(-) were detected in SPINEX 1, SPINEX 2, and IMS data sets. An average uncertainty of +/-10-percent SF6(-) is present in all three experiments. Concentrations of 30-percent Br(-) were detected in the NICARE 1 release, with uncertainties of +/-4 percent.

  20. Air oxidation of d-limonene (the citrus solvent) creates potent allergens.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, A T; Magnusson, K; Nilsson, U

    1992-05-01

    Products containing as much as 95% of d-limonene are used for, e.g., degreasing metal before industrial painting and for cleaning assemblies. Experimental studies on the sensitizing potential of limonene show diverging results. In a previous study, we found that the sensitizing potential of d-limonene increased with prolonged air exposure. The aim of this study was to make further chemical analyses, to identify compounds formed by air exposure of d-limonene and to study their allergenic potential. d-limonene was found to be a sensitizer after prolonged exposure to air according to 2 Freund's complete adjuvant test (FCAT) experiments and 1 guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) study. No significant response was obtained to d-limonene not air exposed, even if the animals were sensitized to oxidized d-limonene. 5 main oxidation products of d-limonene were identified. (R)-(-)-carvone and a mixture of cis and trans isomers of (+)-limonene oxide were found to be potent sensitizers, while no significant reactions were obtained in the animals induced with a mixture of cis and trans isomers of (-)-carveol. It can be concluded that air oxidation of d-limonene is essential for its sensitizing potential, and that potent allergens are created. PMID:1395597

  1. Extended plasma channels created by UV laser in air and their application to control electric discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Zvorykin, V. D. Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.; Shutov, A. V.

    2015-02-15

    Results are presented from a series of experimental and theoretical studies on creating weakly ionized extended plasma channels in atmospheric air by 248-nm UV laser radiation and their application to control long high-voltage discharges. The main mechanisms of air ionization by UV laser pulses with durations from 100 fs to 25 ns and intensities in the ranges of 3×10{sup 11}–1.5×10{sup 13} and 3×10{sup 6}–3×10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}, respectively, which are below the threshold for optical gas breakdown, as well as the main relaxation processes in plasma with a density of 10{sup 9}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, are considered. It is shown that plasma channels in air can be efficiently created by amplitude-modulated UV pulses consisting of a train of subpicosecond pulses producing primary photoelectrons and a long UV pulse suppressing electron attachment and sustaining the density of free electrons in plasma. Different modes of the generation and amplification of trains of subterawatt subpicosecond pulses and amplitude-modulated UV pulses with an energy of several tens of joules were implemented on the GARPUN-MTW hybrid Ti:sapphire-KrF laser facility. The filamentation of such UV laser beams during their propagation in air over distances of up to 100 m and the parameters of the corresponding plasma channels were studied experimentally and theoretically. Laser initiation of high-voltage electric discharges and control of their trajectories by means of amplitude-modulated UV pulses, as well as the spatiotemporal structure of breakdowns in air gaps with length of up to 80 cm, were studied.

  2. Reduction of air ion mobility to standard conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.

    1998-06-01

    The Langevin rule of the reduction of air ion mobility is adequate in case of zero-size ions. An alternative is the Stokes-Millikan equation that is adequate in the limit of macroscopic charged particles. The temperature variation of air ion mobility predicted by the Stokes-Millikan equation radically contradicts the Langevin rule. The temperature and pressure variation of air ion mobility is examined by using a new semiempirical model that describes the transition from the kinetic theory to the Stokes-Millikan equation. The model is valid in full mobility range. It allows to calculate at first the size of an ion according to the measured mobility and then the standard mobility according to the size. The ascent of the temperature-mobility curve on a logarithmic chart approaches the Langevin value of 1 only at very high mobilities not found in the atmosphere. The value of the ascent is 0.6 in the case of small ions of the mobility of 1.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 which brings about a considerable error when using the Langevin rule. It is recommended to store the natural values of the mobility in databases together with the values of temperature and pressure and to definitely indicate the method when the reduced mobilities are presented in publications.

  3. Tailoring the Optical Properties of Silicon with Ion Beam Created Nanostructures for Advanced Photonics Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Perveen

    light trapping in poly-Si thin films using ion implantation induced surface texturing. In addition to surface texturing produced by H and Ar ion implantations, metal nanostructures are also added to the surface to further suppress light reflection at the plasmonic resonance of metal nanostructures. Remarkable suppression has been achieved resulting in reflection from the air/Si interface to below ˜5%. In the second part, optical properties of embedded metal nanostructures in silicon matrix gettered into the ion implantation created nanocavities are studied. Embedded nanostructures can have a huge impact in future photonics applications by replacing the existing electronic and photonic components such as interconnects, waveguides, modulators and amplifiers with their plasmonic counterparts. This new method of encapsulating metal nanostructures in silicon is cost-effective and compatible with silicon fabrication technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry is used to study the dielectric properties of silicon with embedded silver nanostructures. High absorption regions around 900 nm, corresponding to plasmonic absorption of Ag nanoparticles in Si, have been observed and compared to theoretical calculations and simulation results. The possibility of modifying the dielectric function of Si with metal nanostructures can lay the foundation for functional base structures for advanced applications in silicon photonics, photovoltaics and plasmonics.

  4. Can you help create the next generation of Land Surface Air Temperature products?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Peter; Venema, Victor

    2013-04-01

    The International Surface Temperature Initiative comprises a group of multi-disciplinary researchers constituted in 2010 with the remit of creating a suite of open, transparent Land Surface Air Temperature products suitable for meeting 21st Century science and societal needs and expectations. Since instigation significant progress has been made in the creation of an improved set of 'raw' Land Surface Air Temperature data holdings (to be released in first version in February 2013), constituting in excess of 30,000 stations many going back over a Century, and towards the creation of a rigorous benchmarking framework. What is now requested is that multiple independent groups take up the challenge of creating global and regional products from the databank and submit their algorithms to the benchmarking framework. Key here is to rigorously assess structural uncertainty - it is not sufficient to assume because one group has tackled the problem it is in any meaningful sense mission accomplished. There undoubtedly exist a myriad of issues in the raw data and it is of vital importance to see how sensitive data homogenization is to the set of processing choices independent groups will undertake. This uncertainty will almost certainly be larger at the station or regional level - yet as we move into the 21st Century it is these scales that are of increasing import to end users. It is essential that we serve the right data in the right way with the correct caveats. This can only be achieved if a sufficient number of groups take up the challenge of creating new products from the raw databank. This poster will outline progress to date in the creation of the databank and global benchmarks and outline how investigators and groups can now get involved in creating products from the databank and participate in the benchmarking exercise. Further details upon the Initiative and its aims can be found at www.surfacetemperatures.org and http://surfacetemperatures.blogspot.com/

  5. Creating analogs of thermal distributions from diabatic excitations in ion-trap-based quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, M. H.; Yoshimura, B. T.; Freericks, J. K.

    2016-04-01

    One broad goal of quantum simulation is to start a simple quantum system in its ground state and slowly evolve the Hamiltonian to a complex one, maintaining the ground state throughout the evolution (called adiabatic state preparation). This provides a natural setting to create a highly entangled and correlated quantum state if the final Hamiltonian supports such a ground state. In ion-trap-based quantum simulations, coherence times are too short to allow for such ground-state evolution for large chains, because the rapid evolution of the system creates excitations to higher energy states. Because the probability for this excitation depends exponentially on the excitation energy and because the thermal distribution also depends exponentially on the excitation energy, we investigate whether this so-called diabatic excitation can create the analog of a thermal distribution; as this could serve as an alternative for creating thermal states of complex quantum systems without requiring contact with a heat bath. In this work, we explore this relationship and determine situations, where diabatic excitation can approximately create thermal states.

  6. Creating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns by direct exposure to radio-frequency air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Stephant, Nicolas; Hamon, Jonathan; Thiry, Damien; Chauvin, Adrien; Chettab, Meriem; Gautron, Eric; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Granier, Agnès; Tessier, Pierre-Yves

    2015-12-01

    Nanoporous materials are of great importance for a broad range of applications including catalysis, optical sensors and water filtration. Although several approaches already exist for the creation of nanoporous materials, the race for the development of versatile methods, more suitable for the nanoelectronics industry, is still ongoing. In this communication we report for the first time on the possibility of generating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns using a dry approach based on the oxidation of silver by direct exposure to a commercially available radio-frequency air plasma. The silver nanocolumns are created by glancing angle deposition using magnetron sputtering of a silver target in pure argon plasma. We show that upon exposure to the rf air plasma, the nanocolumns transform from solid silver into nanoporous silver oxide. We further show that by tuning the plasma pressure and the exposure duration, the oxidation process can be finely adjusted allowing for precisely controlling the morphology and the nanoporosity of the silver oxide nanocolumns. The generation of porosity within the silver nanocolumns is explained according to a cracking-induced oxidation mechanism based on two repeated events occurring alternately during the oxidation process: (i) oxidation of silver upon exposure to the air plasma and (ii) generation of nanocracks and blisters within the oxide layer due to the high internal stress generated within the material during oxidation.

  7. Creating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns by direct exposure to radio-frequency air plasma.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Stephant, Nicolas; Hamon, Jonathan; Thiry, Damien; Chauvin, Adrien; Chettab, Meriem; Gautron, Eric; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Granier, Agnès; Tessier, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Nanoporous materials are of great importance for a broad range of applications including catalysis, optical sensors and water filtration. Although several approaches already exist for the creation of nanoporous materials, the race for the development of versatile methods, more suitable for the nanoelectronics industry, is still ongoing. In this communication we report for the first time on the possibility of generating nanoporosity in silver nanocolumns using a dry approach based on the oxidation of silver by direct exposure to a commercially available radio-frequency air plasma. The silver nanocolumns are created by glancing angle deposition using magnetron sputtering of a silver target in pure argon plasma. We show that upon exposure to the rf air plasma, the nanocolumns transform from solid silver into nanoporous silver oxide. We further show that by tuning the plasma pressure and the exposure duration, the oxidation process can be finely adjusted allowing for precisely controlling the morphology and the nanoporosity of the silver oxide nanocolumns. The generation of porosity within the silver nanocolumns is explained according to a cracking-induced oxidation mechanism based on two repeated events occurring alternately during the oxidation process: (i) oxidation of silver upon exposure to the air plasma and (ii) generation of nanocracks and blisters within the oxide layer due to the high internal stress generated within the material during oxidation. PMID:26611109

  8. Can induced theta vacua be created in heavy-Ion collisions?

    PubMed

    Buckley; Fugleberg; Zhitnitsky

    2000-05-22

    We discuss a phenomenon important to the development of the early Universe which may be experimentally testable in heavy-ion collisions. An arbitrary induced straight theta vacuum state should be created in heavy-ion collisions, similar to the creation of the disoriented chiral condensate. It should be a large domain with a wrong straight theta(ind) not equal0 orientation which will mimic the physics of the early Universe when it is believed that the fundamental parameter straight theta(fund) not equal0. We test this idea numerically in a simple model where we study the evolution of the phases of the chiral condensates in QCD with two quark flavors with nonzero straight theta(ind) parameter. We see the formation of a nonzero straight theta(ind) vacuum on a time scale of 10(-23) s. PMID:10990805

  9. High density nitrogen-vacancy sensing surface created via He+ ion implantation of 12C diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinsasser, Ed E.; Stanfield, Matthew M.; Banks, Jannel K. Q.; Zhu, Zhouyang; Li, Wen-Di; Acosta, Victor M.; Watanabe, Hideyuki; Itoh, Kohei M.; Fu, Kai-Mei C.

    2016-05-01

    We present a promising method for creating high-density ensembles of nitrogen-vacancy centers with narrow spin-resonances for high-sensitivity magnetic imaging. Practically, narrow spin-resonance linewidths substantially reduce the optical and RF power requirements for ensemble-based sensing. The method combines isotope purified diamond growth, in situ nitrogen doping, and helium ion implantation to realize a 100 nm-thick sensing surface. The obtained 1017 cm-3 nitrogen-vacancy density is only a factor of 10 less than the highest densities reported to date, with an observed 200 kHz spin resonance linewidth over 10 times narrower.

  10. Removal of fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments by the unipolar ion emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uk Lee, Byung; Yermakov, Mikhail; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2004-09-01

    The continuous emission of unipolar ions was evaluated in order to determine its ability to remove fine and ultrafine particles from indoor air environments. The evolution of the indoor aerosol concentration and particle size distribution was measured in real time with the ELPI in a room-size (24.3 m3) test chamber where the ion emitter was operating. After the results were compared with the natural decay, the air cleaning factor was determined. The particle aerodynamic size range of ∼0.04-2 μm was targeted because it represents many bioaerosol agents that cause emerging diseases, as well as those that can be used for biological warfare or in the event of bioterrorism. The particle electric charge distribution (also measured in the test chamber with the ELPI) was rapidly affected by the ion emission. It was concluded that the corona discharge ion emitters (either positive or negative), which are capable of creating an ion density of 105-106 e± cm-3, can be efficient in controlling fine and ultrafine aerosol pollutants in indoor air environments, such as a typical office or residential room. At a high ion emission rate, the particle mobility becomes sufficient so that the particle migration results in their deposition on the walls and other indoor surfaces. Within the tested ranges of the particle size and ion density, the particles were charged primarily due to the diffusion charging mechanism. The particle removal efficiency was not significantly affected by the particle size, while it increased with increasing ion emission rate and the time of emission. The performance characteristics of three commercially available ionic air purifiers, which produce unipolar ions by corona discharge at relatively high emission rates, were evaluated. A 30-minute operation of the most powerful device among those tested resulted in the removal of about 97% of 0.1 μm particles and about 95% of 1 μm particles from the air in addition to the natural decay effect.

  11. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  12. Selective injection and isolation of ions in quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometry using notched waveforms created using the inverse Fourier transform

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, M.H.; Cooks, R.G. )

    1994-08-01

    Broad-band excitation of ions is accomplished in the quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer using notched waveforms created by the SWIFT (stored waveform inverse Fourier transform) technique. A series of notched SWIFT pulses are applied during the period of ion injection from an external Cs[sup +] source to resonantly eject all ions whose resonance frequencies fall within the frequency range of the pulse while injecting only those analyte ions whose resonance frequencies fall within the limits of the notch. This allows selective injection and accumulation of the ions of interest and continuous ejection of the unwanted ions. This is shown to result in significant improvement in S/N ratio, resolution, and sensitivity for the analyte ions of interest. Selective ion injection is demonstrated by injecting the protonated molecules of peptides VSV and gramicidin S and the intact cation of l-carnitine hydrochloride, using singly notched SWIFT pulses. Multiply notched SWIFT pulses are used to simultaneously inject ions of different m/z values of l-carnitine hydrochloride into the ion trap. A new coarse/fine ion isolation procedure, which employs a doubly notched SWIFT pulse, is demonstrated for isolating ions of a single m/z value of 4-bromobiphenyl from a population of trapped ions. 36 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Effects of air ions on some aspects of learning and memory of rats and mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivereau, J. M.; Lambert, J. F.

    1981-03-01

    When submitted to a single avoidance task male mice showed different behavioral responses if previously treated with opposite aeroionization polarities. Whereas negative air ions tend to improve learning, positive ions have disturbing effects. Male rats submitted to a single — trial inhibitory avoidance step-through task showed that retention processes may also be influenced by air ions. The positive air-ion-treated animals exhibit signs of impaired short and long term memory. The slightly impaired score of negative air-ion-treated animals seems only dependent upon the simultaneously increased locomotor activity. A separate experiment supported this hypothesis showing conspicuous differential effects of air ion polarity on spontaneous activity of male rats. On the basis of these findings and the results of other studies in biological air ion dependence field, the behavioral significance of aero-ionization in learning and memory processes is discussed in relation to serotonin metabolism and other neuroendocrine mechanisms.

  14. Equilibrium selectivity alone does not create K+-selective ion conduction in K+ channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shian; Lockless, Steve W.

    2013-11-01

    Potassium (K+) channels are selective for K+ over Na+ ions during their transport across membranes. We and others have previously shown that tetrameric K+ channels are primarily occupied by K+ ions in their selectivity filters under physiological conditions, demonstrating the channel’s intrinsic equilibrium preference for K+ ions. Based on this observation, we hypothesize that the preference for K+ ions over Na+ ions in the filter determines its selectivity during ion conduction. Here, we ask whether non-selective cation channels, which share an overall structure and similar individual ion-binding sites with K+ channels, have an ion preference at equilibrium. The variants of the non-selective Bacillus cereus NaK cation channel we examine are all selective for K+ over Na+ ions at equilibrium. Thus, the detailed architecture of the K+ channel selectivity filter, and not only its equilibrium ion preference, is fundamental to the generation of selectivity during ion conduction.

  15. Trial of a negative ion generator device in remediating problems related to indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Daniell, W.; Camp, J.; Horstman, S. )

    1991-06-01

    It has been suggested that supplementation of indoor air with negative ions can improve air quality. This study examined the effects of a negative ion-generator device on air contaminants and symptom reporting in two office buildings. Separate sets of functional and nonfunctional negative ion generators were monitored using a double blind, crossover design involving two 5-week exposure periods. There were no detectable direct or residual effects of negative ion generator use on air ion levels, airborn particulates, carbon dioxide levels, or symptom reporting. Symptom reporting declined at both sites initially and appeared to be consistent with placebo effect. Job dissatisfaction was an apparent contributor to symptom reporting, with a magnitude comparable to presumed effects of air quality. Further testing of such devices is needed before they should be considered for office air quality problems.

  16. Characterization of positive air ions in boreal forest air at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, U.; Aalto, P. P.; Salm, J.; Komsaare, K.; Tammet, H.; Mäkelä, J. M.; Laakso, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2007-07-01

    The behavior of the concentration of positive small (or cluster) air ions and naturally charged nanometer aerosol particles (aerosol ions) has been studied on the basis of measurements carried out in a boreal forest at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station, Finland, during the BIOFOR III campaign in spring 1999. Statistical characteristics of the concentrations of cluster ions, two classes of aerosol ions of the sizes of 2.5-8 nm and 8-ca. 20 nm and the quantities that determine the balance of small ions in the atmosphere have been given for the nucleation event days and non-event days. The dependence of small ion concentration on the ion loss (sink) due to aerosol particles was investigated applying a model of bipolar diffusion charging of particles by small ions. The small ion concentration and the ion sink were closely correlated (correlation coefficient -87%) when the fog events and the hours of high relative humidity (above 95%), as well as nocturnal calms and weak wind (wind speed <0.6 m s-1) had been excluded. However, an extra ion loss term presumably due to small ion deposition on coniferous forest with a magnitude equal to the average ion loss to pre-existing particles is needed to explain the observations. Also the hygroscopic growth correction of measured aerosol particle size distributions was found to be necessary for proper estimation of the ion sink. In the case of nucleation burst events, variations in the concentration of small positive ions were in accordance with the changes caused by the ion sink due to aerosols; no clear indication of positive ion depletion by ion-induced nucleation was found. The estimated average ionization rate of the air at the Hyytiälä station in early spring, when the ground was partly covered with snow, was about 6 ion pairs cm-3 s-1. The study of the charging state of nanometer aerosol particles (2.5-8 nm) revealed a strong correlation (correlation coefficient 88%) between the concentrations of particles and positively

  17. Climate change and air pollution jointly creating nightmare for tourism industry.

    PubMed

    Sajjad, Faiza; Noreen, Umara; Zaman, Khalid

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study is to examine the long-run and causal relationship between climate change (i.e., greenhouse gas emissions, hydrofluorocarbons, per fluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride), air pollution (i.e., methane emissions, nitrous oxide emissions, and carbon dioxide emissions), and tourism development indicators (i.e., international tourism receipts, international tourism expenditures, natural resource depletion, and net forest depletion) in the World's largest regions. The aggregate data is used for robust analysis in the South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, and East Asia and the Pacific regions, over a period of 1975-2012. The results show that climatic factors and air pollution have a negative impact on tourism indicators in the form of deforestation and natural resource depletion. The impact is evident, as we have seen the systematic eroding of tourism industry, due to severe changes in climate and increasing strain of air pollution. There are several channels of cause-effect relationship between the climatic factors, air pollution, and tourism indicators in the World's region. The study confirms the unidirectional, bidirectional, and causality independent relationship between climatic factors, air pollution, and tourism indicators in the World. It is conclusive that tourism industry is facing all time bigger challenges of reduce investment, less resources, and minor importance from the government agencies because of the two broad challenges, i.e., climate change and air pollution, putting them in a dismal state. PMID:24938808

  18. Research report on the physiological effects of air ions and their significance as environmental factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varga, A.

    1978-01-01

    The series of experiments performed have shown that small air ions generated artificially using radioactive materials produced physiological effects in all test subjects, which are described. These results show that the air ions were important climatic factors in the production of comfortable and healthy room climates.

  19. CREATING BUILDING BLOCKS FOR A MORE DYNAMIC AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed research is expected to produce 1) a prototype episodic air quality management tool, b) an assessment of the historic relationships between planned/actual changes in emissions and pollutant concentrations, and c) an assessment of the impacts of inter-annual var...

  20. Exposure to Air Ions in Indoor Environments: Experimental Study with Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Peter; Kundi, Michael; Panny, Michael; Tappler, Peter; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century there has been a scientific debate about the potential effects of air ions on biological tissues, wellbeing and health. Effects on the cardiovascular and respiratory system as well as on mental health have been described. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in this topic. In an experimental indoor setting we conducted a double-blind cross-over trial to determine if higher levels of air ions, generated by a special wall paint, affect cognitive performance, wellbeing, lung function, and cardiovascular function. Twenty healthy non-smoking volunteers (10 female, 10 male) participated in the study. Levels of air ions, volatile organic compounds and indoor climate factors were determined by standardized measurement procedures. Air ions affected the autonomous nervous system (in terms of an increase of sympathetic activity accompanied by a small decrease of vagal efferent activity): In the test room with higher levels of air ions (2194/cm3 vs. 1038/cm3) a significantly higher low to high frequency ratio of the electrocardiography (ECG) beat-to-beat interval spectrogram was found. Furthermore, six of nine subtests of a cognitive performance test were solved better, three of them statistically significant (verbal factor, reasoning, and perceptual speed), in the room with higher ion concentration. There was no influence of air ions on lung function and on wellbeing. Our results indicate slightly activating and cognitive performance enhancing effects of a short-term exposure to higher indoor air ion concentrations. PMID:26569277

  1. Exposure to Air Ions in Indoor Environments: Experimental Study with Healthy Adults.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Peter; Kundi, Michael; Panny, Michael; Tappler, Peter; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2015-11-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century there has been a scientific debate about the potential effects of air ions on biological tissues, wellbeing and health. Effects on the cardiovascular and respiratory system as well as on mental health have been described. In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in this topic. In an experimental indoor setting we conducted a double-blind cross-over trial to determine if higher levels of air ions, generated by a special wall paint, affect cognitive performance, wellbeing, lung function, and cardiovascular function. Twenty healthy non-smoking volunteers (10 female, 10 male) participated in the study. Levels of air ions, volatile organic compounds and indoor climate factors were determined by standardized measurement procedures. Air ions affected the autonomous nervous system (in terms of an increase of sympathetic activity accompanied by a small decrease of vagal efferent activity): In the test room with higher levels of air ions (2194/cm³ vs. 1038/cm³) a significantly higher low to high frequency ratio of the electrocardiography (ECG) beat-to-beat interval spectrogram was found. Furthermore, six of nine subtests of a cognitive performance test were solved better, three of them statistically significant (verbal factor, reasoning, and perceptual speed), in the room with higher ion concentration. There was no influence of air ions on lung function and on wellbeing. Our results indicate slightly activating and cognitive performance enhancing effects of a short-term exposure to higher indoor air ion concentrations. PMID:26569277

  2. Capture CO2 from Ambient Air Using Nanoconfined Ion Hydration.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoyang; Xiao, Hang; Lackner, Klaus S; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-14

    Water confined in nanoscopic pores is essential in determining the energetics of many physical and chemical systems. Herein, we report a recently discovered unconventional, reversible chemical reaction driven by water quantities in nanopores. The reduction of the number of water molecules present in the pore space promotes the hydrolysis of CO3(2-) to HCO3(-) and OH(-). This phenomenon led to a nano-structured CO2 sorbent that binds CO2 spontaneously in ambient air when the surrounding is dry, while releasing it when exposed to moisture. The underlying mechanism is elucidated theoretically by computational modeling and verified by experiments. The free energy of CO3 (2-) hydrolysis in nanopores reduces with a decrease of water availability. This promotes the formation of OH(-), which has a high affinity to CO2 . The effect is not limited to carbonate/bicarbonate, but is extendable to a series of ions. Humidity-driven sorption opens a new approach to gas separation technology. PMID:26914978

  3. Variation and balance of positive air ion concentrations in a boreal forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, U.; Aalto, P. P.; Salm, J.; Komsaare, K.; Tammet, H.; Mäkelä, J. M.; Laakso, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2008-02-01

    Air ions are characterized on the basis of measurements carried out in a boreal forest at the Hyytiälä SMEAR station, Finland, during the BIOFOR III campaign in spring 1999. The air ions were discriminated as small ions (charged molecular aggregates of the diameter of less than 2.5 nm), intermediate ions (charged aerosol particles of the diameter of 2.5-8 nm), and large ions (charged aerosol particles of the diameter of 8-20 nm). Statistical characteristics of the ion concentrations and the parameters of ion balance in the atmosphere are presented separately for the nucleation event days and non-event days. In the steady state, the ionization rate is balanced with the loss of small ions, which is expressed as the product of the small ion concentration and the ion sink rate. The widely known sinks of small ions are the recombination with small ions of opposite polarity and attachment to aerosol particles. The dependence of small ion concentration on the concentration of aerosol particles was investigated applying a model of the bipolar diffusion charging of particles by small ions. When the periods of relative humidity above 95% and wind speed less than 0.6 m s-1 were excluded, then the small ion concentration and the theoretically calculated small ion sink rate were closely negatively correlated (correlation coefficient -87%). However, an extra ion loss term of the same magnitude as the ion loss onto aerosol particles is needed for a quantitative explanation of the observations. This term is presumably due to the small ion deposition on coniferous forest. The hygroscopic growth correction of the measured aerosol particle size distributions was also found to be necessary for the proper estimation of the ion sink rate. In the case of nucleation burst events, the concentration of small positive ions followed the general balance equation, no extra ion loss in addition to the deposition on coniferous forest was detected, and the hypothesis of the conversion of ions

  4. Fast ion conductivity in strained defect-fluorite structure created by ion tracks in Gd2Ti2O7

    PubMed Central

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The structure and ion-conducting properties of the defect-fluorite ring structure formed around amorphous ion-tracks by swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore are investigated. High angle annular dark field imaging complemented with ion-track molecular dynamics simulations show that the atoms in the ring structure are disordered, and have relatively larger cation-cation interspacing than in the bulk pyrochlore, illustrating the presence of tensile strain in the ring region. Density functional theory calculations show that the non-equilibrium defect-fluorite structure can be stabilized by tensile strain. The pyrochlore to defect-fluorite structure transformation in the ring region is predicted to be induced by recrystallization during a melt-quench process and stabilized by tensile strain. Static pair-potential calculations show that planar tensile strain lowers oxygen vacancy migration barriers in pyrochlores, in agreement with recent studies on fluorite and perovskite materials. In view of these results, it is suggested that strain engineering could be simultaneously used to stabilize the defect-fluorite structure and gain control over its high ion-conducting properties. PMID:26555848

  5. Fast ion conductivity in strained defect-fluorite structure created by ion tracks in Gd2Ti2O7

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-10

    The structure and ion-conducting properties of the defect-fluorite ring structure formed around amorphous ion-tracks by swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore are investigated. High angle annular dark field imaging complemented with ion-track molecular dynamics simulations show that the atoms in the ring structure are disordered, and have relatively larger cation-cation interspacing than in the bulk pyrochlore, illustrating the presence of tensile strain in the ring region. Density functional theory calculations show that the non-equilibrium defect-fluorite structure can be stabilized by tensile strain. The pyrochlore to defect-fluorite structure transformation in the ring region is predicted to be induced by recrystallizationmore » during a melt-quench process and stabilized by tensile strain. Static pair-potential calculations show that planar tensile strain lowers oxygen vacancy migration barriers in pyrochlores, in agreement with recent studies on fluorite and perovskite materials. Lastly, in view of these results, it is suggested that strain engineering could be simultaneously used to stabilize the defect-fluorite structure and gain control over its high ion-conducting properties.« less

  6. Computed Tomography Artifact Created by Air in the X-ray Tube Oil.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Wayne R; Markovic, Michael A; Short, James H; Vera, Chido D

    2016-01-01

    A subtle artifact of patchy hypodensities in computed tomography images of the head mimicked acute or subacute cerebral infarct. The cause of the artifact was air in the oil of the x-ray tube. The artifact manifested only when the acquisition parameters included a rotation time of 0.5 second and a gantry tilt angle of 11 to 20 degrees. Routine quality control testing did not detect nonuniformities in the water phantom. PMID:26466108

  7. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-01-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  8. Response of air-filled ion chambers to high-intensity radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Plum, M.; Brown, D.

    1993-06-01

    Ion chambers are one of the most popular types of detectors used for beam loss-monitor systems. To provide a foundation for the development of future loss-monitor systems, and to fully characterize the ion chambers in use at LAMPF, we have studied the response of air-filled cylindrical ion chambers to high-intensity, short-duration radiation pulses. The most intense pulses were about 180 rad in 250 ns (the equivalent steady-state dose rate was about 700 Mrad/h). We filled our chambers with nitrogen gas at 760 Torr and air at 600 Torr. The ion chambers were driven into extreme nonlinear response. We hope these data will be used to design loss-monitor systems based on air-filled ion chambers, thus eliminating the need for gas-flow systems and/or airtight ion chambers.

  9. Amplitude scaling of a static wrinkle at an oil-air interface created by dielectrophoresis forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. V.; Al-Shabib, W.; Wells, G. G.; McHale, G.; Newton, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    Dielectrophoresis forces have been used to create a static periodic wrinkle with a sinusoidal morphology on the surface of a thin layer of 1-decanol oil. The surface deformation occurs when a voltage V is applied between adjacent coplanar strip electrodes in an interdigitated array onto which the oil film is coated. It has been shown experimentally that the peak-to-peak amplitude A of the wrinkle scales according to the functional form A ∝V2 exp(-αh¯/p) for a range of oil film thicknesses h¯ (between 15 and 50 μm) and wrinkle pitches p (160, 240, and 320 μm).

  10. Stress and physiological, behavioral and performance patterns of children under varied air ion levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornof, K. T.; Gilbert, G. O.

    1988-12-01

    The possibility that individual differences in reactivity to stressors are a major factor underlying discordant results reported for air ion studies prompted an investigation of response patterns in school children under both normal indoor air ion levels and moderately increased negative air ion levels (4000±500/cm3). It was hypothesized that the impact of stressors is reduced with high negative air ionization, and that resultant changes in stress effects would be differentially exhibited according to the children's normal degree of stimulus reactivity. A counter-balanced, replicative, withinssubject design was selected, and the subjects were 12 environmentally sensitive, 1st 4th grade school children. In addition to monitoring stress effects on activity level, attention span, concentration to task and conceptual performance, measures were also made of urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid levels and skin resistance response (SRR) to determine if changes extended to the physiological state. The cold water test was used to add physical stress and enable calculations of Lacey's autonomic lability scores (ALS) as indicators of individual reactivity. The results show main effects for air ions on both physiological parameters, with 48% less change in %SRR ( P<0.01) and 46% less change in urinary 5-HIAA levels ( P<0.055) during negative air ions, indicating increased stress tolerance. Strong interactive effects for ALS x air ion condition appeared, with high and low ALS children reacting oppositely to negative air ions in measures of skin resistance level ( P<0.01), wrist activity ( P<0.01) and digit span backwards ( P<0.004). Thus individual differences in autonomic reactivity and the presence or absence of stressors appear as critical elements for internal validity, and in preventing consequent skewed results from obscuring progress in air ion research.

  11. Air ion measurements as a source of information about atmospheric aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, Urmas; Mirme, Aadu; Salm, Jaan; Tamm, Eduard; Tammet, Hannes

    The mobility spectra of air ions recorded in the course of routine atmospheric electric measurements contain information about atmospheric aerosols. The mobility spectrum of air ions is correlated with the size spectrum of aerosol particles. Two procedures of conversion (and conversion errors) are considered in this paper assuming the steady state of charge distribution. The first procedure uses the fraction model of the aerosol particle size distribution and algebraic solution of the conversion problem. The second procedure uses the parametric KL model of the particle size distribution and the least square fitting of the mobility measurements. The procedures were tested using simultaneous side-by-side measurements of air ion mobilities and aerosol particle size distributions at a rural site during a monthly period. The comparison of results shows a promising agreement between the measured and calculated size spectra in the common size range. A supplementary information about nanometer particles was obtained from air ion measurements.

  12. A novel double hohlraum target to create a moderately coupled plasma for ion stopping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, A.; Faik, S.; Schumacher, D.; Basko, M. M.; Blazevic, A.; Busold, S.; Bedacht, S.; Cayzac, W.; Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Rienecker, T.; Schaumann, G.; Tauschwitz, An.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new double hohlraum target for the creation of a moderately coupled (0.1 < Γ < 1) carbon plasma for energy loss and charge state measurements of projectile ions interacting with this plasma. A spherical cavity of 600 μm in diameter is heated with a 150-J laser pulse (λL = 527nm) within 1.2ns to produce a quasi-Planckian X-ray source with a radiation temperature of Tr ≈ 100eV . These X-rays are then used to heat volumetrically two thin carbon foils in a secondary cylindrical hohlraum to a dense plasma state. An axi-symmetric plasma column with a free-electron density of up to 8 ×1021cm-3, a temperature of T ≈ 10 eV, and an average ionization degree of Z ≈ 3 is generated. This plasma stays in a dense and an almost uniform state for about 5ns . Ultimately, such targets are supposed to be used in experiments where a heavy ion beam is launched through the sample plasma, and the ion energy losses as well as the charge distributions are to be measured. The present paper is in a certain sense a symbiotic one, where the theoretical analysis and the experimental results are combined to investigate the basic properties and the prospects of this type of plasma targets.

  13. The effects of negative air ions on various physiological functions during work in a hot environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbar, O.; Rotstein, A.; Dlin, R.; Dotan, R.; Sulman, F. G.

    1982-06-01

    The effects of negative air-ions on human physical performance has been investigated. Twenty-one healthy males, 20 25 years old (X=23.6±2.6) were exposed to two 180-min rest and exercise sessions two weeks apart. The subjects were randomly assigned into either an experimental group (n=12) or to a control group (n=9). The experimental group performed the first session in neutral air conditions and the second one in air containing 1.36 to 1.90×105 negative air ions and 1.40 to 1.66×102 positive air ions/ml. The control group performed both sessions under neutral air conditions. All sessions were held at Ta=40±1‡C and 25±5% RH. Each session included one hour of resting under the respective ionization conditions, followed by 3 30-min cycle ergometer work bouts, separated by 7-min rest periods. The mechanical work-load during the bicycle exercise was 1.64±0.6 W/kg BW. The experimental group showed a significant reduction with negative air-ions in heart rate (HR), in rectal temperature, and in the rating of perceived exertion (RPE), all when compared with their own neutral session. The control group showed no significant changes between the first and the second exposure. Although not statistically significant, being exposed to negative air-ions seems also to reduce total sweat rate and minute ventilation (VE), and to increase O2 pulse. It is suggested that under the conditions of this study negative air ions can improve various cardiovascular and thermoregulatory functions as well as subjective feelings during physical effort. It is felt that such positive influences may be augmented by increasing the exposure time to negative ionized air and/or prolonging the stressful conditions.

  14. Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

    2014-05-13

    Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

  15. Remote mass spectrometric sampling of electrospray- and desorption electrospray-generated ions using an air ejector.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Bereman, Michael S; Muddiman, David C; Hawkridge, Adam M

    2007-10-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data are presented. PMID:17716909

  16. Remote Mass Spectrometric Sampling of Electrospray- and Desorption Electrospray-Generated Ions Using an Air Ejector

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, R. Brent; Bereman, Michael S.; Muddiman, David C.; Hawkridge, Adam M.

    2007-01-01

    A commercial air ejector was coupled to an electrospray ionization linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ) to transport remotely generated ions from both electrospray (ESI) and desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) sources. We demonstrate the remote analysis of a series of analyte ions that range from small molecules and polymers to polypeptides using the AE-LTQ interface. The details of the ESI-AE-LTQ and DESI-AE-LTQ experimental configurations are described and preliminary mass spectrometric data is presented. PMID:17716909

  17. Deuterium trapping at defects created with neutron and ion irradiations in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Hatano; M. Shimada; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; V.Kh. Alimov; M. Hara; J. Shi; M. Kobayashi; T. Oda; G. Cao; K. Okuno; T. Tanaka; K. Sugiyama; J. Roth; B. Tyburska-Püschel; J. Dorner; N. Yoshida; N. Futagami; H. Watanabe; M. Hatakeyama; H. Kurishita; M. Sokolov; Y. Katoh

    2013-07-01

    The effects of neutron and ion irradiations on deuterium (D) retention in tungsten (W) were investigated. Specimens of pure W were irradiated with neutrons to 0.3 dpa at around 323 K and then exposed to high-flux D plasma at 473 and 773 K. The concentration of D significantly increased by neutron irradiation and reached 0.8 at% at 473 K and 0.4 at% at 773 K. Annealing tests for the specimens irradiated with 20 MeV W ions showed that the defects which play a dominant role in the trapping at high temperature were stable at least up to 973 K, while the density decreased at temperatures equal to or above 1123 K. These observations of the thermal stability of traps and the activation energy for D detrapping examined in a previous study (˜1.8 eV) indicated that the defects which contribute predominantly to trapping at 773 K were small voids. The higher concentration of trapped D at 473 K was explained by additional contributions of weaker traps. The release of trapped D was clearly enhanced by the exposure to atomic hydrogen at 473 K, though higher temperatures are more effective for using this effect for tritium removal in fusion reactors.

  18. Sub-bandgap luminescence centers in silicon created by self-ion implantation and thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yu; Bao Jiming; Wang Chong; Aziz, Michael J.

    2010-06-15

    We investigated the conditions for the generation of silicon sub-bandgap luminescence centers (W, R, and D1 centers) in p-type silicon wafer by self-ion implantation and thermal annealing. Luminescence centers and their spatial distributions were probed by measuring their photoluminescence (PL) spectra before and after sequential removal of top surface layers. It was demonstrated that the optimal annealing temperature for W-line is {approx}300 deg. C. The strongest R-line is observed in the sample with a dose of 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and at an annealing temperature of 700 deg. C. The creation of D1-band requires a minimum dose of 3x10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} and a minimum annealing temperature of 800 deg. C. PL versus etch depth measurements indicate that within the studied dose range, the W-line luminescence centers are distributed beyond twice the ion projected range (R{sub p{approx_equal}}400 nm), R-line centers are located slightly deeper than the R{sub p}, and D1 related defects are distributed at about the same depth as R{sub p}. These results provide valuable information for fabricating the silicon-based infrared light sources.

  19. Investigating the air oxidation of V(II) ions in a vanadium redox flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngamsai, Kittima; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2015-11-01

    The air oxidation of vanadium (V(II)) ions in a negative electrolyte reservoir is a major side reaction in a vanadium redox flow battery (VRB), which leads to electrolyte imbalance and self-discharge of the system during long-term operation. In this study, an 80% charged negative electrolyte solution is employed to investigate the mechanism and influential factors of the reaction in a negative-electrolyte reservoir. The results show that the air oxidation of V(II) ions occurs at the air-electrolyte solution interface area and leads to a concentration gradient of vanadium ions in the electrolyte solution and to the diffusion of V(II) and V(III) ions. The effect of the ratio of the electrolyte volume to the air-electrolyte solution interface area and the concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid in an electrolyte solution is investigated. A higher ratio of electrolyte volume to the air-electrolyte solution interface area results in a slower oxidation reaction rate. The high concentrations of vanadium and sulfuric acid solution also retard the air oxidation of V(II) ions. This information can be utilized to design an appropriate electrolyte reservoir for the VRB system and to prepare suitable ingredients for the electrolyte solution.

  20. In-air ion beam analysis with high spatial resolution proton microbeam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, M.; Chokheli, D.; Fazinić, S.; Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Sudić, I.; Tadić, T.; Antičić, T.

    2016-03-01

    One of the possible ways to maintain the micrometre spatial resolution while performing ion beam analysis in the air is to increase the energy of ions. In order to explore capabilities and limitations of this approach, we have tested a range of proton beam energies (2-6 MeV) using in-air STIM (Scanning Ion Transmission Microscopy) setup. Measurements of the spatial resolution dependence on proton energy have been compared with SRIM simulation and modelling of proton multiple scattering by different approaches. Results were used to select experimental conditions in which 1 micrometre spatial resolution could be obtained. High resolution in-air microbeam could be applied for IBIC (Ion Beam Induced Charge) tests of large detectors used in nuclear and high energy physics that otherwise cannot be tested in relatively small microbeam vacuum chambers.

  1. Thin film germanium on silicon created via ion implantation and oxide trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, R.; Knights, A. P.

    2015-06-01

    We present a novel process for integrating germanium with silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers. Germanium is implanted into SOI which is then oxidized, trapping the germanium between the two oxide layers (the grown oxide and the buried oxide). With careful control of the implantation and oxidation conditions this process creates a thin layer (current experiments indicate up to 20-30nm) of almost pure germanium. The layer can be used potentially for fabrication of integrated photo-detectors sensitive to infrared wavelengths, or may serve as a seed for further germanium growth. Results are presented from electron microscopy and Rutherford back-scattering analysis, as well as preliminary modelling using an analytical description of the process.

  2. Metal-air cell with ion exchange material

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2015-08-25

    Embodiments of the invention are related to anion exchange membranes used in electrochemical metal-air cells in which the membranes function as the electrolyte material, or are used in conjunction with electrolytes such as ionic liquid electrolytes.

  3. Contribution of nitrogen atoms and ions to the luminescence emission during femotosecond filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-Yu; Li, Shu-Chang; Sui, Lai-Zhi; Jiang, Yuan-Fei; Chen, An-Min; Jin, Ming-Xing

    2016-01-01

    During femtosecond filamentation in air, nitrogen molecules and corresponding molecular ions undergo dissociation due to the high intensity of laser pulses, generating nitrogen atoms and atomic ions. The generated atoms and atomic ions emit luminescence in the UV range, which superposes on those emissions for the neutral and ionic nitrogen molecules. Here we report on a significant difference between the emission behavior of the 391-nm line and the other spectral lines under different pump laser polarizations. We attribute this difference to the contribution of the atomic ions to the luminescence emission around 391 nm. The difference becomes more evident in tightly focusing cases, providing an indirect but effective evidence for the dissociation of nitrogen molecular ions.

  4. An Inexpensive Autosampler to Maximize Throughput for an Ion Source that Samples Surfaces in Open Air

    EPA Science Inventory

    An autosampler was built to pull cotton swab heads mounted into a 3-foot long, square Al rod in ambient air through the He ionizing beam of a Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) ion source interfaced to an orthogonal acceleration, time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The cost of th...

  5. A Comparison of Statistical Techniques for Combining Modeled and Observed Concentrations to Create High-Resolution Ozone Air Quality Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality surfaces representing pollutant concentrations across space and time are needed for many applications, including tracking trends and relating air quality to human and ecosystem health. The spatial and temporal characteristics of these surfaces may reveal new informat...

  6. DIRECT TRACE ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR USING ION TRAP MASS SPECTROMETERS WITH FILTERED NOISE FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two ion trap mass spectrometers and direct air sampling interfaces are being evaluated in the laboratory for monitoring toxic air pollutants in real time. he mass spectrometers are the large, laboratory-based Finnigan MAT ion trap (ITMS) and the compact, field-deployable Teledyne...

  7. Stereolithographic biomodelling to create tangible hard copies of the ethmoidal labyrinth air cells based on the visible human project.

    PubMed

    Kapakin, S

    2011-02-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP), or stereolithography, is a new clinical application area, which is used to obtain accurate three-dimensional physical replicas of complex anatomical structures. The aim of this study was to create tangible hard copies of the ethmoidal labyrinth air cells (ELACs) with stereolithographic biomodelling. The visible human dataset (VHD) was used as the input imaging data. The Surfdriver software package was applied to these images to reconstruct the ELACs as three-dimensional DXF (data exchange file) models. These models were post-processed in 3D-Doctor software for virtual reality modelling language (VRML) and STL (Standard Triangulation Language) formats. Stereolithographic replicas were manufactured in a rapid prototyping machine by using the STL format. The total number of ELACs was 21. The dimensions of the ELACs on the right and left sides were 52.91 x 13.00 x 28.68 mm and 53.79 x 12.42 x 28.55 mm, respectively. The total volume of the ELACs was 4771.1003 mm(3). The mean ELAC distance was 27.29 mm from the nasion and 71.09 mm from the calotte topologically. In conclusion, the combination of Surfdriver and 3D-Doctor could be effectively used for manufacturing 3D solid models from serial sections of anatomical structures. Stereolithographic anatomical models provide an innovative and complementary tool for students, researchers, and surgeons to apprehend these anatomical structures tangibly. The outcomes of these attempts can provide benefits in terms of the visualization, perception, and interpretation of the structures in anatomy teaching and prior to surgical interventions. PMID:21604251

  8. Influence of air ions on brain activity induced by electrical stimulation in the rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivereau, J. M.; Lambert, J. F.; Truong-Ngoc, A.

    1981-03-01

    The brain induced activity was studied in 18 rats wearing chronically skull implanted electrodes. The stimulating factor was various electrical stimulations of the mesencephalic reticular activating formation, given during the slow wave state of sleep. The results of 300 stimulations were measured by amplitude and frequency changes in the EEG simultaneously recorded. Animals previously exposed to positive air ions (3 weeks 80,000 ions/ml) exhibited lowered excitability of the reticulocortical system. Significantly higher stimulations were necessary to induce arousal. Negative air ions induced more intricate effects: brain excitability was lowered when tested with weak stimulations, but normal when evaluated with medium high level stimilations. Sleep seems first more stable but as stimulation increases, arousal is soon as effective as in controls. These results are in agreement with others findings in behavioral fields and partly explains them.

  9. [Negative air ions generated by plants upon pulsed electric field stimulation applied to soil].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ren-ye; Deng, Chuan-yuan; Yang, Zhi-jian; Weng, Hai-yong; Zhu, Tie-jun-rong; Zheng, Jin-gui

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigated the capacity of plants (Schlumbergera truncata, Aloe vera var. chinensis, Chlorophytum comosum, Schlumbergera bridgesii, Gymnocalycium mihanovichii var. friedrichii, Aspidistra elatior, Cymbidium kanran, Echinocactus grusonii, Agave americana var. marginata, Asparagus setaceus) to generate negative air ions (NAI) under pulsed electric field stimulation. The results showed that single plant generated low amounts of NAI in natural condition. The capacity of C. comosum and G. mihanovichii var. friedrichii generated most NAI among the above ten species, with a daily average of 43 ion · cm(-3). The least one was A. americana var. marginata with the value of 19 ion · cm(-3). When proper pulsed electric field stimulation was applied to soil, the NAI of ten plant species were greatly improved. The effect of pulsed electric field u3 (average voltage over the pulse period was 2.0 x 10(4) V, pulse frequency was 1 Hz, and pulse duration was 50 ms) was the greatest. The mean NAI concentration of C. kanran was the highest 1454967 ion · cm(-3), which was 48498.9 times as much as that in natural condition. The lowest one was S. truncata with the value of 34567 ion · cm(-3), which was 843.1 times as much as that in natural condition. The capacity of the same plants to generate negative air ion varied extremely under different intensity pulsed electric fields. PMID:26094455

  10. Estimation of magnetospheric plasma ion composition for 1956-1975 by using high time resolution geomagnetic field data created from analog magnetograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, K.; Nosé, M.; Mashiko, N.; Morinaga, K.; Nagamachi, S.

    2016-06-01

    This study addresses the ion composition in the magnetosphere before the satellite era. We estimate the plasma ion mass for 1956-1975 from the period of low-latitude Pi2 pulsations found in digital geomagnetic field data that are created from analog magnetograms at Kakioka. The period of investigation covers most of solar cycle 19 and the whole solar cycle 20. To consider long-term variation, the moving average of the estimated plasma ion mass is calculated with a 1 year time window. We find that 1 year moving average of the plasma ion mass changed by a factor of ˜2 during one solar cycle (i.e., between ˜1.1 amu and ˜2.4 amu for solar cycle 19 and between ˜1.1 amu and ˜2.0 amu for solar cycle 20). The correlation coefficient between the 1 year moving average of the plasma ion mass and that of the F10.7 index is 0.86. This result supports the idea that in long-term variation, solar radiation increases the density and the temperature of O+ ions in the ionosphere, leads to the outflow of O+ ions, and contributes to the enhancement of the plasma ion mass in the nightside magnetosphere. The digital data created from analog magnetograms provide an important clue to know the space environment in old days and are advantageous for studies of the space weather and space climate.

  11. Design of a high-sensitivity negative ion source time-of-flight mass analyzer assembly created by cylindrical electrodes with a common axis.

    PubMed

    Ioanoviciu, D; Cuna, C; Cosma, V; Albert, I; Szilagyi, Edina

    2004-12-01

    The new design incorporates the negative ion source and the mass analyzer, both constructed from cylindrical electrodes. The ion source is formed by three gridded cylindrical electrodes: a pulsed grid, the intermediate grid and the final accelerating grid. During a first time lapse, the electrons penetrate through the pulsed grid into the retarding field between this grid and the intermediate grid. The electrons are turning at some depth inside this intergrid space, where the attachment to neutral molecules most probably occurs. Next, the pulsed grid becoming strongly negative and ions are extracted towards the final acceleration grid. The ions from the cylindrical surface where they were created concentrate on the common axis of the electrodes (lateral focusing). The source lateral and time focus are coincident. A cylindrical electrostatic mirror is fitted to the source. The design, with a single stage, ensures also lateral focusing of the ions diverging from the common axis of the electrodes. The mirror electric and geometric parameters were selected to ensure both lateral and time focusing on the final detector with subsequent high luminosity. The basic parameters of the specific negative ion source time-of-flight mass analyzer design proposed here, are ion source final acceleration, intermediate, pulsed cylindrical grid radii 10, 20 and 30 mm, respectively, electrostatic mirror earthed grid and ion turning points surface radii 0.6 and 0.8 m, respectively. Ion packet smearing by the ion energy spread (resulting from the initial electron energy spread as electrons are turning at different depths inside the ionization region, from the moment when ions were created, being accelerated towards the pulsed grid during ionization) and by the turnaround time inside the cylindrical field was accounted for. Maintaining very high sensitivity, a resolution of the order of 100 is expected. PMID:15578737

  12. Specific ion adsorption at the air/water interface: The role of hydrophobic solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horinek, Dominik; Herz, Alexander; Vrbka, Lubos; Sedlmeier, Felix; Mamatkulov, Shavkat I.; Netz, Roland R.

    2009-09-01

    Classical force fields for molecular simulations of aqueous electrolytes are still controversial. We study alkali and halide ions at the air/water interface using novel non-polarizable force fields that were optimized based on bulk thermodynamics. In qualitative agreement with polarizable force-field simulations, ion repulsion from the interface decreases with increasing ion size. Iodide is even enhanced at the interface, which is rationalized by hydrophobic solvation at the interface, but exhibits a smaller surface propensity than in previous polarizable simulations. Surprisingly, lithium is less repelled than other cations because of its tightly bound hydration shell. A generalized Poisson-Boltzmann approach that includes ionic potentials of mean force from simulation almost quantitatively matches experimental interfacial tension increments for 1 molar sodium halides and alkali chlorides. We conclude that properly optimized non-polarizable force fields are transferable to interfacial environments and hold the potential for unravelling ion-specific effects even in biological situations involving peptidic surfaces.

  13. Laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions generated by a corona discharge in ambient air.

    PubMed

    Konthasinghe, Kumarasiri; Fitzmorris, Kristin; Peiris, Manoj; Hopkins, Adam J; Petrak, Benjamin; Killinger, Dennis K; Muller, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we present the measurement of laser-induced fluorescence from N2(+) ions via the B(2)Σu(+)-X(2)Σg(+) band system in the near-ultraviolet. The ions were generated continuously by a plasma glow discharge in low pressure N2 and by a corona discharge in ambient air. The fluorescence decay time was found to rapidly decrease with increasing pressure leading to an extrapolated decay rate of ≍10(10) s(-1) at atmospheric pressure. In spite of this quenching, we were able to observe laser induced fluorescence in ambient air by means of a time-gated spectral measurement. In the process of comparing the emission signal with that of N2 spontaneous Raman scattering, ion concentrations in ambient air of order 10(8-)10(10) cm(-3) were determined. With moderate increases in laser power and collection efficiency, ion concentrations of less than 10(6) cm(-3) may be measurable, potentially enabling applications in atmospheric standoff detection of ionizing radiation from hazardous radioactive sources. PMID:26414524

  14. Measurements of an ion beam diameter extracted into air through a large-bore metal capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Y.; Umigishi, M.; Ishii, K.; Ogawa, H.

    2015-07-01

    To extract an ion beam into air, the technique using a single macro-capillary has been paid attention. We have expanded the bore of the metal capillary up to 500 μm∅ inlet diameter to increase the beam intensity and have measured the intensity distributions of the extracted 3 MeV proton beam. Furthermore, we have tilted the capillary angle and measured the intensity distributions of the ion beam. In this article, we will present the experimental results together with the simulation which takes the tilt angles of the capillary into account.

  15. Development of cooling strategy for an air cooled lithium-ion battery pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hongguang; Dixon, Regan

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes a cooling strategy development method for an air cooled battery pack with lithium-ion pouch cells used in a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV). The challenges associated with the temperature uniformity across the battery pack, the temperature uniformity within each individual lithium-ion pouch cell, and the cooling efficiency of the battery pack are addressed. Initially, a three-dimensional battery pack thermal model developed based on simplified electrode theory is correlated to physical test data. An analytical design of experiments (DOE) approach using Optimal Latin-hypercube technique is then developed by incorporating a DOE design model, the correlated battery pack thermal model, and a morphing model. Analytical DOE studies are performed to examine the effects of cooling strategies including geometries of the cooling duct, cooling channel, cooling plate, and corrugation on battery pack thermal behavior and to identify the design concept of an air cooled battery pack to maximize its durability and its driving range.

  16. Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

    2012-07-08

    A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

  17. Ion mobility spectrometry of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, and ammonia in air with 5-nonanone reagent gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.; Salazar, M. R.; Rodriguez, M. R.; Limero, T. F.; Beck, S. W.; Cross, J. H.; Young, R.; James, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrazine (HZ) and monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in air were monitored continuously using a hand-held ion mobility spectrometer equipped with membrane inlet, 63Ni ion source, acetone reagent gas, and ambient temperature drift tube. Response characteristics included detection limit, 6 ppb; linear range, 10-600 ppb; saturated response, >2 ppm; and stable response after 15-30 min. Ammonia interfered in hydrazines detection through a product ion with the same drift time as that for MMH and HZ. Acetone reagent gas was replaced with 5-nonanone to alter drift times of product ions and separate ammonia from MMH and HZ. Patterns in mobility spectra, ion identifications from mass spectra, and fragmentation cross-sections from collisional-induced dissociations suggest that drift times are governed by ion-cluster equilibria in the drift region of the mobility spectrometer. Practical aspects including calibration, stability, and reproducibility are reported from the use of a hand-held mobility spectrometer on the space shuttle Atlantis during mission STS-37.

  18. Air ions and mood outcomes: a review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychological effects of air ions have been reported for more than 80 years in the media and scientific literature. This study summarizes a qualitative literature review and quantitative meta-analysis, where applicable, that examines the potential effects of exposure to negative and positive air ions on psychological measures of mood and emotional state. Methods A structured literature review was conducted to identify human experimental studies published through August, 2012. Thirty-three studies (1957–2012) evaluating the effects of air ionization on depression, anxiety, mood states, and subjective feelings of mental well-being in humans were included. Five studies on negative ionization and depression (measured using a structured interview guide) were evaluated by level of exposure intensity (high vs. low) using meta-analysis. Results Consistent ionization effects were not observed for anxiety, mood, relaxation/sleep, and personal comfort. In contrast, meta-analysis results showed that negative ionization, overall, was significantly associated with lower depression ratings, with a stronger association observed at high levels of negative ion exposure (mean summary effect and 95% confidence interval (CI) following high- and low-density exposure: 14.28 (95% CI: 12.93-15.62) and 7.23 (95% CI: 2.62-11.83), respectively). The response to high-density ionization was observed in patients with seasonal or chronic depression, but an effect of low-density ionization was observed only in patients with seasonal depression. However, no relationship between the duration or frequency of ionization treatment on depression ratings was evident. Conclusions No consistent influence of positive or negative air ionization on anxiety, mood, relaxation, sleep, and personal comfort measures was observed. Negative air ionization was associated with lower depression scores particularly at the highest exposure level. Future research is needed to evaluate the biological

  19. Simulation and Theory of Ions at Atmospherically Relevant Aqueous Liquid-Air Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tobias, Douglas J.; Stern, Abraham C.; Baer, Marcel D.; Levin, Yan; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2013-04-01

    Chemistry occurring at or near the surfaces of aqueous droplets and thin films in the atmosphere influences air quality and climate. Molecular dynamics simulations are becoming increasingly useful for gaining atomic-scale insight into the structure and reactivity of aqueous interfaces in the atmosphere. Here we review simulation studies of atmospherically relevant aqueous liquid-air interfaces, with an emphasis on ions that play important roles in the chemistry of atmospheric aerosols. In addition to surveying results from simulation studies, we discuss challenges to the refinement and experimental validation of the methodology for simulating ion adsorption to the air-water interface, and recent advances in elucidating the driving forces for adsorption. We also review the recent development of a dielectric continuum theory that is capable of reproducing simulation and experimental data on ion behavior at aqueous interfaces. MDB and CJM acknowledge support from the US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. MDB is supported by the Linus Pauling Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at PNNL.

  20. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  1. Thermal analysis and two-directional air flow thermal management for lithium-ion battery pack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kuahai; Yang, Xi; Cheng, Yongzhou; Li, Changhao

    2014-12-01

    Thermal management is a routine but crucial strategy to ensure thermal stability and long-term durability of the lithium-ion batteries. An air-flow-integrated thermal management system is designed in the present study to dissipate heat generation and uniformize the distribution of temperature in the lithium-ion batteries. The system contains of two types of air ducts with independent intake channels and fans. One is to cool the batteries through the regular channel, and the other minimizes the heat accumulations in the middle pack of batteries through jet cooling. A three-dimensional anisotropic heat transfer model is developed to describe the thermal behavior of the lithium-ion batteries with the integration of heat generation theory, and validated through both simulations and experiments. Moreover, the simulations and experiments show that the maximum temperature can be decreased to 33.1 °C through the new thermal management system in comparison with 42.3 °C through the traditional ones, and temperature uniformity of the lithium-ion battery packs is enhanced, significantly.

  2. An Autosampler and Field Sample Carrier for Maximizing Throughput Using an Open-Air, Surface Sampling Ion Source for MS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently developed, commercially available, open-air, surface sampling ion source for mass spectrometers provides individual analyses in several seconds. To realize its full throughput potential, an autosampler and field sample carrier were designed and built. The autosampler ...

  3. Net ion fluxes in the facultative air-breather Hoplosternum littorale (tamoata) and the obligate air-breather Arapaima gigas (pirarucu) exposed to different Amazonian waters.

    PubMed

    Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Copatti, Carlos E; Gomes, Levy C; Chagas, Edsandra C; Brinn, Richard P; Roubach, Rodrigo

    2008-12-01

    Fishes that live in the Amazon environment may be exposed to several kinds of water: black water (BW), acidic black water (pH 3.5) (ABW) and white water (WW), among others. The aim of the present study was to analyze net ion fluxes in the facultative air-breather Hoplosternum littorale (tamoata) and the obligate air-breather Arapaima gigas (pirarucu) exposed to different types of water. Fishes were acclimated in well water and later placed in individual chambers containing one type of water for ion flux measurements. After 4 h, the water in the chambers was replaced by a different type of water. The transfer of both species to ABW (independent of previous water exposure) increased net ion loss. Tamoatas transferred from ABW to BW or WW presented a net ion influx, but pirarucus showed only small changes on net ion efflux. These results allow us to conclude that tamoatas and pirarucus present differences in terms of ion regulation but that the general aspects of the ion flux are similar: (1) exposure to ABW led to net ion loss; (2) transfer from BW to WW or vice-versa induced only minor changes on net ion fluxes. These observations demonstrate that any osmoregulatory difficulties encountered by either species during changes between these latter two waters can be easily overcome. PMID:18958598

  4. New type of capillary for use as ion beam collimator and air-vacuum interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoytschew, V.; Schulte-Borchers, M.; Božičević Mihalića, Iva; Perez, R. D.

    2016-08-01

    Glass capillaries offer a unique way to combine small diameter ion beam collimation with an air-vacuum interface for ambient pressure ion beam applications. Usually they have an opening diameter of a few microns, limiting the air inflow sufficiently to maintain stable conditions on the vacuum side. As the glass capillaries generally are quite thin and fragile, handling of the capillary in the experiment becomes difficult. They also introduce an X-ray background produced by the capillary wall material, which has to be shielded or subtracted from the data for Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) applications. To overcome both drawbacks, a new type of conical glass capillary has been developed. It has a higher wall thickness eliminating the low energy X-ray background produced by common capillaries and leading to a more robust lens. The results obtained in first tests show, that this new capillary is suitable for ion beam collimation and encourage further work on the capillary production process to provide thick wall capillaries with an outlet diameter in the single digit micro- or even nanometre range.

  5. Cross-B convection of artificially created, negative-ion clouds and plasma depressions - Low-speed flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernhardt, Paul A.

    1988-01-01

    A negative-ion, positive-ion plasma produced by the release of an electron attachment chemical into the F region becomes electrically polarized by collisions with neutrals moving across magnetic field lines. The resulting electric field causes E x B drift of the two ion species and the residual electrons. The cross-field flow of the modified ionosphere is computed using a two-dimensional numerical simulation which includes electron attachment and mutual neutralization chemistry, self-consistent electric fields, and three-species plasma transport. The velocity of the plasma is initially in the direction of the neutral wind because the negative-ion cloud is a Pedersen conductivity enhancement. As the positive and negative ions react, the Pedersen conductivity becomes depressed below the ambient value and the velocity of the plasma reverses direction. A plasma hole remains after the positive and negative ions have mutually neutralized. The E x B gradient drift instability produces irregularities on the upwind edge of the hole.

  6. High-resolution ion pulse ionization chamber with air filling for the 222Rn decays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Gezhaev, A. M.; Etezov, R. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Tekueva, D. A.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    The construction and characteristics of the cylindrical ion pulse ionization chamber (CIPIC) with a working volume of 3.2 L are described. The chamber is intended to register α-particles from the 222Rn and its daughter's decays in the filled air sample. The detector is less sensitive to electromagnetic pick-ups and mechanical noises. The digital pulse processing method is proposed to improve the energy resolution of the ion pulse ionization chamber. An energy resolution of 1.6% has been achieved for the 5.49 MeV α-line. The dependence of the energy resolution on high voltage and working media pressure has been investigated and the results are presented.

  7. On-site application of air cleaner emitting plasma ion to reduce airborne contaminants in pig building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Man Su; Ko, Han Jong; Kim, Daekeun; Kim, Ki Youn

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this field study is to evaluate temporal reduction efficiency of air cleaner emitting plasma ion on airborne pollutants emitted from pig building. The operation principle of air cleaner based on plasma ion is that hydrogen atoms and oxygen ions combine to form hydroperoxyl radicals (HOO-), which surround and attach to surface of airborne microorganisms and eliminate them by breaking the hydrogen bond in their protein structure. In gaseous pollutants, it was found that there is no reduction effect of the air cleaner on ammonia and hydrogen sulfide (p > 0.05). In particulate pollutants, the air cleaner showed mean 79%(±6.1) and 78%(±3.0) of reduction efficiency for PM2.5. and PM1, respectively, compared to the control without air cleaner (p < 0.05). However, there is no significant difference in TSP and PM10 between the treatment with air cleaner and the control without air cleaner (p > 0.05). In biological pollutants, the mean reduction efficiencies for airborne bacteria and fungi by application of air cleaner were 22%(±6.6) and 25%(±8.7), respectively (p < 0.05). Based on the results obtained from this study, it was concluded that the air cleaner had a positive reduction effect on PM2.5, PM1, airborne bacteria and airborne fungi among airborne pollutants distributed in pig building while it did not lead to significant reduction of ammonia and hydrogen sulfide.

  8. Factors of air ion balance in a coniferous forest according to measurements in Hyytiälä, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Hõrrak, U.; Laakso, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-08-01

    A new mathematical model describing air ion balance was developed and tested. It has improved approximations and includes dry deposition of ions onto the forest canopy. The model leads to an explicit algebraic solution of the balance equations. This allows simple calculation of both the ionization rate and the average charge of aerosol particles from measurements of air ions and aerosol particles, with some parameters of the forest. Charged aerosol particles are distinguished from cluster ions by their size, which exceeds 1.6 nm diameter. The relative uncertainty of the ionization rate is about the same or less than the relative uncertainties of the measurements. The model was tested with specific air ion measurements carried out simultaneously at two heights at the Hyytiälä forest station, Finland. Earlier studies have shown a difference in the predictions of the ionization rate in the Hyytiälä forest when calculated in two different ways: based on the measurements of the environmental radioactivity and based on the air ion and aerosol measurements. The new model explains the difference as a consequence of neglecting dry deposition of ions in the earlier models. The ionization rate during the 16 h campaign was 5.6±0.8 cm-3 s-1 at the height of 2 m and 3.9±0.2 cm-3 s-1 at the height of 14 m, between the tops of the trees. The difference points out the necessity to consider the height variation when the ionization rate is used as a parameter in studies of ion-induced nucleation. Additional results are some estimates of the parameters of air ion balance. The recombination sink of cluster ions on the ions of opposite polarity made up 9-13%, the sink on aerosol particles 65-69%, and the sink on forest canopy 18-26% of the total sink of cluster ions. The average lifetime of cluster ions was about 130 s for positive and about 110 s for negative ions. At the height of 2 m, about 70% of the space charge of air was carried by aerosol particles, and at the height of 14

  9. A comparison of statistical techniques for combining modeled and observed concentrations to create high-resolution ozone air quality surfaces.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Valerie C; Foley, Kristen M; Gego, Edith; Holland, David M; Rao, S Trivikrama

    2010-05-01

    Air quality surfaces representing pollutant concentrations across space and time are needed for many applications, including tracking trends and relating air quality to human and ecosystem health. The spatial and temporal characteristics of these surfaces may reveal new information about the associations between emissions, pollution levels, and human exposure and health outcomes that may not have been discernable before. This paper presents four techniques, ranging from simple to complex, to statistically combine observed and modeled daily maximum 8-hr ozone concentrations for a domain covering the greater New York State area for the summer of 2001. Cross-validation results indicate that, for the domain and time period studied, the simpler techniques (additive and multiplicative bias adjustment) perform as well as or better than the more complex techniques. However, the spatial analyses of the resulting ozone concentration surfaces revealed some problems with these simpler techniques in limited areas where the model exhibits difficulty in simulating the complex features such as those observed in the New York City area. PMID:20480858

  10. Design, simulation and evaluation of improved air amplifier incorporating an ion funnel for nano-ESI MS.

    PubMed

    Jurcicek, Petr; Liu, Lingpeng; Zou, Helin; An, Zhiqi; Xiao, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    An improved air amplifier design that takes advantage of the combined effects of aerodynamic and electrodynamic focusing was developed to couple a nanoelectrospray ionisation (nano-ESI) source and the heated mass spectrometer inlet to improve the sensitivity of a mass spectrometer. The new design comprises an electrodynamic ion funnel integrated into the main air pathway of the air amplifier to more effectively focus and transmit gas-phase ions from the nano-ESI source into the heated mass spectrometer inlet. Numerical computational fluid dynamics simulations were carried out using a commercial software package, ANSYS FLUENT, to provide more detailed information about the device's performance. The gas flow field as well as the electric field patterns and the Lagrangian ion motion were conveniently simulated using this single package and custom-written, user-defined functions. Experimental results show a nearly five-fold improvement in reserpine ion intensity with the air amplifier operated at a nitrogen gauge pressure of 40 kPa and no direct current (DC) or radiofrequency (RF) potentials applied to the ion funnel when the distance between the electrospray emitter and sampling inlet tube was 24 mm, as compared to direct sample infusion from the same distance without the air amplifier. More importantly, a nearly three-fold additional gain in ion intensity was measured when both DC and RF potentials were co-applied, resulting in more than a 13-fold overall ion intensity gain which could be attributed to the combined air amplifier aerodynamic and ion funnel electrodynamic focusing effect. PMID:24895774

  11. Monte Carlo simulations on the water-to-air stopping power ratio for carbon ion dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Henkner, Katrin; Bassler, Niels; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Jaekel, Oliver

    2009-04-15

    Many papers discussed the I value for water given by the ICRU, concluding that a value of about 80{+-}2 eV instead of 67.2 eV would reproduce measured ion depth-dose curves. A change in the I value for water would have an effect on the stopping power and, hence, on the water-to-air stopping power ratio, which is important in clinical dosimetry of proton and ion beams. For energies ranging from 50 to 330 MeV/u and for one spread out Bragg peak, the authors compare the impact of the I value on the water-to-air stopping power ratio. The authors calculate ratios from different ICRU stopping power tables and ICRU reports. The stopping power ratio is calculated via track-length dose calculation with SHIELD-HIT07. In the calculations, the stopping power ratio is reduced to a value of 1.119 in the plateau region as compared to the cited value of 1.13 in IAEA TRS-398. At low energies the stopping power ratio increases by up to 6% in the last few tenths of a mm toward the Bragg peak. For a spread out Bragg peak of 13.5 mm width at 130 mm depth, the stopping power ratio increases by about 1% toward the distal end.

  12. Growth and morphological analysis of segmented AuAg alloy nanowires created by pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched membranes

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Loic; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, Maria Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: Multicomponent heterostructure nanowires and nanogaps are of great interest for applications in sensorics. Pulsed electrodeposition in ion-track etched polymer templates is a suitable method to synthesise segmented nanowires with segments consisting of two different types of materials. For a well-controlled synthesis process, detailed analysis of the deposition parameters and the size-distribution of the segmented wires is crucial. Results: The fabrication of electrodeposited AuAg alloy nanowires and segmented Au-rich/Ag-rich/Au-rich nanowires with controlled composition and segment length in ion-track etched polymer templates was developed. Detailed analysis by cyclic voltammetry in ion-track membranes, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy was performed to determine the dependency between the chosen potential and the segment composition. Additionally, we have dissolved the middle Ag-rich segments in order to create small nanogaps with controlled gap sizes. Annealing of the created structures allows us to influence their morphology. Conclusion: AuAg alloy nanowires, segmented wires and nanogaps with controlled composition and size can be synthesised by electrodeposition in membranes, and are ideal model systems for investigation of surface plasmons. PMID:26199830

  13. Estimating neutral nanoparticle steady state size distribution and growth according to measurements of intermediate air ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Komsaare, K.; Hõrrak, U.

    2013-05-01

    The concentration of nanometer aerosol particles in atmospheric air during quiet periods of new particle formation is low and direct measuring is difficult. We study what information about neutral particles can be drawn from measurements of intermediate ions, which are the electrically charged particles between 1.5-7.5 nm in diameter. If the coagulation sink of nanoparticles and the growth rate of charged particles are known, then the steady state equations allow us to calculate the size distribution of neutral nanoparticles. Variations in the trial value of the growth rate have a minor effect on the estimates of the concentrations and size distributions. There exists a value of the constant growth rate of charged nanoparticles that leads to a minimum deviation of the estimated growth rate of neutral nanoparticles from the growth rate of charged nanoparticles. Rough estimates of the growth rate and size distribution of neutral nanoparticles are derived despite the fact that the sample data of intermediate ion measurements is not accompanied by simultaneous measurements of the background aerosol and ionization rate. In the case of a near-median intermediate ion concentration of 21 ± 2 cm-3 in the urban air of a small town, the growth rate of nanoparticles is estimated to be about 2 nm h-1, while the growth flux or apparent nucleation rate is about 0.5 cm-3 s-1 at 3 nm and about 0.08 cm-3 s-1 at 7 nm. The results suggest that the process of new particle formation is not interrupted during the quiet periods between events of intensive nucleation of atmospheric aerosols.

  14. The effect of exposure to negative air ions on the recovery of physiological responses after moderate endurance exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryushi, T.; Kita, Ichirou; Sakurai, Tomonobu; Yasumatsu, Mikinobu; Isokawa, Masanori; Aihara, Yasutugu; Hama, Kotaro

    This study examined the effects of negative air ion exposure on the human cardiovascular and endocrine systems during rest and during the recovery period following moderate endurance exercise. Ten healthy adult men were studied in the presence (8,000-10,000 cm-3) or absence (200-400 cm-3) of negative air ions (25° C, 50% humidity) after 1 h of exercise. The level of exercise was adjusted to represent a 50-60% load compared with the subjects' maximal oxygen uptake, which was determined using a bicycle ergometer in an unmodified environment (22-23° C, 30-35% humidity, 200-400 negative air ions.cm-3). The diastolic blood pressure (DBP) values during the recovery period were significantly lower in the presence of negative ions than in their absence. The plasma levels of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) were significantly lower in the presence of negative ions than in their absence. These results demonstrated that exposure to negative air ions produced a slow recovery of DBP and decreases in the levels of 5-HT and DA in the recovery period after moderate endurance exercise. 5-HT is thought to have contributed to the slow recovery of DBP.

  15. Effects of impregnated metal ions on air/CO2-gasification of woody biomass.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Scott; Li, Hanning; Xu, Chunbao Charles

    2010-12-01

    Several impregnated metal ions (Fe (III), Co (II), Ni (II), and Ru (IV)) and a raw iron ore (natural limonite) were examined as catalysts for gasification of pine sawdust in air/CO(2) at 700 and 800 degrees C. The yields of char and tar both increased with increasing CO(2) content in the feed gas. All the impregnated metal ions, in particular Ni (II), Co (II) and Ru (IV), were very effective for promoting biomass gasification in CO(2), leading to greatly reduced yields of tar and char accompanied by significantly enhanced formation of CO and H(2). At 800 degrees C, the impregnation of Fe (III), Ni (II), Co (II) or Ru (IV) led to almost complete conversion of the solid biomass into gas/liquid products, producing an extremely low char yield (<1-4 wt.%), and a very high yield of combustible gas (from 51.7 wt.% for Fe to 84 wt.% for Ru). The tar yield reduced from 32.1 wt.% without catalyst to 19-27 wt.% with the impregnated metal ions. PMID:20667716

  16. Factors of air ion balance in a coniferous forest according to measurements in Hyytiälä, Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Hõrrak, U.; Laakso, L.; Kulmala, M.

    2006-04-01

    A new theoretical model includes dry deposition of ions onto the forest canopy and takes into account different parameters of positive and negative ions. Explicit algebraic solution of the air ion balance equations allows calculating the ionization rate and the average charge of aerosol particles according to air ion and aerosol measurements, and parameters of forest. The transformation of direct measurements to the values of the ionization rate does not bring along amplification of measurement errors. The model was used to estimate the ionization rate at the Hyytiälä forest station, Finland, and it solved the controversy of different estimates in the earlier study. The ionization rate during one-day measurements proved to be 5.6±0.8 cm-3 s-1 at the standard measuring height of 2 m and 3.9±0.2 cm-3 s-1 at the height of 14 m between the tops of the trees. The height variation should be considered when the ionization rate is used as a parameter in models of ion-induced nucleation. The recombination sink of cluster ions on the ions of opposite polarity made up 9-13%, the sink on aerosol particles 65-69%, and the sink on forest canopy 18-26% of the total sink of cluster ions. The average lifetime of cluster ions was about 130 s for positive ions and about 110 s for negative ions. About 70% of the space charge of the air was carried by aerosol particles at the height of 2 m and about 84% at the height of 14 m.

  17. [Spatiotemporal distribution of negative air ion concentration in urban area and related affecting factors: a review].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Jian; Zeng, Hong-Da; Chen, Guang-Shui; Zhong, Xian-Fang

    2013-06-01

    Negative air ion (NAI) concentration is an important indicator comprehensively reflecting air quality, and has significance to human beings living environment. This paper summarized the spatiotemporal distribution features of urban NAI concentration, and discussed the causes of these features based on the characteristics of the environmental factors in urban area and their effects on the physical and chemical processes of NAI. The temporal distribution of NAI concentration is mainly controlled by the periodic variation of solar radiation, while the spatial distribution of NAI concentration along the urban-rural gradient is mainly affected by the urban aerosol distribution, underlying surface characters, and urban heat island effect. The high NAI concentration in urban green area is related to the vegetation life activities and soil radiation, while the higher NAI concentration near the water environment is attributed to the water molecules that participate in the generation of NAI through a variety of ways. The other environmental factors can also affect the generation, life span, component, translocation, and distribution of NAI to some extent. To increase the urban green space and atmospheric humidity and to maintain the soil natural attributes of underlying surface could be the effective ways to increase the urban NAI concentration and improve the urban air quality. PMID:24066568

  18. Inert gas purgebox for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of air-sensitive solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Michael A.; Marshall, Alan G.

    1994-03-01

    A sealed rigid ``purgebox'' makes it possible to load air- and/or moisture-sensitive solids into the solids probe inlet of a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT/ICR) mass spectrometer. A pelletized sample is transferred (in a sealed canister) from a commercial drybox to a Lucite(R) purgebox. After the box is purged with inert gas, an attached glove manipulator is used to transfer the sample from the canister to the solids probe of the mass spectrometer. Once sealed inside the inlet, the sample is pre-evacuated and then passed into the high vacuum region of the instrument at ˜10-7 Torr. The purgebox is transparent, portable, and readily assembled/disassembled. Laser desorption FT/ICR mass spectra of the air- and moisture-sensitive solids, NbCl5. NbCl2(C5H5)2, and Zr(CH3)2(C5H5)2 are obtained without significant oxidation. The residual water vapor concentration inside the purgebox was measured as 100±20 ppm after a 90-min purge with dry nitrogen gas. High-resolution laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry of air-sensitive solids becomes feasible with the present purgebox interface. With minor modification of the purgebox geometry, the present method could be adapted to any mass spectrometer equipped with a solid sample inlet.

  19. Measurement of the Charge Reduction and Asymmetrical Interaction Force Created by the Ion Wakefield in a Dusty Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mudi; Yousefi, Razieh; Kong, Jie; Qiao, Ke; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    The manner in which the ion wakefield forms has strong implications on the structure, stability and dynamics of a complex plasma. The majority of vertically aligned, ordered dust particle structures observed in a complex plasma result from a combination of the ion wakefield and the external confinement. The ion wakefield is also responsible for other interesting phenomena, such as the reduction in charge seen for a down-stream particle in a vertically aligned dust particle chain and the asymmetrical interaction force between the up-stream and down-stream particles. Unfortunately, few experimental measurements of these phenomena are available. In this experiment, one dimensional (1-D) dust particle structures (i.e., particle chains) are formed in a GEC RF reference cell within a glass box sitting on the powered, lower electrode. The charge reduction on the downstream particle and the asymmetric interaction force are examined using an externally produced DC bias applied to the lower electrode and a diode pumped solid state laser (Coherent VERDI) for perturbation.

  20. Use of electrospinning and dynamic air focusing to create three-dimensional cell culture scaffolds in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chengpeng; Mehl, Benjamin T; Sell, Scott A; Martin, R Scott

    2016-09-21

    those cultured on a thin layer of PCL in a channel or directly on the inner channel wall. Overall, this study represents a new approach for in vitro cell studies, where electrospinning can be used to easily and quickly create 3D scaffolds that can improve the culture conditions in microfluidic devices. PMID:27373715

  1. A selected ion flow tube study of the reactions of NO + and O + 2 ions with some organic molecules: The potential for trace gas analysis of air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Španěl, Patrik; Smith, David

    1996-02-01

    A study has been carried out using our selected ion flow tube apparatus of the reactions of NO+ and O+2 ions in their vibronic ground states with ten organic species: the hydrocarbons, benzene, toluene, isoprene, cyclopropane, and n-pentane; the oxygen-containing organics, methanol, ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and diethyl ether. The major objectives of this work are, on the one hand, to fully understand the processes involved in these reactions and, on the other hand, to explore the potential of NO+ and O+2 as chemical ionization agents for the analysis of trace gases in air and on human breath. Amongst the NO+ reactions, charge transfer, hydride-ion transfer, and termolecular association occur, and the measured rate coefficients, k, for the reactions vary from immeasurably small to the maximum value, collisional rate coefficient, kc. The O+2 reactions are all fast, in each case the k being equal to or an appreciable fraction of kc, and charge transfer producing the parent organic ion or dissociative charge transfer resulting in two or three fragments of the parent ion are the reaction processes that occur. We conclude from these studies, and from previous studies, that NO+ ions and O+2 ions can be used to great effect as chemical ionization agents for trace gas analysis, especially in combination with H3O+ ions which we now routinely use for this purpose.

  2. Application of MeV ion bombardment to create micro-scale annealing of Silica-Gold films

    SciTech Connect

    Bouyard, A.; Blanchet, X.; Ila, D.; Muntele, C.I.; Muntele, I.C.; Zimmerman, R.L.

    2003-08-26

    This project studies the production of nanoscale annealing using MeV Si ion beams. To test the technique we produced thin films of Au-Silica by sequential deposition of Au and SiO2 on Suprasil substrates. We measured the thickness of the deposited films with an interferometer and by using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Using the measured thickness we calculated the concentration of Au in each film. TRIM simulation was used to confirm our results. Since the localized annealing causes the formation of gold nano-clusters, we performed optical absorption photospectrometry (OAP) on all slides, before deposition, after deposition, and after bombardment by MeV Si beams. Optical index changes are apparent in the sequentially deposited multilayer samples that were not seen in Au-silica co-deposited samples with the same volume fraction of gold.

  3. Effects of negative air ions on oxygen uptake kinetics, recovery and performance in exercise: a randomized, double-blinded study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmerichter, Alfred; Holdhaus, Johann; Mehnen, Lars; Vidotto, Claudia; Loidl, Markus; Barker, Alan R.

    2014-09-01

    Limited research has suggested that acute exposure to negatively charged ions may enhance cardio-respiratory function, aerobic metabolism and recovery following exercise. To test the physiological effects of negatively charged air ions, 14 trained males (age: 32 ± 7 years; : 57 ± 7 mL min-1 kg-1) were exposed for 20 min to either a high-concentration of air ions (ION: 220 ± 30 × 103 ions cm-3) or normal room conditions (PLA: 0.1 ± 0.06 × 103 ions cm-3) in an ionization chamber in a double-blinded, randomized order, prior to performing: (1) a bout of severe-intensity cycling exercise for determining the time constant of the phase II response ( τ) and the magnitude of the slow component (SC); and (2) a 30-s Wingate test that was preceded by three 30-s Wingate tests to measure plasma [adrenaline] (ADR), [nor-adrenaline] (N-ADR) and blood [lactate] (BLac) over 20 min during recovery in the ionization chamber. There was no difference between ION and PLA for the phase II τ (32 ± 14 s vs. 32 ± 14 s; P = 0.7) or SC (404 ± 214 mL vs 482 ± 217 mL; P = 0.17). No differences between ION and PLA were observed at any time-point for ADR, N-ADR and BLac as well as on peak and mean power output during the Wingate tests (all P > 0.05). A high-concentration of negatively charged air ions had no effect on aerobic metabolism during severe-intensity exercise or on performance or the recovery of the adrenergic and metabolic responses after repeated-sprint exercise in trained athletes.

  4. Differential negative air ion effects on learning disabled and normal-achieving children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, L. L.; Kershner, J. R.

    1990-03-01

    Forty normal-achieving and 33 learning disabled (LD) children were assigned randomly to either a negative ion or placebo test condition. On a dichotic listening task using consonant-vowel (CV) combinations, both groups showed an ioninduced increase in the normal right ear advantage (REA). However, the mechanisms for this effect were different for each group. The LDs showed the effect at the right ear/left hemisphere (enhancement). The normal achievers showed the effect at the left ear/right hemisphere (inhibition). The results are consistent with an activation-inhibition model of cerebral function and suggest a functional relationship between arousal, interhemispheric activation-inhibition, and learning disabilities. The LDs may have an interhemispheric dysfunction. Both groups showed superior right ear report and the normal achiever showed overall superiority. Normal achievers showed higher consonant intrusion scores, probably due to a greater cognitive capacity. Age was a significant covariate reflecting developmental capacity changes. Negative air ions are seen to be a tool with potential theoretical and remedial applications.

  5. Generation of hydroxyl radicals by urban suspended particulate air matter. The role of iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Salika, Anastasia; Theodoropoulou, Anna

    Recent epidemiologic studies showed statistical associations between particulate air pollution in urban areas and increased morbidity and mortality, even at levels well within current national air quality standards. Inhalable particulate matter (PM 10) can penetrate into the lower airways where they can cause acute and chronic lung injury by generating toxic oxygen free radicals. We tested inhalable total suspended particulates (TSP) from the Athens area, diesel and gasoline exhaust particles (DEP and GED), and urban street dusts, by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). All particulates can generate hydroxyl radicals (HO ṡ), in aqueous buffered solutions, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Results showed that oxidant generating activity is related with soluble iron ions. Leaching studies showed that urban particulate matter can release large amounts of Fe 3+ and lesser amounts of Fe 2+, as it was shown from other studies. Direct evidence of HO ṡ was confirmed by spin trapping with DMPO and measurement of DMPO-OH adduct by EPR. Evidence was supported with the use of chelator (EDTA), which increases the EPR signal, and the inhibition of the radical generating activity by desferrioxamine or/and antioxidants ( D-mannitol, sodium benzoate).

  6. Haematological and ion regulatory effects of nitrite in the air-breathing snakehead fish Channa striata.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Sjannie; Jensen, Frank B; Huong, Do T T; Wang, Tobias; Phuong, Nguyen T; Bayley, Mark

    2012-08-15

    The tolerance and effects of nitrite on ion balance and haematology were investigated in the striped snakehead, Channa striata Bloch 1793, which is an air-breathing fish with reduced gills of importance for aquaculture in South East Asia. C. striata was nitrite tolerant with a 96 h LC50 of 4.7 mM. Effects of sub-lethal exposures to nitrite (0mM, 1.4mM, and 3.0mM) were determined during a 7-day exposure period. Plasma nitrite increased, but the internal concentration remained well below ambient levels. Extracellular nitrate rose by several mM, indicating that a large proportion of the nitrite taken up was converted to nitrate. Nitrite reacted with erythrocyte haemoglobin (Hb) causing methaemoglobin (metHb) to increase to 30% and nitrosylhaemoglobin (HbNO) to increase to 10% of total Hb. Both metHb and HbNO stabilised after 4 days, and functional Hb levels accordingly never fell below 60% of total Hb. Haematocrit and total Hb were unaffected by nitrite. Although the effects of nitrite exposure seemed minor in terms of plasma nitrite and metHb increases, ion balance was strongly affected. In the high exposure group, total osmolality decreased from 320 mOsm to 260 mOsm, and plasma sodium from 150 mM to 120 mM, while plasma chloride fell from 105 mM to 60mM and plasma bicarbonate rose from 12 mM in controls to 20mM in exposed fish. The extreme changes in ion balance in C. striata are different from the response reported in other fish, and further studies are needed to investigate the mechanism behind the observed changes in regulation. PMID:22516674

  7. Calculated calibrations for ion chambers fabricated from plastics simulating air and muscle; determination of W and tauRa.

    PubMed

    Rose, J E; Shonka, F R

    1968-12-01

    An experiment is described utilizing two 16-liter ionization chambers, fabricated from electrically conducting plastics which closely simulate air and human muscle, designed to minimize most of the errors inherent in the use of cavity chambers. A careful calibration was done, using a 226Ra source in 0.5 mm platinum, in an almost scatter-free environment which permitted the derivation of accurate corrections for scatter and air attenuation. Calibrations calculated from the physical measurements of the ion chambers are compared with the experimental calibrations. Values of Wbeta for air, and muscle gas and of tauRa are derived. PMID:17387873

  8. SEM and XPS studies of nanohole arrays on InP(1 0 0) surfaces created by coupling AAO templates and low energy Ar + ion sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert-Goumet, C.; Monier, G.; Zefack, B.; Chelda, S.; Bideux, L.; Gruzza, B.; Awitor, O. K.

    2009-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the feasibility to form well-ordered nanoholes on InP(1 0 0) surfaces by low Ar + ion sputtering process in UHV conditions from anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. This process is a promising approach in creating ordered arrays of surface nanostructures with controllable size and morphology. To follow the Ar + ion sputtering effects on the AAO/InP surfaces, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the different surface species. In 4d and P 2p core level spectra were recorded on different InP(1 0 0) surfaces after ions bombardment. XPS results showed the presence of metallic indium on both smooth InP(1 0 0) and AAO/InP(1 0 0) surfaces. Finally, we showed that this experiment led to the formation of metallic In dropplets about 10 nm in diameter on nanoholes patterned InP surface while the as-received InP(1 0 0) surface generated metallic In about 60 nm in diameter.

  9. Membrane modulates affinity for calcium ion to create an apparent cooperative binding response by annexin a5.

    PubMed

    Gauer, Jacob W; Knutson, Kristofer J; Jaworski, Samantha R; Rice, Anne M; Rannikko, Anika M; Lentz, Barry R; Hinderliter, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to characterize the binding of calcium ion (Ca²⁺) and phospholipid to the peripheral membrane-binding protein annexin a5. The phospholipid was a binary mixture of a neutral and an acidic phospholipid, specifically phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine in the form of large unilamellar vesicles. To stringently define the mode of binding, a global fit of data collected in the presence and absence of membrane concentrations exceeding protein saturation was performed. A partition function defined the contribution of all heat-evolving or heat-absorbing binding states. We find that annexin a5 binds Ca²⁺ in solution according to a simple independent-site model (solution-state affinity). In the presence of phosphatidylserine-containing liposomes, binding of Ca²⁺ differentiates into two classes of sites, both of which have higher affinity compared with the solution-state affinity. As in the solution-state scenario, the sites within each class were described with an independent-site model. Transitioning from a solution state with lower Ca²⁺ affinity to a membrane-associated, higher Ca²⁺ affinity state, results in cooperative binding. We discuss how weak membrane association of annexin a5 prior to Ca²⁺ influx is the basis for the cooperative response of annexin a5 toward Ca²⁺, and the role of membrane organization in this response. PMID:23746516

  10. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D; Gemmel, A; Jäkel, O; Parodi, K; Rietzel, E

    2012-06-01

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (s(w, air)), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (s(w, air)) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (s(w, air)) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on I(w, air) and I(air) has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, s(w,air)(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of I(w) and I(air) values with I(air)/I(w) = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of s(w,air) = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in s(w,air)(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy. PMID:22596046

  11. Comparison of negative-ion proton-transfer with iodide ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry for quantification of isocyanic acid in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward-Massey, Robert; Taha, Youssef M.; Moussa, Samar G.; Osthoff, Hans D.

    2014-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a trace gas pollutant of potential importance to human health whose measurement has recently become possible through the development of negative-ion proton-transfer chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS) with acetate reagent ion. In this manuscript, an alternative ionization and detection scheme, in which HNCO is quantified by iodide CIMS (iCIMS) as a cluster ion at m/z 170, is described. The sensitivity was inversely proportional to water vapor concentration but could be made independent of humidity changes in the sampled air by humidifying the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) region of the CIMS. The performance of the two ionization schemes was compared and contrasted using ambient air measurements of HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary, AB, Canada, by NI-PT-CIMS with acetate reagent ion from Dec 16 to 20, 2013, and by the same CIMS operated in iCIMS mode from Feb 3 to 7, 2014. The iCIMS exhibited a greater signal-to-noise ratio than the NI-PT-CIMS, not because of its sensitivity, which was lower (˜0.083 normalized counts per second (NCPS) per parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv) compared to ˜9.7 NCPS pptv-1), but because of a much lower and more stable background (3 ± 4 compared to a range of ˜2 × 103 to ˜6 × 103 NCPS). For the Feb 2014 data set, the HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary air ranged from <12 to 94 pptv (median 34 pptv), were marginally higher at night than during day, and correlated with nitrogen oxide (NOx = NO + NO2) mixing ratios and submicron particle volume. The ratios of HNCO to NOx observed are within the range of emission ratios reported for gasoline-powered motor vehicles.

  12. Antimicrobial action of essential oil vapours and negative air ions against Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, A K; Malik, A

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of essential oil (in liquid as well as in vapour phase) and negative air ions (NAI) against Pseudomonas fluorescens. The combined effect of NAI with essential oil vapour was also investigated to determine kill time and morphological changes in bacterial cells. The MIC of Cymbopogon citratus (0.567 mg/ml), Mentha arvensis (0.567 mg/ml), Mentha piperita (1.125 mg/ml) and Eucalyptus globulus (2.25 mg/ml) was studied via the agar dilution method. To estimate the antibacterial activity of essential oils in the vapour phase, agar plates inoculated with P. fluorescens were incubated with various concentrations of each essential oil vapour and zone of inhibition was recorded. Further, in order to assess the kill time, P. fluorescens inoculated agar plates were exposed to selected bactericidal essential oil vapour and NAI, separately, in an air-tight chamber. A continuous decrease in bacterial count was observed over time. A significant enhancement in the bactericidal action was observed by exposure to the combination of essential oil vapour and NAI as compared to their individual action. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the alteration in morphology of P. fluorescens cells after exposure to C. citratus oil vapour, NAI, and combination of C. citratus oil vapour and NAI. Maximum morphological deformation was found due to the combined effect of C. citratus oil vapour and NAI. This study demonstrates that the use of essential oils in the vapour phase is more advantageous than the liquid phase. Further the antibacterial effect of the essential oil vapours can be significantly enhanced by the addition of NAI. The work described here offers a novel and efficient approach for control of bacterial contamination that could be applied for food stabilization practices. PMID:20850191

  13. Long-term biological effects of air ions and D.C. electric fields on Namru mice: First year report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, E. W.; Yost, M. G.; Reed, E. J.; Krueger, A. P.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes for the first time the effects of long-term continuous exposures of animals to small air ions and D.C. electric fields. In this study we exposed 200 female NAMRU mice (25/cage) to the following conditions: ± high ions (2×105/cm3), ± low ions (2×103/cm3), ± field only and ground (ion depleted, no field). Specially designed cages provided a defined D.C. field of about 2 kV/meter in ionized environments, with somewhat lower values in the field only cages. Detailed mapping of ion flux originating from a tritium foil generating system (multiple sources in an overhead plate) indicated a well defined, but heterogenous pattern with eight peak areas. Using a 100 cm2 probe, ion flux values ranged from 10-12 10-14 A/cm2, with an average flux of 8.7±6.8×10-13 A/cm2 in high negative ion cages, with good reproducibility between cages. Measurements of serum glucose, cholesterol, and urea nitrogen (samples taken every three months) showed a number of small but consistent and statistically significant differences between animals maintained in different environments during the first year of exposure. Serum globulin and whole blood serotonin, however, did not show any significant environmental effects. Interestingly, pairwise comparisons between high negative and low negative ion conditions, or between high positive and low positive ion conditions, or between the two ground conditions, revealed no significant differences between cages. This argues for a similarity of environmental responses for the mice maintained in each of the compared conditions. The results of a multiple classification analysis for the entire first year showed a preponderence of effects for the ionized cages, although other conditions also had highly significant differences as compared to the grand mean value. While this study has shown effects of only small magnitude (compared to normal physiological variations) in the female NAMRU mice studied here, the significance of these results

  14. Desorption/ionization of acrylamide in aqueous solutions in atmospheric pressure air using a microdischarge with vortex focusing of ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervukhin, V. V.; Sheven', D. G.

    2014-09-01

    A method of desorption/ionization in a microdischarge with ion vortex focusing (vortex focusing microdischarge, VFM) is suggested. A glow microdischarge is initiated in an air flow, and resulting ions act on the surface of interest. As a model compound, an aqueous solution of acrylamide is taken. Desorption/ionization taking place under atmospheric pressure is followed by the mass-spectrometric identification of the ions. The operating parameters of the VFM system are studied and optimized. Upon optimization of the system, the detection limit of acrylamide trace amounts in aqueous solutions is determined using the suggested method of desorption/ionization and analyte ion focusing with a vortex (swirling) jet. The acrylamide detection limit is found to be 2 × 10-3 g/L.

  15. Studies on the effects of gaseous ions on plant growth. II. The construction and operation of an air purification unit for use in studies on the biological effects of gaseous ions.

    PubMed

    KRUEGER, A P; BECKETT, J C; ANDRIESE, P C; KOTAKA, S

    1962-05-01

    Air pollutants seriously interfere with the maintenance of unipolar ionized atmospheres required in experimenting with the biological effects of gaseous ions. The construction and operation of an air purification unit designed to reduce air pollution to tolerable levels are described; it has functioned satisfactorily in conducting experiments with plants and animals. PMID:14459882

  16. Effects of negative air ions on activity of neural substrates involved in autonomic regulation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Satoko; Yanagita, Shinya; Amemiya, Seiichiro; Kato, Yumi; Kubota, Natsuko; Ryushi, Tomoo; Kita, Ichiro

    2008-07-01

    The neural mechanism by which negative air ions (NAI) mediate the regulation of autonomic nervous system activity is still unknown. We examined the effects of NAI on physiological responses, such as blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and heart rate variability (HRV) as well as neuronal activity, in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), nucleus ambiguus (NA), and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) with c-Fos immunohistochemistry in anesthetized, spontaneously breathing rats. In addition, we performed cervical vagotomy to reveal the afferent pathway involved in mediating the effects of NAI on autonomic regulation. NAI significantly decreased BP and HR, and increased HF power of the HRV spectrum. Significant decreases in c-Fos positive nuclei in the PVN and LC, and enhancement of c-Fos expression in the NA and NTS were induced by NAI. After vagotomy, these physiological and neuronal responses to NAI were not observed. These findings suggest that NAI can modulate autonomic regulation through inhibition of neuronal activity in PVN and LC as well as activation of NA neurons, and that these effects of NAI might be mediated via the vagus nerves.

  17. Long-term biological effects of air ions and D.C. electric fields on Namru mice: Second year report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, E. W.; Yost, M. G.; Reed, E. J.; Madin, S. H.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the second year of long-term continuous exposures of female NAMRU mice to small air ions and D.C. electric fields in the following conditions: ± high ions ((2×105/cm3), ± low ions (2×103/cm3), ± field (2 kV/m) only and ground (ion depleted, no field). Using an isolated anesthesized mouse, whole body ion flux values averaged 1.04±0.63×10-10 A in high ion cages for different positions on the cage floor, with about a hundred-fold reduction for low ion cages. During the second year (sample periods 5 8) of exposure serum chemistry variability increased, due to increased pathology and decreased numbers of animals as our experimental population died off. The fifth sample period yielded results consistent with those seen earlier, but later sample periods had many fewer significant differences between cages than did those of the first year. Nevertheless, MCA statistics for serum glucose for the second year found a pattern remarkably similar to the first, with the low ion cages (LN and LP) having the lowest levels. MCA statistics for both years emphasized this possible “window” effect of low level ionized conditions. Also, a comparison between the combined values for ionized (HN, LN, HP and LP) and ion depleted cages (NF, PF, G1 and G2) showed a highly significant difference (p<10-6) for serum glucose for both years of exposure, with lower glucose values seen for animals in the ionized cages overall. Animals of all conditions also showed a highly significant decrease in serum glucose with age. Comparison of mice in ionized cages vs. the non-ionized cages also resulted in a significant difference (p<.013) for survival characteristics between groups, with ion exposed animals having a shorter lifespan. These statistics argue strongly for significant effects of long-term exposure of NAMRU mice to the ionized environment.

  18. Estimating neutral nanoparticle steady-state size distribution and growth according to measurements of intermediate air ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Komsaare, K.; Hõrrak, U.

    2013-09-01

    Continuous measurements of intermediate air ion size distributions were carried out in the small town Tartu, Estonia, from 1 April 2010 through 7 November 2011. The intermediate ions are charged aerosol particles of diameter 1.5-7.5 nm. In this paper we study what information about neutral nanoparticles of atmospheric aerosols can be drawn from the air ion measurements. Rough estimates of the growth rate and the size distribution of neutral nanoparticles were derived for the subset of measurements while the concentration of the intermediate ions was close to the median and remains in the range of 21 ± 2 cm-3. This criterion excludes the specific new particle formation events characterized with high concentration of intermediate ions and includes only most typical quiet periods between the events when the simultaneous growth, depletion and recharging of particles are described with steady-state equations. We estimated the growth rate of nanoparticles to be about 2 nm h-1 while the growth flux or apparent nucleation rate proved to be about 0.5 cm-3 s-1 at 3 nm and about 0.08 cm-3 s-1 at 7 nm. The results suggest that the process of new particle formation is not interrupted during the quiet periods between events of intensive nucleation of atmospheric aerosols.

  19. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D.; Gemmel, A.; Jäkel, O.; Parodi, K.; Rietzel, E.

    2012-06-01

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (sw, air), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (sw, air) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (sw, air) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on Iw, air and Iair has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, sw,air(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of Iw and Iair values with Iair/Iw = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of sw,air = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in sw,air(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy.

  20. A metal-free, lithium-ion oxygen battery: a step forward to safety in lithium-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Hassoun, Jusef; Jung, Hun-Gi; Lee, Dong-Ju; Park, Jin-Bum; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Yang-Kook; Scrosati, Bruno

    2012-11-14

    A preliminary study of the behavior of lithium-ion-air battery where the common, unsafe lithium metal anode is replaced by a lithiated silicon-carbon composite, is reported. The results, based on X-ray diffraction and galvanostatic charge-discharge analyses, demonstrate the basic reversibility of the electrochemical process of the battery that can be promisingly cycled with a rather high specific capacity. PMID:23077970

  1. Simultaneous Exposure to Multiple Air Pollutants Influences Alveolar Epithelial Cell Ion Transport

    EPA Science Inventory

    Purpose. Air pollution sources generally release multiple pollutants simultaneously and yet, research has historically focused on the source-to-health linkages of individual air pollutants. We recently showed that exposure of alveolar epithelial cells to a combination of particul...

  2. Contribution of positive and negative ions to the electrohydrodynamic force in a dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuator operating in air

    SciTech Connect

    Boeuf, J. P.; Lagmich, Y.; Pitchford, L. C.

    2009-07-15

    We present a parametric study of the electrohydrodynamic force generated by surface dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators in air for sinusoidal voltage waveforms. The simulation results confirm that momentum is transferred from the charged particles to the neutral species in the same direction during both positive and negative parts of the cycle. The momentum transfer is due to positive ions during the positive part of the cycle (electrode above the dielectric layer is the anode), and to negative ions during the negative part of the cycle. The relative contribution of the positive and negative parts of the cycle depends on the voltage amplitude and frequency. The model predicts that the contribution of negative ions tends to be dominant at low voltage frequencies and high voltage amplitudes.

  3. Seasonal variability of tritium and ion concentrations in rain at Kumamoto, Japan and back-trajectory analysis of air mass

    SciTech Connect

    Momoshima, N.; Sugihara, S.; Toyoshima, T.; Nagao, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Nakamura, Y.

    2008-07-15

    Tritium and major ion concentrations in rain were analyzed in Kumamoto (Japan)) between 2001 and 2006 to examine present tritium concentration and seasonal variation. The average tritium concentration was 0.36 {+-} 0.19 Bq/L (n=104) and higher tritium concentrations were observed in spring than the other seasons. Among the ions, non-sea-salt (nss) SO{sub 4}{sup 2}'- showed higher concentration in winter while other ions did not show marked increase in winter. Based on the back-trajectory analyses of air masses, the increase in tritium concentrations in spring arises from downward movement of naturally produced tritium from stratosphere to troposphere, while the increase of the nss-SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations in winter is due to long range transport of pollutants from China to Japan. (authors)

  4. Development of portable mass spectrometer with electron cyclotron resonance ion source for detection of chemical warfare agents in air.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Kazuya; Kitagawa, Michiko; Sato, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Enomoto, Shuichi; Kidera, Masanori; Seto, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    A portable mass spectrometer with an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (miniECRIS-MS) was developed. It was used for in situ monitoring of trace amounts of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in atmospheric air. Instrumental construction and parameters were optimized to realize a fast response, high sensitivity, and a small body size. Three types of CWAs, i.e., phosgene, mustard gas, and hydrogen cyanide were examined to check if the mass spectrometer was able to detect characteristic elements and atomic groups. From the results, it was found that CWAs were effectively ionized in the miniECRIS-MS, and their specific signals could be discerned over the background signals of air. In phosgene, the signals of the 35Cl+ and 37Cl+ ions were clearly observed with high dose-response relationships in the parts-per-billion level, which could lead to the quantitative on-site analysis of CWAs. A parts-per-million level of mustard gas, which was far lower than its lethal dosage (LCt50), was successfully detected with a high signal-stability of the plasma ion source. It was also found that the chemical forms of CWAs ionized in the plasma, i.e., monoatomic ions, fragment ions, and molecular ions, could be detected, thereby enabling the effective identification of the target CWAs. Despite the disadvantages associated with miniaturization, the overall performance (sensitivity and response time) of the miniECRIS-MS in detecting CWAs exceeded those of sector-type ECRIS-MS, showing its potential for on-site detection in the future. PMID:24211802

  5. The effect of positive air ions on reproduction and growth in laboratory rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsull, S. M.; Head, E. L.

    1986-03-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to determine the growth rates, reproductive success and early mortality of laboratory rats maintained at 10,000 positive ions/ml over two generations. These findings were compared with those from animals maintained at ambient ion levels. The present work indicates that positive ions do not have any adverse effects on the reproductive capabilities or the growth of laboratory rats. In contrast it is shown that exposure to elevated levels of positive ions promotes overall growth, particularly in male rats. This action of positive ions increases with each successive generation exposed to the ions. It is suggested that the growth promoting effect of positive ions may be mediated via some modulation of the endocrine system.

  6. New Approach to Create TiO2(B)/Carbon Core/Shell Nanotubes: Ideal Structure for Enhanced Lithium Ion Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Xianfeng; Lv, Chunxiao; Guo, Shaojun; Li, Jianjiang; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Zhu, Huaiyong; Yang, Dongjiang

    2016-07-27

    To achieve uniform carbon coating on TiO2 nanomaterials, high temperature (>500 °C) annealing treatment is a necessity. However, the annealing treatment inevitably leads to the strong phase transformation from TiO2(B) with high lithium ion storage (LIS) capacity to anatase with low LIS one as well as the damage of nanostructures. Herein, we demonstrate a new approach to create TiO2(B)/carbon core/shell nanotubes (C@TBNTs) using a long-chain silane polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS) to bind the TBNTs by forming Si-O-Ti bonds. The key feature of this work is that the introduction of PMHS onto TBNTs can afford TBNTs with very high thermal stability at higher than 700 °C and inhibit the phase transformation from TiO2(B) to anatase. Such a high thermal property of PMHS-TBNTs makes them easily coated with highly graphitic carbon shell via CVD process at 700 °C. The as-prepared C@TBNTs deliver outstanding rate capability and electrochemical stability, i.e., reversible capacity above 250 mAh g(-1) at 10 C and a high specific capacity of 479.2 mAh g(-1) after 1000 cycles at 1 C. As far as we know, the LIS performance of our sample is the highest among the previously reported TiO2(B) anode materials. PMID:27383450

  7. Prediction of thermal behaviors of an air-cooled lithium-ion battery system for hybrid electric vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong Seok; Kang, Dal Mo

    2014-12-01

    Thermal management has been one of the major issues in developing a lithium-ion (Li-ion) hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) battery system since the Li-ion battery is vulnerable to excessive heat load under abnormal or severe operational conditions. In this work, in order to design a suitable thermal management system, a simple modeling methodology describing thermal behavior of an air-cooled Li-ion battery system was proposed from vehicle components designer's point of view. A proposed mathematical model was constructed based on the battery's electrical and mechanical properties. Also, validation test results for the Li-ion battery system were presented. A pulse current duty and an adjusted US06 current cycle for a two-mode HEV system were used to validate the accuracy of the model prediction. Results showed that the present model can give good estimations for simulating convective heat transfer cooling during battery operation. The developed thermal model is useful in structuring the flow system and determining the appropriate cooling capacity for a specified design prerequisite of the battery system.

  8. Selected Ion Flow-Drift Tube Mass Spectrometry: Quantification of Volatile Compounds in Air and Breath.

    PubMed

    Spesyvyi, Anatolii; Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    2015-12-15

    A selected ion flow-drift tube mass spectrometric analytical technique, SIFDT-MS, is described that extends the established selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, by the inclusion of a static but variable E-field along the axis of the flow tube reactor in which the analytical ion-molecule chemistry occurs. The ion axial speed is increased in proportion to the reduced field strength E/N (N is the carrier gas number density), and the residence/reaction time, t, which is measured by Hadamard transform multiplexing, is correspondingly reduced. To ensure a proper understanding of the physics and ion chemistry underlying SIFDT-MS, ion diffusive loss to the walls of the flow-drift tube and the mobility of injected H3O(+) ions have been studied as a function of E/N. It is seen that the derived diffusion coefficient and mobility of H3O(+) ions are consistent with those previously reported. The rate coefficient has been determined at elevated E/N for the association reaction of the H3O(+) reagent ions with H2O molecules, which is the first step in the production of H3O(+)(H2O)1,2,3 reagent hydrate ions. The production of hydrated analyte ion was also experimentally investigated. The analytical performance of SIFDT-MS is demonstrated by the quantification of acetone and isoprene in exhaled breath. Finally, the essential features of SIFDT-MS and SIFT-MS are compared, notably pointing out that a much lower speed of the flow-drive pump is required for SIFDT-MS, which facilitates the development of smaller cost-effective analytical instruments for real time breath and fluid headspace analyses. PMID:26583448

  9. Thermal management improvement of an air-cooled high-power lithium-ion battery by embedding metal foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadian, Shahabeddin K.; Rassoulinejad-Mousavi, Seyed Moein; Zhang, Yuwen

    2015-11-01

    Effect of embedding aluminum porous metal foam inside the flow channels of an air-cooled Li-ion battery module was studied to improve its thermal management. Four different cases of metal foam insert were examined using three-dimensional transient numerical simulations. The effects of permeability and porosity of the porous medium as well as state of charge were investigated on the standard deviation of the temperature field and maximum temperature inside the battery in all four cases. Compared to the case of no porous insert, embedding aluminum metal foam in the air flow channel significantly improved the thermal management of Li-ion battery cell. The results also indicated that, decreasing the porosity of the porous structure decreases both standard deviation of the temperature field and maximum temperature inside the battery. Moreover, increasing the permeability of the metal foam drops the maximum temperature inside the battery while decreasing this property leads to improving the temperature uniformity. Our results suggested that, among the all studied cases, desirable temperature uniformity and maximum temperature were achieved when two-third and the entire air flow channel is filled with aluminum metal foam, respectively.

  10. Effects of air ions on the neonatal growth of laboratory rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsull, S. M.; Bellamy, D.; Head, E. L.

    1981-12-01

    The effect of continuous positive and negative ionization on the growth of rats during the pre and post natal period, up to 10 weeks of age was investigated. It was found that continuous exposure to 1.0×104 pos. ions/ml had no detrimental effect on the animals at any stage of their development. In contrast, exposure to 1.0×104 neg. ions/ml, during gestation and the early post natal period, resulted in some adverse effects on growth and development. However, when exposure to this level of negative ions began at the time of weaning, no adverse effects were observed.

  11. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants aremore » 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.« less

  12. Ion energy and angular distributions onto polymer surfaces delivered by dielectric barrier discharge filaments in air: II. Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaeva, Natalia Yu; Kushner, Mark J.

    2011-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure streamers intersecting particles are of interest in the context of plasma aided combustion, where the particle may be a fuel aerosol droplet, or in sterilization of air, where the particle may be a bacterium. The ion energy and angular distributions (IEADs) incident on the particles, small curved dielectric surfaces, then in part determine the propensity for activating chemical reactions or, in the case of bacteria, the plasma's sterilization capability. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of IEADs on small particles (45 µm radius) produced by atmospheric pressure discharge. Streamers intersecting a particle momentarily generate a large sheath potential as the streamer passes by as the particle charges towards the plasma floating potential. During that time, ions of energies up to 3-10 eV can strike the particle. The permittivity of the particle and the streamer polarity in part determine the character of the IEAD.

  13. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li-air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2- produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. The reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1 and 0.67 s-1 M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  14. Application of ion chemistry and the SIFT technique to the quantitative analysis of trace gases in air and on breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Španěl, Patrik

    Our major objective in this paper is to describe a new method we have developed for the analysis of trace gases at partial pressures down to the ppb level in atmospheric air, with special emphasis on the detection and quantification of trace gases on human breath. It involves the use of our selected ion flow tube (Sift) technique which we previously developed and used extensively for the study of gas phase ionic reactions occurring in ionized media such as the terrestrial atmosphere and interstellar gas clouds. Before discussing this analytical technique we describe the results of our very recent Sift and flowing afterglow (FA) studies of the reactions of the H3O+ and OH- ions, of their hydrates H3O+(H2O)1,2,3 and OH- (H2O)1,2, and of NO+ and O2+, with several hydrocarbons and oxygen-bearing organic molecules, studies that are very relevant to our trace gas analytical studies. Then follows a detailed discussion of the application of our Sift technique to trace gas analysis, after which we present some results obtained for the analyses of laboratory air, the breath of a healthy non-smoking person, the breath of a person who regularly smokes cigarettes, the complex vapours emitted by banana and onion, and the molecules present in a butane/air flame. We show how the quantitative analysis of breath can be achieved from only a single exhalation and in real time (the time response of the instrument is only about 20 ms). We also show how the time variation of breath gases over long time periods can be followed, using the decay of ethanol on the breath after the ingestion of distilled liquor as an example, yet simultaneously following several other trace gases including acetone and isoprene which are very easily detected on the breath of all individuals because of their relatively high partial pressures (typically 100 to 1000 ppb). The breath of a smoker is richer in complex molecules, some nitrogen containing organics apparently being very evident at the 5 to 50 ppb level

  15. [Characteristics of aerosol water-soluble inorganic ions in three types air-pollution incidents of Nanjing City].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiu-Chen; Zhu, Bin; Su, Ji-Feng; Wang, Hong-Lei

    2012-06-01

    In order to compare aerosol water-soluble inorganic species in different air-pollution periods, samples of PM10, PM2.1, PM1.1 and the main water-soluble ions (NH4+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Na+, K+, NO2(-), F(-), NO3(-), Cl(-), SO4(2-)) were measured, which were from 3 air-pollution incidents (continued pollution in October 16-30 of 2009, sandstorm pollution in April 27-30 of 2010, and crop burning pollution in June 14 of 2010. The results show that aerosol pollution of 3 periods is serious. The lowest PM2.1/PM10 is only 0.27, which is from sandstorm pollution period, while the largest is 0. 7 from crop burning pollution period. In continued pollution periods, NO3(-) and SO4(2-) are the dominant ions, and the total anions account for an average of 18.62%, 32.92% and 33.53% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1. Total water-soluble ions only account for 13.36%, 23.72% and 28.54% of PM10, PM2.1 and PM1.1 due to the insoluble species is increased in sandstorm pollution period. The mass concentration of Ca2+ in sandstorm pollution period is higher than the other two pollution periods, and which is mainly in coarse particles with diameter larger than 1 microm. All the ten water-soluble ions are much higher in crop burning pollution especially K+ which is the tracer from crop burning. The peak mass concentrations of NO3(-), SO4(2-) and NH4+ are in 0.43-0.65 microm. PMID:22946180

  16. Comparison of Experimental and Calculated Ion Mobilities of Small Molecules in Air.

    PubMed

    Gunzer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is a well-known technique for analyzing gases. Examples are military applications, but also safety related applications, for example, for protection of employees in industries working with hazardous gases. In the last 15 years, this technique has been further developed as a tool for structural analysis, for example, in pharmaceutical applications. In particular, the collision cross section, which is related to the mobility, is of interest here. With help of theoretic principles, it is possible to develop molecular models that can be verified by the comparison of their calculated cross sections with experimental data. In this paper, it is analyzed how well the ion trajectory method is suitable to reproduce the measured ion mobility of small organic molecules such as the water clusters forming the positively charged reactant ions, simple aromatic substances, and n-alkanes. PMID:27298751

  17. Comparison of Experimental and Calculated Ion Mobilities of Small Molecules in Air

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry is a well-known technique for analyzing gases. Examples are military applications, but also safety related applications, for example, for protection of employees in industries working with hazardous gases. In the last 15 years, this technique has been further developed as a tool for structural analysis, for example, in pharmaceutical applications. In particular, the collision cross section, which is related to the mobility, is of interest here. With help of theoretic principles, it is possible to develop molecular models that can be verified by the comparison of their calculated cross sections with experimental data. In this paper, it is analyzed how well the ion trajectory method is suitable to reproduce the measured ion mobility of small organic molecules such as the water clusters forming the positively charged reactant ions, simple aromatic substances, and n-alkanes. PMID:27298751

  18. Diurnal variation in the concentration of air ions of different mobility classes in a rural area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hõrrak, Urmas; Salm, Jaan; Tammet, Hannes

    2003-10-01

    Analyzed data consist of 8900 hourly average mobility distributions measured in the mobility range of 0.00041-3.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 (diameter range 0.36-79 nm) at Tahkuse Observatory, Estonia, in 1993-1994. The average diurnal variation in the concentration of cluster ions is typical for continental stations: the maximum in the early morning hours and the minimum in the afternoon. This is explained by variations in radon concentration. The diurnal variation for big cluster ions (0.5-1.3 cm2 V-1 s-1) differs from that for small cluster ions (1.3-3.14 cm2 V-1 s-1). The size distribution of intermediate and light large ions in the range of 1.6-22 nm is strongly affected by nucleation bursts of nanometer particles. On the burst days, the maximum concentration of intermediate ions (1.6-7.4 nm) is about the noontime and that of light large ions (7.4-22 nm) about 2 hours later. The concentration of heavy large ions (charged Aitken particles of diameters of 22-79 nm) is enhanced in the afternoon and this is explained by the bursts of nanometer particles and the subsequent growth of particles by condensation and coagulation. If the burst days are excluded, then in the warm season the concentration of Aitken particles increases during night. In the cold season, the diurnal variation is different and all the classes of aerosol ions (2.1-79 nm) show similar variation with the minimum at 0600 LT and the maximum in the afternoon; exceptions are the rare nucleation burst days.

  19. Creating Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drury, John

    Encouraging exploration and practice, this book offers hundreds of exercises and numerous tips covering every step involved in creating poetry. Each chapter is a self-contained unit offering an overview of material in the chapter, a definition of terms, and poetry examples from well-known authors designed to supplement the numerous exercises.…

  20. Creating Community

    PubMed Central

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education describes ways that Lamaze International is helping to create a community for those who share a common interest in promoting, supporting, and protecting natural, safe, and healthy childbirth. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth. PMID:19936112

  1. Measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air by collection onto an ion exchange resin and analysis by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-02-01

    Ammonia and amines are common trace gases in the atmosphere and have a variety of both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, with a major contribution coming from agricultural sites. In addition to their malodorous nature, both ammonia and amines have been shown to enhance particle formation from acids such as nitric, sulfuric and methanesulfonic acids, which has implications for visibility, human health and climate. A key component of quantifying the effects of these species on particle formation is accurate gas-phase measurements in both laboratory and field studies. However, these species are notoriously difficult to measure as they are readily taken up on surfaces, including onto glass surfaces from aqueous solution as established in the present studies. We describe here a novel technique for measuring gas-phase ammonia and amines that involves uptake onto a weak cation exchange resin followed by extraction and analysis using ion chromatography. Two variants, one for ppb concentrations in air and the second with lower (ppt) detection limits, are described. The latter involves the use of a custom-designed high-pressure cartridge to hold the resin for in-line extraction. These methods avoid the use of sampling lines, which can lead to significant inlet losses of these compounds. They also have the advantages of being relatively simple and inexpensive. The applicability of this technique to ambient air is demonstrated in measurements made near a cattle farm in Chino, CA.

  2. Measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air by collection onto an ion exchange resin and analysis by ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Perraud, V.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-08-01

    Ammonia and amines are common trace gases in the atmosphere and have a variety of both biogenic and anthropogenic sources, with a major contribution coming from agricultural sites. In addition to their malodorous nature, both ammonia and amines have been shown to enhance particle formation from acids such as nitric, sulfuric and methanesulfonic acids, which has implications for visibility, human health and climate. A key component of quantifying the effects of these species on particle formation is accurate gas-phase measurements in both laboratory and field studies. However, these species are notoriously difficult to measure as they are readily taken up on surfaces, including onto glass surfaces from aqueous solution as established in the present studies. We describe here a novel technique for measuring gas-phase ammonia and amines that involves uptake onto a weak cation exchange resin followed by extraction and analysis using ion chromatography. Two variants - one for parts per billion concentrations in air and the second with lower (parts per trillion) detection limits - are described. The latter involves the use of a custom-designed high-pressure cartridge to hold the resin for in-line extraction. These methods avoid the use of sampling lines, which can lead to significant inlet losses of these compounds. They also have the advantages of being relatively simple and inexpensive. The applicability of this technique to ambient air is demonstrated in measurements made near a cattle farm in Chino, CA.

  3. Determination of benzene, toluene and xylene concentration in humid air using differential ion mobility spectrometry and partial least squares regression.

    PubMed

    Maziejuk, M; Szczurek, A; Maciejewska, M; Pietrucha, T; Szyposzyńska, M

    2016-05-15

    Benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX compounds) are chemicals of greatest concern due to their impact on humans and the environment. In many cases, quantitative information about each of these compounds is required. Continuous, fast-response analysis, performed on site would be desired for this purpose. Several methods have been developed to detect and quantify these compounds in this way. Methods vary considerably in sensitivity, accuracy, ease of use and cost-effectiveness. The aim of this work is to show that differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) may be applied for determining concentration of BTX compounds in humid air. We demonstrate, this goal is achievable by applying multivariate analysis of the measurement data using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The approach was tested at low concentrations of these compounds in the range of 5-20ppm and for air humidity in a range 0-12g/kg. These conditions correspond to the foreseeable application of the developed approach in occupational health and safety measurements. The average concentration assessment error was about 1ppm for each: benzene, toluene and xylene. We also successfully determined water vapor content in air. The error achieved was 0.2g/kg. The obtained results are very promising regarding further development of DMS technique as well as its application. PMID:26992504

  4. Impacts of anthropogenic emissions and cold air pools on urban to montane gradients of snowpack ion concentrations in the Wasatch Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Steven J.; Maurer, Gregory; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Taylor, Raili; Bowling, David R.

    2014-12-01

    Urban montane valleys are often characterized by periodic wintertime temperature inversions (cold air pools) that increase atmospheric particulate matter concentrations, potentially stimulating the deposition of major ions to these snow-covered ecosystems. We assessed spatial and temporal patterns of ion concentrations in snow across urban to montane gradients in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, and the adjacent Wasatch Mountains during January 2011, a period of several persistent cold air pools. Ion concentrations in fresh snow samples were greatest in urban sites, and were lower by factors of 4-130 in a remote high-elevation montane site. Adjacent undeveloped canyons experienced significant incursions of particulate-rich urban air during stable atmospheric conditions, where snow ion concentrations were lower but not significantly different from urban sites. Surface snow ion concentrations on elevation transects in and adjacent to Salt Lake City varied with temporal and spatial trends in aerosol concentrations, increasing following exposure to particulate-rich air as cold air pools developed, and peaking at intermediate elevations (1500-1600 m above sea level, or 200-300 m above the valley floor). Elevation trends in ion concentrations, especially NH4+ and NO3-, corresponded with patterns of aerosol exposure inferred from laser ceilometer data, suggesting that high particulate matter concentrations stimulated fog or dry ion deposition to snow-covered surfaces at the top of the cold air pools. Fog/dry deposition inputs were similar to wet deposition at mid-elevation montane sites, but appeared negligible at lower and higher-elevation sites. Overall, snow ion concentrations in our urban and adjacent montane sites exceeded many values reported from urban precipitation in North America, and greatly exceeded those reported for remote snowpacks. Sodium, Cl-, NH4+, and NO3- concentrations in fresh snow were high relative to previously measured urban precipitation, with means

  5. Trace Elements and Common Ions in Southeastern Idaho Snow: Regional Air Pollutant Tracers for Source Area Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Michael Lehman; Einerson, Jeffrey James; Schuster, Paul; Susong, David D.

    2002-09-01

    Snow samples were collected in southeastern Idaho over two winters to assess trace elements and common ions concentrations in air pollutant fallout across the region. The objectives were to: 1) develop sampling and analysis techniques that would produce accurate measurements of a broad suite of elements and ions in snow, 2) identify the major elements in regional fallout and their spatial and temporal trends, 3) determine if there are unique combinations of elements that are characteristic to the major source areas in the region (source profiles), and 4) use pattern recognition and multivariate statistical techniques (principal component analysis and classical least squares regression) to investigate source apportionment of the fallout to the major source areas. In the winter of 2000-2001, 250 snow samples were collected across the region over a 4-month period and analyzed in triplicate using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC). Thirty-nine (39) trace elements and 9 common ions were positively identified in most samples. The data were analyzed using pattern recognition tools in the software, Pirouette® (Infometrix, Inc.). These results showed a large crustal component (Al, Zn, Mn, Ba, and rare earth elements), an overwhelming contribution from phosphate processing facilities located outside Pocatello in the southern portion of the ESRP, some changes in concentrations over time, and no obvious source area profiles (unique chemical signatures) other than at Pocatello. Concentrations near a major U.S. Department of Energy industrial complex on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) were lower than those observed at major downwind communities. In the winter of 2001-2002, we tried a new sampling design (and collected 135 additional samples) in an attempt to estimate pure emission profiles from the major source areas in the region and used classical least squares regression (CLS) to source

  6. Air Force/Ion Physics hardened lithium doped solar cell development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A.; Bartels, F.; Carnes, C.; Ho, J.; Smith, D.

    1971-01-01

    Introduction of lithium by ion implantation eliminates reproducibility and surface problem deficiencies of other introduction techniques. Implantation has been demonstrated to make possible a degree of control over the cell lithium content which has not previously been available. Front barrier development remains to be completed. Successful development of the barrier will make available the freedom to select optimum lithium concentration throughout the cell, including in the vicinity of the junction.

  7. Sensitive and comprehensive detection of chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow introduction.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Iura, Kazumitsu; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki; Tsuge, Kouichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki

    2014-05-01

    A highly sensitive and specific real-time field-deployable detection technology, based on counterflow air introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, has been developed for a wide range of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) comprising gaseous (two blood agents, three choking agents), volatile (six nerve gases and one precursor agent, five blister agents), and nonvolatile (three lachrymators, three vomiting agents) agents in air. The approach can afford effective chemical ionization, in both positive and negative ion modes, for ion trap multiple-stage mass spectrometry (MS(n)). The volatile and nonvolatile CWAs tested provided characteristic ions, which were fragmented into MS(3) product ions in positive and negative ion modes. Portions of the fragment ions were assigned by laboratory hybrid mass spectrometry (MS) composed of linear ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometers. Gaseous agents were detected by MS or MS(2) in negative ion mode. The limits of detection for a 1 s measurement were typically at or below the microgram per cubic meter level except for chloropicrin (submilligram per cubic meter). Matrix effects by gasoline vapor resulted in minimal false-positive signals for all the CWAs and some signal suppression in the case of mustard gas. The moisture level did influence the measurement of the CWAs. PMID:24678766

  8. How to reliably detect molecular clusters and nucleation mode particles with Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Hanna E.; Mirme, Sander; Mirme, Aadu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-08-01

    To understand the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation and growth processes, information on the size where the atmospheric nucleation and cluster activation occurs, is crucially needed. The current understanding of the concentrations and dynamics of charged and neutral clusters and particles is based on theoretical predictions and experimental observations. This paper gives a standard operation procedure (SOP) for Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) measurements and data processing. With the NAIS data, we have improved the scientific understanding by (1) direct detection of freshly formed atmospheric clusters and particles, (2) linking experimental observations and theoretical framework to understand the formation and growth mechanisms of aerosol particles, and (3) parameterizing formation and growth mechanisms for atmospheric models. The SOP provides tools to harmonize the world-wide measurements of small clusters and nucleation mode particles and to verify consistent results measured by the NAIS users. The work is based on discussions and interactions between the NAIS users and the NAIS manufacturer.

  9. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li–air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Li–air batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  10. A compact UHV package for microfabricated ion-trap arrays with direct electronic air-side access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilpers, Guido; See, Patrick; Gill, Patrick; Sinclair, Alastair G.

    2013-04-01

    We have demonstrated a new apparatus for operating microfabricated ion-trap arrays in a compact ultra-high-vacuum setup with excellent optical and electrical access. The approach uses conventional components, materials and techniques in a unique fashion. The microtrap chip is mounted on a modified ceramic leadless chip carrier, the conductors of which serve as the vacuum feedthrough. The chip carrier is indium-sealed to stainless-steel components to form vacuum seals, resulting in short electrical path lengths of ≤20 mm from the trap electrodes under vacuum to air side. The feedthrough contains conductors for the radio-frequency trap drive, as well as 42 conductors for DC electrodes. Vacuum pressures of ˜1 × 10-11 mbar are achieved, and ions have been confined and laser cooled in a microtrap chip. The apparatus enables accurate measurements of radio-frequency voltage amplitudes on the trap electrodes, yielding an excellent agreement between measured and modelled trap efficiencies. This feature is of significant use in establishing initial operation of new devices. The principle of the connectivity scheme presented here is applicable to larger ceramic chip carriers containing many more conductors.

  11. Low-pressure barrier discharge ion source using air as a carrier gas and its application to the analysis of drugs and explosives.

    PubMed

    Usmanov, Dilshadbek T; Yu, Zhan; Chen, Lee Chuin; Hiraoka, Kenzo; Yamabe, Shinichi

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a low-pressure air dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) ion source using a capillary with the inner diameter of 0.115 and 12 mm long applicable to miniaturized mass spectrometers was developed. The analytes, trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), 1,3,5,7-tetranitroperhydro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), nitroglycerine (NG), hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), caffeine, cocaine and morphine, introduced through the capillary, were ionized by a low-pressure air DBD. The ion source pressures were changed by using various sizes of the ion sampling orifice. The signal intensities of those analytes showed marked pressure dependence. TNT was detected with higher sensitivity at lower pressure but vice versa for other analytes. For all analytes, a marked signal enhancement was observed when a grounded cylindrical mesh electrode was installed in the DBD ion source. Among nine analytes, RDX, HMX, NG and PETN could be detected as cluster ions [analyte + NO3 ](-) even at low pressure and high temperature up to 180 °C. The detection indicates that these cluster ions are stable enough to survive under present experimental conditions. The unexpectedly high stabilities of these cluster ions were verified by density functional theory calculation. PMID:26889929

  12. A simple external-beam ion milliprobe system for in-air PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, Steve A.; Correll, F. D.; Huddle, James R.; Vanhoy, Jeff; Kulp, W. D.

    1991-05-01

    A simple external-beam ion milliprobe system was designed and constructed as part of an undergraduate honors research project. The system includes an adjustable object slit, a compact electrostatic quadrupole triplet lens, a lens positioner, and a shielded tip with a thin Kapton window through which the beam exits the accelerator vacuum and enters a sample enclosure with interlocked doors. Auxiliary equipment includes a four-segment lens-entrance collimator with a beam-current monitor that facilitates steering the beam and an interlock system that intercepts the beam when any of the doors to the sample enclosure are opened. Details of the design and construction of the system will be presented and its performance will be described.

  13. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to comparemore » internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.« less

  14. Formation rate for Rb 2 + molecular ions created in collisions of Rb Rydberg and ground-state atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanojevic, Jovica; Côté, Robin

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the formation rate of the molecular Rb2+ion in its various bound states produced in the associative ionization of a Rydberg and a ground-state atom. Before the formation takes place, the colliding atoms are accelerated by an attractive force between the collision partners. In this way the ground-state atom is first captured by the Rydberg electron and then guided towards the positive ion-core where a molecular ion is subsequently formed. As recently demonstrated, this process results in giant collisional cross sections for the molecular ion formation, with the cross sections essentially determined by the size of the Rydberg atom. For sufficient high principal quantum numbers and atomic densities, many ground-state atoms are already located inside the Rydberg atom and ready to participate in the associative ionization. The same process can occur between a Rydberg and a ground-state atom that form a long-range Rydberg molecule, possibly contributing to the shortening of the lifetimes of Rydberg atoms and molecules. Partial support from the US Army Research Office (ARO-MURI W911NF-14-1-0378), and from NSF (Grant No. PHY-1415560).

  15. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.

  16. EVALUATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY COUPLED WITH ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY FOR MONITORING VINYL CHLORIDE AND OTHER CHLORINATED AND AROMATIC COMPOUNDS IN AIR SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research was to evaluate, in the laboratory, the potential of gas chromatography/ion mobility spectrometry (GC/IMS) for monitoring vinyl chloride and other organic compounds in air samples in the field. It was determined that GC/IMS has the potential to dire...

  17. SP CREATE. Creating Sample Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, J.H.; Seebode, L.

    1998-11-10

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to be analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.

  18. Versatile new ion source for the analysis of materials in open air under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Cody, Robert B; Laramée, James A; Durst, H Dupont

    2005-04-15

    A new ion source has been developed for rapid, noncontact analysis of materials at ambient pressure and at ground potential. The new source, termed DART (for "Direct Analysis in Real Time"), is based on the reactions of electronic or vibronic excited-state species with reagent molecules and polar or nonpolar analytes. DART has been installed on a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) that provides improved selectivity and accurate elemental composition assignment through exact mass measurements. Although DART has been applied to the analysis of gases, liquids, and solids, a unique application is the direct detection of chemicals on surfaces without requiring sample preparation, such as wiping or solvent extraction. DART has demonstrated success in sampling hundreds of chemicals, including chemical agents and their signatures, pharmaceutics, metabolites, peptides and oligosaccharides, synthetic organics, organometallics, drugs of abuse, explosives, and toxic industrial chemicals. These species were detected on various surfaces, such as concrete, asphalt, human skin, currency, airline boarding passes, business cards, fruits, vegetables, spices, beverages, body fluids, horticultural leaves, cocktail glasses, and clothing. DART employs no radioactive components and is more versatile than devices using radioisotope-based ionization. Because its response is instantaneous, DART provides real-time information, a critical requirement for screening or high throughput. PMID:15828760

  19. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture/Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-09-01

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed noncontact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect material ablated by a 355 nm UV laser in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appears to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the `softness' of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. In this work, a series of benzylpyridinium salts were employed as thermometer ions to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation/liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. These data, along with results from the analysis the biological molecules bradykinin and angiotensin III indicated that the ions or their fragments formed directly by UV laser ablation that survive the liquid capture/electrospray ionization process were likely to be an extremely small component of the total ion signal observed. Instead, the preponderate neutral molecules, clusters, and particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream, then electrosprayed, were the principal source of the ion signal observed. Thus, the electrospray ionization process used controls the overall `softness' of this technique.

  20. Creating Locally-Resolved Mobile-Source Emissions Inputs for Air Quality Modeling in Support of an Exposure Study in Detroit, Michigan, USA

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Michelle; Arunachalam, Saravanan; Isakov, Vlad; Talgo, Kevin; Naess, Brian; Valencia, Alejandro; Omary, Mohammad; Davis, Neil; Cook, Rich; Hanna, Adel

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a methodology for modeling the impact of traffic-generated air pollutants in an urban area. This methodology presented here utilizes road network geometry, traffic volume, temporal allocation factors, fleet mixes, and emission factors to provide critical modeling inputs. These inputs, assembled from a variety of sources, are combined with meteorological inputs to generate link-based emissions for use in dispersion modeling to estimate pollutant concentration levels due to traffic. A case study implementing this methodology for a large health study is presented, including a sensitivity analysis of the modeling results reinforcing the importance of model inputs and identify those having greater relative impact, such as fleet mix. In addition, an example use of local measurements of fleet activity to supplement model inputs is described, and its impacts to the model outputs are discussed. We conclude that with detailed model inputs supported by local traffic measurements and meteorology, it is possible to capture the spatial and temporal patterns needed to accurately estimate exposure from traffic-related pollutants. PMID:25501000

  1. Creating locally-resolved mobile-source emissions inputs for air quality modeling in support of an exposure study in Detroit, Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Michelle; Arunachalam, Saravanan; Isakov, Vlad; Talgo, Kevin; Naess, Brian; Valencia, Alejandro; Omary, Mohammad; Davis, Neil; Cook, Rich; Hanna, Adel

    2014-12-01

    This work describes a methodology for modeling the impact of traffic-generated air pollutants in an urban area. This methodology presented here utilizes road network geometry, traffic volume, temporal allocation factors, fleet mixes, and emission factors to provide critical modeling inputs. These inputs, assembled from a variety of sources,are combined with meteorological inputs to generate link-based emissions for use in dispersion modeling to estimate pollutant concentration levels due to traffic. A case study implementing this methodology for a large health study is presented, including a sensitivity analysis of the modeling results reinforcing the importance of model inputs and identify those having greater relative impact, such as fleet mix. In addition, an example use of local measurements of fleet activity to supplement model inputs is described, and its impacts to the model outputs are discussed. We conclude that with detailed model inputs supported by local traffic measurements and meteorology, it is possible to capture the spatial and temporal patterns needed to accurately estimate exposure from traffic-related pollutants. PMID:25587603

  2. Creating locally-resolved mobile-source emissions inputs for air quality modeling in support of an exposure study in Detroit, Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Michelle; Arunachalam, Saravanan; Isakov, Vlad; Talgo, Kevin; Naess, Brian; Valencia, Alejandro; Omary, Mohammad; Davis, Neil; Cook, Rich; Hanna, Adel

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a methodology for modeling the impact of traffic-generated air pollutants in an urban area. This methodology presented here utilizes road network geometry, traffic volume, temporal allocation factors, fleet mixes, and emission factors to provide critical modeling inputs. These inputs, assembled from a variety of sources, are combined with meteorological inputs to generate link-based emissions for use in dispersion modeling to estimate pollutant concentration levels due to traffic. A case study implementing this methodology for a large health study is presented, including a sensitivity analysis of the modeling results reinforcing the importance of model inputs and identify those having greater relative impact, such as fleet mix. In addition, an example use of local measurements of fleet activity to supplement model inputs is described, and its impacts to the model outputs are discussed. We conclude that with detailed model inputs supported by local traffic measurements and meteorology, it is possible to capture the spatial and temporal patterns needed to accurately estimate exposure from traffic-related pollutants. PMID:25501000

  3. Development of gas exchange and ion regulation in two species of air-breathing fish, Betta splendens and Macropodus opercularis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yen; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2015-07-01

    Aquatic air-breathing anabantoids, a group of fish species characterized by the presence of a labyrinth organ and some gills, exhibit morphological variations. This study aimed to examine whether unequal gill growth begins during the early stages and described the sequence of the early gill developmental events in Betta splendens and Macropodus opercularis. To determine when the ion regulatory and gas exchange abilities first appear in the gills, mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) and neuroepithelial cells (NECs) were examined in young B. splendens. To evaluate the relative importance of the gills and the labyrinth organ under different levels of oxygen uptake stress, the levels of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) protein expressions in 2 gills and the labyrinth organ were examined in M. opercularis. We found that the first 3 gills developed earlier than the 4th gill in both species, an indication that the morphological variation begins early in life. In B. splendens, the MRCs and NECs clearly appeared in the first 3 gills at 4 dph and were first found in the 4th gill until 11 dph. The oxygen-sensing ability of the gills was concordant with the ionoregulatory function. In M. opercularis, the hypoxic group had a significantly higher air-breathing frequency. CAII protein expression was higher in the labyrinth organ in the hypoxic group. The gills exhibited increased NKA protein expression in the hypoxic and restricted groups, respectively. Functional plasticity in CAII and NKA protein expressions was found between the gills and the labyrinth organ in adult M. opercularis. PMID:25783787

  4. Further study of the intrinsic safety of internally shorted lithium and lithium-ion cells within methane-air

    PubMed Central

    Dubaniewicz, Thomas H.; DuCarme, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) researchers continue to study the potential for lithium and lithium-ion battery thermal runaway from an internal short circuit in equipment for use in underground coal mines. Researchers conducted cell crush tests using a plastic wedge within a 20-L explosion-containment chamber filled with 6.5% CH4-air to simulate the mining hazard. The present work extends earlier findings to include a study of LiFePO4 cells crushed while under charge, prismatic form factor LiCoO2 cells, primary spiral-wound constructed LiMnO2 cells, and crush speed influence on thermal runaway susceptibility. The plastic wedge crush was a more severe test than the flat plate crush with a prismatic format cell. Test results indicate that prismatic Saft MP 174565 LiCoO2 and primary spiral-wound Saft FRIWO M52EX LiMnO2 cells pose a CH4-air ignition hazard from internal short circuit. Under specified test conditions, A123 systems ANR26650M1A LiFePO4 cylindrical cells produced no chamber ignitions while under a charge of up to 5 A. Common spiral-wound cell separators are too thin to meet intrinsic safety standards provisions for distance through solid insulation, suggesting that a hard internal short circuit within these cells should be considered for intrinsic safety evaluation purposes, even as a non-countable fault. Observed flames from a LiMnO2 spiral-wound cell after a chamber ignition within an inert atmosphere indicate a sustained exothermic reaction within the cell. The influence of crush speed on ignitions under specified test conditions was not statistically significant. PMID:26139958

  5. A method of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide determination in ambient air by use of passive samplers and ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krochmal, Dariusz; Kalina, Andrzej

    A passive sampling method for simultaneous determination of SO 2 and NO 2 in ambient air is presented. Sampling periods from 24 h to 1 month can be applied. SO 2 and NO 2 collected by the sampler are determined as sulphate and nitrite with ion chromatography in a single run. Both suppressed or nonsuppressed IC can be applied with the former giving lower detection limits. Analysis for NO 2 as nitrite can be also performed spectrophotometrically after reaction with Saltzman reagent. The lower determination limit for monthly exposure of samplers is 0.5 and 0.7 μg m -3 for NO 2 and SO 2, respectively. For shorter periods of exposure the determination limit is proportionally higher. Precision of the method as RSD is 6% for NO 2 and 14% for SO 2 at concentrations of around 50 μg m -3. Influence of meteorological factors like sunlight, wind velocity, temperature and humidity of air on sampling rate have been minimised by an appropriate modification of the sampler and calibration of the method under various conditions. The method has been optimised to make it possible to perform large number of analyses at a very low cost. Passive samplers can be stored before and after exposure for a period of up to 10 weeks what makes it possible to prepare and analyse them by a central laboratory for better integrity of data. Samplers can be sent from and back to the central laboratory by mail. Suitability of the method for large-scale monitoring was demonstrated in several projects.

  6. Ability of a gridless ion source to functionalize polypropylene surfaces by low-energy (60-100 eV) nitrogen ion bombardment. Effects of ageing in air and in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Laurent; Scaglione, Salvatore; Flori, Daniele; Riga, Joseph; Caudano, Roland

    2001-12-01

    Polymer surface treatments are of great importance for various industrial applications that can range from food packaging or car bumper painting to biocompatible implants. For such applications, plasma or corona discharges are well known and used "on-line" in polymer plants to incorporate new chemical functions at polymer surfaces. The aim of this work is to investigate the ability of a simple ion source to functionalize polypropylene surfaces in comparison with these intensively used industrial methods. Estimation of the influence of the nitrogen ion dose (from 1×10 15 to 1×10 16 ions/ cm2) and the ion energy (from 60 to 100 eV) on incorporation is attempted in order to be able to use them in a controlled way. The ageing of these polymer surfaces in air and in water was studied by XPS for several months.

  7. Adsorption of counter ions to a stearate monolayer spread at the water-air interface: A synchrotron x-ray study

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, J.M.; Yun, W.B.; Yang, X. ); Montano, P.A. . Dept. of Physics); Ramanathan, M. ); Capasso, C. )

    1988-06-01

    The Near Total External Fluorescence (NTEF) technique was used to measure in-situ the adsorption of a metal ion from a subphase solution to the liquid-air interface, induced by a surfactant monolayer on the interface. For a monolayer formed by spreading stearic acid (a surfactant material) on a 10{sup {minus}3} mole/l solution of MnCl{sub 2}, the ratio of Mn ions segregated to the interface to the number of stearate molecules on the surface was determined to be approximately 0.6 {plus minus} 0.2. SEXAFS experiments revealed local order of the Mn ions at the surface at the condensed phase but no order showed up in the expanded phase. We explain these findings using a self consistent Poisson-Boltzman calculation of a partially ionized monolayer. Our model also explains earlier reports of adsorption of metal ions to the liquid/monolayer interface. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Characterization and antimicrobial efficacy against E. coli of a helium/air plasma at atmospheric pressure created in a plastic package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J.; Valdramidis, V. P.; Byrne, E.; Karatzas, K. A.; Cullen, P. J.; Keener, K. M.; Mosnier, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    A plasma source, sustained by the application of a floating high voltage (±15 kV) to parallel-plate electrodes at 50 Hz, has been achieved in a helium/air mixture at atmospheric pressure (P = 105 Pa) contained in a zip-locked plastic package placed in the electrode gap. Some of the physical and antimicrobial properties of this apparatus were established with a view to ascertain its performance as a prototype for the disinfection of fresh produce. The current-voltage (I-V) and charge-voltage (Q-V) characteristics of the system were measured as a function of gap distance d, in the range (3 × 103 ⩽ Pd ⩽ 1.0 × 104 Pa m). The electrical measurements showed this plasma source to exhibit the characteristic behaviour of a dielectric barrier discharge in the filamentary mode and its properties could be accurately interpreted by the two-capacitance in series model. The power consumed by the discharge and the reduced field strength were found to decrease quadratically from 12.0 W to 4.5 W and linearly from 140 Td to 50 Td, respectively, in the range studied. Emission spectra of the discharge were recorded on a relative intensity scale and the dominant spectral features could be assigned to strong vibrational bands in the 2+ and 1- systems of N2 and N_2^+ , respectively, with other weak signatures from the NO and OH radicals and the N+, He and O atomic species. Absolute spectral intensities were also recorded and interpreted by comparison with the non-equilibrium synthetic spectra generated by the computer code SPECAIR. At an inter-electrode gap of 0.04 m, this comparison yielded typical values for the electron, vibrational and translational (gas) temperatures of (4980 ± 100) K, (2700 ± 200) K and (300 ± 100) K, respectively and an electron density of 1.0 × 1017 m-3. A Boltzmann plot also provided a value of (3200 ± 200 K) for the vibrational temperature. The antimicrobial efficacy was assessed by studying the resistance of both Escherichia coli K12 its isogenic

  9. Fast ion conductivity in strained defect-fluorite structure created by ion tracks in Gd2Ti2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; Sachan, Ritesh; Zarkadoula, Eva; Pakarinen, Olli; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.

    2015-11-10

    The structure and ion-conducting properties of the defect-fluorite ring structure formed around amorphous ion-tracks by swift heavy ion irradiation of Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore are investigated. High angle annular dark field imaging complemented with ion-track molecular dynamics simulations show that the atoms in the ring structure are disordered, and have relatively larger cation-cation interspacing than in the bulk pyrochlore, illustrating the presence of tensile strain in the ring region. Density functional theory calculations show that the non-equilibrium defect-fluorite structure can be stabilized by tensile strain. The pyrochlore to defect-fluorite structure transformation in the ring region is predicted to be induced by recrystallization during a melt-quench process and stabilized by tensile strain. Static pair-potential calculations show that planar tensile strain lowers oxygen vacancy migration barriers in pyrochlores, in agreement with recent studies on fluorite and perovskite materials. Lastly, in view of these results, it is suggested that strain engineering could be simultaneously used to stabilize the defect-fluorite structure and gain control over its high ion-conducting properties.

  10. Simulated Solvation of Organic Ions II: Study of Linear Alkylated Carboxylate Ions in Water Nanodrops and in Liquid Water. Propensity for Air/Water Interface and Convergence to Bulk Solvation Properties.

    PubMed

    Houriez, Céline; Meot-Ner Mautner, Michael; Masella, Michel

    2015-09-10

    We investigated the solvation of carboxylate ions from formate to hexanoate, in droplets of 50 to 1000 water molecules and neat water, by computations using standard molecular dynamics and sophisticated polarizable models. The carboxylate ions from methanoate to hexanoate show strong propensity for the air/water interface in small droplets. Only the ions larger than propanoate retain propensity for the interface in larger droplets, where their enthalpic stabilization by ion/water dispersion is reduced there by 3 kcal mol(-1) per CH2 group. This is compensated by entropy effects over +3.3 cal mol(-1) K(-1) per CH2 group. On the surface, the anionic headgroups are strongly oriented toward the aqueous core, while the hydrophobic alkyl chains are repelled into air and lose their structure-making effects. These results reproduce the structure-making effects of alkyl groups in solution, and suggest that the hydrocarbon chains of ionic headgroups and alkyl substituents solvate independently. Extrapolation to bulk solution using standard extrapolation schemes yields absolute carboxylate solvation energies. The results for formate and acetate yield a proton solvation enthalpy of about 270 kcal mol(-1), close to the experiment-based value. The largest carboxylate ions yield a value smaller by about 10 kcal mol(-1), which requires studies in much larger droplets. PMID:26287943

  11. Creating and Analyzing a Mirage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, Lauren; Stewart, Bailey; Peatross, Justin

    2006-10-01

    Most people have witnessed mirages such as the distant "puddles" that appear on a highway when the pavement is warmed by the Sun. The warmed surface heats the nearby air creating a temperature gradient with the cooler (and more dense) air above. The apparent displacement of distant objects occurs as light refracts through the different air densities. Rays of light from the sky that are originally directed toward the ground can be bent upward, appearing to a viewer as though coming from the ground. This effect is known as an inferior mirage; a superior mirage occurs when cooler air is underneath.1,2 In this paper, a mirage is created indoors using an electric hotplate and a saucepan filled with ice water.

  12. Study of a High-Yield Cellulase System Created by Heavy-Ion Irradiation-Induced Mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger and Mixed Fermentation with Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-Hong; Li, Wen-Jian; Liu, Jing; Hu, Wei; Xiao, Guo-Qing; Dong, Miao-Yin; Wang, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and validate the efficiency of 12C6+ irradiation of Aspergillus niger (A. niger) or mutagenesis via mixed Trichoderma viride (T. viride) culturing as well as a liquid cultivation method for cellulase production via mixed Trichoderma reesei (T. reesei) and A. niger culture fermentation. The first mutagenesis approach was employed to optimize yield from a cellulase-producing strain via heavy-ion mutagenesis and high-throughput screening, and the second was to effectively achieve enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulase from a mixed culture of mutant T. viride and A. niger. We found that 12C6+-ion irradiation induced changes in cellulase biosynthesis in A. niger but had no effect on the time course of the synthesis. It is notable that the exoglucanases (CBH) activities of A. niger strains H11-1 and H differed (6.71 U/mL vs. 6.01 U/mL) and were significantly higher than that of A. niger mutant H3-1. Compared with strain H, the filter paper assay (FPA), endoglucanase (EG) and β-glucosidase (BGL) activities of mutant strain H11-1 were increased by 250.26%, 30.26% and 34.91%, respectively. A mixed culture system was successfully optimized, and the best ratio of T. reesei to A. niger was 5:1 for 96 h with simultaneous inoculation. The BGL activity of the mixed culture increased after 72 h. At 96 h, the FPA and BGL activities of the mixed culture were 689.00 and 797.15 U/mL, respectively, significantly higher than those of monocultures, which were 408.70 and 646.98 U/mL for T. reesei and 447.29 and 658.89 U/mL for A. niger, respectively. The EG activity of the mixed culture was 2342.81 U/mL, a value that was significantly higher than that of monocultures at 2206.57 U/mL for T. reesei and 1727.62 U/mL for A. niger. In summary, cellulose production and hydrolysis yields were significantly enhanced by the proposed combination scheme. PMID:26656155

  13. The absence of ion-regulatory suppression in the gills of the aquatic air-breathing fish Trichogaster lalius during oxygen stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yen; Lin, Hsueh-Hsi; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2015-01-01

    The strategy for most teleost to survive in hypoxic or anoxic conditions is to conserve energy expenditure, which can be achieved by suppressing energy-consuming activities such as ion regulation. However, an air-breathing fish can cope with hypoxic stress using a similar adjustment or by enhancing gas exchange ability, both behaviorally and physiologically. This study examined Trichogaster lalius, an air-breathing fish without apparent gill modification, for their gill ion-regulatory abilities and glycogen utilization under a hypoxic treatment. We recorded air-breathing frequency, branchial morphology, and the expression of ion-regulatory proteins (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase) in the 1(st) and 4(th) gills and labyrinth organ (LO), and the expression of glycogen utilization (GP, glycogen phosphorylase protein expression and glycogen content) and other protein responses (catalase, CAT; carbonic anhydrase II, CAII; heat shock protein 70, HSP70; hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, HIF-1α; proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA; superoxidase dismutase, SOD) in the gills of T. lalius after 3 days in hypoxic and restricted conditions. No morphological modification of the 1(st) and 4(th) gills was observed. The air-breathing behavior of the fish and CAII protein expression both increased under hypoxia. Ion-regulatory abilities were not suppressed in the hypoxic or restricted groups, but glycogen utilization was enhanced within the groups. The expression of HIF-1α, HSP70 and PCNA did not vary among the treatments. Regarding the antioxidant system, decreased CAT enzyme activity was observed among the groups. In conclusion, during hypoxic stress, T. lalius did not significantly reduce energy consumption but enhanced gas exchange ability and glycogen expenditure. PMID:25194989

  14. Heavy air pollution episodes in Beijing during January 2013: inorganic ion chemistry and source analysis using Highly Time-Resolved Measurements in an urban site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, B.; Zhang, R.; Yang, W.; Bai, Z.; Ma, Z.; Zhang, W.

    2015-04-01

    Heavy air pollution episodes occurred in Beijing in January 2013 attracted intensively attention around the whole world. During this period, the authors conducted highly time-resolved measurements of water soluble ions associated with PM2.5 at an urban site, and attempted to distinguish the ion chemistry and potential sources. In this study, hourly mean concentrations of Cl-, NO3-, SO42-, Na+, NH4+, K+, Mg2+ and Ca2+ were measured during the air pollution episode in January 2013, and the ions were found to exist mainly in the form of (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, NaCl and KCl in aerosol particles by correlation and linear analysis. SO42- and NO3- were observed peak concentrations in 10-15, 18-20, 21-24, and 26-30 January during this monitoring campaign. The percentage of SO42- and NH4+ in total ions concentrations exhibited an increasing trend with the enhancement of PM2.5 concentration, indicating high concentrations of SO42- and NH4+ had played important roles in the formation of air pollution episodes. Ratio of [NO3-]/[SO42-] was calculated, finding the sources of SO42- would contribute more to the formation of PM2.5 than mobile sources. Diurnal variations of SO42-, NO3-, NH4+ were examined, and all of them exhibited similar pattern with high concentration in night and relative low level at daytime. Emission from coal combustion, remote transportation at night or impact of meteorological was likely to be responsible for the high level of SO42-, NH4+ andNO3-. Potential sources were identified by applying PMF. Secondary nitrate, secondary sulfate, coal combustion and biomass burning, as well as fugitive dust were considered as the major contributors to total ions.

  15. Toward a unified picture of the water self-ions at the air-water interface: a density functional theory perspective.

    PubMed

    Baer, Marcel D; Kuo, I-Feng W; Tobias, Douglas J; Mundy, Christopher J

    2014-07-17

    The propensities of the water self-ions, H3O(+) and OH(-), for the air-water interface have implications for interfacial acid-base chemistry. Despite numerous experimental and computational studies, no consensus has been reached on the question of whether or not H3O(+) and/or OH(-) prefer to be at the water surface or in the bulk. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study of the bulk vs interfacial behavior of H3O(+) and OH(-) that employs forces derived from density functional theory with a generalized gradient approximation exchange-correlation functional (specifically, BLYP) and empirical dispersion corrections. We computed the potential of mean force (PMF) for H3O(+) as a function of the position of the ion in the vicinity of an air-water interface. The PMF suggests that H3O(+) has equal propensity for the interface and the bulk. We compare the PMF for H3O(+) to our previously computed PMF for OH(-) adsorption, which contains a shallow minimum at the interface, and we explore how differences in solvation of each ion at the interface vs in the bulk are connected with interfacial propensity. We find that the solvation shell of H3O(+) is only slightly dependent on its position in the water slab, while OH(-) partially desolvates as it approaches the interface, and we examine how this difference in solvation behavior is manifested in the electronic structure and chemistry of the two ions. PMID:24762096

  16. Autocrine A2 in the T-system of ventricular myocytes creates transmural gradients in ion transport: a mechanism to match contraction with load?

    PubMed

    Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; Potapova, Irina A; Cohen, Ira S; Mathias, Richard T; Kim, Jeremy H

    2014-06-01

    Transmural heterogeneities in Na/K pump current (IP), transient outward K(+)-current (Ito), and Ca(2+)-current (ICaL) play an important role in regulating electrical and contractile activities in the ventricular myocardium. Prior studies indicated angiotensin II (A2) may determine the transmural gradient in Ito, but the effects of A2 on IP and ICaL were unknown. In this study, myocytes were isolated from five muscle layers between epicardium and endocardium. We found a monotonic gradient in both Ip and Ito, with the lowest currents in ENDO. When AT1Rs were inhibited, EPI currents were unaffected, but ENDO currents increased, suggesting endogenous extracellular A2 inhibits both currents in ENDO. IP- and Ito-inhibition by A2 yielded essentially the same K0.5 values, so they may both be regulated by the same mechanism. A2/AT1R-mediated inhibition of IP or Ito or stimulation of ICaL persisted for hours in isolated myocytes, suggesting continuous autocrine secretion of A2 into a restricted diffusion compartment, like the T-system. Detubulation brought EPI IP to its low ENDO value and eliminated A2 sensitivity, so the T-system lumen may indeed be the restricted diffusion compartment. These studies showed that 33-50% of IP, 57-65% of Ito, and a significant fraction of ICaL reside in T-tubule membranes where they are transmurally regulated by autocrine secretion of A2 into the T-system lumen and activation of AT1Rs. Increased AT1R activation regulates each of these currents in a direction expected to increase contractility. Endogenous A2 activation of AT1Rs increases monotonically from EPI to ENDO in a manner similar to reported increases in passive tension when the ventricular chamber fills with blood. We therefore hypothesize load is the signal that regulates A2-activation of AT1Rs, which create a contractile gradient that matches the gradient in load. PMID:24896115

  17. Real-time air monitoring of mustard gas and Lewisite 1 by detecting their in-line reaction products by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry with counterflow ion introduction.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Watanabe, Susumu; Hashimoto, Hiroaki; Ezawa, Naoya; Seto, Yasuo; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Kishi, Shintaro; Satoh, Takafumi; Kondo, Tomohide; Nagashima, Hisayuki; Nagoya, Tomoki

    2015-01-20

    A new method enabling sensitive real-time air monitoring of highly reactive chemical warfare agents, namely, mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1), by detecting ions of their in-line reaction products instead of intact agents, is proposed. The method is based on corona discharge-initiated atmospheric pressure chemical ionization coupled with ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) via counterflow ion introduction. Therefore, it allows for highly sensitive and specific real-time detection of a broad range of airborne compounds. In-line chemical reactions, ionization reactions, and ion fragmentations of these agents were investigated. Mustard gas is oxygenated in small quantity by reactive oxygen species generated in the corona discharge. With increasing air humidity, the MS(2) signal intensity of protonated molecules of mono-oxygenated HD decreases but exceeds that of dominantly existing intact HD. This result can be explained in view of proton affinity. Lewisite 1 is hydrolyzed and oxidized. As the humidity increases from zero, the signal of the final product, namely, didechlorinated, dihydroxylated, and mono-oxygenated L1, quickly increases and reaches a plateau, giving the highest MS(2) and MS(3) signals among those of L1 and its reaction products. The addition of minimal moisture gives the highest signal intensity, even under low humidity. The method was demonstrated to provide sufficient analytical performance to meet the requirements concerning hygienic management and counter-terrorism. It will be the first practical method, in view of sensitivity and specificity, for real-time air monitoring of HD and L1 without sample pretreatment. PMID:25553788

  18. Exposure of silver-nanoparticles and silver-ions to lung cells in vitro at the air-liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to its antibacterial properties, silver (Ag) has been used in more consumer products than any other nanomaterial so far. Despite the promising advantages posed by using Ag-nanoparticles (NPs), their interaction with mammalian systems is currently not fully understood. An exposure route via inhalation is of primary concern for humans in an occupational setting. Aim of this study was therefore to investigate the potential adverse effects of aerosolised Ag-NPs using a human epithelial airway barrier model composed of A549, monocyte derived macrophage and dendritic cells cultured in vitro at the air-liquid interface. Cell cultures were exposed to 20 nm citrate-coated Ag-NPs with a deposition of 30 and 278 ng/cm2 respectively and incubated for 4 h and 24 h. To elucidate whether any effects of Ag-NPs are due to ionic effects, Ag-Nitrate (AgNO3) solutions were aerosolised at the same molecular mass concentrations. Results Agglomerates of Ag-NPs were detected at 24 h post exposure in vesicular structures inside cells but the cellular integrity was not impaired upon Ag-NP exposures. Minimal cytotoxicity, by measuring the release of lactate dehydrogenase, could only be detected following a higher concentrated AgNO3-solution. A release of pro-inflammatory markers TNF-α and IL-8 was neither observed upon Ag-NP and AgNO3 exposures as well as was not affected when cells were pre-stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Also, an induction of mRNA expression of TNF-α and IL-8, could only be observed for the highest AgNO3 concentration alone or even significantly increased when pre-stimulated with LPS after 4 h. However, this effect disappeared after 24 h. Furthermore, oxidative stress markers (HMOX-1, SOD-1) were expressed after 4 h in a concentration dependent manner following AgNO3 exposures only. Conclusions With an experimental setup reflecting physiological exposure conditions in the human lung more realistic, the present study indicates that Ag

  19. Air Cleaning Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    water molecules and form cluster ions which are attracted to airborne particles. The cluster ion surrounds the airborne particle, and the positive and negative ions react to form hydroxyls. These hydroxyls steal the airborne particle’s hydrogen atom, which creates a hole in the particle’s outer protein membrane, thereby rendering it inactive. Because influenza is primarily acquired by large droplets and direct and indirect contact with an infectious person, any in-room air cleaner will have little benefit in controlling and preventing its spread. Therefore, there is no role for the Plasmacluster ion air purifier or any other in-room air cleaner in the control of the spread of influenza. Accordingly, for purposes of this review, the Medical Advisory Secretariat presents no further analysis of the Plasmacluster. Review Strategy The objective of the systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of in-room air cleaners with built in UVGI lights and HEPA filtration compared with those using HEPA filtration only. The Medical Advisory Secretariat searched the databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, INAHATA (International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment), Biosis Previews, Bacteriology Abstracts, Web of Science, Dissertation Abstracts, and NIOSHTIC 2. A meta-analysis was conducted if adequate data was available from 2 or more studies and where statistical and clinical heterogeneity among studies was not an issue. Otherwise, a qualitative review was completed. The GRADE system was used to summarize the quality of the body of evidence comprised of 1 or more studies. Summary of Findings There were no existing health technology assessments on air cleaning technology located during the literature review. The literature search yielded 59 citations of which none were retained. One study was retrieved from a reference list of a guidance document from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which

  20. A fractal time thermal model for predicting the surface temperature of air-cooled cylindrical Li-ion cells based on experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Marambio, Jorge; Moser, Francisco; Gana, Felipe; Severino, Bernardo; Calderón-Muñoz, Williams R.; Palma-Behnke, Rodrigo; Estevez, Pablo A.; Orchard, Marcos; Cortés, Marcelo

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a experimentally-validated fractal time thermal model to describe the discharge and cooling down processes of air-cooled cylindrical Lithium-ion cells. Three cases were studied, a spatially isolated single cell under natural convection and two spatial configurations of modules with forced air cooling: staggered and aligned arrays with 30 and 25 cells respectively. Surface temperature measurements for discharge processes were obtained in a single cell at 1 C, 2 C and 3 C discharge rates, and in the two arrays at 1 C discharge rate. In the modules, surface temperature measurements were obtained for selected cells at specific inlet cooling air speeds. The fractal time energy equation captures the anomalous temperature relaxation and describes the cell surface temperature using a stretched exponential model. Stretched exponential temperature models of cell surface temperature show a better agreement with experimental measurements than pure exponential temperature models. Cells closer to the horizontal side walls have a better heat dissipation than the cells along the centerline of the module. The high prediction capabilities of the fractal time energy equation are useful in new design approaches of thermal control strategies of modules and packs, and to develop more efficient signal-correction algorithms in multipoint temperature measurement technologies in Li-ion batteries.

  1. Active (air-cooled) vs. passive (phase change material) thermal management of high power lithium-ion packs: Limitation of temperature rise and uniformity of temperature distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, Rami; Kizilel, R.; Selman, J. R.; Al-Hallaj, S.

    The effectiveness of passive cooling by phase change materials (PCM) is compared with that of active (forced air) cooling. Numerical simulations were performed at different discharge rates, operating temperatures and ambient temperatures of a compact Li-ion battery pack suitable for plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) propulsion. The results were also compared with experimental results. The PCM cooling mode uses a micro-composite graphite-PCM matrix surrounding the array of cells, while the active cooling mode uses air blown through the gaps between the cells in the same array. The results show that at stressful conditions, i.e. at high discharge rates and at high operating or ambient temperatures (for example 40-45 °C), air-cooling is not a proper thermal management system to keep the temperature of the cell in the desirable operating range without expending significant fan power. On the other hand, the passive cooling system is able to meet the operating range requirements under these same stressful conditions without the need for additional fan power.

  2. Development of an automatic continuous analyzer for water-soluble gases in air by combining an artificial lung with an ion chromatograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Takeno, Masaki; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiko; Ishitani, Osamu; Fukuyama, Tsutomu; Utiyama, Masahiro

    An automatic measurement system for the simultaneous monitoring of sulfur dioxide (SO 2) and ammonia (NH 3) in air was developed by combining an artificial lung and an ion chromatograph. An artificial lung was used as a new technique for concentrated collection of trace amounts of gaseous pollutants in air. It was found that SO 2 and NH 3 were effectively absorbed into ultra-pure water in the artificial lung. Collection efficiencies for SO 2 and NH 3 were 100% and 98%, respectively, at a gas flow rate of 1 l min -1, and material balances >90% were obtained. No interference from the simultaneous collection of SO 2 and NH 3 was found. When a 400 ppb standard NH 3 gas was measured automatically with this system, the recovery rate was 98%, and the relative standard deviation was 2.7% ( n=8). In the case of a 200 ppb standard SO 2 gas, the recovery rate was 87%, and the relative standard deviation was 1.6% ( n=7). Results from the simultaneous measurement of SO 2 and NH 3 with the automatic system were equally as good as those obtained by measuring a single component at a time. Calibration curves for SO 2 and NH 3 showed good relationships between concentration and peak intensity. The linear correlation coefficients were 0.997 and 0.998 for SO 2 and NH 3, respectively. The detection limits of SO 2 and NH 3 were 0.06 and 0.1 ppb, respectively, in a 40 l air volume. The system was tested in air and found to be capable of simultaneous measurement of SO 2 and NH 3 with a 20 min cycle.

  3. Towards a unified picture of the water self-ions at the air-water interface: a density functional theory perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Marcel D.; Kuo, I-F W.; Tobias, Douglas J.; Mundy, Christopher J.

    2014-07-17

    The propensities of the water self ions, H3O+ and OH- , for the air-water interface has implications for interfacial acid-base chemistry. Despite numerous experimental and computational studies, no consensus has been reached on the question of whether or not H3O+ and/or OH- prefer to be at the water surface or in the bulk. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study of the bulk vs. interfacial behavior of H3O+ and OH- that employs forces derived from density functional theory with a generalized gradient approximation exchangecorrelation functional (specifically, BLYP) and empirical dispersion corrections. We computed the potential of mean force (PMF) for H3O+ as a function of the position of the ion in a 215-molecule water slab. The PMF is flat, suggesting that H3O+ has equal propensity for the air-water interface and the bulk. We compare the PMF for H3O+ to our previously computed PMF for OH- adsorption, which contains a shallow minimum at the interface, and we explore how differences in solvation of each ion at the interface vs. the bulk are connected with interfacial propensity. We find that the solvation shell of H3O+ is only slightly dependent on its position in the water slab, while OH- partially desolvates as it approaches the interface, and we examine how this difference in solvation behavior is manifested in the electronic structure and chemistry of the two ions. DJT was supported by National Science Foundation grant CHE-0909227. CJM was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy‘s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is operated for the Department of Energy by Battelle. The potential of mean force required resources of the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DEAC05-00OR22725. The remaining simulations

  4. Nanoporous silicon prepared through air-oxidation demagnesiation of Mg2Si and properties of its lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jianwen; Li, Xiaona; Hou, Zhiguo; Guo, Cong; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2015-04-28

    Nanoporous silicon has been prepared through the air-oxidation demagnesiation of Mg2Si at 600 °C for 10 hours (Mg2Si + O2 → Si + MgO), followed by HCl washing. Mg2Si was prepared from 200 mesh commercial Si at 500 °C for 5 h in an autoclave. The as-prepared Si exhibits a reversible capacity of 1000 mA h g(-1) at 36 A g(-1) and ∼1200 mA h g(-1) at 1.8 A g(-1) over 400 cycles. PMID:25812916

  5. Integrated Chemical and Microorganism Monitoring of Air Using Gas Chromatography/Ion Mobility Spectometry: Toward an Expanded-Use Volatile Organic Analyzer (VOA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiceman, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The work described in this research program originated with the choice by NASA of an ion mobility spectrometer for air quality monitoring on-board the international spacestation. Though the gas chromatograph-ion mobility spectrometer analyzer known as VOA met or exceeded expectations, limitations in the basic understanding of response and the utilization of foundational principles into usable technology was considered unacceptable. In this research program, a comprehensive model for the origins of mobility spectra was proposed, tested and verified. The principles considered responsible for the appearance of mobility spectra have now been elucidated through this project. This understanding has been applied in automated identification of mobility spectra using neural networks and routine procedures for this now exist. Finally, the limitation on linear range has been shown to be a technical limitation and not a fundamental limitation so that a hardware component was crafted to extend the linear range of a mobility spectrometer by 10X. This project has led to one Ph.D. dissertation and one MS thesis. In addition, over ten public presentations at professional meetings and six journal publications have resulted from this program of research. The findings are so plentiful that total analysis of the findings may require four to six years or more. The findings confirm that the decision to use VOA was sound and that the chemical and physical principles of mobility spectrometry are both understandable and predictable.

  6. Ion mobility sensor

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2005-08-23

    An ion mobility sensor which can detect both ion and molecules simultaneously. Thus, one can measure the relative arrival times between various ions and molecules. Different ions have different mobility in air, and the ion sensor enables measurement of ion mobility, from which one can identify the various ions and molecules. The ion mobility sensor which utilizes a pair of glow discharge devices may be designed for coupling with an existing gas chromatograph, where various gas molecules are already separated, but numbers of each kind of molecules are relatively small, and in such cases a conventional ion mobility sensor cannot be utilized.

  7. A morphology, porosity and surface conductive layer optimized MnCo2O4 microsphere for compatible superior Li(+) ion/air rechargeable battery electrode materials.

    PubMed

    Yun, Young Jun; Kim, Jin Kyu; Ju, Ji Young; Unithrattil, Sanjith; Lee, Sun Sook; Kang, Yongku; Jung, Ha-Kyun; Park, Jin-Seong; Im, Won Bin; Choi, Sungho

    2016-03-15

    Uniform surface conductive layers with porous morphology-conserved MnCo2O4 microspheres are successfully synthesized, and their electrochemical performances are thoroughly investigated. It is found that the microwave-assisted hydrothermally grown MnCo2O4 using citric acid as the carbon source shows a maximum Li(+) ion lithiation/delithiation capacity of 501 mA h g(-1) at 500 mA g(-1) with stable capacity retention. Besides, the given microsphere compounds are effectively activated as air cathode catalysts in Li-O2 batteries with reduced charge overpotentials and improved cycling performance. We believe that such an affordable enhanced performance results from the appropriate quasi-hollow nature of MnCo2O4 microspheres, which can effectively mitigate the large volume change of electrodes during Li(+) migration and/or enhance the surface transport of the LiOx species in Li-air batteries. Thus, the rationally designed porous media for the improved Li(+) electrochemical reaction highlight the importance of the 3D macropores, the high specific area and uniformly overcoated conductive layer for the promising Li(+) redox reaction platforms. PMID:26877264

  8. Adsorption, Ordering, and Local Environments of Surfactant-Encapsulated Polyoxometalate Ions Probed at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Benjamin; Yin, Panchao; Ma, Ying-Zhong

    2016-08-16

    The continued development and application of surfactant-encapsulated polyoxometalates (SEPs) relies on understanding the ordering and organization of species at their interface and how these are impacted by the various local environments to which they are exposed. Here, we report on the equilibrium properties of two common SEPs adsorbed to the air-water interface and probed with surface-specific vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. These results reveal clear shifts in vibrational band positions, the magnitude of which scales with the charge of the SEP core, which is indicative of a static field effect on the surfactant coating and the associated local chemical environment. This static field also induces ordering in surrounding water molecules that is mediated by charge screening via the surface-bound surfactants. From these SFG measurements, we are able to show that Mo132-based SEPs are more polar than Mo72V30 SEPs. Disorder in the surfactant chain packing at the highly curved SEP surfaces is attributed to large conic volumes that can be sampled without interactions with neighboring chains. Measurements of adsorption isotherms yield free energies of adsorption to the air-water interface of -46.8 ± 0.4 and -44.8 ± 1.2 kJ/mol for the Mo132 and Mo72V30 SEPs, respectively, indicating a strong propensity for the fluid surface. The influence of intermolecular interactions on the surface adsorption energies is discussed. PMID:27452922

  9. Intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions in alveolar epithelial cells exposed to airborne ZnO nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mihai, Cosmin; Chrisler, William B.; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Szymanski, Craig J.; Tolic, Ana; Klein, Jessica; Smith, Jordan N.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Orr, Galya

    2015-02-01

    Airborne nanoparticles (NPs) that enter the respiratory tract are likely to reach the alveolar region. Accumulating observations support a role for zinc oxide (ZnO) NP dissolution in toxicity, but the majority of in vitro studies were conducted in cells exposed to NPs in growth media, where large doses of dissolved ions are shed into the exposure solution. To determine the precise intracellular accumulation dynamics and fate of zinc ions (Zn2+) shed by airborne NPs in the cellular environment, we exposed alveolar epithelial cells to aerosolized NPs at the air-liquid interface (ALI). Using a fluorescent indicator for Zn2+, together with organelle-specific fluorescent proteins, we quantified Zn2+ in single cells and organelles over time. We found that at the ALI, intracellular Zn2+ values peaked 3 h post exposure and decayed to normal values by 12 h, while in submersed cultures, intracellular Zn2+ values continued to increase over time. The lowest toxic NP dose at the ALI generated peak intracellular Zn2+ values that were nearly 3 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of NPs in submersed cultures, and 8 folds lower than the peak values generated by the lowest toxic dose of ZnSO4 or Zn2+. At the ALI, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ was found in endosomes and lysosomes as early as 1 h post exposure. In contrast, the majority of intracellular Zn2+ following exposures to ZnSO4 was found in other larger vesicles, with less than 10% in endosomes and lysosomes. Together, our observations indicate that low but critical levels of intracellular Zn2+ have to be reached, concentrated specifically in endosomes and lysosomes, for toxicity to occur, and point to the focal dissolution of the NPs in the cellular environment and the accumulation of the ions specifically in endosomes and lysosomes as the processes underlying the potent toxicity of airborne ZnO NPs.

  10. Some air electricity phenomena caused by waterfalls: Correlative study of the spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luts, Aare; Parts, Tiia-Ene; Laakso, Lauri; Hirsikko, Anne; Grönholm, Tiia; Kulmala, Markku

    2009-02-01

    According to our previous measurements, waterfalls permanently modify air ion spectra. In this paper we performed a correlative study of these results and proposed some pathways which can produce the observed waterfall ions. The small ion composition near waterfalls should be different from that further away due to gaseous OH - core (water shell) clusters. We assumed that the combination of factors (autoionization, fluctuating charge rearrangement, surface protrusions, collisions, Coulomb explosion) serves as the main source of observed intermediate ions, and an extra source for large ions. Evaporation of droplets produces nearly equal numbers of positive and negative intermediate and large ions. Waterfall-produced intermediate ions can attach to the waterfall-produced larger particles, which creates an additional link between the waterfall intermediate and large ions.

  11. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Martina, E.F.

    1958-04-22

    An improved ion source particularly adapted to provide an intense beam of ions with minimum neutral molecule egress from the source is described. The ion source structure includes means for establishing an oscillating electron discharge, including an apertured cathode at one end of the discharge. The egress of ions from the source is in a pencil like beam. This desirable form of withdrawal of the ions from the plasma created by the discharge is achieved by shaping the field at the aperture of the cathode. A tubular insulator is extended into the plasma from the aperture and in cooperation with the electric fields at the cathode end of the discharge focuses the ions from the source,

  12. Characterization of Binary Ag-Cu Ion Mixtures in Zeolites: Their Reduction Products and Stability to Air Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Fiddy, Steven; Petranovskii, Vitalii; Ogden, Steve; Iznaga, Inocente Rodriguez

    2007-02-02

    A series of Ag+-Cu2+ binary mixtures with different Ag/Cu ratios were supported on mordenite with different Si/Al ratios and were subsequently reduced under hydrogen in the temperature range 323K - 473K. Ag and Cu K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) was conducted on these systems in-situ to monitor the reduction species formed and the kinetics of their reduction. In-situ XANES clearly demonstrates that the formation of silver particles is severely impeded by the addition of copper and that the copper is converted from Cu(II) to Cu(I) during reduction and completely reverts back to Cu(II) during cooling. There are no indications at any stage of the formation of bimetallic Ag-Cu clusters. Interestingly, the Ag/Cu ratio appears to have no influence of the reduction kinetics and reduction products formed with only the highest Si/Al ratio (MR = 128) investigated during this study having an influence on the reduction and stability to air oxidation.

  13. The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, Richard J.

    2006-02-15

    The Pulse Line Ion Accelerator concept was motivated by the desire for an inexpensive way to accelerate intense short pulse heavy ion beams to regimes of interest for studies of High Energy Density Physics and Warm Dense Matter. A pulse power driver applied at one end of a helical pulse line creates a traveling wave pulse that accelerates and axially confines the heavy ion beam pulse. Acceleration scenarios with constant parameter helical lines are described which result in output energies of a single stage much larger than the several hundred kilovolt peak voltages on the line, with a goal of 3-5 MeV/meter acceleration gradients. The concept might be described crudely as an ''air core'' induction linac where the PFN is integrated into the beam line so the accelerating voltage pulse can move along with the ions to get voltage multiplication.

  14. Air-snow interactions and atmospheric chemistry.

    PubMed

    Dominé, Florent; Shepson, Paul B

    2002-08-30

    The presence of snow greatly perturbs the composition of near-surface polar air, and the higher concentrations of hydroxyl radicals (OH) observed result in a greater oxidative capacity of the lower atmosphere. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, nitrous acid, light aldehydes, acetone, and molecular halogens have also been detected. Photolysis of nitrate ions contained in the snow appears to play an important role in creating these perturbations. OH formed in the snowpack can oxidize organic matter and halide ions in the snow, producing carbonyl compounds and halogens that are released to the atmosphere or incorporated into snow crystals. These reactions modify the composition of the snow, of the interstitial air, and of the overlying atmosphere. Reconstructing the composition of past atmospheres from ice-core analyses may therefore require complex corrections and modeling for reactive species. PMID:12202818

  15. Air-Snow Interactions and Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominé, Florent; Shepson, Paul B.

    2002-08-01

    The presence of snow greatly perturbs the composition of near-surface polar air, and the higher concentrations of hydroxyl radicals (OH) observed result in a greater oxidative capacity of the lower atmosphere. Emissions of nitrogen oxides, nitrous acid, light aldehydes, acetone, and molecular halogens have also been detected. Photolysis of nitrate ions contained in the snow appears to play an important role in creating these perturbations. OH formed in the snowpack can oxidize organic matter and halide ions in the snow, producing carbonyl compounds and halogens that are released to the atmosphere or incorporated into snow crystals. These reactions modify the composition of the snow, of the interstitial air, and of the overlying atmosphere. Reconstructing the composition of past atmospheres from ice-core analyses may therefore require complex corrections and modeling for reactive species.

  16. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    1996-01-01

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  17. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-10-08

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes. 6 figs.

  18. Measuring the effect of ion-induced drift-gas polarization on the electrical mobilities of multiply-charged ionic liquid nanodrops in air.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Juan; Fernández de la Mora, Juan

    2013-12-01

    The electrical mobilities of multiply-charged nanodrops of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl, 3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (EMI-N[CN]2) were accurately measured in air at 20 °C for mass-selected clusters of composition [EMI-N[CN]2] n [EMI(+)] z , with 2 ≤ n ≤ 369 and 1 ≤ z ≤ 10. We confirm prior reports that the mobility Z of a globular ion of mass m is given approximately by the modified Stokes-Millikan law for spheres, Z  =  Z SM,mod (d m   +  d g , z, m), where d m   =  (6m/πρ)(1/3) is the nanodrop mass-diameter based on the density ρ of the liquid (corrected for the capillary compression and electrostatic deformation of the nanodrop), and d g is an effective air molecule diameter. There is however a measurable (up to 7%) and systematic z-dependent departure of Z from Z SM,mod . As theoretically expected at small ε (*) , this effect is accurately described by a simple correction factor of the form Z/Z SM,mod   =  δ(1  -  βε (*)), where kTε (*) is the potential energy due to the ion-induced dipole (polarization) attraction between a perfectly-conducting charged nanodrop and a polarized neutral gas-molecule at a distance (d m   +  d g )/2 from its center. An excellent fit of this model to hundreds of data points is found for d g ≈ 0.26 nm, β ≈ 0.36, and δ ≈ 0.954. Accounting for the effect of polarization decreases d g considerably with respect to values inferred from earlier nanodrop measurements that ignored this effect. In addition, and in spite of ambiguities in the mobility calibration scale, the measured constant δ smaller than unity increases Millikan's drag enhancement factor from the accepted value ξ m ≈ 1.36 to the new value ξ ≈ ξ m /δ ≈ 1.42  ± 0.03. PMID:24048890

  19. Measuring the Effect of Ion-Induced Drift-Gas Polarization on the Electrical Mobilities of Multiply-Charged Ionic Liquid Nanodrops in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-García, Juan; Fernández de la Mora, Juan

    2013-12-01

    The electrical mobilities of multiply-charged nanodrops of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl, 3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (EMI-N[CN]2) were accurately measured in air at 20 °C for mass-selected clusters of composition [EMI-N[CN]2] n [EMI+] z , with 2 ≤ n ≤ 369 and 1 ≤ z ≤ 10. We confirm prior reports that the mobility Z of a globular ion of mass m is given approximately by the modified Stokes-Millikan law for spheres, Z = Z SM, mod ( d m + d g , z, m), where d m = (6 m/ πρ)1/3 is the nanodrop mass-diameter based on the density ρ of the liquid (corrected for the capillary compression and electrostatic deformation of the nanodrop), and d g is an effective air molecule diameter. There is however a measurable (up to 7 %) and systematic z-dependent departure of Z from Z SM,mod . As theoretically expected at small ɛ * , this effect is accurately described by a simple correction factor of the form Z/ Z SM, mod = δ(1 - βɛ *), where kTɛ * is the potential energy due to the ion-induced dipole ( polarization) attraction between a perfectly-conducting charged nanodrop and a polarized neutral gas-molecule at a distance ( d m + d g )/2 from its center. An excellent fit of this model to hundreds of data points is found for d g ≈ 0.26 nm, β ≈ 0.36, and δ ≈ 0.954. Accounting for the effect of polarization decreases d g considerably with respect to values inferred from earlier nanodrop measurements that ignored this effect. In addition, and in spite of ambiguities in the mobility calibration scale, the measured constant δ smaller than unity increases Millikan's drag enhancement factor from the accepted value ξ m ≈ 1.36 to the new value ξ ≈ ξ m / δ ≈ 1.42 ± 0.03.

  20. Creating Ideal Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Reviews ways that schools can provide effective indoor learning environments by paying attention to the following areas: daylighting, acoustics, space allocation, technology implementation, ergonomics, maintenance, indoor air quality, safety, restrooms, and roofing. (GR)

  1. Create a Logo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchen, Gail

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson that introduced students to graphic art as a career path. Explains that the students met a graphic artist and created a logo for a pretend client. Explains that the students researched logos. (CMK)

  2. 9. COPY OF PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT BOARD CREATED 19481949 SHOWING CONSTRUCTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. COPY OF PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT BOARD CREATED 1948-1949 SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF ARCH HANGAR. BOARD LOCATED AT AIR FORCE BASE CONVERSION AGENCY, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, MAINE. - Loring Air Force Base, Arch Hangar, East of Arizona Road near southern end of runway, Limestone, Aroostook County, ME

  3. Photocatalytic Solutions Create Self-Cleaning Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    A Stennis Space Center researcher investigating the effectiveness of photocatalytic materials for keeping the Center's buildings free of grime turned to a solution created by PURETi Inc. of New York City. Testing proved successful, and NASA and the company now share a Dual Use Technology partnership. PURETi's coatings keep surfaces clean and purify surrounding air, eliminating pollution, odors, and microbes.

  4. Effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra measured by proportional gas counter

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, T.; Tanaka, M.; Isozumi, S.; Isozumi, Y.; Tosaki, M.; Sugiyama, T.

    2015-03-15

    Air exerts a negative effect on radiation detection using a gas counter because oxygen contained in air has a high electron attachment coefficient and can trap electrons from electron-ion pairs created by ionization from incident radiation in counting gas. This reduces radiation counts. The present study examined the influence of air on energy and rise-time spectra measurements using a proportional gas counter. In addition, a decompression procedure method was proposed to reduce the influence of air and its effectiveness was investigated. For the decompression procedure, the counting gas inside the gas counter was decompressed below atmospheric pressure before radiation detection. For the spectrum measurement, methane as well as various methane and air mixtures were used as the counting gas to determine the effect of air on energy and rise-time spectra. Results showed that the decompression procedure was effective for reducing or eliminating the influence of air on spectra measurement using a proportional gas counter. (authors)

  5. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  6. Creating Pupils' Internet Magazine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bognar, Branko; Šimic, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an action research, which aimed to improve pupils' literary creativity and enable them to use computers connected to the internet. The study was conducted in a small district village school in Croatia. Creating a pupils' internet magazine appeared to be an excellent way for achieving the educational aims of almost all…

  7. Creating an Interactive Globe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Kurt D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a hands-on geography activity that is designed to teach longitude and latitude to fifth-grade students. Children create a scale model of the earth from a 300 gram weather balloon. This activity incorporates geography, mathematics, science, art, and homework. Provides information for obtaining materials. (KO)

  8. How Banks Create Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Lyndi

    This teaching module explains how the U.S. banking system uses excess reserves to create money in the form of new deposits for borrowers. The module is part of a computer-animated series of four-to-five-minute modules illustrating standard concepts in high school economics. Although the module is designed to accompany the video program, it may be…

  9. Creating Quality Media Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hortin, John A.; Bailey, Gerald D.

    1982-01-01

    Innovation, imagination, and student creativity are key ingredients in creating quality media materials for the small school. Student-produced media materials, slides without a camera, personalized slide programs and copy work, self-made task cards, self-made overhead transparencies, graphic materials, and utilization of the mass media are some of…

  10. Creating a Reference Toolbox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jane

    1997-01-01

    To help students understand that references are tools used to locate specific information, one librarian has her third-grade students create their own reference toolboxes as she introduces dictionaries, atlases, encyclopedias, and thesauri. Presents a lesson plan to introduce print and nonprint thesauri to third and fourth graders and includes a…

  11. Creating Photo Illustrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    2003-01-01

    Explains the uses of photo illustrations. Notes that the key to developing a successful photo illustration is collaborative planning. Outlines the following guidelines for photo illustrations: never set up a photograph to mimic reality; create only abstractions with photo illustrations; clearly label photo illustrations; and never play photo…

  12. Creating Happy Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weeks, Denise Jarrett

    2001-01-01

    Some teachers are building and sharing their wisdom and know-how through lesson study, in the process creating memorable learning experiences for students and for each other. This paper describes how lesson study can transform teaching and how schools are implementing lesson study. A sidebar presents questions to consider in lesson study. (SM)

  13. Creating dedicated bioenergy crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bioenergy is one of the current mechanisms of producing renewable energy to reduce our use of nonrenewable fossil fuels and to reduce carbon emissions into the atmosphere. Humans have been using bioenergy since we first learned to create and control fire - burning manure, peat, and wood to cook food...

  14. Create a Critter Collector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchey, Elizabeth K.; Nestlerode, Janet A.

    2001-01-01

    Presents methods for creating appropriate ways of collecting live specimens to use for firsthand observation in the classroom. Suggests ecological questions for students to address using these devices. This project is ideal for schools that have access to piers or bridges on a coastal body of water. (NB)

  15. Creating a Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazimirski, J.; And Others

    The second in a series of programmed books, "Creating a Market" is published by the International Labour Office as a manual for persons studying marketing. This manual was designed to meet the needs of the labor organization's technical cooperation programs and is primarily concerned with consumer goods industries. Using a fill-in-the-blanks and…

  16. Looking, Writing, Creating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzive, Bonnie

    1997-01-01

    Describes how a middle school language arts teacher makes analyzing and creating visual art a partner to reading and writing in her classroom. Describes a project on art and Vietnam which shows how background information can add to and influence interpretation. Describes a unit on Greek mythology and Greek vases which leads to a related visual…

  17. Creating an Interactive PDF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    There are many ways to begin a PDF document using Adobe Acrobat. The easiest and most popular way is to create the document in another application (such as Microsoft Word) and then use the Adobe Acrobat software to convert it to a PDF. In this article, the author describes how he used Acrobat's many tools in his project--an interactive…

  18. Creating a Classroom Makerspace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Luz

    2014-01-01

    What is a makerspace? Makerspaces are community-operated physical spaces where people (makers) create do-it-yourself projects together. These membership spaces serve as community labs where people learn together and collaborate on projects. Makerspaces often have tools and equipment like 3-D printers, laser cutters, and soldering irons.…

  19. Creating a Virtual Gymnasium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiorentino, Leah H.; Castelli, Darla

    2005-01-01

    Physical educators struggle with the challenges of assessing student performance, providing feedback about motor skills, and creating opportunities for all students to engage in game-play on a daily basis. The integration of technology in the gymnasium can address some of these challenges by improving teacher efficiency and increasing student…

  20. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  1. Creating Dialogue by Storytelling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Passila, Anne; Oikarinen, Tuija; Kallio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to develop practice and theory from Augusto Boal's dialogue technique (Image Theatre) for organisational use. The paper aims to examine how the members in an organisation create dialogue together by using a dramaturgical storytelling framework where the dialogue emerges from storytelling facilitated by…

  2. Create Your State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Kris; Melvin, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Students are often encouraged to work together with their classmates, sometimes with other classes, occasionally with kids at other schools, but rarely with kids across the country. In this article the authors describe the Create Your State project, a collaborative nationwide project inspired by the Texas Chair Project wherein the artist, Damien…

  3. Creating Quality Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    This booklet presents information on how total quality management can be applied to school systems to create educational improvement. Total quality management offers education a systemic approach and a new set of assessment tools. Chapter 1 provides a definition and historical overview of total quality management. Chapter 2 views the school…

  4. Monodisperse CoFe2O4 nanoparticles supported on Vulcan XC-72: High performance electrode materials for lithium-air and lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şener, Tansel; Kayhan, Emine; Sevim, Melike; Metin, Önder

    2015-08-01

    Addressed herein is the preparation and the electrode performance of monodisperse CoFe2O4 nanoparticles (NPs) supported on Vulcan XC-72 for the Lithium-air battery (LAB) and Lithium-ion battery (LIB). Monodisperse CoFe2O4 NPs were synthesized by the thermal decomposition of cobalt(II) acetylacetonate and iron(III) acetylacetonate in oleylamine and oleic acid in the presence of 1,2-tetradecanediol and benzyl ether. As-prepared CoFe2O4 NPs with a particle size of 11 nm were then supported on Vulcan XC-72 (Vulcan-CoFe2O4) at different theoretical loadings (20, 40 and 60 wt % CoFe2O4 NPs) by using the simple liquid phase self assembly method. CoFe2O4 NPs dispersed on Vulcan-CoFe2O4 composites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The AAS analyses indicated that the Vulcan-CoFe2O4 composites with different loadings were included 3.7, 8.1 and 16.4 wt % CoFe2O4 on the metal basis. The electrode performance of Vulcan-CoFe2O4 composites were evaluated as the anode active material for LIB and cathode active material for LABs by performing the galvanostatic charge-discharge tests. The highest discharge capacity for both LAB (7510 mAh g(Vulcan+CoFe2O4)-1; 13380 mAh gCoFe2O4-1 @ 0.1C) and LIB (863 mAh g(Vulcan+CoFe2O4)-1; 9330 mAh gCoFe2O4-1@ 0.1C) was investigated with 16.4 wt % CoFe2O4.

  5. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony; Saldana, Christopher J.; Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John; Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  6. Structure and Composition of Air-Plane Soots and Surrogates Analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy and Laser/Ions Desorption Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Ismael; Chazallon, Bertrand; Carpentier, Yvain; Irimiea, Cornelia; Focsa, Cristian; Ouf, François-Xavier; Salm, François; Delhaye, David; Gaffié, Daniel; Yon, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Aviation alters the composition of the atmosphere globally and can thus drive climate change and ozone depletion [1]. An aircraft exhaust plume contains species emitted by the engines, species formed in the plume from the emitted species and atmospheric species that become entrained into the plume. The majority of emitted species (gases and soot particles) are produced by the combustion of kerosene with ambient air in the combustion chamber of the engine. Emissions of soot particles by air-planes produce persistent contrails in the upper troposphere in ice-supersaturated air masses that contribute to cloudiness and impact the radiative properties of the atmosphere. These aerosol-cloud interactions represent one of the largest sources of uncertainty in global climate models [2]. Though the formation of atmospheric ice particles has been studied since many years [3], there are still numerous opened questions on nucleation properties of soot particles [4], as the ice nucleation experiments showed a large spread in results depending on the nucleation mode chosen and origin of the soot produced. Most likely one of the reasons behind these discrepancies resides in the different physico-chemical properties (composition, structure) of soot particles produced in different conditions, e.g. with respect to fuel or combustion techniques. In this work, we use Raman microscopy (266, 514 and 785 nm excitation) and ablation techniques (SIMS, Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry, and Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometry) to characterize soot particles produced from air-plane at different engine regimes simulating a landing and taking-off (LTO) cycle. First, the spectral parameters of the first-order Raman band of various soot samples, collected from three different sources in the frame of the MERMOSE project (http://mermose.onera.fr/): PowerJet SaM-146 turbofan (four engine regimes), CAST generator (propane fuel, four different global equivalence ratios), and Kerosene laboratory flame

  7. Creating Geoscience Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskop, J.; Buskop, W.

    2013-12-01

    The United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization recognizes 21 World Heritage in the United States, ten of which have astounding geological features: Wrangell St. Elias National Park, Olympic National Park, Mesa Verde National Park, Chaco Canyon, Glacier National Park, Carlsbad National Park, Mammoth Cave, Great Smokey Mountains National Park, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, and Everglades National Park. Created by a student frustrated with fellow students addicted to smart phones with an extreme lack of interest in the geosciences, one student visited each World Heritage site in the United States and created one e-book chapter per park. Each chapter was created with original photographs, and a geological discovery hunt to encourage teen involvement in preserving remarkable geological sites. Each chapter describes at least one way young adults can get involved with the geosciences, such a cave geology, glaciology, hydrology, and volcanology. The e-book describes one park per chapter, each chapter providing a geological discovery hunt, information on how to get involved with conservation of the parks, geological maps of the parks, parallels between archaeological and geological sites, and how to talk to a ranger. The young author is approaching UNESCO to publish the work as a free e-book to encourage involvement in UNESCO sites and to prove that the geosciences are fun.

  8. Creating new growth platforms.

    PubMed

    Laurie, Donald L; Doz, Yves L; Sheer, Claude P

    2006-05-01

    Sooner or later, most companies can't attain the growth rates expected by their boards and CEOs and demanded by investors. To some extent, such businesses are victims of their own successes. Many were able to sustain high growth rates for a long time because they were in high-growth industries. But once those industries slowed down, the businesses could no longer deliver the performance that investors had come to take for granted. Often, companies have resorted to acquisition, though this strategy has a discouraging track record. Over time, 65% of acquisitions destroy more value than they create. So where does real growth come from? For the past 12 years, the authors have been researching and advising companies on this issue. With the support of researchers at Harvard Business School and Insead, they instituted a project titled "The CEO Agenda and Growth". They identified and approached 24 companies that had achieved significant organic growth and interviewed their CEOs, chief strategists, heads of R&D, CFOs, and top-line managers. They asked, "Where does your growth come from?" and found a consistent pattern in the answers. All the businesses grew by creating new growth platforms (NGPs) on which they could build families of products and services and extend their capabilities into multiple new domains. Identifying NGP opportunities calls for executives to challenge conventional wisdom. In all the companies studied, top management believed that NGP innovation differed significantly from traditional product or service innovation. They had independent, senior-level units with a standing responsibility to create NGPs, and their CEOs spent as much as 50% of their time working with these units. The payoff has been spectacular and lasting. For example, from 1985 to 2004, the medical devices company Medtronic grew revenues at 18% per year, earnings at 20%, and market capitalization at 30%. PMID:16649700

  9. Creating healthy camp experiences.

    PubMed

    Walton, Edward A; Tothy, Alison S

    2011-04-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has created recommendations for health appraisal and preparation of young people before participation in day or resident camps and to guide health and safety practices for children at camp. These recommendations are intended for parents, primary health care providers, and camp administration and health center staff. Although camps have diverse environments, there are general guidelines that apply to all situations and specific recommendations that are appropriate under special conditions. This policy statement has been reviewed and is supported by the American Camp Association. PMID:21444589

  10. Portable oven air circulator

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Jorgen A.; Nygren, Donald W.

    1983-01-01

    A portable air circulating apparatus for use in cooking ovens which is used to create air currents in the oven which transfer heat to cooking foodstuffs to promote more rapid and more uniform cooking or baking, the apparatus including a motor, fan blade and housing of metallic materials selected from a class of heat resistant materials.

  11. Protective air lock

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Herbert W.

    1976-03-30

    A device suitable for preventing escape and subsequent circulation of toxic gases comprising an enclosure which is sealed by a surrounding air lock, automatic means for partially evacuating said enclosure and said air lock and for ventilating said enclosure and means for disconnecting said enclosure ventilating means, whereby a relatively undisturbed atmosphere is created in said enclosure.

  12. Creating corporate advantage.

    PubMed

    Collis, D J; Montgomery, C A

    1998-01-01

    What differentiates truly great corporate strategies from the merely adequate? How can executives at the corporate level create tangible advantage for their businesses that makes the whole more than the sum of the parts? This article presents a comprehensive framework for value creation in the multibusiness company. It addresses the most fundamental questions of corporate strategy: What businesses should a company be in? How should it coordinate activities across businesses? What role should the corporate office play? How should the corporation measure and control performance? Through detailed case studies of Tyco International, Sharp, the Newell Company, and Saatchi and Saatchi, the authors demonstrate that the answers to all those questions are driven largely by the nature of a company's special resources--its assets, skills, and capabilities. These range along a continuum from the highly specialized at one end to the very general at the other. A corporation's location on the continuum constrains the set of businesses it should compete in and limits its choices about the design of its organization. Applying the framework, the authors point out the common mistakes that result from misaligned corporate strategies. Companies mistakenly enter businesses based on similarities in products rather than the resources that contribute to competitive advantage in each business. Instead of tailoring organizational structures and systems to the needs of a particular strategy, they create plain-vanilla corporate offices and infrastructures. The company examples demonstrate that one size does not fit all. One can find great corporate strategies all along the continuum. PMID:10179655

  13. Creating sustainable performance.

    PubMed

    Spreitzer, Gretchen; Porath, Christine

    2012-01-01

    What makes for sustainable individual and organizational performance? Employees who are thriving-not just satisfied and productive but also engaged in creating the future. The authors found that people who fit this description demonstrated 16% better overall performance, 125% less burnout, 32% more commitment to the organization, and 46% more job satisfaction than their peers. Thriving has two components: vitality, or the sense of being alive and excited, and learning, or the growth that comes from gaining knowledge and skills. Some people naturally build vitality and learning into their jobs, but most employees are influenced by their environment. Four mechanisms, none of which requires heroic effort or major resources, create the conditions for thriving: providing decision-making discretion, sharing information about the organization and its strategy, minimizing incivility, and offering performance feedback. Organizations such as Alaska Airlines, Zingerman's, Quicken Loans, and Caiman Consulting have found that helping people grow and remain energized at work is valiant on its own merits-but it can also boost performance in a sustainable way. PMID:22299508

  14. Entanglement Created by Dissipation

    SciTech Connect

    Alharbi, Abdullah F.; Ficek, Zbigniew

    2011-10-27

    A technique for entangling closely separated atoms by the process of dissipative spontaneous emission is presented. The system considered is composed of two non-identical two-level atoms separated at the quarter wavelength of a driven standing wave laser field. At this atomic distance, only one of the atoms can be addressed by the laser field. In addition, we arrange the atomic dipole moments to be oriented relative to the inter-atomic axis such that the dipole-dipole interaction between the atoms is zero at this specific distance. It is shown that an entanglement can be created between the atoms on demand by tuning the Rabi frequency of the driving field to the difference between the atomic transition frequencies. The amount of the entanglement created depends on the ratio between the damping rates of the atoms, but is independent of the frequency difference between the atoms. We also find that the transient buildup of an entanglement between the atoms may differ dramatically for different initial atomic conditions.

  15. Creating innovative departments.

    PubMed

    von Segesser, Ludwig K

    2004-12-01

    'Creating an innovative department' as an objective implies further improvements in organization, function, and progression of a surgical unit active in patient care, research, and education. It is of prime importance to stress here the mutual benefits of patient care, research (the basis for future patient care) and education (the channel for training health care professionals in future patient care). Neither innovation (from latin innovare: to renew, revive) nor creation (from latin creare: to make, produce) is something that will fall from heaven without effort any time soon. Hence, a pro-active attitude towards progress is indicated. This requires searching for new ideas, allocation of resources, finding allies, getting focussed, and being persistent. One word says it all: WORK! PMID:15776856

  16. Creating With Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A subsidiary of SI Diamond Technology, Inc., Applied Nanotech, of Austin, Texas, is creating a buzz among various technology firms and venture capital groups interested in the company s progressive research on carbon-related field emission devices, including carbon nanotubes, filaments of pure carbon less than one ten-thousandth the width of human hair. Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have gained considerable attention due to their unique physical properties. For example, a single perfect carbon nanotube can range from 10 to 100 times stronger than steel, per unit weight. Recent studies also indicate that the nanotubes may be the best heat-conducting material in existence. These properties, combined with the ease of growing thin films or nanotubes by a variety of deposition techniques, make the carbon-based material one of the most desirable for cold field emission cathodes.

  17. Creating the living brand.

    PubMed

    Bendapudi, Neeli; Bendapudi, Venkat

    2005-05-01

    It's easy to conclude from the literature and the lore that top-notch customer service is the province of a few luxury companies and that any retailer outside that rarefied atmosphere is condemned to offer mediocre service at best. But even companies that position themselves for the mass market can provide outstanding customer-employee interactions and profit from them, if they train employees to reflect the brand's core values. The authors studied the convenience store industry in depth and focused on two that have developed a devoted following: QuikTrip (QT) and Wawa. Turnover rates at QT and Wawa are 14% and 22% respectively, much lower than the typical rate in retail. The authors found six principles that both firms embrace to create a strong culture of customer service. Know what you're looking for: A focus on candidates' intrinsic traits allows the companies to hire people who will naturally bring the right qualities to the job. Make the most of talent: In mass-market retail, talent is generally viewed as a commodity, but that outlook becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. Create pride in the brand: Service quality depends directly on employees' attachment to the brand. Build community: Wawa and QT have made concerted efforts to build customer loyalty through a sense of community. Share the business context: Employees need a clear understanding of how their company operates and how it defines success. Satisfy the soul: To win an employee's passionate engagement, a company must meet his or her needs for security, esteem, and justice. PMID:15929408

  18. Creating Griffith Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Griffith Observatory has been the iconic symbol of the sky for southern California since it began its public mission on May 15, 1935. While the Observatory is widely known as being the gift of Col. Griffith J. Griffith (1850-1919), the story of how Griffith’s gift became reality involves many of the people better known for other contributions that made Los Angeles area an important center of astrophysics in the 20th century. Griffith began drawing up his plans for an observatory and science museum for the people of Los Angeles after looking at Saturn through the newly completed 60-inch reflector on Mt. Wilson. He realized the social impact that viewing the heavens could have if made freely available, and discussing the idea of a public observatory with Mt. Wilson Observatory’s founder, George Ellery Hale, and Director, Walter Adams. This resulted, in 1916, in a will specifying many of the features of Griffith Observatory, and establishing a committee managed trust fund to build it. Astronomy popularizer Mars Baumgardt convinced the committee at the Zeiss Planetarium projector would be appropriate for Griffith’s project after the planetarium was introduced in Germany in 1923. In 1930, the trust committee judged funds to be sufficient to start work on creating Griffith Observatory, and letters from the Committee requesting help in realizing the project were sent to Hale, Adams, Robert Millikan, and other area experts then engaged in creating the 200-inch telescope eventually destined for Palomar Mountain. A Scientific Advisory Committee, headed by Millikan, recommended that Caltech Physicist Edward Kurth be put in charge of building and exhibit design. Kurth, in turn, sought help from artist Russell Porter. The architecture firm of John C. Austin and Fredrick Ashley was selected to design the project, and they adopted the designs of Porter and Kurth. Philip Fox of the Adler Planetarium was enlisted to manage the completion of the Observatory and become its

  19. PULSED ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.E.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1958-06-17

    An ion source is described for producing very short high density pulses of ions without bcam scattering. The ions are created by an oscillating electron discharge within a magnetic field. After the ions are drawn from the ionization chamber by an accelerating electrode the ion beam is under the influence of the magnetic field for separation of the ions according to mass and, at the same time, passes between two neutralizing plntes maintained nt equal negative potentials. As the plates are formed of a material having a high ratio of secondary electrons to impinging ions, the ion bombardment of the plntes emits electrons which neutralize the frirge space-charge of the beam and tend to prevent widening of the beam cross section due to the mutual repulsion of the ions.

  20. Creating new market space.

    PubMed

    Kim, W C; Mauborgne, R

    1999-01-01

    Most companies focus on matching and beating their rivals. As a result, their strategies tend to take on similar dimensions. What ensues is head-to-head competition based largely on incremental improvements in cost, quality, or both. The authors have studied how innovative companies break free from the competitive pack by staking out fundamentally new market space--that is, by creating products or services for which there are no direct competitors. This path to value innovation requires a different competitive mind-set and a systematic way of looking for opportunities. Instead of looking within the conventional boundaries that define how an industry competes, managers can look methodically across them. By so doing, they can find unoccupied territory that represents real value innovation. Rather than looking at competitors within their own industry, for example, managers can ask why customers make the trade-off between substitute products or services. Home Depot, for example, looked across the substitutes serving home improvement needs. Intuit looked across the substitutes available to individuals managing their personal finances. In both cases, powerful insights were derived from looking at familiar data from a new perspective. Similar insights can be gleaned by looking across strategic groups within an industry; across buyer groups; across complementary product and service offerings; across the functional-emotional orientation of an industry; and even across time. To help readers explore new market space systematically, the authors developed a tool, the value curve, that can be used to represent visually a range of value propositions. PMID:10345394

  1. Creating alternatives in science

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Traditional scientist training at the PhD level does not prepare students to be competitive in biotechnology or other non-academic science careers. Some universities have developed biotechnology-relevant doctoral programmes, but most have not. Forming a life science career club makes a statement to university administrators that it is time to rework the curriculum to include biotechnology-relevant training. A career club can supplement traditional PhD training by introducing students to available career choices, help them develop a personal network and teach the business skills that they will need to be competitive in science outside of academia. This paper is an instructional guide designed to help students create a science career club at their own university. These suggestions are based on the experience gained in establishing such a club for the Graduate School at the University of Colorado Denver. We describe the activities that can be offered, the job descriptions for the offices required and potential challenges. With determination, a creative spirit, and the guidance of this paper, students should be able to greatly increase awareness of science career options, and begin building the skills necessary to become competitive in non-academic science. PMID:20161069

  2. Creating Sample Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Spears, Joseph H.; Seebode, Linda C.

    1999-03-24

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to be analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.

  3. Creating Sample Plans

    1999-03-24

    The program has been designed to increase the accuracy and reduce the preparation time for completing sampling plans. It consists of our files 1. Analyte/Combination (AnalCombo) A list of analytes and combinations of analytes that can be requested of the onsite and offsite labs. Whenever a specific combination of analytes or suite names appear on the same line as the code number, this indicates that one sample can be placed in one bottle to bemore » analyzed for these paremeters. A code number is assigned for each analyte and combination of analytes. 2. Sampling Plans Database (SPDb) A database that contains all of the analytes and combinations of analytes along with the basic information required for preparing a sample plan. That basic information includes the following fields; matrix, hold time, preservation, sample volume, container size, if the bottle caps are taped, acceptable choices. 3. Sampling plans create (SPcreate) a file that will lookup information from the Sampling Plans Database and the Job Log File (JLF98) A major database used by Sample Managemnet Services for recording more than 100 fields of information.« less

  4. Self Creating Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, Bruce

    2001-04-01

    Cosmology has deduced that our existence began 15 billion years ago but that does not constitute a true story. When compared against infinity, the true question one must as is, ‘why did creation begin now (a mere 15 billion give or take years ago) and not at some infinite point before? What could keep the one common original source static for an infinity, and then spring forth into existence?’ Also, accelerators are actually creating atmospheres much like that within quasars, black holes and stars. This destructive/creative environment is not that of original creation, it is of that which occurs in a later stage of cosmic evolution. Knowing that it is only a matter of movement or change, understanding what is moving is the key. Regardless of how much power is used to alter the character of a particle’s matter, it does not make its essence go away, nor does it make the understanding of original essence clearer. To find the true answer of what occurred, one must look back in time and think carefully over the process of elimination to find the original creation of matter, albeit different than that of the later processes. Matter and the physical laws formed themselves in an absolute infinity of blackness prior to light and no Big Bang scenario was necessary.

  5. The transition from water-breathing to air-breathing is associated with a shift in ion uptake from gills to gut: a study of two closely related erythrinid teleosts, Hoplerythrinus unitaeniatus and Hoplias malabaricus.

    PubMed

    Wood, Chris M; Pelster, Bernd; Giacomin, Marina; Sadauskas-Henrique, Helen; Almeida-Val, Vera Maria F; Val, Adalberto Luis

    2016-05-01

    The evolutionary transition from water-breathing to air-breathing involved not only a change in function of the organs of respiratory gas exchange and N-waste excretion, but also in the organs of ion uptake from the environment. A combination of in vivo and in vitro techniques was used to look at the relative importance of the gills versus the gut in Na(+), Cl(-), and K(+) balance in two closely related erythrinid species: a facultative air-breather, the jeju (Hoplerythrinus unitaeniatus) and an obligate water-breather, the traira (Hoplias malabaricus). The jeju has a well-vascularized physostomous swimbladder, while that in the traira is poorly vascularized, but the gills are much larger. Both species are native to the Amazon and are common in the ion-poor, acidic blackwaters of the Rio Negro. Under fasting conditions, the traira was able to maintain positive net Na(+) and Cl(-) balance in this water, and only slightly negative net K(+) balance. However, the jeju was in negative net balance for all three ions and had lower plasma Na(+) and Cl(-) concentrations, despite exhibiting higher branchial Na(+),K(+)ATPase and v-type H(+)ATPase activities. In the intestine, activities of these same enzymes were also higher in the jeju, and in vitro measurements of net area-specific rates of Na(+), Cl(-), and K(+) absorption, as well as the overall intestinal absorption capacities for these three ions, were far greater than in the traira. When acutely exposed to disturbances in water O2 levels (severe hypoxia ~15 % or hyperoxia ~420 % saturation), gill ionoregulation was greatly perturbed in the traira but less affected in the jeju, which could "escape" the stressor by voluntarily air-breathing. We suggest that a shift of ionoregulatory capacity from the gills to the gut may have occurred in the evolutionary transition to air-breathing in jeju, and in consequence branchial ionoregulation, while less powerful, is also less impacted by variations in water O2 levels. PMID

  6. Rechargeable Lithium-Air Batteries: Development of Ultra High Specific Energy Rechargeable Lithium-Air Batteries Based on Protected Lithium Metal Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-01

    BEEST Project: PolyPlus is developing the world’s first commercially available rechargeable lithium-air (Li-Air) battery. Li-Air batteries are better than the Li-Ion batteries used in most EVs today because they breathe in air from the atmosphere for use as an active material in the battery, which greatly decreases its weight. Li-Air batteries also store nearly 700% as much energy as traditional Li-Ion batteries. A lighter battery would improve the range of EVs dramatically. Polyplus is on track to making a critical breakthrough: the first manufacturable protective membrane between its lithium–based negative electrode and the reaction chamber where it reacts with oxygen from the air. This gives the battery the unique ability to recharge by moving lithium in and out of the battery’s reaction chamber for storage until the battery needs to discharge once again. Until now, engineers had been unable to create the complex packaging and air-breathing components required to turn Li-Air batteries into rechargeable systems.

  7. A general method for the calculation of absolute trace gas concentrations in air and breath from selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanel, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Smith, David

    2006-03-01

    A complete description is presented of a numerical method that allows the calculation, in real time, of absolute concentrations of trace gases, including volatile organic compounds and water vapour, from selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, data. No assumptions are made concerning the SIFT-MS instrument size or its configuration and thus the calculation can be applied to the currently available, relatively large instruments and the anticipated new generation of smaller SIFT-MS instruments. This numerical method clearly distinguishes those parameters that are obviously specific to a particular instrument, including flow tube geometry, degree of mass discrimination in the analytical mass spectrometer and flow tube reaction time, from general fundamental processes, in particular the differential diffusive loss of ions along the flow tube that is dependent on the properties of those ions involved in the determination of the concentrations of particular trace gases. The essential reaction and transport kinetics are outlined, which describe the formation and loss of the product ions formed in the chemical ionisation of the trace gases by the precursor ions. A generalised calculation of the required ionic diffusion coefficients is introduced with options either for their accurate determination from the molecular geometry of ions or for less accurate but simpler estimates obtained using just the ionic mass. Based on the above ideas, a straightforward calculation sequence is shown to determine trace gas concentrations by SIFT-MS, and its utility demonstrated by an example of the analysis of acetone in exhaled breath.

  8. Ion specific effects: decoupling ion-ion and ion-water interactions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinsuk; Kang, Tae Hui; Kim, Mahn Won; Han, Songi

    2015-01-01

    Ion-specific effects in aqueous solution, known as the Hofmeister effect is prevalent in diverse systems ranging from pure ionic to complex protein solutions. The objective of this paper is to explicitly demonstrate how complex ion-ion and ion-water interactions manifest themselves in the Hofmeister effects, based on a series of recent experimental observation. These effects are not considered in the classical description of ion effects, such as the Deryaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory that, likely for that reason, fail to describe the origin of the phenomenological Hofmeister effect. However, given that models considering the basic forces of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions can offer rationalization for the core experimental observations, a universal interaction model stands a chance to be developed. In this perspective, we separately derive the contribution from ion-ion electrostatic interaction and ion-water interaction from second harmonic generation (SHG) data at the air-ion solution interface, which yields an estimate of ion-water interactions in solution. Hofmeister ion effects observed on biological solutes in solution should be similarly influenced by contributions from ion-ion and ion-water interactions, where the same ion-water interaction parameters derived from SHG data at the air-ion solution interface could be applicable. A key experimental data set available from solution systems to probe ion-water interaction is the modulation of water diffusion dynamics near ions in bulk ion solution, as well as near biological liposome surfaces. It is obtained from Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP), a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry technique. The surface water diffusivity is influenced by the contribution from ion-water interactions, both from localized surface charges and adsorbed ions, although the relative contribution of the former is larger on liposome surfaces. In this perspective, ion-water interaction

  9. Ion photon emission microscope

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.

    2003-04-22

    An ion beam analysis system that creates microscopic multidimensional image maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the ion-induced photons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted photons are collected in the lens system of a conventional optical microscope, and projected on the image plane of a high resolution single photon position sensitive detector. Position signals from this photon detector are then correlated in time with electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these photons initially.

  10. Creating a Toilet Training Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share Creating a Toilet Training Plan Page Content Article Body These are the tools ... will need to create your own toilet-training plan and implement it at the best time for ...

  11. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION CREATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  12. Creating and probing coherent atomic states

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhold, C.O.; Burgdoerfer, J. |; Frey, M.T.; Dunning, F.B.

    1997-06-01

    The authors present a brief review of recent experimental and theoretical time resolved studies of the evolution of atomic wavepackets. In particular, wavepackets comprising a superposition of very-high-lying Rydberg states which are created either using a short half-cycle pulse (HCP) or by rapid application of a DC field. The properties of the wavepackets are probed using a second HCP that is applied following a variable time delay and ionizes a fraction of the atoms, much like a passing-by ion in atomic collisions.

  13. Monitoring Air Pollution In and Around the Premises of Industrial Parks Using Two Types of Electronic Nose and Gas Chromatography-Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jen Yu; Ling, Yong Chien, Sr.

    2004-03-31

    Two types of electronic nose and GC-MS were used to monitor air pollution in the premises of seven industrial parks. Real-time analysis of air at the sites was performed using portable electronic noses. Air samples were analyzed from the up and down stream direction along the wind flow to investigate the effect or distribution of the pollutants on the surrounding environment. The advantage of multisensors in spatially resolved sensing for direct multicomponent analysis was explored to minimize tedious sample preparation procedure. Electronic nose could give characteristic odor fingerprints, which were correlated with the pollutants analyzed using GC-MS providing detailed diagnostic information such as the presence of hydrocarbons, halocarbons, phenols, nitrogenous benzenes, sulfur compounds, lipid-derived compounds, polysiloxanes, etc. Subsequent principal component analysis helped in identifying the source of pollutants. The applicability of the electronic nose was demonstrated confirming it to be a simple and rapid screening method for identifying the pollutant source.

  14. Hepa room air purifier

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, G.B.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes a portable air purification apparatus comprising a housing including a base portion and cover means, the base portion including an air deflection means and a plate means mounted in spaced relationship to the air deflection means so as to create a substantially continuous air exhaust opening therebetween. A centrifugal fan means is disposed between the plate means and the air deflection means and is mounted so as to direct air radially outwardly therefrom through the air exhaust opening, at least one opening through the plate means to permit air flow therethrough to the centrifugal fan means. The motor means carried by the base portion and extends upwardly with respect to the opening in the plate means, the motor means having drive shaft means for driving the centrifugal fan means. An air filter means is mounted between the base portion and the cover means so that air is drawn therethrough toward the centrifugal fan means, and a means for secures the cover means relative to the base means to thereby retain the air filter means therebetween.

  15. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  16. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  17. Released air during vapor and air cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonská, Jana; Kozubková, Milada

    2016-06-01

    Cavitation today is a very important problem that is solved by means of experimental and mathematical methods. The article deals with the generation of cavitation in convergent divergent nozzle of rectangular cross section. Measurement of pressure, flow rate, temperature, amount of dissolved air in the liquid and visualization of cavitation area using high-speed camera was performed for different flow rates. The measurement results were generalized by dimensionless analysis, which allows easy detection of cavitation in the nozzle. For numerical simulation the multiphase mathematical model of cavitation consisting of water and vapor was created. During verification the disagreement with the measurements for higher flow rates was proved, therefore the model was extended to multiphase mathematical model (water, vapor and air), due to release of dissolved air. For the mathematical modeling the multiphase turbulence RNG k-ɛ model for low Reynolds number flow with vapor and air cavitation was used. Subsequently the sizes of the cavitation area were verified. In article the inlet pressure and loss coefficient depending on the amount of air added to the mathematical model are evaluated. On the basis of the approach it may be create a methodology to estimate the amount of released air added at the inlet to the modeled area.

  18. Comparing toxic air pollutant programs

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, S.C.

    1997-05-01

    This article compares state and federal toxic air pollutant programs. The Clean Air Act Ammendments created a program for the control of Hazardous Air Pollutants based on the establishment of control technology standards. State toxic programs can be classified into two categories: control technology-based and ambient concentration-based. Many states have opened to implement the MACT standards while enforcing their own state air toxics programs. Specific topics discussed include the following: the Federal air toxics program; existing state regulations; New Jersey Air Toxic Program; New York Toxics program.

  19. Negative Oxygen Ions Production by Superamphiphobic and Antibacterial TiO2/Cu2O Composite Film Anchored on Wooden Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Likun; Qiu, Zhe; Gan, Wentao; Zhan, Xianxu; Li, Jian; Qiang, Tiangang

    2016-05-01

    According to statistics, early in the 20th century, the proportion of positive and negative air ions on the earth is 1 : 1.2. However, after more than one century, the equilibrium state of the proportion had an obvious change, which the proportion of positive and negative air ions became 1.2 : 1, leading to a surrounding of positive air ions in human living environment. Therefore, it is urgent to adopt effective methods to improve the proportion of negative oxygen ions, which are known as “air vitamin”. In this study, negative oxygen ions production by the TiO2/Cu2O-treated wood under UV irradiation was first reported. Anatase TiO2 particles with Cu2O particles were doped on wooden substrates through a two-step method and further modification is employed to create remarkable superamphiphobic surface. The effect of Cu2O particles dopant on the negative oxygen ions production of the TiO2-treated wood was investigated. The results showed that the production of negative oxygen ions was drastically improved by doping with Cu2O particles under UV irradiation. The wood modified with TiO2/Cu2O composite film after hydrophobization is imparted with superamphiphobicity, antibacterial actions against Escherichia coli, and negative oxygen ions production under UV irradiation.

  20. Negative Oxygen Ions Production by Superamphiphobic and Antibacterial TiO2/Cu2O Composite Film Anchored on Wooden Substrates.

    PubMed

    Gao, Likun; Qiu, Zhe; Gan, Wentao; Zhan, Xianxu; Li, Jian; Qiang, Tiangang

    2016-01-01

    According to statistics, early in the 20th century, the proportion of positive and negative air ions on the earth is 1 : 1.2. However, after more than one century, the equilibrium state of the proportion had an obvious change, which the proportion of positive and negative air ions became 1.2 : 1, leading to a surrounding of positive air ions in human living environment. Therefore, it is urgent to adopt effective methods to improve the proportion of negative oxygen ions, which are known as "air vitamin". In this study, negative oxygen ions production by the TiO2/Cu2O-treated wood under UV irradiation was first reported. Anatase TiO2 particles with Cu2O particles were doped on wooden substrates through a two-step method and further modification is employed to create remarkable superamphiphobic surface. The effect of Cu2O particles dopant on the negative oxygen ions production of the TiO2-treated wood was investigated. The results showed that the production of negative oxygen ions was drastically improved by doping with Cu2O particles under UV irradiation. The wood modified with TiO2/Cu2O composite film after hydrophobization is imparted with superamphiphobicity, antibacterial actions against Escherichia coli, and negative oxygen ions production under UV irradiation. PMID:27229763

  1. Negative Oxygen Ions Production by Superamphiphobic and Antibacterial TiO2/Cu2O Composite Film Anchored on Wooden Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Likun; Qiu, Zhe; Gan, Wentao; Zhan, Xianxu; Li, Jian; Qiang, Tiangang

    2016-01-01

    According to statistics, early in the 20th century, the proportion of positive and negative air ions on the earth is 1 : 1.2. However, after more than one century, the equilibrium state of the proportion had an obvious change, which the proportion of positive and negative air ions became 1.2 : 1, leading to a surrounding of positive air ions in human living environment. Therefore, it is urgent to adopt effective methods to improve the proportion of negative oxygen ions, which are known as “air vitamin”. In this study, negative oxygen ions production by the TiO2/Cu2O-treated wood under UV irradiation was first reported. Anatase TiO2 particles with Cu2O particles were doped on wooden substrates through a two-step method and further modification is employed to create remarkable superamphiphobic surface. The effect of Cu2O particles dopant on the negative oxygen ions production of the TiO2-treated wood was investigated. The results showed that the production of negative oxygen ions was drastically improved by doping with Cu2O particles under UV irradiation. The wood modified with TiO2/Cu2O composite film after hydrophobization is imparted with superamphiphobicity, antibacterial actions against Escherichia coli, and negative oxygen ions production under UV irradiation. PMID:27229763

  2. Prototype Sodium-Ion Batteries Using an Air-Stable and Co/Ni-Free O3-Layered Metal Oxide Cathode.

    PubMed

    Mu, Linqin; Xu, Shuyin; Li, Yunming; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Chen, Liquan; Huang, Xuejie

    2015-11-18

    A prototype rechargeable sodium-ion battery using an O3-Na0.90[Cu0.22 Fe0.30 Mn0.48]O2 cathode and a hard carbon anode is demonstrated to show an energy density of 210 W h kg(-1) , a round-trip energy efficiency of 90%, a high rate capability (up to 6C rate), and excellent cycling stability. PMID:26436288

  3. Ion trap device

    DOEpatents

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-01-26

    An ion trap device is disclosed. The device includes a series of electrodes that define an ion flow path. A radio frequency (RF) field is applied to the series of electrodes such that each electrode is phase shifted approximately 180 degrees from an adjacent electrode. A DC voltage is superimposed with the RF field to create a DC gradient to drive ions in the direction of the gradient. A second RF field or DC voltage is applied to selectively trap and release the ions from the device. Further, the device may be gridless and utilized at high pressure.

  4. The Leadership Assignment: Creating Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Raymond L.

    This book provides change-motivated leaders with an understanding of the change process and the tools to drive change. Eight change principles guide change agents in creating and sustaining change: prepare to lead change; knowledge is power; create empowering mental models; overcome resistance to change; lead change; accelerate the change process;…

  5. Whiskers, cones and pyramids created in sputtering by ion bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    A thorough study of the role which foreign atoms play in cone formation during sputtering of metals revealed many experimental facts. Two types of cone formation were distinquished, deposit cones and seed cones. Twenty-six combinations of metals for seed cone formation were tested. The sputtering yield variations with composition for combinations which form seed cones were measured. It was demonstrated that whisker growth becomes a common occurrence when low melting point material is sputter deposited on a hot nonsputtered high melting point electrode.

  6. Using Ambient Ion Beams to Write Nanostructured Patterns for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Anyin; Baird, Zane; Bag, Soumabha; Sarkar, Depanjan; Prabhath, Anupama; Pradeep, Thalappil; Cooks, Robert G.

    2014-11-10

    Electrolytic spray deposition was used to pattern surfaces with 2D metallic nanostructures. Spots that contain silver nanoparticles (AgNP) were created by landing solvated silver ions at desired locations using electrically floated masks to focus the metal ions to an area as little as 20 mm in diameter. The AgNPs formed are unprotected and their aggregates can be used for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The morphology and SERS activity of the NP structures were controlled by the surface coverage of landed silver ions. The NP structures created could be used as substrates onto which SERS samples were deposited or prepared directly on top of predeposited samples of interest. The evenly distributed hot spots in the micron-sized aggregates had an average SERS enhancement factor of 108. The surfaces showed SERS activity when using lasers of different wavelengths (532, 633, and 785 nm) and were stable in air.

  7. Transfer of small negative atmospheric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Toshiro; Katayama, Takashi

    2003-12-01

    The transfer of small negative atmospheric ions in air and from air to water has been studied. The mean lifetime of ions was experimentally obtained from the concentration distribution of ions in a round free jet. It was about 30 s in relative humidity of 63%-75%, indicating that ions generated at one source in a room could not be homogeneously spread throughout the room by conventional convective flow of air. Rapid dissipation of the ions occurs during diffusion in stationary air. However, most of the ions that enter the mouth of a human body reach the lungs, because of the high convective velocity of breathing. The irradiation of ions onto water decreased the electric conductivity of the water. This finding suggests that the transfer of ions into water in a human body breaks the network of H2O molecules and enhances the formation of hydrogen bonds between a biopolymer and water.

  8. Photonic crystal waveguide created by selective infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas Bedoya, A.; Domachuk, P.; Grillet, C.; Monat, C.; Mägi, E. C.; Li, E.; Eggleton, B. J.

    2012-06-01

    The marriage of photonics and microfluidics ("optofluidics") uses the inherent mobility of fluids to reversibly tune photonic structures beyond traditional fabrication methods by infiltrating voids in said structures. Photonic crystals (PhCs) strongly control light on the wavelength scale and are well suited to optofluidic tuning because their periodic airhole microstructure is a natural candidate for housing liquids. The infiltration of a single row of holes in the PhC matrix modifies the effective refractive index allowing optical modes to be guided by the PhC bandgap. In this work we present the first experimental demonstration of a reconfigurable single mode W1 photonic crystal defect waveguide created by selective liquid infiltration. We modified a hexagonal silicon planar photonic crystal membrane by selectively filling a single row of air holes with ~300nm resolution, using high refractive index ionic liquid. The modification creates optical confinement in the infiltrated region and allows propagation of a single optical waveguide mode. We describe the challenges arising from the infiltration process and the liquid/solid surface interaction in the photonic crystal. We include a detailed comparison between analytic and numerical modeling and experimental results, and introduce a new approach to create an offset photonic crystal cavity by varying the nature of the selective infiltration process.

  9. Hand-held gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry for on-site analysis of complex organic mixtures in air or vapors over waste sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, S.C. ); Eiceman, G.A. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    The strengths of Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) are low detection limits, a wide range of application, and simplicity of design and operation. The gentle ionization processes used in IMS impart a measure of selectivity to its response. However, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization with compounds of comparable proton affinities leads to mobility spectra for which interpretive and predictive models do not exist. An alternative approach for the analysis of complex mixtures with IMS is the use of a separation device such as a gas chromatograph (GC) as an inlet. Results suggest that an IMS cell temperature of ca. 150{degrees} to 175{degrees}C provided mobility spectra with suitable spectral detail without the complications of ion-molecule clusters or fragmentation. Significant fluctuation in peak heights were observed over a 30 day test period. Neural network pattern identification techniques were applied to data obtained at room temperature and at 150{degrees}. Results showed that spectral variables within compound classes as insufficient to distinguish related compounds when mobility data was obtained using the commercial room temperature IMS cell. Similar but less severe difficulty was encountered using the 150{degrees} data. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Air Abrasion

    MedlinePlus

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  11. Fuel-air control device

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, J.

    1981-12-15

    The invention concerns a device for controlling the vehicles fuel-air mixture by regulating the air in the ventilation passage leading to the engine air intake from the crankcase. In a vehicle provided with a PCV valve, the device is located in the ventilation passage leading from the crankcase to the engine air intake and the device is downstream of the PCV valve. The device admits outside air to the ventilation passage to lean the gas mixture when the engine creates a vacuum less than 8 psi in the ventilation passage.

  12. Creating and Exploring Simple Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Miles J.

    2007-01-01

    Students manipulate data algebraically, and statistically to create models applied to a falling ball. They also borrow tools from arithmetic progressions to examine the relationship between the velocity and the distance the ball falls. (Contains 2 tables and 5 figures.)

  13. Lithium-ion battery electrode prepared by confining carbon nanotubes/V2O5 nanoribbons suspension in model air-liquid foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carn, Florent; Morcrette, Mathieu; Desport, Barthélemy; Backov, Rénal

    2013-03-01

    Well-defined macroporous V2O5-CNTs hybrid solid foams are synthesized in the form of monolith by a controlled bubbling process. For the first time, the solid phase results from the co-assembly of two different anisotropic nano-building blocks in the continuous phase of model foams whose bubble size and liquid fraction could be tuned. Their electrochemical properties were examined in view of their application as cathode for Li-ion battery. This first investigation revealed that capacity up to 250 mAh g-1 (i.e. 2 Li per V2O5) can be attain with a good retention under cycles when CNTs are present making these new cellular materials interesting candidate for systems which require the penetration of viscous ionic-liquid/polymer electrolytes.

  14. Roos and NACP-02 ion chamber perturbations and water-air stopping-power ratios for clinical electron beams for energies from 4 to 22 MeV.

    PubMed

    Bailey, M; Shipley, D R; Manning, J W

    2015-02-01

    Empirical fits are developed for depth-compensated wall- and cavity-replacement perturbations in the PTW Roos 34001 and IBA / Scanditronix NACP-02 parallel-plate ionisation chambers, for electron beam qualities from 4 to 22 MeV for depths up to approximately 1.1 × R₅₀,D. These are based on calculations using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code EGSnrc and its user codes with a full simulation of the linac treatment head modelled using BEAMnrc. These fits are used with calculated restricted stopping-power ratios between air and water to match measured depth-dose distributions in water from an Elekta Synergy clinical linear accelerator at the UK National Physical Laboratory. Results compare well with those from recent publications and from the IPEM 2003 electron beam radiotherapy Code of Practice. PMID:25586026

  15. How to Create Social Media Guidelines for Your School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Social media is fast becoming as ubiquitous as the air we breathe. In recent months, many schools and districts around the country have taken steps to create social media policies and guidelines for their students and staff. In the author's work with several districts to draft these documents, he has seen many approaches that work well, and some…

  16. Computer-Based Instruction in Accounting Using the CREATE System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henkle, Edward B.; Robertson, Kenneth W.

    The Graduate Logistics program of the United States Air Force (USAF) Institute of Technology has required that prospective students show a satisfactory level of competence in basic accounting procedures before entering the program. The purpose of this thesis was to develop accounting case problems for use with the CREATE computer system that would…

  17. Method and Apparatus for Creating a Topography at a Surface

    DOEpatents

    Adams, David P.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Mayer, Thomas M.; Vasile, Michael J.; Sweatt, William C.

    2008-11-11

    Methods and apparatus whereby an optical interferometer is utilized to monitor and provide feedback control to an integrated energetic particle column, to create desired topographies, including the depth, shape and/or roughness of features, at a surface of a specimen. Energetic particle columns can direct energetic species including, ions, photons and/or neutral particles to a surface to create features having in-plane dimensions on the order of 1 micron, and a height or depth on the order of 1 nanometer. Energetic processes can include subtractive processes such as sputtering, ablation, focused ion beam milling and, additive processes, such as energetic beam induced chemical vapor deposition. The integration of interferometric methods with processing by energetic species offers the ability to create desired topographies at surfaces, including planar and curved shapes.

  18. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W. M.

    1959-04-14

    This patent deals with calutrons and more particularly to an arrangement therein whereby charged bottles in a calutron source unit may be replaced without admitting atmospheric air to the calutron vacuum chamber. As described, an ion unit is disposed within a vacuum tank and has a reservoir open toward a wall of the tank. A spike projects from the source into the reservoir. When a charge bottle is placed in the reservoir, the spike breaks a frangible seal on the bottle. After the contents of the bottle are expended the bottle may be withdrawn and replaced with another charge bottle by a vacuum lock arrangement in conjunction with an arm for manipulating the bottle.

  19. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-04-14

    This patent deals with calutrons and more particularly to an arrangement therein whereby charged bottles in a calutron source unit may be replaced without admitting atmospheric air to the calutron vacuum chamber. As described, an ion unit is disposed within a vacuum tank and has a reservoir open toward a wall of the tank. A spike projects from thc source into the reservoir. When a charge bottle is placed in the reservoir, the spike breaks a frangible seal on the bottle. After the contents of the bottle are expended the bottle may be withdrawn and replaced with another charge bottle by a varuum lock arrangement in conjunction with an arm for manipulating the bottle.

  20. Journaling: creating space for "I".

    PubMed

    Charles, Jennell P

    2010-01-01

    As nurses engaged in a caring profession, it is critical that we learn not only to care for others but also to care for ourselves. To care effectively for ourselves, we must create the space and time in which to do this. Journaling is one tool that scholars offer as a way to create this space. Although there is no clear consensus about the best techniques for journaling, there is evidence that journaling, as a reflective, meditative activity, can promote creativity, self-awareness, and personal development. PMID:21140872

  1. Traffic air quality index.

    PubMed

    Bagieński, Zbigniew

    2015-02-01

    Vehicle emissions are responsible for a considerable share of urban air pollution concentrations. The traffic air quality index (TAQI) is proposed as a useful tool for evaluating air quality near roadways. The TAQI associates air quality with the equivalent emission from traffic sources and with street structure (roadway structure) as anthropogenic factors. The paper presents a method of determining the TAQI and defines the degrees of harmfulness of emitted pollution. It proposes a classification specifying a potential threat to human health based on the TAQI value and shows an example of calculating the TAQI value for real urban streets. It also considers the role that car traffic plays in creating a local UHI. PMID:25461063

  2. ION ROCKET ENGINE

    DOEpatents

    Ehlers, K.W.; Voelker, F. III

    1961-12-19

    A thrust generating engine utilizing cesium vapor as the propellant fuel is designed. The cesium is vaporized by heat and is passed through a heated porous tungsten electrode whereby each cesium atom is fonized. Upon emergfng from the tungsten electrode, the ions are accelerated rearwardly from the rocket through an electric field between the tungsten electrode and an adjacent accelerating electrode grid structure. To avoid creating a large negative charge on the space craft as a result of the expulsion of the positive ions, a source of electrons is disposed adjacent the ion stream to neutralize the cesium atoms following acceleration thereof. (AEC)

  3. Climate change - creating watershed resilience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change is likely to intensify the circulation of water, which will shift spatial and temporal availability of snowmelt and runoff. In addition, drought and floods are likely to be more frequent, severe and widespread. Higher air temperatures will lead to higher ocean temperatures, elevating ...

  4. Creating a New Professional Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Reading and Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This position paper investigates the merits and potential benefits of creating a new, more comprehensive professional association for members of the learning assistance and developmental education profession. This was the task assigned to the College Reading and Learning Association/National Association for Developmental Education (CRLA/NADE)…

  5. Creating Three-Dimensional Scenes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumpe, Norm

    2005-01-01

    Persistence of Vision Raytracer (POV-Ray), a free computer program for creating photo-realistic, three-dimensional scenes and a link for Mathematica users interested in generating POV-Ray files from within Mathematica, is discussed. POV-Ray has great potential in secondary mathematics classrooms and helps in strengthening students' visualization…

  6. Creating Frameworks for Reflective Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2007-01-01

    The task of creating organizational policies and systems that promote and support reflective teaching is multifaceted and seldom enumerated in early childhood professional literature. One of the best overviews the author has found comes from Carol Brunson Phillips and Sue Bredekamp (1998). The author opines that if the early childhood profession…

  7. Creating an Innovative Learning Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how to create an innovative learning (iLearning) organization. It begins by discussing the life cycle of knowledge in an organization, followed by a description of the theoretical foundation for iLearning. Next, the article presents an example of iLearning, followed by a description of the distributed nature of work, the…

  8. Creating Presentations on ICT Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchis, Iuliana

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on the creation of presentations on ICT classes. The first part highlights the most important steps when creating a presentation. The main idea is, that the computer presentation shouldn't consist only from the technological part, i.e. the editing of the presentation in a computer program. There are many steps before and after…

  9. Creating Highlander Wherever You Are

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Susan; Mullett, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Highlander Research and Education Center serves as a catalyst for grassroots organizing and movement building. This article focuses on an interview with education coordinator Susan Williams who has worked at Highlander for 26 years. We discuss how others can and do create powerful popular education experiences anywhere, whether they have a…

  10. Can Children Really Create Knowledge?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereiter, Carl; Scardamalia, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    Can children genuinely create new knowledge, as opposed to merely carrying out activities that resemble those of mature scientists and innovators? The answer is yes, provided the comparison is not to works of genius but to standards that prevail in ordinary research communities. One important product of knowledge creation is concepts and tools…

  11. Creating Space for Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serafini, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As teachers struggle to balance the needs of their students with the requirements of commercial reading materials, educators need to consider how teachers will create space for children's literature in today's classrooms. In this article, 10 practical recommendations for incorporating children's literature in the reading instructional framework…

  12. Creating Time for Equity Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renée, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Iin urban communities across the nation, a broad range of partners have committed to reinventing educational time together to ensure equitable access to rich learning opportunities for all young people. Across the nation, education partners are using their creativity, commitment, and unique resources to create new school and system designs that…

  13. Creating a Global Perspective Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braskamp, Larry A.

    2011-01-01

    The author has written this Guidebook to assist users interested in creating a campus that will be more global in its mission, programs, and people. His approach is to focus on the views and contributions of the people who are engaged in higher education. Thus it has a "person" emphasis rather than a structural or policy point of view. The author…

  14. Creating a Culture of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Phyllis H.

    1994-01-01

    In financially troubled times, the college or university must develop a culture of leadership. Leadership development programming can strengthen the institution by fostering a team approach to solving institutional problems, by increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of human resources, and by creating a pool of qualified professionals for…

  15. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  16. Indoor Air vs. Indoor Construction: A New Beginning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manicone, Santo

    2000-01-01

    Identifies the steps that can be taken to lessen the impact of indoor air pollution created from indoor renovation projects, including project management tips to help contractors avoid creating unnecessary air pollution. Final comments address air pollution control when installing new furniture, smoking restrictions, occupant relations, and the…

  17. Creating small transcription activating RNAs.

    PubMed

    Chappell, James; Takahashi, Melissa K; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-03-01

    We expanded the mechanistic capability of small RNAs by creating an entirely synthetic mode of regulation: small transcription activating RNAs (STARs). Using two strategies, we engineered synthetic STAR regulators to disrupt the formation of an intrinsic transcription terminator placed upstream of a gene in Escherichia coli. This resulted in a group of four highly orthogonal STARs that had up to 94-fold activation. By systematically modifying sequence features of this group, we derived design principles for STAR function, which we then used to forward engineer a STAR that targets a terminator found in the Escherichia coli genome. Finally, we showed that STARs could be combined in tandem to create previously unattainable RNA-only transcriptional logic gates. STARs provide a new mechanism of regulation that will expand our ability to use small RNAs to construct synthetic gene networks that precisely control gene expression. PMID:25643173

  18. Creating advanced health informatics certification.

    PubMed

    Gadd, Cynthia S; Williamson, Jeffrey J; Steen, Elaine B; Fridsma, Douglas B

    2016-07-01

    In 2005, AMIA leaders and members concluded that certification of advanced health informatics professionals would offer value to individual practitioners, organizations that hire them, and society at large. AMIA's work to create advanced informatics certification began by leading a successful effort to create the clinical informatics subspecialty for American Board of Medical Specialties board-certified physicians. Since 2012, AMIA has been working to establish advanced health informatics certification (AHIC) for all health informatics practitioners regardless of their primary discipline. In November 2015, AMIA completed the first of 3 key tasks required to establish AHIC, with the AMIA Board of Directors' endorsement of proposed eligibility requirements. This AMIA Board white paper describes efforts to establish AHIC, reports on the current status of AHIC components, and provides a context for the proposed AHIC eligibility requirements. PMID:27358327

  19. Creating a Mobile Library Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutshall, Tom C.; Blake, Lindsay; Bandy, Sandra L.

    2011-01-01

    The overwhelming results were iPhones and Android devices. Since the library wasn't equipped technologically to develop an in-house application platform and because we wanted the content to work across all mobile platforms, we decided to focus on creating a mobile web-based platform. From the NLM page of mobile sites we chose the basic PubMed/…

  20. Air resources

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This section describes the ambient (surrounding) air quality of the TVA region, discusses TVA emission contributions to ambient air quality, and identifies air quality impacts to human health and welfare. Volume 2 Technical Document 2, Environmental Consequences, describes how changes in TVA emissions could affect regional air quality, human health, environmental resources, and materials. The primary region of the affected environment is broadly defined as the state of Tennessee, as well as southern Kentucky, western Virginia, southern West Virginia, western North Carolina, and northern Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi. This area represents the watershed of the Tennessee River and the 201 counties of the greater TVA service area. Emissions from outside the Tennessee Valley region contribute to air quality in the Valley. Also, TVA emissions are transported outside the Valley and have some impact on air quality beyond the primary study area. Although the study area experiences a number of air quality problems, overall air quality is good.

  1. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, Alan

    A summary of one of our most pressing environmental problems, air pollution, is offered in this book by the Director of Air Pollution Control for the Queensland (Australia) State Government. Discussion of the subject is not restricted to Queensland or Australian problems and policies, however, but includes analysis of air pollution the world over.…

  2. Deployable Engine Air Brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    On approach, next-generation aircraft are likely to have airframe noise levels that are comparable to or in excess of engine noise. ATA Engineering, Inc. (ATA) is developing a novel quiet engine air brake (EAB), a device that generates "equivalent drag" within the engine through stream thrust reduction by creating a swirling outflow in the turbofan exhaust nozzle. Two Phase II projects were conducted to mature this technology: (1) a concept development program (CDP) and (2) a system development program (SDP).

  3. Lithium-Air Battery: High Performance Cathodes for Lithium-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-01

    BEEST Project: Researchers at Missouri S&T are developing an affordable lithium-air (Li-Air) battery that could enable an EV to travel up to 350 miles on a single charge. Today’s EVs run on Li-Ion batteries, which are expensive and suffer from low energy density compared with gasoline. This new Li-Air battery could perform as well as gasoline and store 3 times more energy than current Li-Ion batteries. A Li-Air battery uses an air cathode to breathe oxygen into the battery from the surrounding air, like a human lung. The oxygen and lithium react in the battery to produce electricity. Current Li-Air batteries are limited by the rate at which they can draw oxygen from the air. The team is designing a battery using hierarchical electrode structures to enhance air breathing and effective catalysts to accelerate electricity production.

  4. Creating Cross-disciplinary Courses

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Elaine R.

    2012-01-01

    Because of its focus on the biological underpinnings of action and behavior, neuroscience intersects with many fields of human endeavor. Some of these cross-disciplinary intersections have been long standing, while others, such as neurotheology or neuroeconomics, are more recently formed fields. Many undergraduate institutions have sought to include cross-disciplinary courses in their curriculum because this style of pedagogy is often seen as applicable to real world problems. However, it can be difficult for faculty with specialized training within their discipline to expand beyond their own fields to offer cross-disciplinary courses. I have been creating a series of multi- or cross-disciplinary courses and have found some strategies that have helped me successfully teach these classes. I will discuss general strategies and tools in developing these types of courses including: 1) creating mixed experience classrooms of students and contributing faculty 2) finding the right tools that will allow you to teach to a mixed population without prerequisites 3) examining the topic using multiple disciplinary perspectives 4) feeding off student experience and interest 5) assessing the impact of these courses on student outcomes and your neuroscience program. This last tool in particular is important in establishing the validity of this type of teaching for neuroscience students and the general student population. PMID:23494491

  5. Creating your own leadership brand.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene

    2002-01-01

    Building equity in a brand happens through many encounters. The initial attraction must be followed by the meeting of expectations. This creates a loyalty that is part of an emotional connection to that brand. This is the same process people go through when they first meet a leader and decide if this is a person they want to buy into. People will examine your style, your competence, and your standards. If you fail on any of these fronts, your ability to lead will be severely compromised. People expect more of leaders now, because they know and recognize good leaders. And, predictably, people are now more cynical of leaders because of the well-publicized excess of a few leaders who advanced their own causes at the expense of their people and their financial future. This will turn out to be a good thing, because it will create a higher standard of leadership that all must aspire to achieve. When the bar is raised for us, our standards of performance are also raised. PMID:12424994

  6. Creating your own leadership brand.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene

    2002-01-01

    Building equity in a brand happens through many encounters. The initial attraction must be followed by the meeting of expectations. This creates a loyalty that is part of an emotional connection to that brand. This is the same process people go through when they first meet a leader and decide if this is a person they want to buy into. People will examine your style, your competence, and your standards. If you fail on any of these fronts, your ability to lead will be severely compromised. People expect more of leaders now, because they know and recognize good leaders. And, predictably, people are now more cynical of leaders because of the well-publicized excess of a few leaders who advanced their own causes at the expense of their people and their financial future. This will turn out to be a good thing, because it will create a higher standard of leadership that all must aspire to achieve. When the bar is raised for us, our standards of performance are also raised. PMID:12382542

  7. EMW transformation in suddenly created two-component magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrijevic, M.M.; Stanic, B.V.

    1995-06-01

    Suddenly created plasmas appear practically in all pulse gas discharges or laser created plasmas as well as following either a lightning or nuclear explosion. The transformation of time-harmonic plane electromagnetic wave (EMW) in a suddenly created cold and lossless magnetoplasma was considered. Static magnetic field was arbitrary oriented. The plasma was considered to be a two component (electron and ion mixture) when longitudinal and transverse propagation were considered. It was shown that for an arbitrary orientation of the static magnetic field in electron plasma, the original linearly polarized EMW splits into eight wave modes with different orientations and energies and on nonpropagating wave mode. Some of the wave modes were strongly influenced by strength or by orientation of the external static magnetic field. When ions are included in analysis it was shown that the energy of low-frequency transverse wave modes exceeds that of the longitudinal modes and also that nonpropagating magnetic field mode disappears, which differs from results where only electron plasma was considered. The energies of the wave modes formed in the pure electron plasma only slightly differ from that when ions are included into account. The dispersion relation and amplitude distribution of the different wave modes were presented by the use of suitable diagrams.

  8. Ion beam texturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    A microscopic surface texture is created by sputter etching a surface while simultaneously sputter depositing a lower sputter yield material onto the surface. A xenon ion beam source has been used to perform this texturing process on samples as large as three centimeters in diameter. Ion beam textured surface structures have been characterized with SEM photomicrographs for a large number of materials including Cu, Al, Si, Ti, Ni, Fe, Stainless steel, Au, and Ag. Surfaces have been textured using a variety of low sputter yield materials - Ta, Mo, Nb, and Ti. The initial stages of the texture creation have been documented, and the technique of ion beam sputter removal of any remaining deposited material has been studied. A number of other texturing parameters have been studied such as the variation of the texture with ion beam power, surface temperature, and the rate of texture growth with sputter etching time.

  9. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  10. Methodologies in creating skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-09-01

    The creation of skin substitutes has significantly decreased morbidity and mortality of skin wounds. Although there are still a number of disadvantages of currently available skin substitutes, there has been a significant decline in research advances over the past several years in improving these skin substitutes. Clinically most skin substitutes used are acellular and do not use growth factors to assist wound healing, key areas of potential in this field of research. This article discusses the five necessary attributes of an ideal skin substitute. It comprehensively discusses the three major basic components of currently available skin substitutes: scaffold materials, growth factors, and cells, comparing and contrasting what has been used so far. It then examines a variety of techniques in how to incorporate these basic components together to act as a guide for further research in the field to create cellular skin substitutes with better clinical results. PMID:27154041

  11. Creating an environment for learning.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-03-16

    This article, the third in a series of 11, provides guidance to new and existing mentors and practice teachers to enable them to progress in their role and develop a portfolio of evidence that meets the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice (SSLAP). The importance of developing a high quality practice placement is discussed in relation to the fifth domain of the SSLAP, 'creating an environment for learning'. The article provides learning activities and suggests ways in which mentors and practice teachers can undertake various self-assessments, enabling them to gather relevant evidence to demonstrate how they can meet and maintain the requirements of this domain. PMID:26982867

  12. A simple novel device for air sampling by electrokinetic capture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gordon, Julian; Gandhi, Prasanthi; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Frazier, Angel; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2015-12-27

    A variety of different sampling devices are currently available to acquire air samples for the study of the microbiome of the air. All have a degree of technical complexity that limits deployment. Here, we evaluate the use of a novel device, which has no technical complexity and is easily deployable. An air-cleaning device powered by electrokinetic propulsion has been adapted to provide a universal method for collecting samples of the aerobiome. Plasma-induced charge in aerosol particles causes propulsion to and capture on a counter-electrode. The flow of ions creates net bulk airflow, with no moving parts. A device and electrodemore » assembly have been re-designed from air-cleaning technology to provide an average air flow of 120 lpm. This compares favorably with current air sampling devices based on physical air pumping. Capture efficiency was determined by comparison with a 0.4 μm polycarbonate reference filter, using fluorescent latex particles in a controlled environment chamber. Performance was compared with the same reference filter method in field studies in three different environments. For 23 common fungal species by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), there was 100 % sensitivity and apparent specificity of 87%, with the reference filter taken as “gold standard.” Further, bacterial analysis of 16S RNA by amplicon sequencing showed equivalent community structure captured by the electrokinetic device and the reference filter. Unlike other current air sampling methods, capture of particles is determined by charge and so is not controlled by particle mass. We analyzed particle sizes captured from air, without regard to specific analyte by atomic force microscopy: particles at least as low as 100 nM could be captured from ambient air. This work introduces a very simple plug-and-play device that can sample air at a high-volume flow rate with no moving parts and collect particles down to the sub-micron range. In conclusion, the performance of

  13. A simple novel device for air sampling by electrokinetic capture

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, Julian; Gandhi, Prasanthi; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Frazier, Angel; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2015-12-27

    A variety of different sampling devices are currently available to acquire air samples for the study of the microbiome of the air. All have a degree of technical complexity that limits deployment. Here, we evaluate the use of a novel device, which has no technical complexity and is easily deployable. An air-cleaning device powered by electrokinetic propulsion has been adapted to provide a universal method for collecting samples of the aerobiome. Plasma-induced charge in aerosol particles causes propulsion to and capture on a counter-electrode. The flow of ions creates net bulk airflow, with no moving parts. A device and electrode assembly have been re-designed from air-cleaning technology to provide an average air flow of 120 lpm. This compares favorably with current air sampling devices based on physical air pumping. Capture efficiency was determined by comparison with a 0.4 μm polycarbonate reference filter, using fluorescent latex particles in a controlled environment chamber. Performance was compared with the same reference filter method in field studies in three different environments. For 23 common fungal species by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), there was 100 % sensitivity and apparent specificity of 87%, with the reference filter taken as “gold standard.” Further, bacterial analysis of 16S RNA by amplicon sequencing showed equivalent community structure captured by the electrokinetic device and the reference filter. Unlike other current air sampling methods, capture of particles is determined by charge and so is not controlled by particle mass. We analyzed particle sizes captured from air, without regard to specific analyte by atomic force microscopy: particles at least as low as 100 nM could be captured from ambient air. This work introduces a very simple plug-and-play device that can sample air at a high-volume flow rate with no moving parts and collect particles down to the sub-micron range. In conclusion, the performance of the

  14. Creating breakthroughs at 3M.

    PubMed

    von Hippel, E; Thomke, S; Sonnack, M

    1999-01-01

    Most senior managers want their product development teams to create break-throughs--new products that will allow their companies to grow rapidly and maintain high margins. But more often they get incremental improvements to existing products. That's partly because companies must compete in the short term. Searching for breakthroughs is expensive and time consuming; line extensions can help the bottom line immediately. In addition, developers simply don't know how to achieve breakthroughs, and there is usually no system in place to guide them. By the mid-1990s, the lack of such a system was a problem even for an innovative company like 3M. Then a project team in 3M's Medical-Surgical Markets Division became acquainted with a method for developing breakthrough products: the lead user process. The process is based on the fact that many commercially important products are initially thought of and even prototyped by "lead users"--companies, organizations, or individuals that are well ahead of market trends. Their needs are so far beyond those of the average user that lead users create innovations on their own that may later contribute to commercially attractive breakthroughs. The lead user process transforms the job of inventing breakthroughs into a systematic task of identifying lead users and learning from them. The authors explain the process and how the 3M project team successfully navigated through it. In the end, the team proposed three major new product lines and a change in the division's strategy that has led to the development of breakthrough products. And now several more divisions are using the process to break away from incrementalism. PMID:10621267

  15. Philanthropy's new agenda: creating value.

    PubMed

    Porter, M E; Kramer, M R

    1999-01-01

    During the past two decades, the number of charitable foundations in the United States has doubled while the value of their assets has increased more than 1,100%. As new wealth continues to pour into foundations, the authors take a timely look at the field and conclude that radical change is needed. First, they explain why. Compared with direct giving, foundations are strongly favored through tax preferences whose value increases in rising stock markets. As a nation, then, we make a substantial investment in foundation philanthropy that goes well beyond the original gifts of private donors. We should therefore expect foundations to achieve a social impact disproportionate to their spending. If foundations serve merely as passive conduits for giving, then they not only fall far short of their potential but also fail to meet an important societal obligation. Drawing on Porter's work on competition and strategy, the authors then present a framework for thinking systematically about how foundations create value and how the various approaches to value creation can be deployed within the context of an overarching strategy. Although many foundations talk about "strategic" giving, much current practice is at odds with strategy. Among the common problems, foundations scatter their funding too broadly, they overlook the value-creating potential of longer and closer working relationships with grantees, and they pay insufficient attention to the ultimate results of the work they fund. This article lays out a blueprint for change, challenging foundation leaders to spearhead the evolution of philanthropy from private acts of conscience into a professional field. PMID:10662001

  16. Propensity of Hydrated Excess Protons and Hydroxide Anions for the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ying-Lung Steve; Chen, Chen; Lindberg, Gerrick E; Kumar, Revati; Voth, Gregory A

    2015-10-01

    Significant effort has been undertaken to better understand the molecular details governing the propensity of ions for the air-water interface. Facilitated by computationally efficient reactive molecular dynamics simulations, new and statistically conclusive molecular-scale results on the affinity of the hydrated excess proton and hydroxide anion for the air-water interface are presented. These simulations capture the dynamic bond breaking and formation processes (charge defect delocalization) that are important for correctly describing the solvation and transport of these complex species. The excess proton is found to be attracted to the interface, which is correlated with a favorable enthalpic contribution and consistent with reducing the disruption in the hydrogen bond network caused by the ion complex. However, a recent refinement of the underlying reactive potential energy function for the hydrated excess proton shows the interfacial attraction to be weaker, albeit nonzero, a result that is consistent with the experimental surface tension measurements. The influence of a weak hydrogen bond donated from water to the protonated oxygen, recently found to play an important role in excess hydrated proton transport in bulk water, is seen to also be important for this study. In contrast, the hydroxide ion is found to be repelled from the air-water interface. This repulsion is characterized by a reduction of the energetically favorable ion-water interactions, which creates an enthalpic penalty as the ion approaches the interface. Finally, we find that the fluctuation in the coordination number around water sheds new light on the observed entropic trends for both ions. PMID:26366480

  17. Michael Thackeray on Lithium-air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Thackeray, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Michael Thackeray, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  18. Michael Thackeray on Lithium-air Batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Thackeray, Michael

    2013-04-19

    Michael Thackeray, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  19. Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Khalil Amine

    2010-01-08

    Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  20. Khalil Amine on Lithium-air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil Amine

    2009-09-14

    Khalil Amine, materials scientist at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries.

  1. Create a Pint-Sized Photo Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gathright, Pat

    2003-01-01

    Explains a project, which involves creating a book using digital images. Notes that teachers can create books with samples of their work. Provides other suggestions for using this project, such as teaching scanning, creating a photo portfolio as a semester exam project, or creating introduction pieces for yearbook or newspaper staffers. (PM)

  2. Ion photon emission microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, P.; Doyle, B. L.; Banks, J. C.; Battistella, A.; Gennaro, G.; McDaniel, F. D.; Mellon, M.; Vittone, E.; Vizkelethy, G.; Wing, N. D.

    2003-09-01

    A new ion-induced emission microscopy has been invented and demonstrated, which is called ion photon emission microscopy (IPEM). It employs a low current, broad ion beam impinging on a sample, previously coated or simply covered with a few microns of a fast, highly efficient phosphor layer. The light produced at the single ion impact point is collected with an optical microscope and projected at high magnification onto a single photon position sensitive detector (PSD). This allows maps of the ion strike effects to be produced, effectively removing the need for a microbeam. Irradiation in air and even the use of alpha particle sources with no accelerator are possible. Potential applications include ion beam induced charge collection studies of semiconducting and insulating materials, single event upset studies on microchips and even biological cells in radiobiological effectiveness experiments. We describe the IPEM setup, including a 60× OM-40 microscope with a 1.5 mm hole for the beam transmission and a Quantar PSD with 60 μm pixel. Bicron plastic scintillator blades of 10 μm were chosen as a phosphor for their nanosecond time resolution, homogeneity, utility and commercial availability. The results given in this paper are for a prototype IPEM system. They indicate a resolution of ˜12 μm, the presence of a spatial halo and a He-ion efficiency of ˜20%. This marks the first time that nuclear microscopy has been performed with a radioactive source.

  3. Electric propulsion using ion-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aanesland, A.; Meige, A.; Chabert, P.

    2009-04-01

    Recently, we have proposed to use both positive and negative ions for thrust in an electromagnetic space propulsion system. This concept is called PEGASES for Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative GASES and has been patented by the Ecole Polytechnique in France in 2007. The basic idea is to create a stratified plasma with an electron free (ion-ion plasma) region at the periphery of a highly ionized plasma core such that both positive and negative ions can be extracted and accelerated to provide thrust. As the extracted beam is globally neutral there is no need for a downstream neutralizer. The recombination of positive and negative ions is very efficient and will result in a fast recombination downstream of the thruster and hence there is no creation of a plasma plume downstream. The first PEGASES prototype, designed in 2007, has recently been installed in a small vacuum chamber for preliminary tests in our laboratory and the first results have been presented in several conferences. This paper reviews important work that has been used in the process of designing the first PEGASES prototype.

  4. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    Materials related to air pollution are reviewed for the period January 1987, to October 1988. The topics are pollution monitoring, air pollution, and environmental chemistry. The organization consists of two major analytical divisions: (1) gaseous methods; and (2) aerosol and particulate methods. (MVL)

  5. Air Pollution.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air quality is affected by many types of pollutants that are emitted from various sources, including stationary and mobile. These sources release both criteria and hazardous air pollutants, which cause health effects, ecological harm, and material damage. They are generally categ...

  6. Creating experimental color harmony map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamaret, Christel; Urban, Fabrice; Lepinel, Josselin

    2014-02-01

    Starting in the 17th century with Newton, color harmony is a topic that did not reach a consensus on definition, representation or modeling so far. Previous work highlighted specific characteristics for color harmony on com- bination of color doublets or triplets by means of a human rating on a harmony scale. However, there were no investigation involving complex stimuli or pointing out how harmony is spatially located within a picture. The modeling of such concept as well as a reliable ground-truth would be of high value for the community, since the applications are wide and concern several communities: from psychology to computer graphics. We propose a protocol for creating color harmony maps from a controlled experiment. Through an eye-tracking protocol, we focus on the identification of disharmonious colors in pictures. The experiment was composed of a free viewing pass in order to let the observer be familiar with the content before a second pass where we asked "to search for the most disharmonious areas in the picture". Twenty-seven observers participated to the experiments that was composed of a total of 30 different stimuli. The high inter-observer agreement as well as a cross-validation confirm the validity of the proposed ground-truth.

  7. Creating a winning organizational culture.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Robert James

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the idea of how to create a winning organizational culture. By definition, a winning organizational culture is one that is able to make current innovations stick, while continuously changing based on the demands of the marketplace. More importantly, the article explores the notion that a winning organizational culture can have a profound impact on the conscious of the workforce, helping each individual to become a better, more productive person, who provides important services and products to the community. To form a basis toward defining the structure of what a winning organization culture looks like, 4 experts were asked 12 questions related to the development of an organizational culture. Three of the experts have worked intimately within the health care industry, while a fourth has been charged with turning around an organization that has had a losing culture for 17 years. The article provides insight into the role that values, norms, goals, leadership style, familiarity, and hiring practices play in developing a winning organizational culture. The article also emphasizes the important role that leaders perform in developing an organizational culture. PMID:19910709

  8. Creating healthy and just bioregions.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, Keith; Leiter, Robert Allen

    2016-03-01

    Dramatic changes taking place locally, regionally, globally, demand that we rethink strategies to improve public health, especially in disadvantaged communities where the cumulative impacts of toxicant exposure and other environmental and social stressors are most damaging. The emergent field of Sustainability Science, including a new bioregionalism for the 21st Century, is giving rise to promising place-based (territorially rooted) approaches. Embedded in this bioregional approach is an integrated planning framework (IPF) that enables people to map and develop plans and strategies that cut across various scales (e.g. from regional to citywide to neighborhood scale) and various topical areas (e.g. urban land use planning, water resource planning, food systems planning and "green infrastructure" planning) with the specific intent of reducing the impacts of toxicants to public health and the natural environment. This paper describes a case of bioregionally inspired integrated planning in San Diego, California (USA). The paper highlights food-water-energy linkages and the importance of "rooted" community-university partnerships and knowledge-action collaboratives in creating healthy and just bioregions. PMID:26812849

  9. Creating a urine black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurd, Randy; Pan, Zhao; Meritt, Andrew; Belden, Jesse; Truscott, Tadd

    2015-11-01

    Since the mid-nineteenth century, both enlisted and fashion-conscious owners of khaki trousers have been plagued by undesired speckle patterns resulting from splash-back while urinating. In recent years, industrial designers and hygiene-driven entrepreneurs have sought to limit this splashing by creating urinal inserts, with the effectiveness of their inventions varying drastically. From this large assortment of inserts, designs consisting of macroscopic pillar arrays seem to be the most effective splash suppressers. Interestingly this design partially mimics the geometry of the water capturing moss Syntrichia caninervis, which exhibits a notable ability to suppress splash and quickly absorb water from impacting rain droplets. With this natural splash suppressor in mind, we search for the ideal urine black hole by performing experiments of simulated urine streams (water droplet streams) impacting macroscopic pillar arrays with varying parameters including pillar height and spacing, draining and material properties. We propose improved urinal insert designs based on our experimental data in hopes of reducing potential embarrassment inherent in wearing khakis.

  10. Laser Created Relativistic Positron Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Meyerhofer, D D; Bonlie, J; Chen, C D; Chen, S N; Courtois, C; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Kruer, W; Landoas, O; Mithen, J; Murphy, C; Nilson, P; Price, D; Scheider, M; Shepherd, R; Stoeckl, C; Tabak, M; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorder, P

    2009-10-08

    Electron-positron jets with MeV temperature are thought to be present in a wide variety of astrophysical phenomena such as active galaxies, quasars, gamma ray bursts and black holes. They have now been created in the laboratory in a controlled fashion by irradiating a gold target with an intense picosecond duration laser pulse. About 10{sup 11} MeV positrons are emitted from the rear surface of the target in a 15 to 22-degree cone for a duration comparable to the laser pulse. These positron jets are quasi-monoenergetic (E/{delta}E {approx} 5) with peak energies controllable from 3-19 MeV. They have temperatures from 1-4 MeV in the beam frame in both the longitudinal and transverse directions. Positron production has been studied extensively in recent decades at low energies (sub-MeV) in areas related to surface science, positron emission tomography, basic antimatter science such as antihydrogen experiments, Bose-Einstein condensed positronium, and basic plasma physics. However, the experimental tools to produce very high temperature positrons and high-flux positron jets needed to simulate astrophysical positron conditions have so far been absent. The MeV temperature jets of positrons and electrons produced in our experiments offer a first step to evaluate the physics models used to explain some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe.

  11. Creating Effective K-12 Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, J.

    2011-12-01

    Grant opportunities require investigators to provide 'broader impacts' for their scientific research. For most researchers this involves some kind of educational outreach for the K-12 community. I have been able to participate in many different types of grant funded science teacher professional development programs. The most valuable have been outreach where the research seamlessly integrated with my classroom curriculum and was sustainable with my future classes. To accomplish these types of programs, the investigators needed to research the K-12 community and identify several key aspects of the K-12 environment where their expertise would benefit me and my students. There are a lot of different K-12 learning environments, so researchers need to be sure to match up with the right grade level and administrative environment. You might want to consider non-main stream school settings, such as magnet programs, STEM academies, and distance learning. The goal is to try to make your outreach seem natural and productive. This presentation will illustrate how researchers can create an educational outreach project that will be a win-win situation for everyone involved.

  12. Creating engaging experiences for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    McClusky, John F

    2008-01-01

    The traditional model of rehabilitation center design based on usability and function falls short of addressing the aspirations of those who use them. To better serve the motivational needs of both patients and therapists, we need to reconsider the gymnasium-inspired designs of current rehabilitation centers. Designers Patricia Moore and David Guynes have drawn inspiration from the everyday to create more engaging rehabilitation experiences with their Easy Street, Independence Square, Rehab 1-2-3, Our Town, and WorkSyms rehabilitation environments. Their designs simulate real-life situations to motivate patients by helping them connect their therapy to the life in which they aspire to return. Utilizing an empathic research process, Moore and Guynes build a deeper understanding of both patients' and therapists' values and apply that understanding to designs that are more directly connected to patients' aspirational goals while still meeting their functional rehabilitation needs. This same research-based design approach is utilized in all of their design work that has included, most recently, the design of the Phoenix Valley Transit Authority's Metro Light Rail Train. The train and stations have won awards for accessibility and will begin public operation in late 2008. PMID:18430671

  13. Adolescents and HIV: creating partnerships.

    PubMed

    Tierney, S

    1998-05-01

    Despite the President's directive on youth and HIV in 1997 to focus the nation's attention on adolescents and the battle against AIDS, prevention programs continue to be ineffective. The number of seropositive youth, ages 13 to 24 years old, is unclear due to inconsistent definitions of age ranges and inadequate access to testing. Youth have not sought testing for many reasons, including failing to perceive their vulnerability to HIV, confidentiality concerns, and not realizing the effectiveness of early treatment. Adolescents are creating independence, establishing relationships, and learning about drugs and alcohol. Young gay and bisexual men, drug-using youth, and youth of color are at high risk of HIV transmission. Identifying the population involved in risk-taking behavior and eliminating the behavior is an ineffective strategy for adolescent HIV prevention programs. Complicating the issue further, the goals and expectations of adolescents differ from the adults who design and deliver prevention programs. HIV education and prevention efforts need to address solutions to hopelessness, isolation, and violence, rather than focusing on the negative effects risky behaviors will have in the future. Effective programs combine a youth/adult partnership to take advantage of the strengths of each individual. Strategies for implementing prevention programs that address the specific needs of adolescents are suggested. PMID:11365416

  14. Ion chambers simplify absolute intensity measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. A. R.

    1966-01-01

    Single or double ion chamber technique measures absolute radiation intensities in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet region of the spectrum. The ion chambers use rare gases as the ion carrier. Photon absorbed by the gas creates one ion pair so a measure of these is a measure of the number of incident photons.

  15. India creates social marketing organization.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    India, in a major policy shift toward reversible birth controls methods, will form a new organization to promote private sector contraceptive sales. The government, through a recently signed agreement with the Agency for International Development (AID), plans to establish a private nonprofit Contraceptive Marketing Organization (CMO) in fiscal year 1984. This momentous move marks a full circle return to a 1969 proposal by AID and Ford Foundation consultants. Funded at about $500 million over a 7 year period, the CMO will function as a semi-autonomous entity run by a board of governors representing government and such public and public sectors as health, communications, management, manufacturing, marketing, advertising, and market research. According to the agreement called the India Family Planning Communications and Marketing Plan, the CMO's activities will cover procurement and distribution of condoms, oral contraceptives (OCs), and other yet to be determined contraceptive methods. Of the $500 million in funds, the government of India has pledged 2/3, AID roughly $50 million in grants and loans, with the balance expected from such sources as the UN Fund for Population Activities. The CMO's goal is a marked increase in contraceptive use by married couples of reproductive age from the current 6% rate to 20% by 1990. As of 1982, India has 122 million such couples, with 1% purchasing commercial products, 2% buying Nirodh Marketing Program condoms and 3% relying on free government contraceptives. Besides creating the CMO, the India/AID pact outlines intensified public sector family planning promotions and activities. Some Indian health experts believe the government's decision to expand social marketing's role rests with a significant decade long decline in the popularity of such permanent birth control measures as vasectomy and tubal ligation. PMID:12313308

  16. Field reversed ion rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. HIGH VOLTAGE ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-04-19

    A device is described for providing a source of molecular ions having a large output current and with an accelerated energy of the order of 600 kv. Ions are produced in an ion source which is provided with a water-cooled source grid of metal to effect maximum recombination of atomic ions to molecular ions. A very high accelerating voltage is applied to withdraw and accelerate the molecular ions from the source, and means are provided for dumping the excess electrons at the lowest possible potentials. An accelerating grid is placed adjacent to the source grid and a slotted, grounded accelerating electrode is placed adjacent to the accelerating grid. A potential of about 35 kv is maintained between the source grid and accelerating grid, and a potential of about 600 kv is maintained between the accelerating grid and accelerating electrode. In order to keep at a minimum the large number of oscillating electrons which are created when such high voltages are employed in the vicinity of a strong magnetic field, a plurality of high voltage cascaded shields are employed with a conventional electron dumping system being employed between each shield so as to dump the electrons at the lowest possible potential rather than at 600 kv.

  18. The Art of Gymnastics: Creating Sequences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rovegno, Inez

    1988-01-01

    Offering students opportunities for creating movement sequences in gymnastics allows them to understand the essence of gymnastics, have creative experiences, and learn about themselves. The process of creating sequences is described. (MT)

  19. Air Pollution

    MedlinePlus

    ... tobacco smoke. How is air pollution linked to climate change? While climate change is a global process, it ... ozone levels are also a concern. Impacts of Climate Change on Human Health in the United States: A ...

  20. Air Apparent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbster, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Explains the principle upon which a barometer operates. Describes how to construct two barometric devices for use in the classroom that show air's changing pressure. Cites some conditions for predicting weather. (RT)

  1. Creating A Light Curve Using Gathered Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggs, Joseph; Stolarz, S. A.; DePorto, R. W.; Shake, W. J.; Piper, M.; Linder, T. R.; Holmes, R.; Conwell, J.

    2012-01-01

    Our group of students with the support of educators and astronomers carried out a program to do astrometric and photometric analysis on the asteroid 2000 SO1 with the objective of obtaining a more in depth analysis of this asteroid and publishing light curve data describing the period of the asteroid. We chose our target asteroid using the minor planet center database, choosing an object that would have an acceptable Right Ascension, Declination, magnitude, and air mass for the ARO (Astronomical Research Observatory)-30 inch telescope operated by the SKYNET program. Our journey began with using Astrometrica for the IASC/WISE Program to identify and find new asteroids in the sky and add data to the Minor Planet Center Database. We then used MPO (Minor Planet Observatory) Canopus to form a light curve and conduct a fourier analysis on an example asteroid to familiarize ourselves with the program and used the program again to conduct fourier analysis on asteroid 2000 SO1. The educational goal in mind was to (a) learn the process of collecting and analyzing data using Astrometrica, MPO Canopus, the Minor Planet Center, and SKYNET and (b) create a poster to display the steps used in the process of surveying taken images and the production of a light curve. We collected 300 images a night, while discarding all the corrupted images, until we had enough data to accurately represent the object.Our work was successful due to resources from; Eastern Illinois University's Physics Department, the Astronomical Research Observatory, the University of Chicago's Yerkes Observatory, the SKYNET network, NASA's IASC/WISE (International Astronomical Search Collaboration/ Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer), NITARP (NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program) and Lincoln-Way North High School.

  2. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Webb, Ian K.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Zhang, Xinyu; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-08-23

    Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulation (SLIM) represent a novel class of ion optical devices based upon electrodes patterned on planar surfaces, and relying on a combined action of radio frequency and DC electric fields and specific buffer gas density conditions. Initial experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the SLIM concept. This report offers an in-depth consideration of key ion dynamics properties in such devices based upon ion optics theory and computational modeling. The SLIM devices investigated are formed by two surfaces, each having an array of radio frequency (RF) "rung" electrodes, bordered by DC "guard" electrodes. Ion motion is confined by the RF effective potential in the direction orthogonal to the boards, and limited or controlled in the transversal direction by the guard DC potentials. Ions can be efficiently trapped and stored in SLIM devices where the confinement of ions can be ‘soft’ in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along the axis makes it possible to apply electric field profiles to stimulate ion transfer within a SLIM. In the case of a linear DC gradient applied to RF rungs and guards, a virtually uniform electric field can be created along the axis of the device, enabling ion mobility separations.

  3. Characterization of Ion Dynamics in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulation (SLIM) represent a novel class of ion optical devices based upon electrodes patterned on planar surfaces, and relying on a combined action of radiofrequency and DC electric fields and specific buffer gas density conditions. Initial experimental studies have demonstrated the feasibility of the SLIM concept. This report offers an in-depth consideration of key ion dynamics properties in such devices based upon ion optics theory and computational modeling. The SLIM devices investigated are formed by two surfaces, each having an array of radiofrequency (RF) “rung” electrodes, bordered by DC “guard” electrodes. Ion motion is confined by the RF effective potential in the direction orthogonal to the boards and limited or controlled in the transversal direction by the guard DC potentials. Ions can be efficiently trapped and stored in SLIM devices where the confinement of ions can be “soft” in regard to the extent of collisional activation, similarly to RF-only multipole ion guides and traps. The segmentation of the RF rung electrodes and guards along the axis makes it possible to apply static or transient electric field profiles to stimulate ion transfer within a SLIM. In the case of a linear DC gradient applied to RF rungs and guards, a virtually uniform electric field can be created along the axis of the device, enabling high quality ion mobility separations. PMID:25152178

  4. An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization study of the positive and negative ion chemistry of the hydrofluorocarbons 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a) and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and of perfluoro-n-hexane (FC-72) in air plasma at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Ester; Paradisi, Cristina; Scorrano, Gianfranco

    2004-07-01

    A report is given on the ionization/dissociation behavior of the title compounds within air plasmas produced by electrical corona discharges at atmospheric pressure: both positive and negative ions were investigated at different temperatures using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). CHF(2)CH(3) (HFC-152a) undergoes efficient ionic oxidation to C(2)H(5)O(+), in which the oxygen comes from water present in the plasma. In contrast, CF(3)CH(2)F (HFC-134a) does not produce any characteristic positive ion under APCI conditions, its presence within the plasma being revealed only as a neutral ligand in ion-molecule complexes with ions of the background (H(3)O(+) and NO(+)). Analogously, the perfluorocarbon FC-72 (n-C(6)F(14)) does not produce significant positive ions at 30 degrees C: at high temperature, however, it undergoes dissociative ionization to form many product ions including C(3)F(6)(+), C(2)F(4)(+), C(n)F(2n+1)(+) and a few families of oxygen containing cations (C(n)F(2n+1)OH(2)(+), C(n)F(2n)OH(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(2)H(2)(+), C(n)F(2n-2)O(2)H(+)) which are suggested to derive from C(n)F(2n+1)(+) in a cascade of steps initiated by condensation with water followed by steps of HF elimination and H(2)O addition. Negative ions formed from the fluoroethanes CHF(2)CH(3) and CF(3)CH(2)F (M) include complexes with ions of the background, O(2)(-)(M), O(3)(-)(M) and some higher complexes involving also water, and complexes of the fluoride ion, F(-)(H(2)O), F(-)(M) and higher complexes with both M and H(2)O also together. The interesting product O(2)(-)(HF) is also formed from 1,1-difluoroethane. In contrast to the HFCs, perfluoro-n-hexane gives stable molecular anions, M(-), which at low source temperature or in humidified air are also detected as hydrates, M(-)(H(2)O). In addition, in humidified air F(-)(H(2)O)(n) complexes are also formed. The reactions leading to all major positive and negative product ions are discussed

  5. Orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process

    DOEpatents

    Kurulugama, Ruwan T; Belov, Mikhail E

    2014-04-15

    An orthogonal ion injection apparatus and process are described in which ions are directly injected into an ion guide orthogonal to the ion guide axis through an inlet opening located on a side of the ion guide. The end of the heated capillary is placed inside the ion guide such that the ions are directly injected into DC and RF fields inside the ion guide, which efficiently confines ions inside the ion guide. Liquid droplets created by the ionization source that are carried through the capillary into the ion guide are removed from the ion guide by a strong directional gas flow through an inlet opening on the opposite side of the ion guide. Strong DC and RF fields divert ions into the ion guide. In-guide orthogonal injection yields a noise level that is a factor of 1.5 to 2 lower than conventional inline injection known in the art. Signal intensities for low m/z ions are greater compared to convention inline injection under the same processing conditions.

  6. Facility produced charge-exchange ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    These facility produced ions are created by charge-exchange collisions between neutral atoms and energetic thruster beam ions. The result of the electron transfer is an energetic neutral atom and an ion of only thermal energy. There are true charge-exchange ions produced by collisions with neutrals escaping from the ion thruster and being charge-exchange ionized before the neutral intercepts the tank wall. The facility produced charge-exchange ions will not exist in space and therefore, represent a source of error where measurements involving ion thruster plasmas and their density are involved. The quantity of facility produced ions in a test chamber with a 30 cm mercury ion thruster was determined.

  7. Free radicals created by plasmas cause autohesive bonding in polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Awaja, Firas; McKenzie, David R.; Zhang Shengnan; James, Natalie

    2011-05-23

    We find that plasma immersion ion implantation of polymer surfaces enhances their autohesive bond strength when pressed together by more than a factor of five. Both polymerising (CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}) and nonpolymerising (Ar) plasmas are effective. There is currently no satisfactory theory for predicting this remarkable phenomenon. We propose that free radicals created by the plasma treatment process diffuse to the interface and cause covalent bonds to form. This theory predicts the dependence of bond strength on plasma bias voltage, treatment time, and autohesive process conditions.

  8. Ion mobility spectrometers and methods for ion mobility spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, David A; Scott, Jill R; Appelhans, Anthony D; McJunkin, Timothy R; Olson, John E

    2009-04-14

    An ion mobility spectrometer may include an inner electrode and an outer electrode arranged so that at least a portion of the outer electrode surrounds at least a portion of the inner electrode and defines a drift space therebetween. The inner and outer electrodes are electrically insulated from one another so that a non-linear electric field is created in the drift space when an electric potential is placed on the inner and outer electrodes. An ion source operatively associated with the ion mobility spectrometer releases ions to the drift space defined between the inner and outer electrodes. A detector operatively associated with at least a portion of the outer electrode detects ions from the drift space.

  9. The inception of pulsed discharges in air: simulations in background fields above and below breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Anbang; Teunissen, Jannis; Ebert, Ute

    2014-11-01

    We investigate discharge inception in air, in uniform background electric fields above and below the breakdown threshold. We perform 3D particle simulations that include a natural level of background ionization in the form of positive and \\text{O}2- ions. In background fields below breakdown, we use a strongly ionized seed of electrons and positive ions to enhance the field locally. In the region of enhanced field, we observe the growth of positive streamers, as in previous simulations with 2D plasma fluid models. The inclusion of background ionization has little effect in this case. When the background field is above the breakdown threshold, the situation is very different. Electrons can then detach from \\text{O}2- and start ionization avalanches in the whole volume. These avalanches together create one extended discharge, in contrast to the ‘double-headed’ streamers found in many fluid simulations.

  10. Reconfigurable photonic crystal waveguides created by selective liquid infiltration.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, A Casas; Domachuk, P; Grillet, C; Monat, C; Mägi, E C; Li, E; Eggleton, B J

    2012-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate reconfigurable photonic crystal waveguides created directly by infiltrating high refractive index (n≈2.01) liquids into selected air holes of a two-dimensional hexagonal periodic lattice in silicon. The resulting effective index contrast is large enough that a single row of infiltrated holes enables light propagation at near-infrared wavelengths. We include a detailed comparison between modeling and experimental results of single line defect waveguides and show how our infiltration procedure is reversible and repeatable. We achieve infiltration accuracy down to the single air hole level and demonstrate control on the volume of liquid infused into the holes by simply changing the infiltration velocity. This method is promising for achieving a wide range of targeted optical functionalities on a "blank" photonic crystal membrane that can be reconfigured on demand. PMID:22565727

  11. Mushrooms use convectively created airflows to disperse their spores.

    PubMed

    Dressaire, Emilie; Yamada, Lisa; Song, Boya; Roper, Marcus

    2016-03-15

    Thousands of basidiomycete fungal species rely on mushroom spores to spread across landscapes. It has long been thought that spores depend on favorable winds for dispersal--that active control of spore dispersal by the parent fungus is limited to an impulse delivered to the spores to carry them clear of the gill surface. Here we show that evaporative cooling of the air surrounding the pileus creates convective airflows capable of carrying spores at speeds of centimeters per second. Convective cells can transport spores from gaps that may be only 1 cm high and lift spores 10 cm or more into the air. This work reveals how mushrooms tolerate and even benefit from crowding and explains their high water needs. PMID:26929324

  12. Intermediate ions in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, Hannes; Komsaare, Kaupo; Hõrrak, Urmas

    2014-01-01

    Intermediate air ions are charged nanometer-sized aerosol particles with an electric mobility of about 0.03-0.5 cm2 V- 1 s- 1 and a diameter of about 1.5-7.5 nm. Intensive studies of new particle formation provided good knowledge about intermediate ions during burst events of atmospheric aerosol nucleation. Information about intermediate ions during quiet periods between the bursts remained poor. The new mobility analyzer SIGMA can detect air ions at concentrations of mobility fractions of about 1 cm- 3 and enables studying intermediate ions during quiet periods. It became evident that intermediate ions always exist in atmospheric air and should be considered an indicator and a mediator of aerosol nucleation. The annual average concentration of intermediate ions of one polarity in Tartu, Estonia, was about 40 cm- 3 while 5% of the measurements showed a concentration of less than 10 cm- 3. The fraction concentrations in logarithmic 1/8-decade mobility bins between 0.1 and 0.4 cm2 V- 1 s- 1 often dropped below 1 cm- 3. The bursts of intermediate ions at stations separated by around 100 km appeared to be correlated. The lifespan of intermediate ions in the atmosphere is a few minutes, and they cannot be carried by wind over long distances. Thus the observed long-range correlation of intermediate ions is explained by simultaneous changes in air composition in widely spaced stations. A certain amount of intermediate ion bursts, predominantly of negative polarity, are produced by the balloelectric effect at the splashing of water drops during rain. These bursts are usually excluded when speaking about new particle formation because the balloelectric particles are assumed not to grow to the size of the Aitken mode. The mobility distribution of balloelectric ions is uniform in shape in all measurements. The maximum is located at a mobility of about 0.2 cm2 V- 1 s- 1, which corresponds to the diameter of particles of about 2.5 nm.

  13. Air surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, G.W.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the air surveillance and monitoring programs currently in operation at that Hanford Site. Atmospheric releases of pollutants from Hanford to the surrounding region are a potential source of human exposure. For that reason, both radioactive and nonradioactive materials in air are monitored at a number of locations. The influence of Hanford emissions on local radionuclide concentrations was evaluated by comparing concentrations measured at distant locations within the region to concentrations measured at the Site perimeter. This section discusses sample collection, analytical methods, and the results of the Hanford air surveillance program. A complete listing of all analytical results summarized in this section is reported separately by Bisping (1995).

  14. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    An ion source which generates ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal magnetic field to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

  15. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, John Paul; Burns, Erskine John Thomas; Draper, Charles Hadley

    1997-01-01

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

  16. Transfer Casting From Ion-Beam-Textured Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, B. A.; Weigand, A. J.; Sovey, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Textured surfaces created on metals, ceramics, and polymers. Electron-bombardment ion thrustor used as neutralized-ion-beam source. Beam of directed, energetic ions alter surface chemistry and/or morphology of many materials. By adjusting ion energy and ion-beam current density impinging upon target, precise surface modifications obtained without risk of targetmaterial melting or bulk decomposition. Technique developed to generate precise, controllable, surface microstructures on metals, ceramics, and polymers.

  17. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  18. /Air Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Samar; Sohn, Hong Yong; Kim, Hang Goo

    2014-08-01

    Molten magnesium oxidizes rapidly when exposed to air causing melt loss and handling difficulties. The use of certain additive gases such as SF6, SO2, and CO2 to form a protective MgO layer over a magnesium melt has been proposed. The oxidation behavior of molten magnesium in air containing various concentrations of SF6 was investigated. Measurements of the kinetics of the oxide layer growth at various SF6 concentrations in air and temperatures were made. Experiments were performed using a thermogravimetric analysis unit in the temperature range of 943 K to 1043 K (670 °C to 770 °C). Results showed that a thin, coherent, and protective MgF2 layer was formed under SF6/Air mixtures, with a thickness ranging from 300 nm to 3 μm depending on SF6 concentration, temperature, and exposure time. Rate parameters were calculated and a model for the process was developed. The morphology and composition of the surface films were studied using scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive spectroscope.

  19. Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Marjorie

    1964-01-01

    Dr Marjorie Clifton describes the classification of gaseous and nongaseous constituents of air pollution and then outlines the methods of measuring these. The National Survey embraced 150 towns of all sizes throughout England and Wales and provided data on smoke and sulphur dioxide in relation to climate, topography, industrialization, population density, fuel utilization and urban development. Dr W C Turner discusses the relationship between air pollution and mortality from respiratory conditions, and particularly the incidence of chronic bronchitis. He postulates a theory that such respiratory conditions arise as an allergy to the spores of certain moulds, spore formation being encouraged by the air humidity in Greatv Britain and overcrowded and damp living conditions. He describes the results of a twenty-week study undertaken in 1962-3, showing associations between respiratory disease and levels of air pollution. Dr Stuart Carne undertook a survey in general practice to plot the patterns of respiratory illness in London during the winter of 1962-3. There were two peaks of respiratory illnesses coinciding with the fog at the beginning of December and the freeze-up from the end of December until the beginning of March. PMID:14178955

  20. Air Trafficco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasunic, Kevin

    1970-01-01

    The work of the 14,000 air traffic controllers can be both challenging and nerve-racking. Concentration, steady nerves, and a clear voice are required to remember the routing and identification of the maze of aircraft and to instruct each of them accurately. Controllers must have a high school diploma and three years work experience or a college…

  1. Characterization of ions at Alpine waterfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolarž, P.; Gaisberger, M.; Madl, P.; Hofmann, W.; Ritter, M.; Hartl, A.

    2012-04-01

    During a three-year field campaign of measuring waterfall generated ions, we monitored five different waterfalls in the Austrian Alps. Most measurements were performed at the Krimml waterfall (Salzburg, Austria), which is the biggest waterfall in Europe, and the Gartl waterfall (Mölltal, Austria). We characterized spatial, time and size distributions of waterfall-generated ions under the influence of surrounding topography. The smallest ions with boundary diameters of 0.9, 1.5 and 2 nm, were measured with a cylindrical air ion detector (CDI-06), while ion sizes from 5.5 to 350 nm were measured using a modified Grimm SMPS aerosol spectrometer. High negative ion concentration gradients are detected in the vicinity of the waterfalls, whereas the increase of positive ions was only moderate. Ions in the nano range were the most abundant at 2 nm, and at 120 nm in the sub-micrometer range.

  2. Evolution of injected air stream in granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Ritwik; Das, Gargi; Das, Prasanta

    2015-11-01

    An air stream injected through an orifice into a granular bed creates intriguing but aesthetically exotic patterns. The interaction of air with an aggregate of cohesionless granules presents evolution of patterns from stationary bubble to meandering filament and finally to a floating canopy with the increase of air velocity.

  3. Microwave remote sensing of ionized air.

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Heifetz, A.; Elmer, T.; Fiflis, P.; Koehl, E. R.; Chien, H. T.; Raptis, A. C.

    2011-07-01

    We present observations of microwave scattering from ambient room air ionized with a negative ion generator. The frequency dependence of the radar cross section of ionized air was measured from 26.5 to 40 GHz (Ka-band) in a bistatic mode with an Agilent PNA-X series (model N5245A) vector network analyzer. A detailed calibration scheme is provided to minimize the effect of the stray background field and system frequency response on the target reflection. The feasibility of detecting the microwave reflection from ionized air portends many potential applications such as remote sensing of atmospheric ionization and remote detection of radioactive ionization of air.

  4. Alpha-environmental continuous air monitor inlet

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.

    2003-01-01

    A wind deceleration and protective shroud that provides representative samples of ambient aerosols to an environmental continuous air monitor (ECAM) has a cylindrical enclosure mounted to an input on the continuous air monitor, the cylindrical enclosure having shrouded nozzles located radially about its periphery. Ambient air flows, often along with rainwater flows into the nozzles in a sampling flow generated by a pump in the continuous air monitor. The sampling flow of air creates a cyclonic flow in the enclosure that flows up through the cylindrical enclosure until the flow of air reaches the top of the cylindrical enclosure and then is directed downward to the continuous air monitor. A sloped platform located inside the cylindrical enclosure supports the nozzles and causes any moisture entering through the nozzle to drain out through the nozzles.

  5. Air tightness of buildings in Finland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppinen, Timo T.

    2001-03-01

    There are no requirements of building air tightness in Finland. Buildings always have thermal bridges and air leak routes, whose impact in decreasing comfort depends on the structures and the way of constructing. Uncontrolled air leaks are cooling the structures and causing draft and, in the long run, defects. These air leaks and thermal bridges can be found only by thermal scanning. In Finland building air tightness has been measured for over 20 years. The procedure includes two stages, in which the target is scanned by a thermal imager. The paper is based on the results of over 200 tests of one-family and detached houses. The air tightness level has improved, but there are still problems in the structural details. The monitoring procedure for therm scanning of buildings should be further developed (there is no generally accepted practice at the moment), as well as air tightness requirements should be created.

  6. Air transparent soundproof window

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  7. Process for modifying the metal ion sorption capacity of a medium

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.

    2002-01-01

    A process for modifying a medium is disclosed that includes treating a medium having a metal ion sorption capacity with a solution that includes: A) an agent capable of forming a complex with metal ions; and B) ions selected from the group consisting of sodium ions, potassium ions, magnesium ions, and combinations thereof, to create a medium having an increased capacity to sorb metal ions relative to the untreated medium.

  8. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R.G.

    2006-06-01

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8} cm{sup -2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nmion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  9. Extending ion-track lithography to the low-energy ion regime

    SciTech Connect

    Musket, R G

    2005-10-14

    Ion tracking and ion-track lithography have been performed almost exclusively using ions with energies near or above the maximum in electronic stopping, which occurs at {approx}1 MeV/amu. In this paper, ion-track lithography using ions with energies well below this maximum is discussed. The results of etching ion tracks created in polycarbonate films by ions with energies just above the anticipated threshold for creating etchable latent tracks with cylindrical geometry have been examined. Low-energy neon and argon ions with 18-60 keV/amu and fluences of {approx}10{sup 8}/cm{sup 2} were used to examine the limits for producing useful, etchable tracks in polycarbonate films. By concentrating on the early stages of etching (i.e., {approx}20 nm < SEM hole diameter < {approx}100 nm), the energy deposition calculated for the incident ion was correlated with the creation of etchable tracks. The experimental results are discussed with regard to the energy losses of the ions in the polycarbonate films and to the formation of continuous latent tracks through the entire thickness of the films. The probability distributions for large-angle scattering events were calculated to assess their importance as a function of ion energy. All these results have significant implications with respect to the threshold for formation of etchable tracks and to the use of low-energy ions for lithographic applications of ion tracking.

  10. Educating Managers to Create Healthy Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbreath, Brad

    2012-01-01

    This article provides management educators with a comprehensive, research-based set of concepts they can use to enrich students' understanding of how to create healthy workplaces. To assist with that endeavor, learning objectives related to creating healthy workplaces are provided. Work environment stressors are discussed along with human and…

  11. Energy cost of creating quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Avijit; Singh, Uttam; Bhattacharya, Samyadeb; Pati, Arun Kumar

    2016-05-01

    We consider physical situations where the resource theories of coherence and thermodynamics play competing roles. In particular, we study the creation of quantum coherence using unitary operations with limited thermodynamic resources. We find the maximal coherence that can be created under unitary operations starting from a thermal state and find explicitly the unitary transformation that creates the maximal coherence. Since coherence is created by unitary operations starting from a thermal state, it requires some amount of energy. This motivates us to explore the trade-off between the amount of coherence that can be created and the energy cost of the unitary process. We also find the maximal achievable coherence under the constraint on the available energy. Additionally, we compare the maximal coherence and the maximal total correlation that can be created under unitary transformations with the same available energy at our disposal. We find that when maximal coherence is created with limited energy, the total correlation created in the process is upper bounded by the maximal coherence, and vice versa. For two-qubit systems we show that no unitary transformation exists that creates the maximal coherence and maximal total correlation simultaneously with a limited energy cost.

  12. Learning Course Content by Creating a Wiki

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthew, Kathryn I.; Felvegi, Emese

    2009-01-01

    In this article, students' perceptions of the benefits and the challenges of creating a wiki for a language arts methods class are explored through their online reflections and interview transcripts. The students' own words describe their experiences about learning course content while collaborating to create a course wiki. Reflecting on the…

  13. Creating Civil Societies: The University's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daxner, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The president emeritus of Carl von Ossietzky University in Germany describes a research project examining the university's role in creating a democratic citizenship, prompted by the European Union's need to create societies in which citizens can participate actively in determining their own future. (EV)

  14. Process to create simulated lunar agglutinate particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gustafson, Robert J. (Inventor); Gustafson, Marty A. (Inventor); White, Brant C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of creating simulated agglutinate particles by applying a heat source sufficient to partially melt a raw material is provided. The raw material is preferably any lunar soil simulant, crushed mineral, mixture of crushed minerals, or similar material, and the heat source creates localized heating of the raw material.

  15. Creating "Third Spaces": Promoting Learning through Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    Wilhelm offers us a definition of "third spaces" as "more democratic and dialogic spaces than a classroom, as well as a metaphor for a space in which new, hybrid, and challenging discourses and real-world knowledge and applications are created." With helpful background and examples, he urges us to create such spaces for our students, adamant that…

  16. Create a Positive Environment | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Family, friends, coworkers, and others who you interact with can affect how you feel about yourself. This includes how you feel about your body. One of the keys to creating a more positive body image is to create a more positive environment for yourself by focusing on:

  17. Creating Safe Spaces for Music Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Karin S.; Smith, Tawnya D.; Stanuch, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a practical model for fostering emotionally safe learning environments that instill in music students a positive sense of self-belief, freedom, and purpose. The authors examine the implications for music educators of creating effective learning environments and present recommendations for creating a safe space for learning,…

  18. Learning by Doing: Creating Engaging Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Liz; Glass, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the implementation of a Learning-by-Doing Instructional model to create an innovative language course. The authors describe the structure of the course, the instructional strategies implemented, and the Learning Management System tools used to create an engaging learning experience.

  19. Using Technology to Create Safer Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townley, Arthur J.; Martinez, Kenneth

    1995-01-01

    Although classes to create student self-esteem and antigang programs are gaining in popularity, most school districts have not used available technology to help create safer campuses. Increased availability of telephones and two-way radios would enhance school security, along with incorporation of newer technologies such as computers, digitized…

  20. Creating Digital Video in Your School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Creating digital videos provides students with practice in critical 21st century communication skills, as the video production involves critical thinking, general observation, and analysis and perspective-making skills. Producing video helps students appreciate literature and other expressions of information and students creating digital video…

  1. Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  2. Ion production cost of a gridded helicon ion thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Logan T.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.

    2013-10-01

    Helicon plasma sources are capable of efficiently ionizing propellants and have been considered for application in electric propulsion. However, studies that estimate the ion production cost of the helicon plasma source are limited and rely on estimates of the extracted ion current. The ion production cost of a helicon plasma source is determined using a gridded ion thruster configuration that allows accurate measurement of the ion beam current. These measurements are used in conjunction with previous characterization of the helicon plasma to create a model of the discharge plasma within the gridded thruster. The device is tested across a range of operating conditions: 343-600 W radio frequency power at 13.56 MHz, 50-250 G and 1.5 mg s-1 of argon at a pressure of 1.6 × 10-5 Torr-Ar. The ion production cost is 132-212 ± 28-46 eV/ion, driven primarily by ion loss to the walls and anode, as well as energy loss in the anode and grid sheaths.

  3. Cold atomic beam ion source for focused ion beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Knuffman, B.; Steele, A. V.; McClelland, J. J.

    2013-07-28

    We report measurements and modeling of an ion source that is based on ionization of a laser-cooled atomic beam. We show a high brightness and a low energy spread, suitable for use in next-generation, high-resolution focused ion beam systems. Our measurements of total ion current as a function of ionization conditions support an analytical model that also predicts the cross-sectional current density and spatial distribution of ions created in the source. The model predicts a peak brightness of 2 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1} and an energy spread less than 0.34 eV. The model is also combined with Monte-Carlo simulations of the inter-ion Coulomb forces to show that the source can be operated at several picoamperes with a brightness above 1 × 10{sup 7} A m{sup −2} sr{sup −1} eV{sup −1}. We estimate that when combined with a conventional ion focusing column, an ion source with these properties could focus a 1 pA beam into a spot smaller than 1 nm. A total current greater than 5 nA was measured in a lower-brightness configuration of the ion source, demonstrating the possibility of a high current mode of operation.

  4. Simulation Based on Ion Propulsion Rocket System with Using Negative ion - Negative Ion Pair Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyavel, C.

    2016-07-01

    Ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of ion-ion pair techniques because of their stimulated of low propellant, Design of Thrust range is 1N with low electric power and high efficiency. A Negative ion-Negative ion pair of ion propulsion rocket system is proposed in this work .Negative Ion Based Rocket system consists of three parts 1.ionization chamber 2. Repulsion force and ion accelerator 3. Exhaust of Nozzle. The Negative ions from electro negatively gas are produced by attachment of the gas ,such as chlorine with electron emitted from a Electron gun ionization chamber. The formulate of large stable negative ion is achievable in chlorine gas with respect to electron affinity (∆E). The electron affinity is a measure of the energy change when an electron is added to a neutral atom to form a negative ion. When a neutral chlorine atom in the gaseous form picks up an electron to form a Cl- ion, it releases energy of 349 kJ/mol or 3.6 ev/atom. It is said to have an electron affinity of -349 kJ/mol ,the negative sign indicating that energy is released during this process .The mechanisms of attachment involve the formation of intermediate states. In that reason for , the highly repulsive force created between the same negative ions. The distance between same negative ions is important for the evaluate of the rocket thrust and is also determined by the exhaust velocity of the propellant. The mass flow rate of propellant is achieved by the ratio of total mass of the propellant (Kg) needed for operation to time period(s). Accelerate the Negative ions to a high velocity in the thrust vector direction with a significantly intense Magnetic field and the exhaust of negative ions through Nozzle. The simulation of the ion propulsion system has been carried out by MATLAB. By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results, we have found that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with estimated

  5. [Air pollution].

    PubMed

    Bauters, Christophe; Bauters, Gautier

    2016-01-01

    Short-term exposure to particulate matter (PM) air pollution is associated with an increased cardiovascular mortality. Chronic exposure to PM is also associated with cardiovascular risk. Myocardial infarction and heart failure are the most common cardiovascular events associated with PM pollution. The pathophysiological mechanisms related to PM pollution are inflammation, thrombosis, vasomotion abnormalities, progression of atherosclerosis, increased blood pressure, and cardiac remodeling. A decrease in PM exposure may be particularly beneficial in subjects with a high cardiovascular risk. PMID:26547674

  6. The effectiveness of a heated air curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Daria

    2014-11-01

    Air curtains are high-velocity plane turbulent jets which are installed in the doorway in order to reduce the heat and the mass exchange between two environments. The air curtain effectiveness E is defined as the fraction of the exchange flow prevented by the air curtain compared to the open-door situation. In the present study, we investigate the effects of an opposing buoyancy force on the air curtain effectiveness. Such an opposing buoyancy force arises for example if a downwards blowing air curtain is heated. We conducted small-scale experiments using water as the working fluid with density differences created by salt and sugar. The effectiveness of a downwards blowing air curtain was measured for situations in which the initial density of the air curtain was less than both the indoor and the outdoor fluid density, which corresponds to the case of a heated air curtain. We compare the effectiveness of the heated air curtain to the case of the neutrally buoyant air curtain. It is found that the effectiveness starts to decrease if the air curtain is heated beyond a critical temperature. Furthermore, we propose a theoretical model to describe the dynamics of the buoyant air curtain. Numerical results obtained from solving this model corroborate our experimental findings.

  7. Air filtering device

    SciTech Connect

    Backus, A.L.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes a room air cleaning device. It comprises: a box housing having an air inlet and an air outlet provided therein; a vertical baffle coupled to the box housing opposite the air outlet and spaced form the box housing such that an air egress outlet is formed between the vertical baffle and the box housing; air cleansing means substantially disposed within the box housing and cleansing air passing into the inlet and out of the air egress outlet; a fan disposed within the box housing, the fan providing air movement through the air inlet and the air egress outlet; wherein air exits the room air cleaning device through the air egress outlet as a vertical plane of moving air; and wherein formation of the vertical plane of moving air contributes to the formation of a low pressure area drawing impure air toward the air inlet.

  8. Energetic ions in ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Pinches, S. D.; Chapman, I. T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Lauber, Ph. W.; Oliver, H. J. C.; Shinohara, K.; Tani, K.

    2015-02-15

    This paper discusses the behaviour and consequences of the expected populations of energetic ions in ITER plasmas. It begins with a careful analytic and numerical consideration of the stability of Alfvén Eigenmodes in the ITER 15 MA baseline scenario. The stability threshold is determined by balancing the energetic ion drive against the dominant damping mechanisms and it is found that only in the outer half of the plasma (r/a>0.5) can the fast ions overcome the thermal ion Landau damping. This is in spite of the reduced numbers of alpha-particles and beam ions in this region but means that any Alfvén Eigenmode-induced redistribution is not expected to influence the fusion burn process. The influence of energetic ions upon the main global MHD phenomena expected in ITER's primary operating scenarios, including sawteeth, neoclassical tearing modes and Resistive Wall Modes, is also reviewed. Fast ion losses due to the non-axisymmetric fields arising from the finite number of toroidal field coils, the inclusion of ferromagnetic inserts, the presence of test blanket modules containing ferromagnetic material, and the fields created by the Edge Localised Mode (ELM) control coils in ITER are discussed. The greatest losses and associated heat loads onto the plasma facing components arise due to the use of the ELM control coils and come from neutral beam ions that are ionised in the plasma edge.

  9. Reactant ion chemistry for detection of TNT, RDX, and PETN using an ion mobility spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Klassen, S.E.; Rodacy, P.; Silva, R.

    1997-09-01

    This report describes the responses of three energetic materials (TNT, RDX, and PETN) to varying reactant ion chemistries and IMS cell temperatures. The following reactant ion chemistries were evaluated; air-dry; air-wet; methylene chloride-dry; methylene chloride-wet; methylene bromide-dry; nitrogen dioxide-wet; sulfur dioxide-wet. The temperature was varied between 160 - 220{degrees}C.

  10. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  11. Convection of ion cyclotron waves to ion-heating regions

    SciTech Connect

    Roennmark, K.; Andre, M. )

    1991-10-01

    Low-frequency waves associated with ion conics have been observed in the central plasma sheet, in a region where there are no obvious sources of free energy that could destabilize these waves locally. The authors consider ion cyclotron waves generated in the equatorial plane by a proton temperature anisotropy and use computed growth rates to create a model wave distribution. Using ray tracing and conservation of the wave distribution function along phase space rays, they then map the wave intensities form the equatorial plane to the top of the ion-heating region. They find that the spectral density at a geocentric distance of 2.8 R{sub E} will be about 10 times higher than that in the equatorial region. Thus, convection from the equatorial plane could explain the observed spectral density of 10{sup {minus}6} V{sup 2} m{sup {minus}2} Hz{sup {minus}1} and the associated oxygen ion heating.

  12. ION SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Cook, B.

    1959-02-10

    An ion switch capable of transferring large magnitudes of power is described. An ion switch constructed in accordance with the invention includes a pair of spaced control electrodes disposed in a highly evacuated region for connection in a conventional circuit to control the passing of power therethrough. A controllable ionic conduction path is provided directiy between the control electrodes by a source unit to close the ion switch. Conventional power supply means are provided to trigger the source unit and control the magnitude, durations and pulse repetition rate of the aforementioned ionic conduction path.

  13. Recent advances in zinc-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanguang; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-08-01

    Zinc-air is a century-old battery technology but has attracted revived interest recently. With larger storage capacity at a fraction of the cost compared to lithium-ion, zinc-air batteries clearly represent one of the most viable future options to powering electric vehicles. However, some technical problems associated with them have yet to be resolved. In this review, we present the fundamentals, challenges and latest exciting advances related to zinc-air research. Detailed discussion will be organized around the individual components of the system - from zinc electrodes, electrolytes, and separators to air electrodes and oxygen electrocatalysts in sequential order for both primary and electrically/mechanically rechargeable types. The detrimental effect of CO2 on battery performance is also emphasized, and possible solutions summarized. Finally, other metal-air batteries are briefly overviewed and compared in favor of zinc-air. PMID:24926965

  14. Taking medicine at home - create a routine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000613.htm Taking medicine at home - create a routine To use the ... teeth. Find Ways to Help You Remember Your Medicines You can: Set the alarm on your clock, ...

  15. High-energy metal air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Xiao, Jie; Xu, Wu; Wang, Deyu; Williford, Ralph E.; Liu, Jun

    2013-07-09

    Disclosed herein are embodiments of lithium/air batteries and methods of making and using the same. Certain embodiments are pouch-cell batteries encased within an oxygen-permeable membrane packaging material that is less than 2% of the total battery weight. Some embodiments include a hybrid air electrode comprising carbon and an ion insertion material, wherein the mass ratio of ion insertion material to carbon is 0.2 to 0.8. The air electrode may include hydrophobic, porous fibers. In particular embodiments, the air electrode is soaked with an electrolyte comprising one or more solvents including dimethyl ether, and the dimethyl ether subsequently is evacuated from the soaked electrode. In other embodiments, the electrolyte comprises 10-20% crown ether by weight.

  16. High-energy metal air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ji-Guang; Xiao, Jie; Xu, Wu; Wang, Deyu; Williford, Ralph E.; Liu, Jun

    2014-07-01

    Disclosed herein are embodiments of lithium/air batteries and methods of making and using the same. Certain embodiments are pouch-cell batteries encased within an oxygen-permeable membrane packaging material that is less than 2% of the total battery weight. Some embodiments include a hybrid air electrode comprising carbon and an ion insertion material, wherein the mass ratio of ion insertion material to carbon is 0.2 to 0.8. The air electrode may include hydrophobic, porous fibers. In particular embodiments, the air electrode is soaked with an electrolyte comprising one or more solvents including dimethyl ether, and the dimethyl ether subsequently is evacuated from the soaked electrode. In other embodiments, the electrolyte comprises 10-20% crown ether by weight.

  17. Characterization of ions at Alpine waterfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolarž, P.; Gaisberger, M.; Madl, P.; Hofmann, W.; Ritter, M.; Hartl, A.

    2011-09-01

    During a three-year field campaign of measuring waterfall generated ions, we monitored five different waterfalls in the Austrian Alps. Most measurements were performed at the Krimml waterfall (Salzburg), which is the biggest and most visited one in Europe and the Gartl waterfall (Mölltal, Carinthia). Smallest ion sizes (0.9-2 nm) were measured with a cylindrical air ion detector (CDI-06) while ion sizes from 5.5 to 350 nm were measured using a modified Grimm SMPS aerosol spectrometer. Measurements showed high negative ion gradients nearby waterfalls whereas positive ions showed only a moderate increase. The most abundant sizes of nano-sized and sub-micrometer ions measured were at 2 nm and of the larger and heavier ones at 120 nm.

  18. Creating a VAPEPS database: A VAPEPS tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, George

    1989-01-01

    A procedural method is outlined for creating a Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) Database. The method of presentation employs flowcharts of sequential VAPEPS Commands used to create a VAPEPS Database. The commands are accompanied by explanatory text to the right of the command in order to minimize the need for repetitive reference to the VAPEPS user's manual. The method is demonstrated by examples of varying complexity. It is assumed that the reader has acquired a basic knowledge of the VAPEPS software program.

  19. ISO 55000: Creating an asset management system.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Chris; Main, Kevin

    2015-02-01

    In the October 2014 issue of HEJ, Keith Hamer, group vice-president, Asset Management & Engineering at Sodexo, and marketing director at Asset Wisdom, Kevin Main, argued that the new ISO 55000 standards present facilities managers with an opportunity to create 'a joined-up, whole lifecycle approach' to managing and delivering value from assets. In this article, Kevin Main and Chris Bradley, who runs various asset management projects, examine the process of creating an asset management system. PMID:26268021

  20. Create three distinct career paths for innovators.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Gina Colarelli; Corbett, Andrew; Pierantozzi, Ron

    2009-12-01

    Large companies say they Create Three Distinct want to be Career Paths for Innovators innovative, but they fundamentally mismanage their talent. Expecting innovators to grow along with their projects-from discovery to incubation to acceleration--sets them up to fail. Most people excel at one of the phases, not all three. By allowing innovation employees to develop career paths suited to their strengths, companies will create a sustainable innovation function. PMID:19968059

  1. Creating Math Videos: Comparing Platforms and Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbasian, Reza O.; Sieben, John T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a short tutorial on creating mini-videos using two platforms--PCs and tablets such as iPads--and software packages that work with these devices. Specifically, we describe the step-by-step process of creating and editing videos using a Wacom Intuos pen-tablet plus Camtasia software on a PC platform and using the software…

  2. Ion focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  3. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Leland, W.T.

    1960-01-01

    The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

  4. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-07-19

    An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

  5. MS/MS Automated Selected Ion Chromatograms

    2005-12-12

    This program can be used to read a LC-MS/MS data file from either a Finnigan ion trap mass spectrometer (.Raw file) or an Agilent Ion Trap mass spectrometer (.MGF and .CDF files) and create a selected ion chromatogram (SIC) for each of the parent ion masses chosen for fragmentation. The largest peak in each SIC is also identified, with reported statistics including peak elution time, height, area, and signal to noise ratio. It creates severalmore » output files, including a base peak intensity (BPI) chromatogram for the survey scan, a BPI for the fragmentation scans, an XML file containing the SIC data for each parent ion, and a "flat file" (ready for import into a database) containing summaries of the SIC data statistics.« less

  6. Ion-induced electron emission microscopy

    DOEpatents

    Doyle, Barney L.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Weller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    An ion beam analysis system that creates multidimensional maps of the effects of high energy ions from an unfocussed source upon a sample by correlating the exact entry point of an ion into a sample by projection imaging of the secondary electrons emitted at that point with a signal from a detector that measures the interaction of that ion within the sample. The emitted secondary electrons are collected in a strong electric field perpendicular to the sample surface and (optionally) projected and refocused by the electron lenses found in a photon emission electron microscope, amplified by microchannel plates and then their exact position is sensed by a very sensitive X Y position detector. Position signals from this secondary electron detector are then correlated in time with nuclear, atomic or electrical effects, including the malfunction of digital circuits, detected within the sample that were caused by the individual ion that created these secondary electrons in the fit place.

  7. Air quality data systems integration

    SciTech Connect

    Row, V.K.; Wilson, J.F.

    1998-12-31

    Traditionally, data used for compliance with air quality programs are obtained from various sources within the plant, on site lab, or perhaps from a product movement accounting program. For the most part, the data processing and subsequent calculations and reports were handled individually, thus generating huge spreadsheets and mounds of process data in paper format. The natural reaction to this overwhelming data management problem is to search for an off-the-shelf software package that will hopefully cover all of the plant`s needs for compliance with air quality regulations. Rather than searching for or trying to custom build a single electronic system, the authors suggest using internet browsing software to create links between existing repositories of air quality data and related information.

  8. Underbalanced drilling with air offers many pluses

    SciTech Connect

    Shale, L.

    1995-06-26

    A pressure overbalance during conventional drilling can cause significant fluid filtrate invasion and lost circulation. Fluid invasion into the formation can lead to formation damage, high mud costs, a need for expensive completions, and well productivity impairment. Because underbalanced drilling creates a natural tendency for fluid and gas to flow from the formation to the borehole, successful underbalanced drilling depends upon the appropriate selection of circulating fluid. The use of a compressible fluid in the circulating system, referred to as air drilling, lowers the downhole pressure, allowing drilling into and beyond these sensitive formations. The paper discusses the equipment needed; well control; downhole air requirements; air drilling techniques using dry air, air-mist, stable foam, stiff foam, and aerated-fluid; downhole fires; directional air drilling; and well completions.

  9. Pair creation in heavy ion channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, N. A.; Harman, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Heavy ions channeled through crystals with multi-GeV kinetic energies can create electron-positron pairs. In the framework of the ion, the energy of virtual photons arising from the periodic crystal potential may exceed the threshold 2mec2. The repeated periodic collisions with the crystal ions yield high pair production rates. When the virtual photon frequency matches a nuclear transition in the ion, the production rate can be resonantly increased. In this two-step excitation-pair conversion scheme, the excitation rates are coherently enhanced, and scale approximately quadratically with the number of crystal sites along the channel.

  10. Surface analysis using a new plasma assisted desorption/ionisation source for mass spectrometry in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowfield, A.; Barrett, D. A.; Alexander, M. R.; Ortori, C. A.; Rutten, F. M.; Salter, T. L.; Gilmore, I. S.; Bradley, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The authors report on a modified micro-plasma assisted desorption/ionisation (PADI) device which creates plasma through the breakdown of ambient air rather than utilising an independent noble gas flow. This new micro-PADI device is used as an ion source for ambient mass spectrometry to analyse species released from the surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene, and generic ibuprofen and paracetamol tablets through remote activation of the surface by the plasma. The mass spectra from these surfaces compare favourably to those produced by a PADI device constructed using an earlier design and confirm that the new ion source is an effective device which can be used to achieve ambient mass spectrometry with improved spatial resolution.

  11. AIR CLEANING FOR ACCEPTABLE INDOOR AIR QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses air cleaning for acceptable indoor air quality. ir cleaning has performed an important role in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems for many years. raditionally, general ventilation air-filtration equipment has been used to protect cooling coils ...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1103 - Induction system ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... between the air duct source and the airplane unit served by the air. (e) Each auxiliary power unit... other compartment or area of the airplane in which a hazard would be created resulting from the entry...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1103 - Induction system ducts and air duct systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... between the air duct source and the airplane unit served by the air. (e) Each auxiliary power unit... other compartment or area of the airplane in which a hazard would be created resulting from the entry...

  14. Ion trajectories in Mercury's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantos, M.; Reiff, P.; Killen, R.

    2003-04-01

    The atmosphere of Mercury is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Resulting ions are affected by both magnetic and electric field forces due to their small energy. The escape flux of these ions from Mercury's magnetosphere is believed to respond to the degree of solar wind - Hermean magnetosphere interaction. We present the structure of the Hermean magnetosphere obtained by the Toffoletto-Hill (JGR 98, 1339, 1993) model of an open magnetosphere, and supplement it with the Ding et al. (Phys. Space Plasmas, 1996) potential solver to represent the convection electric field. We follow thousands of Na and K ions in a tight grid of magnetic and electric fields at Mercury. Ions are created with a spatial distribution given from the neutral distribution to cover the entire dayside, and are launched at the surface, with an isotropic angular distribution. The initial energy is taken to be ˜1eV. We calculate the loci of points where the ions reimpact the planetary surface. We conclude that the dawn-dusk asymmetry and high-latitude enhancements in the sodium atmosphere are perpetuated by the pattern of ion redistribution due to a predominant dawn to dusk electric field. The solar wind ion sputtering effect will further amplify atmospheric patchiness.

  15. Simulator Of Rain In Flowing Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Richard M.; Cho, Young I.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Back, Lloyd H.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes relatively inexpensive apparatus that creates simulated precipitation from drizzle to heavy rain in flowing air. Small, positive-displacement pump and water-injecting device positioned at low-airspeed end of converging section of wind tunnel 10 in. in diameter. Drops injected by array entrained in flow of air as it accelerates toward narrower outlet, 15 in. downstream. Outlet 5 in. in diameter.

  16. NARSTO PAC2001 GVRD CAPMON AIR QUAL DATA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    ... Temperature Probe Humidity Probe Wind Sensor UV Ozone Detector Chemiluminescence TEOM GC-MS Ion Chromatograph ... Related Data:  Spatial Coverage: Canada Pacific 2001 Air Quality Study SCAR-B Block:  ...

  17. Sampling of ions at atmospheric pressure: ion transmission and ion energy studied by simulation and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Große-Kreul, Simon; Hübner, Simon; Benedikt, Jan; von Keudell, Achim

    2016-04-01

    Mass spectrometry of ions from atmospheric pressure plasmas is a challenging diagnostic method that has been applied to a large variety of cold plasma sources in the past. However, absolute densities can usually not be obtained, moreover, the process of sampling of ions and neutrals from such a plasma inherently influences the measured composition. These issues are studied in this contribution by a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Different numerical domains are sequentially coupled to calculate the ion transmission from the source to the mass analyzer. It is found that the energy of the sampled ions created by a radio-frequency microplasma operated in a He-N2 mixture at atmospheric pressure is of the order of 0.1 eV and that it depends linearly on the ion mass in good agreement with the expectation for seeded particles accelerated in a supersonic expansion. Moreover, the measured ion energy distribution from an afterglow of an atmospheric pressure plasma can be reproduced on basis of the particle trajectories in the sampling system. Eventually, an estimation of the absolute flux of ions to the detector is deduced.

  18. Creating standardized electronic data sheets for applications and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, L. J.; Lanza, D.

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) continues to develop infrastructure to enable the modular construction of satellites using an open network architecture and off-the-shelf avionics for space systems. Recent efforts have included the refinement of an ontology to formalize a standard language for the exchange of data and commands between components, including hardware and software, which is still evolving. AFRL is also focusing effort on creating standard interfaces using electronic data sheets based on this recently defined ontology. This paper will describe the development of standard interfaces that are documented in terms of an electronic datasheet for a specific application. The datasheet will identify the standard interfaces between hardware devices and software applications that are needed for a specific satellite function, in this case, a spacecraft guidance, navigation, and control (GN& C) application for Sun pointing. Finally, the benefits of using standardized interfaces will be discussed.

  19. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  20. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  1. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  2. [Create or copy... Which is the difference?].

    PubMed

    López P, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    Creating and copying are two different processes; we must not confuse creativity with plagiarism. However, this distinction is problematic, because there is no possibility of creating from scratch, this implies that any creative act necessarily arises from accumulative experience, inevitably producing a continuity between old and new. Even so it is necessary to establish clearly the difference between creating and copying. It is not desirable that a matter of such importance remains in the nebula or that the relationship between creativity and ethics is kept unaware. There are many cases of plagiarism, but this cannot be a consolation. There is no gain when the existence of a plagiarism is ignored or concealed and less when it is unjustified. PMID:19399333

  3. Creating Spin Switches and Junctions on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Eric; Stamp, Philip

    2010-03-01

    Inspired by the work of Hirjibehedin et al, (Science 317 1199) creating Heisenberg spin chains on an insulating surface, we examine geometries in which excitations down a spin chain are either blocked or transmitted depending on the state of a central junction, made from a spin dimer. The dimer state can be controlled by excitations down an additional chain, creating a spin switch. In addition to the technological applications of such a switch, the theoretical language developed has application to certain quantum computation schemes.

  4. Tools for creating and manipulating voxel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Gary H; Capello, Kevin; Chiang, Albert; Cardenas-Mendez, Erick; Sabourin, Trevor

    2010-03-01

    The National Internal Radiation Assessment Section's Human Monitoring Laboratory (HML) has purchased and developed a number of in-house tools to create and edit voxel phantoms. This paper describes the methodology developed in the HML using those tools to prepare input files for Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms. Three examples are given. The in-house tools described in this paper, and the phantoms that have been created using them, are all publically available upon request from the corresponding author. PMID:20147794

  5. Nanostructures created by interfered femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Chang, Yun-Ching; Yao, Jimmy; Luo, Claire; Yin, Shizhuo; Ruffin, Paul; Brantley, Christina; Edwards, Eugene

    2011-10-01

    The method by applying the interfered femtosecond laser to create nanostructured copper (Cu) surface has been studied. The nanostructure created by direct laser irradiation is also realized for comparison. Results show that more uniform and finer nanostructures with sphere shape and feature size around 100 nm can be induced by the interfered laser illumination comparing with the direct laser illumination. This offers an alternative fabrication approach that the feature size and the shape of the laser induced metallic nanostructures can be highly controlled, which can extremely improve its performance in related application such as the colorized metal, catalyst, SERS substrate, and etc.

  6. ION SOURCE

    DOEpatents

    Bell, W.A. Jr.; Love, L.O.; Prater, W.K.

    1958-01-28

    An ion source is presented capable of producing ions of elements which vaporize only at exceedingly high temperatures, i.e.,--1500 degrees to 3000 deg C. The ion source utilizes beams of electrons focused into a first chamber housing the material to be ionized to heat the material and thereby cause it to vaporize. An adjacent second chamber receives the vaporized material through an interconnecting passage, and ionization of the vaporized material occurs in this chamber. The ionization action is produced by an arc discharge sustained between a second clectron emitting filament and the walls of the chamber which are at different potentials. The resultant ionized material egresses from a passageway in the second chamber. Using this device, materials which in the past could not be processed in mass spectometers may be satisfactorily ionized for such applications.

  7. Microtopography enhances nitrogen cycling and removal in created mitigation wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, K.L.; Ahn, C.; Noe, G.B.

    2011-01-01

    Natural wetlands often have a heterogeneous soil surface topography, or microtopography (MT), that creates microsites of variable hydrology, vegetation, and soil biogeochemistry. Created mitigation wetlands are designed to mimic natural wetlands in structure and function, and recent mitigation projects have incorporated MT as one way to attain this goal. Microtopography may influence nitrogen (N) cycling in wetlands by providing adjacent areas of aerobic and anaerobic conditions and by increasing carbon storage, which together facilitate N cycling and removal. This study investigated three created wetlands in the Virginia Piedmont that incorporated disking-induced MT during construction. One site had paired disked and undisked plots, allowing an evaluation of the effects of this design feature on N flux rates. Microtopography was measured using conventional survey equipment along a 1-m circular transect and was described using two indices: tortuosity (T), describing soil surface roughness and relief, and limiting elevation difference (LD), describing soil surface relief. Ammonification, nitrification, and net N mineralization were determined with in situ incubation of modified ion-exchange resin cores and denitrification potential was determined using denitrification enzyme assay (DEA). Results demonstrated that disked plots had significantly greater LD than undisked plots one year after construction. Autogenic sources of MT (e.g. tussock-forming vegetation) in concert with variable hydrology and sedimentation maintained and in some cases enhanced MT in study wetlands. Tortuosity and LD values remained the same in one wetland when compared over a two-year period, suggesting a dynamic equilibrium of MT-forming and -eroding processes at play. Microtopography values also increased when comparing the original induced MT of a one-year old wetland with MT of older created wetlands (five and eight years old) with disking-induced MT, indicating that MT can increase by

  8. Ion Exchange Formation via Sulfonated Bicomponent Nonwovens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoughton, Hannah L.

    For many years ion exchange resins were used to: remove heavy metals from water, recover materials from wastewater, and eliminate harmful gases from the air. While use of these resin beads dominates the ion exchange industry, the beads have limitations that should be considered when decisions are made to employ them. For instance, officials must balance the inherent zero sum surface area and porosity of the materials. This series of studies investigates the use of bicomponent nonwovens as a base substrate for producing high surface area ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metal ions. Functionalized materials were produced in a two-step process: (1) PET/PE spunbond bicomponent fibers were fractured completely, producing the high surface area nonwoven to be used as the base ion exchange material, and (2) the conditions for functionalizing the PET fibers of the nonwoven webs were investigated where an epoxy containing monomer was grafted to the surface followed by sulfonation of the monomer. The functionalization reactions of the PET fibers were monitored based on: weight gain, FTIR, TOF-SIMS, and SEM. Ion exchange properties were evaluated using titration and copper ion removal capacity from test solutions. The relationship between web structure and removal efficiency of the metal ions was defined through a comparison of the bicomponent and homocomponent nonwovens for copper ion removal efficiency. The investigation revealed that utilizing the high surface area, fractured bicomponent nonwoven ion exchange materials with capacities comparable to commercially available ion exchange resins could be produced.

  9. Creating Opportunities: Tennessee's Southeast Regional Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Fred D.

    2002-01-01

    Rural Marion County (Tennessee), the town of Kimball, the Appalachian Regional Commission, and a local community college founded a regional skills center. The center offers a 2-year associate of science degree and classes in GED preparation, parenting, drug abuse prevention, cosmetology, and air conditioning and refrigeration. It has expanded…

  10. Principles for Creating a Computerized Test Battery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyllonen, Patrick C.

    1991-01-01

    The experience of developing a set of comprehensive aptitude batteries for computer administration for the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory's Learning Abilities Measurement Program resulted in the formulation of nine principles for creation of a computerized test battery. These principles are discussed in the context of research on…

  11. Creating a Garden for the Senses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Almost everyone enjoys a walk through a garden, bending to sniff a flower, enjoying a fresh air breeze, listening to water bubbling from a fountain, and watching sunlight dapple through trees and plants. At Allegheny Valley School (AVS), the emphasis on multisensory environments (MSE) for individuals with intellectual and developmental…

  12. Congress Creates Super Federal Library Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steere, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    In a rare show of bipartisanship, the Senate passed the controversial Federal Library Agency Act (FLAA) on a nearly unanimous voice vote, sending it to President Obama for his expected signature. The House had passed it in February with a two-thirds majority. The FLAA creates a new mandate by combining federal library functions scattered…

  13. Position Paper: Creating a New Professional Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arendale, David; Barrow, Hilda; Carpenter, Kathy; Hodges, Russ; McGrath, Jane; Newell, Pat; Norton, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This position paper investigates the merits and potential benefits of creating a new, more comprehensive professional association for members of the learning assistance and developmental education profession. This task was assigned to the College Reading and Learning Association/National Association for Developmental Education (CRLA/NADE) Working…

  14. The Magic Moment: Creating Color Harmony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartges, Dan

    2009-01-01

    If there is a truly magic moment in art class, it must be when a student--of any age--attains a working knowledge of color's core principles. At that point, she or he becomes able to consistently create color harmony in any painting, regardless of the subject matter. From then on, that student gains greater confidence, can paint better pictures…

  15. Will Education Reform Create More Opportunity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lionel S.

    2003-01-01

    Asserts that the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which is intended to close the achievement gap by improving schools, may be largely ineffective due to several of its questionable assumptions (e.g, school attendance is valued by and valuable to all individuals, and education creates opportunities). Suggests that simply providing the poor…

  16. Creating Music Environments in Early Childhood Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, Elayne

    1999-01-01

    Describes how teachers and caregivers can create music environments in early childhood settings that connect to other areas of development. Discusses how music environments can accommodate free-choice participation, describes the caregiver's role, and suggests music activities. Includes definitions of musical concepts for young children, also tips…

  17. Creating Teams Increases Extension Educator Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalker-Scott, Linda; Daniels, Catherine H.; Martini, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The Garden Team at Washington State University is a transdisciplinary group of faculty, staff, and students with expertise in applied plant and soil sciences and an interest in Extension education. The team's primary mission is to create current, relevant, and peer-reviewed materials as Extension publications for home gardeners. The average yearly…

  18. Creating the "History through Deaf Eyes" Documentary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hott, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author outlines how a documentary film about the history of deafness in the United States, inspired by the exhibition "History through Deaf Eyes," is going to be created. "History through Deaf Eyes" will have a dual focus. Part of its subject is deafness from the inside: the personal experiences of deaf people (and hearing…

  19. Creating Learning Communities in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saville, Bryan K.; Lawrence, Natalie Kerr; Jakobsen, Krisztina V.

    2012-01-01

    There are many ways to construct classroom-based learning communities. Nevertheless, the emphasis is always on cooperative learning. In this article, the authors focus on three teaching methods--interteaching, team-based learning, and cooperative learning in large, lecture-based courses--that they have used successfully to create classroom-based…

  20. Green Energy Technologies Create Green Jobs

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing advanced energy technologies that can help address climate change and reduce U.S. dependence on oil. As these new technologies are launched into commercial use, they create new jobs for American workers.

  1. A Model for an Object Created

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyeok-Je

    2006-04-01

    Before going into the model treated here, it is need to know the nature of energy. Energy itself is active and constantly move. This fact results in the phenomenon of energy spread. The phenomenon of energy spread is under the law of energy conservation. For confining energy, additional energy is required. Suppose there were gathered energies for some reason. Creation of some objects is the result of the gathered energy and energy spread. In the case where a new object is more stable, after some fluctuation, energy from the object goes away so that a new object remains behind. For this, the enegy, E, larger than the sum of energy barrier, Eb, and the difference between the energy state of the object and initial energy state, dE, is required. E > Eb+dE Thus, a new object is created. It is an irreversible process. Adaptation is a sort of creation with no energy barrier. In the case where there is no energy source near the object, the created object is relatively inactive one. This is matter. To reduce the increased energy state due to gravitation, matters gather. In the case where there is an energy source near matters, a new object can be created around or within the matters. The created object will be active. This is life.

  2. Designing and Creating Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMeen, George R.

    Designed to encourage the use of a defined methodology and careful planning in creating computer-assisted instructional programs, this paper describes the instructional design process, compares computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and programmed instruction (PI), and discusses pragmatic concerns in computer programming. Topics addressed include:…

  3. Creating Inclusive Schools for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Causton-Theoharis, Julie; Theoharis, George

    2008-01-01

    In this article, a former principal at Falk Elementary School in Madison, Wisconsin, describes his school's shift as it sought to create an inclusive school for all students and establish an authentic sense of belonging. Nationwide, schools and districts from Concord, New Hampshire, to Whittier, California, and from Cambridge, Massachusetts, to…

  4. Extending the "Knowledge Advantage": Creating Learning Chains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maqsood, Tayyab; Walker, Derek; Finegan, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a synergy between the approaches of knowledge management in a learning organisation and supply chain management so that learning chains can be created in order to unleash innovation and creativity by managing knowledge in supply chains. Design/methodology/approach: Through extensive literature…

  5. Creating Competence: Perspectives and Practices in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Martin

    Creating competence has become a major issue in organizations. Various authors contend that competency management has the potential of integrating organizational strategy, human-resource instruments, and human-resource development; that competency development can lead to performance improvement; and that it can help Human Resource Development…

  6. Leveraging Resources to Create Comprehensive Access Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boisvert, Pamela K.

    2007-01-01

    The Colleges of Worcester Consortium has created a broad array of statewide, higher education access services over several decades by leveraging federal, state, local, and foundation resources. The consortium comprises thirteen diverse colleges and universities in central Massachusetts and is a nonprofit regional association of these institutions:…

  7. An Integrated System for Creating Educational Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Ellis

    1988-01-01

    Describes the development of ScriptWriter, a computer program designed at the University of Southern California to help create software for computer assisted instruction. Topics discussed include the graphics editor; text editor; font editor; a programming language called IQ; its use with interactive video and speech; and current applications.…

  8. Creating a Total Object of Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klie, Evelyn Busch

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a workshop that accompanied the author's exhibit, "A Sense of Place: Paintings by Evelyn Busch Klie." Explains that students created a watercolor painting and a clay frame or base with details in it. Includes a list of art materials and learning objectives. (CMK)

  9. Creating a National Skills Corporation. Policy Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Rob

    To address the skills shortages stemming from the transition to a more technological and skills-intensive economy, Congress established a program whereby funds from H-1B visa fees would provide seed funds for private companies, labor, and government to join together in creating training alliances focused on skills in short supply. Unfortunately,…

  10. Creating a Sun-Safe Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrey, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Strategies for minimizing sun exposure of campers and staff include educating campers about the sun's effect on their skin, scheduling activities when the sun is less intense, creating shade at the camp site, incorporating sun protection into camp dress code, and training staff regarding sun protection. Addresses OSHA and liability issues. (LP)

  11. Creating a Successful Facility Master Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJong, William; Staskiewicz, Carolyn

    2001-01-01

    Presents the steps necessary for creating a successful facility master plan, including the purpose and use of a steering committee and the need for a comprehensive database that includes a community/school profile. Explains community involvement in plan development, and outlines the steps necessary for preparing a final facility plan for…

  12. System and method for creating expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Peter M. (Inventor); Luczak, Edward C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system and method provides for the creation of a highly graphical expert system without the need for programming in code. An expert system is created by initially building a data interface, defining appropriate Mission, User-Defined, Inferred, and externally-generated GenSAA (EGG) data variables whose data values will be updated and input into the expert system. Next, rules of the expert system are created by building appropriate conditions of the rules which must be satisfied and then by building appropriate actions of rules which are to be executed upon corresponding conditions being satisfied. Finally, an appropriate user interface is built which can be highly graphical in nature and which can include appropriate message display and/or modification of display characteristics of a graphical display object, to visually alert a user of the expert system of varying data values, upon conditions of a created rule being satisfied. The data interface building, rule building, and user interface building are done in an efficient manner and can be created without the need for programming in code.

  13. Creating a Career: Field Test Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training Research and Development Station, Prince Albert (Saskatchewan).

    This booklet has been prepared to guide the implementation, operation, and evaluation of the field tests of the Creating a Career program. This field test guide describes the preparation needed for a field test, (acquiring materials, choosing the instructor, registration, scheduling the field test, preparing the classroom, orientation of other…

  14. Creating the Total Quality Effective School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lezotte, Lawrence W.

    This book shows how Deming's Total Quality Management (TQM) theory for organizational management can be integrated with the effective-schools literature. Part 1 compares the 14 principles of TQM with the tenets of effective-schools research. The second part develops a blueprint for creating the total quality effective school. The conceptual…

  15. Creating "Technology Intensive" Courses through Faculty Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichelberger, Ariana; Fulford, Catherine P.

    The College of Education at the University of Hawaii has already begun to create an infrastructure to systematically infuse technology into its curriculum through a new designation of "Technology Intensive" courses. The primary goal of this project was to prepare future teachers to integrate technology into instruction through systematic…

  16. Games and Students: Creating Innovative Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Jason Stratton

    2011-01-01

    To create professionals for the future, who will be innovative and internationally competitive, we need to change the learning environment. The current traditional delivery systems of education do not develop the necessary interpersonal, analytical and creative skills to deal with the new knowledge economy. Baer (2005), in calling for a new model…

  17. Creating a District Plan for Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsen, Kathleen; Adams, Helen R.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses how to create a district plan for managing computer technology in schools from the perspectives of a district administrator and a media director. Topics addressed include equity in access and instruction; distance education consortiums; planning committee membership; goals and effective planning; staff support; adoption strategies;…

  18. Inspiring Students to Create the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Cynthia; Vespia, Kristin M.; Fitzpatrick, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    An exemplary program based at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay greatly increases the odds that at-risk youngsters will not only graduate from high school, but will go on to higher education. The program is also a model of university/community collaboration. ["Inspiring Students to Create the Future" was written with Timothy U. Kaufman, Linda…

  19. Creating competitive weapons from information systems.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, C; MacMillan, I C

    1984-01-01

    As the pace of competition intensifies in the 1980s, information systems will emerge as critical new weapons in the battle to gain an advantage over competitors. The authors show how a business can use modern information technologies to create a competitive edge by adding value to present products and services. PMID:10269062

  20. Creating an Internal Content Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sennema, Greg

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about an internal content management system that they have created at Calvin College. It is a hybrid of CMS and intranet that organizes Web site content and a variety of internal tools to help librarians complete their daily tasks. Hobbes is a Web-based tool that uses Common Gateway Interface (CGI) scripts written…

  1. Creating New Identities in Design Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Hannah Rose; Bernasconi, Claudia; MacDonald, Nora M.

    2007-01-01

    An international education opportunity has been created for design students at West Virginia University. This experience is unique because it takes an interdisciplinary approach to design that exposes students to the idea of a larger design methodology common to design professions. Students take core courses with students from a variety of design…

  2. Instruction: Does It Mean Creating Intelligence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brethower, Dale

    1990-01-01

    Argues that the mission of the university is to create intelligence. Defines intelligence, discusses research on cognitive processes of learning, and discusses obstacles to using the demonstrate-label-coach-mastery strategy emphasizing the value of the clinical approach used to teach seven specific skills. Presents a classroom illustration of this…

  3. Creating Smart-er Cities: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allwinkle, Sam; Cruickshank, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The following offers an overview of what it means for cities to be "smart." It draws the supporting definitions and critical insights into smart cities from a series of papers presented at the 2009 Trans-national Conference on Creating Smart(er) Cities. What the papers all have in common is their desire to overcome the all too often…

  4. Mental Mapping: A Lesson that Creates Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comenetz, Joshua

    2005-01-01

    Mental image and place-preference maps of college students in Florida were created through a two-part lesson. The patterns revealed by these maps were linked to students' life experiences, census data on migration and income, and similar studies conducted in other states. Students prefer states with established migration links to Florida and…

  5. Creating healthy futures. 2000 NOVA Award winners.

    PubMed

    Larson, L

    2000-05-01

    Winners of this year's NOVA awards, sponsored by the American Hospital Association and H&HN magazine, all share a broad definition of health. These five stars of community benefit also understand that a community and a health care organization share responsibility for what creates health, and that collaborative efforts are the only way to sustain innovative programs. PMID:11785219

  6. Spoken Word Processing Creates a Lexical Bottleneck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleland, Alexandra A.; Tamminen, Jakke; Quinlan, Philip T.; Gaskell, M. Gareth

    2012-01-01

    We report 3 experiments that examined whether presentation of a spoken word creates an attentional bottleneck associated with lexical processing in the absence of a response to that word. A spoken word and a visual stimulus were presented in quick succession, but only the visual stimulus demanded a response. Response times to the visual stimulus…

  7. Leadership for Creating Community within Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Zelema M.

    Community college leaders are responsible for creating an institutional climate that is supportive, nurturing, collaborative, integrative, empowering, and inclusive. In providing leadership, it is important to remember that collective wisdom can take a college much farther than operating according to one person's ideal. In managing a multifaceted…

  8. Creating 21st Century Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Phan P.; Locke, John; Nair, Prakash; Bunting, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    What is involved in creating learning environments for the 21st century? How can school facilities serve as tools for teaching and meet the needs of students in the future? What components are required to design effective schools, and how does architecture relate to the purposes of schooling? These are some of the questions addressed at the…

  9. Web Pages Created Via SCID Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stammen, Ronald M.

    This paper describes the use of a management process, Systematic Curriculum and Instructional Development (SCID), for developing online multimedia modules. The project, "Collaboratively Creating Multimedia Modules for Teachers and Professors," was funded by the USWEST Foundation. The curriculum development process involved teams of experts in…

  10. Creating Innovative Student Projects with App Smashing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Donna

    2014-01-01

    The potential for using various apps to improve student learning is tremendous. Yet, despite the iPad's possibilities, apps are often limited in their functionality. No one has created that magical, one-size-fits-all app that accomplishes all of the tasks that you had in mind. Luckily, there is an answer to this common problem: app smashing.…

  11. Multimedia Madness: Creating with a Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodley, Barb; Bremer, Janet

    2004-01-01

    High school students working in a project-driven environment create "projects with a purpose" that give younger students technology-based activities to help them practice skills in reading, math, spelling and science. An elective semester-long course using the Macromedia suite of programs with the objective of learning the software skills of…

  12. Creating and Implementing a Culture of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Phyllis H.; McDade, Sharon A.

    1996-01-01

    Colleges and universities should place less emphasis on the leadership of one or a few individual administrators and concentrate on creating a culture of leadership that will empower all members of the institution. The human resource development program at Boston College (Massachusetts) exemplifies the dynamic possibilities of leadership…

  13. Creating High Functioning Schools: Practice and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cano, Yvonne, Ed.; Wood, Fred H., Ed.; Simmons, Jan C., Ed.

    This book contains 17 papers, chosen from those presented within the last 2 years at the annual National Conference on Creating the Quality School, hosted by the Center for the Study of Small/Rural Schools at the University of Oklahoma. The papers are grouped into three sections: leadership for school improvement; classroom practices for school…

  14. Leadership: creating a cuiture of caring.

    PubMed

    DePaola, Dominick P

    2004-01-01

    Leadership is characterized in terms of accomplishing mutual goals for the organization, its employees, and its community through vision and creating a community of caring. The examples of Herb Kelleher of Southwest Airlines, Walt Disney, and Dean Arthur A. Dugoni of the University of the Pacific are used to illustrate how this style of leadership plays out in specific accomplishments. PMID:15948494

  15. Creating, Invigorating, and Sustaining Effective Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Susan; Miller, John W.

    1996-01-01

    Teams can boost creativity, morale, and communication, but they can also unleash disharmony, create tension, and waste time. To maximize teaming benefits, administrators must share authority, cultivate teacher leadership, train all team members, use situational leadership, model effective team leader behaviors, provide incentives, support each…

  16. Creating and Sustaining the Constructivist Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Bruce A.; Page, Marilyn L.

    This book addresses key issues that teachers raise about creating and sustaining constructivist classrooms, providing practical tips, techniques, and examples to allow step-by-step implementation of constructivism and ongoing evaluation of student progress. The book gives directions for use at any grade level and includes checklists to evaluate…

  17. Creating Critical Viewers: A Personal Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherow-O'Leary, Renee

    2014-01-01

    This essay is a personal reflection on the implementation of "Creating Critical Viewers," a national media literacy program sponsored by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS), an industry association, in 1995. The television industry's decision to develop a media literacy curriculum in the 1990s was a powerful…

  18. Razzle Dazzle: Creating Interactive Library Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combes, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Creating an interactive and engaging school library environment for your school community is an important prerequisite to establishing a creditable identity with teaching staff, which in turn, leads to opportunities to develop collaborative curriculum programs. The library and its personnel must be perceived as a hub for learning and part of the…

  19. Creating Spaces to Support Transgender Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Jenifer K.; Conover-Williams, Meredith

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the opportunity to create spaces within the family, school, and community that specifically promote the well-being of transgender adolescents and young adults. When social contexts are supportive, transgender youth report significantly less risk. Supportive home and school environments have been linked to better outcomes…

  20. Creating and Maintaining a Desirable Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lori K.; Stoldt, G. Clayton; Comfort, P. Greg

    2002-01-01

    Introduces an 11-step organizational audit designed to help administrators in the sport and activity sector, as well as the traditional business sector, create a friendly, encouraging environment for all. The 11 steps are: empowerment; rewards; evaluation; mission statement; policy manuals; resources; communication; organizational structure;…

  1. Creating Socially Networked Knowledge through Interdisciplinary Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuk, Eric; Hoetzlein, Rama; Kim, David; Panko, Julia

    2012-01-01

    We report on the experience of creating a socially networked system, the Research-oriented Social Environment (RoSE), for representing knowledge in the form of relationships between people, documents, and groups. Developed as an intercampus, interdisciplinary project of the University of California, this work reflects on a collaboration between…

  2. Creating a Culture for Teachers' Professional Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Linda; Kragler, Sherry

    1999-01-01

    In the literature, discussions of staff development (as a top-down decision-making model) have shifted to teacher-centered professional growth. Components include teachers as learners, reflective decisionmakers, collaborators, and accountability experts. Creating a culture of learning and involving teachers in strategic decision making are…

  3. The Media Creates Us in Its Image

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Propaganda in all its forms is the culture of a mass society. The media transmits propaganda to form public opinion and recreate the human being. Reversing the Western ideal of a rational and free individual, the media creates a childish conformist ensconced in the peer group, who acts unconsciously.

  4. Strategies for Creating New Venture Legitimacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsson, Tomas; Middleton, Karen Williams

    2015-01-01

    New ventures, being heavily subjected to liabilities of newness, are seen to engage in legitimacy strategies to overcome these liabilities. Building on an adapted theoretical framework of organizational legitimacy, self-reported weekly diaries of twelve entrepreneurs were analysed to identify strategies used by new ventures to create legitimacy.…

  5. [The use of individual protective devices for decreasing the microbial contamination of the inhaled air].

    PubMed

    Sedov, A V; Akin'shin, A V; Tregub, T I

    1995-01-01

    The work was aimed to justify application of gas masks and respirators with autonomous air source fo lower bacterial contamination of inhaled air. The studies also covered possible catch of bacteria by cotton and filters FPP-15-1.5, those composed of antimicrobial materials, containing furagin or copper ions. As the studies proved, for lower bacterial contaminations of inhaled air one can apply autonomous air source apparatus with filters made of Petrianov tissue, antimicrobial tissue (containing furagin or copper ions), as they reduce fungal content of the air. Such filters are self-disinfecting, but do not influence total contamination of the air. PMID:7663856

  6. Metal-air cell with performance enhancing additive

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Cody A; Buttry, Daniel

    2015-11-10

    Systems and methods drawn to an electrochemical cell comprising a low temperature ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions and a performance enhancing additive added to the low temperature ionic liquid. The additive dissolves in the ionic liquid to form cations, which are coordinated with one or more negative ions forming ion complexes. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. The ion complexes improve oxygen reduction thermodynamics and/or kinetics relative to the ionic liquid without the additive.

  7. Jeff Chamberlain on Lithium-air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Jeff Chamberlain, technology transfer expert at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries. More information at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/batteries090915.html

  8. Jeff Chamberlain on Lithium-air batteries

    ScienceCinema

    Chamberlain, Jeff

    2013-04-19

    Jeff Chamberlain, technology transfer expert at Argonne National Laboratory, speaks on the new technology Lithium-air batteries, which could potentially increase energy density by 5-10 times over lithium-ion batteries. More information at http://www.anl.gov/Media_Center/News/2009/batteries090915.html

  9. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  10. Sub-micron resolution of localized ion beam induced charge reduction in silicon detectors damaged by heavy ions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Auden, Elizabeth C.; Pacheco, Jose L.; Bielejec, Edward; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Abraham, John B. S.; Doyle, Barney L.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, displacement damage reduces ion beam induced charge (IBIC) through Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Closely spaced pulses of 200 keV Si++ ions focused in a 40 nm beam spot are used to create damage cascades within 0.25 μm2 areas. Damaged areas are detected through contrast in IBIC signals generated with focused ion beams of 200 keV Si++ ions and 60 keV Li+ ions. IBIC signal reduction can be resolved over sub-micron regions of a silicon detector damaged by as few as 1000 heavy ions.

  11. Creating science simulations through Computational Thinking Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basawapatna, Ashok Ram

    Computational thinking aims to outline fundamental skills from computer science that everyone should learn. As currently defined, with help from the National Science Foundation (NSF), these skills include problem formulation, logically organizing data, automating solutions through algorithmic thinking, and representing data through abstraction. One aim of the NSF is to integrate these and other computational thinking concepts into the classroom. End-user programming tools offer a unique opportunity to accomplish this goal. An end-user programming tool that allows students with little or no prior experience the ability to create simulations based on phenomena they see in-class could be a first step towards meeting most, if not all, of the above computational thinking goals. This thesis describes the creation, implementation and initial testing of a programming tool, called the Simulation Creation Toolkit, with which users apply high-level agent interactions called Computational Thinking Patterns (CTPs) to create simulations. Employing Computational Thinking Patterns obviates lower behavior-level programming and allows users to directly create agent interactions in a simulation by making an analogy with real world phenomena they are trying to represent. Data collected from 21 sixth grade students with no prior programming experience and 45 seventh grade students with minimal programming experience indicates that this is an effective first step towards enabling students to create simulations in the classroom environment. Furthermore, an analogical reasoning study that looked at how users might apply patterns to create simulations from high- level descriptions with little guidance shows promising results. These initial results indicate that the high level strategy employed by the Simulation Creation Toolkit is a promising strategy towards incorporating Computational Thinking concepts in the classroom environment.

  12. Metal Ion Sources for Ion Beam Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, W. J.; Zhao, Z. Q.; Ren, X. T.

    2008-11-03

    In this paper a theme touched upon the progress of metal ion sources devoted to metal ion beam implantation (MIBI) will be reviewed. A special emphasis will be given to some kinds of ion sources such as ECR, MEVVA and Cluster ion sources. A novel dual hollow cathode metal ion source named DUHOCAMIS will be introduced and discussed.

  13. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-10-28

    We report on the development and characterization of a new traveling wave-based Structure for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses parallel arrays of rf electrodes on two closely spaced surfaces for ion confinement, where the rf electrodes are separated by arrays of short electrodes, and using these TWs can be created to drive ion motion. In this initial work, TWs are created by the dynamic application of dc potentials. The capabilities of the TW-SLIM module for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different rf and TW parameters are reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to transmit a wide mass range of ions (m/z 200–2500) utilizing a confining rf waveform (~1 MHz and ~300 Vp-p) and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Additionally, the short TW-SLIM module achieved resolutions comparable to existing commercially available low pressure IMS platforms and an ion mobility peak capacity of ~32 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of rf and TW parameters and demonstrated robust performance. In conclusion, the combined attributes of the flexible design and low voltage requirements for the TW-SLIM module provide a basis for devices capable of much higher resolution and more complex ion manipulations.

  14. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Ahmed M; Ibrahim, Yehia M; Garimella, Sandilya V B; Webb, Ian K; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A; Prost, Spencer A; Norheim, Randolph V; Tolmachev, Aleksey V; Smith, Richard D

    2015-11-17

    We report on the development and characterization of a traveling wave (TW)-based Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) module for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses parallel arrays of rf electrodes on two closely spaced surfaces for ion confinement, where the rf electrodes are separated by arrays of short electrodes, and using these TWs can be created to drive ion motion. In this initial work, TWs are created by the dynamic application of dc potentials. The capabilities of the TW-SLIM module for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different rf and TW parameters are reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to transmit a wide mass range of ions (m/z 200-2500) utilizing a confining rf waveform (∼1 MHz and ∼300 Vp-p) and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Additionally, the short TW-SLIM module achieved resolutions comparable to existing commercially available low pressure IMS platforms and an ion mobility peak capacity of ∼32 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of rf and TW parameters and demonstrated robust performance. The combined attributes of the flexible design and low voltage requirements for the TW-SLIM module provide a basis for devices capable of much higher resolution and more complex ion manipulations. PMID:26510005

  15. Characterization of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Separations in Structures for Lossless Ion Manipulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Venkata BS; Webb, Ian K.; Deng, Liulin; Chen, Tsung-Chi; Anderson, Gordon A.; Prost, Spencer A.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; et al

    2015-10-28

    We report on the development and characterization of a new traveling wave-based Structure for Lossless Ion Manipulations (TW-SLIM) for ion mobility separations (IMS). The TW-SLIM module uses parallel arrays of rf electrodes on two closely spaced surfaces for ion confinement, where the rf electrodes are separated by arrays of short electrodes, and using these TWs can be created to drive ion motion. In this initial work, TWs are created by the dynamic application of dc potentials. The capabilities of the TW-SLIM module for efficient ion confinement, lossless ion transport, and ion mobility separations at different rf and TW parameters aremore » reported. The TW-SLIM module is shown to transmit a wide mass range of ions (m/z 200–2500) utilizing a confining rf waveform (~1 MHz and ~300 Vp-p) and low TW amplitudes (<20 V). Additionally, the short TW-SLIM module achieved resolutions comparable to existing commercially available low pressure IMS platforms and an ion mobility peak capacity of ~32 for TW speeds of <210 m/s. TW-SLIM performance was characterized over a wide range of rf and TW parameters and demonstrated robust performance. In conclusion, the combined attributes of the flexible design and low voltage requirements for the TW-SLIM module provide a basis for devices capable of much higher resolution and more complex ion manipulations.« less

  16. Metal-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

    2011-08-01

    Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

  17. Selective Gas-Phase Oxidation and Localization of Alkylated Cysteine Residues in Polypeptide Ions via Ion/Ion Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    The thiol group in cysteine residues is susceptible to several post-translational modifications (PTMs), including prenylation, nitrosylation, palmitoylation, and the formation of disulfide bonds. Additionally, cysteine residues involved in disulfide bonds are commonly reduced and alkylated prior to mass spectrometric analysis. Several of these cysteine modifications, specifically S-alkyl modifications, are susceptible to gas-phase oxidation via selective ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Multiply protonated peptides containing modified cysteine residues undergo complex formation upon ion/ion reaction with periodate anions. Activation of the ion/ion complexes results in oxygen transfer from the reagent to the modified sulfur residue to create a sulfoxide functionality. Further activation of the sulfoxide derivative yields abundant losses of the modification with the oxidized sulfur as a sulfenic acid (namely, XSOH) to generate a dehydroalanine residue. This loss immediately indicates the presence of an S-alkyl cysteine residue, and the mass of the loss can be used to easily deduce the type of modification. An additional step of activation can be used to localize the modification to a specific residue within the peptide. Selective cleavage to create c- and z-ions N-terminal to the dehydroalanine residue is often noted. As these types of ions are not typically observed upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), they can be used to immediately indicate where in the peptide the PTM was originally located. PMID:27476698

  18. Miniature cyclotron resonance ion source using small permanent magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V. G.; Huntress, W. T., Jr. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion source using the cyclotron resonance principle is described. A miniaturized ion source device is used in an air gap of a small permanent magnet with a substantially uniform field in the air gap of about 0.5 inch. The device and permanent magnet are placed in an enclosure which is maintained at a high vacuum (typically 10 to the minus 7th power) into which a sample gas can be introduced. The ion beam end of the device is placed very close to an aperture through which an ion beam can exit into the apparatus for an experiment.

  19. Construction of waveguiding structures in potassium lithium tantalate niobate crystals by combined laser ablation and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashar, Ayelet Badichi; Ilan, Harel; Agranat, Aharon J.

    2015-02-01

    A generic methodology for constructing complex integrated electro-optic circuits in waveguided configurations is presented. The method is based on combining two techniques, "laser ablation" and "refractive index engineering by ion implantations." The constructed circuits are side-cladded by air trenches that were produced using laser ablation and bottom-cladded by a layer with a reduced refractive index which is generated through the implantation of He+ ions. This fabrication technique enables the construction of circular structures with complex geometry featuring small radii of curvature, and further can be employed to construct microfluidic channels on the same substrate. The research demonstrates waveguides in both linear and circular configurations that were constructed in a potassium lithium tantalate niobate (KLTN) substrate using the aforementioned method, proving that this substrate is a suitable candidate for use in creating laboratories-on-a-chip with multifunctional capabilities. The proposed techniques used in the research are generic and applicable to a wide range of substrates.

  20. Pigeons home faster through polluted air

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongqiu; Courchamp, Franck; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution, especially haze pollution, is creating health issues for both humans and other animals. However, remarkably little is known about how animals behaviourally respond to air pollution. We used multiple linear regression to analyse 415 pigeon races in the North China Plain, an area with considerable air pollution, and found that while the proportion of pigeons successfully homed was not influenced by air pollution, pigeons homed faster when the air was especially polluted. Our results may be explained by an enhanced homing motivation and possibly an enriched olfactory environment that facilitates homing. Our study provides a unique example of animals’ response to haze pollution; future studies are needed to identify proposed mechanisms underlying this effect. PMID:26728113